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Sample records for methamphetamine dependent subjects

  1. Elevated Plasma Prolactin in Abstinent Methamphetamine-Dependent Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zorick, Todd; Mandelkern, Mark A.; Lee, Buyean; Wong, Ma-Li; Miotto, Karen; Shabazian, Jon; London, Edythe D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine use disorders are pervasive global social problems that produce large medical and public health burdens. Abnormalities in pituitary hormonal regulation have been observed in preclinical models of substance abuse and in human substance abusers. They have not been studied before, however, in methamphetamine-dependent human subjects. Objectives To determine if methamphetamine-dependent research volunteers differ from healthy control subjects in plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, or prolactin, or in pituitary dopamine D2 receptor availability during early abstinence from methamphetamine. Methods Methamphetamine-dependent subjects (N=31), who were not seeking treatment, resided on an inpatient ward for up to 5 weeks. Abstinence was confirmed by daily urine drug screening. Venous blood was sampled for plasma hormone levels, and positron emission tomography with [18F]fallypride was performed to determine dopamine D2 receptor availability during the first week of abstinence. Venous blood was sampled again for hormone levels during the fourth week of abstinence. Matched healthy volunteers (N=23) participated as a comparison group. Results Methamphetamine-dependent and healthy comparison subjects did not differ in plasma ACTH or cortisol levels, but had an elevated plasma prolactin at both the first week and fourth week of abstinence. There was no group difference in pituitary dopamine D2 receptor availability. Conclusion Methamphetamine-dependent individuals have abnormalities in prolactin regulation, which is not likely due to alterations in pituitary dopamine D2 receptor availability. Scientific Significance Methamphetamine dependence is associated with elevated prolactin levels, which may contribute to medical co-morbidity in afflicted individuals. PMID:21142706

  2. The cardiovascular and subjective effects of methamphetamine combined with gamma-vinyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid (GVG) in non-treatment seeking methamphetamine-dependent volunteers.

    PubMed

    De La Garza, Richard; Zorick, Todd; Heinzerling, Keith G; Nusinowitz, Steve; London, Edythe D; Shoptaw, Steven; Moody, David E; Newton, Thomas F

    2009-11-01

    Gamma-vinyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid (GVG) elevates central nervous system gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels by irreversibly inhibiting GABA transaminase. An open-label clinical trial in humans suggested that GVG may reduce cocaine and methamphetamine use. To test safety and to obtain preliminary data on efficacy of GVG for treating methamphetamine dependence, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study of GVG interaction with the cardiovascular and subjective effects produced by methamphetamine. Non-treatment seeking methamphetamine-dependent volunteers received either GVG (N=8) or placebo (N=9) by random assignment. GVG treatment was initiated at 1 g/day and increased to 5 g/day. After reaching the target dose of 5 g/day, participants received methamphetamine (15+30 mg, IV), and cardiovascular and subjective effects were assessed. No serious adverse events were noted, and the total number of adverse events was similar between the treatment groups. Considering the full time course and peak effects independently, no significant differences were detected between the groups for systolic or diastolic blood pressures, or heart rate, following methamphetamine exposure. Some methamphetamine-induced cardiovascular changes approached significance (p<0.10) and may warrant attention in future trials. Methamphetamine-induced subjective effects ("any drug effect", "high", "crave methamphetamine") were statistically similar between GVG and placebo treatment groups. Pharmacokinetic data indicate that GVG treatment did not alter methamphetamine or amphetamine plasma levels, and there was no association between methamphetamine or amphetamine plasma levels and peak cardiovascular effects. Taken together, the data indicate that GVG treatment is generally well tolerated but not efficacious in attenuating the positive subjective effects of methamphetamine in the laboratory.

  3. Relationship of Alexithymia Ratings to Dopamine D2-type Receptors in Anterior Cingulate and Insula of Healthy Control Subjects but Not Methamphetamine-Dependent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Okita, Kyoji; Ghahremani, Dara G.; Payer, Doris E.; Robertson, Chelsea L.; Mandelkern, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Individuals with substance-use disorders exhibit emotional problems, including deficits in emotion recognition and processing, and this class of disorders also has been linked to deficits in dopaminergic markers in the brain. Because associations between these phenomena have not been explored, we compared a group of recently abstinent methamphetamine-dependent individuals (n=23) with a healthy-control group (n=17) on dopamine D2-type receptor availability, measured using positron emission tomography with [18F]fallypride. Methods: The anterior cingulate and anterior insular cortices were selected as the brain regions of interest, because they receive dopaminergic innervation and are thought to be involved in emotion awareness and processing. The Toronto Alexithymia Scale, which includes items that assess difficulty in identifying and describing feelings as well as externally oriented thinking, was administered, and the scores were tested for association with D2-type receptor availability. Results: Relative to controls, methamphetamine-dependent individuals showed higher alexithymia scores, reporting difficulty in identifying feelings. The groups did not differ in D2-type receptor availability in the anterior cingulate or anterior insular cortices, but a significant interaction between group and D2-type receptor availability in both regions, on self-report score, reflected significant positive correlations in the control group (higher receptor availability linked to higher alexithymia) but nonsignificant, negative correlations (lower receptor availability linked to higher alexithymia) in methamphetamine-dependent subjects. Conclusions: The results suggest that neurotransmission through D2-type receptors in the anterior cingulate and anterior insular cortices influences capacity of emotion processing in healthy people but that this association is absent in individuals with methamphetamine dependence. PMID:26657175

  4. Cocaine and methamphetamine produce different patterns of subjective and cardiovascular effects.

    PubMed

    Newton, Thomas F; De La Garza, Richard; Kalechstein, Ari D; Nestor, Liam

    2005-09-01

    The stimulant effects of cocaine and methamphetamine are mediated by changes in synaptic concentrations of brain monoamines; however, the drugs alter monoamine levels via different mechanisms. This study examined the subjective and cardiovascular responses produced by investigational administration of cocaine or methamphetamine, in order to examine the onset and patterns of subjective and cardiovascular responses. Subjects included 14 non-treatment seeking cocaine-dependent and 11 non-treatment seeking methamphetamine-dependent volunteers. As part of ongoing research studies, cocaine and methamphetamine subjects received cocaine (40 mg, IV) or methamphetamine (30 mg, IV), respectively. Subjective and cardiovascular responses were assessed for 30 min and 60 min, respectively. The data reveal significant within groups differences for all subjective effects and cardiovascular effects (p<0.05). Significant between group differences in subjective effects were observed for "Any Drug Effect" (p<.008 for group, and p<.029 for group x time), for "High" (p<.002 for group, and p<.0001 for group x time) and for "Stimulated" (p<.001 for group, and p<.006 for group x time). Significant between group differences in cardiovascular effects were observed for Systolic blood pressure (p<.0001 for group, and p<.002 for group x time), Diastolic blood pressure (p<.0001 for group, though p=NS for group x time), and for Heart Rate (p<.0001 for group, and p<.0001 for group x time). The only difference between the groups for placebo was for heart rate, where there was a significant group x time effect (p<.005). Taken together, the data reveal that the subjective effects of cocaine tended to peak and then decline more rapidly than those produced by methamphetamine. The subjective effects of methamphetamine tended to rise more slowly, and remain elevated longer. Cardiovascular effects of cocaine and methamphetamine had similar onset, but effects of cocaine tended to decline more rapidly

  5. Predictors of cardiovascular response to methamphetamine administration in methamphetamine-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Gilles; De La Garza, Richard; Mahoney, James J; Evans, Sarah E; Newton, Thomas F

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the present investigation was to determine predictors of cardiovascular response to methamphetamine administrated in the laboratory. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured at baseline and at several time points following the administration of methamphetamine or saline placebo. One-way ANOVA was used to determine the differences between female and male subjects in their cardiovascular response. In male subjects, linear regression and one-way ANOVA were used to determine the influence of potential predictors on cardiovascular response, including age, weight, drug use indicators, concurrent use of other substances, route of administration, and race. Methamphetamine administration provoked significant increases in HR and BP, as compared to placebo. Female gender was associated with larger peak change in diastolic BP following administration. Baseline HR and BP were found to be strong predictors of cardiovascular response to methamphetamine administration in male subjects. Lifetime use and recent use of methamphetamine and nicotine did not predict cardiovascular response to methamphetamine. Recent alcohol use was associated with increased peak change in diastolic BP. Also, current use of cannabis was negatively correlated with peak HR change. Male cannabis users show lower peak change in HR as compared to non-cannabis users. As compared to methamphetamine smokers, intravenous users demonstrated higher peak change in diastolic BP following drug administration. Race did not have a significant effect on cardiovascular response. Taken together, these findings may help in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular events in a population at high risk of premature morbidity and mortality.

  6. Predictors of cardiovascular response to methamphetamine administration in methamphetamine-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Gilles; De La Garza, Richard; Mahoney, James J; Evans, Sarah E; Newton, Thomas F

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the present investigation was to determine predictors of cardiovascular response to methamphetamine administrated in the laboratory. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured at baseline and at several time points following the administration of methamphetamine or saline placebo. One-way ANOVA was used to determine the differences between female and male subjects in their cardiovascular response. In male subjects, linear regression and one-way ANOVA were used to determine the influence of potential predictors on cardiovascular response, including age, weight, drug use indicators, concurrent use of other substances, route of administration, and race. Methamphetamine administration provoked significant increases in HR and BP, as compared to placebo. Female gender was associated with larger peak change in diastolic BP following administration. Baseline HR and BP were found to be strong predictors of cardiovascular response to methamphetamine administration in male subjects. Lifetime use and recent use of methamphetamine and nicotine did not predict cardiovascular response to methamphetamine. Recent alcohol use was associated with increased peak change in diastolic BP. Also, current use of cannabis was negatively correlated with peak HR change. Male cannabis users show lower peak change in HR as compared to non-cannabis users. As compared to methamphetamine smokers, intravenous users demonstrated higher peak change in diastolic BP following drug administration. Race did not have a significant effect on cardiovascular response. Taken together, these findings may help in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular events in a population at high risk of premature morbidity and mortality. PMID:18393052

  7. Educational Attainment is not a Good Proxy for Cognitive Function in Methamphetamine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Andy C.; Hellemann, Gerhard; Sugar, Catherine A.; London, Edythe D.

    2014-01-01

    We sought to test the hypothesis that methamphetamine use interferes with both the quantity and quality of one's education, such that the years of education obtained by methamphetamine dependent individuals serves to underestimate general cognitive functioning and overestimate the quality of academic learning. Thirty-six methamphetamine-dependent participants and 42 healthy comparison subjects completed cognitive tests and self-report measures in Los Angeles, California. An overall cognitive battery score was used to assess general cognition, and vocabulary knowledge was used as a proxy for the quality of academic learning. Linear regression procedures were used for analyses. Supporting the hypothesis that methamphetamine use interferes with the quantity of education, we found that a) earlier onset of methamphetamine use was associated with fewer years of education (p < .01); b) using a normative model developed in healthy participants, methamphetamine-dependent participants had lower educational attainment than predicted from their demographics and performance on the cognitive battery score (p < .01); and c) greater differences between methamphetamine-dependent participants' predicted and actual educational attainment were associated with an earlier onset of MA use (p ≤ .01). Supporting the hypothesis that methamphetamine use interferes with the quality of education, years of education received prior to the onset of methamphetamine use was a better predictor of a proxy for academic learning, vocabulary knowledge, than was the total years of education obtained. Results support the hypothesis that methamphetamine use interferes with the quantity and quality of educational exposure, leading to under- and overestimation of cognitive function and academic learning, respectively. PMID:22206606

  8. Methamphetamine

    MedlinePlus

    Methamphetamine is used as part of a treatment program to control symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ( ... people who are the same age) in children. Methamphetamine is also used for a limited period of ...

  9. Methamphetamine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription ... Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription ...

  10. Regional Brain Activity in Abstinent Methamphetamine Dependent Males Following Cue Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Robert; Myrick, Hugh; Li, Xingbao; Henderson, Scott; Brady, Kathleen T; George, Mark S; See, Ronald E

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroimaging of drug-associated cue presentations has aided in understanding the neurobiological substrates of craving and relapse for cocaine, alcohol, and nicotine. However, imaging of cue-reactivity in methamphetamine addiction has been much less studied. Method Nine caucasian male methamphetamine-dependent subjects and nine healthy controls were scanned in a Phillips 3.0T MRI scan when they viewed a randomized presentation of visual cues of methamphetamine, neutral objects, and rest conditions. Functional Imaging data were analyzed with Statistical Parametric Mapping software 5 (SPM 5) Results Methamphetamine subjects had significant brain activation in the ventral striatum and medial frontal cortex in comparison to meth pictures and neutral pictures in healthy controls (p<0.005, threshold 15 voxels). Interestingly the ventral striatum activation significantly correlated with the days since the last use of meth (r=−0.76, p=0.017). No significant activity was found in healthy control group. Conclusion The preliminary data suggest that methamphetamine dependent subjects, when exposed to methamphetamine-associated visual cues, have increased brain activity in ventral striatum, caudate nucleus and medial frontal cortex which subserve craving, drug-seeking, and drug use. PMID:27314105

  11. Investigating the relationship between subjective drug craving and temporal dynamics of the default mode network, executive control network, and salience network in methamphetamine dependents using rsfMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanian-Zadeh, Somayyeh; Hossein-Zadeh, Gholam-Ali; Shahbabaie, Alireza; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2016-03-01

    Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) studies using fMRI provides a great deal of knowledge on the spatiotemporal organization of the brain. The relationships between and within a number of resting state functional networks, namely the default mode network (DMN), salience network (SN) and executive control network (ECN) have been intensely studied in basic and clinical cognitive neuroscience [1]. However, the presumption of spatial and temporal stationarity has mostly restricted the assessment of rsFC [1]. In this study, sliding window correlation analysis and k-means clustering were exploited to examine the temporal dynamics of rsFC of these three networks in 24 abstinent methamphetamine dependents. Afterwards, using canonical correlation analysis (CCA) the possible relationship between the level of self-reported craving and the temporal dynamics was examined. Results indicate that the rsFC transits between 6 discrete "FC states" in the meth dependents. CCA results show that higher levels of craving are associated with higher probability of transiting from state 4 to 6 (positive FC of DMN-ECN getting weak and negative FC of DMN-SN appearing) and staying in state 4 (positive FC of DMN-ECN), lower probability of staying in state 2 (negative FC of DMN-ECN), transiting from state 4 to 2 (change of positive FC of DMN-ECN to negative FC), and transiting from state 3 to 5 (appearance of negative FC of DMN-SN and positive FC of DMN-ECN with the presence of negative FC of SN-ECN). Quantitative measures of temporal dynamics in large-scale brain networks could bring new added values to increase potentials for applications of rsfMRI in addiction medicine.

  12. Discriminative stimulus and subject-rated effects of methamphetamine, d-amphetamine, methylphenidate, and triazolam in methamphetamine-trained humans.

    PubMed

    Sevak, Rajkumar J; Stoops, William W; Hays, Lon R; Rush, Craig R

    2009-03-01

    Methamphetamine abuse is a significant public health concern. Although widely studied in laboratory animals, little is known about the abuse-related behavioral effects of methamphetamine relative to other abused stimulants in controlled laboratory settings in humans. The aim of this study was to examine the discriminative stimulus, subject-rated, performance, and cardiovascular effects of methamphetamine in humans. In the present study, subjects first learned to discriminate 10 mg of oral methamphetamine from placebo. After acquiring the discrimination (> or = 80% drug-appropriate responding on four consecutive sessions), a range of oral doses of methamphetamine (2.5-15 mg), d-amphetamine (2.5-15 mg), methylphenidate (5-30 mg), and triazolam (0.0625-0.375 mg) was tested. Methamphetamine functioned as a discriminative stimulus and produced prototypical stimulant-like subject-rated effects. d-Amphetamine and methylphenidate produced dose-related increases in methamphetamine-appropriate responding, whereas triazolam did not. d-Amphetamine and methylphenidate produced stimulant-like behavioral effects, whereas triazolam produced sedative-like effects. Methamphetamine, but no other drug, increased heart rate, systolic pressure, and diastolic pressure significantly above placebo levels. Performance in the Digit-Symbol Substitution Test was not affected by any of the drugs tested. Overall, these results demonstrate that the acute behavioral effects of methamphetamine, d-amphetamine, and methylphenidate overlap extensively in humans, which is concordant with findings from preclinical studies. Future studies should assess whether the similarity in the behavioral effects of methamphetamine and related stimulants can be extended to other behavioral assays, such as measures of reinforcement, in humans.

  13. Effect of add-on valproate on craving in methamphetamine depended patients: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Kheirabadi, Gholam Reza; Ghavami, Masoud; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Salehi, Mehrdad; Sharbafchi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methamphetamine dependence lead to the compulsive use, loss of control, and social and occupational dysfunctions. This study aimed to compare the effect of valproate in reducing the craving in methamphetamine dependents. Materials and Methods: This is a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial on 40 men of 18–40 years old referred to Noor Hospital during December 2012–September 2013 in Isfahan, Iran. The subjects participated in matrix program and randomly were divided into two groups of valproate and placebo. A 4-months program of intervention with valproate or placebo was arranged for each group. The rate of craving to methamphetamine and positive methamphetamine urine tests were evaluated in both groups every 2 weeks using cocaine craving questionnaire-brief (CCQ-Brief) and urine test. After the 4 months (active treatment with valproate and placebo), the drug was tapered and discontinued within 10 days, and patients were introduced to self-help groups and monitored regularly on a weekly basis over another 3 months. Collected data were analyzed with SPSS 20 using analysis of covariance repeated measure, Chi-square, and t-test. Results: CCQ score of the intervention group was significantly less than the placebo group (P < 0.001), except on weeks 1, 3, and 28. The ratio of a positive urine test for methamphetamine in the intervention group was significantly lower than the control group in all screenings except weeks 3 and 28. Conclusion: Adding valproate to matrix program in the treatment of methamphetamine dependence showed significant effect on the reduction of the craving to methamphetamine.

  14. Effect of add-on valproate on craving in methamphetamine depended patients: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Kheirabadi, Gholam Reza; Ghavami, Masoud; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Salehi, Mehrdad; Sharbafchi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methamphetamine dependence lead to the compulsive use, loss of control, and social and occupational dysfunctions. This study aimed to compare the effect of valproate in reducing the craving in methamphetamine dependents. Materials and Methods: This is a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial on 40 men of 18–40 years old referred to Noor Hospital during December 2012–September 2013 in Isfahan, Iran. The subjects participated in matrix program and randomly were divided into two groups of valproate and placebo. A 4-months program of intervention with valproate or placebo was arranged for each group. The rate of craving to methamphetamine and positive methamphetamine urine tests were evaluated in both groups every 2 weeks using cocaine craving questionnaire-brief (CCQ-Brief) and urine test. After the 4 months (active treatment with valproate and placebo), the drug was tapered and discontinued within 10 days, and patients were introduced to self-help groups and monitored regularly on a weekly basis over another 3 months. Collected data were analyzed with SPSS 20 using analysis of covariance repeated measure, Chi-square, and t-test. Results: CCQ score of the intervention group was significantly less than the placebo group (P < 0.001), except on weeks 1, 3, and 28. The ratio of a positive urine test for methamphetamine in the intervention group was significantly lower than the control group in all screenings except weeks 3 and 28. Conclusion: Adding valproate to matrix program in the treatment of methamphetamine dependence showed significant effect on the reduction of the craving to methamphetamine. PMID:27656618

  15. Rivastigmine reduces "Likely to use methamphetamine" in methamphetamine-dependent volunteers.

    PubMed

    De La Garza, R; Newton, T F; Haile, C N; Yoon, J H; Nerumalla, C S; Mahoney, J J; Aziziyeh, A

    2012-04-27

    We previously reported that treatment with the cholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine (3mg, PO for 5days) significantly attenuated "Desire for METH". Given that higher dosages of rivastigmine produce greater increases in synaptic ACh, we predicted that 6mg should have more pronounced effects on craving and other subjective measures. In the current study, we sought to characterize the effects of short-term exposure to rivastigmine (0, 3 or 6mg) on the subjective and reinforcing effects produced by administration of methamphetamine (METH) in non-treatment-seeking, METH-dependent volunteers. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Participants received METH on day 1, and were then randomized to placebo or rivastigmine on day 2 in the morning and treatment continued through day 8. METH dosing was repeated on day 6. The data indicate that METH (15 and 30mg), but not saline, increased several positive subjective effects, including "Any Drug Effect", "High", "Stimulated", "Desire METH", and "Likely to Use METH" (all p's<0.0001). In addition, during self-administration sessions, participants were significantly more likely to choose METH over saline (p<0.0001). Evaluating outcomes as peak effects, there was a trend for rivastigmine to reduce "Desire METH" (p=0.27), and rivastigmine significantly attenuated "Likely to Use METH" (p=0.01). These effects were most prominent for rivastigmine 6mg when participants were exposed to the low dose (15mg, IV), but not high dose (30mg, IV), of METH. The self-administration data reveal that rivastigmine did not alter total choices for METH (5mg, IV/choice). Overall, the results indicate some efficacy for rivastigmine in attenuating key subjective effects produced by METH, though additional research using higher doses and longer treatment periods is likely needed. These data extend previous findings and indicate that cholinesterase inhibitors, and other drugs that target acetylcholine systems, warrant continued

  16. Methamphetamine

    MedlinePlus

    Methamphetamine - meth for short - is a very addictive stimulant drug. It is a powder that can be made into ... injected into your body with a needle. Crystal meth is smoked in a small glass pipe. Meth ...

  17. Methamphetamine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... effects as those of other stimulants, such as cocaine or amphetamines. These include increased wakefulness, increased physical ...

  18. Neural Correlates of Affect Processing and Aggression in Methamphetamine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Payer, Doris E.; Lieberman, Matthew D.; London, Edythe D.

    2012-01-01

    Context Methamphetamine abuse is associated with high rates of aggression, but few studies have addressed the contributing neurobiological factors. Objective To quantify aggression, investigate function of the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, and assess relationships between brain function and behavior in methamphetamine-dependent individuals. Design In a case-control study, aggression and brain activation were compared between methamphetamine-dependent and control participants. Setting Participants were recruited from the general community to an academic research center. Participants Thirty-nine methamphetamine-dependent volunteers (16 women) who were abstinent for 7 to 10 days and 37 drug-free control volunteers (18 women) participated in the study; subsets completed self-report and behavioral measures. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed on 25 methamphetamine-dependent and 23 control participants. Main outcome measures We measured self-reported and perpetrated aggression, and self-reported alexithymia. Brain activation was assessed using fMRI during visual processing of facial affect (affect matching), and symbolic processing (affect labeling), the latter representing an incidental form of emotion regulation. Results Methamphetamine-dependent participants self-reported more aggression and alexithymia than control participants and escalated perpetrated aggression more following provocation. Alexithymia scores correlated with measures of aggression. During affect matching, fMRI showed no differences between groups in amygdala activation, but found lower activation in methamphetamine-dependent than control participants in bilateral ventral inferior frontal gyrus. During affect labeling, participants recruited dorsal inferior frontal gyrus and exhibited decreased amygdala activity, consistent with successful emotion regulation; there was no group difference in this effect. The magnitude of decrease in amygdala activity during affect labeling

  19. Extinction of drug cue reactivity in methamphetamine-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Price, Kimber L; Saladin, Michael E; Baker, Nathaniel L; Tolliver, Bryan K; DeSantis, Stacia M; McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Brady, Kathleen T

    2010-09-01

    Conditioned responses to drug-related environmental cues (such as craving) play a critical role in relapse to drug use. Animal models demonstrate that repeated exposure to drug-associated cues in the absence of drug administration leads to the extinction of conditioned responses, but the few existing clinical trials focused on extinction of conditioned responses to drug-related cues in drug-dependent individuals show equivocal results. The current study examined drug-related cue reactivity and response extinction in a laboratory setting in methamphetamine-dependent individuals. Methamphetamine cue-elicited craving was extinguished during two sessions of repeated (3) within-session exposures to multi-modal (picture, video, and in-vivo) cues, with no evidence of spontaneous recovery between sessions. A trend was noted for a greater attenuation of response in participants with longer (4-7 day) inter-session intervals. These results indicate that extinction of drug cue conditioned responding occurs in methamphetamine-dependent individuals, offering promise for the development of extinction- based treatment strategies.

  20. Typologies of positive psychotic symptoms in methamphetamine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Bousman, Chad A.; McKetin, Rebecca; Burns, Richard; Woods, Steven Paul; Morgan, Erin E.; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Everall, Ian P.; Grant, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Understanding methamphetamine associated psychotic (MAP) symptom typologies could aid in identifying individuals at risk of progressing to schizophrenia and guide early intervention. Methods Latent class analysis (LCA) of psychotic symptoms collected from 40 methamphetamine dependent individuals with a history of psychotic symptoms but no history of a primary psychotic disorder. Results Three typologies were identified. In one, persecutory delusions dominated (Type 1), in another persecutory delusions were accompanied by hallucinations (Type 2), and in the third a high frequency of all the assessed hallucinatory and delusional symptoms was observed (Type 3). Discussion and Conclusion MAP is a heterogeneous syndrome with positive symptom typologies. Scientific Significance This study represents the first attempt at identifying typologies of MAP and highlights the potential utility of LCA in future large-scale studies. PMID:25864598

  1. Discriminative-Stimulus, Subject-rated and Physiological Effects of Methamphetamine in Humans Pretreated with Aripiprazole

    PubMed Central

    Sevak, Rajkumar J.; Vansickel, Andrea R.; Stoops, William W.; Glaser, Paul E. A.; Hays, Lon R.; Rush, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine is thought to produce its behavioral effects by releasing dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine. Results from animal studies support this notion, while results from human laboratory studies have not consistently demonstrated the importance of monoamine systems in the behavioral effects of methamphetamine. Human laboratory procedures of drug-discrimination are well suited to assess neuropharmacological mechanisms of the training drug by studying pharmacological manipulation. In this human laboratory study, six participants with a history of recreational stimulant use learned to discriminate 10 mg oral methamphetamine. After acquiring the discrimination (i.e., ≥80% correct responding on 4 consecutive sessions), the effects of a range of doses of methamphetamine (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 15 mg), alone and in combination with 0 and 20 mg aripiprazole (a partial agonist at D2 and 5-HT1A receptors), were assessed. Methamphetamine alone functioned as a discriminative stimulus, produced prototypical stimulant-like subject-rated drug effects (e.g., increased ratings of Good Effects, Talkative-Friendly, and Willing to Pay For) and elevated cardiovascular indices. These effects were generally a function of dose. Aripiprazole alone did not occasion methamphetamine-appropriate responding or produce subject-rated effects, but modestly impaired performance. Administration of aripiprazole significantly attenuated the discriminative-stimulus and cardiovascular effects of methamphetamine, as well as some of the subject-rated drug effects. These results indicate that monoamine systems likely play a role in the behavioral effects of methamphetamine in humans. Moreover, given the concordance between past results with d-amphetamine and the present findings, d-amphetamine can likely serve as a model for the pharmacological effects of methamphetamine. PMID:21694622

  2. Chronic methamphetamine exposure induces cardiac fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liou, Cher-Ming; Tsai, Shiow-Chwen; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Williams, Timothy; Ting, Hua; Lee, Shin-Da

    2014-06-01

    Very limited information regarding the influence of chronic methamphetamine exposure on cardiac apoptosis is available. In this study, we evaluate whether chronic methamphetamine exposure will increase cardiac Fas-dependent (type I) and mitochondria-dependent (type II) apoptotic pathways. Thirty-two male Wistar rats at 3-4 months of age were randomly divided into a vehicle-treated group [phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) 0.5 ml SQ per day] and a methamphetamine-treated group (MA 10 mg/kg SQ per day) for 3 months. We report that after 3 months of exposure, abnormal myocardial architecture, more minor cardiac fibrosis and cardiac TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells were observed at greater frequency in the MA group than in the PBS group. Protein levels of TNF-α, Fas ligand, Fas receptor, Fas-associated death domain, activated caspase-8, and activated caspase-3 (Fas-dependent apoptosis) extracted from excised hearts were significantly increased in the MA group, compared to the PBS group. Protein levels of cardiac Bak, t-Bid, Bak to Bcl-xL ratio, activated caspase-9, and activated caspase-3 (mitochondria-dependent apoptosis) were significantly increased in the MA group, compared with the PBS group. The results from this study reveal that chronic methamphetamine exposure will activate cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways, which may indicate a possible mechanism for developing cardiac abnormalities in humans with chronic methamphetamine abuse.

  3. Methamphetamine causes acute hyperthermia-dependent liver damage.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Laura E; Gunning, William T; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2013-10-01

    Methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity has been correlated with damage to the liver but this damage has not been extensively characterized. Moreover, the mechanism by which the drug contributes to liver damage is unknown. This study characterizes the hepatocellular toxicity of methamphetamine and examines if hyperthermia contributes to this liver damage. Livers from methamphetamine-treated rats were examined using electron microscopy and hematoxylin and eosin staining. Methamphetamine increased glycogen stores, mitochondrial aggregation, microvesicular lipid, and hydropic change. These changes were diffuse throughout the hepatic lobule, as evidenced by a lack of hematoxylin and eosin staining. To confirm if these changes were indicative of damage, serum aspartate and alanine aminotransferase were measured. The functional significance of methamphetamine-induced liver damage was also examined by measuring plasma ammonia. To examine the contribution of hyperthermia to this damage, methamphetamine-treated rats were cooled during and after drug treatment by cooling their external environment. Serum aspartate and alanine aminotransferase, as well as plasma ammonia were increased concurrently with these morphologic changes and were prevented when methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia was blocked. These findings support that methamphetamine produces changes in hepatocellular morphology and damage persisting for at least 24 h after drug exposure. At this same time point, methamphetamine treatment significantly increases plasma ammonia concentrations, consistent with impaired ammonia metabolism and functional liver damage. Methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia contributes significantly to the persistent liver damage and increases in peripheral ammonia produced by the drug. PMID:25505562

  4. Double-blind placebo-controlled evaluation of the PROMETA™ protocol for methamphetamine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Walter; Shoptaw, Steven; Hillhouse, Maureen; Bholat, Michelle A.; Charuvastra, Charles; Heinzerling, Keith; Chim, David; Annon, Jeffrey; Dowling, Patrick T.; Doraimani, Geetha

    2014-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the PROMETA™ Protocol for treating methamphetamine dependence. Design A double-blind, placebo-controlled 108-day study with random assignment to one of two study conditions: active medication with flumazenil (2 mg infusions on days 1, 2, 3, 22, 23), gabapentin (1200 mg to day 40) and hydroxazine (50 mg to day 10) versus placebo medication (with active hydroxazine only). Setting Three substance abuse treatment clinics: two in-patient, one out-patient. Participants Treatment-seeking, methamphetamine-dependent adults (n = 120). Measurements Primary outcome was percentage of urine samples testing negative for methamphetamine during the trial. Findings No statistically significant between-group differences were detected in urine drug test results, craving, treatment retention or adverse events. Conclusions The PROMETA protocol, consisting of flumazenil, gabapentin and hydroxyzine, appears to be no more effective than placebo in reducing methamphetamine use, retaining patients in treatment or reducing methamphetamine craving. PMID:22082089

  5. Chronic wheel running-induced reduction of extinction and reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking in methamphetamine dependent rats is associated with reduced number of periaqueductal gray dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Sobieraj, Jeffery C; Kim, Airee; Fannon, McKenzie J; Mandyam, Chitra D

    2016-01-01

    Exercise (physical activity) has been proposed as a treatment for drug addiction. In rodents, voluntary wheel running reduces cocaine and nicotine seeking during extinction, and reinstatement of cocaine seeking triggered by drug-cues. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of chronic wheel running during withdrawal and protracted abstinence on extinction and reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking in methamphetamine dependent rats, and to determine a potential neurobiological correlate underlying the effects. Rats were given extended access to methamphetamine (0.05 mg/kg, 6 h/day) for 22 sessions. Rats were withdrawn and were given access to running wheels (wheel runners) or no wheels (sedentary) for 3 weeks after which they experienced extinction and reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking. Extended access to methamphetamine self-administration produced escalation in methamphetamine intake. Methamphetamine experience reduced running output, and conversely, access to wheel running during withdrawal reduced responding during extinction and, context- and cue-induced reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking. Immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue demonstrated that wheel running during withdrawal did not regulate markers of methamphetamine neurotoxicity (neurogenesis, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2) and cellular activation (c-Fos) in brain regions involved in relapse to drug seeking. However, reduced methamphetamine seeking was associated with running-induced reduction (and normalization) of the number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in the periaqueductal gray (PAG). The present study provides evidence that dopamine neurons of the PAG region show adaptive biochemical changes during methamphetamine seeking in methamphetamine dependent rats and wheel running abolishes these effects. Given that the PAG dopamine neurons project onto the structures of the extended amygdala, the present findings also

  6. Swimming exercise attenuates psychological dependence and voluntary methamphetamine consumption in methamphetamine withdrawn rats

    PubMed Central

    Damghani, Fatemeh; Bigdeli, Imanollah; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein; Fadaei, Atefeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study evaluated the effect of swimming exercise during spontaneous methamphetamine (METH) withdrawal on the anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and voluntary METH consumption in METH-dependent rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were repeatedly administered with bi-daily doses of METH (2 mg/kg, subcutaneous) over a period of 14 days. Exercised rats were submitted to swimming sessions (45 min/day, five days per week, for 14 days) during spontaneous METH-withdrawal. Then, all animals were tested for the assessment of anxiety by using the elevated plus-maze (EPM), the grooming behaviors (OCD), and depression using forced swimming test (FST) and voluntary METH consumption using a two-bottle choice (TBC) paradigm for the assessment of craving. Results: The results showed that the swimmer METH-withdrawn rats exhibited an increase in EPM open arm time and entries and a reduction of immobility and grooming behaviors compared with the sedentary METH groups. Also, voluntary METH consumption was less in the swimmer METH-withdrawn rats than the sedentary METH groups throughout 5–8 days. Conclusion: This study showed that regular swimming exercise reduced voluntary METH consumption in animal models of craving by reducing anxiety, OCD, and depression in the METH-withdrawn rats. Thus, physical training may be ameliorating some of the withdrawal behavioral consequences of METH. PMID:27482339

  7. Separate and Combined Effects of Naltrexone and Extended-Release Alprazolam on the Reinforcing, Subject-Rated, and Cardiovascular Effects of Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Marks, Katherine R; Lile, Joshua A; Stoops, William W; Glaser, Paul E A; Hays, Lon R; Rush, Craig R

    2016-06-01

    Opioid antagonists (eg, naltrexone) and positive modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (eg, alprazolam) each modestly attenuate the abuse-related effects of stimulants. A previous study demonstrated that acute pretreatment with the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam attenuated a greater number of the subject-rated effects of D-amphetamine than the constituent drugs alone. This study tested the hypothesis that maintenance on the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam XR would attenuate the reinforcing and "positive" subject-rated effects of methamphetamine to a greater extent than the constituent drugs alone.Eight non-treatment-seeking, stimulant-using individuals completed a placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind inpatient protocol. Participants were maintained on naltrexone (0 and 50 mg), alprazolam XR (0 and 1 mg), and the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam XR (50 mg and 1 mg, respectively) for 6 to 7 days. Under each maintenance condition, participants sampled intranasal doses of methamphetamine (0, 10, and 30 mg), and were then offered the opportunity to work for the sampled dose on a modified progressive-ratio procedure. Subject-rated drug effect questionnaires, psychomotor, and physiology assessments were collected.Intranasal methamphetamine functioned as a reinforcer and produced prototypical stimulant-like "positive" subject-rated and physiological effects. Maintenance on naltrexone significantly decreased the reinforcing, but not subject-rated drug effects of 10-mg methamphetamine. Alprazolam XR and the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam XR did not impact methamphetamine self-administration or subject-rated drug effects. The results support the continued evaluation of naltrexone for methamphetamine dependence, as well as the identification of other drugs that enhance its ability to reduce drug-taking behavior.

  8. Methamphetamine use parameters do not predict neuropsychological impairment in currently abstinent dependent adults.

    PubMed

    Cherner, Mariana; Suarez, Paola; Casey, Corinna; Deiss, Robert; Letendre, Scott; Marcotte, Thomas; Vaida, Florin; Atkinson, J Hampton; Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K

    2010-01-15

    Methamphetamine (meth) abuse is increasingly of public health concern and has been associated with neurocognitive dysfunction. Some previous studies have been hampered by background differences between meth users and comparison subjects, as well as unknown HIV and hepatitis C (HCV) status, which can also affect brain functioning. We compared the neurocognitive functioning of 54 meth dependent (METH+) study participants who had been abstinent for an average of 129 days, to that of 46 demographically comparable control subjects (METH-) with similar level of education and reading ability. All participants were free of HIV and HCV infection. The METH+ group exhibited higher rates of neuropsychological impairment in most areas tested. Among meth users, neuropsychologically normal (n=32) and impaired (n=22) subjects did not differ with respect to self-reported age at first use, total years of use, route of consumption, or length of abstinence. Those with motor impairment had significantly greater meth use in the past year, but impairment in cognitive domains was unrelated to meth exposure. The apparent lack of correspondence between substance use parameters and cognitive impairment suggests the need for further study of individual differences in vulnerability to the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine.

  9. Exercise Training Improves Heart Rate Variability after Methamphetamine Dependency

    PubMed Central

    Dolezal, Brett A.; Chudzynski, Joy; Dickerson, Daniel; Mooney, Larissa; Rawson, Richard A.; Garfinkel, Alan; Cooper, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects a healthy autonomic nervous system and is increased with physical training. Methamphetamine dependence (MD) causes autonomic dysfunction and diminished HRV. We compared recently abstinent MD participants with age-matched, drug free controls (DF) and also investigated whether HRV can be improved with exercise training in the MD participants. Methods In 50 participants (MD=28; DF=22) resting heart rate (R-R intervals) was recorded over 5 min while seated using a monitor affixed to a chest strap. Previously reported time-domain (SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50) and frequency-domain (LFnu, HFnu, LF/HF) parameters of HRV were calculated with customized software. MD were randomized to thrice weekly exercise training (ME=14) or equal attention without training (MC=14) over 8 weeks. Groups were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. Results Participant characteristics were matched between groups: age 33±6 years; body mass 82.7±12 kg, BMI 26.8±4.1 kg•min−2, mean±SD. Compared with DF, the MD group had significantly higher resting heart rate (P<0.05), LFnu, and LF/HF (P<0.001) as well as lower SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50 and HFnu (all P<0.001). At randomization, HRV indices were similar between ME and MC groups. However, after training, the ME group significantly (all P<0.001) increased SDNN (+14.7±2.0 ms, +34%), RMSSD (+19.6±4.2 ms, +63%), pNN50 (+22.6±2.7%, +173%), HFnu (+14.2±1.9, +60%) and decreased HR (−5.2±1.1 beats·min−1, −7%), LFnu (−9.6±1.5, −16%) and LF/HF (−0.7±0.3, −19%). These measures did not change from baseline in the MC group. Conclusion HRV, based on several conventional indices, was diminished in recently abstinent, methamphetamine dependent individuals. Moreover, physical training yielded a marked increase of HRV representing increased vagal modulation or improved autonomic balance. PMID:24162556

  10. Quality of life among treatment seeking methamphetamine-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Rachel; Ang, Alfonso; Glik, Deborah C; Rawson, Richard A; Lee, Stella; Iguchi, Martin Y

    2011-01-01

    As the number of men and women entering treatment for substance use disorders continues to increase across the country, it becomes vitally important to understand their quality of life (QOL) or perceived health status, in order to inform treatment efforts for improving such outcomes. To date, QOL assessments among methamphetamine (MA) dependent users are limited. This paper examines QOL health status among a sample of 838 treatment seeking MA users at admission. Using regression analysis, predictors of QOL are examined among MA users. Predictors of poor QOL among MA users at treatment admission included being female, white, high school educated or more, married, experiencing psychosocial dysfunction (lifetime trauma, suicide, social conflict), reporting a high frequency of both MA and polydrugs for 15 days or more in the past month, chronicity of MA and polydrug use, injection use, and having co-morbid medical and psychiatric impairment. Employment status was the only factor related to better health status perceptions. This study expands the scope of scholarly examination of MA-dependent users entering treatment, as there has not been a development of coherent profiles of QOL among representative samples of clinical MA-abusing populations to date. PMID:21679268

  11. [The role of CC-chemokine ligand 2 in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine].

    PubMed

    Saika, Fumihiro; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kishioka, Shiroh

    2015-10-01

    Addiction is described as a chronic neurological disorder associated with plasticity in the mesolimbic system. Recently, it has been suggested that neuroinflammation plays an important role in the induction of neuronal plasticity and the formation of pathogenesis in chronic neurological disorders. Therefore, we examined the role of CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), a proinflammatory chemokine, in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine. In mice treated with methamphetamine, CCL2 mRNA was significantly increased in prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Moreover, phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase serine40 (pTH Ser40) levels in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were increased by methamphetamine. Similarly, pTH Ser40 levels in the VTA were also increased by the intracerebroventricular administration of recombinant CCL2. The increment of pTH Ser40 levels in the VTA by methamphetamine was attenuated by RS504393, a selective CC-chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) antagonist, indicating that the increased CCL2 activates the brain reward system via CCR2 activation. In the conditioned place preference test, methamphetamine produced place preference in a dose-dependent manner, which was attenuated by RS504393. These results suggest that the activation of the brain reward system via CCL2-CCR2 pathway plays an important role in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine. PMID:26946780

  12. [The role of CC-chemokine ligand 2 in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine].

    PubMed

    Saika, Fumihiro; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kishioka, Shiroh

    2015-10-01

    Addiction is described as a chronic neurological disorder associated with plasticity in the mesolimbic system. Recently, it has been suggested that neuroinflammation plays an important role in the induction of neuronal plasticity and the formation of pathogenesis in chronic neurological disorders. Therefore, we examined the role of CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), a proinflammatory chemokine, in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine. In mice treated with methamphetamine, CCL2 mRNA was significantly increased in prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Moreover, phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase serine40 (pTH Ser40) levels in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were increased by methamphetamine. Similarly, pTH Ser40 levels in the VTA were also increased by the intracerebroventricular administration of recombinant CCL2. The increment of pTH Ser40 levels in the VTA by methamphetamine was attenuated by RS504393, a selective CC-chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) antagonist, indicating that the increased CCL2 activates the brain reward system via CCR2 activation. In the conditioned place preference test, methamphetamine produced place preference in a dose-dependent manner, which was attenuated by RS504393. These results suggest that the activation of the brain reward system via CCL2-CCR2 pathway plays an important role in the development of psychic dependence on methamphetamine.

  13. Acute modafinil exposure reduces daytime sleepiness in abstinent methamphetamine-dependent volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, James J.; Jackson, Brian J.; Kalechstein, Ari D.; De La Garza, Richard; Chang, Lee C.; Newton, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute, oral modafinil (200 mg) exposure on daytime sleepiness in methamphetamine (Meth)-dependent individuals. Eighteen Meth-dependent subjects were enrolled in a 7-d inpatient study and were administered placebo or modafinil on day 6 and the counter-condition on day 7 (randomized) of the protocol. Subjects completed several subjective daily assessments (such as the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Beck Depression Inventory and visual analogue scale) throughout the protocol as well as objective assessments on days 5–7, when the Multiple Sleep Latency Test was performed. The results of the current study suggest that short-term abstinence from Meth is associated with increased daytime sleepiness and that a single dose of 200 mg modafinil reduces daytime somnolence in this population. In addition, a positive correlation was found between subjective reporting of the likelihood of taking a nap and craving and desire for Meth, as well as the likelihood of using Meth and whether Meth would make the participant feel better. The results of this study should be considered when investigating candidate medications for Meth-dependence, especially in those individuals who attribute their Meth use to overcoming deficits resulting from sleep abnormalities. PMID:22214752

  14. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of N-acetyl cysteine plus naltrexone for methamphetamine dependence.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian L; Kim, Suck Won

    2010-11-01

    Reducing both glutamatergic and dopaminergic drive in the nucleus accumbens may offer complementary mechanisms by which to reduce drug cravings. This 8-week study sought to examine the efficacy of a combination of a glutamate modulator, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), plus the opioid antagonist, naltrexone, compared to placebo in the treatment of methamphetamine dependence. Thirty-one subjects with methamphetamine dependence (mean age 36.8 ± 7.12 years; 29% female) were randomly assigned in a 1:1 fashion to NAC plus naltrexone or placebo and returned for one post-baseline visit. The Penn Craving Scale was the primary outcome measure. Self-report methamphetamine use frequency and urine toxicology were secondary measures. NAC plus naltrexone failed to demonstrate statistically significant differences from placebo on primary and secondary outcomes. The current study failed to demonstrate greater efficacy for NAC plus naltrexone compared to placebo. Given the small sample size, the statistical power to detect significant effects of active treatment versus placebo was limited. The question of whether a larger, well-powered sample would have detected differences between NAC plus naltrexone and placebo deserves further examination. PMID:20655182

  15. The acetylcholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine does not alter total choices for methamphetamine, but may reduce positive subjective effects, in a laboratory model of intravenous self-administration in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    De La Garza, R; Mahoney, J J; Culbertson, C; Shoptaw, S; Newton, T F

    2008-04-01

    A human laboratory model of intravenous methamphetamine self-administration may facilitate study of putative treatments for methamphetamine addiction. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, between groups investigation of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor rivastigmine in non-treatment-seeking volunteers who met criteria for methamphetamine abuse or dependence. Safety and subjective effects data derived from days 1-10 of this protocol are described in a separate publication. In this report, we describe self-administration outcomes in participants randomized to treatment with rivastigmine (0 mg, N=7; 1.5 mg, N=6; 3 mg, N=9); data that were collected on days 11-15 of the inpatient protocol. On day 11, participants sampled two infusions of methamphetamine (0 and 30 mg, i.v.). On days 12-15, participants made ten choices each day to receive an infusion of either methamphetamine (3 mg, IV) or saline or a monetary alternative ($0.05-$16). The study design allowed for evaluation of differences in behavior on days in which infusions were performed by the physician (experimenter-administered) versus by the participant using a PCA pump (self-administered), and when monetary alternatives were presented in either ascending or descending sequence. The data show that rivastigmine (1.5 and 3 mg), as compared to placebo, did not significantly alter total choices for methamphetamine (p=0.150). Importantly, the number of infusion choices was greater when methamphetamine was available then when saline was available (p<0.0001), and the number of money choices was greater when saline was available then when methamphetamine was available (p<0.0001). The total number of choices for methamphetamine was not altered as a function of a participant's preferred route of methamphetamine use (p=0.57), and did not differ significantly whether they were experimenter-administered or self-administered (p=0.30). In addition, total choices for methamphetamine were similar made when

  16. Childhood Adverse Events and Health Outcomes among Methamphetamine-Dependent Men and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messina, Nena P.; Marinelli-Casey, Patricia; Hillhouse, Maureen; Ang, Alfonso; Hunter, Jeremy; Rawson, Richard

    2008-01-01

    To describe the prevalence of childhood adverse events (CAEs) among methamphetamine-dependent men and women, and assess the relationship of cumulative CAEs to health problems. Data for 236 men and 351 women were analyzed assessing CAEs. Dependent variables included 14 self-reported health problems or psychiatric symptom domains. Mental health was…

  17. The Effects of Methylphenidate on Cognitive Control in Active Methamphetamine Dependence Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Reem K.; Lin, Joanne C.; McLaren, Donald G.; Kirk, Ian J.; Kydd, Rob R.; Russell, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) dependence is associated with cognitive deficits. Methylphenidate (MPH) has been shown to improve inhibitory control in healthy and cocaine-dependent subjects. This study aimed to understand the neurophysiological effects before and after acute MPH administration in active MA-dependent and control subjects. Fifteen MA-dependent and 18 control subjects aged 18–46 years were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging before and after either a single oral dose of MPH (18 mg) or placebo while performing a color-word Stroop task. Baseline accuracy was lower (p = 0.026) and response time (RT) was longer (p < 0.0001) for the incongruent compared to congruent condition, demonstrating the task probed cognitive control. Increased activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and parietal cortex during the incongruent and Stroop effect conditions, respectively was observed in MA-dependent compared to control subjects (p < 0.05), suggesting the need to recruit neural resources within these regions for conflict resolution. Post- compared to pre-MPH treatment, increased RT and DLPFC activation for the Stroop effect were observed in MA-dependent subjects (p < 0.05). In comparison to MPH-treated controls and placebo-treated MA-dependent subjects, MPH-treated MA-dependent subjects showed decreased activation of parietal and occipital regions during the incongruent and Stroop effect conditions (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that in MA-dependent subjects, MPH facilitated increased recruitment of the DLPFC for Stroop conflict resolution, and a decreased need for recruitment of neural resources in parietal and occipital regions compared to the other groups, while maintaining a comparable level of task performance to that achieved pre-drug administration. Due to the small sample size, the results from this study are preliminary; however, they inform us about the effects of MPH on the neural correlates of cognitive

  18. "Frontal systems" behaviors in comorbid human immunodeficiency virus infection and methamphetamine dependency.

    PubMed

    Marquine, María J; Iudicello, Jennifer E; Morgan, Erin E; Brown, Gregory G; Letendre, Scott L; Ellis, Ronald J; Deutsch, Reena; Woods, Steven Paul; Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K

    2014-01-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and methamphetamine (MA) dependence are associated with neural injury preferentially involving frontostriatal circuits. Little is known, however, about how these commonly comorbid conditions impact behavioral presentations typically associated with frontal systems dysfunction. Our sample comprised 47 HIV-uninfected/MA-nondependent; 25 HIV-uninfected/MA-dependent; 36 HIV-infected/MA-nondependent; and 28 HIV-infected/MA-dependent subjects. Participants completed self-report measures of "frontal systems" behaviors, including impulsivity/disinhibition, sensation-seeking, and apathy. They also underwent comprehensive neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric assessments that allowed for detailed characterization of neurocognitive deficits and comorbid/premorbid conditions, including lifetime Mood and Substance Use Disorders, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, and Antisocial Personality Disorder. Multivariable regression models adjusting for potential confounds (i.e., demographics and comorbid/premorbid conditions) showed that MA dependence was independently associated with increased impulsivity/disinhibition, sensation-seeking and apathy, and HIV infection with greater apathy. However, we did not see synergistic/additive effects of HIV and MA on frontal systems behaviors. Global neurocognitive impairment was relatively independent of the frontal systems behaviors, which is consistent with the view that these constructs may have relatively separable biopsychosocial underpinnings. Future research should explore whether both neurocognitive impairment and frontal systems behaviors may independently contribute to everyday functioning outcomes relevant to HIV and MA.

  19. Comparative Study of the Activity of Brain Behavioral Systems in Methamphetamine and Opiate Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Alemikhah, Marjan; Faridhosseini, Farhad; Kordi, Hassan; Rasouli-Azad, Morad; Shahini, Najmeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Substance dependency is a major problem for the general health of a society. Different approaches have investigated the substance dependency in order to explain it. Gray’s reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) is an advanced and important neuropsychological theory in this area. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare three systems of the revised reinforcement sensitivity theory the behavioral activation system (r-BAS), the revised behavioral inhibition system (r-BIS), and the revised fight/flight/freezing system (r-FFFS) between patients dependent on methamphetamine and opiates, and a group of controls. Patients and Methods: This research was a causal-comparative study that was conducted in the first six months of 2012. The population of the study was males of Mashhad city, who were dependent on methamphetamine or opiates, and ruling out psychotic disorders and prominent Axis II. Twenty-five people were selected by the convenient sampling method. Also, 25 non-dependent people from the patients’ relatives were selected and matched for the variables of age, gender, and education to participate in this study. Participants were evaluated using a structured clinical interview (SCID) for DSM-IV, demographic questionnaire information, and a Jackson-5 questionnaire (2009). Data were analyzed by Chi-square, K-S, and independent t-test. Results: The methamphetamine dependent group had a higher sensitivity in the r-BAS, r-BIS, and the r-Fight and r-Freezing systems compared to the control group (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in r-Flight between the two groups (P > 0.05). “The scores of r-BIS were also significantly higher in the methamphetamine-dependent group than the opioid-dependent and control groups. For the r-Fight variable, the methamphetamine-dependent group was higher than the opioid-dependent group”. Conclusions: The personality patterns of patients dependent on methamphetamines were different from the controls

  20. Does alexithymia explain variation in cue-elicited craving reported by methamphetamine-dependent individuals?

    PubMed

    Saladin, Michael E; Santa Ana, Elizabeth J; LaRowe, Steven D; Simpson, Annie N; Tolliver, Bryan K; Price, Kimber L; McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Brady, Kathleen T

    2012-01-01

    Drug craving is an important motivational phenomenon among addicted individuals, and successful management of craving is essential to both the initiation and maintenance of abstinence. Although craving in response to drug cues is common in drug-dependent individuals, it is not universal. At the present time, it is not known why approximately 20-30% of all addicted persons fail to report appreciable craving in laboratory-based cue reactivity studies. This study examined the possibility that alexithymia, a personality attribute characterized by a difficulty identifying and describing emotions, may contribute to the impoverished cue-elicited craving experienced by some addicts. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that alexithymia, as measured by the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS), would be inversely related to the magnitude of cue-elicited craving obtained in a cue reactivity protocol. Forty methamphetamine-dependent individuals completed the TAS and provided craving ratings for methamphetamine after presentation of methamphetamine-associated cues. Thirteen participants (32%) reported no methamphetamine cue-elicited craving. Contrary to expectation, TAS factor 1 (a measure of difficulty identifying feelings) scores were positively associated with cue-elicited craving. Thus, the results suggest that increasing difficulty-identifying feelings may be associated with higher cue-elicited craving. Clinical implications for this finding are discussed.

  1. Does Alexithymia Explain Variation in Cue-Elicited Craving Reported by Methamphetamine-Dependent Individuals?

    PubMed Central

    Saladin, Michael E.; Santa Ana, Elizabeth J.; LaRowe, Steven D.; Simpson, Annie N.; Tolliver, Bryan K.; Price, Kimber L.; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2011-01-01

    Drug craving is an important motivational phenomenon among addicted individuals and successful management of craving is essential to both the initiation and maintenance of abstinence. While craving in response to drug cues is common in drug-dependent individuals, it is not universal. At the present time, it is not known why approximately 20–30% of all addicted persons fail to report appreciable craving in laboratory-based cue reactivity studies. The present study examined the possibility that alexithymia, a personality attribute characterized by a difficulty identifying and describing emotions, may contribute to the impoverished cue-elicited craving experienced by some addicts. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that alexithymia, as measured by the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS), would be inversely related to the magnitude of cue-elicited craving obtained in a cue reactivity protocol. Forty methamphetamine-dependent individuals completed the TAS and provided craving ratings for methamphetamine after presentation of methamphetamine-associated cues. Thirteen participants (32%) reported no methamphetamine cue-elicited craving. Contrary to expectation, TAS factor 1 (a measure of difficulty identifying feelings) scores were positively associated with cue-elicited craving. Thus, the results suggest that increasing difficulty identifying feelings may be associated with higher cue-elicited craving. Clinical implications for this finding are discussed. PMID:22332856

  2. Dose-dependent protective effects of apomorphine against methamphetamine-induced nigrostriatal damage.

    PubMed

    Fornai, F; Battaglia, G; Gesi, M; Orzi, F; Nicoletti, F; Ruggieri, S

    2001-04-13

    (R)-apomorphine is a non-selective dopamine (DA) agonist which is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. In addition to symptomatic effects, apomorphine exerts a neuroprotective activity in specific experimental models. For instance, apomorphine prevents experimental parkinsonism induced by the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Neuroprotection obtained with apomorphine does not seem to be related to its dopamine (DA) agonist properties, instead it appears to be grounded on the antioxidant and the free radical scavenging effects of the compound. In this study, we sought to determine whether apomorphine protects against methamphetamine toxicity. We found that apomorphine (1; 5 and 10 mg/kg) dose-dependently protects against methamphetamine- (5 mg/kg X3, 2 h apart) induced striatal DA loss and reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity in the rat striatum. These protective effects are neither due to a decrease in the amount of striatal methamphetamine nor to hypothermia as indicated by measurement of striatal methamphetamine and body temperature at different time intervals after drug administration. The effects of apomorphine were neither opposite to, nor reversed by the DA antagonist haloperidol despite no decrease in body temperature was observed when apomorphine was given in combination with haloperidol. The present data are in line with recent studies suggesting a DA receptor-independent neuroprotective effect of apomorphine on DA neurons and call for further studies aimed at evaluating potential neuroprotective effects of apomorphine in Parkinson's disease.

  3. Effect of the environmental enrichment on the severity of psychological dependence and voluntary methamphetamine consumption in methamphetamine withdrawn rats.

    PubMed

    Hajheidari, Samira; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein; Bigdeli, Imanollah

    2015-01-01

    Previously results have been shown that chronic methamphetamine causes dependence, withdrawal syndrome and drug craving. Also, environmental enrichment (EE) has been shown protective effects in several animal models of addiction. This study evaluated effect of the EE on the anxiety-depression profile and voluntary METH consumption in METH-dependent rats after abstinence. The rats were chronically treated with bi-daily doses (2 mg/kg, at 12 h intervals) of METH over a period of 14 days. METH dependent rats reared in standard environment (SE) or EE during spontaneous METH withdrawal which lasted 30 days. Then, the rats were tested for anxiety (the elevated plus maze-EPM) and depression (forced swim test-FST) and also voluntary consumption of METH using a two-bottle choice paradigm (TBC). The results showed that the EE rats exhibited an increase in EPM open arm time and entries (P < 0.05), lower levels of immobility (P < 0.001) as compared with the SE groups. Preference ratio of METH was less in the METH/EE rats than the SE group during 2 periods of the intake of drug (P < 0.05). Environmental enrichment seems to be one of the strategies in reduction of behavioral deficits and the risk of relapse induced by METH withdrawal.

  4. State dependent effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on methamphetamine craving.

    PubMed

    Shahbabaie, Alireza; Golesorkhi, Mehrshad; Zamanian, Behnam; Ebrahimpoor, Mitra; Keshvari, Fatemeh; Nejati, Vahid; Fregni, Felipe; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2014-10-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate subjective craving ratings in drug dependents by modification of cortical excitability in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Given the mechanism of craving in methamphetamine (meth) users, we aimed to test whether tDCS of DLPFC could also alter self-reported craving in abstinent meth users while being exposed to meth cues. In this double-blinded, crossover, sham-controlled study, thirty two right-handed abstinent male meth users were recruited. We applied 20 min 'anodal' tDCS (2 mA) or 'sham' tDCS over right DLPFC in a random sequence while subjects performed a computerized cue-induced craving task (CICT) starting after 10 min of stimulation. Immediate craving was assessed before the stimulation, after 10 min of tDCS, and after tDCS termination by visual analog scale (VAS) of 0 to 100. Anodal tDCS of rDLPFC altered craving ratings significantly. We found a significant reduction of craving at rest in real tDCS relative to the sham condition (p = 0.016) after 10 min of stimulation. On the other hand, cue-induced VAS craving was rated significantly higher in the real condition in comparison with sham stimulation (p = 0.012). Our findings showed a state dependent effect of tDCS: while active prefrontal tDCS acutely reduced craving at rest in the abstinent meth users, it increased craving during meth-related cue exposure. These findings reflect the important role of the prefrontal cortex in both cue saliency evaluation and urge to meth consumption.

  5. Family dysfunction differentially affects alcohol and methamphetamine dependence: a view from the Addiction Severity Index in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Nagisa; Haraguchi, Ayako; Ogai, Yasukazu; Senoo, Eiichi; Higuchi, Susumu; Umeno, Mitsuru; Aikawa, Yuzo; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the differential influence of family dysfunction on alcohol and methamphetamine dependence in Japan using the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), a useful instrument that multilaterally measures the severity of substance dependence. The participants in this study were 321 male patients with alcohol dependence and 68 male patients with methamphetamine dependence. We conducted semi-structured interviews with each patient using the ASI, which is designed to assess problem severity in seven functional domains: Medical, Employment/Support, Alcohol use, Drug use, Legal, Family/Social relationships, and Psychiatric. In patients with alcohol dependence, bad relationships with parents, brothers and sisters, and friends in their lives were related to current severe psychiatric problems. Bad relationships with brothers and sisters and partners in their lives were related to current severe employment/support problems, and bad relationships with partners in their lives were related to current severe family/social problems. The current severity of psychiatric problems was related to the current severity of drug use and family/social problems in patients with alcohol dependence. Patients with methamphetamine dependence had difficulty developing good relationships with their father. Furthermore, the current severity of psychiatric problems was related to the current severity of medical, employment/support, and family/social problems in patients with methamphetamine dependence. The results of this study suggest that family dysfunction differentially affects alcohol and methamphetamine dependence. Additionally, family relationships may be particularly related to psychiatric problems in these patients, although the ASI was developed to independently evaluate each of seven problem areas.

  6. Dopamine transporter dysfunction in Han Chinese people with chronic methamphetamine dependence after a short-term abstinence.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jie; Lv, Rongbin; Robert Brašić, James; Han, Mei; Liu, Xingdang; Wang, Yuankai; Zhang, Guangming; Liu, Congjin; Li, Yu; Deng, Yanping

    2014-01-30

    Single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) after the administration of (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1 was performed on healthy subjects and subjects with methamphetamine (METH)dependence at time 1 (T1) after 24-48 h of abstinence, time 2 (T2) after 2 weeks of abstinence, and time 3 (T3) after 4 weeks of abstinence. In contrast to values in controls, the values of the striatal DAT specific uptake ratios (SURs) in subjects with METH dependence were significantly lower at T1 (n=25), T2 (n=9), and T3 (n=8); a mild increase in SURs was observed at T2 and T3, but values were still significantly lower than those in controls. In subjects with METH dependence, there was a trend for a negative correlation of striatal DAT SURs and craving for METH at T1. METH craving, anxiety and depression scores significantly decreased from T1 to T2 to T3. We conclude that Han Chinese people with METH dependence experience significant striatal DAT dysfunction, and that these changes may be mildly reversible after 4 weeks of abstinence, but that DAT levels still remain significantly lower than those in healthy subjects. The mild recovery of striatal DAT may parallel improvements in craving, anxiety and depression.

  7. Time-dependent effects of prazosin on the development of methamphetamine conditioned hyperactivity and context-specific sensitization in mice.

    PubMed

    White, André O; Rauhut, Anthony S

    2014-04-15

    The present experiments examined the effects of prazosin, a selective α₁-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on the development of methamphetamine conditioned hyperactivity and context-specific sensitization. Mice received an injection of vehicle (distilled water) or prazosin (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg) 30 min prior to a second injection of vehicle (saline) or methamphetamine (1.0 mg/kg) during the conditioning sessions (Experiment 1). Following the conditioning sessions, mice were tested for conditioned hyperactivity and then tested for context-specific sensitization. In subsequent experiments, mice received an injection of vehicle (distilled water) or prazosin (2.0 mg/kg) immediately (Experiment 2) or 24 h (Experiment 3) after the conditioning sessions and then tested for conditioned hyperactivity and context-specific sensitization. Prazosin dose-dependently blocked the development of methamphetamine conditioned hyperactivity and context-specific sensitization when administered prior to the methamphetamine during the conditioning phase; however nonspecific motor impairments also were observed (Experiment 1). Immediate (Experiment 2), but not the 24-h delay (Experiment 3), post-session administration of prazosin attenuated the development of methamphetamine conditioned hyperactivity and context-specific sensitization. Nonspecific motor impairments were not observed in these latter experiments. Collectively, these results suggest that the α₁-adrenergic receptor mediates the development of methamphetamine-conditioned hyperactivity and context-specific sensitization, perhaps by altering memory consolidation and/or reconsolidation processes.

  8. Time-Dependent Effects of Prazosin on the Development of Methamphetamine Conditioned Hyperactivity and Context-Specific Sensitization in Mice

    PubMed Central

    White, André O.; Rauhut, Anthony S.

    2014-01-01

    The present experiments examined the effects of prazosin, a selective α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on the development of methamphetamine conditioned hyperactivity and context-specific sensitization. Mice received an injection of vehicle (distilled water) or prazosin (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg) 30 minutes prior to a second injection of vehicle (saline) or methamphetamine (1.0 mg/kg) during the conditioning sessions (Experiment 1). Following the conditioning sessions, mice were tested for conditioned hyperactivity and then tested for context-specific sensitization. In subsequent experiments, mice received an injection of vehicle (distilled water) or prazosin (2.0 mg/kg) immediately (Experiment 2) or 24 hours (Experiment 3) after the conditioning sessions and then tested for conditioned hyperactivity and context-specific sensitization. Prazosin dose-dependently blocked the development of methamphetamine conditioned hyperactivity and context-specific sensitization when administered prior to the methamphetamine during the conditioning phase; however nonspecific motor impairments also were observed (Experiment 1). Immediate (Experiment 2), but not the 24-hour delay (Experiment 3), post-session administration of prazosin attenuated the development of methamphetamine conditioned hyperactivity and context-specific sensitization. Nonspecific motor impairments were not observed in these latter experiments. Collectively, these results suggest that the α1-adrenergic receptor mediates the development of methamphetamine-conditioned hyperactivity and context-specific sensitization, perhaps by altering memory consolidation and/or reconsolidation processes. PMID:24487011

  9. A preliminary randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the safety and efficacy of ondansetron in the treatment of methamphetamine dependence.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Bankole A; Ait-Daoud, Nassima; Elkashef, Ahmed M; Smith, Edwina V; Kahn, Roberta; Vocci, Francis; Li, Shou-Hua; Bloch, Daniel A

    2008-02-01

    Methamphetamine dependence is an increasing public health problem in the United States. No efficacious medication for methamphetamine dependence has been developed. As ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and modulator of cortico-mesolimbic dopamine function, has been shown to reduce some of the rewarding effects of d-amphetamine in animal and human laboratory studies, we decided to test whether it would be superior to placebo at reducing methamphetamine use. In a preliminary, multi-site, randomized, double-blind, 8-wk controlled trial, 150 methamphetamine-dependent men and women received ondansetron (0.25 mg, 1 mg, or 4 mg b.i.d.) or placebo. Participants were assessed on several measures of methamphetamine use including urine methamphetamine level up to three times per week. As a psychosocial adjunct to the medication condition, cognitive behavioural therapy also was administered three times per week. Ondansetron was well tolerated and was less likely than placebo to be associated with serious adverse events. Nevertheless, none of the ondansetron doses was superior to placebo at decreasing any of the measures of methamphetamine use, withdrawal, craving, or clinical severity of methamphetamine dependence. Our preliminary results do not support the utility of ondansetron, at the doses tested, as a treatment for methamphetamine dependence. These findings should be viewed in light of the possibility that a less intensive cognitive behavioural therapy regimen might have yielded more positive results in this initial phase II trial exploring for the efficacy of ondansetron.

  10. Subjective and Cardiovascular Effects of Intravenous Methamphetamine during Perindopril Maintenance: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Human Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Haile, Colin N.; De La Garza, Richard; Grasing, Kenneth; Kosten, Thomas R.; Newton, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our pilot study suggested that the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor perindopril might reduce some subjective effects produced by i.v. methamphetamine. We characterized the impact of a wider range of perindopril doses on methamphetamine-induced effects in a larger group of non-treatment-seeking, methamphetamine-using volunteers. Methods: Before treatment, participants received 30mg methamphetamine. After 5 to 7 days of perindopril treatment (0, 4, 8, or 16mg/d), participants received 15 and 30mg of methamphetamine on alternate days. Before and after treatment, participants rated subjective effects and cardiovascular measures were collected. Results: Prior to treatment with perindopril, there were no significant differences between treatment groups on maximum or peak subjective ratings or on peak cardiovascular effects. Following perindopril treatment, there were significant main effects of treatment on peak subjective ratings of “anxious” and “stimulated”; compared to placebo treatment, treatment with 8mg perindopril significantly reduced peak ratings of both anxious (P=.0009) and stimulated (P=.0070). There were no significant posttreatment differences between groups on peak cardiovascular effects. Conclusions: Moderate doses of perindopril (8mg) significantly reduced peak subjective ratings of anxious and stimulated as well as attenuated many other subjective effects produced by methamphetamine, likely by inhibiting angiotensin II synthesis. Angiotensin II is known to facilitate the effects of norepinephrine, which contributes to methamphetamine’s subjective effects. The lack of a classic dose-response function likely results from either nonspecific effects of perindopril or from between-group differences that were not accounted for in the current study (i.e., genetic variations and/or caffeine use). The current findings suggest that while angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors can reduce some effects produced by methamphetamine

  11. Frequency of Psychiatric Disorders in Children of Opioid or Methamphetamine-Dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Parvaresh, Noushin; Mazhari, Shahrzad; Nazari-Noghabi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background Addiction is one of the main problems of human societies, which is more common in developing countries. In addition, it causes to personal and social problems and family problem. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in children 5-15 years old of opioid or methamphetamine dependence patients. Methods For this study, three groups including: (1) children of parents addicted to opium, (2) children of parents addicted to methamphetamine, and (3) control group were examined. Child symptom inventory-4 (CSI-4) questionnaires completed by non-hospitalized guardian and control group; then make interviews with the children by the Kiddie-schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia (K-SADS). Data were analyzed by chi-square test and ANOVA. Findings Survey showed that the frequency of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, specific phobia (SP), and separation anxiety disorder in children of addicted parents were more than a non-addicted parent. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in the frequency of conduct disorder, social phobia, and oppositional defiant disorders (ODDs). Conclusion Parental addiction can lead to an increase in some psychiatric disorders in the children. Therefore follow-up, early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of these disorders in children of the drug-dependent parent are necessary to reduce health costs and improve the health system. PMID:26885350

  12. The impact of clinical and demographic variables on cognitive performance in methamphetamine-dependent individuals in rural South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Price, Kimber L; DeSantis, Stacia M; Simpson, Annie N; Tolliver, Bryan K; McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Saladin, Michael E; Baker, Nathaniel L; Wagner, Mark T; Brady, Kathleen T

    2011-01-01

    Inconsistencies in reports on methamphetamine (METH) associated cognitive dysfunction may be attributed, at least in part, to the diversity of study sample features (eg, clinical and demographic characteristics). The current study assessed cognitive function in a METH-dependent population from rural South Carolina, and the impact of demographic and clinical characteristics on performance. Seventy-one male (28.2%) and female (71.8%) METH-dependent subjects were administered a battery of neurocognitive tests including the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM), Shipley Institute of Living Scale, Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT), Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), Grooved Pegboard Test, California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT), and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Demographic and clinical characteristics (eg, gender, frequency of METH use) were examined as predictors of performance. Subjects scored significantly lower than expected on one test of attention and one of fine motor function, but performed adequately on all other tests. There were no predictors of performance on attention; however, more frequent METH use was associated with better performance for males and worse for females on fine motor skills. The METH-dependent individuals in this population exhibit very limited cognitive impairment. The marked differences in education, Intellectual Quotient (IQ), and gender in our sample when compared to the published literature may contribute to these findings. Characterization of the impact of clinical and/or demographic features on cognitive deficits could be important in guiding the development of treatment interventions.

  13. Methamphetamine and paranoia: the methamphetamine experience questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Leamon, Martin H; Flower, Keith; Salo, Ruth E; Nordahl, Thomas E; Kranzler, Henry R; Galloway, Gantt P

    2010-01-01

    Paranoia in methamphetamine (MA) users is not well characterized or understood. To investigate this phenomenon, we created the Methamphetamine Experience Questionnaire (MEQ), and tested its reliability and validity in assessing MA-induced paranoia. We administered the MEQ to 274 MA-dependent subjects. Of the total subjects, 45% (123) first experienced paranoia with MA use; 55% did not. Obtaining or using a weapon while paranoid was common (37% and 11% of subjects with MA-induced paranoia, respectively). Test-retest and inter-rater reliability for MA-induced paranoia showed substantial agreement (kappa = .77, p < .05 and kappa = .80, p < .05, respectively). First episodes of paranoia occurred more often with intravenous use of MA, and subsequent episodes at higher doses. There was modest correlation between paranoia on the MEQ and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) paranoid ideation scale (rho = .27, p < .05). As expected, there was a poor correlation between paranoia on the MEQ and the BSI depression scale (rho = .14, p = .07). The MEQ provides useful information on drug use variables that contribute to paranoia commonly associated with MA use. (Am J Addict 2010;00:1-14).

  14. Methamphetamine and Paranoia: The Methamphetamine Experience Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Leamon, Martin H.; Flower, Keith; Salo, Ruth E.; Nordahl, Thomas E.; Kranzler, Henry R.; Galloway, Gantt P.

    2011-01-01

    Paranoia in methamphetamine (MA) users is not well characterized or understood. To investigate this phenomenon, we created the Methamphetamine Experience Questionnaire (MEQ), and tested its reliability and validity in assessing MA-induced paranoia. METHODS: We administered the MEQ to 274 MA-dependent subjects. RESULTS: 45% (123) subjects first experienced paranoia with MA use; 55% did not. Obtaining or using a weapon while paranoid was common (37% and 11% of subjects with MA-induced paranoia, respectively). Test-retest and inter-rater reliability for MA-induced paranoia showed substantial agreement (kappa = 0.77, p < 0.05 and kappa = 0.80, p < 0.05, respectively). First episodes of paranoia occurred more often with intravenous use of MA, and subsequent episodes at higher doses. There was modest correlation between paranoia on the MEQ and the BSI paranoid ideation scale (rho = 0.27, p < 0.05). As expected, there was a poor correlation between paranoia on the MEQ and the BSI depression scale (rho = 0.14, p = 0.07). The MEQ provides useful information on drug use variables that contribute to paranoia commonly associated with MA use. PMID:20163388

  15. Evaluation of the effects of rivastigmine on cigarette smoking by methamphetamine-dependent volunteers.

    PubMed

    De la Garza, R; Yoon, J H

    2011-12-01

    Compared to smokers alone, smokers with co-morbid substance use disorders are at greater risk of suffering from smoking-related death. Despite this, relatively few studies have examined smoking cessation treatments for those with stimulant dependence. In the current study, we sought to evaluate the effects produced by short-term exposure to the cholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine (0, 3 or 6 mg) on cigarette smoking in non-treatment-seeking, methamphetamine-dependent volunteers. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study that took place over 9 days. The data indicate that rivastigmine treatment did not alter Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence scores, carbon monoxide readings, or cigarettes smoked per day, but a trend toward reduced urges to smoke (p<0.09) was detected during treatment with rivastigmine 3mg. These data, while preliminary, indicate that cholinesterase inhibitors warrant consideration as treatments for nicotine dependence, including use in stimulant-dependent individuals who exhibit significantly higher rates of smoking than the general population.

  16. Elevated intraindividual variability in methamphetamine dependence is associated with poorer everyday functioning.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Erin E; Doyle, Katie L; Minassian, Arpi; Henry, Brook L; Perry, William; Marcotte, Thomas D; Woods, Steven Paul; Grant, Igor

    2014-12-15

    Methamphetamine (MA) dependence is associated with executive dysfunction, but no studies have evaluated MA-related elevations in neurocognitive intraindividual variability (IIV), an expression of cognitive dyscontrol linked to poor daily functioning in populations with frontal systems injury. We examined IIV during a vigilance task in a well-characterized sample of 35 MA-dependent (MA+) and 55 non-MA using comparison participants (MA-) as part of a larger neuropsychological battery that included self-report and performance-based measures of everyday functioning. A mixed model ANOVA was conducted while controlling for covariates, including factors that differed between the groups (e.g., education) and those with conceptual relevance to IIV: mean reaction time, global cognitive performance, and HIV-infection (which was comparable across groups; p=0.32). This analysis revealed significantly elevated IIV among MA+ relative to MA- individuals that was comparable in magnitude across all trial blocks of the vigilance task. Within the MA group, elevated IIV was associated with executive dysfunction, psychomotor slowing, and recency of MA use, as well as poorer automobile driving simulator performance, worse laboratory-based functional skills, and more cognitive complaints. MA-users are vulnerable to IIV elevation, likely due to cognitive dyscontrol, which may increase their risk of real-world problems.

  17. Predictors of Attrition in a Cohort Study of HIV Infection and Methamphetamine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Cattie, J.; Marquine, M. J.; Bolden, K. A.; Obermeit, L. C.; Morgan, E. E.; Franklin, D. R.; Umlauf, A; Beck, J. M.; Atkinson, J. H.; Grant, I.; Woods, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal cohort studies of HIV and substance use disorders play an important role in understanding these conditions, but high rates of attrition can threaten their integrity and generalizability. This study aimed to identify factors associated with attrition in a 5-year observational cohort study of 469 individuals with and without HIV infection and methamphetamine (MA) dependence. Rates of attrition in our four study groups were approximately 24% in HIV-MA-, 15% in HIV+MA-, 56% in HIV-MA+, and 47% in HIV+MA+ individuals. Predictors of attrition in the overall cohort included history of MA, alcohol, and other substance dependence, learning impairment, reduced cognitive reserve, and independence in activities of daily living (all ps < .05), but varied somewhat by clinical group. Of particular note, enrollment in a neuroimaging substudy was associated with significantly boosted rates of retention in the MA groups. Results from this investigation highlight the complexity of the clinical factors that influence retention in cohort studies of HIV-infected MA users and might guide the development and implementation of targeted retention efforts. PMID:26752974

  18. Elevated intraindividual variability in methamphetamine dependence is associated with poorer everyday functioning

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Erin E.; Doyle, Katie L.; Minassian, Arpi; Henry, Brook; Perry, William; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Woods, Steven Paul; Grant, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) dependence is associated with executive dysfunction, but no studies have evaluated MA-related elevations in neurocognitive intraindividual variability (IIV), an expression of cognitive dyscontrol linked to poor daily functioning in populations with frontal systems injury. We examined IIV during a vigilance task in a well-characterized sample of 35 MA-dependent (MA+) and 55 non-MA using comparison participants (MA−) as part of a larger neuropsychological battery that included self-report and performance-based measures of everyday functioning. A mixed model ANOVA was conducted while controlling for covariates, including factors that differed between the groups (e.g., education) and those with conceptual relevance to IIV: mean reaction time, global cognitive performance, and HIV-infection (which was comparable across groups; p = .32). This analysis revealed significantly elevated IIV among MA+ relative to MA− individuals that was comparable in magnitude across all trial blocks of the vigilance task. Within the MA group, elevated IIV was associated with executive dysfunction, psychomotor slowing, and recency of MA use, as well as poorer automobile driving simulator performance, worse laboratory-based functional skills, and more cognitive complaints. MA-users are vulnerable to IIV elevation, likely due to cognitive dyscontrol, which may increase their risk of real-world problems. PMID:25081313

  19. Dynamic Indices of Methamphetamine Dependence and HIV Infection Predict Fluctuations in Affective Distress: A Five-year Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Jessica L.; Umlauf, Anya; Abramson, Ian; Badiee, Jayraan; Woods, Steven Paul; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine (METH) use and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are highly comorbid, and both are associated with increased prevalence of affective distress. Delineating the trajectory of affective distress in the context of METH dependence and HIV infection is important given the implications for everyday functional impairment, adverse health behaviors, and increased risk for adverse health outcomes. Methods We conducted a five-year longitudinal investigation involving 133 METH-dependent (74 HIV seropositive) and 163 non-METH-dependent (90 HIV seropositive) persons to examine both long-standing patterns and transient changes in affective distress. Mixed-effect regression models with random subject-specific slopes and intercepts evaluated the effect of METH dependence, HIV serostatus, and related variables on affective distress, as measured by the Profile of Mood States. Results Transient changes in affective distress were found to be greater among those with a diagnosis of current MDD, briefer durations of abstinence from METH, and higher quantity of METH consumed. Weak associations were observed among static (time-independent predictors) covariates and long-standing patterns in affective distress. Limitations Study lacked data pertaining to the participants’ involvement in METH treatment and relied on respondent-driven sampling. Conclusions Our longitudinal investigation of the trajectory of affective distress indicated that specific and dynamic indices of current METH use were associated with greater transient changes in mood. In the evaluation and treatment of affective distress, recency and quantity of current METH use are important to consider given their association with heightened affective distress and mood instability over time. PMID:24012068

  20. Neurofeedback Training as a New Method in Treatment of Crystal Methamphetamine Dependent Patients: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Rostami, R; Dehghani-Arani, F

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of neurofeedback (NFB) plus pharmacotherapy with pharmacotherapy alone, on addiction severity, mental health, and quality of life in crystal methamphetamine-dependent (CMD) patients. The study included 100 CMD patients undergoing a medical treatment who volunteered for this randomized controlled trial. After being evaluated by a battery of questionnaires that included addiction severity index questionnaire, Symptoms Check List 90 version, and World Health Organization Quality of Life, the participants were randomly assigned to an experimental or a control group. The experimental group received thirty 50-min sessions of NFB in addition to their usual medication over a 2-month period; meanwhile, the control group received only their usual medication. In accordance with this study's pre-test-post-test design, both study groups were evaluated again after completing their respective treatment regimens. Multivariate analysis of covariance showed the experimental group to have lower severity of addiction, better psychological health, and better quality of life in than the control group. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant. These finding suggest that NFB can be used to improve the effectiveness of treatment results in CMD patients.

  1. Involvement of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in methamphetamine-induced neural damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xufeng; Xing, Jingjing; Jiang, Lei; Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Yixin; Sun, Hao; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Hang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-11-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an illicit drug, is widely abused in many parts of the world. Mounting evidence shows that METH exposure contributes to neurotoxicity, particularly for the monoaminergic neurons. However, to date, only a few studies have tried to unravel the mechanisms involved in METH-induced non-monoaminergic neural damage. Therefore, in the present study, we tried to explore the mechanisms for METH-induced neural damage in cortical neurons. Our results showed that METH significantly increased intracellular [Ca(2) (+) ]i in Ca(2) (+) -containing solution rather than Ca(2) (+) -free solution. Moreover, METH also upregulated calmodulin (CaM) expression and activated CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Significantly, METH-induced neural damage can be partially retarded by CaM antagonist W7 as well as CaMKII blocker KN93. In addition, L-type Ca(2) (+) channel was also proved to be involved in METH-induced cell damage, as nifedipine, the L-type Ca(2) (+) channel-specific inhibitor, markedly attenuated METH-induced neural damage. Collectively, our results suggest that Ca(2) (+) -CaM-CaMKII is involved in METH-mediated neurotoxicity, and it might suggest a potential target for the development of therapeutic strategies for METH abuse. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Psychometric properties of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale in patients with gambling disorders, hypersexuality, and methamphetamine dependence.

    PubMed

    Reid, Rory C; Cyders, Melissa A; Moghaddam, Jacquelene F; Fong, Timothy W

    2014-11-01

    Although the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS; Patton, Stanford, & Barratt, 1995) is a widely-used self-report measure of impulsivity, there have been numerous questions about the invariance of the factor structure across clinical populations (Haden & Shiva, 2008, 2009; Ireland & Archer, 2008). The goal of this article is to examine the factor structure of the BIS among a sample consisting of three populations exhibiting addictive behaviors and impulsivity: pathological gamblers, hypersexual patients, and individuals seeking treatment for methamphetamine dependence to determine if modification to the existing factors might improve the psychometric properties of the BIS. The current study found that the factor structure of the BIS does not replicate in this sample and instead produces a 12-item three-factor solution consisting of motor-impulsiveness (5 items), non-planning impulsiveness (3 items), and immediacy impulsiveness (4 items). The clinical utility of the BIS in this population is questionable. The authors suggest future studies to investigate comparisons with this modified version of the BIS and other impulsivity scales such as the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale in clinical populations when assessing disposition toward rash action. PMID:24314714

  3. Methamphetamine: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... e.g., methylphenidate and amphetamines), as well as cocaine and methamphetamine. Tolerance: A condition in which higher ...

  4. Altered Statistical Learning and Decision-Making in Methamphetamine Dependence: Evidence from a Two-Armed Bandit Task.

    PubMed

    Harlé, Katia M; Zhang, Shunan; Schiff, Max; Mackey, Scott; Paulus, Martin P; Yu, Angela J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how humans weigh long-term and short-term goals is important for both basic cognitive science and clinical neuroscience, as substance users need to balance the appeal of an immediate high vs. the long-term goal of sobriety. We use a computational model to identify learning and decision-making abnormalities in methamphetamine-dependent individuals (MDI, n = 16) vs. healthy control subjects (HCS, n = 16), in a two-armed bandit task. In this task, subjects repeatedly choose between two arms with fixed but unknown reward rates. Each choice not only yields potential immediate reward but also information useful for long-term reward accumulation, thus pitting exploration against exploitation. We formalize the task as comprising a learning component, the updating of estimated reward rates based on ongoing observations, and a decision-making component, the choice among options based on current beliefs and uncertainties about reward rates. We model the learning component as iterative Bayesian inference (the Dynamic Belief Model), and the decision component using five competing decision policies: Win-stay/Lose-shift (WSLS), ε-Greedy, τ-Switch, Softmax, Knowledge Gradient. HCS and MDI significantly differ in how they learn about reward rates and use them to make decisions. HCS learn from past observations but weigh recent data more, and their decision policy is best fit as Softmax. MDI are more likely to follow the simple learning-independent policy of WSLS, and among MDI best fit by Softmax, they have more pessimistic prior beliefs about reward rates and are less likely to choose the option estimated to be most rewarding. Neurally, MDI's tendency to avoid the most rewarding option is associated with a lower gray matter volume of the thalamic dorsal lateral nucleus. More broadly, our work illustrates the ability of our computational framework to help reveal subtle learning and decision-making abnormalities in substance use. PMID:26733906

  5. Altered Statistical Learning and Decision-Making in Methamphetamine Dependence: Evidence from a Two-Armed Bandit Task

    PubMed Central

    Harlé, Katia M.; Zhang, Shunan; Schiff, Max; Mackey, Scott; Paulus, Martin P.; Yu, Angela J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how humans weigh long-term and short-term goals is important for both basic cognitive science and clinical neuroscience, as substance users need to balance the appeal of an immediate high vs. the long-term goal of sobriety. We use a computational model to identify learning and decision-making abnormalities in methamphetamine-dependent individuals (MDI, n = 16) vs. healthy control subjects (HCS, n = 16), in a two-armed bandit task. In this task, subjects repeatedly choose between two arms with fixed but unknown reward rates. Each choice not only yields potential immediate reward but also information useful for long-term reward accumulation, thus pitting exploration against exploitation. We formalize the task as comprising a learning component, the updating of estimated reward rates based on ongoing observations, and a decision-making component, the choice among options based on current beliefs and uncertainties about reward rates. We model the learning component as iterative Bayesian inference (the Dynamic Belief Model), and the decision component using five competing decision policies: Win-stay/Lose-shift (WSLS), ε-Greedy, τ-Switch, Softmax, Knowledge Gradient. HCS and MDI significantly differ in how they learn about reward rates and use them to make decisions. HCS learn from past observations but weigh recent data more, and their decision policy is best fit as Softmax. MDI are more likely to follow the simple learning-independent policy of WSLS, and among MDI best fit by Softmax, they have more pessimistic prior beliefs about reward rates and are less likely to choose the option estimated to be most rewarding. Neurally, MDI's tendency to avoid the most rewarding option is associated with a lower gray matter volume of the thalamic dorsal lateral nucleus. More broadly, our work illustrates the ability of our computational framework to help reveal subtle learning and decision-making abnormalities in substance use. PMID:26733906

  6. Altered Statistical Learning and Decision-Making in Methamphetamine Dependence: Evidence from a Two-Armed Bandit Task.

    PubMed

    Harlé, Katia M; Zhang, Shunan; Schiff, Max; Mackey, Scott; Paulus, Martin P; Yu, Angela J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how humans weigh long-term and short-term goals is important for both basic cognitive science and clinical neuroscience, as substance users need to balance the appeal of an immediate high vs. the long-term goal of sobriety. We use a computational model to identify learning and decision-making abnormalities in methamphetamine-dependent individuals (MDI, n = 16) vs. healthy control subjects (HCS, n = 16), in a two-armed bandit task. In this task, subjects repeatedly choose between two arms with fixed but unknown reward rates. Each choice not only yields potential immediate reward but also information useful for long-term reward accumulation, thus pitting exploration against exploitation. We formalize the task as comprising a learning component, the updating of estimated reward rates based on ongoing observations, and a decision-making component, the choice among options based on current beliefs and uncertainties about reward rates. We model the learning component as iterative Bayesian inference (the Dynamic Belief Model), and the decision component using five competing decision policies: Win-stay/Lose-shift (WSLS), ε-Greedy, τ-Switch, Softmax, Knowledge Gradient. HCS and MDI significantly differ in how they learn about reward rates and use them to make decisions. HCS learn from past observations but weigh recent data more, and their decision policy is best fit as Softmax. MDI are more likely to follow the simple learning-independent policy of WSLS, and among MDI best fit by Softmax, they have more pessimistic prior beliefs about reward rates and are less likely to choose the option estimated to be most rewarding. Neurally, MDI's tendency to avoid the most rewarding option is associated with a lower gray matter volume of the thalamic dorsal lateral nucleus. More broadly, our work illustrates the ability of our computational framework to help reveal subtle learning and decision-making abnormalities in substance use.

  7. The Effects of Naltrexone on Subjective Response to Methamphetamine in a Clinical Sample: a Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Laboratory Study.

    PubMed

    Ray, Lara A; Bujarski, Spencer; Courtney, Kelly E; Moallem, Nathasha R; Lunny, Katy; Roche, Daniel; Leventhal, Adam M; Shoptaw, Steve; Heinzerling, Keith; London, Edythe D; Miotto, Karen

    2015-09-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) use disorder is a serious psychiatric condition for which there are no FDA-approved medications. Naltrexone (NTX) is an opioid receptor antagonist with demonstrated efficacy, albeit moderate, for the treatment of alcoholism and opioid dependence. Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that NTX may be useful for the treatment of MA use disorder. To inform treatment development, we conducted a double-blind, randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled human laboratory study of NTX. Non-treatment-seeking individuals meeting DSM-IV criteria for MA abuse or dependence (n=30) completed two separate 5-day inpatient stays. During each admission, participants completed testing sessions comprised of MA cue-reactivity and intravenous MA administration (30 mg) after receiving oral NTX (50 mg) or placebo for 4 days. This study tested the hypotheses that NTX would (a) attenuate cue-induced MA craving, and (b) reduce subjective responses to MA administration. Results largely supported the study hypotheses such that (a) NTX significantly blunted cue-induced craving for MA and (b) attenuated several of the hedonic subjective effects of MA, including craving, during controlled MA administration and as compared with placebo. NTX decreased overall subjective ratings of 'crave drug,' 'stimulated,' and 'would like drug access,' decreased the the post-MA administration timecourse of 'anxious' and increased ratings of 'bad drug effects,' as compared with placebo. These findings support a potential mechanism of action by showing that NTX reduced cue-induced craving and subjective responses to MA. This is consistent with positive treatment studies of NTX for amphetamine dependence, as well as ongoing clinical trials for MA.

  8. Histamine h3 receptor antagonists potentiate methamphetamine self-administration and methamphetamine-induced accumbal dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Munzar, Patrik; Tanda, Gianluigi; Justinova, Zuzana; Goldberg, Steven R

    2004-04-01

    Methamphetamine administration increases brain levels of histamine and neuronal histamine attenuates several of methamphetamine's behavioral effects. The role of different subtypes of histamine receptors in this negative feedback, however, remains unclear. There is some evidence on possible involvement of histamine H3 receptors in these actions of methamphetamine. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of two histamine H3 receptor antagonists, clobenpropit and thioperamide, on rewarding and neurochemical effects of methamphetamine utilizing three in vivo methodologies, drug self-administration, drug discrimination, and microdialysis in Sprague-Dawley rats. In rats self-administering methamphetamine intravenously under a fixed-ratio schedule, presession treatment with thioperamide (1.0-3.0 mg/kg, subcutaneous, s.c.) or clobenpropit (1.0-3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) potentiated the reinforcing effects of methamphetamine, as indicated by a dose-dependent increase in responding for a low 0.03 mg/kg dose of methamphetamine, that by itself failed to maintain responding above saline substitution levels, and a decrease in responding for a higher 0.06 mg/kg training dose of methamphetamine. In contrast, neither thioperamide nor clobenpropit treatment increased responding during saline substitution. In other rats trained to discriminate intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 1.0 mg/kg methamphetamine from i.p. injection of saline, both thioperamide and clobenpropit (0.3-3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) dose dependently increased methamphetamine-appropriate responding when administered with a low 0.3 mg/kg i.p. dose of methamphetamine, which by itself produced predominantly saline-appropriate responding. However, thioperamide and clobenpropit produced only saline-appropriate responding when administered with saline vehicle. Finally, thioperamide and clobenpropit potentiated methamphetamine-induced elevations in extracellular dopamine levels in the shell of the nucleus accumbens, but did

  9. Acute, low-dose methamphetamine administration improves attention/information processing speed and working memory in methamphetamine-dependent individuals displaying poorer cognitive performance at baseline.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, James J; Jackson, Brian J; Kalechstein, Ari D; De La Garza, Richard; Newton, Thomas F

    2011-03-30

    Abstinent methamphetamine (Meth) dependent individuals demonstrate poorer performance on tests sensitive to attention/information processing speed, learning and memory, and working memory when compared to non-Meth dependent individuals. The poorer performance on these tests may contribute to the morbidity associated with Meth-dependence. In light of this, we sought to determine the effects of acute, low-dose Meth administration on attention, working memory, and verbal learning and memory in 19 non-treatment seeking, Meth-dependent individuals. Participants were predominantly male (89%), Caucasian (63%), and cigarette smokers (63%). Following a four day, drug-free washout period, participants were given a single-blind intravenous infusion of saline, followed the next day by 30 mg of Meth. A battery of neurocognitive tasks was administered before and after each infusion, and performance on measures of accuracy and reaction time were compared between conditions. While acute Meth exposure did not affect test performance for the entire sample, participants who demonstrated relatively poor performance on these tests at baseline, identified using a median split on each test, showed significant improvement on measures of attention/information processing speed and working memory when administered Meth. Improved performance was seen on the following measures of working memory: choice reaction time task (p≤0.04), a 1-back task (p≤0.01), and a 2-back task (p≤0.04). In addition, those participants demonstrating high neurocognitive performance at baseline experienced similar or decreased performance following Meth exposure. These findings suggest that acute administration of Meth may temporarily improve Meth-associated neurocognitive performance in those individuals experiencing lower cognitive performance at baseline. As a result, stimulants may serve as a successful treatment for improving cognitive functioning in those Meth-dependent individuals experiencing

  10. Personality Characteristics of Adolescents with Hallucinogen, Methamphetamine, and Cannabis Dependence: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Glen A.; Daiss, Doyle D.

    2005-01-01

    A comparison of personality factors on scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) was conducted with a sample of adolescents referred to a residential substance abuse treatment program. A total of sixty adolescents identified with hallucinogen (n = 20), cannabis (n = 20), or methamphetamine (n = 20) as their drug…

  11. Methamphetamine Use Among Iranian Heroin Kerack-Dependent Women: Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alam Mehrjerdi, Zahra; Abarashi, Zohreh; Mansoori, Sahar; Deylamizadeh, Abbas; Salehi Fadardi, Javad; Noroozi, Alireza; Zarghami, Mehran

    2013-01-01

    Background Co-use of heroin kerack with methamphetamine (MA) is a new epidemic health concern among Iranian female drug users. Yet, little is known about this issue because of stigma. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate the reasons associated with initial and continued co-use of heroin kerack with MA among two groups of regular and recreational female co-users, their motivations associated with treatment entry and to compare their general characteristics at a drop in center (DIC) in Tehran. Materials and Methods 82 clients were randomly recruited. A researcher-designed questionnaire was used to collect data. Data was analyzed by performing descriptive statistics, the Chi-square test and t-test. Results The mean age of the participants were 31 (SD = 8) years. Reducing negative affect (55%), addicted family and social networks (50%), curiosity (48%), and the lack of knowledge on addictive effects of co-use of heroin kerack with MA (32%) were the most frequently reported reasons at initiation. Drug dependence (71%) and drug availability (56%) were reasons of continued co-use. Restoring health (61%), fear from becoming MA abuser only (33%), and fear from making a transition from heroin kerack and MA smoking to injection (15%) were important motivations for treatment entry. Regular co-users were more likely to be single (41.7% vs. 14.7%, P < 0.001), jobless (45.8% vs. 38.2, P < 0.05), homemaker (50% vs. 35.3%, P < 0.01), recently incarcerated (16.7% vs. 11.7%, P < 0.01), and were less likely to be enrolled in opioid replacement programs (33.5% vs. 41%, P < 0.01). Regular co-users were younger (30.6 vs. 32.1 years, P < 0.05), less educated (9.6 vs. 10.8 years, P < 0.05) and had a longer duration of drug dependence (9.6 vs. 8 years, P < 0.05). Conclusions Reasons associated with initial and continued co-use of heroin kerack with MA, factors associated with treatment entry and the differences between regular and recreational co-users should be specifically

  12. The Effects of BDNF Val66Met Gene Polymorphism on Serum BDNF and Cognitive Function in Methamphetamine-Dependent Patients and Normal Controls: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Su, Hang; Tao, Jingyan; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Ying; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Yu; Han, Bin; Lu, Yuling; Sun, Haiwei; Wei, Youdan; Zou, Shengzhen; Wu, Wenxiu; Zhang, Jiajia; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Xiangyang; He, Jincai

    2015-10-01

    Studies suggest that a functional polymorphism of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF Val66Met) may contribute to methamphetamine dependence. We hypothesized that this polymorphism had a role in cognitive deficits in methamphetamine-dependent patients and in the relationship of serum BDNF with cognitive impairments. We conducted a case-control study by assessing 194 methamphetamine-dependent patients and 378 healthy volunteers without history of drug use on the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) and the presence of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and serum BDNF levels. We showed no significant differences in genotype and allele distributions between the methamphetamine-dependent patients and controls. Some aspects of cognitive function significantly differed in the 2 groups. The serum BDNF levels in methamphetamine-dependent patients were significantly higher than those of the healthy controls. In the patients, partial correlation analysis showed a significant positive correlation between serum BDNF and the delayed memory index score. The RBANS scores showed statistically significant BDNF level × genotype interaction. Further regression analyses showed a significant positive association between BDNF levels and the RBANS total score, immediate memory or attention index among Val homozygote patients, whereas a significant negative association of BDNF levels with the RBANS total score, visuospatial/constructional, or language index was found among Met/Val heterozygous patients. We demonstrated significant impairment on some aspects of cognitive function and increased BDNF levels in methamphetamine-dependent patients as well as genotypic differences in the relationships between BDNF levels and RBANS scores on the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism only in these patients.

  13. Time-Dependent Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Decline During Methamphetamine Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenwei; Tao, Jingyan; Wei, Youdan; Su, Hang; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Ying; Guo, Jun; Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hailing; He, Jincai

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused illegal psychostimulant, which is confirmed to be neurotoxic and of great damage to human. Studies on the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in human METH addicts are limited and inconsistent. The purposes of this study are to compare the serum BDNF levels between METH addicts and healthy controls during early withdrawal, and explore the changes of serum BDNF levels during the first month after METH withdrawal.179 METH addicts and 90 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were recruited in this study. We measured serum BDNF levels at baseline (both METH addicts and healthy controls) and at 1 month after abstinence of METH (METH addicts only).Serum BDNF levels of METH addicts at baseline were significantly higher than controls (1460.28  ±  490.69 vs 1241.27  ±  335.52  pg/mL; F = 14.51, P < 0.001). The serum BDNF levels of 40 METH addicts were re-examined after 1 month of METH abstinence, which were significantly lower than that at baseline (1363.70  ±  580.59 vs 1621.41  ±  591.07  pg/mL; t = 2.26, P = .03), but showed no differences to the controls (1363.70  ±  580.59 vs 1241.27  ±  335.52  pg/mL; F = 2.29, P = 0.13).Our study demonstrated that serum BDNF levels were higher in METH addicts than controls during early withdrawal, and were time dependent decreased during the first month of abstinence. These findings may provide further evidence that increased serum BDNF levels may be associated with the pathophysiology of METH addiction and withdrawal and may be a protective response against the subsequent METH-induced neurotoxicity. Besides, these findings may also promote the development of medicine in the treatment of METH addiction and withdrawal.

  14. Time-Dependent Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Decline During Methamphetamine Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenwei; Tao, Jingyan; Wei, Youdan; Su, Hang; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Ying; Guo, Jun; Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hailing; He, Jincai

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused illegal psychostimulant, which is confirmed to be neurotoxic and of great damage to human. Studies on the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in human METH addicts are limited and inconsistent. The purposes of this study are to compare the serum BDNF levels between METH addicts and healthy controls during early withdrawal, and explore the changes of serum BDNF levels during the first month after METH withdrawal.179 METH addicts and 90 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were recruited in this study. We measured serum BDNF levels at baseline (both METH addicts and healthy controls) and at 1 month after abstinence of METH (METH addicts only).Serum BDNF levels of METH addicts at baseline were significantly higher than controls (1460.28  ±  490.69 vs 1241.27  ±  335.52  pg/mL; F = 14.51, P < 0.001). The serum BDNF levels of 40 METH addicts were re-examined after 1 month of METH abstinence, which were significantly lower than that at baseline (1363.70  ±  580.59 vs 1621.41  ±  591.07  pg/mL; t = 2.26, P = .03), but showed no differences to the controls (1363.70  ±  580.59 vs 1241.27  ±  335.52  pg/mL; F = 2.29, P = 0.13).Our study demonstrated that serum BDNF levels were higher in METH addicts than controls during early withdrawal, and were time dependent decreased during the first month of abstinence. These findings may provide further evidence that increased serum BDNF levels may be associated with the pathophysiology of METH addiction and withdrawal and may be a protective response against the subsequent METH-induced neurotoxicity. Besides, these findings may also promote the development of medicine in the treatment of METH addiction and withdrawal. PMID:26844469

  15. Time-Dependent Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Decline During Methamphetamine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenwei; Tao, Jingyan; Wei, Youdan; Su, Hang; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Ying; Guo, Jun; Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hailing; He, Jincai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused illegal psychostimulant, which is confirmed to be neurotoxic and of great damage to human. Studies on the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in human METH addicts are limited and inconsistent. The purposes of this study are to compare the serum BDNF levels between METH addicts and healthy controls during early withdrawal, and explore the changes of serum BDNF levels during the first month after METH withdrawal. 179 METH addicts and 90 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were recruited in this study. We measured serum BDNF levels at baseline (both METH addicts and healthy controls) and at 1 month after abstinence of METH (METH addicts only). Serum BDNF levels of METH addicts at baseline were significantly higher than controls (1460.28 ± 490.69 vs 1241.27 ± 335.52 pg/mL; F = 14.51, P < 0.001). The serum BDNF levels of 40 METH addicts were re-examined after 1 month of METH abstinence, which were significantly lower than that at baseline (1363.70 ± 580.59 vs 1621.41 ± 591.07 pg/mL; t = 2.26, P = .03), but showed no differences to the controls (1363.70 ± 580.59 vs 1241.27 ± 335.52 pg/mL; F = 2.29, P = 0.13). Our study demonstrated that serum BDNF levels were higher in METH addicts than controls during early withdrawal, and were time dependent decreased during the first month of abstinence. These findings may provide further evidence that increased serum BDNF levels may be associated with the pathophysiology of METH addiction and withdrawal and may be a protective response against the subsequent METH-induced neurotoxicity. Besides, these findings may also promote the development of medicine in the treatment of METH addiction and withdrawal. PMID:26844469

  16. Relationship between discriminative stimulus effects and plasma methamphetamine and amphetamine levels of intramuscular methamphetamine in male rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Smith, Douglas A; Kisor, David F; Poklis, Justin L

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine is a globally abused drug that is metabolized to amphetamine, which also produces abuse-related behavioral effects. However, the contributing role of methamphetamine metabolism to amphetamine in methamphetamine's abuse-related subjective effects is unknown. This preclinical study was designed to determine 1) the relationship between plasma methamphetamine levels and methamphetamine discriminative stimulus effects and 2) the contribution of the methamphetamine metabolite amphetamine in the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine in rhesus monkeys. Adult male rhesus monkeys (n=3) were trained to discriminate 0.18mg/kg intramuscular (+)-methamphetamine from saline in a two-key food-reinforced discrimination procedure. Time course of saline, (+)-methamphetamine (0.032-0.32mg/kg), and (+)-amphetamine (0.032-0.32mg/kg) discriminative stimulus effects were determined. Parallel pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in the same monkeys to determine plasma methamphetamine and amphetamine levels after methamphetamine administration and amphetamine levels after amphetamine administration for correlation with behavior in the discrimination procedure. Both methamphetamine and amphetamine produced full, ≥90%, methamphetamine-like discriminative stimulus effects. Amphetamine displayed a slightly, but significantly, longer duration of action than methamphetamine in the discrimination procedure. Both methamphetamine and amphetamine behavioral effects were related to methamphetamine and amphetamine plasma levels by a clockwise hysteresis loop indicating acute tolerance had developed to the discriminative stimulus effects. Furthermore, amphetamine levels after methamphetamine administration were absent when methamphetamine stimulus effects were greatest and peaked when methamphetamine discriminative stimulus effects returned to saline-like levels. Overall, these results demonstrate the methamphetamine metabolite amphetamine does not contribute to

  17. Methamphetamine induces the release of endothelin.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Woo; Jones, Susan M; Hostetter, Trisha A; Iliff, Jeffrey J; West, G Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine is a potent psychostimulant drug of abuse that increases release and blocks reuptake of dopamine, producing intense euphoria, factors that may contribute to its widespread abuse. It also produces severe neurotoxicity resulting from oxidative stress, DNA damage, blood-brain barrier disruption, microgliosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Intracerebral hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke have been reported after intravenous and oral abuse of methamphetamine. Several studies have shown that methamphetamine causes vasoconstriction of vessels. This study investigates the effect of methamphetamine on endothelin-1 (ET-1) release in mouse brain endothelial cells by ELISA. ET-1 transcription as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and transcription were measured following methamphetamine treatment. We also examine the effect of methamphetamine on isolated cerebral arteriolar vessels from C57BL/6 mice. Penetrating middle cerebral arterioles were cannulated at both ends with a micropipette system. Methamphetamine was applied extraluminally, and the vascular response was investigated. Methamphetamine treatment of mouse brain endothelial cells resulted in ET-1 release and a transient increase in ET-1 message. The activity and transcription of eNOS were only slightly enhanced after 24 hr of treatment with methamphetamine. In addition, methamphetamine caused significant vasoconstriction of isolated mouse intracerebral arterioles. The vasoconstrictive effect of methamphetamine was attenuated by coapplication of the endothelin receptor antagonist PD145065. These findings suggest that vasoconstriction induced by methamphetamine is mediated through the endothelin receptor and may involve an endothelin-dependent pathway.

  18. Methamphetamine psychosis: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    Glasner-Edwards, Suzette; Mooney, Larissa J

    2014-12-01

    Psychotic symptoms and syndromes are frequently experienced among individuals who use methamphetamine, with recent estimates of up to approximately 40 % of users affected. Although transient in a large proportion of users, acute symptoms can include agitation, violence, and delusions, and may require management in an inpatient psychiatric or other crisis intervention setting. In a subset of individuals, psychosis can recur and persist and may be difficult to distinguish from a primary psychotic disorder such as schizophrenia. Differential diagnosis of primary vs. substance-induced psychotic disorders among methamphetamine users is challenging; nevertheless, with careful assessment of the temporal relationship of symptoms to methamphetamine use, aided by state-of-the art psychodiagnostic assessment instruments and use of objective indicators of recent substance use (i.e., urine toxicology assays), coupled with collateral clinical data gathered from the family or others close to the individual, diagnostic accuracy can be optimized and the individual can be appropriately matched to a plan of treatment. The pharmacological treatment of acute methamphetamine-induced psychosis may include the use of antipsychotic medications as well as benzodiazepines, although symptoms may resolve without pharmacological treatment if the user is able to achieve a period of abstinence from methamphetamine. Importantly, psychosocial treatment for methamphetamine dependence has a strong evidence base and is the optimal first-line treatment approach to reducing rates of psychosis among individuals who use methamphetamines. Prevention of methamphetamine relapse is the most direct means of preventing recurrence of psychotic symptoms and syndromes. Long-term management of individuals presenting with recurrent and persistent psychosis, even in the absence of methamphetamine use, may include both behavioral treatment to prevent resumption of methamphetamine use and pharmacological treatment

  19. Methamphetamine psychosis: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    Glasner-Edwards, Suzette; Mooney, Larissa J

    2014-12-01

    Psychotic symptoms and syndromes are frequently experienced among individuals who use methamphetamine, with recent estimates of up to approximately 40 % of users affected. Although transient in a large proportion of users, acute symptoms can include agitation, violence, and delusions, and may require management in an inpatient psychiatric or other crisis intervention setting. In a subset of individuals, psychosis can recur and persist and may be difficult to distinguish from a primary psychotic disorder such as schizophrenia. Differential diagnosis of primary vs. substance-induced psychotic disorders among methamphetamine users is challenging; nevertheless, with careful assessment of the temporal relationship of symptoms to methamphetamine use, aided by state-of-the art psychodiagnostic assessment instruments and use of objective indicators of recent substance use (i.e., urine toxicology assays), coupled with collateral clinical data gathered from the family or others close to the individual, diagnostic accuracy can be optimized and the individual can be appropriately matched to a plan of treatment. The pharmacological treatment of acute methamphetamine-induced psychosis may include the use of antipsychotic medications as well as benzodiazepines, although symptoms may resolve without pharmacological treatment if the user is able to achieve a period of abstinence from methamphetamine. Importantly, psychosocial treatment for methamphetamine dependence has a strong evidence base and is the optimal first-line treatment approach to reducing rates of psychosis among individuals who use methamphetamines. Prevention of methamphetamine relapse is the most direct means of preventing recurrence of psychotic symptoms and syndromes. Long-term management of individuals presenting with recurrent and persistent psychosis, even in the absence of methamphetamine use, may include both behavioral treatment to prevent resumption of methamphetamine use and pharmacological treatment

  20. Methamphetamine Psychosis: Epidemiology and Management

    PubMed Central

    Glasner-Edwards, Suzette; Mooney, Larissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms and syndromes are frequently experienced among individuals who use methamphetamine, with recent estimates of up to approximately 40% of users affected. Though transient in a large proportion of users, acute symptoms can include agitation, violence, and delusions, and may require management in an inpatient psychiatric or other crisis intervention setting. In a subset of individuals, psychosis can recur and persist and may be difficult to distinguish from a primary psychotic disorder such as schizophrenia. Differential diagnosis of primary versus substance-induced psychotic disorders among methamphetamine users is challenging; nevertheless, with careful assessment of the temporal relationship of symptoms to methamphetamine use, aided by state-of-the art psychodiagnostic assessment instruments and use of objective indicators of recent substance use (i.e., urine toxicology assays), coupled with collateral clinical data gathered from the family or others close to the individual, diagnostic accuracy can be optimized and the individual can be appropriately matched to a plan of treatment. The pharmacological treatment of acute methamphetamine-induced psychosis may include the use of antipsychotic medications as well as benzodiazepines, although symptoms may resolve without pharmacological treatment if the user is able to achieve a period of abstinence from methamphetamine. Importantly, psychosocial treatment for methamphetamine dependence has a strong evidence base and is the optimal first-line treatment approach to reducing rates of psychosis among individuals who use methamphetamines. Prevention of methamphetamine relapse is the most direct means of preventing recurrence of psychotic symptoms and syndromes. Long-term management of individuals who present with recurrent and persistent psychosis, even in the absence of methamphetamine use, may include both behavioral treatment to prevent resumption of methamphetamine use and pharmacological treatment

  1. Impact of prospectively-determined A118G polymorphism on treatment response to injectable naltrexone among methamphetamine-dependent patients: An open-label, pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Reshmi; Mendelson, John E.; Flower, Keith; Garrison, Kathleen; Yount, Garret; Coyle, Jeremy R.; Galloway, Gantt P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Methamphetamine (MA) addiction has no known effective pharmacotherapy. Small trials showed beneficial effects for oral naltrexone in amphetamine users. Trials in alcohol dependent subjects showed better response in persons with the A118G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the µ-opioid receptor. We conducted a pharmacogenetic trial of sustained release intramuscular naltrexone to examine the role of the A118G SNP in MA dependence. Method All eligible A118G subjects screened were enrolled; an equal number of wild type (A118A) subjects were selected using modified urn randomization, balanced on gender and frequency of recent MA use. Enrolled subjects received a single 380 mg naltrexone injection and weekly psychotherapy for four weeks. Self-report of MA use and urine toxicology for MA was assessed twice weekly. Urine samples with <1,000 ng/mL of MA were considered negative. Results Eleven A118G and 11 A118A subjects were enrolled. There were no significant differences between the groups in days of abstinence from MA use (11.5 v. 14.8, respectively, p = 0.51), number of MA-negative urine samples (1.7 v. 1.8, respectively, p = 0.97), consecutive MA-negative urine samples (1.0 v. 1.5, respectively, p = 0.91), or number of MA-negative urine samples before first relapse (0.9 v. 1.5, respectively, p = 0.86). Conclusions Although A118G polymorphism has been shown to be associated with improved treatment response to naltrexone among alcoholics, whether this polymorphism impacts naltrexone treatment response among MA users is unclear at this time. PMID:25622123

  2. Methamphetamine (Meth)

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects, similar to those of other stimulants like cocaine. These include: Feeling very awake and active Fast ... Methamphetamine is a stimulant, with effects similar to cocaine, but longer-lasting. It does not cause illness ...

  3. [Methamphetamine, cannabis].

    PubMed

    Naruse, Nobuya

    2015-09-01

    The persons with marijuana abuse tend to be increasing in Japan, although illegal drugs use in lifetime is remarkably lower than other advanced countries, Europe and USA. In addition, there have been many methamphetamine users in Japan. As use of methamphetamine induces psychotic states, we recognize them as one of the key illegal drugs for clinical psychiatrists. Regarding to diagnosis of methamphetamine psychosis, there is a large difference between Japanese psychiatrists and other advanced countries' ones. The former considers that they have persistent symptoms. In contrast, the latter embraces it as the model of acute toxicosis. The Japanese government has been based on a full commitment to the crackdown on drug problems. However, they will execute the new law in 2016, in which some persons charged with violating the methamphetamine control law will be adapted to partially probation on drug charges. Then, we have to improve our therapeutic and recovery supports to charged illegal drug users as rapidly as possible.

  4. The cortisol level and its relationship with depression, stress and anxiety indices in chronic methamphetamine-dependent patients and normal individuals undergoing inguinal hernia surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pirnia, Bijan; Givi, Fatemeh; Roshan, Rasool; Pirnia, Kambiz; Soleimani, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stimulants addition and abuse can cause some functional and morphological changes in the normal function of glands and hormones. Methamphetamine as an addictive stimulant drug affects the Hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and consequently makes some changes in the psychological state of the drug users. The present study aims to examine the relationship between plasma levels of cortisol with depression, stress and anxiety symptoms in chronic methamphetamine-dependent patients and normal individuals who have undergone the inguinal hernia surgery. Methods: To meet the purpose of the study, 35 chronic methamphetamine-dependent patients in the active phase of drug abuse and 35 non-users (N=70) who were homogenized regarding the demographic features were purposefully selected from among the patients referred to undergo inguinal hernia surgery since March 15 to June 9, 2015. The participants were then divided into the control and experiment group. The changes in cortisol levels in plasma were measured using Radioimmunoassay (RIA) in three-time series including 0 (upon the induction of anesthesia), 12 and 24 hours after the surgery. Further, three behavioral indices of depression, anxiety and stress were measured using the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21 (DASS-21) and then the data were analyzed using t-test and Pearson Correlation coefficient. Results: The plasma level of cortisol in the chronic methamphetamine-dependent patients (experiment group) had a significant increase in 24 hours after surgery (p<0.05). This study showed that cortisol levels in chronic methamphetamine-dependent patients were significantly higher than non-dependent patients in response to alarming events such as inguinal surgery. Changes in cortisol levels were intensified due to a confrontation with the phenomenon of pain and anxiety. In addition, depression index was higher in the chronic methamphetaminedependent patients than that in the non-dependent patients. However

  5. The analysis of BDNF gene polymorphism haplotypes and impulsivity in methamphetamine abusers.

    PubMed

    Su, Hang; Tao, Jingyan; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Ying; Han, Bin; Lu, Yuling; Sun, Haiwei; Wei, Youdan; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Yu; Zou, Shengzhen; Wu, Wenxiu; Zhang, Jiajia; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Xiangyang; He, Jincai

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of evidence showed that genetic factors might contribute to drug abuse vulnerability. Data from genetic scans in humans suggest that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophic factor family, may be associated with substance abuse or dependence. To test the hypothesis that the BDNF gene polymorphism is involved in methamphetamine abuse, we compared three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs16917204, rs16917234, and rs2030324) of the BDNF gene in 200 methamphetamine abusers and 219 healthy individuals. We also considered the association of these polymorphisms with impulsivity in methamphetamine abusers using Barratt Impulsivity Scale-11(BIS-11) Chinese version. Individual SNP analysis showed no significant differences in genotype and allele distributions between the methamphetamine abusers and controls. Haplotype analysis of rs16917204-rs16917234-rs2030324 revealed that a major C-C-T haplotype was significantly associated a lower odds of methamphetamine abuse, even after Bonferroni correction. Within the methamphetamine-abuse group, subjects carrying the T allele of rs2030324 genotype had significantly higher motor impulsivity scores of BIS compared to those with the C/C genotype. Our findings suggest that the BDNF gene polymorphism may contribute to the impulsivity in methamphetamine abusers.

  6. Sex- and dose-dependency in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of (+)-methamphetamine and its metabolite (+)-amphetamine in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Milesi-Halle, Alessandra; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Gentry, W. Brooks; Owens, S. Michael . E-mail: mowens@uams.edu

    2005-12-15

    These studies investigated how (+)-methamphetamine (METH) dose and rat sex affect the pharmacological response to METH in Sprague-Dawley rats. The first set of experiments determined the pharmacokinetics of METH and its pharmacologically active metabolite (+)-amphetamine (AMP) in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats after 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg METH doses. The results showed significant sex-dependent changes in METH pharmacokinetics, and females formed significantly lower amounts of AMP. While the area under the serum concentration-time curve in males increased proportionately with the METH dose, the females showed a disproportional increase. The sex differences in systemic clearance, renal clearance, volume of distribution, and percentage of unchanged METH eliminated in the urine suggested dose-dependent pharmacokinetics in female rats. The second set of studies sought to determine the behavioral implications of these pharmacokinetic differences by quantifying locomotor activity in male and female rats after saline, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg METH. The results showed sex- and dose-dependent differences in METH-induced locomotion, including profound differences in the temporal profile of effects at higher dose. These findings show that the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile of METH (slower METH clearance and lower AMP metabolite formation) plays a significant role in the differential pharmacological response to METH in male and female rats.

  7. Fronto-temporal alterations and affect regulation in methamphetamine dependence with and without a history of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, Anne; Fouche, Jean-Paul; Koen, Nastassja; Meintjes, Ernesta M; Wilson, Don; Stein, Dan J

    2016-02-28

    Methamphetamine (MA) has been shown to have neurotoxic effects associated with brain structure changes and schizophrenia-like psychotic symptoms. Although these abnormalities may in turn be related to cognitive impairment and increased aggression, their association with affect dysregulation is less well studied. We investigated cortical thickness and subcortical volumes in 21 participants with MA dependence, 19 patients with MA-associated psychosis (MAP), and 19 healthy controls. Participants' affect regulation abilities were assessed through self-report scales on emotion reactivity (ERS) and difficulties in emotion regulation (DERS) and correlated with differences in cortical thickness. MAP patients showed thinner cortices in the fusiform and inferior temporal gyrus (ITG), orbitofrontal (OFC) and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and insula, compared to the MA group. MAP also showed significantly lower hippocampal volumes relative to MA and CTRL. Both clinical groups showed impairment in affect regulation, but only in MAP was this dysfunction associated with thinner cortices in ITG, OFC and IFG. Our findings suggest significant differences in cortical thickness in MA dependence with and without psychosis. Lower fronto-temporal cortical thickness and smaller hippocampal volumes in MAP are consistent with neuroimaging findings in other psychotic disorders, supporting the notion of MAP being a useful model of psychosis. PMID:26792587

  8. Fronto-temporal alterations and affect regulation in methamphetamine dependence with and without a history of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, Anne; Fouche, Jean-Paul; Koen, Nastassja; Meintjes, Ernesta M; Wilson, Don; Stein, Dan J

    2016-02-28

    Methamphetamine (MA) has been shown to have neurotoxic effects associated with brain structure changes and schizophrenia-like psychotic symptoms. Although these abnormalities may in turn be related to cognitive impairment and increased aggression, their association with affect dysregulation is less well studied. We investigated cortical thickness and subcortical volumes in 21 participants with MA dependence, 19 patients with MA-associated psychosis (MAP), and 19 healthy controls. Participants' affect regulation abilities were assessed through self-report scales on emotion reactivity (ERS) and difficulties in emotion regulation (DERS) and correlated with differences in cortical thickness. MAP patients showed thinner cortices in the fusiform and inferior temporal gyrus (ITG), orbitofrontal (OFC) and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and insula, compared to the MA group. MAP also showed significantly lower hippocampal volumes relative to MA and CTRL. Both clinical groups showed impairment in affect regulation, but only in MAP was this dysfunction associated with thinner cortices in ITG, OFC and IFG. Our findings suggest significant differences in cortical thickness in MA dependence with and without psychosis. Lower fronto-temporal cortical thickness and smaller hippocampal volumes in MAP are consistent with neuroimaging findings in other psychotic disorders, supporting the notion of MAP being a useful model of psychosis.

  9. The impact of exercise on depression and anxiety symptoms among abstinent methamphetamine-dependent individuals in a residential treatment setting

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Richard A.; Chudzynski, Joy; Gonzales, Rachel; Mooney, Larissa; Dickerson, Daniel; Ang, Alfonso; Dolezal, Brett; Cooper, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    Background This paper reports data from a study designed to determine the impact of an 8-week exercise program on depression and anxiety symptoms among newly abstinent methamphetamine (MA)-dependent individuals in residential treatment. Methods One hundred thirty-five MA-dependent individuals, newly enrolled in residential treatment, were randomly assigned to receive either a 3-times-per-week, 60-minute structured exercise program for 8 weeks (24 sessions) or an equivalent number of health education sessions. Using mixed-modeling repeated-measures regression, we examined changes in weekly total depression and anxiety scores as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory over the 8-week study period. Results Mean age of participants was 31.7 (SD = 6.9); 70.4% were male and 48% Latino. Analyses indicate a significant effect of exercise on reducing depression (β = −0.63, P = 0.001) and anxiety (β = −0.95, P = 0.001) symptoms (total scores) over the 8-week period compared to a health education control group. A significant dose interaction effect between session attendance and exercise was found as well on reducing depression (β = −0.61, P < 0.001) and anxiety symptoms (β = −0.22, P = 0.009) over time compared to the control group. Conclusions Results support the role of a structured exercise program as an effective intervention for improving symptoms of depression and anxiety associated with MA abstinence. PMID:25934458

  10. Differences in maternal behavior and development of their pups depend on the time of methamphetamine exposure during gestation period.

    PubMed

    Malinová-Ševčíková, M; Hrebíčková, I; Macúchová, E; Nová, E; Pometlová, M; Šlamberová, R

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the hypothesis that the extension of noxious effect of methamphetamine (MA) on maternal behavior and postnatal development on the pups may differ in dependence with time of application. Female rats were injected with MA (5 mg/kg) or saline during first (embryonic day (ED) 1-11) or second (ED 12-22) half of gestation. Our results demonstrated that MA exposure on ED 12-22 led to decreased birth weight and weight gained during lactation period relative to rats treated on ED 1-11. Both sexes treated prenatally with MA on ED 1-11 opened eyes earlier compared to animals treated on ED 12-22. As a matter of sensorimotor development application of MA on ED 1-11 impaired the righting reflex, while MA exposure on ED 12-22 impaired the performance of beam balance test in male rats. There were no differences in maternal behavior. Therefore, it seems that MA exposure in the first half of the gestation impaired the early sensorimotor development that is under control of the brain stem, while the MA exposure in the second half of gestation affected the beam balance performance that is dependent on the function of the cerebellum.

  11. Differences in extinction responding and reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking behavior between Fischer 344 and Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Kruzich, Paul J; Xi, Jinlei

    2006-03-01

    Fischer 344 (F344) and Lewis (LEW) rats differ in a number of self-administration behaviors. Whether or not these strains differ in methamphetamine-primed reinstatement of extinguished responding is unknown. F344 and LEW rats were trained to self-administer intravenous (i.v.) methamphetamine (0.06 mg/kg) during daily 2-h limited access sessions for 14 days. Following methamphetamine self-administration, subjects underwent a minimum of 6 extinction sessions where responding on the previously active lever resulted in no programmed consequences. Following extinction sessions, we evaluated strain and dose dependency of methamphetamine-primed (0.06, 0.12, or 0.24 mg/kg/i.v.) reinstatement of responding. All subjects received each dose once. Dosing order was determined by utilizing a within-subjects Latin square design. We found partial strain differences in daily methamphetamine self-administration. In addition, F344 rats responded significantly more during the first extinction session compared LEW rats. Last, the LEW rats demonstrated a heightened propensity to reinstate responding following methamphetamine priming injections compared to F344 rats. Our results suggest that genetic background influences differences in methamphetamine-seeking behaviors in rats.

  12. Methamphetamine-induced locomotor changes are dependent on age, dose and genotype.

    PubMed

    Good, Renee L; Radcliffe, Richard A

    2011-03-01

    Adolescence is a critical age for addiction formation as a large percentage of pathological drug-seeking behaviors manifest during this time. The extent to which the neurotoxic effects of drugs of abuse influence subsequent drug seeking behaviors and impulsivity is an understudied area of research. Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused drug that produces locomotor responses ranging from behavioral sensitization to tolerance, both of which are behaviors that may relate to risk of abuse. Here we investigated the effects of age, genotype, METH dose, including a neurotoxic dose, and METH metabolism on open-field activity (OFA) to gain insight into the complex disease of drug abuse. C57Bl/6 (B6), DBA/2 (D2), and 129S6SvEv/Tac (129) mouse strains were administered saline or either a high dose (4×5 mg/kg in 2 h intervals for 2 days) or low dose (2×1 mg/kg in 24 h intervals) METH pretreatment during adolescence (post natal day (PND) 40) or early adulthood (PND 80) followed by behavioral testing with a METH (1 mg/kg) or saline challenge 40 days later. Striatal concentrations of METH and AMPH were also determined. Significant findings include: 1) METH pretreated adolescent B6 mice displayed significant sensitization for horizontal locomotion due to high dose METH pretreatment; 2) METH pretreated B6 adults showed significant tolerance for the vertical activity measure caused by low dose METH pretreatment; 3) METH pretreated adult D2 mice exhibited significant sensitization for vertical activity induced by low dose METH pretreatment, and 4) 129 mice metabolized METH significantly faster than the B6 and D2 mice, but METH pretreatment did not alter metabolism. No significant behavioral responses to either METH pretreatment dose were observed for the D2 adolescent studies or either 129 age group. Our results highlight the importance of the interactions of age, strain and METH dose on locomotor behavioral outcomes.

  13. Mind Over Matter: Methamphetamine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Term(s): Teachers / NIDA Teaching Guide / Mind Over Matter Teaching Guide and Series / Methamphetamine Print Mind Over Matter: Methamphetamine (Meth) Order Free Publication in: English Spanish Download PDF 739.54 KB Methamphetamine comes in ...

  14. Differences in cortical activity between methamphetamine-dependent and healthy individuals performing a facial affect matching task.

    PubMed

    Payer, Doris E; Lieberman, Matthew D; Monterosso, John R; Xu, Jiansong; Fong, Timothy W; London, Edythe D

    2008-01-11

    As individuals who abuse methamphetamine (MA) often exhibit socially maladaptive behaviors such as violence and aggression, it is possible that they respond abnormally to social cues. To investigate this issue, we exposed 12 MA-dependent participants (abstinent 5-16 days) and 12 healthy comparison participants to fearful and angry faces while they performed an affect matching task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Although the groups did not differ in task performance, the healthy participants showed more task-related activity than the MA-dependent participants in a set of cortical regions consisting of the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), temporoparietal junction (TPJ), anterior and posterior temporal cortex, and fusiform gyrus in the right hemisphere, and the cuneus in the left hemisphere. In contrast, the MA-dependent participants showed more task-related activity than the healthy participants in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC). As expected, the task elicited activation of the amygdala in both groups; however, contrary to expectation, we found no difference between groups in this activation. Dorsal ACC hyperactivity, along with high self-ratings of hostility and interpersonal sensitivity in the MA-dependent group, suggest a hyper-sensitivity to socially threatening cues in the MA-dependent participants, while lower VLPFC activation could point to a deficit in integrating socio-emotional information and/or regulating this limbic hyperactivity. Additional activation differences in neural circuitry related to social cognition (TPJ, anterior, and posterior temporal cortex) suggest further socio-emotional deficits. Together, the results point to cortical abnormalities that could underlie the socially inappropriate behaviors often shown by individuals who abuse MA. PMID:17964741

  15. Do the effects of prenatal exposure and acute treatment of methamphetamine on anxiety vary depending on the animal model used?

    PubMed

    Šlamberová, Romana; Pometlová, Marie; Macúchová, Eva; Nohejlová, Kateryna; Stuchlík, Aleš; Valeš, Karel

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was an evaluation of prenatal exposure to acute methamphetamine (MA) treatment on manifestations of anxiety. Anxiety was evaluated in adult animals in three different experimental models: the Elevated plus-maze (EPM), Social interaction test (SIT) and Ultrasound vocalization (USV). Female rats were administered saline (S) or MA (5 mg/kg) daily throughout their entire gestation period. The male progeny, in adulthood, were administered with challenge dose of S or MA (1 mg/kg) prior to evaluation of anxiety. The study demonstrated that prenatal MA exposure increased the anxiogenic effect on evaluated behaviour patterns in the USV model and to a lesser degree in the EPM model. In addition, the acute MA challenge in adulthood decreased the time spent during social interaction suggesting an anxiogenic effect in the SIT model as well. On the other hand, some of the evaluated parameters (e.g. the number of head-dipping in the EPM and number of dropped boluses in the SIT) also suggest MA-induced anxiolytic effects. Sensitization to a MA challenge was apparent in several parameters of the EPM (e.g. increased number of entries to the closed arms, increased stretched attend postures and increased approach-avoid conflicts) and SIT (total social interaction and following). The present data demonstrate that prenatal MA exposure and adult challenge of the same drug have diverse effects on animal behaviour that depends on the type of anxiety model used.

  16. Total antioxidant capacity is significantly lower in cocaine-dependent and methamphetamine-dependent patients relative to normal controls: results from a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Jessica; Winhusen, Theresa; Storkson, Jayne; Lewis, Daniel; Pariza, Michael W.; Somoza, Eugene; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress can result in damage to the brain and other organs. To protect from oxidative damage, the human body possesses molecular defense systems, based on the activity of antioxidants, and enzymatic defense systems, including the enzymes catalase (CAT), superoxide-dismutase (SOD) and glutathione-peroxidase (GPx). While pre-clinical research has shown that stimulant use is associated with oxidative damage, oxidative stress and the antioxidant defense systems have not been evaluated in clinical samples of stimulant-dependent patients. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the link between stimulant dependence and oxidative stress. Methods Peripheral blood samples from 174 methamphetamine (n=48) and/or cocaine-dependent (n=126) participants as well as 30 normal control participants were analyzed for the enzyme activities of CAT, SOD and GPx in the erythrocytes, and the total antioxidant capacity and the malondialdehyde concentration in the plasma. Results We could show an association of stimulant dependence with a depletion of total antioxidant capacity to 54.6±4.7 %, which correlates with a reduced activity of the SOD to 71.3±0.03 % compared to healthy control participants (100 %). Conclusion Stimulant-dependent patients had significantly lower antioxidant capacity relative to controls, suggesting that they may be at greater risk for oxidative damage to the brain and other organs. PMID:25087849

  17. Functional and Structural Brain Changes Associated with Methamphetamine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Reem K.; Kydd, Rob R.; Russell, Bruce R.

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a potent psychostimulant drug whose abuse has become a global epidemic in recent years. Firstly, this review article briefly discusses the epidemiology and clinical pharmacology of methamphetamine dependence. Secondly, the article reviews relevant animal literature modeling methamphetamine dependence and discusses possible mechanisms of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. Thirdly, it provides a critical review of functional and structural neuroimaging studies in human MA abusers; including positron emission tomography (PET) and functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The effect of abstinence from methamphetamine, both short- and long-term within the context of these studies is also reviewed. PMID:24961256

  18. Midbrain functional connectivity and ventral striatal dopamine D2-type receptors: Link to impulsivity in methamphetamine users

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Milky; Okita, Kyoji; Morales, Angelica M.; Robertson, Chelsea; Dean, Andy C.; Ghahremani, Dara G.; Sabb, Fred; Mandelkern, Mark A.; Bilder, Robert M.; London, Edythe D.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulant use disorders are associated with deficits in striatal dopamine receptor availability, abnormalities in mesocorticolimbic resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC), and impulsivity. In methamphetamine-dependent research participants, impulsivity is correlated negatively with striatal D2-type receptor availability, and mesocorticolimbic RSFC is stronger than in controls. The extent to which these features of methamphetamine dependence are interrelated, however, is unknown. This question was addressed in two studies. In Study 1, 19 methamphetamine-dependent and 26 healthy control subjects underwent [18F]fallypride positron emission tomography to measure ventral striatal dopamine D2-type receptor availability, indexed by binding potential (BPND), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess mesocorticolimbic RSFC, using a midbrain seed. In Study 2, an independent sample of 20 methamphetamine-dependent and 18 control subjects completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale in addition to fMRI. Study 1 showed a significant group by ventral striatal BPND interaction effect on RSFC, reflecting a negative relationship between ventral striatal BPND and RSFC between midbrain and striatum, orbitofrontal cortex, and insula in methamphetamine-dependent participants but a positive relationship in the control group. In Study 2, an interaction of group with RSFC on impulsivity was observed. Methamphetamine-dependent participants users exhibited a positive relationship of midbrain RSFC to the left ventral striatum with cognitive impulsivity, whereas a negative relationship was observed in healthy controls. The results indicate that ventral striatal D2-type receptor signaling may affect system-level activity within the mesocorticolimbic system, providing a functional link that may help explain high impulsivity in methamphetamine-dependent individuals. PMID:26830141

  19. Effects of environmental enrichment during induction of methamphetamine dependence on the behavioral withdrawal symptoms in rats.

    PubMed

    Hajheidari, Samira; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein; Bigdeli, Imanollah

    2015-09-25

    This study was designed to examine the effect of environmental enrichment during METH administration on the behavioral withdrawal symptoms after drug abstinence in rats. Rats reared in standard (SE) or enriched environment (EE) during induction of METH dependence with bi-daily injections of METH (2mg/kg, at 12-h. intervals) for 14 days. Then, rats were evaluated for behavioral withdrawal symptoms, and also for anxiety (elevated plus maze-EPM) and depression (Forced swim test-FST) over a ten day period of abstinence. The results showed that stereotypic behaviors score and the number of rearing were significantly lower in METH/EE rats compared to the SE group during 1-4 days. Also, The METH/EE group exhibited more weight gain during 6-10 days of abstinence. The METH/EE rats exhibited lower levels of immobility after METH abstinence than control group in the FST. EE had no effect on anxiety-like behavior. This study showed that exposure to EE diminished the severity of withdrawal symptoms and depressive-like behavior during spontaneous withdrawal from METH.

  20. Research Reports: Methamphetamine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications » Research Reports » Methamphetamine » Letter from the Director Methamphetamine Email Facebook Twitter Letter from the Director The abuse of methamphetamine—a potent and highly addictive stimulant—remains an ...

  1. Amphetamine and methamphetamine have a direct and differential effect on BV2 microglia cells.

    PubMed

    Shanks, R A; Anderson, J R; Taylor, J R; Lloyd, S A

    2012-12-01

    A comparative analysis of the direct effects of amphetamine and methamphetamine exposure on BV2 microglia cells in the presence and absence of cellular debris was performed. A significant dose-dependent and treatment-dependent effect of amphetamine and methamphetamine on BV2 cells was demonstrated: methamphetamine, but not amphetamine, inhibited phagocytosis, and a differential regulation of cytokines was observed in response to amphetamine and methamphetamine.

  2. Correlates of shared methamphetamine injection among methamphetamine-injecting treatment seekers: the first report from Iran.

    PubMed

    Mehrjerdi, Zahra Alam; Abarashi, Zohreh; Noroozi, Alireza; Arshad, Leila; Zarghami, Mehran

    2014-05-01

    Shared methamphetamine injection is an emerging route of drug use among Iranian methamphetamine injectors. It is a primary vector for blood-borne infections. The aim of the current study is to determine the prevalence and correlates of shared methamphetamine injection in a sample of Iranian methamphetamine injecting treatment seekers in the south of Tehran. We surveyed male and female methamphetamine injectors at three drop-in centres and 18 drug-use community treatment programmes. Participants reported socio-demographic characteristics, drug use, high-risk behaviours, current status of viral infections and service use for drug treatment. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to test associations between participants' characteristics and shared methamphetamine injection. Overall, 209 clients were recruited; 90.9% were male; 52.6% reported current methamphetamine injection without any shared injection behaviour and 47.4% reported current shared methamphetamine injection. Shared methamphetamine injection was found to be primarily associated with living with sex partners (AOR 1.25, 95% CI 1.13-1.98), reporting ≥3 years of dependence on methamphetamine injection (AOR 1.61, 95% CI 1.27-2.12), injection with pre-filled syringes in the past 12 months (AOR 1.96, 95% CI 1.47-2.42), homosexual sex without condom use in the past 12 months (AOR 1.85, 95% CI 1.21-2.25), the paucity of NA group participation in the past 12 months (AOR 0.67, 95% CI 0.41-0.99), the paucity of attending psychotherapeutic sessions in the past 12 months (AOR 0.44, 95% CI 0.28-0.96) and positive hepatitis C status (AOR 1.98, 95% CI 1.67-2.83). Deeper exploration of the relationship between shared methamphetamine injection and sexual risk among Iranian methamphetamine injectors would benefit HIV/sexually transmitted infection prevention efforts. In addition, existing psychosocial interventions for methamphetamine-injecting population may need to be adapted to better meet the

  3. Potentiating effect of morphine upon d-methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia in mice. Effects of naloxone and haloperidol.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, M; Kohda, H; Hori, O; Hayashida, H; Kimura, H

    1990-06-01

    We have examined changes in rectal temperature of mice after subcutaneous administrations of d-methamphetamine alone or methamphetamine plus morphine. Methamphetamine 5 mg/kg produced slight hyperthermia, while simultaneous administration of morphine (25-100 mg/kg), which alone produces hypothermia, potentiated markedly the increase in body temperature by methamphetamine. Methamphetamine showed a hyperthermic effect in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of morphine. The hyperthermia due to methamphetamine plus morphine was avoided by pretreatment with 10 mg/kg naloxone. When animals were pretreated with 2.5 mg/kg haloperidol, hyperthermia due to methamphetamine alone was completely abolished, while that due to methamphetamine plus morphine was still observed. These results showed that dopamine may be implicated in methamphetamine hyperthermia and a haloperidol-nonsensitive mechanism may be involved in the methamphetamine-morphine hyperthermia.

  4. Estimating the intake of abused methamphetamines using experimenter-administered deuterium labeled R-methamphetamine: selection of the R-methamphetamine dose.

    PubMed

    Li, Linghui; Lopez, Juan Carlos; Galloway, Gantt P; Baggott, Matthew J; Everhart, Tom; Mendelson, John

    2010-08-01

    All addictive drugs produce tolerance and addicts compensate by increasing drug exposure. Thus, the quantity of illicit drug ingested is related to the severity of addiction. Unfortunately, there are no objective methods to estimate intake for most addictive drugs. Using experimenter-administered doses of deuterium-labeled R-methamphetamine (R-[-]-MA-d3), we have developed a method to estimate the amount of abused methamphetamine intake in addicts enrolled in clinical trials. This study assessed the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and tolerability of single oral doses of R-MA in healthy adults to select a dose of R-MA-d3 to be used as a biomarker for estimation the amount of methamphetamine abuse. This was a five-session randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced crossover study in eight subjects. Oral R-(-)-MA was dosed at 0 mg, 1 mg, 2.5 mg, 5 mg, or 10 mg; bioavailability was estimated by slow intravenous dosing (30 minutes) of 2.5 mg R-(-)-MA-d3 given with the 2.5 mg R-(-)-MA oral dose condition. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic measures were obtained. No serious adverse events occurred during the study and all doses of R-MA were well tolerated. Linear pharmacokinetics was observed within our oral dose range of 1 to 10 mg. Complete bioavailability and pharmacologic inactivity were found for all oral doses. These characteristics indicate the advantage of using a small oral R-(-)-MA-d3 dose as a biomarker to estimate exposure to abused methamphetamine. Based on these results, 5 mg R-(-)-MA-d3 has been selected as the biomarker dose in future studies. Preliminary findings from our study indicate that experimenter-administered oral R-(-)-MA-d3 may allow estimation of abused methamphetamine intake and exposure. Knowledge of the quantity of methamphetamine intake may allow better estimation of disease severity and treatment efficacy. Experience gained from this study also can be applied to the management of other drug dependence problems such as

  5. The Patients in Recovery (PIR) Perspective: Teaching Physicians about Methamphetamine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walley, Alexander Y.; Phillips, Karran A.; Gordon, Adam J.

    2008-01-01

    Methamphetamine dependence is an emerging epidemic confronting physicians. In an effort to improve understanding of its impact, the authors presented an educational workshop at a national meeting for general internists featuring small group discussions with patients in recovery (PIR) from methamphetamine dependence. Participants rated the workshop…

  6. Risky Decision-making: Prefrontal Function and Mesocorticolimbic Resting-state Connectivity in Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Milky; Morales, Angelica M.; Ghahremani, Dara G.; Hellemann, Gerhard; London, Edythe D.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Various neuropsychiatric disorders, especially addictions, feature impairments in risky decision-making; clarifying the neural mechanisms underlying this problem can inform treatment. Objective To determine how methamphetamine-dependent and control subjects differ in brain activation during a risky decision-making task, resting-state functional connectivity within mesolimbic and executive control circuits, and the relationships between these measures. Design A case-control, functional magnetic resonance imaging study of methamphetamine-dependent and healthy comparison participants at rest and when performing the Balloon Analogue Risk Task, which involves the choice to pump a balloon or to cash out in the context of uncertain risk. Setting Clinical research center at an academic institution. Participants Twenty-five methamphetamine-dependent and 27 control subjects. Main Outcomes and Measures 1) Parametric modulation of activation in the striatum and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, i.e., the degree to which activation changed as a linear function of risk and potential reward, both indexed by pump number; and 2) resting-state functional connectivity, measured in whole brain with seeds in the midbrain and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Relationships between these outcomes were also tested. Results Parametric modulation of cortical and striatal activation by pump number during risk-taking differed with group. It was stronger in the ventral striatum but weaker in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in methamphetamine-dependent participants than controls. Methamphetamine-dependent subjects also exhibited greater resting-state functional connectivity of the midbrain with the putamen, amygdala, and hippocampus. This connectivity was negatively related to modulation of right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation by risk level during risky decision-making. In controls, parametric modulation of right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation

  7. The beta-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone inhibits physical dependence and abstinence-induced withdrawal from cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, and clorazepate in planarians.

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Cavallo, Federica; Capasso, Anna; Ding, Zhe; Raffa, Robert B

    2008-04-28

    Ceftriaxone (a beta-lactam antibiotic) has recently been identified as having the rare ability to increase the expression and functional activity of the glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1) in rat spinal cord cultures. GLT-1 has been implicated in diverse neurological disorders and in opioid dependence and withdrawal. It has been speculated that it might also be involved in the physical dependence and withdrawal of other abused drugs, but demonstration of this property can be difficult in mammalian models. Here, we demonstrate for the first time using a planarian model that ceftriaxone attenuates both the development of physical dependence and abstinence-induced withdrawal from cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, and a benzodiazepine (clorazepate) in a concentration-related manner. These results suggest that physical dependence and withdrawal from several drugs involve a common - beta-lactam-sensitive - mechanism in planarians. If these findings can be shown to extend to mammals, beta-lactam antibiotics might represent a novel pharmacotherapy or adjunct approach for treating drug abuse or serve as a template for drug discovery efforts aimed at treating drug abuse, recovery from drug abuse, or ameliorating the withdrawal from chronic use of therapeutic medications.

  8. Agmatine attenuates methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Thorn, David A; Winter, Jerrold C; Li, Jun-Xu

    2012-04-01

    The polyamine agmatine modulates a variety of behavioral effects including the abuse-related effects of opioids and has been proposed as a potential medication candidate for the treatment of opioid abuse. However, little is known of the effects of agmatine on the abuse-related effects of other drugs of abuse. This study examined the effects of agmatine on the rewarding effects of methamphetamine in rats using a conditioned place preference paradigm. Methamphetamine (0.1-1.0mg/kg) dose-dependently increased the time spent in methamphetamine-paired side (place preference). Agmatine, at doses that did not produce place preference or aversion (10-32mg/kg), significantly decreased the development of methamphetamine-induced place preference when agmatine was administered in combination with methamphetamine during place conditioning. Agmatine also significantly decreased the expression of methamphetamine-induced place preference when an acute injection of agmatine was given immediately before test session. These doses of agmatine do not alter the motor activity in rats, suggesting that the observed attenuation of methamphetamine-induced place preference was not due to general behavioral disruption. Together, these data suggests that agmatine attenuates the rewarding effects of methamphetamine and may be able to modulate the abuse liability of methamphetamine.

  9. Nicotine elicits methamphetamine-seeking in rats previously administered nicotine.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, N M; Harrod, S B; Bardo, M T

    2010-01-01

    Research has indicated a high correlation between psychostimulant use and tobacco cigarette smoking in human substance abusers. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of acute and repeated nicotine administration on responding for intravenous methamphetamine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) in a rodent model of self-administration, as well as the potential of nicotine to induce reinstatement of previously extinguished drug-taking behavior in male Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, it was assessed whether nicotine-induced reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking behavior and nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization require that nicotine be temporally paired with the methamphetamine self-administration session or the locomotor activity chamber. Nicotine acutely decreased methamphetamine self-administration, but did not persistently alter responding during the maintenance of methamphetamine self-administration. However, following extinction of methamphetamine self-administration, nicotine administration reinstated methamphetamine-seeking behavior only in rats that had previously been administered nicotine. Nicotine-induced reinstatement and expression of locomotor sensitization were not dependent on a temporal pairing of nicotine with either the methamphetamine self-administration session or the locomotor activity chamber, respectively. These results indicate that nicotine may be acting, at least in part, through a non-associative mechanism to reinstate methamphetamine-seeking behavior.

  10. Context-Dependent Effects of a Single Administration of Mirtazapine on the Expression of Methamphetamine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Napier, T. Celeste

    2012-01-01

    Re-exposure to cues repeatedly associated with methamphetamine (Meth) can trigger Meth-seeking and relapse in the abstinent abuser. Weakening the conditioned Meth-associated memory during cue re-exposure may provide a means for relapse-reduction pharmacotherapy. Accordingly, we sought to determine if the atypical antidepressant mirtazapine disrupted the persistence of Meth-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) when administered in conjunction with re-exposure to contextual conditioning cues, and if this effect was altered by Meth being present during cue re-exposure. First, we evaluated the effect of mirtazapine on the maintenance of Meth-induced CPP during re-exposure to either the saline- or Meth-paired chamber 12 days after conditioning. Meth-conditioned rats subsequently administered mirtazapine expressed CPP independent of re-exposure to the saline- or Meth-paired chamber; but the magnitude of CPP was significantly less for mirtazapine-treated rats re-exposed to the Meth-paired chamber. Next, we evaluated the effect of mirtazapine on a “reinforced re-exposure” to the Meth-paired context. Administration of mirtazapine vehicle and Meth, prior to re-exposure to the Meth-paired chamber did not disrupt the ability of rats to demonstrate CPP 15 days after conditioning; however, CPP was disrupted when rats were administered mirtazapine and Meth prior to re-exposure to the Meth-paired chamber. These results indicate that the capacity of mirtazapine to diminish Meth-induced CPP is promoted if mirtazapine treatment is coupled with Meth administration in the Meth-associated context and thus appears to be the consequence of disrupting processes necessary to reconsolidate CPP following activation of drug-associated memories. PMID:22347852

  11. Pharmacotherapy of Methamphetamine Addiction: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Elkashef, Ahmed; Vocci, Frank; Hanson, Glen; White, Jason; Wickes, Wendy; Tiihonen, Jari

    2008-01-01

    Methamphetamine dependence is a serious public health problem worldwide for which there are no approved pharmacological treatments. Psychotherapy is still the mainstay of treatment; however, relapse rates are high. The search for effective pharmacological treatment has intensified in the last decade. This review will highlight progress in pharmacological interventions to treat methamphetamine dependence as well as explore new pharmacological targets. Published data from clinical trials for stimulant addiction were searched using PubMed and summarized, as well as highlights from a recent symposium on methamphetamine pharmacotherapy presented at the ISAM 2006 meeting, including interim analysis data from an ongoing D-amphetamine study in Australia. Early pilot data are encouraging for administering D-amphetamine and methylphenidate as treatment for heavy amphetamine users. Abilify at 15 mg/day dose increased amphetamine use in an outpatient pilot study. Sertraline, ondansetron, baclofen, tyrosine, and imipramine were ineffective in proof-of-concept studies. Development of pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine dependence is still in an early stage. Data suggesting D-amphetamine and methylphenidate as effective pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine addiction will need to be confirmed by larger trials. Preclinical data suggest that use of GVG, CB1 antagonist, and lobeline are also promising therapeutic strategies. PMID:19042205

  12. mGluR5 antagonism attenuates methamphetamine reinforcement and prevents reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Gass, Justin T; Osborne, Megan P H; Watson, Noreen L; Brown, Jordan L; Olive, M Foster

    2009-03-01

    Addiction to methamphetamine is a significant public health problem, and there are currently no pharmacological agents that are approved for the treatment of addiction to this powerful psychostimulant. Chronic methamphetamine use leads to cognitive dysfunction as well as numerous psychiatric, neurological, and cardiovascular complications. There is a growing body of literature implicating an important role for glutamate neurotransmission in psychostimulant addiction. In the present study, we examined the effects of the selective type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR5) antagonist 3-((2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)pyridine (MTEP) on intravenous self-administration of methamphetamine and reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking behavior. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to respond for intravenous methamphetamine (0.1 or 0.2 mg/kg per infusion) or food pellets and were subsequently administered vehicle or MTEP (0.3-3 mg/kg) before drug or food self-administration on a fixed-ratio 1 (FR1) schedule of reinforcement or a progressive ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement. We also examined the effects of vehicle or MTEP (0.3-3 mg/kg) on cue- and drug-induced reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking behavior as well as cue-induced reinstatement of food-seeking behavior. Our results show that MTEP dose dependently reduced the reinforcing effects of methamphetamine under FR1 and PR schedules of reinforcement without altering overall responding for food. MTEP also dose dependently prevented cue- and drug-induced reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking behavior, but did not alter cue-induced reinstatement of food-seeking behavior. Together, these results indicate that mGluR5 receptors mediate methamphetamine reinforcement and methamphetamine-seeking behavior, and that pharmacological inhibitors of mGluR5 receptor function may represent a novel class of potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of methamphetamine addiction.

  13. Agmatine attenuates the discriminative stimulus and hyperthermic effects of methamphetamine in male rats.

    PubMed

    Thorn, David A; Li, Jiuzhou; Qiu, Yanyan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2016-09-01

    Methamphetamine abuse remains an alarming public heath challenge, with no approved pharmacotherapies available. Agmatine is a naturally occurring cationic polyamine that has previously been shown to attenuate the rewarding and psychomotor-sensitizing effects of methamphetamine. This study examined the effects of agmatine on the discriminative stimulus and hyperthermic effects of methamphetamine. Adult male rats were trained to discriminate 0.32 mg/kg methamphetamine from saline. Methamphetamine dose dependently increased drug-associated lever responding. The nonselective dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine (5.9-fold rightward shift). Agmatine (10-100 mg/kg) did not substitute for methamphetamine, but significantly attenuated the stimulus effects of methamphetamine, leading to a maximum of a 3.5-fold rightward shift. Acute 10 mg/kg methamphetamine increased the rectal temperature by a maximum of 1.96±0.17°C. Agmatine (10-32 mg/kg) pretreatment significantly attenuated the hyperthermic effect of methamphetamine. Agmatine (10 mg/kg) also significantly reversed methamphetamine-induced temperature increase. Together, these results support further exploration of the value that agmatine may have for the treatment of methamphetamine abuse and overdose. PMID:27232669

  14. Bupropion for the Treatment of Methamphetamine Dependence in Non-Daily Users: a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial*

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ann L.; Li, Shou-Hua; Markova, Denka; Holmes, Tyson H.; Chiang, Nora; Kahn, Roberta; Campbell, Jan; Dickerson, Daniel L.; Galloway, Gantt P.; Stock, Christopher; Elkashef, Ahmed M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Bupropion was tested for efficacy to achieve methamphetamine (MA) abstinence in dependent, non-daily users. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, with 12-week treatment and 4-week follow-up, was conducted with 204 treatment-seeking participants having MA dependence per DSM-IV, who used MA on a less-than-daily basis. 104 were randomized to matched placebo and 100 to bupropion, sustained-release 150mg, twice daily. Participants were seen three times weekly to obtain urine for MA and bupropion assays, study assessments, and thrice weekly, 90-minute, group psychotherapy. There was no biomarker for placebo adherence. The primary outcome was achievement of abstinence throughout the last two weeks of treatment; ‘success’ requiring at least two urine samples during each of Weeks 11 and 12, and all samples MA-negative (<300ng/mL). Results Bupropion and placebo groups did not differ significantly in the percentage achieving abstinence for the last 2 weeks of treatment (chi-square, p=0.32). Subgroup analysis of participants with lower baseline MA use (≤18 of last 30 days before consent) also revealed no difference in success between groups (p=0.73). Medication adherence per protocol (detectable bupropion, >5ng/mL, in ≥50% of urine samples from Study Weeks 1–10 and ≥66% of urine samples from Weeks 11–12) was achieved by 47% of participants taking bupropion. Conclusions These data indicate that bupropion did not increase abstinence in dependent participants who were using MA less-than-daily. Medication non-adherence was a limitation in this trial. Psychosocial therapy remains the mainstay of treatment for MA dependence. Further research on subgroups who may respond to bupropion may be warranted. Trial Registration www.ClinicalTrials.gov : NCT00687713. PMID:25818061

  15. Detrimental Impact of Remote Methamphetamine Dependence on Neurocognitive and Everyday Functioning in Older but not Younger HIV+ Adults: Evidence for a Legacy Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Morgan, Erin E.; Gongvatana, Assawin; Letendre, Scott L.; Grant, Igor; Woods, Steven Paul

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies examining the combined adverse effects of HIV and methamphetamine (MA) on the central nervous system (CNS) have focused on younger to middle-aged adults with recent MA use diagnoses. Aging, HIV, and MA all converge on prefrontal and temporolimbic neural systems and confer independent risk for neurocognitive and functional decline. Thus, this study sought to determine the residual impact of a remote history of MA dependence on neurocognitive and real-world outcomes in older people living with HIV (PLWH). Participants included 116 older (≥50 years) and 94 younger (<40 years) adults classified into one of six study groups based on HIV serostatus (HIV+/HIV-) and lifetime histories of MA dependence (MA+/MA-): Older HIV-MA- (n=36), Older HIV+MA- (n=49), Older HIV+MA+ (n=31), Younger HIV-MA- (n=27), Younger HIV+MA- (n=33), and Younger HIV+MA+ (n=34). No participant met criteria for current MA use disorders and histories of MA dependence were remote in both the Older (average of nearly 9 years prior to evaluation) and Younger (average of over 2 years prior to evaluation) HIV+MA+ groups. Findings revealed that a remote history of MA dependence exerts a significant detrimental impact on specific aspects of neurocognitive performance (e.g., memory) and a broad range of real-world functioning outcomes (e.g., employment) among Older, but not Younger PLWH. These results suggest that MA-associated neurotoxicity may have significant “legacy” effects on both neurocognitive and functional outcomes to which older PLWH are particularly vulnerable. PMID:24470237

  16. The methamphetamine problem

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Niall

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the reader to the characteristics of methamphetamine. Explored within are the drug's effects on those who consume it as well as the history and prevalence of its use. The highly addictive nature of methamphetamine is compounded by its affordability and the ease with which it is produced, with North America and East Asia having become established as heartlands for both consumption and manufacture. The paper discusses recent cultural depictions of the drug and also the role that mental health professionals may take in designing and delivering interventions to treat methamphetamine addiction. PMID:26755964

  17. Differentiating Characteristics of Juvenile Methamphetamine Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fass, Daniel; Calhoun, Georgia B.; Glaser, Brian A.; Yanosky, Daniel J., II

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the differences in characteristics and risk behaviors endorsed by detained adolescent methamphetamine users and compared them with other drug users. Subjects completed the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory and a questionnaire in which sociodemographics and behavioral information were explored and compared. Multivariate…

  18. Methamphetamine Use in Club Subcultures

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Brian C.; LeClair, Amy; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, methamphetamine developed a peculiar geographic distribution in the United States, with limited diffusion in the Northeast. While use within gay clubs received attention, methamphetamine in club subcultures more broadly remains less clear. Using quantitative and qualitative data, we provide a descriptive assessment of methamphetamine use in club subcultures. Methamphetamine use in club subcultures often has instrumental purposes. The context of initiation into methamphetamine use and its close connection to cocaine shape later patterns of use. Viewing meth solely as a gay party drug misses a significant part of the population and may misguide public health strategies to reduce methamphetamine use in the Northeast. PMID:23848380

  19. An association between BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and impulsivity in methamphetamine abusers.

    PubMed

    Su, Hang; Tao, Jingyan; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Ying; Sun, Yeming; Li, Liren; Xu, Ke; Han, Bin; Lu, Yuling; Sun, Haiwei; Wei, Youdan; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Yu; Zou, Shengzhen; Wu, Wenxiu; Zhang, Jiajia; Zhang, Xiangyang; He, Jincai

    2014-10-17

    Recent studies showed an association between a functional polymorphism of BDNF gene (Val66Met) and the susceptibility to methamphetamine addiction. We hypothesized that this polymorphism was associated with methamphetamine abuse and impulsivity in methamphetamine-abuse patients. The polymorphism was genotyped in 200 methamphetamine-abuse patients and 219 healthy controls. The association of the Val66Met polymorphism of the BDNF gene and impulsivity in 138 methamphetamine abusers were assessed using Barratt Impulsivity Scale-11(BIS-11) Chinese version. The relationship between the polymorphism and age of onset of methamphetamine abuse was also examined. Our results showed no significant differences in genotype and allele distributions between the methamphetamine abusers and controls. Within the methamphetamine-abuse group, subjects carried the Met allele had significantly higher attentional impulsivity scores of BIS compared to those with the Val/Val genotype. The Met allele was also associated with earlier age onset of methamphetamine use. Our findings suggest that the BDNF Val66Met gene polymorphism may influence attentional impulsivity in methamphetamine abusers. Moreover, the BDNF Val66Met gene polymorphism may contribute to onset age of methamphetamine use.

  20. A dysbiotic subpopulation of alcohol-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    de Timary, Philippe; Leclercq, Sophie; Stärkel, Peter; Delzenne, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of studies that assessed the importance of biological factors for the development of psychiatric disorders focused on processes occurring at the brain level. Alcohol-dependence is a very frequent psychiatric disorder where psycho-pharmacological interventions are only of moderate efficacy. Our laboratory has recently described that a subpopulation of alcohol-dependent subjects, that accounted for approximately 40% of individuals tested, presented with an increased intestinal permeability, with a dysbiosis, with alterations in the metabolomic content of faeces--that could play a role in the increased permeability--and finally with a more severe profile of alcohol-dependence than the other non-dysbiotic subpopulation. In this addendum, we discuss the implications of our observations for the pathophysiology of alcohol dependence where we try to discriminate which addiction dimensions are likely related to the gut microbiota alterations and whether these alterations are the cause or the consequence of drinking habits. PMID:26727422

  1. Methamphetamine/Dextroamphetamine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Methamphetamine/Dextroamphetamine and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to methamphetamine or dextroamphetamine may increase the risk for birth ...

  2. Inhibiting effects of rhynchophylline on zebrafish methamphetamine dependence are associated with amelioration of neurotransmitters content and down-regulation of TH and NR2B expression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mingjin; Chen, Yifei; Li, Chan; Peng, Qiuxian; Fang, Miao; Liu, Wei; Kang, Qunzhao; Lin, Yingbo; Yung, Ken Kin Lam; Mo, Zhixian

    2016-07-01

    Others and we have reported that rhynchophylline reverses amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) effect which may be partly mediated by amelioration of central neurotransmitters and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor 2B (NR2B) levels in the rat brains. The current study investigated the inhibiting effects of rhynchophylline on methamphetamine-induced (METH-induced) CPP in adult zebrafish and METH-induced locomotor activity in tyrosine hydroxylase-green fluorescent protein (TH-GFP) transgenic zebrafish larvae and attempted to confirm the hypothesis that these effects were mediated via regulation of neurotransmitters and dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems. After baseline preference test (on days 1-3), zebrafish were injected intraperitoneally METH (on days 4, 6 and 8) or the same volume of fish physiological saline (on days 5 and 7) and were immediately conditioned. Rhynchophylline was administered at 12h after injection of METH. On day 9, zebrafish were tested for METH-induced CPP. Results revealed that rhynchophylline (100mg/kg) significantly inhibited the acquisition of METH-induced CPP, reduced the content of dopamine and glutamate and down-regulated the expression of TH and NR2B in the CPP zebrafish brains. Furthermore, the influence of rhynchophylline on METH-induced locomotor activity was also observed in TH-GFP transgenic zebrafish larvae. Results showed that rhynchophylline (50mg/L) treatment led to a significant reduction on the locomotor activity and TH expression in TH-GFP transgenic zebrafish larvae. Taken together, these data indicate that the inhibition of the formation of METH dependence by rhynchophylline in zebrafish is associated with amelioration of the neurotransmitters dopamine and glutamate content and down-regulation of TH and NR2B expression. PMID:27009763

  3. Methamphetamine detection in maternal and neonatal hair: implications for fetal safety

    PubMed Central

    Garcia‐Bournissen, F; Rokach, B; Karaskov, T; Koren, G

    2007-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine misuse is a serious health problem of epidemic proportions. Use of this drug, particularly during pregnancy, is difficult to ascertain. Sparse information is available on gestational exposure. Objectives To quantify methamphetamine accumulation in hair, identify the use of methamphetamine with other drugs of abuse and characterise correlations between concentrations of methamphetamine in maternal and neonatal hair. Subjects and methods Motherisk laboratory at the Hospital for Sick Children routinely carries out analysis of methamphetamine in hair. Mothers and infants with positive results for methamphetamine in hair were identified. Drugs present in hair were analysed by ELISA and positive results were confirmed by gas chromatgraphy/mass spectrometry. Results 396 people positive for methamphetamine in their hair were identified from our database. Almost 85% of them were positive for at least one other drug of abuse, mostly cocaine. Eleven mother–baby pairs with hair positive for methamphetamine were identified. Methamphetamine levels in hair ranged between 0.13 and 51.97 ng/mg in the mothers and between 0 and 22.73 ng/mg in the neonates. Methamphetamine levels in mothers and neonates correlated significantly. One (9%) neonate was negative for methamphetamine even though the mother was positive. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report on fetal exposure to methamphetamine during pregnancy, showing transplacental transfer of the drug, with accumulation in fetal hair. Hair measurement for methamphetamine in neonates is a useful screening method to detect intra‐uterine exposure to the drug. The data also indicate that positive exposure to methamphetamine strongly suggests that the person is a polydrug user, which may have important implications for fetal safety. PMID:17077112

  4. The Cardiac Complications of Methamphetamines.

    PubMed

    Paratz, Elizabeth D; Cunningham, Neil J; MacIsaac, Andrew I

    2016-04-01

    Methamphetamines are increasingly popular drugs of abuse in Australia, and are rising in purity. The rising popularity and purity of methamphetamines has notably increased demands upon Australian medical services. Methamphetamines are sympathomimetic amines with a range of adverse effects upon multiple organ systems. Cardiovascular complications are the second leading cause of death in methamphetamine abusers, and there appears to be a high prevalence of cardiac pathology. Cardiovascular pathology frequently seen in methamphetamine abusers includes hypertension, aortic dissection, acute coronary syndromes, pulmonary arterial hypertension and methamphetamine-associated cardiomyopathy. The rising prevalence of methamphetamine abuse is likely to increase the burden of cardiovascular pathology in Australians. A National Parliamentary Enquiry was opened in March 2015 to address concerns regarding the medical and social impacts of methamphetamine abuse. From April 2015, a National 'Ice Taskforce' was also created in parallel. Reversal of cardiac pathology appears to be achievable with abstinence from methamphetamines and initiation of appropriate treatment. It is key to appreciate that the pathogenesis of methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications arises as a result of the specific toxic effects of methamphetamines. Clinical management is hence individualised; suggested management approaches for methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications are detailed within this article.

  5. A Study of the Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Patients with Methamphetamine-Induced Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Eslami-Shahrbabaki, Mahin; Fekrat, Alireza; Mazhari, Shahrzad

    2015-01-01

    Background The abuse of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances such as amphetamines and ecstasy has had a growing trend. Tachycardia, increased blood pressure, hallucinations, panic attacks, and psychosis are the negative effects of methamphetamine abuse. The present study aimed to assess psychiatric disorders associated with methamphetamine-induced psychotic disorder. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed from October 2013 to March 2014 on 165 patients hospitalized at Shahid Beheshti Hospital in Kerman, Iran, and diagnosed with psychosis induced by methamphetamine abuse within the previous 6 months. Study subjects were selected via census method. Based on the exclusion criteria and due to the lack of cooperation of some patients, 121 patients were enrolled in the study. Research data were gathered using clinical interviews, the Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale (Y-BOCS), Hamilton anxiety scale (HAM-A) and Hamilton rating scale for depression (HRSD), Young mania rating scale (YMRS), substance dependence severity scale (SDSS), positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS), and clinical global impression (CGI) scale. The data analysis was performed using SPSS software, descriptive statistics, and ANOVA. Findings Among the 121 patients of the sample group, 4 patients (3.3%) had anxiety, 58 patients (47.9%) depression, 30 patients (24.8%) obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), 20 patients (16.5%) bipolar mood disorder (BMD), 8 patients (6.6%) persistent psychotic symptoms, 85 patients (70.2%) personality disorder, and 36 patients (29.8%) had no personality disorders. The highest prevalence was related to borderline personality disorder (35.5%). However, 45 patients (37.2%) had no impairment associated with methamphetamine-induced psychosis. Conclusion It seems that there is comorbidity between psychiatric disorders, including mood disorders, especially depressive disorder, childhood history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), bipolar

  6. Naltrexone and bupropion, alone or combined, do not alter the reinforcing effects of intranasal methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Stoops, William W; Pike, Erika; Hays, Lon R; Glaser, Paul E; Rush, Craig R

    2015-02-01

    Naltrexone and bupropion, when administered alone in clinical trials, modestly reduce amphetamine use. Whether combining these drugs would result in greater reductions in methamphetamine taking relative to either drug alone is undetermined. This study examined the influence of naltrexone, bupropion and a naltrexone-bupropion combination on methamphetamine self-administration in humans. Seven subjects reporting recent illicit stimulant use completed a placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind study in which the reinforcing, subject-rated and physiological effects of intranasal methamphetamine (0, 10 and 30 mg) were assessed during maintenance on placebo, naltrexone (50 mg), bupropion (300 mg/day), and naltrexone combined with bupropion. Methamphetamine maintained responding and produced prototypic subjective and physiological effects (e.g., increased ratings of good effects, elevated systolic blood pressure). Maintenance doses were well tolerated and generally devoid of effects. No maintenance condition reduced methamphetamine self-administration or systematically altered the subject-rated effects of methamphetamine. These outcomes demonstrate the robust behavioral effects of methamphetamine that could make it resistant to pharmacological manipulation. Although these outcomes indicate that this combination may be ineffective for managing methamphetamine use disorder, future work should evaluate longer maintenance dosing, individuals with different levels of amphetamine use, adding this combination to a behavioral platform and other pharmacotherapy combinations for reducing methamphetamine use.

  7. Naltrexone and bupropion, alone or combined, do not alter the reinforcing effects of intranasal methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Stoops, William W; Pike, Erika; Hays, Lon R; Glaser, Paul E; Rush, Craig R

    2015-02-01

    Naltrexone and bupropion, when administered alone in clinical trials, modestly reduce amphetamine use. Whether combining these drugs would result in greater reductions in methamphetamine taking relative to either drug alone is undetermined. This study examined the influence of naltrexone, bupropion and a naltrexone-bupropion combination on methamphetamine self-administration in humans. Seven subjects reporting recent illicit stimulant use completed a placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind study in which the reinforcing, subject-rated and physiological effects of intranasal methamphetamine (0, 10 and 30 mg) were assessed during maintenance on placebo, naltrexone (50 mg), bupropion (300 mg/day), and naltrexone combined with bupropion. Methamphetamine maintained responding and produced prototypic subjective and physiological effects (e.g., increased ratings of good effects, elevated systolic blood pressure). Maintenance doses were well tolerated and generally devoid of effects. No maintenance condition reduced methamphetamine self-administration or systematically altered the subject-rated effects of methamphetamine. These outcomes demonstrate the robust behavioral effects of methamphetamine that could make it resistant to pharmacological manipulation. Although these outcomes indicate that this combination may be ineffective for managing methamphetamine use disorder, future work should evaluate longer maintenance dosing, individuals with different levels of amphetamine use, adding this combination to a behavioral platform and other pharmacotherapy combinations for reducing methamphetamine use. PMID:25459104

  8. Developmental neurotoxicity to methamphetamines.

    PubMed

    Weissman, A D; Caldecott-Hazard, S

    1995-05-01

    1. To investigate the long-term changes caused by amphetamines in the developing brain, we used both an in vivo and in vitro model of chronic fetal exposure to methamphetamine and related drugs. 2. Offspring of rats, treated with either saline, 2 mg/kg twice a day (b.i.d.) or 10 mg/kg b.i.d. methamphetamine throughout gestation, were examined at 30 days of age for changes in the monoamine system of their brains. 3. At the lower dose methamphetamine was neurotoxic to specific neuronal populations, mostly serotonergic. At the higher dose, methamphetamine retained its neurotoxic properties, but also stimulated the growth of axonal terminals in specific regions as evidenced by an increase in monoamine uptake sites. The neurochemical changes at the higher dose were correlated with deficits in adult behavioural measures. 4. Corresponding in vitro drug treatments of rat neuroblastomas cells also produced a dose-related effect on cellular growth and differentiation patterns. Neurotoxic as well as stimulatory effects of methamphetamine and some related compounds were seen in culture. 5. Our in vivo and in vitro observations demonstrate neurotoxic effects of amphetamines and the remodelling of synaptic morphology in response.

  9. Methamphetamine-associated burn injuries: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Danks, Roy R; Wibbenmeyer, Lucy A; Faucher, Lee D; Sihler, Kristen C; Kealey, G Patrick; Chang, Phyllis; Amelon, Marge; Lewis, Robert W

    2004-01-01

    Methamphetamine production and use has increased dramatically during the past 10 years. Methamphetamine production requires combining hazardous and volatile chemicals that expose the manufacturer to burn injuries from explosions and chemical spills. We sought to review the epidemiology of burn injuries in a rural burn center secondary to the use of amphetamine or methamphetamine and/or the manufacture of methamphetamine. Review of the records of 507 patients who were admitted to our burn unit from December 1, 1998, to December 31, 2001, revealed 34 patients who were involved in the use of amphetamines or methamphetamines and/or the manufacture of methamphetamine. Thirty-one patients tested positive for either amphetamine (n = 2) or methamphetamine (n = 29) on routine admission urine drug screens. Twenty of these patients were involved in the manufacture of methamphetamines. Three additional patients were identified as methamphetamine manufacturers but tested negative for the use of methamphetamines. The mean age of the study population was 31.88 +/- 7.65 years, with a male:female ratio of 10.3:1. The average burn size was 18.86 +/- 20.72, with the majority secondary to flame (n = 26). Patient burn admission histories were vague, and the patient's involvement in the manufacture of methamphetamine was often only later confirmed by media, the fire marshal, family members, or the patient. Fifteen patients showed the usual withdrawal pattern of agitation and hypersomnolence, with seven patients requiring detoxification with benzodiazepines. Two were admitted acutely to the psychiatric ward for uncontrollable agitation. Eighteen patients were offered chemical dependency treatment, and two completed therapy. There was one mortality. The mean cost per person was US 77,580 dollars (range, US 112 dollars - US 426,386 dollars). The increasing use of and manufacture of methamphetamine presents new challenges for the burn team because these patients can become violent and

  10. Prenatal methamphetamine differentially alters myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury in male and female adult hearts.

    PubMed

    Rorabaugh, Boyd R; Seeley, Sarah L; Bui, Albert D; Sprague, Lisanne; D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2016-02-15

    Methamphetamine is one of the most common illicit drugs abused during pregnancy. The neurological effects of prenatal methamphetamine are well known. However, few studies have investigated the potential effects of prenatal methamphetamine on adult cardiovascular function. Previous work demonstrated that prenatal cocaine exposure increases sensitivity of the adult heart to ischemic injury. Methamphetamine and cocaine have different mechanisms of action, but both drugs exert their effects by increasing dopaminergic and adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus the goal of this study was to determine whether prenatal methamphetamine also worsens ischemic injury in the adult heart. Pregnant rats were injected with methamphetamine (5 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or saline throughout pregnancy. When pups reached 8 wk of age, their hearts were subjected to ischemia and reperfusion by means of a Langendorff isolated heart system. Prenatal methamphetamine had no significant effect on infarct size, preischemic contractile function, or postischemic recovery of contractile function in male hearts. However, methamphetamine-treated female hearts exhibited significantly larger infarcts and significantly elevated end-diastolic pressure during recovery from ischemia. Methamphetamine significantly reduced protein kinase Cε expression and Akt phosphorylation in female hearts but had no effect on these cardioprotective proteins in male hearts. These data indicate that prenatal methamphetamine differentially affects male and female sensitivity to myocardial ischemic injury and alters cardioprotective signaling proteins in the adult heart.

  11. Boundary conditions of methamphetamine craving.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Richard B; Onyemekwu, Chukwudi; Hart, Carl L; Ochsner, Kevin N; Kober, Hedy

    2015-12-01

    Methamphetamine use has increased significantly and become a global health concern. Craving is known to predict methamphetamine use and relapse following abstinence. Some have suggested that cravings are automatic, generalized, and uncontrollable, but experimental work addressing these claims is lacking. In 2 exploratory studies, we tested the boundary conditions of methamphetamine craving by asking: (a) is craving specific to users' preferred route of administration?, and (b) can craving be regulated by cognitive strategies? Two groups of methamphetamine users were recruited. In Study 1, participants were grouped by their preferred route of administration (intranasal vs. smoking), and rated their craving in response to photographs and movies depicting methamphetamine use (via the intranasal vs. smoking route). In Study 2, methamphetamine smokers implemented cognitive regulation strategies while viewing photographs depicting methamphetamine smoking. Strategies involved either focusing on the positive aspects of smoking methamphetamine or the negative consequences of doing so-the latter strategy based on treatment protocols for addiction. In Study 1, we found a significant interaction between group and route of administration, such that participants who preferred to smoke methamphetamine reported significantly stronger craving for smoking stimuli, whereas those who preferred the intranasal route reported stronger craving for intranasal stimuli. In Study 2, participants reported significantly lower craving when focusing on the negative consequences associated with methamphetamine use. Taken together, these findings suggest that strength of craving for methamphetamine is moderated by users' route of administration and can be reduced by cognitive strategies. This has important theoretical, methodological, and clinical implications.

  12. Methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia and lethal toxicity: role of the dopamine and serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    Numachi, Yohtaro; Ohara, Arihisa; Yamashita, Motoyasu; Fukushima, Setsu; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Hata, Harumi; Watanabe, Hidekazu; Hall, F Scott; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L; Uhl, George R; Sora, Ichiro

    2007-10-31

    We examined the hyperthermic and lethal toxic effects of methamphetamine in dopamine transporter (DAT) and/or serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout (KO) mice. Methamphetamine (45 mg/kg) caused significant hyperthermia even in the mice with a single DAT gene copy and no SERT copies (DAT+/- SERT-/- mice). Mice with no DAT copies and a single SERT gene copy (DAT-/- SERT+/- mice) showed significant but reduced hyperthermia when compared to wild-type mice after methamphetamine. Surprisingly, DAT/SERT double KO mice exhibited a paradoxical hypothermia after methamphetamine. These results demonstrate that methamphetamine exerts a hyperthermic effect via DAT, or via SERT, in the absence of DAT. The selective norepinephrine transporter blocker (20 mg/kg nisoxetine) caused hyperthermia in DAT/SERT double KO mice, suggesting that the norepinephrine system is not responsible for methamphetamine-induced paradoxical hypothermia in the double KO mice. DAT gene deletion in mice strikingly increased LD50 of methamphetamine by 1.7-1.8 times that of wild-type mice, suggesting that the lethal toxic effect of methamphetamine is mainly dependent on DAT. Moreover, dissociation between hyperthermic and lethal toxic effects of methamphetamine in DAT single KO mice and DAT/SERT double KO mice suggest that hyperthermia is not a prerequisite for methamphetamine-induced lethality. Methamphetamine (45 mg/kg) significantly increased mRNA of interleukin-1beta, which is the major endogenous pyrogen, in the hypothalamus of wild-type mice but not in DAT/SERT double KO mice, which provides a partial mechanism of methamphetamine-induced paradoxical hypothermia. These results suggest that DAT and SERT are key molecules for hyperthermic and lethal toxic effects of methamphetamine.

  13. Morphine intake and the effects of naltrexone and buprenorphine on the acquisition of methamphetamine intake.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, E C; Phillips, T J

    2014-02-01

    Some common genetic factors appear to influence risk for drug dependence across multiple drugs of abuse. In previous research, mice that were selectively bred for higher amounts of methamphetamine consumption, using a two-bottle choice methamphetamine drinking procedure, were found to be less sensitive to the locomotor stimulant effects of morphine and of the more selective μ-opioid receptor agonist fentanyl, compared to mice that were bred for low methamphetamine consumption. This suggested that μ-opioid receptor-mediated pathways may influence genetic risk for methamphetamine consumption. We hypothesized that these differences in opioid sensitivity would impact opioid intake in the methamphetamine drinking lines and that drugs with μ-opioid receptor activity would impact methamphetamine intake. Consumption of morphine was examined in 2, two-bottle choice studies, one that compared morphine to quinine consumption and another that used a saccharin fading procedure. Next, naltrexone (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg), a μ-opioid receptor antagonist, and buprenorphine (0, 1, 2 or 4 mg/kg), a μ-opioid receptor partial agonist, were each examined for their effects on the acquisition of methamphetamine consumption. Low methamphetamine drinking mice consumed more morphine compared to high methamphetamine drinking mice. Naltrexone did not alter methamphetamine consumption in either selected line; however, buprenorphine reduced methamphetamine intake in the high methamphetamine drinking line. These data show that greater sensitivity to opioids is associated with greater opioid intake and warrant further investigation of drugs with μ-opioid receptor-specific agonist activity in genetically determined differences in methamphetamine consumption.

  14. The Impact of the Media in Influencing Extension's Perceptions of Methamphetamine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudreault, Amy R.

    2013-01-01

    The study reported here explored media dependency and moral panic involving methamphetamine perceptions among a national sample of Extension Directors through survey methodology. With a 70.0% response rate, the questionnaire concentrated on demographics; methamphetamine knowledge, information sources, and dependency; and perceptions of the media.…

  15. METHAMPHETAMINE SELF-ADMINISTRATION IN HUMANS DURING D-AMPHETAMINE MAINTENANCE

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Erika; Stoops, William W.; Hays, Lon R.; Glaser, Paul E. A.; Rush, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Agonist replacement may be a viable treatment approach for managing stimulant use disorders. This study sought to determine the effects of d-amphetamine maintenance on methamphetamine self-administration in stimulant using human participants. We predicted d-amphetamine maintenance would reduce methamphetamine self-administration. Eight participants completed the protocol, which tested two d-amphetamine maintenance conditions in counter-balanced order (0 and 40 mg/day). Participants completed 4 experimental sessions under each maintenance condition in which they first sampled one of four doses of intranasal methamphetamine (0, 10, 20, or 30 mg). Participants then had the opportunity to respond on a computerized progressive ratio task to earn portions of the sampled methamphetamine dose. Subject-rated drug-effect and physiological measures were completed at regular intervals prior to and after sampling methamphetamine. Methamphetamine was self-administered as an orderly function of dose regardless of the maintenance condition. Methamphetamine produced prototypical subject-rated effects on 13 items of the drug-effects questionnaires, 10 of which were attenuated by d-amphetamine maintenance (e.g., increased ratings were attenuated on items such as Any Effect, Like Drug, and Willing to Take Again on the Drug Effect Questionnaire). Methamphetamine produced significant increases in systolic blood pressure, which were attenuated by d-amphetamine maintenance compared to placebo maintenance. Methamphetamine was well tolerated during d-amphetamine maintenance and no adverse events occurred. Although d-amphetamine attenuated some subject-rated effects of methamphetamine, the self-administration results are concordant with those of clinical trials showing that d-amphetamine did not reduce methamphetamine use. Unique pharmacological approaches may be needed for treating amphetamine use disorders. PMID:25154010

  16. Methamphetamine self-administration in humans during D-amphetamine maintenance.

    PubMed

    Pike, Erika; Stoops, William W; Hays, Lon R; Glaser, Paul E A; Rush, Craig R

    2014-12-01

    Agonist replacement may be a viable treatment approach for managing stimulant use disorders. This study sought to determine the effects of D-amphetamine maintenance on methamphetamine self-administration in stimulant using human participants. We predicted that D-amphetamine maintenance would reduce methamphetamine self-administration. Eight participants completed the protocol, which tested 2 D-amphetamine maintenance conditions in counterbalanced order (0 and 40 mg/d). Participants completed 4 experimental sessions under each maintenance condition in which they first sampled 1 of 4 doses of intranasal methamphetamine (0, 10, 20, or 30 mg). Participants then had the opportunity to respond on a computerized progressive-ratio task to earn portions of the sampled methamphetamine dose. Subject-rated drug effect and physiological measures were completed at regular intervals prior to and after sampling methamphetamine. Methamphetamine was self-administered as an orderly function of dose regardless of the maintenance condition. Methamphetamine produced prototypical subject-rated effects on 12 items of the drug-effects questionnaires, 8 of which were attenuated by D-amphetamine maintenance (eg, increased ratings were attenuated on items such as Any Effect, Like Drug, and Willing to Take Again on the Drug Effect Questionnaire). Methamphetamine produced significant increases in systolic blood pressure, which were attenuated by D-amphetamine maintenance compared to placebo maintenance. Methamphetamine was well tolerated during D-amphetamine maintenance and no adverse events occurred. Although D-amphetamine attenuated some subject-rated effects of methamphetamine, the self-administration results are concordant with those of clinical trials showing that D-amphetamine did not reduce methamphetamine use. Unique pharmacological approaches may be needed for treating amphetamine use disorders.

  17. 5-HT(1A)-like receptor activation inhibits abstinence-induced methamphetamine withdrawal in planarians.

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Shah, Hardik; Ayoub, George; Raffa, Robert B

    2010-10-29

    No pharmacological therapy is approved to treat methamphetamine physical dependence, but it has been hypothesized that serotonin (5-HT)-enhancing drugs might limit the severity of withdrawal symptoms. To test this hypothesis, we used a planarian model of physical dependence that quantifies withdrawal as a reduction in planarian movement. Planarians exposed to methamphetamine (10 μM) for 60 min, and then placed (tested) into drug-free water for 5 min, displayed less movement (i.e., withdrawal) than either methamphetamine-naïve planarians tested in water or methamphetamine-exposed planarians tested in methamphetamine. A concentration-related inhibition of withdrawal was observed when methamphetamine-exposed planarians were placed into a solution containing either methamphetamine and 5-HT (0.1-100 μM) or methamphetamine and the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-N,N-dipropyl-2-aminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT) (10, 20 μM). Planarians with prior methamphetamine exposure displayed enhanced withdrawal when tested in a solution of the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY 100635) (1 μM). Methamphetamine-induced withdrawal was not affected by the 5-HT(2B/2C) receptor agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPZ) (0.1-20 μM). These results provide pharmacological evidence that serotonin-enhancing drugs inhibit expression of methamphetamine physical dependence in an invertebrate model of withdrawal, possibly through a 5-HT(1A)-like receptor-dependent mechanism.

  18. Intracellular methamphetamine prevents the dopamine-induced enhancement of neuronal firing.

    PubMed

    Saha, Kaustuv; Sambo, Danielle; Richardson, Ben D; Lin, Landon M; Butler, Brittany; Villarroel, Laura; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2014-08-01

    The dysregulation of the dopaminergic system is implicated in multiple neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson disease and drug addiction. The primary target of psychostimulants such as amphetamine and methamphetamine is the dopamine transporter (DAT), the major regulator of extracellular dopamine levels in the brain. However, the behavioral and neurophysiological correlates of methamphetamine and amphetamine administration are unique from one another, thereby suggesting these two compounds impact dopaminergic neurotransmission differentially. We further examined the unique mechanisms by which amphetamine and methamphetamine regulate DAT function and dopamine neurotransmission; in the present study we examined the impact of extracellular and intracellular amphetamine and methamphetamine on the spontaneous firing of cultured midbrain dopaminergic neurons and isolated DAT-mediated current. In dopaminergic neurons the spontaneous firing rate was enhanced by extracellular application of amphetamine > dopamine > methamphetamine and was DAT-dependent. Amphetamine > methamphetamine similarly enhanced DAT-mediated inward current, which was sensitive to isosmotic substitution of Na(+) or Cl(-) ion. Although isosmotic substitution of extracellular Na(+) ions blocked amphetamine and methamphetamine-induced DAT-mediated inward current similarly, the removal of extracellular Cl(-) ions preferentially blocked amphetamine-induced inward current. The intracellular application of methamphetamine, but not amphetamine, prevented the dopamine-induced increase in the spontaneous firing of dopaminergic neurons and the corresponding DAT-mediated inward current. The results reveal a new mechanism for methamphetamine-induced dysregulation of dopaminergic neurons.

  19. Methamphetamine-related brainstem haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Zelia K; Bennett, Iwan E; Chan, Patrick; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2016-10-01

    We report the case of an otherwise healthy 29-year-old woman who presented with a brainstem haemorrhage following intravenous methamphetamine use. Extensive investigation did not reveal an underlying pathology, and the development of symptoms was temporally related to methamphetamine injection. Although intracerebral haemorrhage secondary to methamphetamine use is well documented, this report describes a haemorrhage within the brainstem which is a rare location. While animal studies have demonstrated the potential of methamphetamines to produce brainstem haemorrhages, there has only been one previous report describing a haemorrhage in this location due to amphetamine use in humans. We conclude with a brief discussion of the clinical features and aetiology of methamphetamine-related stroke. PMID:27345417

  20. Methamphetamine-related brainstem haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Zelia K; Bennett, Iwan E; Chan, Patrick; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2016-10-01

    We report the case of an otherwise healthy 29-year-old woman who presented with a brainstem haemorrhage following intravenous methamphetamine use. Extensive investigation did not reveal an underlying pathology, and the development of symptoms was temporally related to methamphetamine injection. Although intracerebral haemorrhage secondary to methamphetamine use is well documented, this report describes a haemorrhage within the brainstem which is a rare location. While animal studies have demonstrated the potential of methamphetamines to produce brainstem haemorrhages, there has only been one previous report describing a haemorrhage in this location due to amphetamine use in humans. We conclude with a brief discussion of the clinical features and aetiology of methamphetamine-related stroke.

  1. Insanity, methamphetamine and psychiatric expertise in New Zealand courtrooms.

    PubMed

    Thom, Katey; Finlayson, Mary; McKenna, Brian

    2011-06-01

    The use of methamphetamine in New Zealand has increased significantly over the last decade. Due to the potential of methamphetamine to induce, exacerbate and precipitate psychotic symptoms, this drug has also taken centre stage in several criminal trials considering the sanity of defendants. Highly publicised and often involving contested expert evidence, these criminal trials have illustrated the limits of using psychiatric expertise to answer legal questions. This article considers the implications of such cases in light of material from a qualitative study that aimed to generate insights into the difficulties forensic psychiatrists and their instructing lawyers face when providing expert evidence on the relationship between methamphetamine, psychosis and insanity. It reports material from 31 in-depth interviews with lawyers and forensic psychiatrists and observation of one criminal trial that considered the relationship between methamphetamine and legal insanity. The findings are correlated with the clinical and medico-legal literature on the topic and subjected to scrutiny through the lens of "sanism". The article concludes that the continued use of forensic psychiatry to meet the legal objectives of insanity, where methamphetamine is involved, has the potential to reinforce sanist attitudes and practices.

  2. Failure of surgical treatment in methamphetamine body-stuffers.

    PubMed

    Bahrami-Motlagh, Hooman; Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hossein; Behnam, Behdad; Arab-Ahmadi, Mehran

    2015-05-01

    Body stuffing is defined as ingestion of unpackaged or packaged illicit drugs in a quick process. The drugs have usually been wrapped loosely in cellophane, plastic bags, paper, or aluminum foil. Methamphetamine toxicity is a dangerous state that occurs during methamphetamine leakage from the ingested packages in the gastrointestinal tract. This is usually occurring with cocaine and heroin, but methamphetamine body stuffing may less commonly happen, as well. Accordingly, management of methamphetamine body-stuffers is an important subject that has remained a controversy in clinical and legal aspects. We have reported two body-stuffer cases who underwent exploratory laparotomy. Although surgery was done, it was not useful to exit packs and even led to severe methamphetamine toxicity. These cases show that surgical treatment may be ineffective and even harmful in body-stuffers. On the other hand, this report suggests that pre and post-operation abdominal CT-scan is necessary for evaluating surgical treatment in patients who are still symptomatic. PMID:25882154

  3. Failure of surgical treatment in methamphetamine body-stuffers.

    PubMed

    Bahrami-Motlagh, Hooman; Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hossein; Behnam, Behdad; Arab-Ahmadi, Mehran

    2015-05-01

    Body stuffing is defined as ingestion of unpackaged or packaged illicit drugs in a quick process. The drugs have usually been wrapped loosely in cellophane, plastic bags, paper, or aluminum foil. Methamphetamine toxicity is a dangerous state that occurs during methamphetamine leakage from the ingested packages in the gastrointestinal tract. This is usually occurring with cocaine and heroin, but methamphetamine body stuffing may less commonly happen, as well. Accordingly, management of methamphetamine body-stuffers is an important subject that has remained a controversy in clinical and legal aspects. We have reported two body-stuffer cases who underwent exploratory laparotomy. Although surgery was done, it was not useful to exit packs and even led to severe methamphetamine toxicity. These cases show that surgical treatment may be ineffective and even harmful in body-stuffers. On the other hand, this report suggests that pre and post-operation abdominal CT-scan is necessary for evaluating surgical treatment in patients who are still symptomatic.

  4. Primary health-care responses to methamphetamine use in Australian Indigenous communities.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Sarah; Harney, Angela; Arabena, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Crystal methamphetamine (commonly known as 'ice') use is currently a deeply concerning problem for some Australian Indigenous peoples and can cause serious harms to individual, families and communities. This paper is intended to support best practice responses by primary health-care staff working with Australian Indigenous people who use methamphetamine. It draws on a systematic search of relevant databases to identify literature from January 1999 to February 2014, providing an overview of prevalence, treatment, education and harm reduction, and community responses. The prevalence of methamphetamine use is higher in Indigenous than non-Indigenous communities, particularly in urban and regional settings. No evidence was identified that specifically related to effective treatment and treatment outcomes for Indigenous Australians experiencing methamphetamine dependence or problematic use. While studies involving methamphetamine users in the mainstream population suggest that psychological and residential treatments show short-term promise, longer-term outcomes are less clear. Community-driven interventions involving Indigenous populations in Australia and internationally appear to have a high level of community acceptability; however, outcomes in terms of methamphetamine use are rarely evaluated. Improved national data on prevalence of methamphetamine use among Indigenous people and levels of treatment access would support service planning. We argue for the importance of a strength-based approach to addressing methamphetamine use, to counteract the stigma and despair that frequently accompanies it. PMID:25704260

  5. Primary health-care responses to methamphetamine use in Australian Indigenous communities.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Sarah; Harney, Angela; Arabena, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Crystal methamphetamine (commonly known as 'ice') use is currently a deeply concerning problem for some Australian Indigenous peoples and can cause serious harms to individual, families and communities. This paper is intended to support best practice responses by primary health-care staff working with Australian Indigenous people who use methamphetamine. It draws on a systematic search of relevant databases to identify literature from January 1999 to February 2014, providing an overview of prevalence, treatment, education and harm reduction, and community responses. The prevalence of methamphetamine use is higher in Indigenous than non-Indigenous communities, particularly in urban and regional settings. No evidence was identified that specifically related to effective treatment and treatment outcomes for Indigenous Australians experiencing methamphetamine dependence or problematic use. While studies involving methamphetamine users in the mainstream population suggest that psychological and residential treatments show short-term promise, longer-term outcomes are less clear. Community-driven interventions involving Indigenous populations in Australia and internationally appear to have a high level of community acceptability; however, outcomes in terms of methamphetamine use are rarely evaluated. Improved national data on prevalence of methamphetamine use among Indigenous people and levels of treatment access would support service planning. We argue for the importance of a strength-based approach to addressing methamphetamine use, to counteract the stigma and despair that frequently accompanies it.

  6. Impulsivity and methamphetamine use.

    PubMed

    Semple, Shirley J; Zians, Jim; Grant, Igor; Patterson, Thomas L

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between methamphetamine (meth) use and impulsivity in a sample of 385 HIV-negative heterosexually identified meth users. Participants who scored highest on a self-report measure of impulsivity were compared with those who scored lower in terms of background characteristics, meth use patterns, use of alcohol and other illicit drugs, sexual risk behavior, and psychiatric health variables. Methamphetamine users in the high impulsivity group were younger, less educated, used larger quantities of meth, were more likely to be binge users, had a larger number of sexual partners, engaged in more unprotected vaginal and oral sex, and scored higher on the Beck Depression Inventory as compared with those in the low impulsivity group. In a logistic regression analysis, Beck depression was the factor that best distinguished between meth users who scored high and those who scored low on impulsivity. Neurophysiological pathways that may underlie the relationship between impulsivity and meth use are discussed. PMID:16135337

  7. Decreased striatal dopaminergic responsiveness in detoxified cocaine-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G J; Fowler, J S; Logan, J; Gatley, S J; Hitzemann, R; Chen, A D; Dewey, S L; Pappas, N

    1997-04-24

    Cocaine blocks the reuptake of dopamine, a neurotransmitter involved in the control of movement, cognition, motivation and reward. This leads to an increase in extracellular dopamine; the reinforcing effect of cocaine is associated with elevated dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens. But addiction to cocaine involves other effects, such as craving, loss of control and compulsive drug intake; the role of the dopamine system in these effects is less well-understood. We therefore used positron emission tomography (PET) to compare the responses of cocaine addicts and normal controls to intravenous methylphenidate, a drug that, like cocaine, causes an increase in synaptic dopamine. Addicts showed reduced dopamine release in the striatum, the brain region where the nucleus accumbens is located, and also had a reduced 'high' relative to controls. In contrast, addicts showed an increased response to methylphenidate in the thalamus (a region that conveys sensory input to the cortex). This thalamic response was associated with cocaine craving and was not seen in control subjects. Thus, our findings challenge the notion that addiction involves an enhanced striatal dopamine response to cocaine and/or an enhanced induction of euphoria. Moreover, they suggest a participation of thalamic dopamine pathways in cocaine addiction, a possibility that merits further investigation. PMID:9126741

  8. Meth math: modeling temperature responses to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zaretskaia, Maria V; Zaretsky, Dmitry V

    2014-04-15

    Methamphetamine (Meth) can evoke extreme hyperthermia, which correlates with neurotoxicity and death in laboratory animals and humans. The objective of this study was to uncover the mechanisms of a complex dose dependence of temperature responses to Meth by mathematical modeling of the neuronal circuitry. On the basis of previous studies, we composed an artificial neural network with the core comprising three sequentially connected nodes: excitatory, medullary, and sympathetic preganglionic neuronal (SPN). Meth directly stimulated the excitatory node, an inhibitory drive targeted the medullary node, and, in high doses, an additional excitatory drive affected the SPN node. All model parameters (weights of connections, sensitivities, and time constants) were subject to fitting experimental time series of temperature responses to 1, 3, 5, and 10 mg/kg Meth. Modeling suggested that the temperature response to the lowest dose of Meth, which caused an immediate and short hyperthermia, involves neuronal excitation at a supramedullary level. The delay in response after the intermediate doses of Meth is a result of neuronal inhibition at the medullary level. Finally, the rapid and robust increase in body temperature induced by the highest dose of Meth involves activation of high-dose excitatory drive. The impairment in the inhibitory mechanism can provoke a life-threatening temperature rise and makes it a plausible cause of fatal hyperthermia in Meth users. We expect that studying putative neuronal sites of Meth action and the neuromediators involved in a detailed model of this system may lead to more effective strategies for prevention and treatment of hyperthermia induced by amphetamine-like stimulants.

  9. The role of dopamine receptors in the neurotoxicity of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ares-Santos, S; Granado, N; Moratalla, R

    2013-05-01

    Methamphetamine is a synthetic drug consumed by millions of users despite its neurotoxic effects in the brain, leading to loss of dopaminergic fibres and cell bodies. Moreover, clinical reports suggest that methamphetamine abusers are predisposed to Parkinson's disease. Therefore, it is important to elucidate the mechanisms involved in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. Dopamine receptors may be a plausible target to prevent this neurotoxicity. Genetic inactivation of dopamine D1 or D2 receptors protects against the loss of dopaminergic fibres in the striatum and loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Protection by D1 receptor inactivation is due to blockade of hypothermia, reduced dopamine content and turnover and increased stored vesicular dopamine in D1R(-/-) mice. However, the neuroprotective impact of D2 receptor inactivation is partially dependent on an effect on body temperature, as well as on the blockade of dopamine reuptake by decreased dopamine transporter activity, which results in reduced intracytosolic dopamine levels in D2R(-/-) mice.

  10. Reduced striatal dopamine transporter density associated with working memory deficits in opioid-dependent male subjects: a SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chih-Sung; Ho, Pei-Shen; Yen, Che-Hung; Yeh, Yi-Wei; Kuo, Shin-Chang; Huang, Chang-Chih; Chen, Chun-Yen; Shih, Mei-Chen; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Huang, San-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Research on the effects of repeated opioid use on striatal dopamine transporters has yielded inconsistent results, possibly confounded by a history of methamphetamine or methadone exposure in opioid-dependent individuals. Previous studies have shown that striatal dopamine transporter density is positively correlated with the cognitive performance of healthy volunteers. This study aimed to investigate changes in striatal dopamine transporter density and their functional significance in opioid-dependent individuals. Single-photon emission computed tomography with [(99m) Tc]TRODAT-1 as a ligand was used to measure striatal dopamine transporter levels in 20 opioid-dependent individuals and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Opioid-dependent individuals had no history of methamphetamine or methadone use. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) was performed to assess neurocognitive function. We found that compared with healthy controls, opioid-dependent individuals showed a significant reduction in striatal dopamine transporter density. They also showed poorer performance on the WCST in terms of the trials administered, total errors, perseverative responses, perseverative errors, and non-perseverative errors. Striatal dopamine transporter levels negatively correlated with non-perseverative errors not only in opioid-dependent individuals but also in healthy controls. These findings suggest that in human, repeated opioid exposure reduces striatal dopamine transporter density, which can be associated with non-perseverative errors. Non-perseverative errors may be one of the more sensitive parameters in WCST to identify working memory deficits associated with striatal dopamine transporter reduction. Moreover, we suggest that whether opioid-associated neurotoxicity is reversible depends on the brain region. PMID:25439653

  11. Effects of the Trace Amine Associated Receptor 1 Agonist RO5263397 on Abuse-Related Behavioral Indices of Methamphetamine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Li; Zhang, Yanan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Methamphetamine is a major drug of abuse with no effective pharmacotherapy available. Trace amine associated receptor 1 is implicated in cocaine addiction and represents a potential therapeutic target. However, the effects of trace amine associated receptor 1 agonists on addiction-related behavioral effects of methamphetamine are unknown. Methods: This study examined the effects of a trace amine associated receptor 1 agonist RO5263397 on methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization, methamphetamine self-administration, cue- and methamphetamine-induced reinstatement of drug seeking, and cue-induced reinstatement of sucrose-seeking behaviors in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used to examine the effects of methamphetamine alone and in combination with the trace amine associated receptor 1 agonist RO5263397 (3.2–10mg/kg). Results: RO5263397 dose-dependently attenuated the expression of behavioral sensitization to methamphetamine, reduced methamphetamine self-administration, and decreased both cue- and a priming dose of methamphetamine-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behaviors. However, RO5263397 did not alter cue-induced reinstatement of sucrose-seeking behavior. Conclusions: Taken together, trace amine associated receptor 1 agonists attenuate some abuse-related behavioral effects of methamphetamine, strongly suggesting that drugs activating trace amine associated receptor 1 may be potentially useful for the treatment of methamphetamine addiction and warrant further studies. PMID:25522401

  12. [Impulsive behaviors in opiate-dependent subjects treated with naltrexone].

    PubMed

    Pérez de los Cobos, J; Pinet, C; Ribalta, E; Trujols, J; Casas, M

    1994-01-01

    Thirty three heroin dependents (DSM-III-R) attending a naltrexone clinic were assessed to see if their histories of bulimic and non-suicidal self-aggressive behaviours would allow to predict the therapeutic response of the opioid antagonist. Neither these impulsive behaviours non previous suicide attempts or over-doses could predict such a response, which was evaluated according to the time spent under treatment with naltrexone. Before the administration of naltrexone, one or more of the studied impulsive conducts were detected in 87.8% of the sample (n = 29). None of the patients combined enough criteria to be diagnosed of bulimia (DSM-III-R). In 32 patients the occurrence of changes in the impulsive behaviours studied during the treatment period with the opioid antagonist were determined. These variations were not related to the determinations of abuse drugs in urine or with intake of psychoactive drugs. During the treatment with naltrexone, 15 patients ceased to present self-injuries without suicidal purposes and none of the patients began these behaviours for the first time. However, some patients without a previous history of bulimic behaviour developed this condition during the administration of the opioid antagonist. In this sense, four subgroups of patients can be differentiated according to the moment in which the bulimic behaviour appeared: subgroup A includes 7 individuals (21.7%) who discontinued this behaviour upon receiving the antagonist, while subgroup B (n = 3; 9.3%) is made up of those who presented this behaviour during both heroin consumption and the administration of naltrexone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Methamphetamine Trends in the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... and PSE are precursor chemicals used in the production of methamphetamine. In the CMEA, law enforcement officials ... 10 pounds or more of methamphetamine in a production cycle). Meth lab incidents in Kentucky have increased ...

  14. Methamphetamine Alters Brain Structures, Impairs Mental Flexibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alters Brain Structures, Impairs Mental Flexibility Methamphetamine Alters Brain Structures, Impairs Mental Flexibility Email Facebook Twitter March ... methamphetamine use, such as tobacco smoking. Can the Brain Recover? The UCLA study’s findings underscore the importance ...

  15. Prenatal Methamphetamine Exposure Linked with Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... a sequence of effects following prenatal exposure to cocaine, a stimulant similar to methamphetamine. Identifying such problems ...

  16. Cigarette smoking as a target for potentiating outcomes for methamphetamine abuse treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brensilver, Matthew; Heinzerling, Keith G.; Swanson, Aimee-Noelle; Telesca, Donatello; Furst, Benjamin A.; Shoptaw, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction and Aims Cigarette smoking occurs frequently among individuals with methamphetamine dependence. Preclinical and clinical evidence has suggested that the common co-abuse of methamphetamine and cigarettes represents a pharmacologically meaningful pattern. Methods The present study is a secondary analysis of a randomised, placebo-controlled trial of bupropion treatment for methamphetamine dependence (bupropion n=36; placebo n=37). A hierarchical logistic modelling approach assessed the efficacy of bupropion for reducing MA use separately among smokers and non-smokers. Among smokers, relations between cigarettes smoked and MA use were assessed. Results Smoking status did not affect treatment responsiveness in either the bupropion condition or the placebo condition. In the placebo condition, increased cigarette use was associated with an increased probability of methamphetamine use during the same time period. This effect was not observed in the bupropion condition. Discussion and Conclusions Initial smoking status did not impact treatment outcomes. Among smokers, results suggest that bupropion may dissociate cigarette and methamphetamine use. The effect was modest and a precise pharmacologic mechanism remains elusive. Cholinergic systems may be relevant for methamphetamine use outcomes. Future studies should continue to assess the role of smoking in methamphetamine treatment outcomes. PMID:22385210

  17. Methamphetamine: Putting the Brakes on Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettig, Jacob P.; Grady, Sarah E.; Nowosadzka, Izabella

    2006-01-01

    In only recent history, illicit use of methamphetamine, once isolated to urban areas on the West Coast, has spread into rural areas of the Midwest and southern United States. Although past and current methamphetamine legislation has increased penalties for methamphetamine manufacturers and tightened restrictions on sales of known precursors, the…

  18. Bupropion differentially impacts acquisition of methamphetamine self-administration and sucrose-maintained behavior.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Carmela M; Linkugel, Jessica D; Bevins, Rick A

    2008-05-01

    Bupropion reduces the subjective effects and cue-induced craving for methamphetamine in humans. Given these effects of bupropion on methamphetamine in humans and its widespread clinical use, a preclinical model of drug-taking was used to determine if pretreatment with bupropion would alter the acquisition of methamphetamine self-administration. During acquisition, rats were given saline or bupropion (30 or 60 mg/kg, IP) 5 min before a 60-min session. For the first 8 days, each response on the active lever produced an infusion of methamphetamine (0.025 mg/kg). Responding on the inactive lever had no programmed consequence. This FR1 schedule was then increased to an FR3 for 4 more days. In a parallel study, the identical procedures were used to test the impact of bupropion on sucrose-maintained responding. Bupropion pretreatment decreased the number of methamphetamine infusions and sucrose deliveries earned on an FR1 and FR3. However, bupropion pretreatment only delayed discrimination between the active and inactive levers in the methamphetamine self-administration rats. Discrimination between active and inactive levers was acquired in all groups in the sucrose experiment regardless of pretreatment condition. Combined, these results suggest that bupropion has a more general effect within the appetitive/reward system of the brain rather than having complete specificity for methamphetamine.

  19. Deposition characteristics of methamphetamine and amphetamine in fingernail clippings and hair sections.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dong-Liang; Yin, Rea-Ming; Liu, Hsiu-Chuan; Wang, Chung-Yi; Liu, Ray H

    2004-09-01

    Fingernail clippings collected from 97 consenting females, who admitted amphetamines and/or opiates use and are currently under treatment, were quantitatively analyzed for the presence of methamphetamine and amphetamine. Sixty-two subjects were found positive for methamphetamine/amphetamine. Paired nail-hair specimens were collected from 6 of these subjects for a 12-week period and analyzed to determine the duration of detectability and deposition characteristics of amphetamines in fingernails; whether data derived from the analysis of nail clippings and hair sections are reflective of drug use patterns; and whether there is a relationship between the analytical data derived from the paired nail-hair specimens. Typical sample pre-treatment procedures and GC-MS protocols were evaluated to establish the validity of various analytical parameters and to ensure that the resulting data can be properly interpreted. Major findings include 1. Methamphetamine was found in the nails of 62 subjects collected in Week 0. The distribution of methamphetamine concentrations (ng/mg) in these nail samples are range, 0.46-61.50; mean, 9.96; and standard deviation: 13.33. The corresponding data for amphetamine are < 0.20-5.42, 0.93, and 1.01, respectively. 2. Sectional analyses of hair samples collected from 6 subjects in Week 0 show methamphetamine concentrations peak at different distances from the root. 3. The concentrations of methamphetamine and amphetamine in nail clippings are generally lower than the first 1.5-cm section of hair samples collected at the same time from the same individual. 4. Amphetamine/ methamphetamine concentration ratios in nail clippings and hair samples are comparable. 5. Methamphetamine concentration in the nail clippings collected at Weeks 0, 4, 8, and 12 decreases in a pattern similar to that exhibited by the first 1.5-cm sections of the hair samples collected at the same time.

  20. Reduced Prefrontal Cortex Hemodynamic Response in Adults with Methamphetamine Induced Psychosis: Relevance for Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Kimoto, Sohei; Iida, Junzo; Kishimoto, Naoko; Nakanishi, Yoko; Tanaka, Shohei; Ota, Toyosaku; Makinodan, Manabu; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with methamphetamine abuse/dependence often exhibit high levels of impulsivity, which may be associated with the structural abnormalities and functional hypoactivities observed in the frontal cortex of these subjects. Although near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a simple and non-invasive method for characterizing the clinical features of various psychiatric illnesses, few studies have used NIRS to directly investigate the association between prefrontal cortical activity and inhibitory control in patients with methamphetamine-induced psychosis (MAP). Using a 24-channel NIRS system, we compared hemodynamic responses during the Stroop color-word task in 14 patients with MAP and 21 healthy controls matched for age, sex and premorbid IQ. In addition, we used the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11) to assess impulsivity between subject groups. The MAP group exhibited significantly less activation in the anterior and frontopolar prefrontal cortex accompanied by lower Stroop color-word task performance, compared with controls. Moreover, BIS-11 scores were significantly higher in the MAP group, and were negatively correlated with the hemodynamic responses in prefrontal cortex. Our data suggest that reduced hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal cortex might reflect higher levels of impulsivity in patients with MAP, providing new insights into disrupted inhibitory control observed in MAP. PMID:27050450

  1. The effect of early environmental manipulation on locomotor sensitivity and methamphetamine conditioned place preference reward.

    PubMed

    Hensleigh, E; Pritchard, L M

    2014-07-15

    Early life stress leads to several effects on neurological development, affecting health and well-being later in life. Instances of child abuse and neglect are associated with higher rates of depression, risk taking behavior, and an increased risk of drug abuse later in life. This study used repeated neonatal separation of rat pups as a model of early life stress. Rat pups were either handled and weighed as controls or separated for 180 min per day during postnatal days 2-8. In adulthood, male and female rats were tested for methamphetamine conditioned place preference reward and methamphetamine induced locomotor activity. Tissue samples were collected and mRNA was quantified for the norepinephrine transporter in the prefrontal cortex and the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens. Results indicated rats given methamphetamine formed a conditioned place preference, but there was no effect of early separation or sex. Separated males showed heightened methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity, but there was no effect of early separation for females. Overall females were more active than males in response to both saline and methamphetamine. No differences in mRNA levels were observed across any conditions. These results suggest early neonatal separation affects methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity in a sex-dependent manner but has no effects on methamphetamine conditioned place preference. PMID:24713150

  2. Development and persistence of methamphetamine-conditioned hyperactivity in Swiss-Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Rauhut, Anthony Sean; Bialecki, Victoria

    2011-06-01

    These experiments examined the development and persistence of methamphetamine-conditioned hyperactivity in Swiss-Webster mice. Experiments 1 and 2 examined the development of conditioned hyperactivity, varying the methamphetamine dose (0.25-2.0 mg/kg), the temporal injection parameters (continuous; experiment 1 or intermittent; experiment 2), and the comparison control group (saline; experiment 1 or unpaired; experiment 2). Experiment 3 examined the persistence of methamphetamine-conditioned hyperactivity by comparing mice 1 (immediate) or 28 (delay) days after drug withdrawal. In each experiment, several behavioral measures (vertical counts, distance traveled, and velocity) were recorded and temporal analyses conducted to assess methamphetamine-conditioned hyperactivity. In experiments 1 and 2, it was found that methamphetamine-conditioned hyperactivity was (i) dose-dependent, (ii) detected early in the session, and (iii) detected by a behavioral measure indicative of general activity (i.e. distance traveled), and (iv) varied as a function of the number of conditioning sessions. In experiment 3, it was found that conditioned hyperactivity persisted for 28 days, though was weakened by nonassociative factors, following methamphetamine withdrawal. Collectively, these results suggest that conditioned hyperactivity to methamphetamine is robust and persists after prolonged periods of drug withdrawal in mice. Furthermore, these results are consistent with an excitatory classical conditioning interpretation of conditioned hyperactivity.

  3. Methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference is facilitated by estradiol pretreatment in female mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, H H; Yang, Y K; Yeh, T L; Cherng, C F G; Hsu, H C; Hsiao, S Y; Yu, L

    2003-12-31

    Ovarian hormones were well documented to modulate the dopamine release in the central dopaminergic systems. The dopamine-releasing effects in the nucleus accumbens, a major target of the mesolimbicortical dopaminergic system, were closely associated with the reinforcing effects of two psychomotor stimulants, cocaine and methamphetamine. This study aimed to examine the sex differences in the cocaine- and methamphetamine-reinforcing behavior, conditioned place preference. In addition, the modulating effects of estradiol and progesterone on methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference were investigated in both sexes of adult gonadectomized mice. There was no sex difference in the sensitivity to the cocaine (5 mg/kg)-induced conditioned place preference. However, female mice exhibited a more potent methamphetamine (1 mg/kg)-induced conditioned place preference than did male mice. Moreover, pretreatment with estradiol for two consecutive days before the beginning of the conditioning and throughout the four daily conditionings (0.47 microg/day for totally six days) effectively facilitated methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference in gonadectomized female mice, but not in gonadectomized male mice. Progesterone, under a similar treatment regimen (0.47 microg/day for six consecutive days), did not alter the methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference in either sex of gonadectomized mice. Taken together, we conclude that the facilitating effects of estradiol on methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference could be sex-dependent with an eminent sensitivity associated with the adult female mice.

  4. Is serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor related to craving for or use of alcohol, cocaine, or methamphetamine?

    PubMed Central

    Hilburn, Craig; Nejtek, Vicki A; Underwood, Wendy A; Singh, Meharvan; Patel, Gauravkumar; Gangwani, Pooja; Forster, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Background Data suggests that brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) plays a neuroadaptive role in addiction. Whether serum BDNF levels are different in alcohol or psychostimulants as a function of craving is unknown. Here, we examined craving and serum BDNF levels in persons with alcohol versus psychostimulant dependence. Our goals were to explore BDNF as an objective biomarker for 1) craving 2) abstinence, and 3) years of chronic substance use. Methods An exploratory, cross-sectional study was designed. Men and women between 20–65 years old with alcohol, cocaine, or methamphetamine dependence were eligible. A craving questionnaire was used to measure alcohol, cocaine and methamphetamine cravings. Serum levels of BDNF were measured using enzyme linked immunoassay. Analysis of variance, chi-square, and correlations were performed using a 95% confidence interval and a significance level of P < 0.05. Results We found a significant difference in the mean craving score among alcohol, cocaine and methamphetamine dependent subjects. There were no significant influences of race, gender, psychiatric disorder or psychotropic medication on serum BDNF levels. We found that among psychostimulant users BDNF levels were significantly higher in men than in women when the number of abstinent days was statistically controlled. Further, a significant correlation between serum BDNF levels and the number of abstinent days since last psychostimulant use was found. Conclusion These data suggest that BDNF may be a biomarker of abstinence in psychostimulant dependent subjects and inform clinicians about treatment initiatives. The results are interpreted with caution due to small sample size and lack of a control group. PMID:21792305

  5. Methamphetamines pretreatment and the vulnerability of the striatum to methamphetamine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Stephans, S; Yamamoto, B

    1996-06-01

    Pretreatment with intermittent low-dose administrations of stimulants increases mesostriatal dopamine transmission upon administration of a challenge dose. This occurs without evidence of a long-term dopamine or serotonin depletion. The purpose was to examine whether pretreatment with low doses of methamphetamine enhances dopamine and/or glutamate efflux and the subsequent depletion of dopamine and serotonin produced by neurotoxic challenge doses of methamphetamine. Microdialysis was used to measure simultaneously extracellular concentrations of dopamine and glutamate in the striatum and prefrontal cortex of awake rats. Basal extracellular concentrations of dopamine and glutamate were unaltered following pretreatment with methamphetamine. The increase in methamphetamine-induced striatal dopamine efflux was not significantly different between methamphetamine and saline pretreated groups. In contrast, after high challenge doses of methamphetamine, dopamine efflux in prefrontal cortex was enhanced to a greater extent in methamphetamine pretreated rats as compared to saline pretreated controls. Acute methamphetamine did not enhance glutamate efflux in prefrontal cortex after pretreatment with saline or methamphetamine. The increase in striatal glutamate efflux was blunted in rats pretreated with methamphetamine. When measured 4 days later, dopamine and serotonin content in striatum was depleted in all rats acutely challenged with methamphetamine. However, these depletions were attenuated in rats pretreated with methamphetamine. An acute methamphetamine challenge did not affect dopamine tissue content in the prefrontal cortex of any rats. Serotonin content in cortex was depleted in all groups following the methamphetamine challenge administration, but these depletions were diminished in methamphetamine-pretreated rats. These results are the first evidence that an intermittent pretreatment regimen with low doses of methamphetamine, followed by a 1 week withdrawal

  6. Maxillary sinus manifestations of methamphetamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Faucett, Erynne A; Marsh, Katherine M; Farshad, Kayven; Erman, Audrey B; Chiu, Alexander G

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamines are the second most commonly used illicit drug worldwide and cost the United States health-care system ∼$23.4 billion annually. Use of this drug affects multiple organ systems and causes a variety of clinical manifestations. Although there are commonly known sequelae of methamphetamine abuse such as "meth mouth," there is limited evidence regarding maxillary sinus manifestations. The following cases highlight the initial evaluation and management of two methamphetamine abusers with loculated purulent collections within the maxillary sinus as a result of methamphetamine abuse. Our aim was to delineate the otolaryngologic symptoms associated with the patients' methamphetamine abuse. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed loculated purulent collections within the maxillary sinus of probable odontogenic origin in both patients. Methamphetamine abuse leading to rampant caries and poor oral hygiene may predispose individuals for craniofacial infections and fluid collections. These cases illustrate the development of maxillary sinusitis and maxilla mucoceles that have been associated with methamphetamine use.

  7. Methamphetamine Self-Administration in Mice Decreases GIRK Channel-Mediated Currents in Midbrain Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Amanda L.; Varela, Erika; Bettinger, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Methamphetamine is a psychomotor stimulant with abuse liability and a substrate for catecholamine uptake transporters. Acute methamphetamine elevates extracellular dopamine, which in the midbrain can activate D2 autoreceptors to increase a G-protein gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) conductance that inhibits dopamine neuron firing. These studies examined the neurophysiological consequences of methamphetamine self-administration on GIRK channel-mediated currents in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. Methods: Male DBA/2J mice were trained to self-administer intravenous methamphetamine. A dose response was conducted as well as extinction and cue-induced reinstatement. In a second study, after at least 2 weeks of stable self-administration of methamphetamine, electrophysiological brain slice recordings were conducted on dopamine neurons from self-administering and control mice. Results: In the first experiment, ad libitum-fed, nonfood-trained mice exhibited a significant increase in intake and locomotion following self-administration as the concentration of methamphetamine per infusion was increased (0.0015–0.15mg/kg/infusion). Mice exhibited extinction in responding and cue-induced reinstatement. In the second experiment, dopamine cells in both the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area from adult mice with a history of methamphetamine self-administration exhibited significantly smaller D2 and GABAB receptor-mediated currents compared with control mice, regardless of whether their daily self-administration sessions had been 1 or 4 hours. Interestingly, the effects of methamphetamine self-administration were not present when intracellular calcium was chelated by including BAPTA in the recording pipette. Conclusions: Our results suggest that methamphetamine self-administration decreases GIRK channel-mediated currents in dopaminergic neurons and that this effect may be calcium dependent. PMID:25522412

  8. Low concentrations of methamphetamine detectable in urine in the presence of high concentrations of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Jemionek, John F; Addison, Joseph; Past, Marilyn R

    2009-04-01

    Twenty-two urine specimens reported by military drug-testing laboratories for the presence of high concentrations of amphetamine only were subject to further analysis for the presence of methamphetamine. The 22 urine specimens had concentrations of amphetamine in the range of 28,028 to 241,142 ng/mL. The specimens were also assayed for the respective isomeric ratio of d (S) and l (R) amphetamine and methamphetamine. The results suggest that urine specimens containing high concentrations of amphetamine in which the urine concentration ratio of methamphetamine to amphetamine is less than 0.5% with similar isomeric distribution of d-(S) and l-(R) amphetamine and methamphetamine, respectively, may not necessarily indicate polydrug use.

  9. Impaired emotional facial expression recognition in alcoholics, opiate dependence subjects, methadone maintained subjects and mixed alcohol-opiate antecedents subjects compared with normal controls.

    PubMed

    Kornreich, Charles; Foisy, Marie-Line; Philippot, Pierre; Dan, Bernard; Tecco, Juan; Noël, Xavier; Hess, Ursula; Pelc, Isidore; Verbanck, Paul

    2003-08-01

    The present study aims to explore whether an impairment in emotional facial expressions (EFE) decoding is specific to alcoholism compared with opiate dependence. An EFE decoding test consisting of 16 photographs of EFE portraying happiness, anger, sadness and disgust was administered to five different groups of 30 subjects each: recently detoxified alcoholics (RA); opiate addicts under methadone maintenance treatment (OM); detoxified opiate addicts (OA); detoxified subjects with both alcohol and opiate dependence antecedents (DAO); and normal controls (NC). Repeated measures analysis of variance using a multivariate approach was conducted on EFE decoding accuracy scores with group as the between-subjects factor. Accuracy scores were significantly lower in RA and DAO than in OM and OA, which had significantly lower scores than NC. Low accuracy scores in RA and DAO confirm previous results indicating that alcoholism is associated with impaired EFE recognition. Results in OM and OA indicate that opiate dependence is also associated with an impaired EFE decoding but less than in alcoholism. Alcohol and opiate chronic consumption could both exercise a deleterious effect on EFE-decoding brain function, alcohol having the most severe impact. Alternatively, EFE-decoding problems could be present before the development of alcohol and opiate dependence, with an additional effect of chronic alcohol consumption on EFE decoding. In this context, EFE-decoding impairment could reflect a more general emotional intelligence deficit in addicted populations.

  10. Differential modulation of the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine and cocaine by alprazolam and oxazepam in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Spence, A L; Guerin, G F; Goeders, N E

    2016-03-01

    Drug users often combine benzodiazepines with psychostimulants, such as methamphetamine. However, very little research has been conducted on this type of polydrug use, particularly in female subjects. The present study was therefore designed to examine the effects of two benzodiazepines, alprazolam and oxazepam, on the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine and cocaine in both male and female rats. Rats were trained to discriminate methamphetamine (1.0 mg/kg, ip) or cocaine (10 mg/kg, ip) from saline using a two-lever operant, food-reinforced, drug discrimination design. Pretreatment with oxazepam (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, ip) significantly attenuated methamphetamine discrimination in both male and female rats. In contrast, however, the high dose of alprazolam (4 mg/kg, ip) actually augmented the subjective effects of lower doses of methamphetamine (0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg, ip). Oxazepam produced similar effects on the subjective effects of cocaine as with methamphetamine, significantly reducing cocaine discrimination in both male and female rats. However, neither the high nor low dose of alprazolam (2 and 4 mg/kg, ip) produced any apparent effect on cocaine discrimination. Finally, while similar results were observed in both male and female rats across these experiments, methamphetamine and cocaine discrimination were more sensitive to oxazepam in female subjects. The results of these experiments suggest that alprazolam and oxazepam can differentially affect the subjective effects of methamphetamine and cocaine. These results also demonstrate that alprazolam can differentially affect the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine and cocaine.

  11. The methamphetamine-sensitive circadian oscillator (MASCO) in mice.

    PubMed

    Tataroglu, Ozgür; Davidson, Alec J; Benvenuto, Luke J; Menaker, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) orchestrates synchrony among many peripheral oscillators and is required for circadian rhythms of locomotor activity and many physiological processes. However, the unique effects of methamphetamine (MAP) on circadian behavior suggest the presence of an SCN-independent, methamphetamine-sensitive circadian oscillator (MASCO). Substantial data collected using rat models show that chronic methamphetamine dramatically lengthens circadian period of locomotor activity rhythms and induces rhythms in animals lacking an SCN. However, the anatomical substrate and the molecular components of the MASCO are unknown. The response to MAP is less well studied in mice, a model that would provide the genetic tools to probe the molecular components of this extra-SCN oscillator. The authors tested the effects of chronic MAP on 2 strains of intact and SCN-lesioned mice in constant dark and constant light. Furthermore, they applied various MAP availability schedules to SCN-lesioned mice to confirm the circadian nature of the underlying oscillator. The results indicate that this oscillator has circadian properties. In intact mice, the MASCO interacts with the SCN in a manner that is strain, sex, and dose dependent. In SCN-lesioned mice, it induces robust free-running locomotor rhythmicity, which persists for up to 14 cycles after methamphetamine is withdrawn. In the future, localization of the MASCO and characterization of its underlying molecular mechanism, as well as its interactions with other oscillators in the body, will be essential to a complete understanding of the organization of the mammalian circadian system.

  12. Effects of methamphetamine and methyldopa on ethanol induced hypothermia in mice.

    PubMed

    Ageel, A M; Ginawi, O T

    1985-02-01

    The effects of D-methamphetamine HCl (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg, i.p.) and alpha-methyldopa (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg, i.p.) on rectal temperature and on ethanol (3 g/kg, i.p.)-induced hypothermia have been investigated in mice. Methamphetamine caused a dose-dependent hyperthermia, but methyldopa induced hypothermia, which decreased with increases in dose. Methamphetamine antagonized the hypothermic effect of ethanol, but methyldopa (1 and 2 mg/kg) did not affect it. Methyldopa (4 mg/kg), however, reversed ethanol hypothermia. Ethanol pretreatment significantly potentiated the hypothermic effect of methyldopa (4 mg/kg), and it prevented methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. A possible central action for the tested drugs on biogenic monoamines and a peripheral component in their thermoregulatory effects are discussed in this report.

  13. Methamphetamine induces trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) expression in human T lymphocytes: role in immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Uma; Cenna, Jonathan M; Haldar, Bijayesh; Fernandes, Nicole C; Razmpour, Roshanak; Fan, Shongshan; Ramirez, Servio H; Potula, Raghava

    2016-01-01

    The novel transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor, trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), represents a potential, direct target for drugs of abuse and monoaminergic compounds, including amphetamines. For the first time, our studies have illustrated that there is an induction of TAAR1 mRNA expression in resting T lymphocytes in response to methamphetamine. Methamphetamine treatment for 6 h significantly increased TAAR1 mRNA expression (P < 0.001) and protein expression (P < 0.01) at 24 h. With the use of TAAR1 gene silencing, we demonstrate that methamphetamine-induced cAMP, a classic response to methamphetamine stimulation, is regulated via TAAR1. We also show by TAAR1 knockdown that the down-regulation of IL-2 in T cells by methamphetamine, which we reported earlier, is indeed regulated by TAAR1. Our results also show the presence of TAAR1 in human lymph nodes from HIV-1-infected patients, with or without a history of methamphetamine abuse. TAAR1 expression on lymphocytes was largely in the paracortical lymphoid area of the lymph nodes with enhanced expression in lymph nodes of HIV-1-infected methamphetamine abusers rather than infected-only subjects. In vitro analysis of HIV-1 infection of human PBMCs revealed increased TAAR1 expression in the presence of methamphetamine. In summary, the ability of methamphetamine to activate trace TAAR1 in vitro and to regulate important T cell functions, such as cAMP activation and IL-2 production; the expression of TAAR1 in T lymphocytes in peripheral lymphoid organs, such as lymph nodes; and our in vitro HIV-1 infection model in PBMCs suggests that TAAR1 may play an important role in methamphetamine -mediated immune-modulatory responses.

  14. Methamphetamines and Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Tricia E.; Schuetter, Renee; Tellei, Jacqueline; Sauvage, Lynnae

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Methamphetamine (MA) is one of the most commonly used illicit drugs in pregnancy, yet studies on MA-exposed pregnancy outcomes have been limited because of retrospective measures of drug use, lack of control for confounding factors: other drug use, including tobacco; poverty; poor diet; and lack of prenatal care. This study presents prospective collected data on MA use and birth outcomes, controlling for most confounders. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective cohort study of women obtaining prenatal care from a clinic treating women with substance use disorders, on whom there are prospectively obtained data on MA and other drug use, including tobacco. MA-exposed pregnancies were compared with non-MA exposed pregnancies as well as non-drug exposed pregnancies, using univariate and multivariate analysis to control for confounders. Results One hundred forty-four infants were exposed to MA during pregnancy, 50 had first trimester exposure only, 45 had continuous use until the second trimester, 29 had continuous use until the third trimester, but were negative at delivery and 20 had positive toxicology at delivery. There were 107 non MA-exposed infants and 59 infants with no drug exposure. Mean birth weights were the same for MA-exposed and non-exposed infants (3159 g vs. 3168 g p=0.9), though smaller than those without any drug exposure (3159 vs. 3321 p=0.04), Infants with positive toxicology at birth (meconium or urine) were smaller than infants with first trimester exposure only (2932 g vs. 3300 g p=0.01). Gestation was significantly shorter among the MA-exposed infants compared to non-exposed infants (38.5 vs. 39.1 weeks p=0.045) and those with no drug exposure (38.5 vs. 39.5 p=0.0011), The infants with positive toxicology at birth had a clinically relevant shortening of gestation (37.3 weeks vs. 39.1 p=0.0002). Conclusions MA use during pregnancy is associated with shorter gestational ages and lower birth weight, especially if used continuously

  15. Cognitive deficits associated with combined HIV gp120 expression and chronic methamphetamine exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Kesby, James P; Markou, Athina; Semenova, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine abuse is common among individuals infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Neurocognitive outcomes tend to be worse in methamphetamine users with HIV. However, it is unclear whether discrete cognitive domains are susceptible to impairment after combined HIV infection and methamphetamine abuse. The expression of HIV/gp120 protein induces neuropathology in mice similar to HIV-induced pathology in humans. We investigated the separate and combined effects of methamphetamine exposure and gp120 expression on cognitive function in transgenic (gp120-tg) and control mice. The mice underwent an escalating methamphetamine binge regimen and were tested in novel object/location recognition, object-in-place recognition, and Barnes maze tests. gp120 expression disrupted performance in the object-in-place test (i.e. similar time spent with all objects, regardless of location), indicating deficits in associative recognition memory. gp120 expression also altered reversal learning in the Barnes maze, suggesting impairments in executive function. Methamphetamine exposure impaired spatial strategy in the Barnes maze, indicating deficits in spatial learning. Methamphetamine-exposed gp120-tg mice had the lowest spatial strategy scores in the final acquisition trials in the Barnes maze, suggesting greater deficits in spatial learning than all of the other groups. Although HIV infection involves interactions between multiple proteins and processes, in addition to gp120, our findings in gp120-tg mice suggest that humans with the dual insult of HIV infection and methamphetamine abuse may exhibit a broader spectrum of cognitive deficits than those with either factor alone. Depending on the cognitive domain, the combination of both insults may exacerbate deficits in cognitive performance compared with each individual insult.

  16. Cognitive deficits associated with combined HIV gp120 expression and chronic methamphetamine exposure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kesby, James P.; Markou, Athina; Semenova, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine abuse is common among individuals infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Neurocognitive outcomes tend to be worse in methamphetamine users with HIV. However, it is unclear whether discrete cognitive domains are susceptible to impairment after combined HIV infection and methamphetamine abuse. The expression of HIV/gp120 protein induces neuropathology in mice similar to HIV-induced pathology in humans. We investigated the separate and combined effects of methamphetamine exposure and gp120 expression on cognitive function in transgenic (gp120-tg) and control mice. The mice underwent an escalating methamphetamine binge regimen and were tested in novel object/location recognition, object-in-place recognition, and Barnes maze tests. gp120 expression disrupted performance in the object-in-place test (i.e., similar time spent with all objects, regardless of location), indicating deficits in associative recognition memory. gp120 expression also altered reversal learning in the Barnes maze, suggesting impairments in executive function. Methamphetamine exposure impaired spatial strategy in the Barnes maze, indicating deficits in spatial learning. Methamphetamine-exposed gp120-tg mice had the lowest spatial strategy scores in the final acquisition trials in the Barnes maze, suggesting greater deficits in spatial learning than all of the other groups. Although HIV infection involves interactions between multiple proteins and processes, in addition to gp120, our findings in gp120-tg mice suggest that humans with the dual insult of HIV infection and methamphetamine abuse may exhibit a broader spectrum of cognitive deficits than those with either factor alone. Depending on the cognitive domain, the combination of both insults may exacerbate deficits in cognitive performance compared with each individual insult. PMID:25476577

  17. Effect alteration of methamphetamine by amino acids or their salts on ambulatory activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuribara, H; Tadokoro, S

    1983-02-01

    Effect alterations of methamphetamine by pretreatment of amino acids or their salts on ambulatory activity in mice were investigated to confirm a fact that certain amino acids, particularly monosodium L-glutamate, are added to methamphetamine by the street users, and that the amino acids augment the effect of methamphetamine. The ambulatory activity of mouse was measured by a tilting-type round activity cage of 25 cm in diameter. The amino acids or their salts tested were monosodium L-glutamate, monosodium L-aspartate, gamma-amino-butyric acid, L-alanine, L-lysine hydrochloride and L-arginine hydrochloride. A single administration of each chemical at doses of 1 and 2 g/kg i.p. did not induce a marked change in the ambulatory activity in mice. Methamphetamine 2 mg/kg s.c. induced an increase in the ambulatory activity with a peak at 40 min after the administration, and the increased ambulatory activity persisted for 3 hr. The ambulation-increasing effect of methamphetamine was augmented by the pretreatment of monosodium L-glutamate and monosodium L-aspartate at 30 min before the methamphetamine administration, while attenuated by the pretreatment of L-lysine hydrochloride and L-arginine hydrochloride in a dose-dependent manner. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-alanine did not affect the effect of methamphetamine. Similar augmentation and attenuation in the ambulation-increasing effect of methamphetamine were induced by the pretreatment of sodium bicarbonate 0.9 g/kg i.p. (urinary alkalizer) and ammonium chloride 0.07 g/kg i.p. (urinary acidifier), respectively. The urinary pH level was elevated by the administration of monosodium L-glutamate, monosodium L-aspartate and sodium bicarbonate, and decreased by L-lysine hydrochloride, L-arginine hydrochloride and ammonium chloride. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-alanine did not elicit a marked change in the urinary pH level. The present experiment confirms the fact in human that monosodium L-glutamate augments the effect of

  18. Effects of acute doses of prosocial drugs methamphetamine and alcohol on plasma oxytocin levels.

    PubMed

    Bershad, Anya K; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Seiden, Jacob A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-06-01

    Many drugs, including alcohol and stimulants, demonstrably increase sociability and verbal interaction and are recreationally consumed in social settings. One drug, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy), seems to produce its prosocial effects by increasing plasma oxytocin levels, and the oxytocin system has been implicated in responses to several other drugs of abuse. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of 2 other "social" drugs on plasma oxytocin levels--methamphetamine and alcohol. Based on their shared capacity to enhance sociability, we hypothesized that both methamphetamine and alcohol would increase plasma oxytocin levels. In study 1, 11 healthy adult volunteers attended 3 sessions during which they received methamphetamine (10 mg or 20 mg) or placebo under double-blind conditions. Subjective drug effects, cardiovascular effects, and plasma oxytocin levels were measured at regular intervals throughout the sessions. In study 2, 8 healthy adult volunteers attended a single session during which they received 1 beverage containing placebo, and then a beverage containing alcohol (0.8 g/kg). Subjective effects, breath alcohol levels, and plasma oxytocin levels were measured at regular intervals. Both methamphetamine and alcohol produced their expected physiological and subjective effects, but neither of these drugs increased plasma oxytocin levels. The neurobiological mechanisms mediating the prosocial effects of drugs such as alcohol and methamphetamine remain to be identified.

  19. Methamphetamine Use and Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    FOR THE DENTAL PATIENT ... Methamphetamine use and oral health M ethamphetamine is an inexpensive, easy-to-make illicit drug. It is known by several street names: “meth,” “speed,” “ice,” “chalk,” “crank,” “fire,” “glass,” “crystal” and “tina.” It is ...

  20. Working memory fMRI activation in cocaine dependent subjects: association with treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, F. Gerard; Steinberg, Joel L.; Schmitz, Joy M.; Ma, Liangsuo; Liu, Shijing; Kjome, Kimberly L.; Rathnayaka, Nuvan; Kramer, Larry A.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2010-01-01

    fMRI studies of early abstinence cocaine users offer information about the state of the brain when most cocaine users seek treatment. This study examined the relationship between pretreatment brain function and subsequent treatment response in 19 treatment-seeking early abstinence cocaine dependent (CD) subjects. These subjects and 14 non-drug using control subjects underwent fMRI while performing a working memory task with three levels of difficulty. CD subjects were then randomized to treatment studies. Results showed CD subjects had significantly lower (random effects, corrected for multiple comparisons) brain activation in caudate, putamen, cingulate gyrus, middle and superior frontal gyri, inferior frontal gyrus pars triangularis and pars opercularis, precentral gyrus, and thalamus compared to non-drug using controls. Within CD subjects, thalamic activation significantly correlated with treatment response. This study shows CD subjects in early abstinence have alteration of brain function in frontal, striatal, and thalamic brain regions known to be part of a circuit associated with motor control, reward, and cognition. Subjects with pretreatment thalamic deactivation showed the poorest treatment response, possibly related to thalamic involvement in mesocortical and mesolimbic dopamine projections. PMID:20153142

  1. 21 CFR 862.3610 - Methamphetamine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Methamphetamine test system. 862.3610 Section 862....3610 Methamphetamine test system. (a) Identification. A methamphetamine test system is a device intended to measure methamphetamine, a central nervous system stimulating drug, in serum, plasma, and...

  2. 21 CFR 862.3610 - Methamphetamine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Methamphetamine test system. 862.3610 Section 862....3610 Methamphetamine test system. (a) Identification. A methamphetamine test system is a device intended to measure methamphetamine, a central nervous system stimulating drug, in serum, plasma, and...

  3. Predicting Rapid Relapse Following Treatment for Chemical Dependence: A Matched-Subjects Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svanum, Soren; McAdoo, William George

    1989-01-01

    Persons who underwent residential treatment for chemical dependency were identified as three-month treatment failures (N=52) or successes (N=52). Subjects were matched on Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) scores. Found posttreatment depression, anxiety, and sleep problems strongly related to failure among psychiatric MMPI group;…

  4. Methamphetamine Use: Hazards and Social Influences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wermuth, Laurie

    2000-01-01

    Presents data on methamphetamine use in the United States and the economic and social pressures that may partially explain expanded methamphetamine use. Recommends a policy response that utilizes a public health approach, including prevention campaigns, harm-reduction outreach and treatment approaches, and pharmacologic and abstinence-based drug…

  5. Need for Methamphetamine Programming in Extension Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudreault, Amy R.; Miller, Larry E.

    2011-01-01

    The study reported sought to identify the prevention education needs involving methamphetamine through survey methodology. The study focused on a random sample of U.S. states and the Extension Directors within each state, resulting in a 70% response rate (n = 134). Findings revealed that 11% reported they had received methamphetamine user…

  6. Quality of life and health of opioid-dependent subjects in India

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Om Prakash; Srivastava, Mona; Shankar, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The quality of life (QoL) of substance abusers is known to be severely impaired. This study was carried out to assess the impact of opioid dependence on the QoL of subjects and compared it with the normal subjects. Materials and Methods: Based on specified inclusion criteria a total of 47 subjects were recruited from a tertiary care center from India. The WHOQoL-BREF scale domain scores obtained at baseline were compared to that of normal subjects. An assessment of dysfunction and reasons for continuing and other parameters were assessed. Results: WHOQoL-BREF domains (Physical, Psychological, Social relationships and Environment) showed significantly lower scores and the difference was statistically significant. Interpretation and Conclusions: The results showed that QoL is an important parameter in assessment of substance abusers and can be used for long-term prognosis of these individuals. PMID:25288838

  7. Evaluation of the 20% D-methamphetamine requirement for determining illicit use of methamphetamine in urine.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Francis M; Crumpton, Susan; Mitchell, John; Flegel, Ronald R

    2012-07-01

    In urine drug testing, enantiomer analysis is used to determine whether a positive methamphetamine result could be due to use of an over-the-counter (OTC) nasal inhaler containing L-methamphetamine. D-methamphetamine at more than 20% of the total is considered indicative of a source other than an OTC product. This interpretation is based on a 1991 Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Technical Advisory. We performed studies to verify the methamphetamine enantiomer content of current OTC nasal inhalers and to evaluate current laboratory testing capabilities. This study demonstrated that OTC inhalers contain less than 1% D-methamphetamine. A proficiency testing (PT) set for HHS-certified laboratories performing methamphetamine enantiomer testing found D-methamphetamine percentages that were consistently 1 to 3% higher than theoretical due to optical impurity of the derivatizing reagent N-trifluoroacetyl-L-prolyl chloride (L-TPC). The PT results also demonstrate that laboratories can accurately determine 20% D-methamphetamine in samples with total methamphetamine concentrations down to 250 ng/mL. Based on these studies, the guideline of >20% D-methamphetamine is appropriate for interpreting results obtained using current laboratory methods.

  8. Inhibitory behavioral control: A stochastic dynamic causal modeling study comparing cocaine dependent subjects and controls

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liangsuo; Steinberg, Joel L.; Cunningham, Kathryn A.; Lane, Scott D.; Bjork, James M.; Neelakantan, Harshini; Price, Amanda E.; Narayana, Ponnada A.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Bechara, Antoine; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is associated with increased impulsivity in humans. Both cocaine dependence and impulsive behavior are under the regulatory control of cortico-striatal networks. One behavioral laboratory measure of impulsivity is response inhibition (ability to withhold a prepotent response) in which altered patterns of regional brain activation during executive tasks in service of normal performance are frequently found in cocaine dependent (CD) subjects studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, little is known about aberrations in specific directional neuronal connectivity in CD subjects. The present study employed fMRI-based dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to study the effective (directional) neuronal connectivity associated with response inhibition in CD subjects, elicited under performance of a Go/NoGo task with two levels of NoGo difficulty (Easy and Hard). The performance on the Go/NoGo task was not significantly different between CD subjects and controls. The DCM analysis revealed that prefrontal–striatal connectivity was modulated (influenced) during the NoGo conditions for both groups. The effective connectivity from left (L) anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to L caudate was similarly modulated during the Easy NoGo condition for both groups. During the Hard NoGo condition in controls, the effective connectivity from right (R) dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to L caudate became more positive, and the effective connectivity from R ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) to L caudate became more negative. In CD subjects, the effective connectivity from L ACC to L caudate became more negative during the Hard NoGo conditions. These results indicate that during Hard NoGo trials in CD subjects, the ACC rather than DLPFC or VLPFC influenced caudate during response inhibition. PMID:26082893

  9. Actigraphy-based sleep parameters during the reinstatement of methamphetamine self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Berro, Laís F; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Howell, Leonard L

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate nighttime activity of nonhuman primates during extinction and cue- and drug-primed reinstatement of methamphetamine self-administration. Adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; n = 5) self-administered methamphetamine (0.01 mg/kg/injection, i.v.) under a fixed-ratio 20 schedule of reinforcement. Saline infusions were then substituted for methamphetamine and stimulus light (drug-conditioned stimulus presented during drug self-administration) withheld until subjects reached extinction criteria. Drug- and cue-induced reinstatement effects were evaluated after i.v. noncontingent priming injections of methamphetamine (0.03, 0.1, or 0.3 mg/kg). Activity-based sleep measures were evaluated with Actiwatch monitors a week before (baseline nighttime activity parameters) and throughout the protocol. Although methamphetamine self-administration did not significantly affect nighttime activity compared to baseline, sleeplike parameters were improved during extinction compared to self-administration maintenance. Priming injection of 0.1 mg/kg methamphetamine, but not 0.03 or 0.3 mg/kg, induced significant reinstatement effects. These behavioral responses were accompanied by nighttime outcomes, with increased sleep fragmentation and decreased sleep efficiency in the night following 0.1 mg/kg methamphetamine-induced reinstatement. In the absence of both drug and drug-paired cues (extinction conditions), nighttime activity decreased compared to self-administration maintenance. Additionally, effective reinstatement conditions impaired sleeplike measures. Our data indicate that the reintroduction of the stimulus light as a drug-paired cue increased nighttime activity. PMID:26882419

  10. Actigraphy-based sleep parameters during the reinstatement of methamphetamine self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Berro, Laís F; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Howell, Leonard L

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate nighttime activity of nonhuman primates during extinction and cue- and drug-primed reinstatement of methamphetamine self-administration. Adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; n = 5) self-administered methamphetamine (0.01 mg/kg/injection, i.v.) under a fixed-ratio 20 schedule of reinforcement. Saline infusions were then substituted for methamphetamine and stimulus light (drug-conditioned stimulus presented during drug self-administration) withheld until subjects reached extinction criteria. Drug- and cue-induced reinstatement effects were evaluated after i.v. noncontingent priming injections of methamphetamine (0.03, 0.1, or 0.3 mg/kg). Activity-based sleep measures were evaluated with Actiwatch monitors a week before (baseline nighttime activity parameters) and throughout the protocol. Although methamphetamine self-administration did not significantly affect nighttime activity compared to baseline, sleeplike parameters were improved during extinction compared to self-administration maintenance. Priming injection of 0.1 mg/kg methamphetamine, but not 0.03 or 0.3 mg/kg, induced significant reinstatement effects. These behavioral responses were accompanied by nighttime outcomes, with increased sleep fragmentation and decreased sleep efficiency in the night following 0.1 mg/kg methamphetamine-induced reinstatement. In the absence of both drug and drug-paired cues (extinction conditions), nighttime activity decreased compared to self-administration maintenance. Additionally, effective reinstatement conditions impaired sleeplike measures. Our data indicate that the reintroduction of the stimulus light as a drug-paired cue increased nighttime activity.

  11. Actigraphy-Based Sleep Parameters During the Reinstatement of Methamphetamine Self-Administration in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Berro, Laís F.; Andersen, Monica L.; Tufik, Sergio; Howell, Leonard L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate nighttime activity of nonhuman primates during extinction and cue- and drug-primed reinstatement of methamphetamine self-administration. Adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; n = 5) self-administered methamphetamine (0.01 mg/kg/injection, i.v.) under a fixed-ratio 20 schedule of reinforcement. Saline infusions were then substituted for methamphetamine and stimulus light (drug-conditioned stimulus presented during drug self-administration) withheld until subjects reached extinction criteria. Drug- and cue-induced reinstatement effects were evaluated after i.v. non-contingent priming injections of methamphetamine (0.03, 0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg). Activity-based sleep measures were evaluated with Actiwatch monitors a week before (baseline nighttime activity parameters) and throughout the protocol. Although methamphetamine self-administration did not significantly affect nighttime activity compared to baseline, sleep-like parameters were improved during extinction compared to self-administration maintenance. Priming injection of 0.1 mg/kg methamphetamine, but not 0.03 or 0.3 mg/kg, induced significant reinstatement effects. These behavioral responses were accompanied by nighttime outcomes, with increased sleep fragmentation and decreased sleep efficiency in the night following 0.1 mg/kg methamphetamine-induced reinstatement. In the absence of both drug and drug-paired cues (extinction conditions), nighttime activity decreased compared to self-administration maintenance. Additionally, effective reinstatement conditions impaired sleep-like measures. Our data indicate that the reintroduction of the stimulus light as a drug-paired cue increased nighttime activity. PMID:26882419

  12. Melatonin attenuates methamphetamine-induced neuroinflammation through the melatonin receptor in the SH-SY5Y cell line.

    PubMed

    Wongprayoon, Pawaris; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2015-09-01

    Methamphetamine is a well-known psychostimulant drug, the abuse of which is a serious worldwide public health issue. In addition to its addictive effect, methamphetamine exposure has been shown to be associated with neuroinflammation in several brain areas. Several lines of evidence indicate that TNFα plays an important role in the methamphetamine-induced neuroinflammatory processes that result in apoptotic cell death. Many investigators have demonstrated the anti-neuroinflammatory effects of melatonin, but the mechanism by which this occurs still needs to be explored. In this study, we investigated the effect of methamphetamine on TNFα expression and NFκB activation in the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. We demonstrated the time-dependent effect of methamphetamine on the induction of TNFα expression as well as IκB degradation and NFκB nuclear translocation. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of melatonin on methamphetamine-induced TNFα overexpression and NFκB activation. The results showed that pretreatment with 100nM melatonin could prevent the TNFα overexpression caused by methamphetamine exposure. This attenuating effect was prevented by pre-incubation with luzindole, an antagonist of the melatonin MT1/MT2 receptors. Furthermore, methamphetamine-induced IκB degradation and NFκB nuclear translocation were also suppressed by pretreatment with melatonin, and pretreatment with luzindole diminished these protective effects. MT2 knockdown by siRNA abrogated the anti-inflammatory effect exerted by melatonin. From these findings, we propose that melatonin exerts its protective effects on methamphetamine-induced neuroinflammation through the membrane receptor, at least in part MT2 subtype, in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line.

  13. Optical study on the dependence of breast tissue composition and structure on subject anamnesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taroni, Paola; Quarto, Giovanna; Pifferi, Antonio; Abbate, Francesca; Balestreri, Nicola; Menna, Simona; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2015-07-01

    Time domain multi-wavelength (635 to 1060 nm) optical mammography was performed on 200 subjects to estimate their average breast tissue composition in terms of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, water, lipid and collagen, and structural information, as provided by scattering parameters (amplitude and power). Significant (and often marked) dependence of tissue composition and structure on age, menopausal status, body mass index, and use of oral contraceptives was demonstrated.

  14. Neural Correlates of Impulsive Aggressive Behavior in Subjects With a History of Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Samet; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard; Gowin, Joshua L.; Zuniga, Edward; Kamdar, Zahra N.; Schmitz, Joy M.; Lane, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol-related aggression is a complex and problematic phenomenon with profound public health consequences. We examined neural correlates potentially moderating the relationship between human aggressive behavior and chronic alcohol use. Thirteen subjects meeting DSM–IV criteria for past alcohol-dependence in remission (AD) and 13 matched healthy controls (CONT) participated in an fMRI study adapted from a laboratory model of human aggressive behavior (Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm, or PSAP). Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation was measured during bouts of operationally defined aggressive behavior, during postprovocation periods, and during monetary-reinforced behavior. Whole brain voxelwise random-effects analyses found group differences in brain regions relevant to chronic alcohol use and aggressive behavior (e.g., emotional and behavioral control). Behaviorally, AD subjects responded on both the aggressive response and monetary response options at significantly higher rates than CONT. Whole brain voxelwise random-effects analyses revealed significant group differences in response to provocation (monetary subtractions), with CONT subjects showing greater activation in frontal and prefrontal cortex, thalamus, and hippocampus. Collapsing data across all subjects, regression analyses of postprovocation brain activation on aggressive response rate revealed significant positive regression slopes in precentral gyrus and parietal cortex; and significant negative regression slopes in orbitofrontal cortex, prefrontal cortex, caudate, thalamus, and middle temporal gyrus. In these collapsed analyses, response to provocation and aggressive behavior were associated with activation in brain regions subserving inhibitory and emotional control, sensorimotor integration, and goal directed motor activity. PMID:25664566

  15. Effects of methamphetamine on response rate: a microstructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J Adam; Hughes, Christine E; Pitts, Raymond C

    2007-06-01

    Key pecking in pigeons was maintained under a multiple random-interval (RI) 1-min, RI 4-min schedule of food presentation. Several doses (0.3-5.6 mg/kg) of methamphetamine were administered, and effects on overall response rates and on the microstructure of responding were characterized. In three of the four pigeons, methamphetamine dose-dependently decreased overall response rate in both components; in the fourth pigeon, intermediate doses increased response rates. Log-survivor analyses did not produce the clear "broken-stick" pattern previously reported with rats [Shull, R.L., Gaynor, S.T., Grimes, J.A., 2001. Response rate viewed as engagement bouts: effects of relative reinforcement and schedule type. J. Exp. Anal. Behav. 75, 247-274]. A fine-grained analysis of inter-response times (IRTs) revealed clear bands of responding around certain IRT durations. Methamphetamine tended to decrease the frequency of IRTs in the shorter bands and increase the frequency of IRTs across all bins greater than 2s. These results suggest that (a) survivor analyses may not extend to pigeon key pecking, (b) microstructural analyses can reveal order not evident with overall response rate, and (c) a detailed analysis of responding might prove more useful than summary measures in characterizing drug effects on behavior.

  16. Neural Correlates of Craving in Methamphetamine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Shahmohammadi, Fanak; Golesorkhi, Mehrshad; Riahi Kashani, Mohammad Mansour; Sangi, Mehrdad; Yoonessi, Ahmad; Yoonessi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Methamphetamine is a powerful psychostimulant that causes significant neurological impairments with long-lasting effects and has provoked serious international concerns about public health. Denial of drug abuse and drug craving are two important factors that make the diagnosis and treatment extremely challenging. Here, we present a novel and rapid noninvasive method with potential application for differentiation and monitoring methamphetamine abuse. Methods: Visual stimuli comprised a series of images with neutral and methamphetamine-related content. A total of 10 methamphetamine abusers and 10 age-gender matched controls participated in the experiments. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded and compared using a time window analysis method. The ERPs were divided into 19 time windows of 100 ms with 50 ms overlaps. The area of positive sections below each window was calculated to measure the differences between the two groups. Results: Significant differences between two groups were observed from 250 to 500 ms (P300) in response to methamphetamine-related visual stimuli and 600 to 800 ms in response to neutral stimuli. Conclusion: This study presented a novel and noninvasive method based on neural correlates to discriminate healthy individuals from methamphetamine drug abusers. This method can be employed in treatment and monitoring of the methamphetamine abuse. PMID:27563415

  17. Methamphetamine. Stimulant of the 1990s?

    PubMed Central

    Derlet, R. W.; Heischober, B.

    1990-01-01

    During the past several years, the use of a smokable form of methamphetamine hydrochloride called "ice" has increased rapidly. The heaviest use has occurred on the West Coast and in Hawaii. Many regional emergency departments treat more methamphetamine users than cocaine-intoxicated patients. The ease of synthesis from inexpensive and readily available chemicals makes possible the rampant abuse of a dangerous drug that can produce a euphoria similar to that induced by cocaine. Clinicians should be familiar with the medical effects and treatment of acute methamphetamine toxicity. PMID:2293467

  18. Gender dependent association of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and circulating leptin in saudi subjects: influence of dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Rahman, Shakilur; Amer, Osama E; Al-Attas, Omar S; McTernan, Philip G; Alokail, Majed S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Leptin and vitamin D play an important role in obesity development and metabolic effects; however, the association between leptin and vitamin D is not well studied in Saudi subjects. We aimed to examine gender dependent association between serum leptin and 25-OH-VitD in adult Saudi subjects. Subjects and Methods: For this cross-sectional study in a cohort of 259 Saudi adults (100 male, age: 46.4 ± 0.9 yr [mean ± SD]; BMI: 27.8 ± 0.5 Kg/m2) and (159 female, age 46.5 ± 0.7 [mean ± SD]; BMI: 28.4 ± 0.4 Kg/m2) anthropometrics, fasting bloods, and biochemical data were collected. Serum leptin and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (vitamin D or 25-OH-VitD) were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Circulating leptin and vitamin D levels were significantly higher in females compared to male (P<0.001 and P<0.01 respectively). Visceral adiposity index (VAI), triglycerides and total cholesterol were significantly higher (P<0.05, P<0.001, and P<0.05, respectively) while HDL-cholesterol were lower (P<0.001) in male compared to female subjects. In males, vitamin D levels were positively associated with leptin (r = 0.196, P<0.05). Conclusion: Vitamin D was positively associated with serum leptin in male Saudi subjects. Additionally, male subjects were found to be dyslipidemic, which might be a responsible factor for this discordant association between vitamin D and leptin in Saudi population. PMID:26379918

  19. Repeated resveratrol treatment attenuates methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity and [3H]dopamine overflow in rodents.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dennis K; Oelrichs, Clark E; Sage, Andrew S; Sun, Grace Y; Simonyi, Agnes

    2013-10-25

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) has been investigated for its potential as a prophylactic against degenerative diseases. It is a sirtulin activator that has recently been shown to regulate dopaminergic systems that contribute to the behavioral effects of methamphetamine and cocaine. The present study examined the impact of resveratrol on stimulant neuropsychopharmacology in rodents. Acute resveratrol treatment (20-40mg/kg) was ineffective to alter methamphetamine (0.5mg/kg)-induced hyperactivity in mice. Rodents received resveratrol once-daily for seven days to determine the effect of repeated polyphenolic treatment. Repeated resveratrol treatment (1-20mg/kg) decreased methamphetamine (0.5mg/kg)-induced hyperactivity in mice. Methamphetamine's (0.1-60μM) efficacy to evoke [(3)H]overflow from rat striatal slices preloaded with [(3)H]dopamine was also attenuated by repeated resveratrol (1mg/kg) treatment. Repeated resveratrol treatment (10-20mg/kg) did not affect cocaine-induced hyperactivity in mice. Overall, these data suggest that resveratrol appears to have metaplastic and prophylactic activity to minimize the effects of methamphetamine to increase locomotor activity and evoke dopamine release. These data encourage future research to further investigate the relationship between polyphenolics and psychostimulant abuse and dependence.

  20. Stress-Induced Enzyme Compounds Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... to methamphetamine damages dopamine and serotonin terminals on neurons in the striatum, reducing levels of these neurotransmitters and impairing communication between neurons in this brain area. Past studies have shown ...

  1. The GPR88 receptor agonist 2-PCCA does not alter the behavioral effects of methamphetamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Xu; Thorn, David A; Jin, Chunyang

    2013-01-01

    GPR88 is a novel orphan G protein-coupled receptor that is primarily located at the striatum. Genetic knockout studies reveal phenotypes of increased dopamine D(2) receptor sensitivity in mice, suggesting that GPR88 receptors may be involved in the modulation of dopaminergic system. However, there is no study that examines the pharmacological effects of GPR88 receptor ligands in in vivo preparations. This study examined the effects of a GPR88 receptor agonist, (1R, 2R)-2-pyridin-2-yl-cyclopropane carboxylic acid ((2S, 3S)-2-amino-3-methyl-pentyl)-(4'-propylbiphenyl-4-yl)-amide (2-PCCA), on the motor activity in rats and on methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity and discriminative stimulus effects. 2-PCCA (0.1-3.2mg/kg) dose-dependently decreased the locomotor activity in rats and, when studied in combination with 1.0mg/kg methamphetamine, also dose-dependently decreased methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity. However, the dose of 2-PCCA that significantly attenuated methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity was also the dose that by itself markedly decreased the baseline locomotor activity. In rats discriminating 0.32mg/kg methamphetamine, 2-PCCA (1-3.2mg/kg) itself did not produce methamphetamine-like discriminative stimulus effects and, when studied in combination, did not alter the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine. Together, these data have provided the first line of evidence that activation of GPR88 receptors does not alter the behavioral effects of methamphetamine. The potential implications of these findings are also discussed.

  2. Theories of addiction: methamphetamine users' explanations for continuing drug use and relapse.

    PubMed

    Newton, Thomas F; De La Garza, Richard; Kalechstein, Ari D; Tziortzis, Desey; Jacobsen, Caitlin A

    2009-01-01

    A variety of preclinical models have been constructed to emphasize unique aspects of addiction-like behavior. These include Negative Reinforcement ("Pain Avoidance"), Positive Reinforcement ("Pleasure Seeking"), Incentive Salience ("Craving"), Stimulus Response Learning ("Habits"), and Inhibitory Control Dysfunction ("Impulsivity"). We used a survey to better understand why methamphetamine-dependent research volunteers (N = 73) continue to use methamphetamine, or relapse to methamphetamine use after a period of cessation of use. All participants met DSM-IV criteria for methamphetamine abuse or dependence, and did not meet criteria for other current Axis I psychiatric disorders or dependence on other drugs of abuse, other than nicotine. The questionnaire consisted of a series of face-valid questions regarding drug use, which in this case referred to methamphetamine use. Examples of questions include: "Do you use drugs mostly to make bad feelings like boredom, loneliness, or apathy go away?", "Do you use drugs mostly because you want to get high?", "Do you use drugs mostly because of cravings?", "Do you find yourself getting ready to take drugs without thinking about it?", and "Do you impulsively take drugs?". The scale was anchored at 1 (not at all) and 7 (very much). For each question, the numbers of participants rating each question negatively (1 or 2), neither negatively or affirmatively (3-5), and affirmatively (6 or 7) were tabulated. The greatest number of respondents (56%) affirmed that they used drugs due to "pleasure seeking." The next highest categories selected were "impulsivity" (27%) and "habits"(25%). Surprisingly, many participants reported that "pain avoidance" (30%) and "craving" (30%) were not important for their drug use. Results from this study support the contention that methamphetamine users (and probably other drug users as well) are more heterogeneous than is often appreciated, and imply that treatment development might be more successful if

  3. Dysregulation of D₂-mediated dopamine transmission in monkeys after chronic escalating methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Groman, Stephanie M; Lee, Buyean; Seu, Emanuele; James, Alex S; Feiler, Karen; Mandelkern, Mark A; London, Edythe D; Jentsch, J David

    2012-04-25

    Compulsive drug-seeking and drug-taking are important substance-abuse behaviors that have been linked to alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission and to impaired inhibitory control. Evidence supports the notions that abnormal D₂ receptor-mediated dopamine transmission and inhibitory control may be heritable risk factors for addictions, and that they also reflect drug-induced neuroadaptations. To provide a mechanistic explanation for the drug-induced emergence of inhibitory-control deficits, this study examined how a chronic, escalating-dose regimen of methamphetamine administration affected dopaminergic neurochemistry and cognition in monkeys. Dopamine D₂-like receptor and dopamine transporter (DAT) availability and reversal-learning performance were measured before and after exposure to methamphetamine (or saline), and brain dopamine levels were assayed at the conclusion of the study. Exposure to methamphetamine reduced dopamine D₂-like receptor and DAT availability and produced transient, selective impairments in the reversal of a stimulus-outcome association. Furthermore, individual differences in the change in D₂-like receptor availability in the striatum were related to the change in response to positive feedback. These data provide evidence that chronic, escalating-dose methamphetamine administration alters the dopamine system in a manner similar to that observed in methamphetamine-dependent humans. They also implicate alterations in positive-feedback sensitivity associated with D₂-like receptor dysfunction as the mechanism by which inhibitory control deficits emerge in stimulant-dependent individuals. Finally, a significant degree of neurochemical and behavioral variation in response to methamphetamine was detected, indicating that individual differences affect the degree to which drugs of abuse alter these processes. Identification of these factors ultimately may assist in the development of individualized treatments for substance dependence.

  4. The neurobiology of methamphetamine induced psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jennifer H.; Stein, Dan J.; Howells, Fleur M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic methamphetamine abuse commonly leads to psychosis, with positive and cognitive symptoms that are similar to those of schizophrenia. Methamphetamine induced psychosis (MAP) can persist and diagnoses of MAP often change to a diagnosis of schizophrenia over time. Studies in schizophrenia have found much evidence of cortical GABAergic dysfunction. Methamphetamine psychosis is a well studied model for schizophrenia, however there is little research on the effects of methamphetamine on cortical GABAergic function in the model, and the neurobiology of MAP is unknown. This paper reviews the effects of methamphetamine on dopaminergic pathways, with focus on its ability to increase glutamate release in the cortex. Excess cortical glutamate would likely damage GABAergic interneurons, and evidence of this disturbance as a result of methamphetamine treatment will be discussed. We propose that cortical GABAergic interneurons are particularly vulnerable to glutamate overflow as a result of subcellular location of NMDA receptors on interneurons in the cortex. Damage to cortical GABAergic function would lead to dysregulation of cortical signals, resulting in psychosis, and further support MAP as a model for schizophrenia. PMID:25100979

  5. Estimating differences in restricted mean lifetime using observational data subject to dependent censoring

    PubMed Central

    Schaubel, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In epidemiologic studies of time to an event, mean lifetime is often of direct interest. We propose methods to estimate group- (e.g., treatment-) specific differences in restricted mean lifetime for studies where treatment is not randomized and lifetimes are subject to both dependent and independent censoring. The proposed methods may be viewed as a hybrid of two general approaches to accounting for confounders. Specifically, treatment-specific proportional hazards models are employed to account for baseline covariates, while inverse probability of censoring weighting is used to accommodate time-dependent predictors of censoring. The average causal effect is then obtained by averaging over differences in fitted values based on the proportional hazards models. Large-sample properties of the proposed estimators are derived and simulation studies are conducted to assess their finite-sample applicability. We apply the proposed methods to liver wait list mortality data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. PMID:21039400

  6. Tracking Irregular Morphophonological Dependencies in Natural Language: Evidence from the Acquisition of Subject-Verb Agreement in French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazzi, Thierry; Barriere, Isabelle; Goyet, Louise; Kresh, Sarah; Legendre, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    This study examines French-learning infants' sensitivity to grammatical non-adjacent dependencies involving subject-verb agreement (e.g., "le/les garcons lit/lisent" "the boy(s) read(s)") where number is audible on both the determiner of the subject DP and the agreeing verb, and the dependency is spanning across two syntactic phrases. A further…

  7. Prenatal Methamphetamine Use and Neonatal Neurobehavioral Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lynne M.; LaGasse, Linda L.; Derauf, Chris; Grant, Penny; Shah, Rizwan; Arria, Amelia; Huestis, Marilyn; Haning, William; Strauss, Arthur; Grotta, Sheri Della; Fallone, Melissa; LiuPhD, Jing; Lester, Barry M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine (MA) use among pregnant women is an increasing problem in the United States. How prenatal MA exposure affects neonatal neurobehavior is unknown. Objective To examine the neurobehavioral effects of prenatal MA exposure. Design The Infant Development, Environment and Lifestyle (IDEAL) study screened 13,808 subjects and 1632 were eligible and consented. 166 (n=74 exposed) were enrolled in a longitudinal follow up. Exposure was determined by meconium assay and self-report with alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco present in both groups. The NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS) was administered within the first 5 days of life. Analyses conducted on NNNS summary scores included exposure group effects, heavy MA use effects, association with frequency of use by trimester, and dose-response relationships with amphetamine metabolites. Results After adjusting for covariates, exposure to MA was associated with increased physiological stress. Heavy MA use was related to lower arousal, more lethargy, and increased physiological stress. First trimester MA use was related to elevated physiological stress. Third trimester use was related to poorer quality of movement. Higher level of amphetamine metabolites in meconium was associated with increased CNS stress. Conclusions Prenatal MA exposure was associated with neurobehavioral patterns of decreased arousal, increased stress, and poor quality of movement. The dose response relationships may represent neurotoxic effects from MA. PMID:18031987

  8. Neurophysiology of Hungarian subject-verb dependencies with varying intervening complexity.

    PubMed

    Jolsvai, Hajnal; Sussman, Elyse; Csuhaj, Roland; Csépe, Valéria

    2011-12-01

    Non-adjacent dependencies are thought to be more costly to process than sentences wherein dependents immediately follow or precede what they depend on. In English locality effects have been revealed, while in languages with rich case marking (German and Hindi) sentence final structures show anti-locality-effects. The motivation of the current study is to test whether locality effects can be directly applied to a typologically different language than those investigated so far. Hungarian is a "topic prominent" language; it permits a variation of possible word sequencing for semantic reasons, including SVO word order. Hungarian also has a rich morphological system (e.g., rich case system) and postpositions to indicate grammatical functions. In the present ERP study, Hungarian subject-verb dependencies were compared by manipulating the mismatch of number agreement between the sentence's initial noun phrase and the sentence's final intransitive verb as well as the complexity of the intervening sentence material, interrupting the dependencies. Possible lexical class and frequency or cloze-probability effects for the first two words of the intervening sentence material were revealed when used separate baseline for each word, while at the third word of the intervening material as well as at the main verb ERPs were not modulated by complexity but at the verb ERPs were enhanced by grammaticality. Ungrammatical sentences enlarged the amplitude of both LAN and P600 components at the main verb. These results are in line with studies suggesting that the retrieval of the first element of a dependency is not influenced by distance from the second element, as the first element is directly accessible when needed for integration (e.g., McElree, 2000).

  9. Transcriptional and epigenetic substrates of methamphetamine addiction and withdrawal: evidence from a long-access self-administration model in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean Lud; Brannock, Christie; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; Krasnova, Irina N

    2015-04-01

    Methamphetamine use disorder is a chronic neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent binge episodes, intervals of abstinence, and relapses to drug use. Humans addicted to methamphetamine experience various degrees of cognitive deficits and other neurological abnormalities that complicate their activities of daily living and their participation in treatment programs. Importantly, models of methamphetamine addiction in rodents have shown that animals will readily learn to give themselves methamphetamine. Rats also accelerate their intake over time. Microarray studies have also shown that methamphetamine taking is associated with major transcriptional changes in the striatum measured within a short or longer time after cessation of drug taking. After a 2-h withdrawal time, there was increased expression of genes that participate in transcription regulation. These included cyclic AMP response element binding (CREB), ETS domain-containing protein (ELK1), and members of the FOS family of transcription factors. Other genes of interest include brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyrosine kinase receptor, type 2 (TrkB), and synaptophysin. Methamphetamine-induced transcription was found to be regulated via phosphorylated CREB-dependent events. After a 30-day withdrawal from methamphetamine self-administration, however, there was mostly decreased expression of transcription factors including junD. There was also downregulation of genes whose protein products are constituents of chromatin-remodeling complexes. Altogether, these genome-wide results show that methamphetamine abuse might be associated with altered regulation of a diversity of gene networks that impact cellular and synaptic functions. These transcriptional changes might serve as triggers for the neuropsychiatric presentations of humans who abuse this drug. Better understanding of the way that gene products interact to cause methamphetamine addiction will help to develop better pharmacological

  10. A novel dopamine D3 receptor antagonist YQA14 inhibits methamphetamine self-administration and relapse to drug-seeking behaviour in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Song, Rui; Yang, Ri-Fang; Wu, Ning; Li, Jin

    2014-11-15

    Growing preclinical evidence suggests that dopamine D3 receptor antagonists are promising for the treatment of addiction. We have previously reported a novel dopamine D3 receptor antagonist YQA14 with better pharmacokinetic behaviours and pharmacotherapeutic efficacy than other tested compounds in attenuating the reward and relapse of cocaine. In the present study, we investigated whether YQA14 can similarly inhibit methamphetamine self-administration and cue- or methamphetamine-trigged reinstatement of drug-seeking behaviour. The research illustrated that systemic administration of YQA14 (6.25-25mg/kg, i.p. 20min prior to methamphetamine) failed to alter methamphetamine (0.05mg/kg) self-administration under fixed-ratio 2. However, YQA14 (6.25-25mg/kg, i.p. 20min prior to methamphetamine) significantly and dose-dependently reduced methamphetamine self-administration under fixed-ratio 2 by a low dose (0.006, 0.0125, 0.025mg/kg) of methamphetamine and shifted the dose curve right and down. Further, YQA14 also lowered the break point under progressive-ratio reinforcement conditions in rats. Finally, YQA14 also significantly inhibited cue- or methamphetamine-triggered reinstatement of extinguished drug-seeking behaviour. Overall, our findings suggest that blockade of the dopamine D3 receptor by YQA14 attenuated the rewarding and incentive motivational effects of methamphetamine in rats and may have pharmacotherapeutic potential in the treatment of methamphetamine addiction. Thus, YQA14 deserves further investigation as a promising medication for the treatment of addiction.

  11. [Personality changes in opioid-dependent subjects in a methadone maintenance treatment program].

    PubMed

    Trémeau, F; Darreye, A; Leroy, B; Renckly, V; Ertlé, S; Weibel, H; Khidichian, F; Macher, J-P

    2003-01-01

    Personality disorders and particularly antisocial personality disorders (APD) are quite frequent in opioid-dependent subjects. They show various personality traits: high neuroticism, high impulsivity, higher extraversion than the general population. Previous studies have reported that some but not all personality traits improved with treatment. In a previous study, we found a low rate of APD in a French population of opioid-dependent subjects. For this reason, we evaluated personality traits at intake and during maintenance treatment with methadone. Methods - The form A of the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) was given to opioid addicts at intake and after 6 and 12 months of methadone treatment. Results - 134 subjects (96 males and 38 females) took the test at intake, 60 completed 12 months of treatment. After 12 months, the EPI Neuroticism (N) and the Extraversion-introversion (E) scale scores decreased significantly. The N score improved in the first 6 months, while the E score improved only during the second 6 months of treatment. Compared to a reference group of French normal controls, male and female opioid addicts showed high N and E scores. Demographic data and EPI scores of patients who stayed in treatment for 12 months did not differ significantly from those of dropouts (n=23). Patients with a history of suicide attempts (SA) started to use heroin at an earlier age and they showed a higher E score and a tendency for a higher N score at intake. Discussion - The two personality dimensions of the EPI changed during MMT, and the N score converged towards the score of normal controls. Opioid addicts differ from normal controls mostly in their N score. The EPI did not help to differentiate 12-month completers from dropouts. Higher E scores in patients with an SA history might reflect a higher impulsivity, which has been linked to suicidality in other patient groups.

  12. Liposomal melatonin rescues methamphetamine-elicited mitochondrial burdens, pro-apoptosis, and dopaminergic degeneration through the inhibition PKCδ gene.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Lee, Jaehwi; Shin, Eun-Joo; Dang, Duy-Khanh; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Nguyen, Thuy-Ty Lan; Nam, Yunsung; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Lee, Jae-Chul; Park, Dae Hun; Jang, Choon-Gon; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that mitochondrial oxidative damage and PKCδ overexpression contribute to methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic degeneration. Although it is recognized that antioxidant melatonin is effective in preventing neurotoxicity induced by methamphetamine, its precise mechanism remains elusive. C57BL/6J wild-type mice exhibited a similar degree of dopaminergic deficit when methamphetamine was administered during light and dark phases. Furthermore, dopaminergic neuroprotection by genetic inhibition of PKCδ during the light phase was comparable to that during the dark phase. Thus, we have focused on the light phase to examine whether melatonin modulates PKCδ-mediated neurotoxic signaling after multiple high doses of methamphetamine. To enhance the bioavailability of melatonin, we applied liposomal melatonin. Treatment with methamphetamine resulted in hyperthermia, mitochondrial translocation of PKCδ, oxidative damage (mitochondria > cytosol), mitochondrial dysfunction, pro-apoptotic changes, ultrastructural mitochondrial degeneration, dopaminergic degeneration, and behavioral impairment in wild-type mice. Treatment with liposomal melatonin resulted in a dose-dependent attenuation against degenerative changes induced by methamphetamine in wild-type mice. Attenuation by liposomal melatonin might be comparable to that by genetic inhibition (using PKCδ((-/-)) mice or PKCδ antisense oligonucleotide). However, liposomal melatonin did not show any additional protective effects on the attenuation by genetic inhibition of PKCδ. Our results suggest that the circadian cycle cannot be a key factor in modulating methamphetamine toxicity under the current experimental condition and that PKCδ is one of the critical target genes for melatonin-mediated protective effects against mitochondrial burdens (dysfunction), oxidative stress, pro-apoptosis, and dopaminergic degeneration induced by methamphetamine.

  13. Methamphetamine blocks exercise effects on Bdnf and Drd2 gene expression in frontal cortex and striatum.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew B; Stolyarova, Alexandra; Ying, Zhe; Zhuang, Yumei; Gómez-Pinilla, Fernando; Izquierdo, Alicia

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to drugs of abuse can produce many neurobiological changes which may lead to increased valuation of rewards and decreased sensitivity to their costs. Many of these behavioral alterations are associated with activity of D2-expressing medium spiny neurons in the striatum. Additionally, Bdnf in the striatum has been shown to play a role in flexible reward-seeking behavior. Given that voluntary aerobic exercise can affect the expression of these proteins in healthy subjects, and that exercise has shown promise as an anti-addictive therapy, we set out to quantify changes in D2 and Bdnf expression in methamphetamine-exposed rats given access to running wheels. Sixty-four rats were treated for two weeks with an escalating dose of methamphetamine or saline, then either sacrificed, housed in standard cages, or given free access to a running wheel for 6 weeks prior to sacrifice. Rats treated with methamphetamine ran significantly greater distances than saline-treated rats, suggesting an augmentation in the reinforcement value of voluntary wheel running. Transcription of Drd2 and Bdnf was assessed via RT-qPCR. Protein expression levels of D2 and phosphorylation of the TrkB receptor were measured via western blot. Drd2 and Bdnf mRNA levels were impacted independently by exercise and methamphetamine, but exposure to methamphetamine prior to the initiation of exercise blocked the exercise-induced changes seen in rats treated with saline. Expression levels of both proteins were elevated immediately after methamphetamine, but returned to baseline after six weeks, regardless of exercise status.

  14. Growing Old With Ice: A Review of the Potential Consequences of Methamphetamine Abuse in Australian Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Searby, Adam; Maude, Phil; McGrath, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This review analyzes contemporary literature in the context of Australian aging methamphetamine users, service response, and challenges to provision of care to this population. The article focuses on Australian literature with comparisons made with trends arising from international scholarship. Searches of the CINAHL, ProQuest, and Scopus electronic journal databases were performed in early 2014 as part of a wider study investigating dual diagnosis in older adults. Methamphetamine abuse is common in individuals with comorbid mental illness. The literature presented in this review outlines potential neuropsychological and persistent psychiatric sequelae associated with the use of methamphetamine, along with a number of concerning behaviors prevalent in individuals with comorbid human immunodeficiency virus-positive status. Despite an abundance of literature discussing methamphetamine use in adult populations, this is the first review exploring methamphetamine use in the context of aging and older adult mental health. Contemporary literature suggests that methamphetamine dependence will be a significant challenge for services that cater to older adults, requiring further research to fully assess the impact this cohort will have on the healthcare system.

  15. Genetic markers associated with abstinence length in alcohol-dependent subjects treated with acamprosate

    PubMed Central

    Karpyak, V M; Biernacka, J M; Geske, J R; Jenkins, G D; Cunningham, J M; Rüegg, J; Kononenko, O; Leontovich, A A; Abulseoud, O A; Hall-Flavin, D K; Loukianova, L L; Schneekloth, T D; Skime, M K; Frank, J; Nöthen, M M; Rietschel, M; Kiefer, F; Mann, K F; Weinshilboum, R M; Frye, M A; Choi, D S

    2014-01-01

    Acamprosate supports abstinence in some alcohol-dependent subjects, yet predictors of response are unknown. To identify response biomarkers, we investigated associations of abstinence length with polymorphisms in candidate genes in glycine and glutamate neurotransmission pathways and genes previously implicated in acamprosate response. Association analyses were conducted in the discovery sample of 225 alcohol-dependent subjects treated with acamprosate for 3 months in community-based treatment programs in the United States. Data from 110 alcohol-dependent males treated with acamprosate in the study PREDICT were used for replication of the top association findings. Statistical models were adjusted for relevant covariates, including recruitment site and baseline clinical variables associated with response. In the discovery sample, shorter abstinence was associated with increased intensity of alcohol craving and lower number of days between the last drink and initiation of acamprosate treatment. After adjustment for covariates, length of abstinence was associated with the GRIN2B rs2058878 (P=4.6 × 10−5). In the replication sample, shorter abstinence was associated with increased craving, increased depressive mood score and higher alcohol consumption. Association of abstinence length with GRIN2B rs2058878 was marginally significant (P=0.0675); as in the discovery sample, the minor A allele was associated with longer abstinence. Furthermore, rs2300272, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs2058878, was also associated with abstinence length (P=0.049). This is the first report of a replicated association of genetic markers with the length of abstinence in acamprosate-treated alcoholics. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of this association and its usefulness for individualized treatment selection should follow. PMID:25290263

  16. Spectral properites and scale dependent transport in simplified stratified systems subject to sporadic threshold adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.

    2005-12-01

    A stratified atmosphere can be essentially characterized by systems subject to stochastic forcing and threshold adjustment due to convective and shear instability, and the vertical transport can be approximated by eddy diffusion/viscosity. In the linear limit, the equations can be solved explicitly, and the spectra could be determined and are shown to follow power-law distributions, and the eddy transport coefficients are scale independent. The nonlinear equations are also shown to support scale invariance under rather general conditions, and the power-law indices of the spectra are derived from the analysis. These indices, as well as those in the linear limit, are confirmed by numerical simulations. The power-law indices of the ``universal'' spectra of temperature and horizontal wind versus vertical wavenumber and frequency from previous observations are shown to fall in the range determined by the linear and nonlinear limit. This theory, therefore, provides a possible explanation to the universal vertical wavenumber and frequency spectra and their variability. By relating the universal spectra with the sporadic threshold adjustment due to convective or shear instability, which is ubiquitous in stratified fluid systems, the difficulty of previous theories to associate the time and location independent spectral feature with the highly time and location dependent gravity waves is avoided. The analysis also suggests that the vertical eddy transport coefficients are scale dependent, and the implication of this scale dependence will be explored.

  17. 21 CFR 862.3610 - Methamphetamine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methamphetamine test system. 862.3610 Section 862...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3610 Methamphetamine test system. (a) Identification. A methamphetamine test system is a...

  18. The Methamphetamine Home: Psychological Impact on Preschoolers in Rural Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asanbe, Comfort B.; Hall, Charlene; Bolden, Charles D.

    2008-01-01

    Context: A growing number of children reside with methamphetamine-abusing parents in homes where the illicit drug is produced. Yet, the effects of a methamphetamine environment on psychological child outcome are still unknown. Purpose: To examine whether preschoolers who lived in methamphetamine-producing homes are at increased risk for developing…

  19. Violence perpetrated by women who use methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    HAMILTON, ALISON B.; GOEDERS, NICHOLAS E.

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) is widely recognized as being associated with violence and aggression. This association is found among women and men, with rates of meth-related violence among women possibly being equal to or even exceeding rates among men. This study examined female-perpetrated violence from the phenomenological point of view of 30 women (aged 18–45 years; mean age of 28.5 years) in residential treatment for meth dependence. Of the 30 participants, 80% (n = 24) reported experiencing violence in their lifetimes: 67% (n = 20) had violence perpetrated against them, and 57% (n = 17) had perpetrated violence. Most participants described perpetrating violence when they were ‘coming down’ off of meth (i.e. withdrawing). Five women (29%) attributed their violent behaviors to meth and said they would not have been violent had they not been using meth. In contrast, 10 women (59%) described pre-existing ‘anger issues’ that were ‘enhanced’ by meth. This article describes the timing of meth-related violence, bi-directional violence, men’s responses to female-perpetrated violence, aggression in the context of sexual activities, and violence perpetrated against non-partners. A biopsychosocial theoretical framework is useful to interpret the complex explanations that women provide for their perpetration of violence under the influence of chronic meth use. PMID:26045288

  20. Methamphetamine

    MedlinePlus

    ... OPERATIONS Diversion Control Programs Most Wanted Fugitives Training Intelligence Submit a Tip DRUG INFO Drug Fact Sheets ... Operations Diversion Control Programs Most Wanted Fugitives Training Intelligence Submit a Tip Drug Info Drug Fact Sheets ...

  1. Processing subject-verb agreement in a second language depends on proficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Noriko; Dussias, Paola E.; Kroll, Judith F.

    2010-01-01

    Subject-verb agreement is a computation that is often difficult to execute perfectly in the first language (L1) and even more difficult to produce skillfully in a second language (L2). In this study, we examined the way in which bilingual speakers complete sentence fragments in a manner that reflects access to both grammatical and conceptual number. In two experiments, we show that bilingual speakers are sensitive to both grammatical and conceptual number in the L1 and grammatical number agreement in the L2. However, only highly proficient bilinguals are also sensitive to conceptual number in the L2. The results suggest that the extent to which speakers are able to exploit conceptual information during speech planning depends on the level of language proficiency. PMID:20640178

  2. A General Method for Evaluating Deep Brain Stimulation Effects on Intravenous Methamphetamine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Vinita; Guerin, Glenn F.; Goeders, Nicholas E.; Wilden, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Substance use disorders, particularly to methamphetamine, are devastating, relapsing diseases that disproportionally affect young people. There is a need for novel, effective and practical treatment strategies that are validated in animal models. Neuromodulation, including deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy, refers to the use of electricity to influence pathological neuronal activity and has shown promise for psychiatric disorders, including drug dependence. DBS in clinical practice involves the continuous delivery of stimulation into brain structures using an implantable pacemaker-like system that is programmed externally by a physician to alleviate symptoms. This treatment will be limited in methamphetamine users due to challenging psychosocial situations. Electrical treatments that can be delivered intermittently, non-invasively and remotely from the drug-use setting will be more realistic. This article describes the delivery of intracranial electrical stimulation that is temporally and spatially separate from the drug-use environment for the treatment of IV methamphetamine dependence. Methamphetamine dependence is rapidly developed in rodents using an operant paradigm of intravenous (IV) self-administration that incorporates a period of extended access to drug and demonstrates both escalation of use and high motivation to obtain drug. PMID:26863392

  3. Characteristics of heart rate variability in alcohol-dependent subjects and nondependent chronic alcohol users.

    PubMed

    Karpyak, Victor M; Romanowicz, Magdalena; Schmidt, John E; Lewis, Kriste A; Bostwick, John M

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is an objective and sensitive measure of integrated physiological functioning reflective of heart rhythm responsivity to internal and external demands. Reduced HRV is associated with vulnerability to stress and deterioration of medical and/or psychiatric conditions, while increased HRV is associated with a favorable treatment response and recovery from various medical and/or psychiatric conditions. Our previous review found that acute alcohol consumption caused decreased parasympathetic and increased sympathetic HRV effects in both nonalcoholic and chronic alcohol users. This review investigates the effects of chronic alcohol consumption on HRV in alcohol-dependent subjects and nondependent users. MEDLINE, Scopus, and PubMed were searched for human experimental and clinical trials that measured the effects of chronic alcohol use on HRV. Only publications that included a description of their study designs and clearly stated methodologies for data collections, and outcome measures were reviewed. We have reviewed a total of 24 articles. In nondependent users, low dose (approximating the recommended daily amount of 1 standard drink in women and 2 in men) use is associated with increased HRV parameters compared to those who drink less frequently or abstain altogether. A further increase in consumption is associated with decreased HRV compared to both abstainers and more moderate drinkers. HRV changes during withdrawal generally follow the same negative direction but are more complex and less understood. In dependent subjects, an improvement in HRV was seen following abstinence but remained reduced compared to nonalcoholic controls. This review demonstrates that HRV changes associated with chronic use follow a J-shaped curve. It supports recommendations that limit daily alcohol intake to no more than 2 drinks for men and 1 drink for women. Future studies should investigate HRV as a biomarker of alcoholism development and treatment response as

  4. Dose-Dependent Flux of Buprenorphine Following Transdermal Administration in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Cipriano, Alessandra; Munera, Catherine; Harris, Stephen C

    2016-10-01

    Buprenorphine transdermal delivery system (BTDS) applied once every 7 days is indicated for the management of pain that is severe enough to require daily, around-the-clock, long-term opioid treatment and for which alternative treatment options are inadequate. The 7-day flux of buprenorphine from BTDS to systemic circulation was investigated in a phase 1, 2-period crossover study with 3 randomized groups of healthy subjects receiving BTDS containing buprenorphine 5, 10, or 20 mg for 7 days preceded or followed by intravenous buprenorphine infusion (25 μg/h for 24 hours). Residual and absolute bioavailability methods were used to estimate 7-day flux of buprenorphine. Following BTDS administration, mean area under the curve of buprenorphine increased proportionally (12.6, 24.3, and 51.1 ng/[mL · h]), maximum mean plasma concentration rose with increasing dose (176, 191, and 471 pg/mL), and absolute bioavailability was 14% to 16%. Mean residual amount of buprenorphine in the BTDS after 7-day application was 4.50, 8.57, and 17.1 mg. Flux of buprenorphine was approximately 5, 10, and 20 μg/h for BTDS containing 5, 10, and 20 mg buprenorphine, respectively. BTDS was safe and well tolerated following a single 7-day application in healthy subjects. The results of this study demonstrated dose-dependent flux of buprenorphine delivered via transdermal system. PMID:26865472

  5. Comparison of the effects of methamphetamine, bupropion, and methylphenidate on the self-administration of methamphetamine by rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Charles W; Gilman, Joanne P; Panlilio, Leigh V; McCann, David J; Goldberg, Steven R

    2011-02-01

    The effectiveness of methadone as a treatment for opioid abuse and nicotine preparations as treatments for tobacco smoking has led to an interest in developing a similar strategy for treating psychostimulant abuse. The current study investigated the effects of three such potential therapies on intravenous methamphetamine self-administration (1 - 30 μg/kg/injection) in rhesus monkeys. When given as a presession intramuscular injection, a high dose of methamphetamine (1.0 mg/kg) decreased intravenous methamphetamine self-administration but did not affect responding for a food reinforcer during the same sessions. However, the dose of intramuscular methamphetamine required to reduce intravenous methamphetamine self-administration exceeded the cumulative amount taken during a typical self-administration session, and pretreatment with a low dose of methamphetamine (0.3 mg/kg) actually increased self-administration in some monkeys at the lower self-administration dose. Like pretreatment with methamphetamine, pretreatment with bupropion (3.2 mg/kg) decreased methamphetamine self-administration but did not affect responding for food. Pretreatment with methylphenidate (0.56 mg/kg) did not significantly alter methamphetamine self-administration. These results suggest that some agonist-like agents can decrease methamphetamine self-administration. Although the most robust effects occurred with a high dose of methamphetamine, safety and abuse liability considerations suggest that bupropion should also be considered for further evaluation as a methamphetamine addiction treatment.

  6. Nature of functional links in valuation networks differentiates impulsive behaviors between abstinent heroin-dependent subjects and nondrug-using subjects.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Tianye; Shao, Yongcong; Chen, Gang; Ye, Enmao; Ma, Lin; Wang, Lubin; Lei, Yu; Chen, Guangyu; Li, Wenjun; Zou, Feng; Jin, Xiao; Li, Shi-Jiang; Yang, Zheng

    2015-07-15

    Advanced neuroimaging studies have identified brain correlates of pathological impulsivity in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, whether and how these spatially separate and functionally integrated neural correlates collectively contribute to aberrant impulsive behaviors remains unclear. Building on recent progress in neuroeconomics toward determining a biological account of human behaviors, we employed resting-state functional MRI to characterize the nature of the links between these neural correlates and to investigate their impact on impulsivity. We demonstrated that through functional connectivity with the ventral medial prefrontal cortex, the δ-network (regions of the executive control system, such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) and the β-network (regions of the reward system involved in the mesocorticolimbic pathway), jointly influence impulsivity measured by the Barratt impulsiveness scale scores. In control nondrug-using subjects, the functional link between the β- and δ-networks is balanced, and the δ-network competitively controls impulsivity. However, in abstinent heroin-dependent subjects, the link is imbalanced, with stronger β-network connectivity and weaker δ-network connectivity. The imbalanced link is associated with impulsivity, indicating that the β- and δ-networks may mutually reinforce each other in abstinent heroin-dependent subjects. These findings of an aberrant link between the β- and δ-networks in abstinent heroin-dependent subjects may shed light on the mechanism of aberrant behaviors of drug addiction and may serve as an endophenotype to mark individual subjects' self-control capacity. PMID:25944613

  7. Quantization and instability of the damped harmonic oscillator subject to a time-dependent force

    SciTech Connect

    Majima, H. Suzuki, A.

    2011-12-15

    We consider the one-dimensional motion of a particle immersed in a potential field U(x) under the influence of a frictional (dissipative) force linear in velocity (-{gamma}x) and a time-dependent external force (K(t)). The dissipative system subject to these forces is discussed by introducing the extended Bateman's system, which is described by the Lagrangian: L=mxy-U(x+1/2 y)+U(x-1/2 y)+({gamma})/2 (xy-yx)-xK(t)+yK(t), which leads to the familiar classical equations of motion for the dissipative (open) system. The equation for a variable y is the time-reversed of the x motion. We discuss the extended Bateman dual Lagrangian and Hamiltonian by setting U(x{+-}y/2)=1/2 k(x{+-}y/2){sup 2} specifically for a dual extended damped-amplified harmonic oscillator subject to the time-dependent external force. We show the method of quantizing such dissipative systems, namely the canonical quantization of the extended Bateman's Hamiltonian H. The Heisenberg equations of motion utilizing the quantized Hamiltonian H surely lead to the equations of motion for the dissipative dynamical quantum systems, which are the quantum analog of the corresponding classical systems. To discuss the stability of the quantum dissipative system due to the influence of an external force K(t) and the dissipative force, we derived a formula for transition amplitudes of the dissipative system with the help of the perturbation analysis. The formula is specifically applied for a damped-amplified harmonic oscillator subject to the impulsive force. This formula is used to study the influence of dissipation such as the instability due to the dissipative force and/or the applied impulsive force. - Highlights: > A method of quantizing dissipative systems is presented. > In order to obtain the method, we apply Bateman's dual system approach. > A formula for a transition amplitude is derived. > We use the formula to study the instability of the dissipative systems.

  8. Accidental death via intravaginal absorption of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Prentiss; Mutsvunguma, Romeo; Prahlow, Joseph A

    2014-06-01

    In this paper a drug fatality that involved an unintended drug delivery route is described. The decedent, a 23-year-old female in custody in a county jail on suspicion of a felony drug offense, was discovered in a holding cell unconscious and unresponsive. Following unsuccessful cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempts she was pronounced dead at the scene. At autopsy a wad of multiple small loosely wrapped plastic packages held together with another layer of clear plastic was found in the decedent's vagina. The smaller plastic packages contained an off-white pasty substance that was later identified as methamphetamine. Toxicological testing of specimens collected during autopsy revealed methamphetamine in the decedent's subclavian blood, vitreous fluid, and urine at extremely high concentrations (42.6, 20.1, and 771 mg/L, respectively). Amphetamine, the active metabolite of methamphetamine, was also present in the subclavian blood, vitreous fluid, and urine at significant concentrations (1.3, 0.5, and 20.4 mg/L, respectively). The cause of death was attributed to toxic effects of methamphetamine and the manner of death was ruled accidental. This report suggests that lethal concentrations of methamphetamine may be distributed to the systemic circulation via intravaginal absorption.

  9. Methamphetamine use and HIV in relation to social cognition.

    PubMed

    Homer, Bruce D; Halkitis, Perry N; Moeller, Robert W; Solomon, Todd M

    2013-07-01

    The relation of methamphetamine abuse and HIV infection to social cognition (Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task and Faux Pas Recognition Task) was examined in men who have sex with men (N = 56): Of the methamphetamine users (n = 29), 19 were identified as HIV positive, and of the nonusers (n = 27), 13 were identified as HIV positive. Both methamphetamine use and HIV were associated with impaired performance on the Eyes Task (p < .05). Methamphetamine use was also associated with impaired performance on the Faux Pas Task (p < .05). These results link impaired social cognition to methamphetamine abuse and HIV infection.

  10. Comparison of Caffeine and d-amphetamine in Cocaine-Dependent Subjects: Differential Outcomes on Subjective and Cardiovascular Effects, Reward Learning, and Salivary Paraxanthine

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Scott D; Green, Charles E; Schmitz, Joy M; Rathnayaka, Nuvan; Fang, Wendy B; Ferré, Sergi; Moeller, F Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Due to indirect modulation of dopamine transmission, adenosine receptor antagonists may be useful in either treating cocaine use or improving disrupted cognitive-behavioral functions associated with chronic cocaine use. To compare and contrast the stimulant effects of adenosine antagonism to direct dopamine stimulation, we administered 150 mg and 300 mg caffeine, 20 mg amphetamine, and placebo to cocaine-dependent vs. healthy control subjects, matched on moderate caffeine use. Data were obtained on measures of cardiovascular effects, subjective drug effects (ARCI, VAS, DEQ), and a probabilistic reward-learning task sensitive to dopamine modulation. Levels of salivary caffeine and the primary caffeine metabolite paraxanthine were obtained on placebo and caffeine dosing days. Cardiovascular results revealed main effects of dose for diastolic blood pressure and heart rate; follow up tests showed that controls were most sensitive to 300 mg caffeine and 20 mg amphetamine; cocaine-dependent subjects were sensitive only to 300 mg caffeine. Subjective effects results revealed dose × time and dose × group interactions on the ARCI A, ARCI LSD, and VAS ‘elated’ scales; follow up tests did not show systematic differences between groups with regard to caffeine or d-amphetamine. Large between-group differences in salivary paraxanthine (but not salivary caffeine) levels were obtained under both caffeine doses. The cocaine-dependent group expressed significantly higher paraxanthine levels than controls under 150 mg and 3–4 fold greater levels under 300 mg at 90 min and 150 min post caffeine dose. However, these differences also covaried with cigarette smoking status (not balanced between groups), and nicotine smoking is known to alter caffeine/paraxanthine metabolism via cytochrome P450 enzymes. These preliminary data raise the possibility that adenosine antagonists may affect cocaine-dependent and non-dependent subjects differently. In conjunction with previous

  11. Comparison of Caffeine and d-amphetamine in Cocaine-Dependent Subjects: Differential Outcomes on Subjective and Cardiovascular Effects, Reward Learning, and Salivary Paraxanthine.

    PubMed

    Lane, Scott D; Green, Charles E; Schmitz, Joy M; Rathnayaka, Nuvan; Fang, Wendy B; Ferré, Sergi; Moeller, F Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Due to indirect modulation of dopamine transmission, adenosine receptor antagonists may be useful in either treating cocaine use or improving disrupted cognitive-behavioral functions associated with chronic cocaine use. To compare and contrast the stimulant effects of adenosine antagonism to direct dopamine stimulation, we administered 150 mg and 300 mg caffeine, 20 mg amphetamine, and placebo to cocaine-dependent vs. healthy control subjects, matched on moderate caffeine use. Data were obtained on measures of cardiovascular effects, subjective drug effects (ARCI, VAS, DEQ), and a probabilistic reward-learning task sensitive to dopamine modulation. Levels of salivary caffeine and the primary caffeine metabolite paraxanthine were obtained on placebo and caffeine dosing days. Cardiovascular results revealed main effects of dose for diastolic blood pressure and heart rate; follow up tests showed that controls were most sensitive to 300 mg caffeine and 20 mg amphetamine; cocaine-dependent subjects were sensitive only to 300 mg caffeine. Subjective effects results revealed dose × time and dose × group interactions on the ARCI A, ARCI LSD, and VAS 'elated' scales; follow up tests did not show systematic differences between groups with regard to caffeine or d-amphetamine. Large between-group differences in salivary paraxanthine (but not salivary caffeine) levels were obtained under both caffeine doses. The cocaine-dependent group expressed significantly higher paraxanthine levels than controls under 150 mg and 3-4 fold greater levels under 300 mg at 90 min and 150 min post caffeine dose. However, these differences also covaried with cigarette smoking status (not balanced between groups), and nicotine smoking is known to alter caffeine/paraxanthine metabolism via cytochrome P450 enzymes. These preliminary data raise the possibility that adenosine antagonists may affect cocaine-dependent and non-dependent subjects differently. In conjunction with previous preclinical and

  12. Spend today, clean tomorrow: Predicting methamphetamine abstinence in a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Murtaugh, Kimberly Ling; Krishnamurti, Tamar; Davis, Alexander L.; Reback, Cathy J.; Shoptaw, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Objective This secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial tested two behavioral economics mechanisms (substitutability and delay discounting) to explain outcomes using contingency management (CM) for methamphetamine dependence. Frequency and purchase type (hedonic/utilitarian and consumable/durable) of CM payments were also examined. Methods 82 methamphetamine-dependent gay/bisexual men randomly assigned to conditions delivering CM received monetary vouchers in exchange for stimulant-negative urine samples in a 16-week trial requiring thrice weekly visits (Shoptaw et al., 2005). At any visit participants could redeem vouchers for goods. A time-lagged counting process Cox Proportional Hazards model for recurrent event survival analysis examined aspects of the frequency and type of these CM purchases. Results After controlling for severity of baseline methamphetamine use and accumulated CM wealth, as measured by cumulative successful earning days, participants who redeemed CM earnings at any visit (“spenders”) were significantly more likely to produce stimulant-negative urine samples in the subsequent visit, compared to those who did not redeem (“savers”) 1.011* [1.005, 1.017], Z=3.43, p<0.001. Conclusions Findings support the economic concept of substitutability of CM purchases and explain trial outcomes as a function of frequency of CM purchases rather than frequency or accumulated total CM earnings. Promotion of frequent purchases in incentive-based programs should facilitate substitution for the perceived value of methamphetamine and improve abstinence outcomes. PMID:24001246

  13. Methamphetamine Self-Administration and Voluntary Exercise Have Opposing Effects on Medial Prefrontal Cortex Gliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mandyam, Chitra D.; Wee, Sunmee; Eisch, Amelia J.; Richardson, Heather N.; Koob, George F.

    2009-01-01

    Psychostimulant abuse produces deficits in prefrontal cortex (PFC) function, whereas physical activity improves PFC-dependent cognition and memory. The present study explored the vulnerability of medial PFC (mPFC) precursor proliferation and survival to methamphetamine self-administration and voluntary exercise, factors that may have opposing effects on mPFC plasticity to facilitate functional consequences. Intermittent 1 h access to methamphetamine (I-ShA) increased, but daily 1 and 6 h access decreased, proliferation and survival, with dose-dependent effects on mature cell phenotypes. All groups showed increased cell death. Voluntary exercise enhanced proliferation and survival but, in contrast to methamphetamine exposure, did not alter cell death or mature phenotypes. Furthermore, enhanced cell survival by I-ShA and voluntary exercise had profound effects on gliogenesis with differential regulation of oligodendrocytes versus astrocytes. In addition, new cells in the adult mPFC stain for the neuronal marker neuronal nuclear protein, although enhanced cell survival by I-ShA and voluntary exercise did not result in increased neurogenesis. Our findings demonstrate that mPFC gliogenesis is vulnerable to psychostimulant abuse and physical activity with distinct underlying mechanisms. The susceptibility of mPFC gliogenesis to even modest doses of methamphetamine could account for the pronounced pathology linked to psychostimulant abuse. PMID:17942739

  14. Relationship Between Methamphetamine Exposure and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Brown, Sheketta; Shaikh, Jamaluddin; Fishback, James A.; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity was evaluated. Injection of mice with stimulant or toxic doses of methamphetamine up regulated MMP9 gene expression in the brain within 5 min. By 24 h, MMP9 gene expression returned to control levels in the stimulant-treated mice, but remained elevated in animals exposed to toxic doses of methamphetamine. Reductions in striatal dopamine levels, a marker of methamphetamine neurotoxicity, developed 1–7 days following methamphetamine exposure, but were not accompanied by concomitant changes in MMP9 gene expression. In MMP9 knock out mice, methamphetamine retained its ability to elicit neurotoxicity. The data suggest that MMP9 expression does not contribute to methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity, and may instead be involved in remodeling of the nervous system. PMID:18766021

  15. Relationship between methamphetamine exposure and matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Brown, Sheketta; Shaikh, Jamaluddin; Fishback, James A; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2008-09-17

    The involvement of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity was evaluated. Injection of mice with stimulant or toxic doses of methamphetamine upregulated MMP9 gene expression in the brain within 5 min. By 24 h, MMP9 gene expression returned to control levels in the stimulant-treated mice, but remained elevated in animals exposed to toxic doses of methamphetamine. Reductions in striatal dopamine levels, a marker of methamphetamine neurotoxicity, developed 1-7 days after methamphetamine exposure, but were not accompanied by concomitant changes in MMP9 gene expression. In MMP9 knockout mice, methamphetamine retained its ability to elicit neurotoxicity. The data suggest that MMP9 expression does not contribute to methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity, and may instead be involved in remodeling of the nervous system. PMID:18766021

  16. A new rate-dependent unidirectional composite model - Application to panels subjected to underwater blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoding; de Vaucorbeil, Alban; Tran, Phuong; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we developed a finite element fluid-structure interaction model to understand the deformation and failure mechanisms of both monolithic and sandwich composite panels. A new failure criterion that includes strain-rate effects was formulated and implemented to simulate different damage modes in unidirectional glass fiber/matrix composites. The laminate model uses Hashin's fiber failure criterion and a modified Tsai-Wu matrix failure criterion. The composite moduli are degraded using five damage variables, which are updated in the post-failure regime by means of a linear softening law governed by an energy release criterion. A key feature in the formulation is the distinction between fiber rupture and pull-out by introducing a modified fracture toughness, which varies from a fiber tensile toughness to a matrix tensile toughness as a function of the ratio of longitudinal normal stress to effective shear stress. The delamination between laminas is modeled by a strain-rate sensitive cohesive law. In the case of sandwich panels, core compaction is modeled by a crushable foam plasticity model with volumetric hardening and strain-rate sensitivity. These constitutive descriptions were used to predict deformation histories, fiber/matrix damage patterns, and inter-lamina delamination, for both monolithic and sandwich composite panels subjected to underwater blast. The numerical predictions were compared with experimental observations. We demonstrate that the new rate dependent composite damage model captures the spatial distribution and magnitude of damage significantly more accurately than previously developed models.

  17. Fibroblast growth factors 1 and 2 in cerebrospinal fluid are associated with HIV disease, methamphetamine use, and neurocognitive functioning

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Ajay R; Woods, Steven Paul; Ellis, Ronald J; Cherner, Mariana; Rosario, Debra; Potter, Michael; Heaton, Robert K; Everall, Ian P; Masliah, Eliezer; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L

    2016-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and methamphetamine use commonly affect neurocognitive (NC) functioning. We evaluated the relationships between NC functioning and two fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) in volunteers who differed in HIV serostatus and methamphetamine dependence (MAD). Methods A total of 100 volunteers were categorized into four groups based on HIV serostatus and MAD in the prior year. FGF-1 and FGF-2 were measured in cerebrospinal fluid by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays along with two reference biomarkers (monocyte chemotactic protein [MCP]-1 and neopterin). Comprehensive NC testing was summarized by global and domain impairment ratings. Results Sixty-three volunteers were HIV+ and 59 had a history of MAD. FGF-1, FGF-2, and both reference biomarkers differed by HIV and MAD status. For example, FGF-1 levels were lower in subjects who had either HIV or MAD than in HIV− and MAD− controls (P=0.003). Multivariable regression identified that global NC impairment was associated with an interaction between FGF-1 and FGF-2 (model R2=0.09, P=0.01): higher FGF-2 levels were only associated with neurocognitive impairment among subjects who had lower FGF-1 levels. Including other covariates in the model (including antidepressant use) strengthened the model (model R2=0.18, P=0.004) but did not weaken the association with FGF-1 and FGF-2. Lower FGF-1 levels were associated with impairment in five of seven cognitive domains, more than FGF-2, MCP-1, or neopterin. Conclusion These findings provide in vivo support that HIV and MAD alter expression of FGFs, which may contribute to the NC abnormalities associated with these conditions. These cross-sectional findings cannot establish causality and the therapeutic benefits of recombinant FGF-1 need to be investigated. PMID:27199571

  18. GZ-793A, a lobelane analog, interacts with the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 to inhibit the effect of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Horton, David B; Nickell, Justin R; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2013-10-01

    (R)-3-[2,6-cis-Di(4-methoxyphenethyl)piperidin-1-yl]propane-1,2-diol (GZ-793A) inhibits methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release from striatal slices and methamphetamine self-administration in rats. GZ-793A potently and selectively inhibits dopamine uptake at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2). This study determined GZ-793A's ability to evoke [³H]dopamine release and inhibit methamphetamine-evoked [³H]dopamine release from isolated striatal synaptic vesicles. Results show GZ-793A concentration-dependent [³H]dopamine release; nonlinear regression revealed a two-site model of interaction with VMAT2 (High- and Low-EC₅₀ = 15.5 nM and 29.3 μM, respectively). Tetrabenazine and reserpine completely inhibited GZ-793A-evoked [³H]dopamine release, however, only at the High-affinity site. Low concentrations of GZ-793A that interact with the extravesicular dopamine uptake site and the High-affinity intravesicular DA release site also inhibited methamphetamine-evoked [³H]dopamine release from synaptic vesicles. A rightward shift in the methamphetamine concentration-response was evident with increasing concentrations of GZ-793A, and the Schild regression slope was 0.49 ± 0.08, consistent with surmountable allosteric inhibition. These results support a hypothetical model of GZ-793A interaction at more than one site on the VMAT2 protein, which explains its potent inhibition of dopamine uptake, dopamine release via a High-affinity tetrabenazine- and reserpine-sensitive site, dopamine release via a Low-affinity tetrabenazine- and reserpine-insensitive site, and a low-affinity interaction with the dihydrotetrabenazine binding site on VMAT2. GZ-793A inhibition of the effects of methamphetamine supports its potential as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of methamphetamine abuse.

  19. GZ-793A, a lobelane analog, interacts with the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 to inhibit the effect of methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Horton, David B.; Nickell, Justin R.; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A.; Dwoskin, Linda P.

    2013-01-01

    GZ-793A inhibits methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release from striatal slices and methamphetamine self-administration in rats. GZ-793A potently and selectively inhibits dopamine uptake at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2). The present study determined GZ-793A’s ability to evoke [3H]dopamine release and inhibit methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine release from isolated striatal synaptic vesicles. Results show GZ-793A concentration-dependent [3H]dopamine release; nonlinear regression revealed a two-site model of interaction with VMAT2 (High- and Low-EC50 = 15.5 nM and 29.3 µM, respectively). Tetrabenazine and reserpine completely inhibited the GZ-793A-evoked [3H]dopamine release, however, only at the High-affinity site. Low concentrations of GZ-793A that interact with the extravesicular dopamine uptake site and the High-affinity intravesicular DA release site also inhibited methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine release from synaptic vesicles. A rightward shift in the methamphetamine concentration-response was evident with increasing concentrations of GZ-793A, and the Schild regression slope was 0.49±0.08, consistent with surmountable allosteric inhibition. These results support a hypothetical model of GZ-793A interaction at more than one site on VMAT2 protein, which explains its potent inhibition of dopamine uptake, dopamine release via a High-affinity tetrabenazine- and reserpine-sensitive site, dopamine release via a Low-affinity tetrabenazine- and reserpine-insensitive site, and low-affinity interaction with the dihydrotetrabenazine binding site on VMAT2. GZ-793A-inhibition of the effects of methamphetamine supports its potential as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of methamphetamine abuse. PMID:23875622

  20. Methamphetamine Causes Degeneration of Dopamine Cell Bodies and Terminals of the Nigrostriatal Pathway Evidenced by Silver Staining

    PubMed Central

    Ares-Santos, Sara; Granado, Noelia; Espadas, Isabel; Martinez-Murillo, Ricardo; Moratalla, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine is a widely abused illicit drug. Recent epidemiological studies showed that methamphetamine increases the risk for developing Parkinson's disease (PD) in agreement with animal studies showing dopaminergic neurotoxicity. We examined the effect of repeated low and medium doses vs single high dose of methamphetamine on degeneration of dopaminergic terminals and cell bodies. Mice were given methamphetamine in one of the following paradigms: three injections of 5 or 10 mg/kg at 3 h intervals or a single 30 mg/kg injection. The integrity of dopaminergic fibers and cell bodies was assessed at different time points after methamphetamine by tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry and silver staining. The 3 × 10 protocol yielded the highest loss of striatal dopaminergic terminals, followed by the 3 × 5 and 1 × 30. Some degenerating axons could be followed from the striatum to the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). All protocols induced similar significant degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc, evidenced by amino-cupric-silver-stained dopaminergic neurons. These neurons died by necrosis and apoptosis. Methamphetamine also killed striatal neurons. By using D1-Tmt/D2-GFP BAC transgenic mice, we observed that degenerating striatal neurons were equally distributed between direct and indirect medium spiny neurons. Despite the reduced number of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc at 30 days after treatment, there was a partial time-dependent recovery of dopamine terminals beginning 3 days after treatment. Locomotor activity and motor coordination were robustly decreased 1–3 days after treatment, but recovered at later times along with dopaminergic terminals. These data provide direct evidence that methamphetamine causes long-lasting loss/degeneration of dopaminergic cell bodies in the SNpc, along with destruction of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum. PMID:24169803

  1. Methamphetamine causes degeneration of dopamine cell bodies and terminals of the nigrostriatal pathway evidenced by silver staining.

    PubMed

    Ares-Santos, Sara; Granado, Noelia; Espadas, Isabel; Martinez-Murillo, Ricardo; Moratalla, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    Methamphetamine is a widely abused illicit drug. Recent epidemiological studies showed that methamphetamine increases the risk for developing Parkinson's disease (PD) in agreement with animal studies showing dopaminergic neurotoxicity. We examined the effect of repeated low and medium doses vs single high dose of methamphetamine on degeneration of dopaminergic terminals and cell bodies. Mice were given methamphetamine in one of the following paradigms: three injections of 5 or 10 mg/kg at 3 h intervals or a single 30 mg/kg injection. The integrity of dopaminergic fibers and cell bodies was assessed at different time points after methamphetamine by tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry and silver staining. The 3 × 10 protocol yielded the highest loss of striatal dopaminergic terminals, followed by the 3 × 5 and 1 × 30. Some degenerating axons could be followed from the striatum to the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). All protocols induced similar significant degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc, evidenced by amino-cupric-silver-stained dopaminergic neurons. These neurons died by necrosis and apoptosis. Methamphetamine also killed striatal neurons. By using D1-Tmt/D2-GFP BAC transgenic mice, we observed that degenerating striatal neurons were equally distributed between direct and indirect medium spiny neurons. Despite the reduced number of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc at 30 days after treatment, there was a partial time-dependent recovery of dopamine terminals beginning 3 days after treatment. Locomotor activity and motor coordination were robustly decreased 1-3 days after treatment, but recovered at later times along with dopaminergic terminals. These data provide direct evidence that methamphetamine causes long-lasting loss/degeneration of dopaminergic cell bodies in the SNpc, along with destruction of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum.

  2. Methamphetamine enhances sexual behavior in female rats.

    PubMed

    Winland, Carissa; Haycox, Charles; Bolton, Jessica L; Jampana, Sumith; Oakley, Benjamin J; Ford, Brittany; Ornelas, Laura; Burbey, Alexandra; Marquette, Amber; Frohardt, Russell J; Guarraci, Fay A

    2011-06-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of methamphetamine (MA) on sexual behavior in female rats. In Experiment 1, ovariectomized, hormone-primed rats were injected with MA (1.0mg/kg, i.p.) or saline prior to a test for mate choice wherein females could mate with two males simultaneously. Female rats treated with saline returned to their preferred mate faster after receiving intromissions and visited their preferred mate at a higher rate than their non-preferred mate. In contrast, MA-treated female rats spent a similar amount of time with their preferred and non-preferred mate and failed to return to their preferred mate faster than to their non-preferred mate following intromissions. Two weeks later, the females received the same drug treatment but were tested for partner preference wherein females could spend time near a male or female stimulus rat. All subjects spent more time near the male stimulus than the female stimulus. However, the MA-treated rats visited the male stimulus more frequently and spent less time near the female stimulus than the saline-treated rats. Similar to Experiment 1, female rats in Experiment 2 were tested for mate choice and then two weeks later tested for partner preference; however, females received three daily injections of MA (1.0mg/kg, i.p.) or saline. Females treated chronically with MA returned to both males faster following intromissions than females treated with saline, independent of preference (i.e., preferred mate and non-preferred mate). Furthermore, MA-treated rats were more likely to leave either male (i.e., preferred or non-preferred mate) than saline-treated rats after receiving sexual stimulation. Although MA-treated subjects spent more time near the male stimulus than the female stimulus, they spent less time near either when compared to saline-treated subjects. The present results demonstrate that MA affects sexual behavior in female rats partly by increasing locomotion and partly by directly affecting sexual

  3. A Pilot Study of Creatine as a Novel Treatment for Depression in Methamphetamine Using Females

    PubMed Central

    Hellem, Tracy L.; Sung, Young-Hoon; Shi, Xian-Feng; Pett, Marjorie A.; Latendresse, Gwen; Morgan, Jubel; Huber, Rebekah S.; Kuykendall, Danielle; Lundberg, Kelly J.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Depression among methamphetamine users is more prevalent in females than males, but gender specific treatment options for this comorbidity have not been described. Reduced brain phosphocreatine levels have been shown to be lower in female methamphetamine users compared to males, and, of relevance, studies have demonstrated an association between treatment resistant depression and reduced brain phosphocreatine concentrations. The nutritional supplement creatine monohydrate has been reported to reduce symptoms of depression in female adolescents and adults taking antidepressants, as well as to increase brain phosphocreatine in healthy volunteers. Therefore, the purpose of this pilot study was to investigate creatine monohydrate as a treatment for depression in female methamphetamine users. Methods Fourteen females with depression and comorbid methamphetamine dependence were enrolled in an 8 week open label trial of 5 grams of daily creatine monohydrate and of these 14, eleven females completed the study. Depression was measured using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and brain phosphocreatine levels were measured using phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy pre- and post-creatine treatment. Secondary outcome measures included anxiety symptoms, measured with the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), as well as methamphetamine use, monitored by twice weekly urine drug screens and self-reported use. Results The results of a linear mixed effects repeated measures model showed significantly reduced HAMD and BAI scores as early as week 2 when compared to baseline scores. This improvement was maintained through study completion. Brain phosphocreatine concentrations were higher at the second phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy scan compared to the baseline scan; Mbaseline = 0.223 (SD = 0.013) vs. Mpost-treatment = 0.233 (SD = 0.009), t(9) = 2.905, p < .01, suggesting that creatine increased phosphocreatine levels. Also, a reduction in methamphetamine

  4. Identifying methamphetamine exposure in children

    PubMed Central

    Castaneto, Marisol S.; Barnes, Allan J.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Schaffer, Michael; Rogers, Kristen K.; Stewart, Deborah; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Methamphetamine (MAMP) use, distribution and manufacture remain a serious public health and safety problem in the United States, and children environmentally exposed to MAMP face a myriad of developmental, social and health risks, including severe abuse and neglect necessitating child protection involvement. It is recommended that drug-endangered children receive medical evaluation and care with documentation of overall physical and mental conditions and have urine drug testing.1 The primary aim of this study was to determine the best biological matrix to detect MAMP, amphetamine (AMP), methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA) in environmentally exposed children. Method 91 children, environmentally exposed to household MAMP intake, were medically evaluated at the Child and Adolescent Abuse Resource and Evaluation (CAARE) Diagnostic and Treatment Center at the University of California, Davis (UCD) Children's Hospital. MAMP, AMP, MDMA, MDA and MDEA were quantified in urine and oral fluid (OF) by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and in hair by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LCMSMS). Results Overall drug detection rates in OF, urine and hair were 6.9%, 22.1% and 77.8%, respectively. Seventy children (79%) tested positive for 1 or more drugs in 1 or more matrices. MAMP was the primary analyte detected in all 3 biological matrices. All positive OF (n=5) and 18 of 19 positive urine specimens also had a positive hair test. Conclusion Hair analysis offered a more sensitive tool for identifying MAMP, AMP and MDMA environmental exposure in children than urine or OF testing. A negative urine, or hair test does not exclude the possibility of drug exposure, but hair testing provided the greatest sensitivity for identifying drug-exposed children. PMID:24263642

  5. Methamphetamine and amphetamine isomer concentrations in human urine following controlled Vicks VapoInhaler administration.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael L; Nichols, Daniel C; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A; Flegel, Ron; Gorelick, David A; Newmeyer, Matthew N; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-10-01

    Legitimate use of legal intranasal decongestants containing l-methamphetamine may complicate interpretation of urine drug tests positive for amphetamines. Our study hypotheses were that commonly used immunoassays would produce no false-positive results and a recently developed enantiomer-specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure would find no d-amphetamine or d-methamphetamine in urine following controlled Vicks VapoInhaler administration at manufacturer's recommended doses. To evaluate these hypotheses, 22 healthy adults were each administered one dose (two inhalations in each nostril) of a Vicks VapoInhaler every 2 h for 10 h on Day 1 (six doses), followed by a single dose on Day 2. Every urine specimen was collected as an individual void for 32 h after the first dose and assayed for d- and l-amphetamines specific isomers with a GC-MS method with >99% purity of R-(-)-α-methoxy-α-(trifluoromethyl)phenylacetyl derivatives and 10 µg/L lower limits of quantification. No d-methamphetamine or d-amphetamine was detected in any urine specimen by GC-MS. The median l-methamphetamine maximum concentration was 62.8 µg/L (range: 11.0-1,440). Only two subjects had detectable l-amphetamine, with maximum concentrations coinciding with l-methamphetamine peak levels, and always ≤ 4% of the parent's maximum. Three commercial immunoassays for amphetamines EMIT(®) II Plus, KIMS(®) II and DRI(®) had sensitivities, specificities and efficiencies of 100, 97.8, 97.8; 100, 99.6, 99.6 and 100, 100, 100%, respectively. The immunoassays had high efficiencies, but our first hypothesis was not affirmed. The EMIT(®) II Plus assay produced 2.2% false-positive results, requiring an enantiomer-specific confirmation.

  6. Methamphetamine Exposure: A Rural Early Intervention Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Barry M.; Arria, Amelia M.; Derauf, Christian; Grant, Penny; LaGasse, Linda; Newman, Elana; Shah, Rizwan Z.; Stewart, Sara; Wouldes, Trecia

    2006-01-01

    In the Infant Development, Environment and Lifestyle (IDEAL) Study of methamphetamine (MA) effects on children, the authors screened approximately 27,000 newborn infants for MA exposure, and from that pool derived a sample of in utero MA-exposed children as well as a comparison group matched for other drug use and other factors. IDEAL measures…

  7. Maternal separation fails to render animals more susceptible to methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Faure, Jacqueline; Stein, Dan J; Daniels, William

    2009-12-01

    The maternal separation (MS) paradigm is an animal model that has been successfully used to study the long term effects of child abuse and neglect. Experiments showed that animals subjected to trauma and stress early in life display behavioural, endocrinological and growth factor abnormalities at a later stage in life, results that mirrored clinical conditions. It is apparent that adverse events early in life may affect the development and maturation of the brain negatively. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the abnormal brain development occurring in separated animals would also enhance the development of a preference for psychostimulant drug usage. Rats were subjected to maternal deprivation and further exposed to methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) which primarily measures drug reward (ventral striatum) learning and memory. Apomorphine-induced locomotor activity was also assessed to investigate the effects of methamphetamine on the dorsal (primarily locomotor activity) striatal dopaminergic system. We found that four consecutive injections of methamphetamine resulted in CPP behaviour 24 h after the 4th injection. A further four injections yielded similar CPP results and this effect lasted for at least 7 days until the third CPP assessment. These animals also had decreased ACTH and corticosterone secretions, but the prolactin levels were increased. Prior exposure to maternal separation did not have any effect on the CPP test. The ACTH and corticosterone secretions were also similarly reduced. However maternal separation decreased the release of prolactin and this reduction was not evident in the separated group that received methamphetamine. There was no significant difference in the apomorphine-induced locomotor activity of normally reared animals whether they received methamphetamine or saline. Interestingly there was a significant difference in locomotor activity between the two groups of animals that were

  8. Maternal separation fails to render animals more susceptible to methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Faure, Jacqueline; Stein, Dan J; Daniels, William

    2009-12-01

    The maternal separation (MS) paradigm is an animal model that has been successfully used to study the long term effects of child abuse and neglect. Experiments showed that animals subjected to trauma and stress early in life display behavioural, endocrinological and growth factor abnormalities at a later stage in life, results that mirrored clinical conditions. It is apparent that adverse events early in life may affect the development and maturation of the brain negatively. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the abnormal brain development occurring in separated animals would also enhance the development of a preference for psychostimulant drug usage. Rats were subjected to maternal deprivation and further exposed to methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) which primarily measures drug reward (ventral striatum) learning and memory. Apomorphine-induced locomotor activity was also assessed to investigate the effects of methamphetamine on the dorsal (primarily locomotor activity) striatal dopaminergic system. We found that four consecutive injections of methamphetamine resulted in CPP behaviour 24 h after the 4th injection. A further four injections yielded similar CPP results and this effect lasted for at least 7 days until the third CPP assessment. These animals also had decreased ACTH and corticosterone secretions, but the prolactin levels were increased. Prior exposure to maternal separation did not have any effect on the CPP test. The ACTH and corticosterone secretions were also similarly reduced. However maternal separation decreased the release of prolactin and this reduction was not evident in the separated group that received methamphetamine. There was no significant difference in the apomorphine-induced locomotor activity of normally reared animals whether they received methamphetamine or saline. Interestingly there was a significant difference in locomotor activity between the two groups of animals that were

  9. Increased Orbitofrontal Brain Activation after Administration of a Selective Adenosine A2A Antagonist in Cocaine Dependent Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, F. Gerard; Steinberg, Joel L.; Lane, Scott D.; Kjome, Kimberly L.; Ma, Liangsuo; Ferre, Sergi; Schmitz, Joy M.; Green, Charles E.; Bandak, Stephen I.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Kramer, Larry A.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Positron Emission Tomography imaging studies provide evidence of reduced dopamine function in cocaine dependent subjects in the striatum, which is correlated with prefrontal cortical glucose metabolism, particularly in the orbitofrontal cortex. However, whether enhancement of dopamine in the striatum in cocaine dependent subjects would be associated with changes in prefrontal cortical brain activation is unknown. One novel class of medications that enhance dopamine function via heteromer formation with dopamine receptors in the striatum is the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. This study sought to determine the effects administration of the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SYN115 on brain function in cocaine dependent subjects. Methodology/Principle Findings: Twelve cocaine dependent subjects underwent two fMRI scans (one after a dose of placebo and one after a dose of 100 mg of SYN115) while performing a working memory task with three levels of difficulty (3, 5, and 7 digits). fMRI results showed that for 7-digit working memory activation there was significantly greater activation from SYN115 compared to placebo in portions of left (L) lateral orbitofrontal cortex, L insula, and L superior and middle temporal pole. Conclusion/Significance: These findings are consistent with enhanced dopamine function in the striatum in cocaine dependent subjects via blockade of adenosine A2A receptors producing increased brain activation in the orbitofrontal cortex and other cortical regions. This suggests that at least some of the changes in brain activation in prefrontal cortical regions in cocaine dependent subjects may be related to altered striatal dopamine function, and that enhancement of dopamine function via adenosine A2A receptor blockade could be explored further for amelioration of neurobehavioral deficits associated with chronic cocaine use. PMID:22654774

  10. HIV Prevalence and Risk among Heterosexual Methamphetamine Injectors in California

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Alex H.; Lorvick, Jennifer; Martinez, Alexis; Lewis, Megan A.; Orr, Alexander; Anderson, Rachel; Flynn, Neil; Bluthenthal, Ricky N.

    2013-01-01

    This CDC-funded study compares HIV prevalence and risk behavior among heterosexual methamphetamine (n=428) and non-methamphetamine (n=878) injectors in California, USA during 2001–2003. While HIV was not highly prevalent among methamphetamine injectors (3%), sexual and injection risk behaviors were highly prevalent (ranging from 21% to 72%). In multivariate analyses, methamphetamine injectors had higher odds than non-methamphetamine injectors of unprotected vaginal intercourse and sex with five or more sexual partners in the past six months, and of distributive and receptive syringe sharing in the past thirty days. There was no significant difference in HIV sero-status by methamphetamine use. Suggestions are made for designing HIV prevention programs. PMID:21391786

  11. Against professional advice: treatment attrition among pregnant methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Brianna; Albrecht, Jennifer; Terplan, Mishka

    2011-01-01

    Pregnant methamphetamine users who leave substance use treatment against professional advice may be at risk of poorer health outcomes. To examine the hypothesis that methamphetamine use during pregnancy may be associated with leaving substance use treatment against professional advice, the 2006 Treatment Episode Data Set was analyzed. A logistic regression adjusting for age, race, service setting, prior substance abuse treatment, criminal justice referral, and education was conducted. Inclusion criteria were met by 18,688 pregnant admissions; 26.4% identified methamphetamines as their primary substance of use. Frequency of use was identified as an effect modifier, therefore results were stratified by less than weekly use and weekly or more use. Methamphetamine use was significantly associated with leaving treatment against professional advice regardless of usage level. However, the odds of leaving treatment were greater among women using methamphetamine less than weekly. Further investigation into this association may be warranted due to the complications that may result from methamphetamine use during pregnancy.

  12. Methamphetamine Regulation of Sulfotransferase 1A1 and 2A1 Expression in Rat Brain Sections

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tianyan; Huang, Chaoqun; Chen, Yue; Xu, Jiaojiao; Shanbhag, Preeti Devaraya; Chen, Guangping

    2012-01-01

    Sulfotransferase catalyzed sulfation regulates the biological activities of various neurotransmitters/hormones and detoxifies xenobiotics. Rat sulfotransferase rSULT1A1 catalyzes the sulfation of neurotransmitters and xenobiotic phenolic compounds. rSULT2A1 catalyzes the sulfation of hydroxysteroids and xenobiotic alcoholic compounds. In this work, Western blot and real-time RT-PCR were used to investigate the effect of methamphetamine on rSULT1A1 and rSULT2A1 protein and mRNA expression in rat cerebellum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. After 1-day treatment, significant induction of rSULT1A1 was observed only in the cerebellum; rSULT2A1 was induced significantly in the cerebellum, frontal cortex, and hippocampus. After 7-days of exposure, rSULT1A1 was induced in the cerebellum, frontal cortex, and hippocampus, while rSULT2A1 was induced significantly in all four regions. Western blot results agreed with the real-time RT-PCR results, suggesting that the induction occurred at the gene transcriptional level. Results indicate that rSULT1A1 and rSULT2A1 are expressed in rat frontal cortex, cerebellum, striatum, and hippocampus. rSULT1A1 and rSULT2A1are inducible by methamphetamine in rat brain sections in a time dependable manner. rSULT2A1 is more inducible than rSULT1A1 by methamphetamine in rat brain sections. Induction activity of methamphetamine is in the order of cerebellum > frontal cortex, hippocampus > striatum. These results suggest that the physiological functions of rSULT1A1 and rSULT2A1 in different brain regions can be affected by methamphetamine. PMID:23026138

  13. A cluster of trace-concentration methamphetamine identifications in racehorses associated with a methamphetamine-contaminated horse trailer: A report and analysis.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Kimberly; Shults, Theodore F; Machin, Jacob; Kudrimoti, Sucheta; Eisenberg, Rodney L; Hartman, Petra; Wang, Caroline; Fenger, Clara; Beaumier, Pierre; Tobin, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Three low concentration methamphetamine "positive" tests were linked to use of a methamphetamine-contaminated trailer to transport the affected horses. This incident establishes methamphetamine as a human-use substance that can inadvertently enter the environment of racing horses, resulting in urinary methamphetamine "positives;" an interim regulatory cut-off of 15 ng/mL for methamphetamine in post-race urine is proposed. PMID:27493286

  14. Clinical Characteristics of Subjects with Sulfonylurea-Dependent Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Min, Se Hee; Kwak, Soo Heon; Cho, Young Min; Park, Kyong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background Even though several oral anti-diabetic drugs (OAD) with various modes of action are replacing sulfonylurea (SU), some patients seem to be dependent on SU for adequate glycemic control. Therefore, we evaluated the clinical characteristics of such patients. Methods We selected the patients with type 2 diabetes who met following criteria from 2009 to 2014 at Seoul National University Hospital: glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was maintained below 7.5% for at least 6 months under small dose of SU (glimepiride ≤2 mg/day or equivalent dose); after discontinuation of SU, HbA1c increased ≥1.2% within 3 months or ≥1.5% within 6 months; and after resuming SU, HbA1c reduction was ≥0.8% or reduction of fasting plasma glucose was ≥40 mg/dL within 3 months. Patients with impaired hepatic or renal function, and steroid users were excluded. Results Nineteen subjects were enrolled: after averaged 4.8±1.5 months of SU-free period, HbA1c increased from 6.7%±0.4% to 8.8%±0.8% even though adding other OAD such as gliptins. However, HbA1c decreased to 7.4%±0.7% after resuming SU within 2.4±0.8 months. There was no sexual predominance. Despite their old age (67±11 years) and long duration of diabetes (18±10 years), fasting C-peptide was relatively well-reserved (3.9±2.6 ng/mL), and nephropathy was not observed (albumin-creatinine ratio 21.2±16.6 mg/g and estimated glomerular filtration rate 75.8±18.0 mL/min/1.73 m2). Strong family history was also noted (73.7%). Conclusion Despite hypoglycemia risk of SU, it seemed indispensable for a subset of patients with regard to insulin secretion. Genetic influences would be evaluated. PMID:26354492

  15. Hypoglycemic effect of triphala on selected non insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus subjects

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sowmya S.; Antony, Seema

    2008-01-01

    Modern life style is characterized by high stress, increased automation, junk food consumption and sedentary life style which have lead to the incidence of Diabetes. The study involved selection of NIDDM subjects who were supplemented with Triphala powder called, The Three Myrobalans (Terminalia bellirica- Belliric myrobalan, Terminalia chebula-Inknut, Embilica officinalis - Indian gooseberry) for a period of 45 days. Statistical evaluation of the blood profile showed significant reduction in the blood glucose level of the subjects. PMID:22557278

  16. Association of Smoking with Mu- Opioid Receptor Availability Before and During Naltrexone Blockade in Alcohol-Dependent Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Weerts, Elise M.; Wand, Gary S.; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Frost, J.James; Wong, Dean F.; McCaul, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    Persons with a history of alcohol dependence are more likely to use tobacco and to meet criteria for nicotine dependence compared to social drinkers or nondrinkers. The high levels of comorbidity of nicotine and alcohol use and dependence are thought to be related to interactions between nicotinic, opioid and dopamine receptors in mesolimbic regions. The current study examined whether individual differences in regional mu-opioid receptor (MOR) availability were associated with tobacco use, nicotine dependence, and level of nicotine craving in 25 alcohol dependent (AD) subjects. AD subjects completed an inpatient protocol, which included medically supervised alcohol withdrawal, monitored alcohol abstinence, transdermal nicotine maintenance (21 mg/day), and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging using the MOR agonist [11C]-carfentanil (CFN) before (basal scan) and during treatment with 50 mg/day naltrexone (naltrexone scan). Subjects who had higher scores on the Fagerström Nicotine Dependence Test had significantly lower basal scan binding potential (BPND) across mesolimbic regions including the amygdala, cingulate, globus pallidus, thalamus and insula. Likewise, the number of cigarettes per day was negatively associated with basal scan BPND in mesolimbic regions Higher nicotine craving was significantly associated with lower BPND in amygdala, globus pallidus, putamen, thalamus and ventral striatum. Although blunted during naltrexone treatment, the negative association was maintained for nicotine dependence and cigarettes per day, but not for nicotine craving. These findings suggest that intensity of cigarette smoking and severity of nicotine dependence symptoms are systematically related to reduced BPND across multiple brain regions in AD subjects. PMID:23252742

  17. Methamphetamine abuse during pregnancy: outcome and fetal effects.

    PubMed

    Little, B B; Snell, L M; Gilstrap, L C

    1988-10-01

    Methamphetamines are a popular class of recreational drugs sometimes abused by women of childbearing age. The effects of methamphetamine abuse on pregnancy outcome and embryofetal development are not known. In this study, we compared pregnancy and fetal outcome in 52 women who abused methamphetamines with a randomly selected control group of 52 non-drug-abusing women. Body weight, length, and head circumference were significantly decreased in neonates born to mothers who abused methamphetamines during pregnancy. However, the frequency of congenital anomalies was not significantly increased in this group.

  18. Is brain gliosis a characteristic of chronic methamphetamine use in the human?

    PubMed

    Tong, Junchao; Fitzmaurice, Paul; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Schmunk, Gregory A; Wickham, Dennis J; Ang, Lee-Cyn; Sherwin, Allan; McCluskey, Tina; Boileau, Isabelle; Kish, Stephen J

    2014-07-01

    Animal data show that high doses of the stimulant drug methamphetamine can damage brain dopamine neurones; however, it is still uncertain whether methamphetamine, at any dose, is neurotoxic to human brain. Since gliosis is typically associated with brain damage and is observed in animal models of methamphetamine exposure, we measured protein levels (intact protein and fragments, if any) of markers of microgliosis (glucose transporter-5, human leukocyte antigens HLA-DRα [TAL.1B5] and HLA-DR/DQ/DPβ [CR3/43]) and astrogliosis (glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, and heat shock protein-27) in homogenates of autopsied brain of chronic methamphetamine users (n=20) and matched controls (n=23). Intact protein levels of all markers were, as expected, elevated (+28%-1270%, P<0.05) in putamen of patients with the neurodegenerative disorder multiple system atrophy (as a positive control) as were concentrations of fragments of glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin and heat shock protein-27 (+170%-4700%, P<0.005). In contrast, intact protein concentrations of the markers were normal in dopamine-rich striatum (caudate, putamen) and in the frontal cortex of the drug users. However, striatal levels of cleaved vimentin and heat shock protein-27 were increased (by 98%-211%, P<0.05), with positive correlations (r=0.41-0.60) observed between concentrations of truncated heat shock protein-27 and extent of dopamine loss (P=0.006) and levels of lipid peroxidation products 4-hydroxynonenal (P=0.046) and malondialdehyde (P=0.11). Our failure to detect increased intact protein levels of commonly used markers of microgliosis and astrogliosis could be explained by exposure to methamphetamine insufficient to cause a toxic process associated with overt gliosis; however, about half of the subjects had died of drug intoxication suggesting that "high" drug doses might have been used. Alternatively, drug tolerance to toxic effects might have occurred in the subjects, who were all

  19. Neural mechanisms underlying contextual dependency of subjective values: converging evidence from monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Abitbol, Raphaëlle; Lebreton, Maël; Hollard, Guillaume; Richmond, Barry J; Bouret, Sébastien; Pessiglione, Mathias

    2015-02-01

    A major challenge for decision theory is to account for the instability of expressed preferences across time and context. Such variability could arise from specific properties of the brain system used to assign subjective values. Growing evidence has identified the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) as a key node of the human brain valuation system. Here, we first replicate this observation with an fMRI study in humans showing that subjective values of painting pictures, as expressed in explicit pleasantness ratings, are specifically encoded in the VMPFC. We then establish a bridge with monkey electrophysiology, by comparing single-unit activity evoked by visual cues between the VMPFC and the orbitofrontal cortex. At the neural population level, expected reward magnitude was only encoded in the VMPFC, which also reflected subjective cue values, as expressed in Pavlovian appetitive responses. In addition, we demonstrate in both species that the additive effect of prestimulus activity on evoked activity has a significant impact on subjective values. In monkeys, the factor dominating prestimulus VMPFC activity was trial number, which likely indexed variations in internal dispositions related to fatigue or satiety. In humans, prestimulus VMPFC activity was externally manipulated through changes in the musical context, which induced a systematic bias in subjective values. Thus, the apparent stochasticity of preferences might relate to the VMPFC automatically aggregating the values of contextual features, which would bias subsequent valuation because of temporal autocorrelation in neural activity. PMID:25653384

  20. Association between subjective and cortisol stress response depends on the menstrual cycle phase.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Annie; Pruessner, Jens C

    2013-12-01

    The relation between the physiologic and subjective stress responses is inconsistently reported across studies. Menstrual cycle phases variations have been found to influence the psychophysiological stress response; however little is known about possible cycle phase differences in the relationship between physiological and subjective stress responses. This study examined the effect of menstrual cycle phase in the association between subjective stress and physiological response. Forty-five women in either the follicular (n=21) or the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle were exposed to a psychosocial stress task. Salivary cortisol, cardiovascular, and subjective stress were assessed throughout the experiment. Results revealed a significant group difference in the association between peak levels of cortisol and post task subjective stress. In women in the follicular phase a negative association was observed (r(2)=0.199, p=0.04), while this relation was positive in the group of women in the luteal phase (r(2)=0.227, p=0.02). These findings suggest a possible role of sex hormones in modulating the cortisol stress response function in emotion regulation.

  1. Neural mechanisms underlying contextual dependency of subjective values: converging evidence from monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Abitbol, Raphaëlle; Lebreton, Maël; Hollard, Guillaume; Richmond, Barry J; Bouret, Sébastien; Pessiglione, Mathias

    2015-02-01

    A major challenge for decision theory is to account for the instability of expressed preferences across time and context. Such variability could arise from specific properties of the brain system used to assign subjective values. Growing evidence has identified the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) as a key node of the human brain valuation system. Here, we first replicate this observation with an fMRI study in humans showing that subjective values of painting pictures, as expressed in explicit pleasantness ratings, are specifically encoded in the VMPFC. We then establish a bridge with monkey electrophysiology, by comparing single-unit activity evoked by visual cues between the VMPFC and the orbitofrontal cortex. At the neural population level, expected reward magnitude was only encoded in the VMPFC, which also reflected subjective cue values, as expressed in Pavlovian appetitive responses. In addition, we demonstrate in both species that the additive effect of prestimulus activity on evoked activity has a significant impact on subjective values. In monkeys, the factor dominating prestimulus VMPFC activity was trial number, which likely indexed variations in internal dispositions related to fatigue or satiety. In humans, prestimulus VMPFC activity was externally manipulated through changes in the musical context, which induced a systematic bias in subjective values. Thus, the apparent stochasticity of preferences might relate to the VMPFC automatically aggregating the values of contextual features, which would bias subsequent valuation because of temporal autocorrelation in neural activity.

  2. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Contextual Dependency of Subjective Values: Converging Evidence from Monkeys and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Abitbol, Raphaëlle; Lebreton, Maël; Hollard, Guillaume; Richmond, Barry J.; Bouret, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for decision theory is to account for the instability of expressed preferences across time and context. Such variability could arise from specific properties of the brain system used to assign subjective values. Growing evidence has identified the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) as a key node of the human brain valuation system. Here, we first replicate this observation with an fMRI study in humans showing that subjective values of painting pictures, as expressed in explicit pleasantness ratings, are specifically encoded in the VMPFC. We then establish a bridge with monkey electrophysiology, by comparing single-unit activity evoked by visual cues between the VMPFC and the orbitofrontal cortex. At the neural population level, expected reward magnitude was only encoded in the VMPFC, which also reflected subjective cue values, as expressed in Pavlovian appetitive responses. In addition, we demonstrate in both species that the additive effect of prestimulus activity on evoked activity has a significant impact on subjective values. In monkeys, the factor dominating prestimulus VMPFC activity was trial number, which likely indexed variations in internal dispositions related to fatigue or satiety. In humans, prestimulus VMPFC activity was externally manipulated through changes in the musical context, which induced a systematic bias in subjective values. Thus, the apparent stochasticity of preferences might relate to the VMPFC automatically aggregating the values of contextual features, which would bias subsequent valuation because of temporal autocorrelation in neural activity. PMID:25653384

  3. Ceftriaxone upregulates the glutamate transporter in medial prefrontal cortex and blocks reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking in a condition place preference paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Abulseoud, Osama A.; Miller, Joseph D.; Wu, Jinhua; Choi, Doo-Sup; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate signaling plays an essential role in drug-seeking behavior. Using reinstatement of conditioned place preference (CPP), we determined whether ceftriaxone, a β-lactam antibiotic known to increase the expression and activity of the glutamate transporter (EAAT2) on glial cells, blocks methamphetamine-triggered reinstatement of CPP. Rats acquired methamphetamine CPP following 7 consecutive days of conditioning, during which each animal received pairings of alternating morning methamphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, IP) and afternoon saline (IP). Animals showing CPP were successfully extinguished with repeated twice daily saline administration over a 7-day period. Ceftriaxone (200 mg/kg, IP) was administered (vs. saline) once a day for 7 days during the extinction period. Upon successful extinction, animals received a single dose of methamphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, IP) for reinstatement and were tested for CPP one day later. Using real time PCR, EAAT2 mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) were quantified in response to ceftriaxone. Ceftriaxone blocked methamphetamine-triggered reinstatement of CPP and significantly increased EAAT2 mRNA levels in the mPFC, with a trend towards significance in the NAc. In conclusion, Ceftriaxone modulated the expression of the glutamate transporter in a critical region of the cortico-striatal addiction circuitry and attenuated drug-seeking behavior in rats. Further research is needed to test the efficacy of compounds targeting the EAAT2 in human methamphetamine-dependent users. PMID:22521042

  4. Altered white matter in cocaine-dependent subjects with traumatic brain injury: a diffusion tensor imaging study*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liangsuo; Steinberg, Joel L.; Keyser-Marcus, Lori; Ramesh, Divya; Narayana, Ponnada A.; Merchant, Randall E; Moeller, F. Gerard; Cifu, David X

    2015-01-01

    Background Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a useful technique for non-invasively investigating the microstructural organization of white matter (WM), and the most consistent DTI finding regarding cocaine-related WM alterations is in the corpus callosum (CC). WM injury has also been observed in subjects with traumatic brain injury (TBI), including in the CC. Methods We used DTI to test if the WM microstructure is relatively more impaired in cocaine-dependent subjects who had suffered a mild TBI (mTBI). Fractional anisotropy (FA), which reflects the degree of alignment of cellular structures within fiber tracts and their structural integrity, was compared across cocaine-dependent subjects with mTBI (COCTBI group, n=9), matched cocaine-dependent subjects without TBI (COC group, n=12), and matched healthy controls (CTL group, n=12). Results The COCTBI group had significantly lower FA in the genu, body, and splenium of CC, than the CTL group whenever the education was controlled or not. The COC group had significantly lower FA in the left and right anterior corona radiata than the CTL group only when the education was controlled. There was no significant difference in FA between the COC and COCTBI groups. Conclusion Cocaine dependence (or mTBI) related WM impairments in the CC were not detectable in this small subject sample. The significant finding in the CC suggests that the concurrence of cocaine dependence and mTBI might result in more severe damage to the CC, which could even be detected in small sample size. PMID:25841982

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of glucose metabolism in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus subjects.

    PubMed

    Shulman, R G

    1996-09-01

    In this review, the results of a series of NMR experiments investigating glucose storage and synthesis in NIDDM patients and normal controls have been summarized. These have shown: 1. The deficit in nonoxidative glucose disposal in NIDDM subjects results from a defect in the muscle glycogen synthesis pathway. 2. Reduced activity of glucose transporter/hexokinase step in this pathway accounts for the reduced rate of glycogen synthesis in NIDDM patients. 3. This reduced activity of GT/Hk is a genetic defect present before the clinical onset of disease in prediabetic descendants of diabetic parents. 4. In muscle from normal, healthy subjects the rate of glycogen synthesis is controlled by the glucose transport/hexokinase activity step and not by the activity of the muscle glycogen synthase enzyme. 5. Hepatic gluconeogenesis is responsible for most hepatic glucose production during an overnight fast in both normal and NIDDM subjects, and increases in gluconeogenic flux are responsible for the increased rate of hepatic glucose production in NIDDM subjects. 6. In contrast to human muscle, where glycogenesis ceases at rest, in the liver gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis are always active. Numerous previous studies were considered prior to embarking in each of these NMR experiments. In the original research articles we published, the earlier studies were discussed in terms of the relevant literature. Here, however, I have chosen to present the NMR data as simply as possible, in the hope of exposing the significance of these studies by disentangling the results from the complexities of NMR methodology.

  6. Methamphetamine Ingestion Misdiagnosed as Centruroides sculpturatus Envenomation.

    PubMed

    Strommen, Joshua; Shirazi, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a case report of a 17-month-old female child who ingested a large amount of methamphetamine that looked very similar clinically to a scorpion envenomation specific to the southwestern United States by the species Centruroides sculpturatus. The child was initially treated with 3 vials of antivenom specific for that scorpion species and showed a transient, though clinically relevant neurologic improvement. Her clinical course of sympathomimetic toxicity resumed and she was treated with intravenous fluids and benzodiazepines after blood analysis showed significant levels of d-methamphetamine. This case report is to specifically underline the clinical confusion in discerning between these two conditions and the realization of limited and/or expensive resources that may be used in the process. PMID:25649670

  7. Abnormal transient rise in hepatic glucose production after oral glucose in non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Thorburn, A; Litchfield, A; Fabris, S; Proietto, J

    1995-05-01

    A transient rise in hepatic glucose production (HGP) after an oral glucosa load has been reported in some insulin-resistant states such as in obese fa/fa Zucker rats. The aim of this study was to determine whether this rise in HGP also occurs in subjects with established non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Glucose kinetics were measured basally and during a double-label oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 12 NIDDM subjects and 12 non-diabetic 'control' subjects. Twenty minutes after the glucose load, HGP had increased 73% above basal in the NIDDM subjects (7.29 +/- 0.52 to 12.58 +/- 1.86 mumol/kg/min, P < 0.02). A transient rise in glucagon (12 pg/ml above basal, P < 0.004) occurred at a similar time. In contrast, the control subjects showed no rise in HGP or plasma glucagon. HGP began to suppress 40-50 min after the OGTT in both the NIDDM and control subjects. A 27% increase in the rate of gut-derived glucose absorption was also observed in the NIDDM group, which could be the result of increased gut glucose absorption or decreased first pass extraction of glucose by the liver. Therefore, in agreement with data in animal models of NIDDM, a transient rise in HGP partly contributes to the hyperglycemia observed after an oral glucose load in NIDDM subjects. PMID:7587920

  8. Nicotine Administration Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Novel Object Recognition Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Vieira-Brock, Paula L.; McFadden, Lisa M.; Nielsen, Shannon M.; Smith, Misty D.; Hanson, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have demonstrated that methamphetamine abuse leads to memory deficits and these are associated with relapse. Furthermore, extensive evidence indicates that nicotine prevents and/or improves memory deficits in different models of cognitive dysfunction and these nicotinic effects might be mediated by hippocampal or cortical nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The present study investigated whether nicotine attenuates methamphetamine-induced novel object recognition deficits in rats and explored potential underlying mechanisms. Methods: Adolescent or adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received either nicotine water (10–75 μg/mL) or tap water for several weeks. Methamphetamine (4×7.5mg/kg/injection) or saline was administered either before or after chronic nicotine exposure. Novel object recognition was evaluated 6 days after methamphetamine or saline. Serotonin transporter function and density and α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density were assessed on the following day. Results: Chronic nicotine intake via drinking water beginning during either adolescence or adulthood attenuated the novel object recognition deficits caused by a high-dose methamphetamine administration. Similarly, nicotine attenuated methamphetamine-induced deficits in novel object recognition when administered after methamphetamine treatment. However, nicotine did not attenuate the serotonergic deficits caused by methamphetamine in adults. Conversely, nicotine attenuated methamphetamine-induced deficits in α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density in the hippocampal CA1 region. Furthermore, nicotine increased α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density in the hippocampal CA3, dentate gyrus and perirhinal cortex in both saline- and methamphetamine-treated rats. Conclusions: Overall, these findings suggest that nicotine-induced increases in α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex might be one mechanism by which

  9. Methamphetamine drinking microstructure in mice bred to drink high or low amounts of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Emily C; Barkley-Levenson, Amanda M; Phillips, Tamara J

    2014-10-01

    Genetic factors likely influence individual sensitivity to positive and negative effects of methamphetamine (MA) and risk for MA dependence. Genetic influence on MA consumption has been confirmed by selectively breeding mouse lines to consume high (MAHDR) or low (MALDR) amounts of MA, using a two-bottle choice MA drinking (MADR) procedure. Here, we employed a lickometer system to characterize the microstructure of MA (20, 40, and 80mg/l) and water intake in MAHDR and MALDR mice in 4-h limited access sessions, during the initial 4hours of the dark phase of their 12:12h light:dark cycle. Licks at one-minute intervals and total volume consumed were recorded, and bout analysis was performed. MAHDR and MALDR mice consumed similar amounts of MA in mg/kg on the first day of access, but MAHDR mice consumed significantly more MA than MALDR mice during all subsequent sessions. The higher MA intake of MAHDR mice was associated with a larger number of MA bouts, longer bout duration, shorter interbout interval, and shorter latency to the first bout. In a separate 4-h limited access MA drinking study, MALDR and MAHDR mice had similar blood MA levels on the first day MA was offered, but MAHDR mice had higher blood MA levels on all subsequent days, which corresponded with MA intake. These data provide insight into the microstructure of MA intake in an animal model of differential genetic risk for MA consumption, which may be pertinent to MA use patterns relevant to genetic risk for MA dependence.

  10. Neuropsychiatric Adverse Effects of Amphetamine and Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus

    2015-01-01

    Administration of amphetamine and methamphetamine can elicit psychiatric adverse effects at acute administration, binge use, withdrawal, and chronic use. Most troublesome of these are psychotic states and aggressive behavior, but a large variety of undesirable changes in cognition and affect can be induced. Adverse effects occur more frequently with higher dosages and long-term use. They can subside over time but some persist long-term. Multiple alterations in the gray and white matter of the brain assessed as changes in tissue volume or metabolism, or at molecular level, have been associated with amphetamine and methamphetamine use and the psychiatric adverse effects, but further studies are required to clarify their causal role, specificity, and relationship with preceding states and traits and comorbidities. The latter include other substance use disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and antisocial personality disorder. Amphetamine- and methamphetamine-related psychosis is similar to schizophrenia in terms of symptomatology and pathogenesis, and these two disorders share predisposing genetic factors.

  11. Neuropsychological function in older subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Atiea, J A; Moses, J L; Sinclair, A J

    1995-08-01

    Neuropsychological function was compared in three well-matched groups of subjects: Group 1, 20 diabetic patients with hypertension, mean age 69.1 +/- 4.8 years, 14 males and 6 females; Group 2, 20 normotensive diabetic patients, mean age 69.0 +/- 6.2 years, 14 males and 6 females; Group 3, 20 healthy community controls, mean age 68.1 +/- 4.5 years, 13 males and 7 females. There were no significant differences between the groups in education or estimated IQ using the NART (National Adult Reading Test). Groups 1 and 2 did not differ significantly in duration of diabetes (mean 10.6 and 9.5 years, respectively), or mean glycosylated haemoglobin, HbA1 (mean 9.8 and 10.6%, respectively), or mean blood glucose before and after testing. On a battery neuropsychological tests, sensitive to cognitive impairment in older subjects, analysis of covariance using estimated IQ as the covariate showed no significant differences between the groups on tests of recall, with (Brown-Peterson Test) and without (Kendrick Object Learning Test) interference, forward and backward digit span, concentration (serial subtraction), verbal fluency, immediate and delayed prose recall, digit symbol substitution or psychomotor speed (Kendrick Digit Copying Test). These results provide no support for an association between cognitive deficits and Type 2 diabetes mellitus in older subjects or for the view that such deficits may also be mediated by hypertension.

  12. Chronic wheel running reduces maladaptive patterns of methamphetamine intake: regulation by attenuation of methamphetamine-induced neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Alexander J; Aparicio, Mark B; Kim, Airee; Sobieraj, Jeffery C; Yuan, Clara J; Grant, Yanabel; Mandyam, Chitra D

    2014-03-01

    We investigated whether prior exposure to chronic wheel running (WR) alters maladaptive patterns of excessive and escalating methamphetamine intake under extended access conditions, and intravenous methamphetamine self-administration-induced neurotoxicity. Adult rats were given access to WR or no wheel (sedentary) in their home cage for 6 weeks. A set of WR rats were injected with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to determine WR-induced changes in proliferation (2-h old) and survival (28-day old) of hippocampal progenitors. Another set of WR rats were withdrawn (WRw) or continued (WRc) to have access to running wheels in their home cages during self-administration days. Following self-administration [6 h/day], rats were tested on the progressive ratio (PR) schedule. Following PR, BrdU was injected to determine levels of proliferating progenitors (2-h old). WRc rats self-administered significantly less methamphetamine than sedentary rats during acquisition and escalation sessions, and demonstrated reduced motivation for methamphetamine seeking. Methamphetamine reduced daily running activity of WRc rats compared with that of pre-methamphetamine days. WRw rats self-administered significantly more methamphetamine than sedentary rats during acquisition, an effect that was not observed during escalation and PR sessions. WR-induced beneficial effects on methamphetamine self-administration were not attributable to neuroplasticity effects in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex, but were attributable to WR-induced inhibition of methamphetamine-induced increases in the number of neuronal nitric oxide synthase expressing neurons and apoptosis in the nucleus accumbens shell. Our results demonstrate that WR prevents methamphetamine-induced damage to forebrain neurons to provide a beneficial effect on drug-taking behavior. Importantly, WR-induced neuroprotective effects are transient and continued WR activity is necessary to prevent compulsive methamphetamine intake.

  13. A Qualitative Exploration of Trajectories among Suburban Users of Methamphetamine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeri, Miriam Williams; Harbry, Liam; Gibson, David

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this exploratory study was to gain a better understanding of methamphetamine use among suburban users. We know very little about the mechanisms of initiation and trajectory patterns of methamphetamine use among this under-researched and hidden population. This study employed qualitative methods to examine the drug career of suburban…

  14. 21 CFR 862.3610 - Methamphetamine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intended to measure methamphetamine, a central nervous system stimulating drug, in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methamphetamine test system. 862.3610 Section 862...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  15. Why Is Parkinsonism Not a Feature of Human Methamphetamine Users?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moszczynska, Anna; Fitzmaurice, Paul; Ang, Lee; Kalasinsky, Kathryn S.; Schmunk, Gregory A.; Peretti, Frank J.; Aiken, Sally S.; Wickham, Dennis J.; Kish, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    For more than 50 years, methamphetamine has been a widely used stimulant drug taken to maintain wakefulness and performance and, in high doses, to cause intense euphoria. Animal studies show that methamphetamine can cause short-term and even persistent depletion of brain levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine. However, the clinical features of…

  16. Prevention of Methamphetamine Abuse: Can Existing Evidence Inform Community Prevention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birckmayer, Johanna; Fisher, Deborah A.; Holder, Harold D.; Yacoubian, George S.

    2008-01-01

    Little research exists on effective strategies to prevent methamphetamine production, distribution, sales, use, and harm. As a result, prevention practitioners (especially at the local level) have little guidance in selecting potentially effective strategies. This article presents a general causal model of methamphetamine use and harms that…

  17. Methamphetamine Abuse and Manufacture: The Child Welfare Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohman, Melinda; Oliver, Rhonda; Wright, Wendy

    2004-01-01

    Methamphetamine abuse is on the rise, particularly by women of child-bearing age. This article describes the history and effects of methamphetamine use. The authors examine the ways exposure to the manufacture of this drug affects clients and social workers in the course of their work. Because children are frequently found at the scene of a…

  18. School-Related Factors Affecting High School Seniors' Methamphetamine Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Jarrod M.; Lo, Celia C.

    2009-01-01

    Data from the 2005 Monitoring the Future survey were used to examine relationships between school-related factors and high school seniors' lifetime methamphetamine use. The study applied logistic regression techniques to evaluate effects of social bonding variables and social learning variables on likelihood of lifetime methamphetamine use. The…

  19. 21 CFR 862.3610 - Methamphetamine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intended to measure methamphetamine, a central nervous system stimulating drug, in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methamphetamine test system. 862.3610 Section 862...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  20. Candidate gene networks and blood biomarkers of methamphetamine-associated psychosis: an integrative RNA-sequencing report.

    PubMed

    Breen, M S; Uhlmann, A; Nday, C M; Glatt, S J; Mitt, M; Metsalpu, A; Stein, D J; Illing, N

    2016-01-01

    The clinical presentation, course and treatment of methamphetamine (METH)-associated psychosis (MAP) are similar to that observed in schizophrenia (SCZ) and subsequently MAP has been hypothesized as a pharmacological and environmental model of SCZ. However, several challenges currently exist in diagnosing MAP accurately at the molecular and neurocognitive level before the MAP model can contribute to the discovery of SCZ biomarkers. We directly assessed subcortical brain structural volumes and clinical parameters of MAP within the framework of an integrative genome-wide RNA-Seq blood transcriptome analysis of subjects diagnosed with MAP (N=10), METH dependency without psychosis (MA; N=10) and healthy controls (N=10). First, we identified discrete groups of co-expressed genes (that is, modules) and tested them for functional annotation and phenotypic relationships to brain structure volumes, life events and psychometric measurements. We discovered one MAP-associated module involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis downregulation, enriched with 61 genes previously found implicated in psychosis and SCZ across independent blood and post-mortem brain studies using convergent functional genomic (CFG) evidence. This module demonstrated significant relationships with brain structure volumes including the anterior corpus callosum (CC) and the nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, a second MAP and psychoticism-associated module involved in circadian clock upregulation was also enriched with 39 CFG genes, further associated with the CC. Subsequently, a machine-learning analysis of differentially expressed genes identified single blood-based biomarkers able to differentiate controls from methamphetamine dependents with 87% accuracy and MAP from MA subjects with 95% accuracy. CFG evidence validated a significant proportion of these putative MAP biomarkers in independent studies including CLN3, FBP1, TBC1D2 and ZNF821 (RNA degradation), ELK3 and SINA3 (circadian clock) and PIGF and

  1. Candidate gene networks and blood biomarkers of methamphetamine-associated psychosis: an integrative RNA-sequencing report

    PubMed Central

    Breen, M S; Uhlmann, A; Nday, C M; Glatt, S J; Mitt, M; Metsalpu, A; Stein, D J; Illing, N

    2016-01-01

    The clinical presentation, course and treatment of methamphetamine (METH)-associated psychosis (MAP) are similar to that observed in schizophrenia (SCZ) and subsequently MAP has been hypothesized as a pharmacological and environmental model of SCZ. However, several challenges currently exist in diagnosing MAP accurately at the molecular and neurocognitive level before the MAP model can contribute to the discovery of SCZ biomarkers. We directly assessed subcortical brain structural volumes and clinical parameters of MAP within the framework of an integrative genome-wide RNA-Seq blood transcriptome analysis of subjects diagnosed with MAP (N=10), METH dependency without psychosis (MA; N=10) and healthy controls (N=10). First, we identified discrete groups of co-expressed genes (that is, modules) and tested them for functional annotation and phenotypic relationships to brain structure volumes, life events and psychometric measurements. We discovered one MAP-associated module involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis downregulation, enriched with 61 genes previously found implicated in psychosis and SCZ across independent blood and post-mortem brain studies using convergent functional genomic (CFG) evidence. This module demonstrated significant relationships with brain structure volumes including the anterior corpus callosum (CC) and the nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, a second MAP and psychoticism-associated module involved in circadian clock upregulation was also enriched with 39 CFG genes, further associated with the CC. Subsequently, a machine-learning analysis of differentially expressed genes identified single blood-based biomarkers able to differentiate controls from methamphetamine dependents with 87% accuracy and MAP from MA subjects with 95% accuracy. CFG evidence validated a significant proportion of these putative MAP biomarkers in independent studies including CLN3, FBP1, TBC1D2 and ZNF821 (RNA degradation), ELK3 and SINA3 (circadian clock) and PIGF and

  2. A tryptamine-derived catecholaminergic enhancer, (-)-1-(benzofuran-2-yl)-2-propylaminopentane [(-)-BPAP], attenuates reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Hiranita, T; Yamamoto, T; Nawata, Y

    2010-01-20

    Relapse to drug craving is problematic in treatment for drug abuse. Evidence suggests inactivation of dopaminergic neurotransmission during drug withdrawal. Meanwhile, a tryptamine analogue, (-)-1-(benzofuran-2-yl)-2-propylaminopentane [(-)-BPAP], has been reported to enhance electrical stimulation of monoamine release. This study examined the effect of (-)-BPAP on reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking behavior in an animal model of relapse to drug abuse. Rats were trained to i.v. self-administer methamphetamine paired with a light and tone (methamphetamine-associated cues) under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement for 10 days. After extinction session under saline infusions without cues, a reinstatement test under saline infusions was begun. Reinstatement induced by methamphetamine-associated cues or methamphetamine-priming injections was attenuated by repeated administration of (-)-BPAP during the extinction phase. Acute administration of (-)-BPAP on test day dose-dependently attenuated both reinstatements. Acute administration of (-)-BPAP neither reinstated methamphetamine-seeking behavior alone nor affected methamphetamine self-administration. Pretreatment with either R(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (SCH-23390), a dopamine D(1)-like receptor antagonist, or amisulpride, a dopamine D(2)-like receptor antagonist, did not appreciably affected the acute effect of (-)-BPAP on both reinstatements. Co-pretreatment with the dopamine receptor antagonists failed to alter the effects of (-)-BPAP. Meanwhile, pretreatment with a dopamine D(1)-like receptor agonist, (+/-)-6-chloro-7,8-dihydroxy-l-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide (SKF-81297), dose-dependently attenuated reinstatement induced by the cues or methamphetamine-priming injections. In contrast to (-)-BPAP, pretreatment with SCH-23390 reversed the effects of SKF-81297. Our findings suggest activation of dopamine D(1)-like receptors results

  3. Frequency-dependent effects of sine-wave cranial transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D N; Lee, C T

    1992-01-01

    In a double-blind protocol, ninety healthy volunteer subjects received 30 minutes of constant current sine-wave cranial transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of 5 Hertz (Hz), 100 Hz, or 2000 Hz frequency (current maintained below .5 mA for safety), placebo TENS, or no treatment. The five groups were compared on pre- to posttreatment changes in blood pressure, heart rate, peripheral temperature, and anxiety. Analysis showed significant reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate after 100 Hz cranial TENS as compared to the other groups. No other differences achieved significance. PMID:1357927

  4. Treatment of methamphetamine abuse: research findings and clinical directions.

    PubMed

    Cretzmeyer, Margaret; Sarrazin, Mary Vaughan; Huber, Diane L; Block, Robert I; Hall, James A

    2003-04-01

    Over the past few years, methamphetamine has appeared in mass quantities, in part, because of the ease and cost efficiency of manufacturing. With this increase in availability, the use of methamphetamine has increased significantly. The purpose of this article is to describe the existing treatment options for methamphetamine abuse and provide recommendations for practitioners and researchers. Methamphetamine abuse adversely impacts physical functioning, brain functioning and cognition, social support and social networks, and behavioral functioning. Negative consequences have also been documented to the environment and communities. In the studies reviewed on effective treatments, interventions consisted of aversion therapy, medication, psychosocial treatment, and case management. Each specific treatment is described as connected with an overall drug treatment program. If methamphetamine abuse continues to increase and the consequences continue to be so devastating, researchers and clinicians could advance the field by particular focus on the treatment of this type of drug use.

  5. Antemortem and postmortem methamphetamine blood concentrations: three case reports.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Iain M; Nelson, Craig L; Schaber, Bethann; Hamm, Catherine E

    2013-01-01

    We compare antemortem whole-blood to postmortem peripheral blood concentrations of methamphetamine and its metabolite amphetamine in three medical examiner cases. Antemortem specimens, initially screened positive for methamphetamine by ELISA, were subsequently confirmed, together with the postmortem specimens, by GC-MS analysis following solid-phase extraction. Methamphetamine peripheral blood to antemortem blood ratios averaged 1.51 (± 0.049; n = 3) and amphetamine peripheral blood to antemortem blood ratios averaged 1.50 (n = 2). These data show that postmortem redistribution occurs for both methamphetamine and amphetamine, revealing that postmortem blood concentrations are ∼1.5 times greater than antemortem concentrations. Furthermore, as both methamphetamine and amphetamine have previously been shown to have liver/peripheral blood (L/P) ratios of 5-8, it can be proposed that drugs displaying L/P ratios ranging from 5 to 10 may exhibit postmortem concentrations up to twice those concentrations circulating in blood before death.

  6. Sexual health and stigma in urban newspaper coverage of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Joseph; Andsager, Julie L

    2008-03-01

    The epidemic use of methamphetamine in the United States is a growing public health problem. Recently its use has increased among gay men who live in urban areas, with accompanying increases in sexually transmitted diseases. This study examined how methamphetamine and sexual health are framed. It investigated the stigma associated with heterosexuals and gay men. Stories from 13 urban newspapers in cities with large populations of gay men published from 2000 to 2006 were analyzed. Results indicated that methamphetamine and sexual health were framed primarily as an individual, present problem. Stories framed methamphetamine as a health problem slightly more often than as a crime problem, but health was the dominant frame in stories mentioning gay men. Crime was the dominant frame in stories with heterosexuals. Articles tied gay men to sexual health issues. Findings indicate gay men and heterosexuals are stigmatized in news coverage of sexual issues and methamphetamine but in different ways.

  7. Dose-dependent increase in subjective symptoms among toluene-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Ukai, Hirohiko ); Watanabe, Takao ); Nakatsuka, Haruo ); Satoh, Toshihiko ); Liu, Shijie; Jin, Chui ); Qiao, Xin ); Li, Guilan ); Ikeda, Masayuki )

    1993-02-01

    A factory survey on dose-response relationship in toluene toxicity was conducted in 1985-1989 in four cities in China. The examination items consisted of personal diffusive sampling for TWA exposure measurement, questionnaires on subjective symptoms, hematology and serum biochemistry, and clinical examination including simple neurology tests. Hippuric acid was also determined in urine samples collected at the end of the shift. With selection criteria that (1) complete results were available on all study items and (2) valid toluene exposure data (i.e., toluene shared 90% or more of the exposure) were obtained for the exposed, 452 toluene-exposed workers (206 men and 246 women; toluene exposure at 24.7 ppm as GM) and 517 nonexposed controls (246 men and 271 women) were selected. The subjective symptoms increased in close association with the intensity of exposure to toluene; the threshold concentration appeared to exist at 100 ppm in the case of symptoms during work, and it might be at 50-100 ppm when symptoms off work were evaluated. During the work with exposure at higher concentrations, various symptoms possibly related to CNS or local effects (e.g., eyes, nose, and throat) were complained, and dizziness and floating sensations were identified as typical symptoms with significant dose-response relationship. Several symptoms persisted off work, most of which were apparently related but not necessarily limited to CNS effects. Hematology and serum biochemistry were essentially negative. 46 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Dependence of transcutaneous oxygen tension on local arteriovenous pressure gradient in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Wyss, C R; Matsen, F A; King, R V; Simmons, C W; Burgess, E M

    1981-05-01

    1. We studied the relationship between transcutaneous oxygen tension at the foot and local arteriovenous pressure difference in 15 normal men and women; arteriovenous pressure difference was varied by changing the height of the foot with respect to the heart and by applying external pressure to the foot. 2. Control transcutaneous oxygen tension was 67 +/- 9 SD mmHg (8.9 +/- 1.2 kPa) at a control arteriovenous pressure difference of 80 +/- 6 SD mmHg (10.6 +/- 0.8 kPa). 3. In every subject transcutaneous oxygen tension fell non-linearly with a decrease in arteriovenous pressure difference; transcutaneous oxygen tension was relatively insensitive to changes in arteriovenous pressure difference when arteriovenous pressure difference was high, but always fell sharply to zero at some positive arteriovenous pressure difference [range 13-34 mmHg (1.7-4.5 kPa)]. 4. An analysis of the data indicated that transcutaneous oxygen tension varied with arteriovenous pressure difference approximately as the oxygen tension of cutaneous venous blood under the sensor varied (in the absence of changes in cutaneous vascular resistance and oxygen consumption). 5. This analysis was supported by studies in three subjects in whom the oxygen tension of superficial venous drainage from a warmed hand or foot was measured along with transcutaneous oxygen tension while arteriovenous pressure difference was varied.

  9. Acute exercise ameliorates craving and inhibitory deficits in methamphetamine: An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongshi; Zhou, Chenglin; Chang, Yu-Kai

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of acute exercise in the potential context of non-pharmacological intervention for methamphetamine (MA)-related craving; we additionally determine its effect on the inhibitory control induced by standard and MA-related tasks according to behavioral and neuroelectric measurements among MA-dependent individuals. The present study employed a within-subjects, counterbalanced design. A total of 24 participants who met the DSM-IV criteria for MA dependence were recruited. The craving level, reaction time, and response accuracy, as well as the event-related potential (ERP) components N2 and P3, were measured following exercise and the control treatment in a counterbalanced order. The exercise session consisted of an acute stationary cycle exercise at a moderate intensity, whereas the control treatment consisted of an active reading session. The self-reported MA craving was significantly attenuated during, immediately following, and 50min after the exercise session compared with the pre-exercise ratings, whereas the craving scores at these time points following exercise were lower than those for the reading control session. Acute exercise also facilitated inhibitory performance in both the standard and MA-related Go/Nogo tasks. A larger N2 amplitude, but not a larger P3 amplitude, was observed during both tasks in the exercise session and the Nogo condition compared with the reading control session and the Go condition. This is the first empirical study to demonstrate these beneficial effects of acute aerobic exercise at a moderate intensity on MA-related craving and inhibitory control in MA-dependent individuals. These results suggest a potential role for acute aerobic exercise in treating this specific type of substance abuse.

  10. Acute exercise ameliorates craving and inhibitory deficits in methamphetamine: An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongshi; Zhou, Chenglin; Chang, Yu-Kai

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of acute exercise in the potential context of non-pharmacological intervention for methamphetamine (MA)-related craving; we additionally determine its effect on the inhibitory control induced by standard and MA-related tasks according to behavioral and neuroelectric measurements among MA-dependent individuals. The present study employed a within-subjects, counterbalanced design. A total of 24 participants who met the DSM-IV criteria for MA dependence were recruited. The craving level, reaction time, and response accuracy, as well as the event-related potential (ERP) components N2 and P3, were measured following exercise and the control treatment in a counterbalanced order. The exercise session consisted of an acute stationary cycle exercise at a moderate intensity, whereas the control treatment consisted of an active reading session. The self-reported MA craving was significantly attenuated during, immediately following, and 50min after the exercise session compared with the pre-exercise ratings, whereas the craving scores at these time points following exercise were lower than those for the reading control session. Acute exercise also facilitated inhibitory performance in both the standard and MA-related Go/Nogo tasks. A larger N2 amplitude, but not a larger P3 amplitude, was observed during both tasks in the exercise session and the Nogo condition compared with the reading control session and the Go condition. This is the first empirical study to demonstrate these beneficial effects of acute aerobic exercise at a moderate intensity on MA-related craving and inhibitory control in MA-dependent individuals. These results suggest a potential role for acute aerobic exercise in treating this specific type of substance abuse. PMID:25846839

  11. Assessment and management of opioid withdrawal symptoms in buprenorphine-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    San, L; Camí, J; Fernández, T; Ollé, J M; Peri, J M; Torrens, M

    1992-01-01

    The spontaneous physical dependence of buprenorphine was assessed in opioid addicts who switched from heroin to sublingual or intravenous buprenorphine. Twenty-two patients were randomly assigned to double-blind administration of methadone (n = 11) or placebo (n = 11) for 13 days after abrupt withdrawal of buprenorphine. Methadone was administered according to four pre-established dosing schedules depending on the previous amount of daily consumed buprenorphine. No methadone-treated patient required modification of the therapeutic regimen, whereas eight of eleven placebo-treated patients needed treatment with methadone. Buprenorphine withdrawal syndrome was of opioid type, began somewhat more slowly, and showed a peak until day 5. The occurrence, time-course and characteristics of buprenorphine withdrawal syndrome make it necessary to reconsider the abuse potential of this analgesic.

  12. Computational microstructure modeling of asphalt mixtures subjected to rate-dependent fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragao, Francisco Thiago Sacramento

    2011-12-01

    Computational microstructure models have been actively pursued by the pavement mechanics community as a promising and advantageous alternative to limited analytical and semi-empirical modeling approaches. The primary goal of this research is to develop a computational microstructure modeling framework that will eventually allow researchers and practitioners of the pavement mechanics community to evaluate the effects of constituents and mix design characteristics (some of the key factors directly affecting the quality of the pavement structures) on the mechanical responses of asphalt mixtures. To that end, the mixtures are modeled as heterogeneous materials with inelastic mechanical behavior. To account for the complex geometric characteristics of the heterogeneous mixtures, an image treatment process is used to generate finite element meshes that closely reproduce the geometric characteristics of aggregate particles (size, shape, and volume fraction) that are distributed within a fine aggregate asphaltic matrix (FAM). These two mixture components, i.e., aggregate particles and FAM, are modeled, respectively, as isotropic linear elastic and isotropic linear viscoelastic materials and the material properties required as inputs for the computational model are obtained from simple and expedited laboratory tests. In addition to the consideration of the complex geometric characteristics and inelastic behavior of the mixtures, this study uses the cohesive zone model to simulate fracture as a gradual and rate-dependent phenomenon in which the initiation and propagation of discrete cracks take place in different locations of the mixture microstructure. Rate-dependent cohesive zone fracture properties are obtained using a procedure that combines laboratory tests of semi-circular bending specimens of the FAM and their numerical simulations. To address the rate-dependent fracture characteristics of the FAM phase, a rate-dependent cohesive zone model is developed and

  13. Methamphetamine compromises gap junctional communication in astrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Paul; Nwagbo, Chisom; Martinez, Luis R; Eugenin, Eliseo A

    2016-05-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant that results in psychological and physical dependency. The long-term effects of meth within the CNS include neuronal plasticity changes, blood-brain barrier compromise, inflammation, electrical dysfunction, neuronal/glial toxicity, and an increased risk to infectious diseases including HIV. Most of the reported meth effects in the CNS are related to dysregulation of chemical synapses by altering the release and uptake of neurotransmitters, especially dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. However, little is known about the effects of meth on connexin (Cx) containing channels, such as gap junctions (GJ) and hemichannels (HC). We examined the effects of meth on Cx expression, function, and its role in NeuroAIDS. We found that meth altered Cx expression and localization, decreased GJ communication between neurons and astrocytes, and induced the opening of Cx43/Cx36 HC. Furthermore, we found that these changes in GJ and HC induced by meth treatment were mediated by activation of dopamine receptors, suggesting that dysregulation of dopamine signaling induced by meth is essential for GJ and HC compromise. Meth-induced changes in GJ and HC contributed to amplified CNS toxicity by dysregulating glutamate metabolism and increasing the susceptibility of neurons and astrocytes to bystander apoptosis induced by HIV. Together, our results indicate that connexin containing channels, GJ and HC, are essential in the pathogenesis of meth and increase the sensitivity of the CNS to HIV CNS disease. Methamphetamine (meth) is an extremely addictive central nervous system stimulant. Meth reduced gap junctional (GJ) communication by inducing internalization of connexin-43 (Cx43) in astrocytes and reducing expression of Cx36 in neurons by a mechanism involving activation of dopamine receptors (see cartoon). Meth-induced changes in Cx containing channels increased extracellular levels of glutamate and resulted in higher

  14. Tracking irregular morphophonological dependencies in natural language: evidence from the acquisition of subject-verb agreement in French.

    PubMed

    Nazzi, Thierry; Barrière, Isabelle; Goyet, Louise; Kresh, Sarah; Legendre, Géraldine

    2011-07-01

    This study examines French-learning infants' sensitivity to grammatical non-adjacent dependencies involving subject-verb agreement (e.g., le/les garçons lit/lisent 'the boy(s) read(s)') where number is audible on both the determiner of the subject DP and the agreeing verb, and the dependency is spanning across two syntactic phrases. A further particularity of this subsystem of French subject-verb agreement is that number marking on the verb is phonologically highly irregular. Despite the challenge, the HPP results for 24- and 18-month-olds demonstrate knowledge of both number dependencies: between the singular determiner le and the non-adjacent singular verbal forms and between the plural determiner les and the non-adjacent plural verbal forms. A control experiment suggests that the infants are responding to known verb forms, not phonological regularities. Given the paucity of such forms in the adult input documented through a corpus study, these results are interpreted as evidence that 18-month-olds have the ability to extract complex patterns across a range of morphophonologically inconsistent and infrequent items in natural language.

  15. Correlates of trading sex for methamphetamine in a sample of HIV-negative heterosexual methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Semple, Shirley J; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Zians, Jim; Patterson, Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    While many studies have examined correlates of trading sex for money, few have examined factors associated with exclusive trading of sex for drugs. We identified sociodemographic, behavioral, and psychological correlates of trading sex for methamphetamine in a sample of HIV-negative heterosexual men and women who were enrolled in a sexual risk reduction intervention in San Diego, California. Of 342 participants, 26% overall (21% of males and 31% of females) reported trading sex for methamphetamine in the past two months. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that recently trading sex for methamphetamine was independently associated with being female, homeless, binging on methamphetamine, sexual victimization in the past two months, engaging in anal sex 24 or more times in the past two months, and higher sexual compulsivity scores. Effective interventions for this high-risk population should consider gender-focused counseling for sexual abuse, motivational enhancement therapy, social-cognitive skills training, as well as enhanced access and utilization of social services, including drug treatment.

  16. Acquisition of Conditioning between Methamphetamine and Cues in Healthy Humans.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Joel S; Mayo, Leah M; de Wit, Harriet

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stimuli repeatedly paired with drugs of abuse can elicit conditioned responses that are thought to promote future drug seeking. We recently showed that healthy volunteers acquired conditioned responses to auditory and visual stimuli after just two pairings with methamphetamine (MA, 20 mg, oral). This study extended these findings by systematically varying the number of drug-stimuli pairings. We expected that more pairings would result in stronger conditioning. Three groups of healthy adults were randomly assigned to receive 1, 2 or 4 pairings (Groups P1, P2 and P4, Ns = 13, 16, 16, respectively) of an auditory-visual stimulus with MA, and another stimulus with placebo (PBO). Drug-cue pairings were administered in an alternating, counterbalanced order, under double-blind conditions, during 4 hr sessions. MA produced prototypic subjective effects (mood, ratings of drug effects) and alterations in physiology (heart rate, blood pressure). Although subjects did not exhibit increased behavioral preference for, or emotional reactivity to, the MA-paired cue after conditioning, they did exhibit an increase in attentional bias (initial gaze) toward the drug-paired stimulus. Further, subjects who had four pairings reported "liking" the MA-paired cue more than the PBO cue after conditioning. Thus, the number of drug-stimulus pairings, varying from one to four, had only modest effects on the strength of conditioned responses. Further studies investigating the parameters under which drug conditioning occurs will help to identify risk factors for developing drug abuse, and provide new treatment strategies. PMID:27548681

  17. Groundwater flow within a sub-aerial orogenic wedge subject to depth-dependent permeability structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollyea, R.; Van Dusen, E.; Fischer, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, investigators have revisited the problem of basin-scale fluid flow with an emphasis on depth-dependent permeability, which is a frequently observed geological phenomenon that is seldom accounted for in basin-scale flow models. These recent investigations have shown that depth-dependent permeability at the basin scale strongly influences the relationship between sub-basin and regional-scale flow paths. Here, we revisit topography driven fluid flow within a foreland basin using a numerical modeling experiment designed to assess first-order fluid system behavior when permeability decreases systematically with depth. Critical taper theory is invoked to define two-dimensional basin geometry, and three sub-aerially exposed orogenic wedge models are presented with critical taper angles of 2°, 4°, and 10°. To assess the combined influence of topographic slope and depth-dependent permeability, a constant rate infiltration is applied at the wedge surface and a transient simulation is performed within each model for 500,000 years. Our results suggest that fluid system structure within the narrowly tapering orogenic wedge (2°) is explained by recent investigations applying depth-decaying permeability to the classic Tóth basin; however, increasing topographic slope beyond 3° results in a fundamentally different fluid system architecture. As topographic slope increases, fluid system structure is characterized by (1) dominant regional flow paths and little, if any, sub-basin scale fluid circulation, (2) shallow meteoric water penetration, (3) a stratified distribution of groundwater residence time without pronounced stagnation points. Moreover, for a given detachment slope, these effects become more pronounced as topographic gradient increases.

  18. Turgidity-dependent petiole flexibility enables efficient water use by a tree subjected to water stress.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Cournède, Paul-Henry; de Langre, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Water stress is a major cause of tree mortality. In response to drought, leaves wilt due to an increase in petiole flexibility. We present an analytical model coupling petiole mechanics, thermal balance, and xylem hydraulics to investigate the role of petiole flexibility in protecting a tree from water stress. Our model suggests that turgidity-dependent petiole flexibility can significantly attenuate the minimal xylem pressure and thus reduce the risk of cavitation. Moreover, we show that petiole flexibility increases water use efficiency by trees under water stress. PMID:26992577

  19. Turgidity-dependent petiole flexibility enables efficient water use by a tree subjected to water stress.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Cournède, Paul-Henry; de Langre, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Water stress is a major cause of tree mortality. In response to drought, leaves wilt due to an increase in petiole flexibility. We present an analytical model coupling petiole mechanics, thermal balance, and xylem hydraulics to investigate the role of petiole flexibility in protecting a tree from water stress. Our model suggests that turgidity-dependent petiole flexibility can significantly attenuate the minimal xylem pressure and thus reduce the risk of cavitation. Moreover, we show that petiole flexibility increases water use efficiency by trees under water stress.

  20. Redox-dependent regulation, redox control and oxidative damage in plant cells subjected to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2010-01-01

    Stress development intricately involves uncontrolled redox reactions and oxidative damage to functional macromolecules. Three phases characterize progressing abiotic stress and the stress strength; in the first phase redox-dependent deregulation in metabolism, in the second phase detectable development of oxidative damage and in the third phase cell death. Each phase is characterized by traceable biochemical features and specific molecular responses that reflect on the one hand cell damage but on the other hand indicate specific regulation and redox signalling aiming at compensation of stress impact. PMID:20387040

  1. Development of a dual test procedure for DNA typing and methamphetamine detection using a trace amount of stimulant-containing blood.

    PubMed

    Irii, Toshiaki; Maebashi, Kyoko; Fukui, Kenji; Sohma, Ryoko; Matsumoto, Sari; Takasu, Shojiro; Iwadate, Kimiharu

    2016-05-01

    Investigation of drug-related crimes, such as violation of the Stimulant Drug Control Law, requires identifying the used drug (mainly stimulant drugs, methamphetamine hydrochloride) from a drug solution and the DNA type of the drug user from a trace of blood left in the syringe used to inject the drug. In current standard test procedures, DNA typing and methamphetamine detection are performed as independent tests that use two separate portions of a precious sample. The sample can be entirely used up by either analysis. Therefore, we developed a new procedure involving partial lysis of a stimulant-containing blood sample followed by separation of the lysate into a precipitate for DNA typing and a liquid-phase fraction for methamphetamine detection. The method enables these two tests to be run in parallel using a single portion of sample. Samples were prepared by adding methamphetamine hydrochloride water solution to blood. Samples were lysed with Proteinase K in PBS at 56°C for 20min, cooled at -20°C after adding methanol, and then centrifuged at 15,000rpm. Based on the biopolymer-precipitating ability of alcohol, the precipitate was used for DNA typing and the liquid-phase fraction for methamphetamine detection. For DNA typing, the precipitate was dissolved and DNA was extracted, quantified, and subjected to STR analysis using the AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® Plus PCR Amplification Kit. For methamphetamine detection, the liquid-phase fraction was evaporated with N2 gas after adding 20μL acetic acid and passed through an extraction column; the substances captured in the column were eluted with a solvent, derivatized, and quantitatively detected using gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry. This method was simple and could be completed in approximately 2h. Both DNA typing and methamphetamine detection were possible, which suggests that this method may be valuable for use in criminal investigations. PMID:27161925

  2. Development of a dual test procedure for DNA typing and methamphetamine detection using a trace amount of stimulant-containing blood.

    PubMed

    Irii, Toshiaki; Maebashi, Kyoko; Fukui, Kenji; Sohma, Ryoko; Matsumoto, Sari; Takasu, Shojiro; Iwadate, Kimiharu

    2016-05-01

    Investigation of drug-related crimes, such as violation of the Stimulant Drug Control Law, requires identifying the used drug (mainly stimulant drugs, methamphetamine hydrochloride) from a drug solution and the DNA type of the drug user from a trace of blood left in the syringe used to inject the drug. In current standard test procedures, DNA typing and methamphetamine detection are performed as independent tests that use two separate portions of a precious sample. The sample can be entirely used up by either analysis. Therefore, we developed a new procedure involving partial lysis of a stimulant-containing blood sample followed by separation of the lysate into a precipitate for DNA typing and a liquid-phase fraction for methamphetamine detection. The method enables these two tests to be run in parallel using a single portion of sample. Samples were prepared by adding methamphetamine hydrochloride water solution to blood. Samples were lysed with Proteinase K in PBS at 56°C for 20min, cooled at -20°C after adding methanol, and then centrifuged at 15,000rpm. Based on the biopolymer-precipitating ability of alcohol, the precipitate was used for DNA typing and the liquid-phase fraction for methamphetamine detection. For DNA typing, the precipitate was dissolved and DNA was extracted, quantified, and subjected to STR analysis using the AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® Plus PCR Amplification Kit. For methamphetamine detection, the liquid-phase fraction was evaporated with N2 gas after adding 20μL acetic acid and passed through an extraction column; the substances captured in the column were eluted with a solvent, derivatized, and quantitatively detected using gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry. This method was simple and could be completed in approximately 2h. Both DNA typing and methamphetamine detection were possible, which suggests that this method may be valuable for use in criminal investigations.

  3. Non-linear dielectric signatures of entropy changes in liquids subject to time dependent electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richert, Ranko

    2016-03-01

    A model of non-linear dielectric polarization is studied in which the field induced entropy change is the source of polarization dependent retardation time constants. Numerical solutions for the susceptibilities of the system are obtained for parameters that represent the dynamic and thermodynamic behavior of glycerol. The calculations for high amplitude sinusoidal fields show a significant enhancement of the steady state loss for frequencies below that of the low field loss peak. Also at relatively low frequencies, the third harmonic susceptibility spectrum shows a "hump," i.e., a maximum, with an amplitude that increases with decreasing temperature. Both of these non-linear effects are consistent with experimental evidence. While such features have been used to conclude on a temperature dependent number of dynamically correlated particles, Ncorr, the present result demonstrates that the third harmonic susceptibility display a peak with an amplitude that tracks the variation of the activation energy in a model that does not involve dynamical correlations or spatial scales.

  4. Membrane integrity of Campylobacter jejuni subjected to high pressure is pH-dependent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerasle, M.; Guillou, S.; Simonin, H.; Laroche, M.; de Lamballerie, M.; Federighi, M.

    2012-03-01

    Our study focuses on a foodborne pathogen, Campylobacter, which is responsible for the most frequent bacterial enteritis worldwide. Membrane integrity of Campylobacter jejuni NCTC 11168 cells treated at high pressure (300 MPa, 20°C, 10 min) at pH 7.0 and pH 5.6 was measured by fluorescence spectroscopy of propidium iodide (PI) uptake. The percentage of membrane-damaged cells by high pressure, in which PI is allowed to penetrate, was determined using two calibration methods based on the PI fluorescence signal obtained with cells killed either by a heat treatment (80°C for 15 min) or by a pressure treatment (400 MPa, 20°C, 10 min). Both calibrations were shown to be statistically different (P<0.05), particularly at acidic pH, suggesting that a difference in the penetration of PI into bacterial cells might depend on the mode of cell inactivation. These results corroborate the fact that the mechanism of microbial inactivation by high pressure is pH-dependent.

  5. Incorporation of methamphetamine and amphetamine in human hair following controlled oral methamphetamine administration

    PubMed Central

    Polettini, Aldo; Cone, Edward J.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although hair testing is well established for the assessment of past drug exposure, uncertainties persist about mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair and interpretation of results. The aim of this study was to administer methamphetamine (MAMP) under controlled conditions as a model drug to investigate drug incorporation into human hair. Material and Methods Seven volunteers with a history of stimulant use received 4×10 mg (low) doses of sustained release S-(+)-MAMP HCl within one week, with weekly head hair samples collected by shaving. 3 weeks later, 4 of them received 4×20 mg (high) doses. After extensive isopropanol/phosphate buffer washing of the hair, MAMP and its metabolite amphetamine (AMP) concentrations were determined in all weekly hair samples by LC-MS-MS in selected reaction monitoring mode with the undeca- and deca-deuterated drugs, respectively, as internal standards (LLOQ, 0.005 ng/mg). Results MAMP Tmax occurred from 1 to 2 weeks after both doses, with Cmax ranging from 0.6–3.5 ng/mg after the low and 1.2–5.3 ng/mg after the high MAMP doses. AMP Cmax in hair was 0.1–0.3 ng/mg and 0.2–0.5 ng/mg, respectively, for low and high doses. Highly dose–related concentrations within subjects, but large variability between subjects were observed. MAMP concentrations were above the 0.2 ng/mg cutoff for at least two weeks following administration of both low and high doses. The overall AMP/MAMP ratio ranged from 0.07 to 0.37 with a mean value of 0.15±0.07, and a median of 0.13. The percentage of MAMP and AMP removed with the washing procedure decreased with time after administration. A strong correlation was found between area under the curve of MAMP (r2=0.90, p=0.00) and AMP (r2=0.94, p=0.00) concentrations calculated for the 3-week period following administration and the total melanin concentration in hair. Significant correlations were observed also between Cmax and melanin. Conclusions This study demonstrated that despite large

  6. Family-supportive supervisor behaviors, work engagement, and subjective well-being: a contextually dependent mediated process.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Russell A; Mills, Maura J; Trout, Rachel C; English, Lucy

    2014-04-01

    Grounded in a multistudy framework, we examined the relationship between family-supportive supervisor behaviors, work engagement, and subjective well-being as a contextually dependent mediated process. In Study 1 (N = 310), based on broaden-and-build and conservation of resources theories, we tested the proposed mediated process while controlling for perceived organizational support and perceived managerial effectiveness. We also demonstrated that family-supportive supervisor behaviors are distinguishable from general supervisor behaviors. In Study 2 (N = 1,640), using multigroup structural equation modeling, we validated and extended Study 1 results by examining how the mediated model varied based on 2 contextualizing constructs: (a) dependent care responsibilities and (b) availability of family-friendly benefits. Although the mediational results were contextually dependent, they were not necessarily consistent with hypothesizing based on conservation of resources theory. Practical implications are emphasized in addition to future research directions. PMID:24730426

  7. An exact solution for the history-dependent material and delamination behavior of laminated plates subjected to cylindrical bending

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Todd O

    2009-01-01

    The exact solution for the history-dependent behavior of laminated plates subjected to cylindrical bending is presented. The solution represents the extension of Pagano's solution to consider arbitrary types of constitutive behaviors for the individual lamina as well as arbitrary types of cohesive zones models for delamination behavior. Examples of the possible types of material behavior are plasticity, viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity, and damaging. Examples of possible CZMs that can be considered are linear, nonlinear hardening, as well as nonlinear with softening. The resulting solution is intended as a benchmark solution for considering the predictive capabilities of different plate theories. Initial results are presented for several types of history-dependent material behaviors. It is shown that the plate response in the presence of history-dependent behaviors can differ dramatically from the elastic response. These results have strong implications for what constitutes an appropriate plate theory for modeling such behaviors.

  8. Family-supportive supervisor behaviors, work engagement, and subjective well-being: a contextually dependent mediated process.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Russell A; Mills, Maura J; Trout, Rachel C; English, Lucy

    2014-04-01

    Grounded in a multistudy framework, we examined the relationship between family-supportive supervisor behaviors, work engagement, and subjective well-being as a contextually dependent mediated process. In Study 1 (N = 310), based on broaden-and-build and conservation of resources theories, we tested the proposed mediated process while controlling for perceived organizational support and perceived managerial effectiveness. We also demonstrated that family-supportive supervisor behaviors are distinguishable from general supervisor behaviors. In Study 2 (N = 1,640), using multigroup structural equation modeling, we validated and extended Study 1 results by examining how the mediated model varied based on 2 contextualizing constructs: (a) dependent care responsibilities and (b) availability of family-friendly benefits. Although the mediational results were contextually dependent, they were not necessarily consistent with hypothesizing based on conservation of resources theory. Practical implications are emphasized in addition to future research directions.

  9. Contact system dependent fibrinolytic activity in vivo: observations in healthy subjects and factor XII deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Levi, M; Hack, C E; de Boer, J P; Brandjes, D P; Büller, H R; ten Cate, J W

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of activation of the contact system to activation of the fibrinolytic system in vivo was investigated in healthy volunteers and in factor XII deficient patients. The plasminogen activating activity in normal plasma was only partially blocked (for 77%) with specific antibodies to tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA). The residual activity could be quenched by a monoclonal antibody that inhibits factor XII activity and was not present in patients with a factor XII deficiency. The formation of plasmin upon the DDAVP stimulus as reflected by circulating plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin (PAP) complexes was lower in factor XII deficient patients than in healthy volunteers. These results indicate that in vivo the plasminogen activating activity is partially dependent on activation of the contact system. This fibrinolytic activity is impaired in factor XII deficient patients which may explain the occurrence of thromboembolic complications in these patients.

  10. Impaired time perception and motor timing in stimulant-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Marc; Leland, David S; Churan, Jan; Paulus, Martin P

    2007-10-01

    Stimulant-dependent individuals (SDI) have abnormal brain metabolism and structural changes involving dopaminergic target areas important for the processing of time. These individuals are also more impulsive and impaired in working memory and attention. The current study tested whether SDI show altered temporal processing in relation to impulsivity or impaired prefrontal cortex functioning. We employed a series of timing tasks aimed to examine time processing from the milliseconds to multiple seconds range and assessed cognitive function in 15 male SDI and 15 stimulant-naïve individuals. A mediation analysis determined the degree to which impulsivity or executive dysfunctions contributed to group differences in time processing. SDI showed several abnormal time processing characteristics. SDI needed larger time differences for effective duration discrimination, particularly for intervals of around 1s. SDI also accelerated finger tapping during a continuation period after a 1Hz pacing stimulus was removed. In addition, SDI overestimated the duration of a relatively long time interval, an effect which was attributable to higher impulsivity. Taken together, these data show for the first time that SDI exhibit altered time processing in several domains, one which can be explained by increased impulsivity. Altered time processing in SDI could explain why SDI have difficulty delaying gratification. PMID:17434690

  11. Morphological and biochemical evidence that apomorphine rescues striatal dopamine terminals and prevents methamphetamine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, G; Gesi, M; Lenzi, P; Busceti, C L; Soldani, P; Orzi, F; Rampello, L; Nicoletti, F; Ruggieri, S; Fornai, F

    2002-06-01

    Apomorphine, given by a single injection, repeated injections, or by continuous infusion, was tested for neuroprotective effects in mice administered methamphetamine or N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) in order to induce striatal dopamine (DA) depletion. In the first part of the study, the DA agonist (R)-apomorphine was administered at various doses (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg), 15 min before methamphetamine (5 mg/kg x 3, 2 h apart). Mice were sacrificed 5 days later. In the second part, apomorphine was administered either continuously by subcutaneous minipump (cumulative daily dose of 0.5, 1, and 3.15 mg/kg), or as single, repeated daily injections (up to 5 mg/kg) starting 40 h after an acute administration of MPTP (30 mg/kg). Mice were sacrificed at different time intervals (up to 1 month) following MPTP injection. In all the animals, the integrity of striatal DA terminals was evaluated by measuring striatal DA levels and TH immunohistochemistry. Apomorphine dose-dependently prevented methamphetamine toxicity. These effects were neither due to a decrease in the amount of striatal methamphetamine nor to the hypothermia, and they were not reversed by the DA antagonist haloperidol. Moreover, chronic, continuous (but not pulsatile) administration of apomorphine rescued damaged striatal dopaminergic terminals. These findings confirm a protective effect of apomorphine that also consists of a neurorescue of damaged striatal DA terminals. This suggests a new hypothesis about the long-term benefits observed during continuous apomorphine administration in Parkinson's disease patients.

  12. Study on the THz spectrum of methamphetamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Li; Shen, Jingling; Jinhai, Sun; Laishun, Liang; Xu, Xiaoyu; Lu, Meihong; Yan, Jia

    2005-09-01

    The spectral absorption features of methamphetamine (MA), one of the most widely consumed illicit drugs in the world, are studied experimentally by Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), and the characteristic absorption spectra are obtained in the range of 0.2 to 2.6 THz. The vibrational frequencies are calculated using the density functional theory (DFT). Theoretical results show significant agreement with experimental results, and identification of vibrational modes are given. The calculated results further confirm that the characteristic frequencies come from the collective vibrational modes. The results suggest that use of the THz-TDS technique can be an effective way to inspect for illicit drugs.

  13. Addiction and treatment experiences among active methamphetamine users recruited from a township community in Cape Town, South Africa: a mixed-methods study

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Christina S.; Towe, Sheri L.; Watt, Melissa H.; Lion, Ryan R.; Myers, Bronwyn; Skinner, Donald; Kimani, Stephen; Pieterse, Desiree

    2015-01-01

    Background Since 2000, there has been a dramatic increase in methamphetamine use in South Africa, but little is known about the experiences of out-of-treatment users. This mixed-methods study describes the substance use histories, addiction symptoms, and treatment experiences of a community-recruited sample of methamphetamine users in Cape Town. Methods Using respondent driven sampling, 360 methamphetamine users (44% female) completed structured clinical interviews to assess substance abuse and treatment history and computerized surveys to assess drug-related risks. A sub-sample of 30 participants completed in-depth interviews to qualitatively explore experiences with methamphetamine use and drug treatment. Results Participants had used methamphetamine for an average of 7.06 years (SD=3.64). They reported using methamphetamine on an average of 23.49 of the past 30 days (SD=8.90); 60% used daily. The majority (90%) met ICD-10 criteria for dependence, and many reported severe social, financial, and legal consequences. While only 10% had ever received drug treatment, 90% reported that they wanted treatment. In the qualitative interviews, participants reported multiple barriers to treatment, including beliefs that treatment is ineffective and relapse is inevitable in their social context. They also identified important motivators, including desires to be drug free and improve family functioning. Conclusion This study yields valuable information to more effectively respond to emerging methamphetamine epidemics in South Africa and other low- and middle-income countries. Interventions to increase uptake of evidence-based services must actively seek out drug users and build motivation for treatment, and offer continuing care services to prevent relapse. Community education campaigns are also needed. PMID:25977205

  14. Initiation into Methamphetamine Use For Young Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Kelly, Brian C.; Weiser, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    Research over the past ten years has suggested that methamphetamine use has become a significant problem and is associated with risky sexual behaviors among gay and bisexual men. In order to better understand initiation into methamphetamine use among gay and bisexual men, qualitative analyses were performed on a sample of young gay and bisexual men (ages 18-29) in New York City. Participants were recruited as part of a larger study which used time-space sampling to enroll club-going young adults who indicated recent club-drug (ecstasy, ketamine, GHB, methamphetamine, cocaine, and/or LSD) use. The data for this paper are derived from the qualitative interviews of 54 gay and bisexual male methamphetamine users. At initiation (1) Methamphetamine was used in a social, non-sexual setting for a majority of the participants; (2) participants expressed limited knowledge of methamphetamine; and (3) many participants used cocaine as a basis for comparison when describing various effects of the drug. The understanding that at initiation methamphetamine was not solely used as a sexual enhancement for members of this community may enable health workers to more accurately target potential users when putting forth intervention efforts. Future research should aim to gain a better understanding into the role that methamphetamine plays in non-sexual contexts, particularly among gay and bisexual men who may not be part of the club “scene.” The relationship between attitudes towards methamphetamine and other drugs, particularly cocaine, among gay and bisexual men should be explored. PMID:17398040

  15. Desorption of a methamphetamine surrogate from wallboard under remediation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppendieck, Dustin; Morrison, Glenn; Corsi, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Thousands of homes in the United States are found to be contaminated with methamphetamine each year. Buildings used to produce illicit methamphetamine are typically remediated by removing soft furnishings and stained materials, cleaning and sometimes encapsulating surfaces using paint. Methamphetamine that has penetrated into paint films, wood and other permanent materials can be slowly released back into the building air over time, exposing future occupants and re-contaminating furnishings. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of two wallboard remediation techniques for homes contaminated with methamphetamine: 1) enhancing desorption by elevating temperature and relative humidity while ventilating the interior space, and 2) painting over affected wallboard to seal the methamphetamine in place. The emission of a methamphetamine surrogate, N-isopropylbenzylamine (NIBA), from pre-dosed wallboard chambers over 20 days at 32 °C and two values of relative humidity were studied. Emission rates from wallboard after 15 days at 32 °C ranged from 35 to 1400 μg h-1 m-2. Less than 22% of the NIBA was removed from the chambers over three weeks. Results indicate that elevating temperatures during remediation and latex painting of impacted wallboard will not significantly reduce freebase methamphetamine emissions from wallboard. Raising the relative humidity from 27% to 49% increased the emission rates by a factor of 1.4. A steady-state model of a typical home using the emission rates from this study and typical residential building parameters and conditions shows that adult inhalation reference doses for methamphetamine will be reached when approximately 1 g of methamphetamine is present in the wallboard of a house.

  16. NAN-190, a possible specific antagonist for methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ginawi, O T; Al-Majed, A A; Al-Suwailem, A K

    2005-03-01

    Effect of NAN-190, a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, on methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity, anorexia, analgesia, and hyperthermia was investigated in male mice. Methamphetamine (1.5 mg/kg, i.p) produced a significant increase in locomotor activity, which was significantly antagonized by NAN-190 at a dose of 4 mg/kg, i.p. NAN-190 did not alter the antinociceptive activity of mice when it was administered alone. Methamphetamine (2 mg/kg, i.p) produced a significant decrease in food intake of mice, which were deprived of food during the previous 24h. This anorectic activity of methamphetamine was significantly antagonized by NAN-190 at a dose of 2 mg/kg, i.p. NAN-190 did not alter the food intake of mice when it was administered alone. Methamphetamine (2 mg/kg, i.p) also produced a significant increase in body temperature of mice, which was significantly antagonized by NAN-190 at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg, i.p. NAN-190 did not alter the body temperature of mice when it was administered alone. In the writhing test, methamphetamine (1 mg/kg, i.p) produced a significant antinociceptive effect in mice. This was significantly antagonized by NAN-190 at a dose of 1 mg/kg, i.p. NAN-190 did not alter the antinociceptive activity of mice when it was administered alone. The results of the present study indicate a possible role for serotonergic mechanisms, in addition to the catecholaminergic systems, in the above-studied activities of methamphetamine in mice. This role is possibly mediated through direct stimulation of the 5-HT(1A) receptor subtype. All of the above-studied activities of methamphetamine were antagonized by NAN-190, which may indicate that NAN-190 is a possible antagonist for methamphetamine.

  17. [Immunohistochemical study on the mechanism of excretion of methamphetamine].

    PubMed

    Kajitani, A; Kaiho, M; Mori, A; Okada, Y; Mukaida, M; Ishiyama, I

    1989-06-01

    Many methods of analysis are available to the forensic toxicologist for determining the amount of methamphetamine within human tissues, but few have the potential of histochemistry for enabling the precise site of excretion of methamphetamine to be defined. We have established a method for the demonstration of methamphetamine by immunohistochemistry, and applied this method for showing morphologically the disposition of methamphetamine. The following cells in the tissues of methamphetamine-intoxicated mice gave a strong positive reaction of the localization, which was thought to be the histological evidence of excretion of this drug: epithelial cells of the distal part of the renal tubule and of the collecting tubule, transitional epithelial cells of the bladder, liver parenchymal cells, epithelial cells of the striated duct of the salivary gland, parietal cells of the gastric gland, part of epithelial cells of the distal portion of the large intestine, secretory cells and part of epithelial cells of the ductal portion of the sweat gland, alveolar cells of the mammary gland, secretory cells of the sebaceous gland and hair medulla and cortex. These results indicated passive diffusion of methamphetamine across membranes of the cells of the distal tubule and collecting tubule of the kidney, of the bladder and of the striated duct of the salivary gland. In the parietal cells of the gastric gland, part of epithelial cells of the distal portion of the large intestine and secretory cells of the sweat gland, methamphetamine was thought to be stored and subsequently released. In the mammary gland, methamphetamine was found to be combined with casein and excreted by exocytosis. Accumulation of methamphetamine in the hair was supposed to be chiefly due to the penetration of this drug derived from tissue fluid and sebum.

  18. Glutamatergic Neurometabolites during Early Abstinence from Chronic Methamphetamine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Marc C.; Hudkins, Matthew; London, Edythe D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The acute phase of abstinence from methamphetamine abuse is critical for rehabilitation success. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy has detected below-normal levels of glutamate+glutamine in anterior middle cingulate of chronic methamphetamine abusers during early abstinence, attributed to abstinence-induced downregulation of the glutamatergic systems in the brain. This study further explored this phenomenon. Methods: We measured glutamate+glutamine in additional cortical regions (midline posterior cingulate, midline precuneus, and bilateral inferior frontal cortex) putatively affected by methamphetamine. We examined the relationship between glutamate+glutamine in each region with duration of methamphetamine abuse as well as the depressive symptoms of early abstinence. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging was acquired at 1.5 T from a methamphetamine group of 44 adults who had chronically abused methamphetamine and a control group of 23 age-, sex-, and tobacco smoking-matched healthy volunteers. Participants in the methamphetamine group were studied as inpatients during the first week of abstinence from the drug and were not receiving treatment. Results: In the methamphetamine group, small but significant (5–15%, P<.05) decrements (vs control) in glutamate+glutamine were observed in posterior cingulate, precuneus, and right inferior frontal cortex; glutamate+glutamine in posterior cingulate was negatively correlated (P<.05) with years of methamphetamine abuse. The Beck Depression Inventory score was negatively correlated (P<.005) with glutamate+glutamine in right inferior frontal cortex. Conclusions: Our findings support the idea that glutamatergic metabolism is downregulated in early abstinence in multiple cortical regions. The extent of downregulation may vary with length of abuse and may be associated with severity of depressive symptoms emergent in early recovery. PMID:25522400

  19. Effect of Abstinence on Depression, Anxiety, and Quality of Life in Chronic Methamphetamine Users in a Therapeutic Community

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Maryam; Mokri, Azarakhsh; Khosravi, Aliakbar; Kabir, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Background: During withdrawal, patients experience different symptoms. These symptoms are associated with relapse. Understanding different outcomes of methamphetamine abstinence is useful for finding better treatments for dependence. Objectives: This study aimed to show the effects of abstinence on depression, anxiety, and quality of life in methamphetamine users. Patients and Methods: A prospective quasi-experimental (before and after study) method was used to show the effect of 3 weeks abstinence on depression, anxiety, and quality of life. A convenient sample of addicted people entered into the study and 34 people completed the study. Beck Depression Scale, Cattell Anxiety Inventory and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) (for assessing quality of life), were used for outcome assessments. Results: The mean depression score after abstinence decreased significantly (P < 0.001). Both hidden and obvious anxiety and total anxiety had a high level at admission and after 3 weeks of abstinence, the mean level of anxiety did not change significantly (P < 0.096). However, the quality of life increased after 3 weeks of abstinence (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Depression and anxiety are prevalent in methamphetamine users. Short-term abstinence improves depression and quality of life but does not improve anxiety in methamphetamine abusers. During follow up of these patients, addressing depression and anxiety is important to achieve better results. PMID:26495258

  20. Working Memory Deficits Affect Risky Decision-Making in Methamphetamine Users with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Nichole A.; Woods, Steven Paul; Rooney, Alexandra; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Grant, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) use and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) commonly co-occur and are independently associated with dysregulation of frontostriatal loops and risky decision-making; however, whether their comorbidity exacerbates risky decision-making is not known. This study evaluated 23 participants with histories of MA dependence and ADHD (MA+ADHD+), 25 subjects with MA dependence alone (MA+ADHD−), and 22 healthy adults (MA−ADHD−), who completed the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) as part of a larger neuropsychiatric research evaluation. Results showed a significant interaction between ADHD, MA, and working memory, such that individuals with working memory deficits in the ADHD+MA+ cohort demonstrated the strongest propensity to select cards from “disadvantageous” versus “advantageous” decks on the IGT. This effect was unique to working memory and was not better explained by other psychiatric, substance use, or neuromedical factors. Findings suggest that working memory deficits may moderate the expression of risky decision-making in MA users with ADHD. PMID:22305489

  1. [Vibration studies of amphetamine and methamphetamine by micro Raman].

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Chen, D; Zhang, P; Lu, F; Xie, H; Li, H

    1999-10-01

    For the first time, we obtained and investigated the Raman spectra of amphetamine and methamphetamine by micro Raman with incidence excitation light 514.5 nm under the ambient environment. According to the fact that both molecules belong to single substituted benzene which has the symmetry of Cy2v, the attribution of Raman vibration modes in amphetamine and methamphetamine molecules was carried out by studying the spectral lines in the two spectra. The Raman line that only appeared in methamphetamine but could not be seen in any other drugs we have investigated was most possibly attributed to the stretching vibration between C-N(+)-C.

  2. Resonance properties of a closed rotating rectangular basin subject to space- and time-dependent wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen L.; Roos, Pieter C.; Schuttelaars, Henk M.; Hulscher, Suzanne J. M. H.

    2015-03-01

    We present an idealised process-based model to study the possibly resonant response of closed basins subject to periodic wind forcing. Two solution methods are adopted: a collocation technique (valid for arbitrary rotation) and an analytical expansion (assuming weak rotation). The spectral response, as obtained from our model, displays resonance peaks, which we explain by linking them to the spatial pattern of the wind forcing, the along-wind and cross-wind basin dimensions as well as the influence of rotation. Increasing bottom friction lowers the peaks. Finally, we illustrate how the spectral response is reflected in the time-dependent set-up due to a single wind event.

  3. On the Josephson effect in a Bose-Einstein condensate subject to a density-dependent gauge potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, M. J.; Valiente, M.; Öhberg, P.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the coherent dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a double well, subject to a density-dependent gauge potential. Further, we derive the nonlinear Josephson equations that allow us to understand the many-body system in terms of a classical Hamiltonian that describes the motion of a nonrigid pendulum with an initial angular offset. Finally we analyse the phase-space trajectories of the system, and describe how the self-trapping is affected by the presence of an interacting gauge potential.

  4. Determination of methamphetamine enantiomer composition in human hair by non-chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Shu, Irene; Alexander, Amy; Jones, Mary; Jones, Joseph; Negrusz, Adam

    2016-08-15

    Chiral separation is crucial for investigating methamphetamine positive cases. While (S)-(+)-enantiomer of methamphetamine (S-MAMP) is a schedule II controlled substance, (R)-(-)-enantiomer (R-MAMP) is an active ingredient of a few over-the-counter drugs in the United States. Among biological specimen types, hair provides greater detection window than blood, urine or oral fluid, and are therefore regarded with particular interest. Herein we describe a novel non-chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to directly determine methamphetamine enantiomeric composition (percentage) in hair specimens. Hair samples were washed once with acetone, powdered, incubated overnight at 53°C in 0.1M hydrochloric acid (HCl), and subjected to a solid phase extraction (SPE). The extracts were derivatized using Marfey's reagent at 53°C for 60min. The final mixture was analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a C18 Kinetex analytical column and 60% (v/v) aqueous methanol as mobile phase (isocratic). Triple quadrupole mass spectrometer was equipped with an electro-spray ionization (ESI) source operating in negative mode and the chromatograms were acquired using a multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) approach. The results were expressed as ratio of R- to S-MAMP and then derived to composition percentages without requiring quantitating each enantiomer. The method was precise and accurate across 0-100% S-composition at a range of 80-18,000pg/mg. The performance of the new method was compared with an (S)-(-)-N-trifluoroacetylprolyl chloride (S-TPC) derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method on authentic methamphetamine-positive hair samples. Not only the new Marfey's reagent approach presented satisfactory correlation with the S-TPC approach, but it also exhibited significantly improved quality (e.g., S/N) of the chromatograms. In summary, our protocol employs cost effective and minimally hazardous Marfey

  5. Common experience modifies the reinforcing properties of methamphetamine-injected cage mates but not morphine-injected cage mates in C57 mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether previous exposure to a drug affects the social facilitation of conditioned place preference (CPP) for a drug-injected cage mate. Twenty-two male C57/BL6J mice received drug injections (methamphetamine or morphine) and 22 male C57/BL6J mice received saline injections. All 44 mice then received CPP training, during which one compartment of a conventional CPP apparatus was associated with a drug-injected cage mate (stimulus mouse) and the other compartment was associated with a saline-injected cage mate (stimulus mouse). The subject mice did not receive any drug injection during this CPP training. Time spent in the compartment associated with the drug-injected cage mate was measured before and after training. Subject mice that had previously received methamphetamine injections showed an increase in the time spent in the compartment associated with the methamphetamine-injected cage mate after CPP training. This effect was not observed in subject mice that had previously received saline injections. Subject mice did not show an increase in the time spent in the compartment associated with the morphine-injected cage mate irrespective of whether they had previously received morphine or saline injections. Therefore, in agreement with previous reports, common experience with methamphetamine induced reinforcing properties, but that with morphine did not.

  6. Glycaemic responses to different types of bread in insulin-dependent diabetic subjects (IDDM): studies at constant insulinaemia.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, O; Winther, E; Hermansen, K

    1991-02-01

    To study the glycaemic effect of various Danish bread types in insulin-dependent diabetic subjects (IDDM) we looked at the incremental blood glucose areas after isocaloric meals of grained wholemeal rye bread, wholemeal bread (graham bread) and white bread in seven C-peptide negative diabetic subjects. Furthermore, we evaluated the glycaemic potency of dried fruits by exchanging 40 per cent of the starch of grained wholemeal rye bread as dried figs. Prior to the meal intake the patients had attained normoglycaemia and isoinsulinaemia by means of the artificial pancreas. The four test meals containing 50 g of available carbohydrate were taken in random order. The postprandial blood glucose response areas after whole-meal bread (1037 +/- 113 mM X 180 min) and white bread (1021 +/- 100 mM X 180 min) were significantly higher than that to grained wholemeal rye bread (786 +/- 66 mM X 180 min, P less than 0.05). Exchange of 40 per cent of the complex carbohydrate as grained wholemeal rye bread with simple sugars, such as figs, had no influence on the blood glucose response (786 +/- 66 mM X 180 min vs. 766 +/- 56 mM X 180 min). Constant and identical serum-free insulin levels at 30 mU/l and similar amounts of glucose lost in the urine were found after the four test meals. In conclusion, the difference in extraction rate of wheat in the form of white flour (0, 7) and wholemeal flour (1, 0) was not reflected in the glycaemic responses in IDDM subjects. Grained wholemeal rye bread is a fibre-rich, cheap nutrient which elicits a significantly lower glycaemic response compared to wholemeal and white bread and can be recommended to diabetic subjects.

  7. Methamphetamine blood concentrations in human abusers: application to pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Melega, William P; Cho, Arthur K; Harvey, Dennis; Laćan, Goran

    2007-04-01

    Characterization of methamphetamine's (METH) dose-dependent effects on brain neurochemistry may represent a critical component for better understanding the range of resultant behavioral pathologies. Most human studies, however, have assessed only the effects of long term, high dose METH abuse (e.g., greater than 1000 mg/day) in individuals meeting DSM-IV criteria for METH dependence. Yet, for the majority of METH abusers, their patterns of METH exposure that consist of lower doses remain less well-characterized. In this study, blood samples were obtained from 105 individuals detained by police for possible criminal activity and testing positive for stimulants by EMIT assay. METH blood concentrations were subsequently quantified by GC-MS and were predominantly in the low micromolar range (0.1-11.1 microM), with median and mean values of 1.3 microM (0.19 mg/l) and 2 microM (0.3 mg/l), respectively. Pharmacokinetic calculations based on these measured values were used to estimate initial METH body burdens, the median value being 52 mg. Modeling a 52 mg dose for a 4 day-METH maintenance exposure pattern of 4 doses/day at 4 h intervals showed that blood concentrations remained between 1 and 4 microM during this period. Collectively, these data present evidence for a METH exposure pattern distinct from high dose-METH abuse and provide the rationale for assessing potential brain pathology associated with such lower dose-METH exposure.

  8. Exercise protects against methamphetamine-induced aberrant neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minseon; Levine, Harry; Toborek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    While no effective therapy is available for the treatment of methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity, aerobic exercise is being proposed to improve depressive symptoms and substance abuse outcomes. The present study focuses on the effect of exercise on METH-induced aberrant neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in the context of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) pathology. Mice were administered with METH or saline by i.p. injections for 5 days with an escalating dose regimen. One set of mice was sacrificed 24 h post last injection of METH, and the remaining animals were either subjected to voluntary wheel running (exercised mice) or remained in sedentary housing (sedentary mice). METH administration decreased expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and increased BBB permeability in the hippocampus. These changes were preserved post METH administration in sedentary mice and were associated with the development of significant aberrations of neural differentiation. Exercise protected against these effects by enhancing the protein expression of TJ proteins, stabilizing the BBB integrity, and enhancing the neural differentiation. In addition, exercise protected against METH-induced systemic increase in inflammatory cytokine levels. These results suggest that exercise can attenuate METH-induced neurotoxicity by protecting against the BBB disruption and related microenvironmental changes in the hippocampus. PMID:27677455

  9. Methamphetamine abuse and oral health: a pilot study of "meth mouth".

    PubMed

    Ravenel, Michele C; Salinas, Carlos F; Marlow, Nicole M; Slate, Elizabeth H; Evans, Zachary P; Miller, Peter M

    2012-03-01

    Abuse of methamphetamine (meth), a potent central nervous system stimulant, has been associated with significant dental disease. Current descriptions of "meth mouth" are limited in their scope and fail to illuminate the potential pathogenic mechanisms of meth for oral disease. The purpose of this pilot study was to characterize the oral health of subjects with a history of meth abuse as compared to nonabusing control subjects. A total of 28 meth abusers and 16 control subjects were enrolled. Interviews and surveys regarding meth abuse, dental history, oral hygiene, and diet were collected. A comprehensive oral cavity examination including salivary characterization was completed. We observed significantly higher rates of decayed surfaces, missing teeth, tooth wear, plaque, and calculus among meth abusers. No significant difference in salivary flow rates were noted, yet results showed significant trends for lower pH and decreased buffering capacity. These findings suggest that salivary quality may play a more important role in meth mouth than previously considered. Salivary analysis may be useful when managing a dental patient with history of methamphetamine abuse.

  10. Size-dependent thermal stability analysis of graded piezomagnetic nanoplates on elastic medium subjected to various thermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Barati, Mohammad Reza

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the thermal stability of magneto-electro-thermo-elastic functionally graded (METE-FG) nanoplates based on the nonlocal theory and a refined plate model. The METE-FG nanoplate is subjected to the external electric potential, magnetic potential and different temperature rises. Interaction of elastic medium with the METE-FG nanoplate is modeled via Winkler-Pasternak foundation model. The governing equations are derived by using the Hamilton principle and solved by using an analytical method to determine the critical buckling temperatures. To verify the validity of the developed model, the results of the present work are compared with those available in the literature. A detailed parametric study is conducted to study the influences of the nonlocal parameter, foundation parameters, temperature rise, external electric and magnetic potentials on the size-dependent thermal buckling characteristics of METE-FG nanoplates.

  11. Metabolic effects of adding sucrose and aspartame to the diet of subjects with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Colagiuri, S; Miller, J J; Edwards, R A

    1989-09-01

    This study compared the effects of adding sucrose and aspartame to the usual diet of individuals with well-controlled noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). A double-blind, cross-over design was used with each 6-wk study period. During the sucrose period, 45 g sucrose (9% of total daily energy) was added, 10 g with each main meal and 5 g with each between-meal beverage. An equivalent sweetening quantity of aspartame (162 mg) was ingested during the aspartame period. The addition of sucrose did not have a deleterious effect on glycemic control, lipids, glucose tolerance, or insulin action. No differences were observed between sucrose and aspartame. Sucrose added as an integral part of the diabetic diet does not adversely affect metabolic control in well-controlled NIDDM subjects. Aspartame is an acceptable sugar substitute for diabetic individuals but no specific advantage over sucrose was demonstrated.

  12. Syphilis and methamphetamine use among female sex workers in Shandong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Liao, Meizhen; Jiang, Zhenxia; Zhang, Xijiang; Kang, Dianming; Bi, Zhenqiang; Liu, Xuezhen; Fu, Jihua; Zhang, Ning; Mao, Wenwen; Jiang, Baofa; Jia, Yujiang

    2011-01-01

    A study of female sex workers in China, found alarmingly high prevalence of methamphetamine use. Methamphetamine users were more likely to be single, younger, inconsistent condom users, and have syphilis.

  13. Decreased frontal lobe phosphocreatine levels in methamphetamine users

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Young-Hoon; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A.; Shi, Xian-Feng; Kondo, Douglas G.; Lundberg, Kelly J.; McGlade, Erin C.; Hellem, Tracy L.; Huber, Rebekah S.; Fiedler, Kristen K.; Harrell, Renee E.; Nickerson, Bethany R.; Kim, Seong-Eun; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mitochondria-related mechanisms have been suggested to mediate methamphetamine (METH) toxicity. However, changes in brain energetics associated with highenergy phosphate metabolism have not been investigated in METH users. Phosphorus-31 (31P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to evaluate changes in mitochondrial high energy phosphates, including phosphocreatine (PCr) and β-nucleoside triphosphate (β-NTP, primarily ATP in brain) levels. We hypothesized that METH users would have decreased high-energy PCr levels in the frontal gray matter. METHODS Study participants consisted of 51 METH (age=32.8±6.7) and 23 healthy comparison (age=31.1±7.5) subjects. High-energy phosphate metabolite levels were compared between the groups and potential gender differences were explored. RESULTS METH users had lower ratios of PCr to total pool of exchangeable phosphate (PCr/TPP) in the frontal lobe as compared to the healthy subjects (p=0.001). The lower PCr levels in METH subjects were significantly associated with lifetime amount of METH use (p=0.003). A sub-analysis for gender differences revealed that female METH users, who had lower daily amounts (1.1±1.0 gram) of METH use than males (1.4±1.7 gram), had significantly lower PCr/TPP ratios than male METH users, controlling for the amount of METH use (p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS The present findings suggest that METH compromises frontal lobe high-energy phosphate metabolism in a dose-responsive manner. Our findings also suggest that the abnormality in frontal lobe high-energy phosphate metabolism might be more prominent in female than in male METH users. This is significant as decreased PCr levels have been associated with depressive symptoms, and poor responses to antidepressant treatment have been reported in those with decreased PCr levels. PMID:23084413

  14. Acquisition of Conditioning between Methamphetamine and Cues in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Leah M.; de Wit, Harriet

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stimuli repeatedly paired with drugs of abuse can elicit conditioned responses that are thought to promote future drug seeking. We recently showed that healthy volunteers acquired conditioned responses to auditory and visual stimuli after just two pairings with methamphetamine (MA, 20 mg, oral). This study extended these findings by systematically varying the number of drug-stimuli pairings. We expected that more pairings would result in stronger conditioning. Three groups of healthy adults were randomly assigned to receive 1, 2 or 4 pairings (Groups P1, P2 and P4, Ns = 13, 16, 16, respectively) of an auditory-visual stimulus with MA, and another stimulus with placebo (PBO). Drug-cue pairings were administered in an alternating, counterbalanced order, under double-blind conditions, during 4 hr sessions. MA produced prototypic subjective effects (mood, ratings of drug effects) and alterations in physiology (heart rate, blood pressure). Although subjects did not exhibit increased behavioral preference for, or emotional reactivity to, the MA-paired cue after conditioning, they did exhibit an increase in attentional bias (initial gaze) toward the drug-paired stimulus. Further, subjects who had four pairings reported “liking” the MA-paired cue more than the PBO cue after conditioning. Thus, the number of drug-stimulus pairings, varying from one to four, had only modest effects on the strength of conditioned responses. Further studies investigating the parameters under which drug conditioning occurs will help to identify risk factors for developing drug abuse, and provide new treatment strategies. PMID:27548681

  15. Impact of methamphetamine on infection and immunity.

    PubMed

    Salamanca, Sergio A; Sorrentino, Edra E; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Martinez, Luis R

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of methamphetamine (METH) use is estimated at ~35 million people worldwide, with over 10 million users in the United States. METH use elicits a myriad of social consequences and the behavioral impact of the drug is well understood. However, new information has recently emerged detailing the devastating effects of METH on host immunity, increasing the acquisition of diverse pathogens and exacerbating the severity of disease. These outcomes manifest as modifications in protective physical and chemical defenses, pro-inflammatory responses, and the induction of oxidative stress pathways. Through these processes, significant neurotoxicities arise, and, as such, chronic abusers with these conditions are at a higher risk for heightened consequences. METH use also influences the adaptive immune response, permitting the unrestrained development of opportunistic diseases. In this review, we discuss recent literature addressing the impact of METH on infection and immunity, and identify areas ripe for future investigation.

  16. METHAMPHETAMINE TOXICITY AND MESSENGERS OF DEATH

    PubMed Central

    Krasnova, Irina N.; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an illicit psychostimulant that is widely abused in the world. Several lines of evidence suggest that chronic METH abuse leads to neurodegenerative changes in the human brain. These include damage to dopamine and serotonin axons, loss of gray matter accompanied by hypertrophy of the white matter and microgliosis in different brain areas. In the present review, we summarize data on the animal models of METH neurotoxicity which include degeneration of monoaminergic terminals and neuronal apoptosis. In addition, we discuss molecular and cellular bases of METH-induced neuropathologies. The accumulated evidence indicates that multiple events, including oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, hyperthermia, neuroinflammatory responses, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress converge to mediate METH-induced terminal degeneration and neuronal apoptosis. When taken together, these findings suggest that pharmacological strategies geared towards the prevention and treatment of the deleterious effects of this drug will need to attack the various pathways that form the substrates of METH toxicity. PMID:19328213

  17. Impact of methamphetamine on infection and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Salamanca, Sergio A.; Sorrentino, Edra E.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Martinez, Luis R.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of methamphetamine (METH) use is estimated at ~35 million people worldwide, with over 10 million users in the United States. METH use elicits a myriad of social consequences and the behavioral impact of the drug is well understood. However, new information has recently emerged detailing the devastating effects of METH on host immunity, increasing the acquisition of diverse pathogens and exacerbating the severity of disease. These outcomes manifest as modifications in protective physical and chemical defenses, pro-inflammatory responses, and the induction of oxidative stress pathways. Through these processes, significant neurotoxicities arise, and, as such, chronic abusers with these conditions are at a higher risk for heightened consequences. METH use also influences the adaptive immune response, permitting the unrestrained development of opportunistic diseases. In this review, we discuss recent literature addressing the impact of METH on infection and immunity, and identify areas ripe for future investigation. PMID:25628526

  18. Nesprin-2G, a Component of the Nuclear LINC Complex, Is Subject to Myosin-Dependent Tension.

    PubMed

    Arsenovic, Paul T; Ramachandran, Iswarya; Bathula, Kranthidhar; Zhu, Ruijun; Narang, Jiten D; Noll, Natalie A; Lemmon, Christopher A; Gundersen, Gregg G; Conway, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    The nucleus of a cell has long been considered to be subject to mechanical force. Despite the observation that mechanical forces affect nuclear geometry and movement, how forces are applied onto the nucleus is not well understood. The nuclear LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex has been hypothesized to be the critical structure that mediates the transfer of mechanical forces from the cytoskeleton onto the nucleus. Previously used techniques for studying nuclear forces have been unable to resolve forces across individual proteins, making it difficult to clearly establish if the LINC complex experiences mechanical load. To directly measure forces across the LINC complex, we generated a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based tension biosensor for nesprin-2G, a key structural protein in the LINC complex, which physically links this complex to the actin cytoskeleton. Using this sensor we show that nesprin-2G is subject to mechanical tension in adherent fibroblasts, with highest levels of force on the apical and equatorial planes of the nucleus. We also show that the forces across nesprin-2G are dependent on actomyosin contractility and cell elongation. Additionally, nesprin-2G tension is reduced in fibroblasts from Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patients. This report provides the first, to our knowledge, direct evidence that nesprin-2G, and by extension the LINC complex, is subject to mechanical force. We also present evidence that nesprin-2G localization to the nuclear membrane is altered under high-force conditions. Because forces across the LINC complex are altered by a variety of different conditions, mechanical forces across the LINC complex, as well as the nucleus in general, may represent an important mechanism for mediating mechanotransduction.

  19. The acute effects of nicotine on the subjective and behavioural responses to denicotinized tobacco in dependent smokers.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Sean P; Darredeau, Christine

    2012-06-01

    Both nicotine and various non-nicotine smoking factors are believed to contribute to tobacco addiction but their relative roles remain incompletely understood. This study aimed to help clarify these roles by examining acute interactions between nicotine and denicotinized tobacco (DT). During two randomized blinded sessions, the effects of a quick-release 4 mg nicotine lozenge (NL) versus placebo lozenge (PL) on the subjective and behavioural responses to DT were examined in 27 (14 men) dependent, daily smokers. Participants were administered NL or PL for 30 min before receiving one initial DT cigarette. Participants could then earn additional DT cigarette puffs over the following 60 min. Subjective state was assessed using the Questionnaire of Smoking Urges-Brief and visual analogue scales at baseline, postlozenge and postinitial DT cigarette. Relative to PL, NL was associated with increased alertness as well as with reduced levels of DT self-administration (P<0.01). The administration of a single DT cigarette was followed by a reduction in craving under both lozenge conditions (P<0.001), an effect that was significantly greater in women (P<0.01). Moreover, DT administration was associated with increased ratings of 'pleasant', 'satisfied', 'stimulated' and 'relaxed', as well as with decreased ratings of 'anxious' (P's<0.01), independent of lozenge condition. The findings suggest that both nicotine and non-nicotine smoking factors may make important contributions towards the addictive properties of tobacco. PMID:22470104

  20. Distribution of methamphetamine and its metabolite amphetamine in acute and subacute ethanol-methamphetamine combination abuse model rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Man; Liu, Yan; Zheng, Na; Ananda, Sunnassee; Liu, Liang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the distribution of methamphetamine (MA) and its metabolite amphetamine (AP) in rat models of acute and subacute MA-ethanol combination abuse. Rats were fed with 20% ethanol for 4 weeks (chronic active-drinking group), and MA was injected intraperitoneally into chronically drinking and normal rats over 5 and 14 days, respectively. Then the rats from the acute and subacute combination abuse groups were euthanized, and ethanol, MA, and AP concentrations in samples were quantified. Except for the similar ethanol concentrations among acute and subacute groups, the MA and AP levels between groups were quite different. The concentrations of MA and AP in rats' liver, lung, kidney, and brain were much higher than other tissues, regardless of combination with ethanol. Also, MA and AP levels in subacute rats groups were higher than those in acute groups, and the levels of MA and the formation of AP in rats subjected to the combination abuse with ethanol were higher than in MA-only intoxicated rats. We conclude that ethanol has no bearing on the MA and AP distribution in body fluids and tissues, yet it can increase MA levels and markedly accelerate the formation of AP in combination-abuse rats. Comparing the acute and subacute combination-abuse rats' samples, it can be deduced that various accumulated amounts of MA and AP were unaffected by ethanol, even after multi-dose injection, regardless of acute or subacute use.

  1. d-Cycloserine combined with cue exposure therapy fails to attenuate subjective and physiological craving in cocaine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Santa Ana, Elizabeth J.; Prisciandaro, James J.; Saladin, Michael E.; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Shaftman, Stephanie R.; Nietert, Paul J.; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Based on preclinical studies showing that the partial N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) agonist d-cycloserine (DCS) facilitates extinction of cocaine self-administration and cocaine-induced conditioned place preference, we evaluated whether 50 mg of DCS would reduce craving to cocaine cues when combined with cue exposure (CE) in cocaine dependent humans. Methods In this double-blind placebo-controlled pilot study, 47 cocaine dependent participants were randomized to DCS or placebo (PBO), plus CE. Participants received DCS or PBO 30 minutes prior to two CE sessions, conducted one day apart. Craving and heart rate was assessed prior to CE sessions, during CE trials, and after CE trials. These measures were assessed again at a 1-week follow-up (session 3) after the second CE session. Results DCS failed to significantly attenuate cocaine cue reactivity based on subjective craving and physiological reactivity (heart rate) compared to PBO. The CE protocol, consisting of repeated exposure to drug cues combined with skills training, resulted in extinction to cocaine cues as suggested by decreased craving within and between sessions in both treatment conditions. All participants exhibited elevated heart rate with repeated exposures, demonstrating a potentiation in heart rate between sessions. PMID:25808169

  2. 21 CFR 250.101 - Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded... DRUGS New Drug or Prescription Status of Specific Drugs § 250.101 Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs. (a) Recurring reports of abuse and misuse of methamphetamine...

  3. 21 CFR 250.101 - Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded... DRUGS New Drug or Prescription Status of Specific Drugs § 250.101 Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs. (a) Recurring reports of abuse and misuse of methamphetamine...

  4. 21 CFR 250.101 - Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded... DRUGS New Drug or Prescription Status of Specific Drugs § 250.101 Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs. (a) Recurring reports of abuse and misuse of methamphetamine...

  5. An Exploration of the Relationship between the Use of Methamphetamine and Prescription Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamonica, Aukje K.; Boeri, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    This study examines patterns of use of prescription drugs and methamphetamine. We drew our sample from a study about 130 active and inactive methamphetamine users and focused on 16 participants with a recent history of methamphetamine and prescription drug use. We collected in-depth interviews to explore relationships in use trajectory patterns.…

  6. Methamphetamine and the Changing Face of Child Welfare: Practice Principles for Child Welfare Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell-Carrick, Kelli

    2007-01-01

    Methamphetamine use and production is changing child welfare practice. Methamphetamine is a significant public health threat (National Institute of Justice, 1999) reaching epidemic proportions (Anglin, Burke, Perrochet, Stamper, & Dawud-Nouris, 2000). The manufacturing of methamphetamine is a serious problem for the child welfare system, yet child…

  7. The Rise in Methamphetamine Use among American Indians in Los Angeles County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spear, Suzanne; Crevecoeur, Desiree A.; Rawson, Richard A.; Clark, Rose

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary review of substance abuse treatment admission data from 2001-2005 was conducted to explore the use of methamphetamine among American Indians in treatment programs funded by Los Angeles County. Comparisons were made between primary methamphetamine users and users whose primary drug was a substance other than methamphetamine. In that…

  8. Dopamine D(3) receptor antagonist SB-277011A inhibits methamphetamine self-administration and methamphetamine-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Higley, Amanda E; Kiefer, Stephen W; Li, Xia; Gaál, József; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Gardner, Eliot L

    2011-06-01

    We have previously reported that selective blockade of brain dopamine D(3) receptors by SB-277011A significantly attenuates cocaine self-administration and cocaine-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. In the present study, we investigated whether SB-277011A similarly inhibits methamphetamine self-administration and methamphetamine-induced reinstatement to drug-seeking behavior. Male Long-Evans rats were allowed to intravenously self-administer methamphetamine (0.05 mg/kg/infusion) under fixed-ratio 2 (FR2) or progressive-ratio (PR) reinforcement conditions, and some rats were tested for methamphetamine-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior after extinction of self-administration. The effects of SB-277011A on each of these methamphetamine-supported behaviors were then tested. Acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of SB-277011A failed to alter methamphetamine self-administration under FR2 reinforcement, but significantly lowered the break-point for methamphetamine self-administration under PR reinforcement. SB-277011A also significantly inhibited methamphetamine-triggered reinstatement of extinguished drug-seeking behavior. Overall, these data show that blockade of dopamine D(3) receptors by SB-277011A attenuates the rewarding and incentive motivational effects of methamphetamine in rats, supporting the development of selective dopamine D(3) antagonists for the treatment of methamphetamine addiction.

  9. Antiretrovirals, Methamphetamine, and HIV-1 Envelope Protein gp120 Compromise Neuronal Energy Homeostasis in Association with Various Degrees of Synaptic and Neuritic Damage

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Ana B.; Varano, Giuseppe P.; de Rozieres, Cyrus M.; Maung, Ricky; Catalan, Irene C.; Dowling, Cari C.; Sejbuk, Natalia E.; Hoefer, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infection frequently causes HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Evidence is accumulating that components of cART can themselves be neurotoxic upon long-term exposure. In addition, abuse of psychostimulants, such as methamphetamine, seems to aggravate HAND and compromise antiretroviral therapy. However, the combined effect of virus and recreational and therapeutic drugs on the brain is poorly understood. Therefore, we exposed mixed neuronal-glial cerebrocortical cells to antiretrovirals (ARVs) (zidovudine [AZT], nevirapine [NVP], saquinavir [SQV], and 118-D-24) of four different pharmacological categories and to methamphetamine and, in some experiments, the HIV-1 gp120 protein for 24 h and 7 days. Subsequently, we assessed neuronal injury by fluorescence microscopy, using specific markers for neuronal dendrites and presynaptic terminals. We also analyzed the disturbance of neuronal ATP levels and assessed the involvement of autophagy by using immunofluorescence and Western blotting. ARVs caused alterations of neurites and presynaptic terminals primarily during the 7-day incubation and depending on the specific compounds and their combinations with and without methamphetamine. Similarly, the loss of neuronal ATP was context specific for each of the drugs or combinations thereof, with and without methamphetamine or viral gp120. Loss of ATP was associated with activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and autophagy, which, however, failed to restore normal levels of neuronal ATP. In contrast, boosting autophagy with rapamycin prevented the long-term drop of ATP during exposure to cART in combination with methamphetamine or gp120. Our findings indicate that the overall positive effect of cART on HIV infection is accompanied by detectable neurotoxicity, which in turn may be aggravated by methamphetamine. PMID:26482305

  10. Antiretrovirals, Methamphetamine, and HIV-1 Envelope Protein gp120 Compromise Neuronal Energy Homeostasis in Association with Various Degrees of Synaptic and Neuritic Damage.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ana B; Varano, Giuseppe P; de Rozieres, Cyrus M; Maung, Ricky; Catalan, Irene C; Dowling, Cari C; Sejbuk, Natalia E; Hoefer, Melanie M; Kaul, Marcus

    2015-10-19

    HIV-1 infection frequently causes HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Evidence is accumulating that components of cART can themselves be neurotoxic upon long-term exposure. In addition, abuse of psychostimulants, such as methamphetamine, seems to aggravate HAND and compromise antiretroviral therapy. However, the combined effect of virus and recreational and therapeutic drugs on the brain is poorly understood. Therefore, we exposed mixed neuronal-glial cerebrocortical cells to antiretrovirals (ARVs) (zidovudine [AZT], nevirapine [NVP], saquinavir [SQV], and 118-D-24) of four different pharmacological categories and to methamphetamine and, in some experiments, the HIV-1 gp120 protein for 24 h and 7 days. Subsequently, we assessed neuronal injury by fluorescence microscopy, using specific markers for neuronal dendrites and presynaptic terminals. We also analyzed the disturbance of neuronal ATP levels and assessed the involvement of autophagy by using immunofluorescence and Western blotting. ARVs caused alterations of neurites and presynaptic terminals primarily during the 7-day incubation and depending on the specific compounds and their combinations with and without methamphetamine. Similarly, the loss of neuronal ATP was context specific for each of the drugs or combinations thereof, with and without methamphetamine or viral gp120. Loss of ATP was associated with activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and autophagy, which, however, failed to restore normal levels of neuronal ATP. In contrast, boosting autophagy with rapamycin prevented the long-term drop of ATP during exposure to cART in combination with methamphetamine or gp120. Our findings indicate that the overall positive effect of cART on HIV infection is accompanied by detectable neurotoxicity, which in turn may be aggravated by methamphetamine.

  11. Impaired memory and reduced sensitivity to the circadian period lengthening effects of methamphetamine in mice selected for high methamphetamine consumption.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Reid H J; Allen, Charles N; Derkach, Victor A; Phillips, Tamara J; Belknap, John K; Raber, Jacob

    2013-11-01

    Drug abuse runs in families suggesting the involvement of genetic risk factors. Differences in addiction-related neurobiological systems, including learning and memory and circadian rhythms, may exist prior to developing addiction. We characterized the cognitive phenotypes and the free-running circadian period of mouse lines selectively bred for high methamphetamine (MA) drinking (MA high drinking or MAHDR) and low MA drinking (MA low drinking or MALDR). MA-naïve MALDR mice showed spatial memory retention while MAHDR mice did not. MA-naïve MAHDR mice had elevated hippocampal levels of the AMPA receptor subunits GluA2 (old terminology: GluR2), but not GluA1 (old terminology: GluR1). There were no line differences in the free running period (τ) when only water was available. During a 25 mg/L MA solution access period (vs water), there was an increase in τ in MALDR but not MAHDR mice, although MAHDR mice consumed significantly more MA. During a 50 mg/L MA solution access period (vs water), both lines showed an increased τ. There was a positive correlation between MA consumption and τ from baseline in MALDR, but not MAHDR, mice. Thus, a heritable proclivity for elevated MA self-administration may be associated with impairments in hippocampus-dependent memory and reduced sensitivity to effects of MA on lengthening of the circadian period.

  12. Env-Specific IgA from Viremic HIV-Infected Subjects Compromises Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, María Julia; Ghiglione, Yanina; Falivene, Juliana; Laufer, Natalia; Holgado, María Pía; Socías, María Eugenia; Cahn, Pedro; Sued, Omar; Giavedoni, Luis; Salomón, Horacio; Gherardi, María Magdalena; Rodríguez, Ana María

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Elucidating the factors that modulate HIV-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) will help in understanding its role in HIV immunity. The aim of this study was to determine whether IgA could modify the magnitude of ADCC in HIV infection, abrogating its protective role. Plasma samples from 20 HIV-positive (HIV+) subjects enrolled during primary HIV infection (PHI), 10 chronically infected subjects (chronic), and 7 elite controllers (EC) were used. ADCC was determined by using a fluorometric ADCC assay, before and after removal of plasma IgA. Data were analyzed by using nonparametric statistics. ADCC was documented in 80% of PHI enrollment samples and in 100% of PHI 12-month, chronic, and EC samples; it peaked after acute infection, reached a plateau in chronic infection, and decreased after initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART). Significant associations between ADCC and disease progression were found only after removal of plasma IgA from 12-month PHI samples: the magnitude of ADCC not only increased after IgA removal but also correlated with CD4+ T-cell preservation. This work provides evidence that gp120-specific IgA was capable of modifying ADCC responses during natural HIV infection for the first time and adds to similar evidence provided in other settings. Furthermore, it underscores the complexity of the ADCC phenomenon and will help in an understanding of its underlying mechanisms. IMPORTANCE Although the induction of ADCC-mediating antibodies in HIV-infected subjects has been extensively documented, the association of these antibodies with protection from disease progression is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that plasma IgA is a factor capable of modifying the magnitude of IgG-mediated ADCC in HIV infection, mitigating its beneficial effect. These results help in understanding why previous studies failed to demonstrate correlations between ADCC and disease progression, and they also contribute to the notion that an

  13. Methamphetamine use and neuropsychiatric factors are associated with antiretroviral nonadherence

    PubMed Central

    Moore, David J.; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Woods, Steven Paul; Ellis, Ronald J.; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Heaton, Robert K.; Grant, Igor

    2012-01-01

    The present study assesses the impact of methamphetamine (METH) on antiretroviral (ART) adherence among HIV+ persons, as well as examines the contribution of neurocognitive impairment and other neuropsychiatric factors (i.e., major depressive disorder (MDD), Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD), and Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD)) for ART nonadherence. We examined HIV+ persons with DSM-IV-diagnosed lifetime history of METH abuse/dependence (HIV+/METH+; n = 67) as compared to HIV+ participants with no history of METH abuse/dependence (HIV+/METH−; n = 50). Ancillary analyses compared these groups with a small group of HIV+/METH+ persons with current METH abuse/dependence (HIV+/CU METH+; n = 8). Nonadherence was defined as self-report of any skipped ART dose in the last four days. Neurocognitive functioning was assessed with a comprehensive battery, covering seven neuropsychological domains. Lifetime METH diagnosis was associated with higher rates of detectable levels of plasma and CSF HIV RNA. When combing groups (i.e., METH+ and METH− participants), univariate analyses indicated co-occurring ADHD, ASPD, and MDD predicted ART nonadherence (p’s<0.10; not lifetime METH status or neurocognitive impairment). A significant multivariable model including these variables indicated that only MDD uniquely predicted ART nonadherence after controlling for the other variables (p<0.05). Ancillary analyses indicated that current METH users (use within 30 days) were significantly less adherent (50% prevalence of nonadherence) than lifetime METH+ users and HIV+/METH-participants, and that neurocognitive impairment was associated with nonadherence (p’s<0.05). METH use disorders are associated with worse HIV disease outcomes and ART medication nonadherence. Interventions often target substance use behaviors alone to enhance antiretroviral treatment outcomes; however, in addition to targeting substance use behaviors, interventions to improve ART adherence may also need to

  14. Stereoselective biodegradation of amphetamine and methamphetamine in river microcosms.

    PubMed

    Bagnall, John; Malia, Louis; Lubben, Anneke; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2013-10-01

    Here presented for the first time is the enantioselective biodegradation of amphetamine and methamphetamine in river microcosm bioreactors. The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that mechanisms governing the fate of amphetamine and methamphetamine in the environment are mostly stereoselective and biological in nature. Several bioreactors were studied over the duration of 15 days (i) in both biotic and abiotic conditions, (ii) in the dark or exposed to light and (iii) in the presence or absence of suspended particulate matter. Bioreactor samples were analysed using SPE-chiral-LC-(QTOF)MS methodology. This investigation has elucidated the fundamental mechanism for degradation of amphetamine and methamphetamine as being predominantly biological in origin. Furthermore, stereoselectivity and changes in enantiomeric fraction (EF) were only observed under biotic conditions. Neither amphetamine nor methamphetamine appeared to demonstrate adsorption to suspended particulate matter. Our experiments also demonstrated that amphetamine and methamphetamine were photo-stable. Illicit drugs are present in the environment at low concentrations but due to their pseudo-persistence and non-racemic behaviour, with two enantiomers revealing significantly different potency (and potentially different toxicity towards aquatic organisms) the risk posed by illicit drugs in the environment should not be under- or over-estimated. The above results demonstrate the need for re-evaluation of the procedures utilised in environmental risk assessment, which currently do not recognise the importance of the phenomenon of chirality in pharmacologically active compounds. PMID:23886544

  15. Stereoselective biodegradation of amphetamine and methamphetamine in river microcosms.

    PubMed

    Bagnall, John; Malia, Louis; Lubben, Anneke; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2013-10-01

    Here presented for the first time is the enantioselective biodegradation of amphetamine and methamphetamine in river microcosm bioreactors. The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that mechanisms governing the fate of amphetamine and methamphetamine in the environment are mostly stereoselective and biological in nature. Several bioreactors were studied over the duration of 15 days (i) in both biotic and abiotic conditions, (ii) in the dark or exposed to light and (iii) in the presence or absence of suspended particulate matter. Bioreactor samples were analysed using SPE-chiral-LC-(QTOF)MS methodology. This investigation has elucidated the fundamental mechanism for degradation of amphetamine and methamphetamine as being predominantly biological in origin. Furthermore, stereoselectivity and changes in enantiomeric fraction (EF) were only observed under biotic conditions. Neither amphetamine nor methamphetamine appeared to demonstrate adsorption to suspended particulate matter. Our experiments also demonstrated that amphetamine and methamphetamine were photo-stable. Illicit drugs are present in the environment at low concentrations but due to their pseudo-persistence and non-racemic behaviour, with two enantiomers revealing significantly different potency (and potentially different toxicity towards aquatic organisms) the risk posed by illicit drugs in the environment should not be under- or over-estimated. The above results demonstrate the need for re-evaluation of the procedures utilised in environmental risk assessment, which currently do not recognise the importance of the phenomenon of chirality in pharmacologically active compounds.

  16. The blood-brain barrier and methamphetamine: open sesame?

    PubMed Central

    Turowski, Patric; Kenny, Bridget-Ann

    2015-01-01

    The chemical and electrical microenvironment of neurons within the central nervous system is protected and segregated from the circulation by the vascular blood–brain barrier. This barrier operates on the level of endothelial cells and includes regulatory crosstalk with neighboring pericytes, astrocytes, and neurons. Within this neurovascular unit, the endothelial cells form a formidable, highly regulated barrier through the presence of inter-endothelial tight junctions, the absence of fenestrations, and the almost complete absence of fluid-phase transcytosis. The potent psychostimulant drug methamphetamine transiently opens the vascular blood–brain barrier through either or both the modulation of inter-endothelial junctions and the induction of fluid-phase transcytosis. Direct action of methamphetamine on the vascular endothelium induces acute opening of the blood-brain barrier. In addition, striatal effects of methamphetamine and resultant neuroinflammatory signaling can indirectly lead to chronic dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier may exacerbate the neuronal damage that occurs during methamphetamine abuse. However, this process also constitutes a rare example of agonist-induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and the adjunctive use of methamphetamine may present an opportunity to enhance delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the underlying neural tissue. PMID:25999807

  17. The blood-brain barrier and methamphetamine: open sesame?

    PubMed

    Turowski, Patric; Kenny, Bridget-Ann

    2015-01-01

    The chemical and electrical microenvironment of neurons within the central nervous system is protected and segregated from the circulation by the vascular blood-brain barrier. This barrier operates on the level of endothelial cells and includes regulatory crosstalk with neighboring pericytes, astrocytes, and neurons. Within this neurovascular unit, the endothelial cells form a formidable, highly regulated barrier through the presence of inter-endothelial tight junctions, the absence of fenestrations, and the almost complete absence of fluid-phase transcytosis. The potent psychostimulant drug methamphetamine transiently opens the vascular blood-brain barrier through either or both the modulation of inter-endothelial junctions and the induction of fluid-phase transcytosis. Direct action of methamphetamine on the vascular endothelium induces acute opening of the blood-brain barrier. In addition, striatal effects of methamphetamine and resultant neuroinflammatory signaling can indirectly lead to chronic dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier may exacerbate the neuronal damage that occurs during methamphetamine abuse. However, this process also constitutes a rare example of agonist-induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and the adjunctive use of methamphetamine may present an opportunity to enhance delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the underlying neural tissue. PMID:25999807

  18. METHAMPHETAMINE USE AMONG RURAL WHITE AND NATIVE AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS: AN APPLICATION OF THE STRESS PROCESS MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Eitle, David J.; McNulty Eitle, Tamela

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine use has been identified as having significant adverse health consequences, yet we know little about the correlates of its use. Additionally, research has found that Native Americans are at the highest risk for methamphetamine use. Our exploratory study, informed by the stress process model, examines stress and stress buffering factors associated with methamphetamine use among a cross-sectional sample of rural white and Native American adolescents (n=573). Results of logistic regression analyses revealed mixed support for the stress process model; while stress exposure and family methamphetamine use predicted past year methamphetamine use, the inclusion of these variables failed to attenuate the association between race and past year use. PMID:25445505

  19. Childhood histories of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders in Japanese methamphetamine and inhalant abusers: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Kamijo, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Akiko; Iseki, Eizo; Hirayasu, Yoshio

    2005-02-01

    The present study examined childhood histories of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in 54 methamphetamine and 12 inhalant abusers using the Wender Utah Rating Scale. The inhalant abusers experienced initial drinking at a younger age than methamphetamine abusers (P=0.038). The Wender Utah Rating Scale score was significantly higher in the inhalant abusers than in the methamphetamine abusers (P=0.013) although 83.3% of inhalant and 55.6% of methamphetamine abusers had higher scores than the cut-off for ADHD. These findings suggest that drug abuse is associated with childhood ADHD, and that inhalant abusers have a higher incidence of childhood ADHD than methamphetamine abusers.

  20. Elevated baseline serum glutamate as a pharmacometabolomic biomarker for acamprosate treatment outcome in alcohol-dependent subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nam, H W; Karpyak, V M; Hinton, D J; Geske, J R; Ho, A M C; Prieto, M L; Biernacka, J M; Frye, M A; Weinshilboum, R M; Choi, D-S

    2015-01-01

    Acamprosate has been widely used since the Food and Drug Administration approved the medication for treatment of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in 2004. Although the detailed molecular mechanism of acamprosate remains unclear, it has been largely known that acamprosate inhibits glutamate action in the brain. However, AUD is a complex and heterogeneous disorder. Thus, biomarkers are required to prescribe this medication to patients who will have the highest likelihood of responding positively. To identify pharmacometabolomic biomarkers of acamprosate response, we utilized serum samples from 120 alcohol-dependent subjects, including 71 responders (maintained continuous abstinence) and 49 non-responders (any alcohol use) during 12 weeks of acamprosate treatment. Notably, baseline serum glutamate levels were significantly higher in responders compared with non-responders. Importantly, serum glutamate levels of responders are normalized after acamprosate treatment, whereas there was no significant glutamate change in non-responders. Subsequent functional studies in animal models revealed that, in the absence of alcohol, acamprosate activates glutamine synthetase, which synthesizes glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. These results suggest that acamprosate reduces serum glutamate levels for those who have elevated baseline serum glutamate levels among responders. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that elevated baseline serum glutamate levels are a potential biomarker associated with positive acamprosate response, which is an important step towards development of a personalized approach to treatment for AUD. PMID:26285131

  1. Urinary pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine and its metabolite, amphetamine following controlled oral administration to humans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Insook; Oyler, Jonathan M; Moolchan, Eric T; Cone, Edward J; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2004-12-01

    Methamphetamine is widely abused for its euphoric effects. Our objectives were to characterize the urinary pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine and amphetamine after controlled methamphetamine administration to humans and to improve the interpretation of urine drug test results. Participants (n = 8) received 4 daily 10-mg (low) oral doses of sustained-release (d)-methamphetamine hydrochloride within 7 days. After 4 weeks, 5 participants received 4 daily 20-mg (high) oral doses. All urine specimens were collected during the study. Methamphetamine and amphetamine were measured by GC-MS/PCI. Maximum excretion rates ranged from 403 to 4919 microg/h for methamphetamine and 59 to 735 microg/h for amphetamine with no relationship between dose and excretion rate. The mean molar percentage of dose in the urine as total methamphetamine and amphetamine were 57.5 +/- 21.7% (low dose) and 40.9 +/- 8.5% (high dose). Mean urinary terminal elimination half-lives across doses were 23.6 +/- 6.6 hours for methamphetamine and 20.7 +/- 7.3 hours for amphetamine. Methamphetamine renal clearance across doses was 175 +/- 102 mL/min. The mean amphetamine/methamphetamine percentage ratio based on the area under the urinary excretion-time curve increased over time from 13.4 +/- 6.5% to 35.7 +/- 26.6%. Slow urinary excretion results in drug accumulation and increases in detection time windows. Our findings also support the presence of an active renal excretion mechanism for methamphetamine.

  2. Sustained-Release Methylphenidate in a Randomized Trial of Treatment of Methamphetamine Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Walter; Chang, Linda; Hillhouse, Maureen; Ang, Alfonso; Striebel, Joan; Jenkins, Jessica; Hernandez, Jasmin; Olaer, Mary; Mooney, Larissa; Reed, Susan; Fukaya, Erin; Kogachi, Shannon; Alicata, Daniel; Holmes, Nataliya; Esagoff, Asher

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims No effective pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine (MA) use disorder has yet been found. This study evaluated sustained-release methylphenidate (MPH-SR) compared with placebo (PLA) for treatment of MA use disorder in people also undergoing behavioural support and motivational incentives. Design This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design with MPH-SR or PLA provided for 10 weeks (active phase) followed by 4 weeks of single-blind PLA. Twice-weekly clinic visits, weekly group counseling (CBT), and motivational incentives (MI) for MA-negative urine drug screens (UDS) were included. Setting Treatment sites were in Los Angeles, California (LA) and Honolulu, Hawaii (HH), USA. Participants 110 MA-dependent (via DSM-IV) participants (LA = 90; HH = 20). Measurements The primary outcome measure is self-reported days of MA use during the last 30 days of the active phase. Included in the current analyses are drug use (UDS and self-report), retention, craving, compliance (dosing, CBT, MI), adverse events, and treatment satisfaction. Findings No difference was found between treatment groups in self-reported days of MA use during the last 30 days of the active phase (p=0.22). In planned secondary outcomes analyses, however, the MPH group had fewer self-reported MA use days from baseline through the active phase compared with the PLA group (p=0.05). The MPH group also had lower craving scores and fewer marijuana-positive UDS than the PLA group in the last 30 days of the active phase. The two groups had similar retention, other drug use, adverse events, and treatment satisfaction. Conclusions Methylphenidate may lead to a reduction in concurrent methamphetamine use when provided as treatment for patients undergoing behavioural support for moderate to severe methamphetamine use disorder but this requires confirmation. PMID:24825486

  3. Agmatine: identification and inhibition of methamphetamine, kappa opioid, and cannabinoid withdrawal in planarians.

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Gerber, Kristin; Ding, Zhe; Roth, Christopher; Raffa, Robert B

    2008-12-01

    Agmatine blocks morphine physical dependence in mammals, but its effects on withdrawal signs caused by other abused drugs have been less studied. One of the reasons is that withdrawal to some of these drugs is difficult to quantify in mammals. An alternative to mammals is planarians, a type of flatworm. Planarians possess mammalian-like neurotransmitters and display withdrawal from amphetamines, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, cocaine, and opioids. The withdrawal is manifested as a reduction in locomotor behavior following discontinuation of drug exposure. In the present study, our goal was to identify agmatine in planarians and to determine if planarians exposed to agmatine display withdrawal to methamphetamine, a cannabinoid receptor agonist (WIN 55,212-2), or a kappa-opioid receptor agonist (U-50,488H). Neurochemical experiments revealed that the concentration of agmatine in planarians was 185 +/- 33.7 pmol per mg of planarian weight (dry weight). In behavioral experiments, withdrawal (i.e., reduced locomotor activity) was observed when planarians exposed to each drug (10 microM) for 60 min were placed into water. The withdrawal was attenuated when methamphetamine- or U-50,488H-exposed planarians were tested in agmatine (100 microM). Withdrawal was inhibited similarly when planarians coexposed to agmatine (100 microM) plus methamphetamine (10 microM), WIN 55,212-2 (10 microM), or U-50,488H (10 microM) were tested in water. Arginine, the metabolic precursor to agmatine, was ineffective. Our results identify endogenous agmatine in planarians and demonstrate that agmatine exposure blocks withdrawal to three different drugs in planarians. This suggests that a change in agmatine signaling is a common mechanism in the withdrawal caused by these drugs, at least in planarians.

  4. A Qualitative Exploration of Trajectories Among Suburban Users of Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Boeri, Miriam Williams; Harbry, Liam; Gibson, David

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this exploratory study was to gain a better understanding of methamphetamine use among suburban users. We know very little about the mechanisms of initiation and trajectory patterns of methamphetamine use among this under-researched and hidden population. This study employed qualitative methods to examine the drug career of suburban methamphetamine users. Analysis of in-depth interviews with 48 former and current users indicated that suburban users often initiate and continue use for functional purposes. Turning points into dysfunctional use included loss of work, broken relationships, and stress related to a suburban lifestyle. The route to cessation included frequent relapses. Findings call for treatment and prevention programs targeted for specific patterns of suburban use. PMID:21552386

  5. The Effects of Locus Coeruleus and Norepinephrine in Methamphetamine Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ferrucci, Michela; Giorgi, Filippo S; Bartalucci, Alessia; Busceti, Carla L; Fornai, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The activity of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons has been extensively investigated in a variety of behavioural states. In fact this norepinephrine (NE)-containing nucleus modulates many physiological and pathological conditions including the sleep-waking cycle, movement disorders, mood alterations, convulsive seizures, and the effects of drugs such as psychostimulants and opioids. This review focuses on the modulation exerted by central NE pathways on the behavioural and neurotoxic effects produced by the psychostimulant methamphetamine, essentially the modulation of the activity of mesencephalic dopamine (DA) neurons. In fact, although NE in itself mediates some behavioural effects induced by methamphetamine, NE modulation of DA release is pivotal for methamphetamine-induced behavioural states and neurotoxicity. These interactions are discussed on the basis of the state of the art of the functional neuroanatomy of central NE- and DA systems. Emphasis is given to those brain sites possessing a remarkable overlapping of both neurotransmitters. PMID:23814540

  6. Methamphetamine use in Central Germany: protocol for a qualitative study exploring requirements and challenges in healthcare from the professionals' perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Laura; Schumann, Nadine; Fankhaenel, Thomas; Thiel, Carolin; Klement, Andreas; Richter, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The synthetic drug methamphetamine with its high addiction potential is associated with substantial adverse health effects. In Germany, especially Central Germany, the increase in the consumption of methamphetamine has exceeded that of other illegal drugs. The treatment system and service providers are facing new challenges due to this rise in consumption. This qualitative study will explore the demand created by the increasing healthcare needs of methamphetamine-addicted persons in Central Germany, and the difficulty of rehabilitating addicted people. Methods and analysis The collection of empirical data will take place in a consecutive, two-stage process. In the first part of data collection, the experiences and perspectives of 40 professionals from numerous healthcare sectors for methamphetamine-addicted persons will be explored with the help of semistructured face-to-face interviews and probed by the research team. These findings will be discussed in 2 focus groups consisting of the participants of the face-to-face interviews; these group discussions comprise the second part of the data collection process. The interviews will be audio recorded, transcribed, and then subjected to qualitative content analysis. Ethics and dissemination All interviewees will receive comprehensive written information about the study, and sign a declaration of consent prior to the interview. The study will comply rigorously with data protection legislation. The research team has obtained the approval of the Ethical Review Committee at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany. The results of the study will be published in high-quality, peer-reviewed international journals, presented at several congresses and used to design follow-up research projects. Trial registration number VfD_METH_MD_15_003600. PMID:27256092

  7. Role for Rab10 in Methamphetamine-Induced Behavior.

    PubMed

    Vanderwerf, Scott M; Buck, David C; Wilmarth, Phillip A; Sears, Leila M; David, Larry L; Morton, David B; Neve, Kim A

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts are specialized, cholesterol-rich membrane compartments that help to organize transmembrane signaling by restricting or promoting interactions with subsets of the cellular proteome. The hypothesis driving this study was that identifying proteins whose relative abundance in rafts is altered by the abused psychostimulant methamphetamine would contribute to fully describing the pathways involved in acute and chronic effects of the drug. Using a detergent-free method for preparing rafts from rat brain striatal membranes, we identified density gradient fractions enriched in the raft protein flotillin but deficient in calnexin and the transferrin receptor, markers of non-raft membranes. Dopamine D1- and D2-like receptor binding activity was highly enriched in the raft fractions, but pretreating rats with methamphetamine (2 mg/kg) once or repeatedly for 11 days did not alter the distribution of the receptors. LC-MS analysis of the protein composition of raft fractions from rats treated once with methamphetamine or saline identified methamphetamine-induced changes in the relative abundance of 23 raft proteins, including the monomeric GTP-binding protein Rab10, whose abundance in rafts was decreased 2.1-fold by acute methamphetamine treatment. Decreased raft localization was associated with a selective decrease in the abundance of Rab10 in a membrane fraction that includes synaptic vesicles and endosomes. Inhibiting Rab10 activity by pan-neuronal expression of a dominant-negative Rab10 mutant in Drosophila melanogaster decreased methamphetamine-induced activity and mortality and decreased caffeine-stimulated activity but not mortality, whereas inhibiting Rab10 activity selectively in cholinergic neurons had no effect. These results suggest that activation and redistribution of Rab10 is critical for some of the behavioral effects of psychostimulants.

  8. Role for Rab10 in Methamphetamine-Induced Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Vanderwerf, Scott M.; Buck, David C.; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; Sears, Leila M.; David, Larry L.; Morton, David B.; Neve, Kim A.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts are specialized, cholesterol-rich membrane compartments that help to organize transmembrane signaling by restricting or promoting interactions with subsets of the cellular proteome. The hypothesis driving this study was that identifying proteins whose relative abundance in rafts is altered by the abused psychostimulant methamphetamine would contribute to fully describing the pathways involved in acute and chronic effects of the drug. Using a detergent-free method for preparing rafts from rat brain striatal membranes, we identified density gradient fractions enriched in the raft protein flotillin but deficient in calnexin and the transferrin receptor, markers of non-raft membranes. Dopamine D1- and D2-like receptor binding activity was highly enriched in the raft fractions, but pretreating rats with methamphetamine (2 mg/kg) once or repeatedly for 11 days did not alter the distribution of the receptors. LC-MS analysis of the protein composition of raft fractions from rats treated once with methamphetamine or saline identified methamphetamine-induced changes in the relative abundance of 23 raft proteins, including the monomeric GTP-binding protein Rab10, whose abundance in rafts was decreased 2.1-fold by acute methamphetamine treatment. Decreased raft localization was associated with a selective decrease in the abundance of Rab10 in a membrane fraction that includes synaptic vesicles and endosomes. Inhibiting Rab10 activity by pan-neuronal expression of a dominant-negative Rab10 mutant in Drosophila melanogaster decreased methamphetamine-induced activity and mortality and decreased caffeine-stimulated activity but not mortality, whereas inhibiting Rab10 activity selectively in cholinergic neurons had no effect. These results suggest that activation and redistribution of Rab10 is critical for some of the behavioral effects of psychostimulants. PMID:26291453

  9. The Methamphetamine Problem in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Rachel; Mooney, Larissa; Rawson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Significant public health problems associated with methamphetamine (MA) production and use in the United States have emerged over the past 25 years. Although the popular press (Newsweek, Aug 8, 2008), has called MA “America’s Most Dangerous Drug” there has been considerable controversy about the size of the problem. Epidemiological indicators have given a mixed picture. National surveys of the adult U.S. population and school-based populations have consistently been used to support the position that MA use is a relatively minor concern (NSDUH, 2006; Johnston & O’Malley, 2007). However, many other data sources, including law-enforcement groups, welfare agencies, substance abuse treatment program admission data, data on criminal justice populations, and state/county executives indicate that MA is a very significant public health problem for many communities throughout much of the country (NDIC, 2007b; NACO, 2005, 2006; NIDA CEWG, 2007). In this article, we describe (1) the historical underpinnings of the MA problem, (2) trends in the epidemiological nature of the MA problem, (3) key subgroups at risk for MA problems, (4) the health and social factors associated with MA use, (5) interventions available for addressing the MA problem, and (5) lessons learned related to the MA problem. PMID:20070191

  10. Chronic methamphetamine increases fighting in mice.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Boris P; Schindler, Charles W; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2004-02-01

    A propensity for violent behaviors to develop in chronic methamphetamine (METH) abusers has been noted. The idea that increased aggressiveness might result from chronic METH administration was tested in mice after chronic (long-term intermittent, 8 weeks) or single exposures to the drug. A single injection of METH (6 mg/kg) did not augment fighting. In contrast, chronic METH administration significantly increased the number of animals that initiated bite attacks. This regimen also shortened the latency before the first attack. Latency before the first attack was shorter at 20 h after the METH injection than at 15 min after injection. Locomotor activity was not different at 20 h after METH injection, indicating that increased fighting was not secondary to METH-induced hyperactivity. METH-induced increases in fighting were not related to the duration of persistent sniffing after the initial encounter with an intruder since the duration of this behavior was significantly increased at 15 min after METH but not at 20 h post drug. These results indicate that repeated injections of METH can increase fighting behaviors and also alter social interactions in mice. Thus, intermittent administration of METH might be useful as a pharmacological model to study the biochemical and molecular bases of aggressiveness.

  11. Histochemical demonstration of methamphetamine by immunocytochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, I; Mukaida, M; Yoshii, T; Suyama, H

    1987-05-01

    A method for the demonstration of methamphetamine (MA) by immunocytochemistry was established. The tissues of intoxicated mice, administered various amounts of MA in single doses of from 0.01 to 1 mg of MA-HCl, were fixed in glutaraldehyde-containing fixatives. Cryostat and paraffin slices gave a positive reaction of MA localization by staining the brain, liver, kidney, lung, stomach, spleen, and so forth, with the aid of the indirect immunoperoxidase technique. Those of animals administered a single dose of 0.1 mg or more (over 3 to 4 mg/kg--the usual dose of MA in acute intoxication death in forensic medicine), in particular, gave a strong strong reaction, so that the diagnosis of MA intoxication can be performed by macroscopic observation of stained slices. The histochemical diagnosis of MA intoxication in clinical toxicology and pathology might be regarded as a useful tool, especially in forensic pathology. The following cells gave a strong positive reaction: nerve cells and myelin sheaths, hepatocytes, epithelial cells of the distal part of the renal tubule and of the collecting tubule, alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells of the lung, chief and parietal cells of the gastric gland, capillaries of the renal glomerulus, macrophages in the blood and tissues, and striated muscle cells including cardiocytes. The morphological evidence of the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of MA can be determined at the cellular level by immunocytochemistry.

  12. Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) and d-methamphetamine improve visuospatial associative memory, but not spatial working memory, in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Wright, MJ; Vandewater, SA; Angrish, D; Dickerson, TJ; Taffe, MA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The novel cathinone derivative 4-methylmethcathinone (4-MMC; mephedrone) is increasingly popular with recreational users. Little scientific information is available but users report both entactogen-like and classic stimulant-like subjective properties. A recent study in humans reported psychomotor speed improvement after intranasal 4-MMC suggesting classic stimulant properties. Limitations of the user group (which was impaired on some tasks) prompt controlled laboratory investigation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Adult male rhesus monkeys were trained to perform tasks from the non-human primate Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery, which assess spatial working memory, visuospatial associative memory, learning and motivation for food reward. Test of bimanual motor coordination and manual tracking were also included. The subjects were challenged with 0.178–0.56 mg·kg−1 4-MMC and 0.056–0.56 mg·kg−1 d-methamphetamine (MA), i.m., in randomized order for behavioural evaluation. KEY RESULTS A pronounced improvement in visuospatial memory and learning was observed after the 0.32 mg·kg−1 dose of each compound, this effect was confirmed with subsequent repetition of these conditions. Spatial working memory was not improved by either drug, and the progressive ratio, bimanual motor and rotating turntable tasks were all disrupted in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These studies show that 4-MMC produces behavioural effects, including improvements in complex spatial memory and learning that are in large part similar to those of MA in non-human primates. Thus, the data suggest that the effects of 4-MMC in monkeys can be classified with classical psychomotor stimulants. PMID:22748013

  13. Differential behavioral responses of the spontaneously hypertensive rat to methylphenidate and methamphetamine: lack of a rewarding effect of repeated methylphenidate treatment.

    PubMed

    dela Peña, Ike; Lee, Jong Chan; Lee, Han Lim; Woo, Tae Seon; Lee, Hae Chang; Sohn, Aee Ree; Cheong, Jae Hoon

    2012-04-18

    Several questions remain unanswered concerning the effects of long-term methylphenidate treatment in individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It has been speculated that repeated methylphenidate treatment may facilitate abuse of the drug or psychological dependence. In the present study, we conducted conditioned place preference (CPP) tests to investigate whether the repeated treatment of methylphenidate results to greater "liking" of the drug. We compared the effect of methylphenidate with that of methamphetamine, a drug with high abuse and dependence liability; also used as a treatment of ADHD. Prior to CPP tests, adolescent spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) (putative rodent model of ADHD) and Wistar rats (strain used to represent the "normal" heterogeneous population) were administered intraperitoneally with methylphenidate (1.25, 5 and 20 mg/kg) or methamphetamine (1.25 and 5 mg/kg) for 14 days in their home cages. CPP tests were commenced and rats were conditioned with the two stimulants at the doses stated. We found that (1) repeated administration of methylphenidate and methamphetamine was rewarding in Wistar rats (2) stimulant-treated SHR showed CPP only to methamphetamine but not to methylphenidate. The observation that Wistar rats, but not SHR showed CPP to methylphenidate indicates vulnerability of "normal" individuals to methylphenidate abuse and dependence following repeated exposure or administration of the drug. The findings in SHR suggest the safety of methylphenidate as an ADHD intervention insofar as its behavioral effects are compared with those of methamphetamine, and to the extent that the SHR appropriately models ADHD in humans.

  14. Methamphetamines: use and trafficking in the Tucson-Nogales area.

    PubMed

    Glittenberg, J; Anderson, C

    1999-12-01

    A national increase in the use of methamphetamine, a cheap, accessible, and dangerous drug, prompted the National Institute on Drug Addiction to sponsor an ethnographic study in the Tucson-Nogales area. This area has experienced a rapid rise in methamphetamine (also known as meth, speed, crank, smoke, or crystal ice) use during the past 3 years. Mexican and Canadian borders are ports of entry for meth and precursor substances, and home manufacturing has increased substantially. The dual consequences of overdose and addiction result in devastating long-term psychological and physiological problems. Increased law enforcement and citizen awareness in controlling the "epidemic" are key elements in curbing the problem.

  15. Segmental hair analysis and estimation of methamphetamine use pattern.

    PubMed

    Han, Eunyoung; Yang, Heejin; Seol, Ilung; Park, Yunshin; Lee, Bongwoo; Song, Joon Myong

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the results of segmental hair analysis can be used to estimate patterns of methamphetamine (MA) use. Segmental hair analysis for MA and amphetamine (AP) was performed. Hair was cut into the hair root, consecutive 1 cm length segments and 1-4 cm length segments. Whole hair was also analyzed. The hair samples were incubated for 20 h in 1 mL methanol containing 1 % hydrochloric acid after washing the hair samples. Hair extracts were evaporated and derivatization was performed using trifluoroacetic anhydride in ethylacetate at 65 °C for 30 min. Derivatized extract was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The 15 subjects consisted of 13 males and two females and their ages ranged from 25 to 42 (mean, 32). MA and AP concentrations in the whole hair ranged from 3.00 to 105.10 ng/mg (mean, 34.53) and from 0.05 to 4.76 ng/mg (mean, 2.42), respectively. Based on the analysis of the 1 cm length segmental hair, the results were interpreted in a way to distinguish between continuous use of MA (n = 10), no recent but previous use of MA (n = 3), and recent but no previous use of MA (n = 2). Furthermore, the individuals were interpreted as light, moderate, and heavy users based on concentration ranges previously published.

  16. Music and Methamphetamine: Conditioned Cue-induced Increases in Locomotor Activity and Dopamine Release in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Polston, J.E.; Rubbinaccio, H.Y.; Morra, J.T.; Sell, E.M.; Glick, S.D.

    2011-01-01

    Associations between drugs of abuse and cues facilitate the acquisition and maintenance of addictive behaviors. Although significant research has been done to elucidate the role that simple discriminative or discrete conditioned stimuli (e.g., a tone or a light) play in addiction, less is known about complex environmental cues. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of a musical conditioned stimulus by assessing locomotor activity and in vivo microdialysis. Two groups of rats were given non-contingent injections of methamphetamine (1.0 mg/kg) or vehicle and placed in standard conditioning chambers. During these conditioning sessions both groups were exposed to a continuous conditioned stimulus, in the form of a musical selection (“Four” by Miles Davis) played repeatedly for ninety minutes. After seven consecutive conditioning days subjects were given one day of rest, and subsequently tested for locomotor activity or dopamine release in the absence of drug while the musical conditioned stimulus was continually present. The brain regions examined included the basolateral amygdala, nucleus accumbens, and prefrontal cortex. The results show that music is an effective contextual conditioned stimulus, significantly increasing locomotor activity after repeated association with methamphetamine. Furthermore, this musical conditioned stimulus significantly increased extracellular dopamine levels in the basolateral amygdala and nucleus accumbens. These findings support other evidence showing the importance of these brain regions in conditioned learning paradigms, and demonstrate that music is an effective conditioned stimulus warranting further investigation. PMID:21145911

  17. Dissociations between interval timing and intertemporal choice following administration of fluoxetine, cocaine, or methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronner, Sarah R.; Meck, Warren. H.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of our study was to characterize the relationship between intertemporal choice and interval timing, including determining how drugs that modulate brain serotonin and dopamine levels influence these two processes. In Experiment 1, rats were tested on a standard 40-s peak-interval procedure following administration of fluoxetine (3, 5, or 8 mg/kg) or vehicle to assess basic effects on interval timing. In Experiment 2, rats were tested in a novel behavioral paradigm intended to simultaneously examine interval timing and impulsivity. Rats performed a variant of the bi-peak procedure using 10-s and 40-s target durations with an additional “defection” lever that provided the possibility of a small, immediate reward. Timing functions remained relatively intact, and ‘patience’ across subjects correlated with peak times, indicating a negative relationship between ‘patience’ and clock speed. We next examined the effects of fluoxetine (5 mg/kg), cocaine (15 mg/kg), or methamphetamine (1 mg/kg) on task performance. Fluoxetine reduced impulsivity as measured by defection time without corresponding changes in clock speed. In contrast, cocaine and methamphetamine both increased impulsivity and clock speed. Thus, variations in timing may mediate intertemporal choice via dopaminergic inputs. However, a separate, serotonergic system can affect intertemporal choice without affecting interval timing directly. PMID:24135569

  18. Selective Enhancement of Dopamine Release in the Ventral Pallidum of Methamphetamine-Sensitized Mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Drugs of abuse induce sensitization, which is defined as enhanced response to additional drug following a period of withdrawal. Sensitization occurs in both humans and animal models of drug reinforcement and contributes substantially to the addictive nature of drugs of abuse, because it is thought to represent enhanced motivational wanting for drug. The ventral pallidum, a key member of the reward pathway, contributes to behaviors associated with reward, such as sensitization. Dopamine inputs to the ventral pallidum have not been directly characterized. Here we provide anatomical, neurochemical, and behavioral evidence demonstrating that dopamine terminals in the ventral pallidum contribute to reward in mice. We report subregional differences in dopamine release, measured by ex vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry: rostral ventral pallidum exhibits increased dopamine release and uptake compared with caudal ventral pallidum, which is correlated with tissue expression of dopaminergic proteins. We then subjected mice to a methamphetamine-sensitization protocol to investigate the contribution of dopaminergic projections to the region in reward related behavior. Methamphetamine-sensitized animals displayed a 508% and 307% increase in baseline dopamine release in the rostral and caudal ventral pallidum, respectively. Augmented dopamine release in the rostral ventral pallidum was significantly correlated with sensitized locomotor activity. Moreover, this presynaptic dopaminergic plasticity occurred only in the ventral pallidum and not in the ventral or dorsal striatum, suggesting that dopamine release in the ventral pallidum may be integrally important to drug-induced sensitization. PMID:27501345

  19. MDMA, methamphetamine, and CYP2D6 pharmacogenetics: what is clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Rafael; Yubero-Lahoz, Samanta; Pardo-Lozano, Ricardo; Farré, Magí

    2012-01-01

    In vitro human studies show that the metabolism of most amphetamine-like psychostimulants is regulated by the polymorphic cytochrome P450 isozyme CYP2D6. Two compounds, methamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), were selected as archetypes to discuss the translation and clinical significance of in vitro to in vivo findings. Both compounds were chosen based on their differential interaction with CYP2D6 and their high abuse prevalence in society. Methamphetamine behaves as both a weak substrate and competitive inhibitor of CYP2D6, while MDMA acts as a high affinity substrate and potent mechanism-based inhibitor (MBI) of the enzyme. The MBI behavior of MDMA on CYP2D6 implies that subjects, irrespective of their genotype/phenotype, are phenocopied to the poor metabolizer (PM) phenotype. The fraction of metabolic clearance regulated by CYP2D6 for both drugs is substantially lower than expected from in vitro studies. Other isoenzymes of cytochrome P450 and a relevant contribution of renal excretion play a part in their clearance. These facts tune down the potential contribution of CYP2D6 polymorphism in the clinical outcomes of both substances. Globally, the clinical relevance of CYP2D6 polymorphism is lower than that predicted by in vitro studies. PMID:23162568

  20. Mir143-BBC3 cascade reduces microglial survival via interplay between apoptosis and autophagy: Implications for methamphetamine-mediated neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Shen, Kai; Bai, Ying; Lv, Xuan; Huang, Rongrong; Zhang, Wei; Chao, Jie; Nguyen, Lan K; Hua, Jun; Gan, Guangming; Hu, Gang; Yao, Honghong

    2016-09-01

    BBC3 (BCL2 binding component 3) is a known apoptosis inducer; however, its role in microglial survival remains poorly understood. In addition to the classical transcription factor TRP53, Mir143 is involved in BBC3 expression at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we identify unique roles of Mir143-BBC3 in mediating microglial survival via the regulation of the interplay between apoptosis and autophagy. Autophagy inhibition accelerated methamphetamine-induced apoptosis, whereas autophagy induction attenuated the decrease in microglial survival. Moreover, anti-Mir143-dependent BBC3 upregulation reversed the methamphetamine-induced decrease in microglial survival via the regulation of apoptosis and autophagy. The in vivo relevance of these findings was confirmed in mouse models, which demonstrated that the microinjection of anti-Mir143 into the hippocampus ameliorated the methamphetamine-induced decrease in microglia as well as that observed in heterozygous Mir143(+/-) mice. These findings provide new insight regarding the specific contributions of Mir143-BBC3 to microglial survival in the context of drug abuse. PMID:27464000

  1. Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor Availability Is Associated with Executive Function in Healthy Controls but Not Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Michael E.; Dean, Andy C.; Mandelkern, Mark A.; London, Edythe D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the striatum has been linked with executive function in healthy individuals, and is below control levels among drug addicts, possibly contributing to diminished executive function in the latter group. This study tested for an association of striatal D2/D3 receptor availability with a measure of executive function among research participants who met DSM-IV criteria for methamphetamine dependence. Methods Methamphetamine users and non-user controls (n = 18 per group) completed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and positron emission tomography with [18F]fallypride. Results The methamphetamine users displayed significantly lower striatal D2/D3 receptor availability on average than controls after controlling for age and education (p = 0.008), but they did not register greater proportions of either perseverative or non-perseverative errors when controlling for education (both ps ≥ 0.622). The proportion of non-perseverative, but not perseverative, errors was negatively correlated with striatal D2/D3 receptor availability among controls (r = -0.588, p = 0.010), but not methamphetamine users (r = 0.281, p = 0.258), and the group-wise interaction was significant (p = 0.030). Conclusions These results suggest that cognitive flexibility, as measured by perseverative errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, is not determined by signaling through striatal D2/D3 receptors in healthy controls, and that in stimulant abusers, who have lower D2/D3 receptor availability, compensation can effectively maintain other executive functions, which are associated with D2/D3 receptor signaling in controls. PMID:26657223

  2. Duration of detection of methamphetamine in hair after abstinence.

    PubMed

    Suwannachom, Natiprada; Thananchai, Thiwaphorn; Junkuy, Anongphan; O'Brien, Timothy E; Sribanditmongkol, Pongruk

    2015-09-01

    Researchers in the field of hair analysis have known for at least two decades that test results for many chemical compounds remain positive for a considerable period of time after subjects have reported cessation of use. These findings were generally based on small sample populations or individual case studies. Within the last decade, hair analyses of larger populations have investigated the phenomenon of residual positives in abstinent individuals in order to determine the period of time required for various compounds to present negative hair test results at internationally accepted cutoff levels. Such data has primarily been used to establish guidelines for retesting former abusers of illicit drugs in order to evaluate claims of abstinence. To date, research has focused on cocaine and opiates. The present study is the first to examine the duration of detection of methamphetamine (MA) and its metabolite amphetamine (AP) in the hair of chronic MA users who recently ceased their consumption of the drug. The study population (n=63) consisted of inpatients at a hospital drug rehabilitation program in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Drug taking behavior was collected by personal interview at the time of enrollment. Subjects provided hair samples at approximately monthly intervals for MA and AP analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry at 0.2ng/mg cutoff levels. The correlation of baseline MA and AP concentrations in hair at the beginning of abstinence with corresponding duration of detection indicated great individual variability for the rate of clearance of MA and AP from hair. In regard to duration of detection, the majority of chronic MA users remained MA positive for up to about 90 days of reported abstinence, but by 120 days, the detection rate had fallen to about 16%. All subjects tested negative for MA after 153 days of abstinence. For AP, the limit of the duration of detection was reached at 106 days. With the adoption of a margin of safety to compensate for

  3. Response of limbic neurotensin systems to methamphetamine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Hanson, G R; Hoonakker, A J; Alburges, M E; McFadden, L M; Robson, C M; Frankel, P S

    2012-02-17

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is personally and socially devastating. Although effects of METH on dopamine (DA) systems likely contribute to its highly addictive nature, no medications are approved to treat METH dependence. Thus, we and others have studied the METH-induced responses of neurotensin (NT) systems. NT is associated with inhibitory feedback action on DA projections, and NT levels are elevated in both the nucleus accumbens and dorsal striatum after noncontingent treatment with high doses of METH. In the present study, we used a METH self-administration (SA) model (linked to lever pressing) to demonstrate that substitution of an NT agonist for METH, while not significantly affecting motor activity, dramatically reduced lever pressing but was not self-administered per se. We also found that nucleus accumbens NT levels were elevated via a D1 mechanism after five sessions in rats self-administering METH (SAM), with a lesser effect in corresponding yoked rats. Extended (15 daily sessions) exposure to METH SA manifested similar NT responses; however, more detailed analyses revealed (i) 15 days of METH SA significantly elevated NT levels in the nucleus accumbens shell and dorsal striatum, but not the nucleus accumbens core, with a lesser effect in the corresponding yoked METH rats; (ii) the elevation of NT in both the nucleus accumbens shell and dorsal striatum significantly correlated with the total amount of METH received in the self-administering, but not the corresponding yoked METH rats; and (iii) an NT agonist blocked, but an NT antagonist did not alter, lever-pressing behavior on day 15 in SAM rats. After 5 days in SAM animals, NT levels were also elevated in the ventral tegmental area, but not frontal cortex of rats self-administering METH.

  4. A VACCINE AGAINST METHAMPHETAMINE ATTENUATES ITS BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyun Y.; Kosten, Therese A.; Lopez, Angel Y.; Kinsey, Berma M.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Orson, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Vaccines have treatment potential for methamphetamine (MA) addiction. We tested whether a conjugate vaccine against MA (succinyl-methamphetamine–keyhole limpet hemocyanin carrier protein; SMA-KLH) would generate MA antibodies and alter MA-induced behaviors. METHODS Mice were injected with SMA-KLH and received booster administrations 3-and 20-weeks later. Serum antibody titers reached peak levels by 4–6 weeks, remained at a modest level through 18-weeks, peaked again at 22-wks after the second boost, and were still elevated at 35-weeks. At 7 weeks, groups of vaccinated and non-vaccinated mice were administered one of three MA doses (1, 2, or 3 mg/kg) to assess locomotor activity. RESULTS Non-vaccinated mice showed dose-dependent effects of MA with hypolocomotion at the lowest dose and elevated activity levels at the highest dose. Both dose effects were reduced in SMA-KLH groups, particularly low dose-induced hypolocomotion at later times post MA administration. Separate groups of vaccinated and non-vaccinated mice were trained in MA place conditioning at 30-weeks with either 0 (vehicle) or 0.5 mg/kg MA. Although times spent in the MA-paired side did not differ between groups on Test vs. Baseline sessions, SMA-KLH mice conditioned with MA showed reduced conditioned approach behaviors and decreased conditioned activity levels compared to control groups. CONCLUSION These data suggest SMA-KLH attenuates the ability of MA to support place conditioning and reduces or delays its locomotor effects. Overall, results support SMA-KLH as a candidate MA vaccine. PMID:23022610

  5. Methamphetamine Exposure Combined with HIV-1 Disease or gp120 Expression: Comparison of Learning and Executive Functions in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kesby, James P; Heaton, Robert K; Young, Jared W; Umlauf, Anya; Woods, Steven P; Letendre, Scott L; Markou, Athina; Grant, Igor; Semenova, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine dependence is a common comorbid condition among people living with HIV, and may exacerbate HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Animal models of neuroAIDS suggest that the gp120 protein may also cause cognitive impairment. The present work evaluated the separate and combined effects of HIV/gp120 and methamphetamine on learning and executive functions in both humans and transgenic mice. Human participants were grouped by HIV serostatus (HIV+ or HIV−) and lifetime methamphetamine dependence (METH+ or METH−). A neurocognitive test battery included domain-specific assessments of learning and executive functions. Mice (gp120+ and gp120−) were exposed to either a methamphetamine binge (METH+) or saline (METH−), then tested in the attentional-set-shifting task to assess learning and executive functions. In humans, HIV status was associated with significant impairments in learning, but less so for executive functions. The frequency of learning impairments varied between groups, with the greatest impairment observed in the HIV+/METH+ group. In mice, gp120 expression was associated with impairments in learning but not reversal learning (executive component). The greatest proportion of mice that failed to complete the task was observed in the gp120+/METH+ group, suggesting greater learning impairments. Our cross-species study demonstrated that HIV in humans and gp120 in mice impaired learning, and that a history of methamphetamine exposure increased the susceptibility to HIV-associated neurocognitive deficits in both species. Finally, the similar pattern of results in both species suggest that the gp120 protein may contribute to HIV-associated learning deficits in humans. PMID:25652249

  6. Methamphetamine Exposure Combined with HIV-1 Disease or gp120 Expression: Comparison of Learning and Executive Functions in Humans and Mice.

    PubMed

    Kesby, James P; Heaton, Robert K; Young, Jared W; Umlauf, Anya; Woods, Steven P; Letendre, Scott L; Markou, Athina; Grant, Igor; Semenova, Svetlana

    2015-07-01

    Methamphetamine dependence is a common comorbid condition among people living with HIV, and may exacerbate HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Animal models of neuroAIDS suggest that the gp120 protein may also cause cognitive impairment. The present work evaluated the separate and combined effects of HIV/gp120 and methamphetamine on learning and executive functions in both humans and transgenic mice. Human participants were grouped by HIV serostatus (HIV+ or HIV-) and lifetime methamphetamine dependence (METH+ or METH-). A neurocognitive test battery included domain-specific assessments of learning and executive functions. Mice (gp120+ and gp120-) were exposed to either a methamphetamine binge (METH+) or saline (METH-), then tested in the attentional-set-shifting task to assess learning and executive functions. In humans, HIV status was associated with significant impairments in learning, but less so for executive functions. The frequency of learning impairments varied between groups, with the greatest impairment observed in the HIV+/METH+ group. In mice, gp120 expression was associated with impairments in learning but not reversal learning (executive component). The greatest proportion of mice that failed to complete the task was observed in the gp120+/METH+ group, suggesting greater learning impairments. Our cross-species study demonstrated that HIV in humans and gp120 in mice impaired learning, and that a history of methamphetamine exposure increased the susceptibility to HIV-associated neurocognitive deficits in both species. Finally, the similar pattern of results in both species suggest that the gp120 protein may contribute to HIV-associated learning deficits in humans.

  7. Identification of Treatment Targets in a Genetic Mouse Model of Voluntary Methamphetamine Drinking.

    PubMed

    Phillips, T J; Mootz, J R K; Reed, C

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine has powerful stimulant and euphoric effects that are experienced as rewarding and encourage use. Methamphetamine addiction is associated with debilitating illnesses, destroyed relationships, child neglect, violence, and crime; but after many years of research, broadly effective medications have not been identified. Individual differences that may impact not only risk for developing a methamphetamine use disorder but also affect treatment response have not been fully considered. Human studies have identified candidate genes that may be relevant, but lack of control over drug history, the common use or coabuse of multiple addictive drugs, and restrictions on the types of data that can be collected in humans are barriers to progress. To overcome some of these issues, a genetic animal model comprised of lines of mice selectively bred for high and low voluntary methamphetamine intake was developed to identify risk and protective alleles for methamphetamine consumption, and identify therapeutic targets. The mu opioid receptor gene was supported as a target for genes within a top-ranked transcription factor network associated with level of methamphetamine intake. In addition, mice that consume high levels of methamphetamine were found to possess a nonfunctional form of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). The Taar1 gene is within a mouse chromosome 10 quantitative trait locus for methamphetamine consumption, and TAAR1 function determines sensitivity to aversive effects of methamphetamine that may curb intake. The genes, gene interaction partners, and protein products identified in this genetic mouse model represent treatment target candidates for methamphetamine addiction. PMID:27055611

  8. The advent of a new pseudoephedrine product to combat methamphetamine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Leech, Ronald; Stark, Jeffrey G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The personal and societal effects of methamphetamine abuse are well documented. The ease of accessibility to methamphetamine and the quality of the “high” it produces makes the drug highly desired by its abusers. Over time, many methamphetamine users will also become methamphetamine cooks, where pseudoephedrine in over-the-counter cold products is converted to methamphetamine through a simple, albeit extremely dangerous, process. New laws limiting access to these products have had limited success. No existing commercial pseudoephedrine products offer significant impediments to slow or limit the extraction and conversion of pseudoephedrine in clandestine methamphetamine laboratories. Objective and Methods: A new pseudoephedrine 30 mg tablet product using Impede technology (Nexafed®) to deter methamphetamine production has recently been introduced into the marketplace. Using methods designed to mimic clandestine laboratory processes, the ability of this product to disrupt extraction and conversion of pseudoephedrine to methamphetamine yet provide therapeutic effectiveness was evaluated. Results: Impede™ technology tablets limited the extraction and/or conversion of pseudoephedrine to methamphetamine when compared to a commercially marketed pseudoephedrine product (Sudafed®). Nexafed® tablets were also shown to be bioequivalent to the same control product, thus ensuring therapeutic equivalence. Conclusions: With the advent of new pseudoephedrine products in the marketplace with features to limit the extraction and conversion of pseudoephedrine to methamphetamine, new tools are now available to minimize the clandestine manufacture of the drug and potentially limit its social impact. PMID:23968171

  9. [The clinical course of chronic methamphetamine psychoses].

    PubMed

    Fujimori, H; Nakatani, Y; Sakaguchi, M

    1989-09-01

    3 cases with chronic methamphetamine psychoses (MAP-P) were studied from the clinical psychiatric point of view and discussed: 1.) The average time of occurrence of psychotic symptoms in our 3 cases after beginning of MAP abuse was two or three years. 2.) Although the psychotic states (often schizophrenia-like) were stable for a short time, the symptoms recurred promptly after reinjection of a small amount of MAP, unspecific stress or drinking sake (flashback phenomenon). The recurrence may happen even after several years. 3.) In cases of chronic MAP-P disturbances of consciousness are rare. Chronic process of MAP-P cases may show acute transient disturbances of consciousness (flashback phenomenon). 4.) The change of affects and behaviour ranges between irritable and indifferent attitudes. While there are close connections between the disturbance of feeling and change of personality (Wesensänderung), it is very difficult to decide whether premorbid character traits are dominant or there is a change of personality or emotional disturbance. 5.) About acute psychic symptoms which are responsible for recurrence of MAP-P, MAP-abusers make the experience that their intimate personal affairs are overlooked and become public (uncovered defensive experiences). In chronic cases of MAP-P we often meet patients with hypertrophic self-feeling or delusion of grandeur predominant in the symptomatology. 6.) In our cases sensations were amalgamated into each other and there were hallucinatory experiences without clear division between them. 7.) In chronic cases the auditory hallucinations criticized or censured the patients for their behaviour. Thought echoing (Gedankenlautwerden) was found. We found signs of mind reading (Gedankenausbreitung).

  10. Nucleus accumbens invulnerability to methamphetamine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Donald M; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Thomas, David M

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages neurons and nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. Emerging studies of human Meth addicts using both postmortem analyses of brain tissue and noninvasive imaging studies of intact brains have confirmed that Meth causes persistent structural abnormalities. Animal and human studies have also defined a number of significant functional problems and comorbid psychiatric disorders associated with long-term Meth abuse. This review summarizes the salient features of Meth-induced neurotoxicity with a focus on the dopamine (DA) neuronal system. DA nerve endings in the caudate-putamen (CPu) are damaged by Meth in a highly delimited manner. Even within the CPu, damage is remarkably heterogeneous, with ventral and lateral aspects showing the greatest deficits. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is largely spared the damage that accompanies binge Meth intoxication, but relatively subtle changes in the disposition of DA in its nerve endings can lead to dramatic increases in Meth-induced toxicity in the CPu and overcome the normal resistance of the NAc to damage. In contrast to the CPu, where DA neuronal deficiencies are persistent, alterations in the NAc show a partial recovery. Animal models have been indispensable in studies of the causes and consequences of Meth neurotoxicity and in the development of new therapies. This research has shown that increases in cytoplasmic DA dramatically broaden the neurotoxic profile of Meth to include brain structures not normally targeted for damage. The resistance of the NAc to Meth-induced neurotoxicity and its ability to recover reveal a fundamentally different neuroplasticity by comparison to the CPu. Recruitment of the NAc as a target of Meth neurotoxicity by alterations in DA homeostasis is significant in light of the numerous important roles played by this brain structure.

  11. Methamphetamine reduces human influenza A virus replication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Wu, Kuang-Lun; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) is a highly addictive psychostimulant that is among the most widely abused illicit drugs, with an estimated over 35 million users in the world. Several lines of evidence suggest that chronic meth abuse is a major factor for increased risk of infections with human immunodeficiency virus and possibly other pathogens, due to its immunosuppressive property. Influenza A virus infections frequently cause epidemics and pandemics of respiratory diseases among human populations. However, little is known about whether meth has the ability to enhance influenza A virus replication, thus increasing severity of influenza illness in meth abusers. Herein, we investigated the effects of meth on influenza A virus replication in human lung epithelial A549 cells. The cells were exposed to meth and infected with human influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus. The viral progenies were titrated by plaque assays, and the expression of viral proteins and cellular proteins involved in interferon responses was examined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. We report the first evidence that meth significantly reduces, rather than increases, virus propagation and the susceptibility to influenza infection in the human lung epithelial cell line, consistent with a decrease in viral protein synthesis. These effects were apparently not caused by meth's effects on enhancing virus-induced interferon responses in the host cells, reducing viral biological activities, or reducing cell viability. Our results suggest that meth might not be a great risk factor for influenza A virus infection among meth abusers. Although the underlying mechanism responsible for the action of meth on attenuating virus replication requires further investigation, these findings prompt the study to examine whether other structurally similar compounds could be used as anti-influenza agents.

  12. PG01037, a novel dopamine D3 receptor antagonist, inhibits the effects of methamphetamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Higley, Amanda E; Spiller, Krista; Grundt, Peter; Newman, Amy Hauck; Kiefer, Stephen W; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Gardner, Eliot L

    2011-02-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the selective dopamine D(3) receptor antagonists SB-277011A or NGB 2904 significantly attenuate cocaine self-administration under a progressive-ratio reinforcement schedule and cocaine-, methamphetamine- or nicotine-enhanced brain stimulation reward. However, the poor bioavailability of SB-277011A has limited its potential use in humans. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the novel D(3) receptor antagonist PG01037 on methamphetamine self-administration, methamphetamine-associated cue-induced reinstatement of drug seeking and methamphetamine-enhanced brain stimulation reward. Rats were allowed to intravenously self-administer methamphetamine under fixed-ratio 2 and progressive-ratio reinforcement conditions, and then the effects of PG01037 on methamphetamine self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement were assessed. Additional groups of rats were trained for intracranial electrical brain stimulation reward and the effects of PG01037 and methamphetamine on brain stimulation reward were assessed. Acute intraperitoneal administration of PG01037 (3, 10, 30 mg/kg) failed to alter methamphetamine or sucrose self-administration under fixed-ratio 2 reinforcement, but significantly lowered the break-point levels for methamphetamine or sucrose self-administration under progressive-ratio reinforcement. In addition, PG01037 significantly inhibited methamphetamine-associated cue-triggered reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior and methamphetamine-enhanced brain stimulation reward. These data suggest that the novel D(3) antagonist PG01037 significantly attenuates the rewarding effects as assessed by progressive-ratio self-administration and brain stimulation reward, and inhibits methamphetamine-associated cue-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior These findings support the potential use of PG01037 or other selective D(3) antagonists in the treatment of methamphetamine addiction.

  13. The Central Amygdala Nucleus is Critical for Incubation of Methamphetamine Craving

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Zeric, Tamara; Kambhampati, Sarita; Bossert, Jennifer M; Shaham, Yavin

    2015-01-01

    Cue-induced methamphetamine seeking progressively increases after withdrawal but mechanisms underlying this ‘incubation of methamphetamine craving' are unknown. Here we studied the role of central amygdala (CeA), ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), brain regions implicated in incubation of cocaine and heroin craving, in incubation of methamphetamine craving. We also assessed the role of basolateral amygdala (BLA) and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). We trained rats to self-administer methamphetamine (10 days; 9 h/day, 0.1 mg/kg/infusion) and tested them for cue-induced methamphetamine seeking under extinction conditions during early (2 days) or late (4–5 weeks) withdrawal. We first confirmed that ‘incubation of methamphetamine craving' occurs under our experimental conditions. Next, we assessed the effect of reversible inactivation of CeA or BLA by GABAA+GABAB receptor agonists (muscimol+baclofen, 0.03+0.3 nmol) on cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during early and late withdrawal. We also assessed the effect of muscimol+baclofen reversible inactivation of vmPFC, dmPFC, and OFC on ‘incubated' cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during late withdrawal. Lever presses in the cue-induced methamphetamine extinction tests were higher during late withdrawal than during early withdrawal (incubation of methamphetamine craving). Muscimol+baclofen injections into CeA but not BLA decreased cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during late but not early withdrawal. Muscimol+baclofen injections into dmPFC, vmPFC, or OFC during late withdrawal had no effect on incubated cue-induced methamphetamine seeking. Together with previous studies, results indicate that the CeA has a critical role in incubation of both drug and non-drug reward craving and demonstrate an unexpected dissociation in mechanisms of incubation of methamphetamine vs cocaine craving. PMID:25475163

  14. The central amygdala nucleus is critical for incubation of methamphetamine craving.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Zeric, Tamara; Kambhampati, Sarita; Bossert, Jennifer M; Shaham, Yavin

    2015-04-01

    Cue-induced methamphetamine seeking progressively increases after withdrawal but mechanisms underlying this 'incubation of methamphetamine craving' are unknown. Here we studied the role of central amygdala (CeA), ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), brain regions implicated in incubation of cocaine and heroin craving, in incubation of methamphetamine craving. We also assessed the role of basolateral amygdala (BLA) and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). We trained rats to self-administer methamphetamine (10 days; 9 h/day, 0.1 mg/kg/infusion) and tested them for cue-induced methamphetamine seeking under extinction conditions during early (2 days) or late (4-5 weeks) withdrawal. We first confirmed that 'incubation of methamphetamine craving' occurs under our experimental conditions. Next, we assessed the effect of reversible inactivation of CeA or BLA by GABAA+GABAB receptor agonists (muscimol+baclofen, 0.03+0.3 nmol) on cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during early and late withdrawal. We also assessed the effect of muscimol+baclofen reversible inactivation of vmPFC, dmPFC, and OFC on 'incubated' cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during late withdrawal. Lever presses in the cue-induced methamphetamine extinction tests were higher during late withdrawal than during early withdrawal (incubation of methamphetamine craving). Muscimol+baclofen injections into CeA but not BLA decreased cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during late but not early withdrawal. Muscimol+baclofen injections into dmPFC, vmPFC, or OFC during late withdrawal had no effect on incubated cue-induced methamphetamine seeking. Together with previous studies, results indicate that the CeA has a critical role in incubation of both drug and non-drug reward craving and demonstrate an unexpected dissociation in mechanisms of incubation of methamphetamine vs cocaine craving.

  15. An Emerging Problem: Methamphetamine Abuse among Treatment Seeking Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Rachel; Ang, Alfonso; McCann, Michael J.; Rawson, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined correlates of methamphetamine (MA) and marijuana (MJ) use and treatment response among treatment-involved youth (N = 4,430) in Los Angeles County, California treated between 2000 and 2005. Of the sample, 912 (21%) were primary MA and 3,518 (79%) were primary MJ users. Correlates of increased MA use included being female, White,…

  16. [Treatment of intoxication with new psychoactive substances and methamphetamine].

    PubMed

    Flüchter, Peter; Pajonk, Frank-Gerald Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    Fatal outcomes subsequent to the use of new psychoactive suostances are increasingly common in Germany. In this article, we present the clinical effects and associated side effects of the different classes of substances, as synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones, phenylethylamines, piperazines and methamphetamine, as well as diagnostic aspects and treatment options in case of symptoms of poisoning. PMID:26364395

  17. Triangular congenital cataract morphology associated with prenatal methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Michael E; Schloff, Susan; Bothun, Erick D

    2009-08-01

    Bilateral congenital cataracts are often characterized by morphology, etiology, and related conditions. We report a case of unique congenital cataracts with triangular morphology and associated prenatal methamphetamine exposure. Although this association is likely coincidental, the cataract's morphology in light of the specific timing of prenatal drug use deserves reporting.

  18. Chronic methamphetamine abuse and corticostriatal deficits revealed by neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    London, Edythe D; Kohno, Milky; Morales, Angelica M; Ballard, Michael E

    2015-12-01

    Despite aggressive efforts to contain it, methamphetamine use disorder continues to be major public health problem; and with generic behavioral therapies still the mainstay of treatment for methamphetamine abuse, rates of attrition and relapse remain high. This review summarizes the findings of structural, molecular, and functional neuroimaging studies of methamphetamine abusers, focusing on cortical and striatal abnormalities and their potential contributions to cognitive and behavioral phenotypes that can serve to promote compulsive drug use. These studies indicate that individuals with a history of chronic methamphetamine abuse often display several signs of corticostriatal dysfunction, including abnormal gray- and white-matter integrity, monoamine neurotransmitter system deficiencies, neuroinflammation, poor neuronal integrity, and aberrant patterns of brain connectivity and function, both when engaged in cognitive tasks and at rest. More importantly, many of these neural abnormalities were found to be linked with certain addiction-related phenotypes that may influence treatment response (e.g., poor self-control, cognitive inflexibility, maladaptive decision-making), raising the possibility that they may represent novel therapeutic targets.

  19. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 does not modify methamphetamine reinstatement of responding.

    PubMed

    Boctor, Sherin Y; Martinez, Joe L; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P

    2007-09-24

    Cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonists can decrease methamphetamine self-administration. This study examined whether the CB(1) receptor antagonist AM251 [N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-indophonyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide] modifies reinstatement in rats that previously self-administered methamphetamine. Rats (n=10) self-administered methamphetamine (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) under a fixed ratio 2 schedule. Non-contingent methamphetamine (0.01-1.78 mg/kg, i.v.) yielded responding for saline (reinstatement) that was similar to responding for self-administered methamphetamine. AM251 (0.032-0.32, i.v.) did not affect methamphetamine-induced reinstatement but significantly attenuated Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (2.0 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced hypothermia. These data fail to support a role for endogenous cannabinoids or cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in reinstatement and, therefore, relapse to stimulant abuse.

  20. Detection of levorotatory methamphetamine and levorotatory amphetamine in urine after ingestion of an overdose of selegiline.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yuji; Takahashi, Katsuo; Takei, Masao; Niitsu, Hisae; Aoki, Yasuhiro; Onodera, Makoto; Fujino, Yasuhisa; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Endo, Shigeatsu

    2008-10-01

    In this study, we measured the urine concentrations of methamphetamine and amphetamine as metabolites of selegiline after ingestion of an overdose of selegiline. A patient who had developed Parkinson disease took selegiline in a suicide attempt. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with trifluoroacetic acid-derivatization revealed the presence of methamphetamine and amphetamine in the patient's urine at concentrations of 0.62 microg/ml and 0.25 microg/ml, respectively. To determine the stereospecificity of the methamphetamine and amphetamine, a urine sample was analyzed by GC-MS after derivatization with N-(trifluoroacetyl)-l-prolyl chloride. The methamphetamine and amphetamine were levorotatory in form. The ratio of the methamphetamine to amphetamine concentration in the urine was 2.5. This value is consistent with other case reports of ingestion of selegiline, which suggests that the methamphetamine to amphetamine concentration ratio in urine is useful information for indicating use of selegiline.

  1. Short communication: Methamphetamine treatment increases in vitro and in vivo HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Toussi, Sima Shelly; Joseph, Aviva; Zheng, Jian Hua; Dutta, Monica; Santambrogio, Laura; Goldstein, Harris

    2009-11-01

    To delineate the mechanistic basis for the epidemiological association between methamphetamine use and accelerated progression to AIDS, we evaluated the direct in vitro and in vivo effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 replication. Methamphetamine administration significantly increased HIV-1 production by both HIV-infected monocytes and CD4 T lymphocytes in vitro. In addition, in vivo methamphetamine treatment increased HIV production and viremia in mice transgenic for a replication-competent HIV provirus and human cyclin T1. Methamphetamine activated transcription of the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR) regulatory region, was associated with nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. Our results provide further insights into the mechanisms by which methamphetamine accelerates disease course in HIV-infected individuals.

  2. Flicker-induced retinal vasodilatation is not dependent on complement factor H polymorphism in healthy young subjects

    PubMed Central

    Told, Reinhard; Palkovits, Stefan; Boltz, Agnes; Schmidl, Doreen; Napora, Katarzyna J; Werkmeister, René M; Haslacher, Helmuth; Frantal, Sophie; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina; Schmetterer, Leopold; Garhöfer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The complement factor H (CFH) tyrosine 402 histidine (Y402H, rs1061170) variant is known to be significantly associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Whether this genetic variant may impact retinal blood flow regulation is largely unknown. This study investigated whether flicker-induced vasodilation, an indicator for the coupling between neural activity and blood flow, is altered in subjects carrying the rs1061170 risk allele. Methods One hundred healthy subjects (aged between 18 and 45 years) were included in this study. Retinal blood flow regulation was tested by assessing retinal vessel calibres in response to stimulation with diffuse flicker light. Retinal vascular flicker responses were determined with a Dynamic Vessel Analyzer (DVA). In addition, genotyping for rs1061170 was performed. Results Eighteen subjects were homozygous for the risk allele C, 50 were homozygous for the ancestral allele T, and 31 subjects were heterozygous (CT). One subject had to be excluded from data evaluation, as no genetic analysis could be performed due to technical difficulties. Baseline diameters of retinal arteries (p = 0.39) and veins (p = 0.64) were comparable between the three groups. Flicker-induced vasodilation in both retinal arteries (p = 0.38) and retinal veins (p = 0.62) was also comparable between the three studied groups. Conclusions Our data indicate that homozygous healthy young carriers of the C risk allele at rs1061170 do not show abnormal flicker-induced vasodilation in the retina. This suggests that the high-risk genetic variant of CFH polymorphism does not impact neuro-vascular coupling in healthy subjects. PMID:24863099

  3. Decontamination of clothing and building materials associated with the clandestine production of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Kate A; Martyny, John W; Kofford, Shalece; Contreras, John R; Van Dyke, Mike V

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to determine how easily methamphetamine can be removed from clothing and building materials, utilizing different cleaning materials and methods. The study also addressed the penetration of methamphetamine into drywall and the ability of paints to encapsulate the methamphetamine on drywall. Clothing and building materials were contaminated in a stainless steel chamber by aerosolizing methamphetamine in a beaker heater. The amount of methamphetamine surface contamination was determined by sampling a grid pattern on the material prior to attempting to clean the materials. After cleaning, the materials were again sampled, and the degree of decontamination noted. We found that household clothing and response gear worn by first responders was easily decontaminated using a household detergent in a household washing machine. A single wash removed over 95% of the methamphetamine from these materials. The study also indicated that methamphetamine-contaminated, smooth non-porous surfaces can be easily cleaned to below detectable levels using only mild cleaners. More porous surfaces such as plywood and drywall were unlikely to be decontaminated to below regulatory levels even with three washes using a mild cleaner. This may be due to methamphetamine penetration into the paint on these surfaces. Evaluation of methamphetamine contamination on drywall indicated that approximately 40% of the methamphetamine was removed using a wipe, while another 60% remained in the paint layer. Stronger cleaners such as those with active ingredients including sodium hypochlorite or quaternary ammonia and commercial decontamination agents were more effective than mild detergent-based cleaners and may reduce methamphetamine contamination to below regulatory levels. Results from the encapsulation studies indicate that sprayed on oil-based paint will encapsulate methamphetamine on drywall and plywood surfaces up to 4.5 months, while latex paints were less effective. PMID

  4. Decontamination of clothing and building materials associated with the clandestine production of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Kate A; Martyny, John W; Kofford, Shalece; Contreras, John R; Van Dyke, Mike V

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to determine how easily methamphetamine can be removed from clothing and building materials, utilizing different cleaning materials and methods. The study also addressed the penetration of methamphetamine into drywall and the ability of paints to encapsulate the methamphetamine on drywall. Clothing and building materials were contaminated in a stainless steel chamber by aerosolizing methamphetamine in a beaker heater. The amount of methamphetamine surface contamination was determined by sampling a grid pattern on the material prior to attempting to clean the materials. After cleaning, the materials were again sampled, and the degree of decontamination noted. We found that household clothing and response gear worn by first responders was easily decontaminated using a household detergent in a household washing machine. A single wash removed over 95% of the methamphetamine from these materials. The study also indicated that methamphetamine-contaminated, smooth non-porous surfaces can be easily cleaned to below detectable levels using only mild cleaners. More porous surfaces such as plywood and drywall were unlikely to be decontaminated to below regulatory levels even with three washes using a mild cleaner. This may be due to methamphetamine penetration into the paint on these surfaces. Evaluation of methamphetamine contamination on drywall indicated that approximately 40% of the methamphetamine was removed using a wipe, while another 60% remained in the paint layer. Stronger cleaners such as those with active ingredients including sodium hypochlorite or quaternary ammonia and commercial decontamination agents were more effective than mild detergent-based cleaners and may reduce methamphetamine contamination to below regulatory levels. Results from the encapsulation studies indicate that sprayed on oil-based paint will encapsulate methamphetamine on drywall and plywood surfaces up to 4.5 months, while latex paints were less effective.

  5. Polarity-Dependent Misperception of Subjective Visual Vertical during and after Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS).

    PubMed

    Santos-Pontelli, Taiza E G; Rimoli, Brunna P; Favoretto, Diandra B; Mazin, Suleimy C; Truong, Dennis Q; Leite, Joao P; Pontes-Neto, Octavio M; Babyar, Suzanne R; Reding, Michael; Bikson, Marom; Edwards, Dylan J

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic tilt of subjective visual vertical (SVV) frequently has adverse functional consequences for patients with stroke and vestibular disorders. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the supramarginal gyrus can produce a transitory tilt on SVV in healthy subjects. However, the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on SVV has never been systematically studied. We investigated whether bilateral tDCS over the temporal-parietal region could result in both online and offline SVV misperception in healthy subjects. In a randomized, sham-controlled, single-blind crossover pilot study, thirteen healthy subjects performed tests of SVV before, during and after the tDCS applied over the temporal-parietal region in three conditions used on different days: right anode/left cathode; right cathode/left anode; and sham. Subjects were blind to the tDCS conditions. Montage-specific current flow patterns were investigated using computational models. SVV was significantly displaced towards the anode during both active stimulation conditions when compared to sham condition. Immediately after both active conditions, there were rebound effects. Longer lasting after-effects towards the anode occurred only in the right cathode/left anode condition. Current flow models predicted the stimulation of temporal-parietal regions under the electrodes and deep clusters in the posterior limb of the internal capsule. The present findings indicate that tDCS over the temporal-parietal region can significantly alter human SVV perception. This tDCS approach may be a potential clinical tool for the treatment of SVV misperception in neurological patients. PMID:27031726

  6. Polarity-Dependent Misperception of Subjective Visual Vertical during and after Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS)

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Pontelli, Taiza E. G.; Rimoli, Brunna P.; Favoretto, Diandra B.; Mazin, Suleimy C.; Truong, Dennis Q.; Leite, Joao P.; Pontes-Neto, Octavio M.; Babyar, Suzanne R.; Reding, Michael; Bikson, Marom; Edwards, Dylan J.

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic tilt of subjective visual vertical (SVV) frequently has adverse functional consequences for patients with stroke and vestibular disorders. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the supramarginal gyrus can produce a transitory tilt on SVV in healthy subjects. However, the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on SVV has never been systematically studied. We investigated whether bilateral tDCS over the temporal-parietal region could result in both online and offline SVV misperception in healthy subjects. In a randomized, sham-controlled, single-blind crossover pilot study, thirteen healthy subjects performed tests of SVV before, during and after the tDCS applied over the temporal-parietal region in three conditions used on different days: right anode/left cathode; right cathode/left anode; and sham. Subjects were blind to the tDCS conditions. Montage-specific current flow patterns were investigated using computational models. SVV was significantly displaced towards the anode during both active stimulation conditions when compared to sham condition. Immediately after both active conditions, there were rebound effects. Longer lasting after-effects towards the anode occurred only in the right cathode/left anode condition. Current flow models predicted the stimulation of temporal-parietal regions under the electrodes and deep clusters in the posterior limb of the internal capsule. The present findings indicate that tDCS over the temporal-parietal region can significantly alter human SVV perception. This tDCS approach may be a potential clinical tool for the treatment of SVV misperception in neurological patients. PMID:27031726

  7. Ibogaine blocked methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia and induction of heat shock protein in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Imam, S Z; Newport, G D; Slikker, W; Ali, S F

    1999-03-27

    Body temperature changes and heat shock protein (HSP-72) induction in the caudate nucleus were studied in female C57BL/6N mice pretreated with ibogaine (50 mg/kg) and sacrificed 48 h. after a single dose of methamphetamine (20 mg/kg). Methamphetamine injection resulted in hyperthermia and induced HSP-72 expression, whereas treatment with ibogaine alone produced hypothermia. The ibogaine followed by methamphetamine injection showed no hyperthermia and decreased HSP-72 expression. These data indicate that pretreatment with ibogaine can completely block methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia and HSP-72 expression in the striatum.

  8. Mutual enhancement of central neurotoxicity induced by ketamine followed by methamphetamine

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, J.-J.; Chen, H.-I.; Jen, C.J.; Kuo, Y.-M.; Cherng, C.G.; Tsai, Y.-P.N.; Ho, M.-C.; Tsai, C.-W.; Lung Yu

    2008-03-01

    We hereby report that repeated administration of ketamine (350 mg/kg in total) and methamphetamine (30 mg/kg in total) causes specific glutamatergic and dopaminergic neuron deficits, respectively, in adult mouse brain. Acute ketamine did not affect basal body temperature or the later methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. However, pretreatment with repeated doses of ketamine aggravated methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic terminal loss as evidenced by a drastic decrease in the levels of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and dopamine transporter density as well as poor gait balance performance. In contrast, methamphetamine-induced serotonergic depletion was not altered by ketamine pretreatment. Likewise, the subsequent treatment with methamphetamine exacerbated the ketamine-induced glutamatergic damage as indicated by reduced levels of the vesicular glutamate transporter in hippocampus and striatum and poor memory performance in the Morris water maze. Finally, since activation of the D1 and AMPA/kainate receptors has been known to be involved in the release of glutamate and dopamine, we examined the effects of co-administration of SCH23390, a D1 antagonist, and CNQX, an AMPA/kainate antagonist. Intraventricular CNQX infusion abolished ketamine's potentiation of methamphetamine-induced dopamine neurotoxicity, while systemic SCH23390 mitigated methamphetamine's potentiation of ketamine-induced glutamatergic toxicity. We conclude that repeated doses of ketamine potentiate methamphetamine-induced dopamine neurotoxicity via AMPA/kainate activation and that conjunctive use of methamphetamine aggravates ketamine-induced glutamatergic neurotoxicity possibly via D1 receptor activation.

  9. Alterations in adult behavioral responses to cocaine and dopamine transporters following juvenile exposure to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Lisa; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Matuszewich, Leslie

    2011-01-20

    The present experiment assessed whether preadolescent exposure to methamphetamine would alter adult behavioral responses to cocaine and dopamine transporter immunoreactivity in the striatum of male and female rats. Juvenile rats were injected once daily with 0 or 2 mg/kg methamphetamine from postnatal days 21 to 35 and tested in adulthood. Male rats, but not female rats, exposed to methamphetamine showed an increase in responsiveness to cocaine in the open field and an increase in dopamine transporter immunoreactivity in the striatum. These findings suggest that early exposure to methamphetamine can lead to sex specific altered responses to psychostimulants in adulthood, which may contribute to later vulnerability to drug use.

  10. Methamphetamine-induced toxicity: an updated review on issues related to hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Rae R.; Seminerio, Michael J.; Turner, Ryan C.; Robson, Matthew J.; Nguyen, Linda; Miller, Diane B.; O’Callaghan, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Reports of methamphetamine-related emergency room visits suggest that elevated body temperature is a universal presenting symptom, with lethal overdoses generally associated with extreme hyperthermia. This review summarizes the available information on methamphetamine toxicity as it pertains to elevations in body temperature. First, a brief overview of thermoregulatory mechanisms is presented. Next, central and peripheral targets that have been considered for potential involvement in methamphetamine hyperthermia are discussed. Finally, future areas of investigation are proposed, as further studies are needed to provide greater insight into the mechanisms that mediate the alterations in body temperature elicited by methamphetamine. PMID:24836729

  11. Altered social cognition in male BDNF heterozygous mice and following chronic methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Manning, Elizabeth E; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2016-05-15

    Growing clinical evidence suggests that persistent psychosis which occurs in methamphetamine users is closely related to schizophrenia. However, preclinical studies in animal models have focussed on psychosis-related behaviours following methamphetamine, and less work has been done to assess endophenotypes relevant to other deficits observed in schizophrenia. Altered social behaviour is a feature of both the negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia, and significantly impacts patient functioning. We recently found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) heterozygous mice show disrupted sensitization to methamphetamine, supporting other work suggesting an important role of this neurotrophin in the pathophysiology of psychosis and the neuronal response to stimulant drugs. In the current study, we assessed social and cognitive behaviours in methamphetamine-treated BDNF heterozygous mice and wildtype littermate controls. Following chronic methamphetamine exposure male wildtype mice showed a 50% reduction in social novelty preference. Vehicle-treated male BDNF heterozygous mice showed a similar impairment in social novelty preference, with a trend for no further disruption by methamphetamine exposure. Female mice were unaffected in this task, and no groups showed any changes in sociability or short-term spatial memory. These findings suggest that chronic methamphetamine alters behaviour relevant to disruption of social cognition in schizophrenia, supporting other studies which demonstrate a close resemblance between persistent methamphetamine psychosis and schizophrenia. Together these findings suggest that dynamic regulation of BDNF signalling is necessary to mediate the effects of methamphetamine on behaviours relevant to schizophrenia.

  12. Altered social cognition in male BDNF heterozygous mice and following chronic methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Manning, Elizabeth E; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2016-05-15

    Growing clinical evidence suggests that persistent psychosis which occurs in methamphetamine users is closely related to schizophrenia. However, preclinical studies in animal models have focussed on psychosis-related behaviours following methamphetamine, and less work has been done to assess endophenotypes relevant to other deficits observed in schizophrenia. Altered social behaviour is a feature of both the negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia, and significantly impacts patient functioning. We recently found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) heterozygous mice show disrupted sensitization to methamphetamine, supporting other work suggesting an important role of this neurotrophin in the pathophysiology of psychosis and the neuronal response to stimulant drugs. In the current study, we assessed social and cognitive behaviours in methamphetamine-treated BDNF heterozygous mice and wildtype littermate controls. Following chronic methamphetamine exposure male wildtype mice showed a 50% reduction in social novelty preference. Vehicle-treated male BDNF heterozygous mice showed a similar impairment in social novelty preference, with a trend for no further disruption by methamphetamine exposure. Female mice were unaffected in this task, and no groups showed any changes in sociability or short-term spatial memory. These findings suggest that chronic methamphetamine alters behaviour relevant to disruption of social cognition in schizophrenia, supporting other studies which demonstrate a close resemblance between persistent methamphetamine psychosis and schizophrenia. Together these findings suggest that dynamic regulation of BDNF signalling is necessary to mediate the effects of methamphetamine on behaviours relevant to schizophrenia. PMID:26965573

  13. HIV testing behaviors and attitudes among community recruited methamphetamine users in a South African township

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Christina S.; Towe, Sheri L.; Watt, Melissa H.; Hobkirk, Andrea; Skinner, Donald; Myers, Bronwyn; Kimani, Stephen M.; Pieterse, Desiree

    2015-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine users in South Africa are at high risk for HIV infection and transmission, but little is known about HIV testing in this population. Methods We examined HIV testing behaviors and attitudes in 362 methamphetamine users recruited using chain referral sampling from one peri-urban community. Results Many (44%) had not been HIV tested in the past year. HIV testing was associated with positive testing attitudes, less AIDS stigma, and greater methamphetamine stigma. Among participants who reported HIV infection (8%), less than half were linked to care. Conclusions Findings highlight the need to identify barriers to HIV service uptake for methamphetamine users. PMID:24858393

  14. Acquisition of responses to a methamphetamine-associated cue in healthy humans: self-report, behavioral, and psychophysiological measures.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Leah M; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-06-01

    Drug-associated cues elicit conditioned responses in human drug users, and are thought to facilitate a drug-seeking behavior. Yet, little is known about how these associations are acquired, or about the specificity of the conditioned response modalities. In this study, healthy, nondependent volunteers (N=90) completed a conditioning paradigm in which they received a moderate dose of methamphetamine paired with one stimulus and placebo with another stimulus, each on two separate occasions. Their responses to these cues were measured with a behavioral preference, self-reported 'liking', emotional reactivity, and attentional bias measures, both before and after the conditioning. Following the conditioning procedure, subjects exhibited a behavioral preference, positive emotional reactivity, and attentional bias toward the methamphetamine-associated cue, compared with the placebo stimulus. In addition, subjects who reported greater positive subjective drug effects during the conditioning displayed a more robust conditioning. This work demonstrates that healthy nondependent volunteers readily acquire conditioned responses to neutral stimuli paired with a drug. The procedure has significant value to study individual variation in acquisition of conditioned responses as a possible risk factor for drug taking, and to study the neural basis of conditioned drug responses.

  15. Methamphetamine Users Have Increased Dental Disease: A Propensity Score Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, V; Harrell, L; Clague, J; Murphy, D A; Dye, B A; Belin, T R

    2016-07-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) users are assumed to have a high burden of tooth decay. Less clear is how the distribution and severity of dental caries in MA users differ from the general population. Using a covariate-balancing propensity score strategy, we investigated the differential effects of MA use on dental caries by comparing the patterns of decayed, missing, and filled teeth in a community sample of 571 MA users with a subset of 2,755 demographically similar control individuals selected from a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cohort. Recruited over a 2-y period with a stratified sampling protocol, the MA users underwent comprehensive dental examinations by 3 trained and calibrated dentists using NHANES protocols. Propensity scores were estimated with logistic regression based on background characteristics, and a subset of closely matched subjects was stratified into quintiles for comparisons. MA users were twice as likely to have untreated caries (odds ratio [OR] = 2.08; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.55 to 2.78) and 4 times more likely to have caries experience (OR = 4.06; 95% CI: 2.24 to 7.34) than the control group of NHANES participants. Additionally, MA users were twice as likely to have 2 more decayed, missing, or filled teeth (OR = 2.08; 95% CI: 1.29 to 2.79) than the NHANES participants. The differential involvement of the teeth surfaces in MA users was quite distinctive, with carious surface involvement being highest for the maxillary central incisors, followed by maxillary posterior premolars and molars. Users injecting MA had significantly higher rates of tooth decay compared with noninjectors (P = 0.04). Although MA users experienced decayed and missing dental surfaces more frequently than NHANES participants, NHANES participants had more restored surfaces, especially on molars. The high rates and distinctive patterns of dental caries observed could be used 1) to alert dentists to covert MA use in their patients and 2) as

  16. Effects of Environmental Manipulations and Treatment with Bupropion and Risperidone on Choice between Methamphetamine and Food in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Blough, Bruce E

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical and human laboratory choice procedures have been invaluable in improving our knowledge of the neurobiological mechanisms of drug reinforcement and in the drug development process for candidate medications to treat drug addiction. However, little is known about the neuropharmacological mechanisms of methamphetamine vs food choice. The aims of this study were to develop a methamphetamine vs food choice procedure and determine treatment effects with two clinically relevant compounds: the monoamine uptake inhibitor bupropion and the dopamine antagonist risperidone. Rhesus monkeys (n=6) responded under a concurrent schedule of food delivery (1-g pellets, fixed-ratio (FR) 100 schedule) and intravenous methamphetamine injections (0-0.32 mg/kg/injection, FR10 schedule) during 7-day bupropion (0.32-1.8 mg/kg/h) and risperidone (0.001-0.0056 mg/kg/h) treatment periods. For comparison, effects of removing food pellets or methamphetamine injections and FR response requirement manipulations were also examined. Under saline treatment conditions, food was preferred over no methamphetamine or small unit methamphetamine doses (0.01-0.032 mg/kg/injection). Larger methamphetamine doses resulted in greater methamphetamine preference and 0.32 mg/kg/injection methamphetamine maintained near exclusive preference. Removing food availability increased methamphetamine choice, whereas removing methamphetamine availability decreased methamphetamine choice. Methamphetamine choice was not significantly altered when the FR response requirements for food and drug were the same (FR100:FR100 or FR10:FR10). Risperidone treatment increased methamphetamine choice, whereas bupropion treatment did not alter methamphetamine choice up to doses that decreased rates of operant behavior. Overall, these negative results with bupropion and risperidone are concordant with previous human laboratory and clinical trials and support the potential validity of this preclinical methamphetamine vs food

  17. [The evaluation of the time of gastric radio-isotopic emptying in subjects with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Allegra, G; Costa, R; Scaffidi, L; Campisi, D; Cangialosi, G; Scaffidi, A

    1996-03-01

    Abnormal gastro-intestinal motility is a well-recognized complication of autonomic neuropathy in diabetics; delayed gastric emptying is frequently documented. Various pharmacologic agents have been used to treat this complication such as cisapride. We have evaluated the effects of cisapride on gastric emptying in nine diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy through radio-scintigraphic method. Gastric emptying diabetic patients was significantly prolonged compared control subjects (p < 0.01). In our study cisapride increased gastric emptying, but this did not reach statistical significance. We concluded that cisapride may be considered as a good alternative in cases where limited efficacy or side effects preclude the use of metoclopramide.

  18. Back and hip extensor muscles fatigue in healthy subjects: task-dependency effect of two variants of the Sorensen test

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, Annick; Descarreaux, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Paraspinal muscle fatigability during various trunk extension tests has been widely investigated by electromyography (EMG), and its task-dependency is established recently. Hip extensor muscle fatigability during the Sorensen test has been reported. The aim of the present experiments was to evaluate the task-dependency of back and hip extensor muscle fatigue during two variants of the Sorensen test. We hypothesized that the rate of muscular fatigue of the hip and back extensor muscles varies according to the test position. Twenty healthy young males with no history of low back pain volunteered to participate in this cross-sectional study. They were asked to perform two body weight-dependent isometric back extension tests (S1 = Sorensen test; S2 = modified Sorensen on a 45° Roman chair). Surface EMG activity of the paraspinal muscles (T10 and L5 levels) and hip extensor muscles (gluteus maximus; biceps femoris) was recorded, and muscular fatigue was assessed through power spectral analysis of the EMG data by calculating the rate of median power frequency change. We observed hip extensor muscle fatigue simultaneously with paraspinal muscle fatigue during both Sorensen variants. However, only L5 level EMG fatigue indices showed a task-dependency effect between S1 and S2. Hip extensor muscles appear to contribute to load sharing of the upper body mass during both Sorensen variants, but to a different extent because L5 level fatigue differs between the Sorensen variants. Our findings suggest that task-dependency has to be considered when EMG variables are compared between two types of lumbar muscle-fatiguing tasks. PMID:18813961

  19. Preclinical efficacy of N-substituted benztropine analogs as antagonists of methamphetamine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Hiranita, Takato; Kohut, Stephen J; Soto, Paul L; Tanda, Gianluigi; Kopajtic, Theresa A; Katz, Jonathan L

    2014-01-01

    Atypical dopamine-uptake inhibitors have low abuse potential and may serve as leads for development of cocaine-abuse treatments. Among them, the benztropine (BZT) derivatives, N-butyl (JHW007), N-allyl (AHN2-005), and N-methyl (AHN1-055) analogs of 3α-[bis(4'-fluorophenyl)methoxy]-tropane dose-dependently decreased cocaine self-administration without effects on food-maintained responding. Our study examined selectivity by assessing their effects on self-administration of other drugs. As with cocaine, each BZT analog (1.0-10.0 mg/kg i.p.) dose-dependently decreased maximal self-administration of d-methamphetamine (0.01-0.32 mg/kg/infusion) but was inactive against heroin (1.0-32.0 µg/kg/infusion) and ketamine (0.032-1.0 mg/kg/infusion) self-administration. Further, standard dopamine indirect-agonists [WIN35,428 ((-)-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)-tropan-2-β-carboxylic acid methyl ester tartrate), d-amphetamine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg i.p., each)] dose-dependently left-shifted self-administration dose-effect curves for d-methamphetamine, heroin, and ketamine. Noncompetitive NMDA-glutamate receptor/channel antagonists [(+)-MK-801 (0.01-0.1 mg/kg i.p.), memantine (1.0-10.0 mg/kg i.p.)] also left-shifted dose-effect curves for d-methamphetamine and ketamine (but not heroin) self-administration. The µ-agonists [dl-methadone and morphine (1.0-10.0 mg/kg i.p., each)] dose-dependently decreased maximal self-administration of µ-agonists (heroin, remifentanil) but not d-methamphetamine or ketamine self-administration. The µ-agonist-induced decreases were similar to the effects of BZT analogs on stimulant self-administration and effects of food prefeeding on responding maintained by food reinforcement. Radioligand-binding and behavioral studies suggested that inhibition of dopamine transporters and σ receptors were critical for blocking stimulant self-administration by BZT-analogs. Thus, the present results suggest that the effects of BZT analogs on stimulant self-administration are

  20. Preclinical Efficacy of N-Substituted Benztropine Analogs as Antagonists of Methamphetamine Self-Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Kohut, Stephen J.; Soto, Paul L.; Tanda, Gianluigi; Kopajtic, Theresa A.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical dopamine-uptake inhibitors have low abuse potential and may serve as leads for development of cocaine-abuse treatments. Among them, the benztropine (BZT) derivatives, N-butyl (JHW007), N-allyl (AHN2-005), and N-methyl (AHN1-055) analogs of 3α-[bis(4′-fluorophenyl)methoxy]-tropane dose-dependently decreased cocaine self-administration without effects on food-maintained responding. Our study examined selectivity by assessing their effects on self-administration of other drugs. As with cocaine, each BZT analog (1.0–10.0 mg/kg i.p.) dose-dependently decreased maximal self-administration of d-methamphetamine (0.01–0.32 mg/kg/infusion) but was inactive against heroin (1.0–32.0 µg/kg/infusion) and ketamine (0.032–1.0 mg/kg/infusion) self-administration. Further, standard dopamine indirect-agonists [WIN35,428 ((−)-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)-tropan-2-β-carboxylic acid methyl ester tartrate), d-amphetamine (0.1–1.0 mg/kg i.p., each)] dose-dependently left-shifted self-administration dose-effect curves for d-methamphetamine, heroin, and ketamine. Noncompetitive NMDA-glutamate receptor/channel antagonists [(+)-MK-801 (0.01–0.1 mg/kg i.p.), memantine (1.0–10.0 mg/kg i.p.)] also left-shifted dose-effect curves for d-methamphetamine and ketamine (but not heroin) self-administration. The µ-agonists [dl-methadone and morphine (1.0–10.0 mg/kg i.p., each)] dose-dependently decreased maximal self-administration of µ-agonists (heroin, remifentanil) but not d-methamphetamine or ketamine self-administration. The µ-agonist-induced decreases were similar to the effects of BZT analogs on stimulant self-administration and effects of food prefeeding on responding maintained by food reinforcement. Radioligand-binding and behavioral studies suggested that inhibition of dopamine transporters and σ receptors were critical for blocking stimulant self-administration by BZT-analogs. Thus, the present results suggest that the effects of BZT analogs on stimulant self

  1. Epigenetic landscape of amphetamine and methamphetamine addiction in rodents.

    PubMed

    Godino, Arthur; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2015-01-01

    Amphetamine and methamphetamine addiction is described by specific behavioral alterations, suggesting long-lasting changes in gene and protein expression within specific brain subregions involved in the reward circuitry. Given the persistence of the addiction phenotype at both behavioral and transcriptional levels, several studies have been conducted to elucidate the epigenetic landscape associated with persistent effects of drug use on the mammalian brain. This review discusses recent advances in our comprehension of epigenetic mechanisms underlying amphetamine- or methamphetamine-induced behavioral, transcriptional, and synaptic plasticity. Accumulating evidence demonstrated that drug exposure induces major epigenetic modifications-histone acetylation and methylation, DNA methylation-in a very complex manner. In rare instances, however, the regulation of a specific target gene can be correlated to both epigenetic alterations and behavioral abnormalities. Work is now needed to clarify and validate an epigenetic model of addiction to amphetamines. Investigations that include genome-wide approaches will accelerate the speed of discovery in the field of addiction.

  2. Distribution and pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in the human body: clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.; Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Wang, G.-J.; Shumay, E.; Telang, F.; Thanos, P.; Alexoff, D.

    2010-12-01

    Methamphetamine is one of the most toxic of the drugs of abuse, which may reflect its distribution and accumulation in the body. However no studies have measured methamphetamine's organ distribution in the human body. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was used in conjunction with [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine to measure its whole-body distribution and bioavailability as assessed by peak uptake (% Dose/cc), rate of clearance (time to reach 50% peak-clearance) and accumulation (area under the curve) in healthy participants (9 Caucasians and 10 African Americans). Methamphetamine distributed through most organs. Highest uptake (whole organ) occurred in lungs (22% Dose; weight {approx}1246 g), liver (23%; weight {approx}1677 g) and intermediate in brain (10%; weight {approx}1600 g). Kidneys also showed high uptake (per/cc basis) (7%; weight 305 g). Methamphetamine's clearance was fastest in heart and lungs (7-16 minutes), slowest in brain, liver and stomach (>75 minutes), and intermediate in kidneys, spleen and pancreas (22-50 minutes). Lung accumulation of [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine was 30% higher for African Americans than Caucasians (p < 0.05) but did not differ in other organs. The high accumulation of methamphetamine, a potent stimulant drug, in most body organs is likely to contribute to the medical complications associated with methamphetamine abuse. In particular, we speculate that methamphetamine's high pulmonary uptake could render this organ vulnerable to infections (tuberculosis) and pathology (pulmonary hypertension). Our preliminary findings of a higher lung accumulation of methamphetamine in African Americans than Caucasians merits further investigation and questions whether it could contribute to the infrequent use of methamphetamine among African Americans.

  3. Methamphetamine use and sexual and injection risk behaviors among out-of-treatment injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Molitor, F; Ruiz, J D; Flynn, N; Mikanda, J N; Sun, R K; Anderson, R

    1999-08-01

    Our primary objective was to examine the relationship between methamphetamine use and sexual risk-taking behaviors--number of sexual partners, frequency of sexual behaviors with regular and casual partners, trading money or drugs for sex, and condom use--among male and female out-of-treatment injection drug users (OTIDUs). As a risk group for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission, we also investigated injection behaviors by methamphetamine use. Data were collected from 1392 OTIDUs within the California counties of Fresno, Sacramento, and San Diego. Excluded from this cross-sectional survey were male OTIDUs engaging in sex with only or mostly men since 1978. In bivariate analyses, we found that male OTIDUs with a history of methamphetamine use had more sex partners and participated in more acts of anal insertive intercourse with casual partners and vaginal intercourse with regular and casual partners than male OTIDUs never using methamphetamines. In addition, a greater percentage of male OTIDUs using methamphetamines reported trading sex for money or drugs. Methamphetamine-using female OTIDUs participated in more acts of vaginal intercourse with regular male sex partners than female OTIDUs never using methamphetamines. By multivariate logistic regression, we found methamphetamine use related to consistent condom use among male OTIDUs and among male sex partners of female OTIDUs. Discriminant function analyses revealed that sexual risk taking could be differentiated by methamphetamine use among male OTIDUs. Methamphetamine use also correlated with using shared needles or syringes among male and female OTIDUs and was related to not always disinfecting used needles or syringes with bleach. Our findings suggest that methamphetamines may contribute to heterosexual HIV transmission.

  4. Partial MHC/neuroantigen peptide constructs: a potential neuroimmune-based treatment for methamphetamine addiction.

    PubMed

    Loftis, Jennifer M; Wilhelm, Clare J; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Huckans, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Relapse rates following current methamphetamine abuse treatments are very high (∼40-60%), and the neuropsychiatric impairments (e.g., cognitive deficits, mood disorders) that arise and persist during remission from methamphetamine addiction likely contribute to these high relapse rates. Pharmacotherapeutic development of medications to treat addiction has focused on neurotransmitter systems with only limited success, and there are no Food and Drug Administration approved pharmacotherapies for methamphetamine addiction. A growing literature shows that methamphetamine alters peripheral and central immune functions and that immune factors such as cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules play a role in the development and persistence of methamphetamine induced neuronal injury and neuropsychiatric impairments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new immunotherapy, partial MHC/neuroantigen peptide construct (RTL551; pI-A(b)/mMOG-35-55), in treating learning and memory impairments induced by repeated methamphetamine exposure. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to two different methamphetamine treatment regimens (using repeated doses of 4 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg, s.c.). Cognitive performance was assessed using the Morris water maze and CNS cytokine levels were measured by multiplex assay. Immunotherapy with RTL551 improved the memory impairments induced by repeated methamphetamine exposure in both mouse models of chronic methamphetamine addiction. Treatment with RTL551 also attenuated the methamphetamine induced increases in hypothalamic interleukin-2 (IL-2) levels. Collectively, these initial results indicate that neuroimmune targeted therapies, and specifically RTL551, may have potential as treatments for methamphetamine-induced neuropsychiatric impairments.

  5. On a relativistic particle and a relativistic position-dependent mass particle subject to the Klein-Gordon oscillator and the Coulomb potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitória, R. L. L.; Furtado, C.; Bakke, K.

    2016-07-01

    The relativistic quantum dynamics of an electrically charged particle subject to the Klein-Gordon oscillator and the Coulomb potential is investigated. By searching for relativistic bound states, a particular quantum effect can be observed: a dependence of the angular frequency of the Klein-Gordon oscillator on the quantum numbers of the system. The meaning of this behaviour of the angular frequency is that only some specific values of the angular frequency of the Klein-Gordon oscillator are permitted in order to obtain bound state solutions. As an example, we obtain both the angular frequency and the energy level associated with the ground state of the relativistic system. Further, we analyse the behaviour of a relativistic position-dependent mass particle subject to the Klein-Gordon oscillator and the Coulomb potential.

  6. The Infant Development, Environment, and Lifestyle Study: Effects of Prenatal Methamphetamine Exposure, Polydrug Exposure, and Poverty on Intrauterine Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lynne M.; LaGasse, Linda L.; Derauf, Chris; Grant, Penny; Shah, Rizwan; Arria, Amelia; Huestis, Marilyn; Haning, William; Strauss, Arthur; Grotta, Sheri Della; Liu, Jing; Lester, Barry M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Methamphetamine use among pregnant women is an increasing problem in the United States. Effects of methamphetamine use during pregnancy on fetal growth have not been reported in large, prospective studies. We examined the neonatal growth effects of prenatal methamphetamine exposure in the multicenter, longitudinal Infant Development,…

  7. Hnrnph1 Is A Quantitative Trait Gene for Methamphetamine Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Neema; Parker, Clarissa C; Shen, Ying; Reed, Eric R; Guido, Michael A; Kole, Loren A; Kirkpatrick, Stacey L; Lim, Jackie E; Sokoloff, Greta; Cheng, Riyan; Johnson, W Evan; Palmer, Abraham A; Bryant, Camron D

    2015-12-01

    Psychostimulant addiction is a heritable substance use disorder; however its genetic basis is almost entirely unknown. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in mice offers a complementary approach to human genome-wide association studies and can facilitate environment control, statistical power, novel gene discovery, and neurobiological mechanisms. We used interval-specific congenic mouse lines carrying various segments of chromosome 11 from the DBA/2J strain on an isogenic C57BL/6J background to positionally clone a 206 kb QTL (50,185,512-50,391,845 bp) that was causally associated with a reduction in the locomotor stimulant response to methamphetamine (2 mg/kg, i.p.; DBA/2J < C57BL/6J)-a non-contingent, drug-induced behavior that is associated with stimulation of the dopaminergic reward circuitry. This chromosomal region contained only two protein coding genes-heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, H1 (Hnrnph1) and RUN and FYVE domain-containing 1 (Rufy1). Transcriptome analysis via mRNA sequencing in the striatum implicated a neurobiological mechanism involving a reduction in mesolimbic innervation and striatal neurotransmission. For instance, Nr4a2 (nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 2), a transcription factor crucial for midbrain dopaminergic neuron development, exhibited a 2.1-fold decrease in expression (DBA/2J < C57BL/6J; p 4.2 x 10-15). Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs)-mediated introduction of frameshift deletions in the first coding exon of Hnrnph1, but not Rufy1, recapitulated the reduced methamphetamine behavioral response, thus identifying Hnrnph1 as a quantitative trait gene for methamphetamine sensitivity. These results define a novel contribution of Hnrnph1 to neurobehavioral dysfunction associated with dopaminergic neurotransmission. These findings could have implications for understanding the genetic basis of methamphetamine addiction in humans and the development of novel therapeutics for prevention and

  8. Hnrnph1 Is A Quantitative Trait Gene for Methamphetamine Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Neema; Parker, Clarissa C.; Shen, Ying; Reed, Eric R.; Guido, Michael A.; Kole, Loren A.; Kirkpatrick, Stacey L.; Lim, Jackie E.; Sokoloff, Greta; Cheng, Riyan; Johnson, W. Evan; Palmer, Abraham A.; Bryant, Camron D.

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulant addiction is a heritable substance use disorder; however its genetic basis is almost entirely unknown. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in mice offers a complementary approach to human genome-wide association studies and can facilitate environment control, statistical power, novel gene discovery, and neurobiological mechanisms. We used interval-specific congenic mouse lines carrying various segments of chromosome 11 from the DBA/2J strain on an isogenic C57BL/6J background to positionally clone a 206 kb QTL (50,185,512–50,391,845 bp) that was causally associated with a reduction in the locomotor stimulant response to methamphetamine (2 mg/kg, i.p.; DBA/2J < C57BL/6J)—a non-contingent, drug-induced behavior that is associated with stimulation of the dopaminergic reward circuitry. This chromosomal region contained only two protein coding genes—heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, H1 (Hnrnph1) and RUN and FYVE domain-containing 1 (Rufy1). Transcriptome analysis via mRNA sequencing in the striatum implicated a neurobiological mechanism involving a reduction in mesolimbic innervation and striatal neurotransmission. For instance, Nr4a2 (nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 2), a transcription factor crucial for midbrain dopaminergic neuron development, exhibited a 2.1-fold decrease in expression (DBA/2J < C57BL/6J; p 4.2 x 10−15). Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs)-mediated introduction of frameshift deletions in the first coding exon of Hnrnph1, but not Rufy1, recapitulated the reduced methamphetamine behavioral response, thus identifying Hnrnph1 as a quantitative trait gene for methamphetamine sensitivity. These results define a novel contribution of Hnrnph1 to neurobehavioral dysfunction associated with dopaminergic neurotransmission. These findings could have implications for understanding the genetic basis of methamphetamine addiction in humans and the development of novel therapeutics for prevention

  9. Methodology for determining time-dependent mechanical properties of tuff subjected to near-field repository conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Blacic, J.D.; Andersen, R.

    1983-01-01

    We have established a methodology to determine the time dependence of strength and transport properties of tuff under conditions appropriate to a nuclear waste repository. Exploratory tests to determine the approximate magnitudes of thermomechanical property changes are nearly complete. In this report we describe the capabilities of an apparatus designed to precisely measure the time-dependent deformation and permeability of tuff at simulated repository conditions. Preliminary tests with this new apparatus indicate that microclastic creep failure of tuff occurs over a narrow strain range with little precursory Tertiary creep behavior. In one test, deformation under conditions of slowly decreasing effective pressure resulted in failure, whereas some strain indicators showed a decreasing rate of strain.

  10. Hysteretic ac loss in a coated superconductor subjected to oscillating magnetic fields: ferromagnetic effect and frequency dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guang-Tong

    2014-06-01

    Numerical simulations of the hysteretic ac loss in a coated superconductor with a more realistic version of the architecture were performed via the finite-element technique in the presence of an oscillating magnetic field. The coated superconductor was electromagnetically modeled by resorting to the quasistatic approximation of a vector potential approach in conjunction with nonlinear descriptions of the superconducting layer and the ferromagnetic substrate therein by a power-law model and the Langevin equation, respectively. A diverse effect of the ferromagnetic substrate on the hysteretic ac loss, depending on the strength of the applied magnetic field, was displayed, and its underlying cause was identified. The dependence of the hysteretic ac loss on the applied frequency is found to be related to a critical amplitude of the applied magnetic field, and the eddy-current loss dissipated in the metal coatings becomes prominent as the frequency increases only at high applied magnetic fields.

  11. An animal model of differential genetic risk for methamphetamine intake.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Tamara J; Shabani, Shkelzen

    2015-01-01

    The question of whether genetic factors contribute to risk for methamphetamine (MA) use and dependence has not been intensively investigated. Compared to human populations, genetic animal models offer the advantages of control over genetic family history and drug exposure. Using selective breeding, we created lines of mice that differ in genetic risk for voluntary MA intake and identified the chromosomal addresses of contributory genes. A quantitative trait locus was identified on chromosome 10 that accounts for more than 50% of the genetic variance in MA intake in the selected mouse lines. In addition, behavioral and physiological screening identified differences corresponding with risk for MA intake that have generated hypotheses that are testable in humans. Heightened sensitivity to aversive and certain physiological effects of MA, such as MA-induced reduction in body temperature, are hallmarks of mice bred for low MA intake. Furthermore, unlike MA-avoiding mice, MA-preferring mice are sensitive to rewarding and reinforcing MA effects, and to MA-induced increases in brain extracellular dopamine levels. Gene expression analyses implicate the importance of a network enriched in transcription factor genes, some of which regulate the mu opioid receptor gene, Oprm1, in risk for MA use. Neuroimmune factors appear to play a role in differential response to MA between the mice bred for high and low intake. In addition, chromosome 10 candidate gene studies provide strong support for a trace amine-associated receptor 1 gene, Taar1, polymorphism in risk for MA intake. MA is a trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) agonist, and a non-functional Taar1 allele segregates with high MA consumption. Thus, reduced TAAR1 function has the potential to increase risk for MA use. Overall, existing findings support the MA drinking lines as a powerful model for identifying genetic factors involved in determining risk for harmful MA use. Future directions include the development of a

  12. Further studies of the role of hyperthermia in methamphetamine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, J F; Davies, D L; Schmued, L; Broening, H W; Newport, G D; Slikker, W; Holson, R R

    1994-03-01

    The depletion of striatal dopamine (DA) that can occur after methamphetamine (METH) administration has been linked to METH-induced hyperthermia. The relationship between METH-induced hyperthermia, neurotoxicity (striatal DA depletions) and compounds that protect against METH neurotoxicity was further investigated in this study. Typically, rats exposed to METH die when their body temperatures exceed 41.3 degrees C but such hyperthermic rats can be saved by hypothermic intervention. Subsequently, rats saved by hypothermic intervention have greater depletion of striatal DA at an earlier time of onset (18 hr or less post-METH) than do METH-exposed rats that do not attain such high temperatures. Striatal damage was present 3 days post-METH in these hyperthermic rats, as assessed by silver degeneration of terminals and increases in the astrocytes that express glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity. By contrast, alterations in the number of [3H]dizoclipine (MK-801) binding sites in cortical or striatal membranes at 1, 3 or 14 days post-METH were not detected. The experiments showed that mean and maximal body temperature correlated well with striatal DA concentrations 3 days post-METH (r = -0.77, n = 58), which suggests a role for hyperthermia in METH neurotoxicity. However, hyperthermia (alone or with haloperidol present) induced by high ambient temperatures did not deplete striatal DA in the absence of METH. Haloperidol, diazepam and MK-801 all reduced METH-induced striatal DA depletion to a degree predicted by their inhibition of hyperthermia and increased ambient temperature abolished their neuroprotection. Although an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist reduced maximal body temperature enough to lower the lethality rate, it did not reduce the temperature sufficiently to block METH neurotoxicity. It was concluded that short- and long-term decreases in striatal DA levels depend on the degree of hyperthermia produced during METH exposure but cannot be produced by

  13. An animal model of differential genetic risk for methamphetamine intake

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Tamara J.; Shabani, Shkelzen

    2015-01-01

    The question of whether genetic factors contribute to risk for methamphetamine (MA) use and dependence has not been intensively investigated. Compared to human populations, genetic animal models offer the advantages of control over genetic family history and drug exposure. Using selective breeding, we created lines of mice that differ in genetic risk for voluntary MA intake and identified the chromosomal addresses of contributory genes. A quantitative trait locus was identified on chromosome 10 that accounts for more than 50% of the genetic variance in MA intake in the selected mouse lines. In addition, behavioral and physiological screening identified differences corresponding with risk for MA intake that have generated hypotheses that are testable in humans. Heightened sensitivity to aversive and certain physiological effects of MA, such as MA-induced reduction in body temperature, are hallmarks of mice bred for low MA intake. Furthermore, unlike MA-avoiding mice, MA-preferring mice are sensitive to rewarding and reinforcing MA effects, and to MA-induced increases in brain extracellular dopamine levels. Gene expression analyses implicate the importance of a network enriched in transcription factor genes, some of which regulate the mu opioid receptor gene, Oprm1, in risk for MA use. Neuroimmune factors appear to play a role in differential response to MA between the mice bred for high and low intake. In addition, chromosome 10 candidate gene studies provide strong support for a trace amine-associated receptor 1 gene, Taar1, polymorphism in risk for MA intake. MA is a trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) agonist, and a non-functional Taar1 allele segregates with high MA consumption. Thus, reduced TAAR1 function has the potential to increase risk for MA use. Overall, existing findings support the MA drinking lines as a powerful model for identifying genetic factors involved in determining risk for harmful MA use. Future directions include the development of a

  14. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol prevents methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Castelli, M Paola; Madeddu, Camilla; Casti, Alberto; Casu, Angelo; Casti, Paola; Scherma, Maria; Fattore, Liana; Fadda, Paola; Ennas, M Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a potent psychostimulant with neurotoxic properties. Heavy use increases the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), production of peroxynitrites, microglia stimulation, and induces hyperthermia and anorectic effects. Most METH recreational users also consume cannabis. Preclinical studies have shown that natural (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, Δ9-THC) and synthetic cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists exert neuroprotective effects on different models of cerebral damage. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Δ9-THC on METH-induced neurotoxicity by examining its ability to reduce astrocyte activation and nNOS overexpression in selected brain areas. Rats exposed to a METH neurotoxic regimen (4 × 10 mg/kg, 2 hours apart) were pre- or post-treated with Δ9-THC (1 or 3 mg/kg) and sacrificed 3 days after the last METH administration. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against nNOS and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP). Results showed that, as compared to corresponding controls (i) METH-induced nNOS overexpression in the caudate-putamen (CPu) was significantly attenuated by pre- and post-treatment with both doses of Δ9-THC (-19% and -28% for 1 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; -25% and -21% for 3 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals); (ii) METH-induced GFAP-immunoreactivity (IR) was significantly reduced in the CPu by post-treatment with 1 mg/kg Δ9-THC1 (-50%) and by pre-treatment with 3 mg/kg Δ9-THC (-53%); (iii) METH-induced GFAP-IR was significantly decreased in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) by pre- and post-treatment with both doses of Δ9-THC (-34% and -47% for 1 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; -37% and -29% for 3 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals). The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A attenuated METH-induced nNOS overexpression in the CPu, but failed to counteract the Δ9-THC-mediated reduction of METH-induced GFAP-IR both in the PFC and CPu. Our

  15. The relationship between methamphetamine use and increased dental disease

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Vivek; Mooney, Larissa J.; Zigler, Corwin M.; Belin, Thomas R.; Murphy, Debra; Rawson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine (MA) use has been linked anecdotally to rampant dental disease. The authors sought to determine the relative prevalence of dental comorbidities in MA users, verify whether MA users have more quantifiable dental disease and report having more dental problems than nonusers and establish the influence of mode of MA administration on oral health outcomes. Methods Participating physicians provided comprehensive medical and oral assessments for adults dependent on MA (n = 301). Trained interviewers collected patients' self-reports regarding oral health and substance-use behaviors. The authors used propensity score matching to create a matched comparison group of nonusers from participants in the the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Results Dental or oral disease was one of the most prevalent (41.3 percent) medical cormorbidities in MA users who otherwise were generally healthy. On average, MA users had significantly more missing teeth than did matched NHANES III control participants (4.58 versus 1.96, P < .001) and were more likely to report having oral health problems (P < .001). Significant subsets of MA users expressed concerns with their dental appearance (28.6 percent), problems with broken or loose teeth (23.3 percent) and tooth grinding (bruxism) or erosion (22.3 percent). The intravenous use of MA was significantly more likely to be associated with missing teeth than was smoking MA (odds ratio = 2.47; 95 percent confidence interval = 1.3-4.8). Conclusions Overt dental disease is one of the key distinguishing comorbidities in MA users. MA users have demonstrably higher rates of dental disease and report long-term unmet oral health needs. Contrary to common perception, users who smoke or inhale MA have lower rates of dental disease than do those who inject the drug. Many MA users are concerned with the cosmetic aspects of their dental disease, and these concerns could be used as behavioral triggers for

  16. Structural and functional cellular alterations underlying the toxicity of methamphetamine in rat retina and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Prudêncio, Cristina; Abrantes, Bruno; Lopes, Isabel; Tavares, Maria Amélia

    2002-06-01

    The consumption of illicit drugs is an increasing problem in contemporary societies, and is one of the major causes of death and illness all over the world. Methamphetamine is among the drugs more widely used. Although evidence for a role of reactive species--especially reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic events--has been shown, the mechanism(s) underlying the cellular toxicity induced by this drug is not yet fully identified. In this context the elucidation of the cytotoxic effects induced by methamphetamine in rat frontal cortex and retina, which compromise cell viability and ultimately result in cell death, can further contribute to the understanding of its mechanism of action. This knowledge may provide new insights into the development of new therapeutic approaches to prevent or ameliorate deleterious alterations of the nervous system. The use of epifluorescence microscopy associated with different fluorescent probes, markers of structural and/or functional cell parameters, can be used as a powerful tool to carry out those studies, in particular, the viability probes propidium iodide (PI) to assess plasma membrane integrity and fluorescein diacetate (FDA), which can monitor intracellular esterase activity and/or pH. In a preliminary study, the kinetic assessment of cellular changes induced by different drug concentrations (0, 1.2, 3, and 6 mM) allowed detection of dose-dependent alterations that are observed earlier in the retina. In fact, in the retina it was possible to monitor alterations (at 4 h of incubation) both in plasma membrane integrity and in esterase activity and/or pH for the lowest drug concentration (1.2 mM). In the prefrontal cortex these changes were only visible for drug concentrations > or = 3 mM. This work is a novel approach to the mechanisms of action of illicit drugs in the central nervous system and will provide the foundations and guidelines for further investigations in the context of tolerance, dependence, and addiction.

  17. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopic Sensing of Methamphetamine by a Specific Aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Johari-Ahar, Mohammad; Hamzeiy, Hossein; Barar, Jaleh; Mashinchian, Omid; Omidi, Yadollah

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is a simple and highly sensitive technique that can be used for evaluation of the aptamer-target interaction even in a label-free approach. Methods To pursue the effectiveness of EIS, in the current study, the folding properties of specific aptamer for methamphetamine (METH) (i.e., aptaMETH) were evaluated in the presence of METH and amphetamine (Amph). Folded and unfolded aptaMETH was mounted on the gold electrode surface and the electron charge transfer was measured by EIS. Results The Ret of methamphetamine-aptaMETH was significantly increased in comparison with other folding conditions, indicating specific detection of METH by aptaMETH. Conclusion Based on these findings, methamphetamine-aptaMETH on the gold electrode surface displayed the most interfacial electrode resistance and thus the most folding situation. This clearly indicates that the aptaMETH can profoundly and specifically pinpoint METH; as a result we suggest utilization of this methodology for fast and cost-effective identification of METH. PMID:23678446

  18. Exposures associated with clandestine methamphetamine drug laboratories in Australia.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jackie; Edwards, John; Walker, Stewart

    2016-09-01

    The clandestine manufacture of methamphetamine in residential homes may represent significant hazards and exposures not only to those involved in the manufacture of the drugs but also to others living in the home (including children), neighbours and first responders to the premises. These hazards are associated with the nature and improper storage and use of precursor chemicals, intermediate chemicals and wastes, gases and methamphetamine residues generated during manufacture and the drugs themselves. Many of these compounds are persistent and result in exposures inside a home not only during manufacture but after the laboratory has been seized or removed. Hence new occupants of buildings formerly used to manufacture methamphetamine may be unknowingly exposed to these hazards. Children are most susceptible to these hazards and evidence is available in the literature to indicate that these exposures may result in immediate and long-term adverse health effects. The assessment of exposure within the home can be undertaken by measuring contaminant levels or collecting appropriate biological data from individuals exposed. To gain a better understanding of the available data and key issues associated with these approaches to the characterisation of exposure, a review of the published literature has been undertaken. PMID:27428841

  19. Methamphetamine-induced structural plasticity in the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Jedynak, Jakub P; Uslaner, Jason M; Esteban, José A; Robinson, Terry E

    2007-02-01

    Repeated exposure to psychostimulant drugs produces long-lasting changes in dendritic structure, presumably reflecting a reorganization in patterns of synaptic connectivity, in brain regions that mediate the psychomotor activating and incentive motivational effects of these drugs, including the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex. However, repeated exposure to psychostimulant drugs also facilitates a transition in the control of some behaviors from action-outcome associations to behavior controlled by stimulus-response (S-R) habits. This latter effect is thought to be due to increasing engagement and control over behavior by the dorsolateral (but not dorsomedial) striatum. We hypothesized therefore that repeated exposure to methamphetamine would differentially alter the density of dendritic spines on medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the dorsolateral vs. dorsomedial striatum. Rats were treated with repeated injections of methamphetamine, and 3 months later dendrites were visualized using Sindbis virus-mediated green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in vivo. We report that prior exposure to methamphetamine produced a significant increase in mushroom and thin spines on MSNs in the dorsolateral striatum, but a significant decrease in mushroom spines in the dorsomedial striatum. This may be due to changes in the glutamatergic innervation of these two subregions of the dorsal striatum. Thus, we speculate that exposure to psychostimulant drugs may facilitate the development of S-R habits because this reorganizes patterns of synaptic connectivity in the dorsal striatum in a way that increases control over behavior by the dorsolateral striatum.

  20. A pilot trial of integrated behavioral activation and sexual risk reduction counseling for HIV-uninfected men who have sex with men abusing crystal methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Mimiaga, Matthew J; Reisner, Sari L; Pantalone, David W; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Mayer, Kenneth H; Safren, Steven A

    2012-11-01

    Crystal methamphetamine use is a major driver behind high-risk sexual behavior among men who have sex with men (MSM). Prior work suggests a cycle of continued crystal methamphetamine use and high-risk sex due to loss of the ability to enjoy other activities, which appears to be a side effect of this drug. Behavioral activation (BA) is a treatment for depression that involves learning to reengage in life's activities. We evaluated a novel intervention for crystal methamphetamine abuse and high-risk sex in MSM, incorporating 10 sessions of BA with integrated HIV risk reduction counseling (RR). Forty-four subjects were screened, of whom 21 met initial entry criteria. A total of 19 participants enrolled; 16 completed an open-phase study of the intervention. Behavioral assessments were conducted at baseline, 3 months postbaseline, and 6 months postbaseline. Linear mixed effects regression models were fit to assess change over time. Mean unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) episodes decreased significantly from baseline to acute postintervention (β=-4.86; 95% confidence interval [CI]=-7.48, -2.24; p=0.0015) and from baseline to 6 months postbaseline (β=-5.07; 95% CI=-7.85, -2.29; p=0.0017; test of fixed effects χ(2)=16.59; df=2,13; p=0.0002). On average, there was a significant decrease over time in the number of crystal methamphetamine episodes in the past 3 months (χ(2)=22.43; df=2,15; p<0.0001), and the number of days of crystal methamphetamine use in the past 30 days (χ(2)=9.21; df=2,15; p=0.010). Statistically significant reductions in depressive symptoms and poly-substance use were also maintained. Adding behavioral activation to risk reduction counseling for MSM with problematic crystal methamphetamine use may augment the potency of a risk reduction intervention for this population. Due to the small sample size and time intensive intervention, future testing in a randomized design is necessary to determine efficacy, with subsequent effectiveness testing.

  1. Sex and parental hypertension as predictors of worsened red blood cell membrane enzyme activities in type 1 insulin-dependent diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Finotti, P; Piccoli, A

    1993-01-01

    The possibility that distinct genetic factors may concur, in association with diabetes, to increase susceptibility to vascular morbidity, including hypertension, has been evaluated in ninety-four normotensive insulin-dependent diabetic patients by testing both the frequency and prevalence of hypertension in parents and by measuring membrane red blood cell enzyme activities. Parental hypertension was present in a significantly higher proportion of diabetic compared to control subjects. A significant decrease in basal membrane red blood cell (Na(+)-K+), (Mg2+) and (Ca2+) ATPase activities was also related to the disease and was apparently uninfluenced by short--or long term metabolic control. In contrast with what was observed in the control group, sex caused in diabetic subjects significant variations in red blood cell enzyme activities, with women showing the lowest mean basal values of all enzyme activities. Parental hypertension turned out to be an independent risk factor in significantly reducing red blood cell enzyme activities both in diabetic and control subjects. However, whereas in diabetic subjects sex interacted strongly with parental hypertension in causing reduction of enzyme activities, in controls the effect of parental hypertension was sex-independent and significantly reduced basal enzyme activities, thus rendering subjects similar to diabetics. It is concluded that both sex and parental hypertension in association with diabetes, are predictors of further damage to red blood cell enzyme activities, which may thus be linked to increased risk of susceptibility towards vascular complications. PMID:8389303

  2. From dilatancy to contraction: Stress-dependent failure mode progression in two porous sandstones subjected to true triaxial testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaodong; Haimson, Bezalel

    2013-04-01

    Porous sedimentary rocks such as sandstones are typical oil-bearing formations in which failure due to high stress concentration is likely to occur during wellbore drilling and subsequent operations. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of ?2 on strength, failure-plane angle, and failure mode under realistically simulated field conditions (?1 ×?2 ×?3). A series of true triaxial compression tests were conducted on two representative porous sandstones: Coconino (17.5% porosity, 99% quartz, with rounded and well-sorted 0.1 mm grains that are bonded by suturing and some quartz overgrowth), and Bentheim (24% porosity, 95% quartz, with sub-rounded 0.3 mm grains that are bonded exclusively by suturing). Square cuboidal specimens (19 x 19 x 38mm) were subjected to independent loads in three principal directions, using the University of Wisconsin testing apparatus, creating a true triaxial state of stress (?1 ×?2 ×?3). In all tests, ?3 and ?2 were maintained constant at predetermined levels, while ?1 was raised monotonically until failure occurred. The magnitude of ?3 varied between 0 and 150 MPa, covering the range of brittle behavior, brittle-ductile transition, and the threshold to the ductile zone in the weaker Bentheim sandstone. It was found that in both rocks the compressive strength (?1,peak) for a given ?3 increases as the preset ?2 is raised between tests, and reaches a peak (15% over ?1,peak when ?2 = ?3 in the Coconino, and less than 10% in the Bentheim), beyond which it gradually drops, such that when ?2 ? ?1,peak, the strength is approximately the same as when ?2 = ?3. This strengthening effect is considerably lower than that in previously tested crystalline rocks, such as Westerly granite and KTB amphibolite (more than 50%, Haimson, 2006). Plotting the test data in the ?oct vs. ?oct domain, where the two stress invariants ?oct, the octahedral shear stress, and ?oct,the mean normal stress, are both taken at failure), Coconino shows

  3. Involvement of sigma (sigma) receptors in the acute actions of methamphetamine: receptor binding and behavioral studies.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Emily C; McCracken, Kari A; Liu, Yun; Pouw, Buddy; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2005-10-01

    Methamphetamine interacts with sigma (sigma) receptors, suggesting that the drug produces some of its physiological and behavioral effects through these sites. Therefore, in the present report, receptor binding and pharmacological studies were performed to characterize the interaction between methamphetamine and sigma receptors. Of the two major sigma receptor subtypes, sigma1 and sigma2, competition binding studies showed that methamphetamine has a 22-fold preferential affinity for the sigma1 subtype. Saturation binding studies using the sigma1 selective radioligand [3H]+-pentazocine showed that in the presence of methamphetamine, there was a significant change in Kd, but not Bmax, suggesting competitive interactions. In behavioral studies, pretreatment of Swiss Webster mice with the sigma1 receptor antagonists, BD1063 or BD1047, significantly attenuated the locomotor stimulatory effects of methamphetamine. Mice that were administered an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to down-regulate brain sigma1 receptors also exhibited a reduced locomotor stimulatory response to methamphetamine, as compared to control mice receiving mismatch oligonucleotides. Together, the data suggest that sigma1 receptors are involved in the acute actions of methamphetamine and that antagonism of this subtype is sufficient to prevent the locomotor stimulatory effects of methamphetamine. PMID:15939443

  4. Demand for Substance Abuse Treatment Related to Use of Crystal Methamphetamine in Ontario: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brands, Bruna; Corea, Larry; Strike, Carol; Singh, Veeran-Anne S.; Behrooz, Renee C.; Rush, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about methamphetamine/crystal methamphetamine (MA) have featured prominently in the Canadian media and on addiction treatment agency agendas. We examined MA admissions at addiction treatment agencies to determine if a service gap existed. In 2006, all addiction treatment agencies (n = 124) in Ontario, Canada were invited to complete an…

  5. Illegal Methamphetamine Drug Laboratories: A New Challenge for Environmental Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeers, Vicki M.

    1992-01-01

    Reports on clandestine drug laboratories for manufacturing methamphetamine; the formation of an interagency steering committee to address the problem; and the role Environmental Health professionals need to play as the problem becomes more prevalent across the United States. Provides background information on methamphetamine characteristics and…

  6. Assessing Environmental Prevention Strategies for Reducing the Prevalence and Associated Harms of Methamphetamine Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yacoubian, George S.

    2007-01-01

    Developed primarily in clandestine laboratories, methamphetamine is a highly addictive synthetic drug whose physical effects include hyperactivity, euphoria, tremors, and a sense of increased energy. While the accuracy of recent accounts suggesting a methamphetamine epidemic in the United States is unclear, these reports have nevertheless…

  7. Methamphetamine Use Is Independently Associated with Recent Risky Sexual Behaviors and Adolescent Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapata, Lauren B.; Hillis, Susan D.; Marchbanks; Polly A.; Curtis, Kathryn M.; Lowry, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background: Lifetime methamphetamine use among adolescents is estimated to be between 5% and 10%. Youth substance use in general is known to be associated with risky sexual behaviors, but the effect of methamphetamine use on recent risky sexual behaviors and adolescent pregnancy has received little attention. The purpose of this analysis was to…

  8. Case Series: Mental Health Needs and Perspectives of Rural Children Reared by Parents Who Abuse Methamphetamine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostler, Teresa; Haight, Wendy; Black, James; Choi, Ga-Young; Kingery, Linda; Sheridan, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This case-based, mixed-methods study was undertaken to understand the perspectives and mental health needs of rural children exposed to parental methamphetamine abuse. Method: Participants were 23 children involved with a state child protective agency because of parental methamphetamine abuse. A semistructured interview provided…

  9. A Multivariate Analysis of the Sociodemographic Predictors of Methamphetamine Production and Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Todd A.; Armstrong, Gaylene S.

    2013-01-01

    To date, research testing the community characteristics associated with methamphetamine production and use has found that the community-level sociodemographic predictors of methamphetamine production and use vary from those of drug use in general. In this study, the authors furthered the research in this area using data from all 102 counties in…

  10. During-Treatment Outcomes among Female Methamphetamine-Using Offenders in Prison-Based Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowan-Szal, Grace A.; Joe, George W.; Simpson, D. Dwayne; Greener, Jack M.; Vance, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    An increasingly important treatment group is the expanding population of methamphetamine-using female offenders. This study focused on women methamphetamine-using offenders (n = 359) who were treated either in a modified therapeutic community (TC) program ("Clean Lifestyle is Freedom Forever" [CLIFF]-TC: n = 234) designed for non-violent offenders…

  11. Methamphetamine Use, Self-Reported Violent Crime, and Recidivism Among Offenders in California Who Abuse Substances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartier, Jerome; Farabee, David; Prendergast, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    This study uses data from 641 state prison parolees in California to examine the associations between methamphetamine use and three measures of criminal behavior: (a) self-reported violent criminal behavior, (b) return to prison for a violent offense, and (c) return to prison for any reason during the first 12 months of parole. Methamphetamine use…

  12. Simple HPLC method for detection of trace ephedrine and pseudoephedrine in high-purity methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yukiko

    2012-03-01

    A simple and sensitive HPLC technique was developed for the qualitative determination of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine (ephedrines), used as precursors of clandestine d-methamphetamine hydrochloride of high purity. Good separation of ephedrines from bulk d-methamphetamine was achieved, without any extraction or derivatization procedure on a CAPCELLPACK C18 MGII (250 × 4.6 mm) column. The mobile phase consisted of 50 mM KH2 PO4-acetonitrile (94:6 v/v %) using an isocratic pump system within 20 min for detecting two analytes. One run took about 50 min as it was necessary to wash out overloaded methamphetamine for column conditioning. The analytes were detected by UV absorbance measurement at 210 nm. A sample (20 mg) was simply dissolved in 1 mL of water, and a 50 μL aliquot of the solution was injected into the HPLC. The detection limits for ephedrine and pseudoephedrine in bulk d-methamphetamine were as low as 3 ppm each. This analytical separation technique made it possible to detect ephedrine and/or pseudoephedrine in seven samples of high-purity d-methamphetamine hydrochloride seized in Japan. The presence of trace ephedrines in illicit methamphetamine may strongly indicate a synthetic route via ephedrine in methamphetamine profiling. This method is simple and sensitive, requiring only commonly available equipment, and should be useful for high-purity methamphetamine profiling.

  13. Combating Methamphetamine Use in the Community: The Efficacy of the Drug Court Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Listwan, Shelley Johnson; Shaffer, Deborah Koetzle; Hartman, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine use was historically a problem facing Western states; however, in recent years it has methodically spread throughout the nation. Methamphetamine use impacts communities, families, and the criminal justice system in a variety of ways. As such, many jurisdictions are developing policies to reduce the sale and consumption of this drug…

  14. Methamphetamine Use among Rural White and Native American Adolescents: An Application of the Stress Process Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eitle, David J.; Eitle, Tamela McNulty

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine use has been identified as having significant adverse health consequences, yet we know little about the correlates of its use. Additionally, research has found that Native Americans are at the highest risk for methamphetamine use. Our exploratory study, informed by the stress process model, examines stress and stress buffering…

  15. National Case-Control Study of Homicide Offending and Methamphetamine Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stretesky, Paul B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between methamphetamine use and homicide. To carry out this study, data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse and Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities were combined to create a case-control design. The main exposure measure is methamphetamine use and the…

  16. Methamphetamine use and HIV risk among substance-abusing offenders in California.

    PubMed

    Farabee, David; Prendergast, Michael; Cartier, Jerome

    2002-01-01

    Recent epidemiological surveys of illicit substance use show a particularly high prevalence of methamphetamine use in the western and southwestern United States-most notably California. Moreover, in their analysis of 1995 Drug Use Forecasting data, Anglin and colleagues (1998) found that methamphetamine was a preferred substance among California arrestees. The present study uses data from 807 state prison inmates in California (32% of whom reported using methamphetamine prior to incarceration) to examine the associations between methamphetamine use and HIV risk behaviors. Methamphetamine users in this sample were significantly more likely than nonusers to have injected drugs during the six months prior to their current incarceration. Among injectors, however, injection-related risks (such as dirty needles and needle sharing, etc.) were not significantly associated with methamphetamine use. However, past six-month sex-related risks were dramatically higher for methamphetamine users. These patterns persisted even after controlling for background differences between the two groups. The results of this study underscore the importance of addressing the higher sex-related HIV/AIDS risk among methamphetamine users undergoing prison-based drug treatment. PMID:12422940

  17. Longitudinal Modeling of Methamphetamine Use and Sexual Risk Behaviors in Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Preetika Pandey; Palamar, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the analyses was to examine the associations between methamphetamine and other club drug use with sexual risk taking across time in cohort of gay and bisexual men. Data were collected from a community-based sample. Assessments of unprotected anal intercourse with casual partners, and use of methamphetamine and other illicit drugs, were assessed at baseline, and at 4-month intervals over the course of a year, and were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling. Methamphetamine use was related to the frequency of unprotected insertive and receptive intercourse with both HIV-positive and status unknown casual partners across time. The association between methamphetamine use and unprotected acts also was more pronounced for HIV-positive participants. These findings suggest that methamphetamine, and unprotected anal intercourse are co-occurring risk behaviors, that potentially heighten the risk of HIV transmission among gay and bisexual men. HIV prevention and intervention should concurrently target both these behaviors. PMID:18661225

  18. Effect of 7-nitroindazole on body temperature and methamphetamine-induced dopamine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Callahan, B T; Ricaurte, G A

    1998-08-24

    The present study was undertaken to examine the role of temperature on the ability of 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) to prevent methamphetamine-induced dopamine (DA) neurotoxicity. Male Swiss-Webster mice received methamphetamine alone or in combination with 7-NI at either room temperature (20+/-1 degrees C) or at 28+/-1 degrees C. At 20+/-1 degrees C, 7-NI produced hypothermic effects and afforded total protection against methamphetamine-induced DA depletions in the striatum. At 28+/-1 degrees C, 7-NI produced minimal effects on body temperature and failed to prevent methamphetamine-induced DA reductions. These findings indicate that the neuroprotection afforded by 7-NI is likely related to its ability to produce hypothermia because agents that produce hypothermia and/or prevent hyperthermia are known to attenuate methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

  19. Mephentermine dependence with psychosis.

    PubMed

    Gehlawat, Pratibha; Singh, Priti; Gupta, Rajiv; Arya, Sidharth

    2013-01-01

    Mephentermine misuse or dependence has been rarely reported in the literature. This is surprising as mephentermine bears a close structural similarity to methamphetamine. Here we report a case of mephentermine dependence with induced psychosis. A 23-year-old professional weightlifter used to administer mephentermine (60 mg) for improving performance in tournaments. The patient became dependent on mephentermine in 2009, and his consumption increased to 100-150 mg every 2-3 days since August 2012 until his presentation in clinic in mid-October 2012. He developed psychosis and had persecutory delusions. Remission of psychosis was seen with stopping use of mephentermine and use of antipsychotic medication. PMID:23759255

  20. Time-dependent behavior of a placed bed of cohesive sediment subjected to erosion and deposition cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, G.; Valentine, K.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to explore the behavior of a cohesive sediment bed that undergoes cycles of erosion and deposition under diluted conditions. A bed of bentonite (montmorillonite) sediment was placed in two annular flumes and subjected to daily erosion tests for a period of 80 days, mimicking intermittent moderate-energy disturbances like tidal currents and wind waves. After each erosion test, the suspended sediment was allowed to settle back in the flumes. The amount of suspended sediment measured at the top of the water column at the end of each erosion test decreased in the first 5 days, concurrently with an increase in the bulk-settling velocity near the bed. This pattern is explained by turbulence-induced flocculation of clay particles and consequent formation of a surface floc layer. After about 20 days, the amount of suspended sediment measured at the top of the water column at the end of each erosion test increased and the settling velocity decreased, whereas the suspended sediment concentration measured near the bed remained nearly constant. We explain such trend by the cumulative release of slow-settling particles from the bed. This experiment suggests that the superficial layer of a placed bed that is periodically eroded and redeposited experiences competing processes: the sediment that is resuspended at every cycle becomes less erodible, but prolonged exposure to shear stress increases the pool of eroded sediment over time. The total amount of resuspended sediment seems to become constant after several tens of cycle, suggesting that the release of particles from the bed by cumulative erosion is balanced by the binding of such particles to the bed.

  1. Varied access to intravenous methamphetamine self-administration differentially alters adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mandyam, Chitra D.; Wee, Sunmee; Crawford, Elena F.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Richardson, Heather N.; Koob, George F.

    2008-01-01

    Background Chronic abuse of methamphetamine produces deficits in hippocampal function, perhaps by altering hippocampal neurogenesis and plasticity. We examined how intravenous methamphetamine self-administration modulates active division, proliferation of late progenitors, differentiation, maturation, survival, and mature phenotype of hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) progenitors. Methods Adult male Wistar rats were given access to methamphetamine 1 h twice weekly (intermittent short), 1 h daily (short), or 6 h daily (long). Rats received one intraperitoneal injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label progenitors in the synthesis (S) phase, and 28-day-old surviving BrdU-immunoreactive (IR) cells were quantified. Ki-67, doublecortin (DCX), and activated caspase-3 (AC-3) were used to visualize and quantify proliferating, differentiating, maturing, and apoptotic cells. Terminal corticosterone was measured to determine changes in adrenal steroids. Results Intermittent access to methamphetamine increased Ki-67 and DCX-IR cells, but opposing effects on late progenitors and postmitotic neurons resulted in no overall change in neurogenesis. Daily access to methamphetamine decreased all studied aspects of neurogenesis and reduced hippocampal granule neurons and volume, changes that likely are mediated by decreased proliferative and neurogenic capacity of the SGZ. Furthermore, methamphetamine self-administration relative to the amount of methamphetamine intake produced a biphasic effect on hippocampal apoptosis and reduced corticosterone levels. Conclusions Intermittent (occasional access) and daily (limited and extended access) self-administration of methamphetamine impact different aspects of neurogenesis, the former producing initial pro-proliferative effects and the latter producing downregulating effects. These findings suggest that altered hippocampal integrity by even modest doses of methamphetamine could account for pronounced pathology linked to methamphetamine

  2. Disruption of striatal glutamatergic/GABAergic homeostasis following acute methamphetamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Frederico C; Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Viana, Sofia D; Travassos, Ana S; Nunes, Sara; Silva, Carlos; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Rego, A Cristina; Ali, Syed F; Ribeiro, Carlos Alberto Fontes

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine leads to functional changes in basal ganglia that are linked to impairment in motor activity. Previous studies from our group and others have shown that a single high-methamphetamine injection induces striatal dopaminergic changes in rodents. However, striatal glutamatergic, GABAergic and serotoninergic changes remain elusive under this methamphetamine regimen. Moreover, nothing is known about the participation of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), which is overexpressed upon synaptic dysfunction and glial response, on methamphetamine-induced striatal dysfunction. The aim of this work was to provide an integrative characterization of the striatal changes in amino acids, monoamines and astroglia, as well as in the RAGE levels, and the associated motor activity profile of C57BL/6 adult mice, 72 h after a single-high dose of methamphetamine (30 mg/kg, i.p.). Our findings indicate, for the first time, that methamphetamine decreases striatal glutamine, glutamate and GABA levels, as well as glutamine/glutamate and GABA/glutamate ratios, while serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels remain unchanged. This methamphetamine regimen also produced dopaminergic terminal degeneration in the striatum, as evidenced by dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase depletion. Consistently, methamphetamine decreased the locomotor activity of mice, in the open field test. In addition, increased levels of glutamine synthase and glial fibrillary acidic protein were observed. Nevertheless, methamphetamine failed to change RAGE levels. Our results show that acute methamphetamine intoxication induces pronounced changes in the striatal glutamatergic/GABAergic and dopaminergic homeostasis, along with astrocyte activation. These neurochemical and glial alterations are accompanied by impairment in locomotor activity.

  3. Fragment C Domain of Tetanus Toxin Mitigates Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity and Its Motor Consequences in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mendieta, Liliana; Granado, Noelia; Aguilera, José; Tizabi, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    Background: The C-terminal domain of the heavy chain of tetanus toxin (Hc-TeTx) is a nontoxic peptide with demonstrated in vitro and in vivo neuroprotective effects against striatal dopaminergic damage induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and 6-hydoxydopamine, suggesting its possible therapeutic potential in Parkinson’s disease. Methamphetamine, a widely abused psychostimulant, has selective dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rodents, monkeys, and humans. This study was undertaken to determine whether Hc-TeTx might also protect against methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity and the consequent motor impairment. Methods: For this purpose, we treated mice with a toxic regimen of methamphetamine (4mg/kg, 3 consecutive i.p. injections, 3 hours apart) followed by 3 injections of 40 ug/kg of Hc-TeTx into grastrocnemius muscle at 1, 24, and 48 hours post methamphetamine treatment. Results: We found that Hc-TeTx significantly reduced the loss of dopaminergic markers tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter and the increases in silver staining (a well stablished degeneration marker) induced by methamphetamine in the striatum. Moreover, Hc-TeTx prevented the increase of neuronal nitric oxide synthase but did not affect microglia activation induced by methamphetamine. Stereological neuronal count in the substan