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Sample records for methane ethane propane

  1. Sorption of methane, ethane, propane, butane, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen on kerogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribylov, A. A.; Skibitskaya, N. A.; Zekel', L. A.

    2014-06-01

    Sorption isotherms of nitrogen, methane (in the pressure range of 0.1-40 MPa), ethane (0.1-3.7MPa), propane (0.01-1 MPa), butane (0.01-0.2 MPa), and carbon dioxide (0.1-6 MPa) are measured on two adsorbents with kerogen contents of 16 and 75% at temperatures of 303, 323, 343 K. Adsorption volumes are calculated for all adsorption systems using two independent methods. The BET technique is used to determine the surface area values of the two adsorbents on the basis of sorption data for ethane, propane, butane, and carbon dioxide. The initial and isosteric adheat of sorption values are calculated on the basis of sorption isotherms of ethane, propane, butane, carbon dioxide measured at three temperatures. It is found from comparing the dependences of isosteric heat of sorption on the two adsorbents that molecules of the above gases diffuse into its bulk (adsorbent 2) in addition to sorbing on the outside surface formed by kerogen molecules, while sorption of the same gases on the rock (adsorbent 1) is similar to sorption on a smooth hard adsorbent surface.

  2. Liquid-state theory of hydrocarbon-water systems: Application to methane, ethane, and propane

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, L.; Blankschtein, D.

    1992-10-15

    The authors studied the structural and bulk thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon (methane, ethane, and propane)-water systems as well as pure water using the site-site Ornstein-Zernike (SSOZ) equation under a variety of different closure relations in order to compare the quantitative predictive capabilities of the various closures. For the hydrocarbon-water systems, the simple point-charge(SPC) potential was used to model water, and the optimized potentials for liquid, simulation (OPLS) were used to model the hydrocarbons. 69 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Raman spectra of methane, ethylene, ethane, dimethyl ether, formaldehyde and propane for combustion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnotti, G.; KC, U.; Varghese, P. L.; Barlow, R. S.

    2015-09-01

    Spontaneous Raman scattering measurements of temperature and major species concentration in hydrocarbon-air flames require detailed knowledge of the Raman spectra of the hydrocarbons present when fuels more complex than methane are used. Although hydrocarbon spectra have been extensively studied at room temperature, there are no data available at higher temperatures. Quantum mechanical calculations, when available are not sufficiently accurate for combustion applications. This work presents experimental measurements of spontaneous Stokes-Raman scattering spectra of methane, ethylene, ethane, dimethyl ether, formaldehyde and propane in the temperature range 300-860 K. Raman spectra from heated hydrocarbons jets have been collected with a higher resolution than is generally employed for Raman measurements in combustion applications. A set of synthetic spectra have been generated for each hydrocarbon, providing the basis for extrapolation to higher temperatures. The spectra provided here will enable simultaneous measurements of multiple hydrocarbons in flames. This capability will greatly extend the range of applicability of Raman measurements in combustion applications. In addition, the experimental spectra provide a validation dataset for quantum mechanical models.

  4. The SPASIBA force field of aldehydes. Part I: Structure and vibrational wavenumbers of methanal, ethanal and propanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanoun, A.; Durier, V.; Belaidi, A.; Vergoten, G.

    1999-02-01

    The SPASIBA vibrational spectroscopic force field has been developed for the aldehyde function. The tested molecules are methanal, ethanal, propanal and some of their deuterated analogues. The parameters have been obtained by fitting calculated and observed vibrational wavenumbers. A set of 34 independant force constants has been found to correctly describe the structure and vibrational spectra. The average error between predicted and observed vibrational wavenumber is 16 cm -1.

  5. Prediction of equilibrium distributions of isotopologues for methane, ethane and propane using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex; Peterson, Brian; Eiler, John

    2016-10-01

    Many previous studies have examined abundances of deuterium (D) and 13C within small organic molecules. Recent advances in analytical instrumentation add the abilities to measure site-specific and multiply substituted isotopologues of natural organics. Here we perform first-principles calculations of the equilibrium distributions of 13C and D in the volatile alkanes (including both single and multiple substitutions), as a guide to the interpretation of current measurements and as a basis for anticipating isotope effects that might be examined with future analytical techniques. The models we present illustrate several common themes of the isotopic structures of the small alkanes, including; temperature dependent enrichment of clumped isotope species, with amplitudes in the order D-D > 13C-D > 13C-13C; similarity in strength of such clumped isotope effects between different molecules (e.g., 13C-D clumping is ∼5‰ enriched at 300 K in methane, ethane and propane); a ∼10× contrast between the amplitudes of stronger adjacent substitution of two heavy isotopes vs. weaker non-adjacent substitution; temperature-dependent site-specific fractionation of D and 13C into interior positions of molecules relative to terminal methyl groups; and a relatively simple additive effect to the overall amplitude of enrichment when clumped and site specific effects combine in the same isotopologue. We suggest that the most promising tools suggested by our results are isotopic thermometers based on site-specific distribution of deuterium, which exhibits strong (∼100‰), highly temperature dependent fractionation between methyl groups and methylene carbon positions in propane (and likely other larger n-alkanes).

  6. Kinetic mechanism of plasma recombination in methane, ethane and propane after high-voltage nanosecond discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhin, E. M.; Popov, M. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Starikovskiy, A. Yu; Aleksandrov, N. L.

    2016-08-01

    The results of the experimental and numerical study of high-voltage nanosecond discharge afterglow in pure methane, ethane and propane are presented for room temperature and pressures from 2 to 20 Torr. Time-resolved electron density during the plasma decay was measured with a microwave interferometer for initial electron densities in the range between 5  ×  1010 and 3  ×  1012 cm-3 and the effective recombination coefficients were obtained. Measured effective recombination coefficients increased with gas pressure and were much higher than the recombination coefficients for simple molecular hydrocarbon ions. The properties of plasma in the discharge afterglow were numerically simulated by solving the balance equations for charged particles and electron temperature. Calculations showed that electrons had time to thermalize prior to the recombination. The measured data were interpreted under the assumption that cluster hydrocarbon ions are formed during the plasma decay that is controlled by the dissociative electron recombination with these ions at electron room temperature. Based on the analysis of the experimental data, the rates of three-body formation of cluster ions and recombination coefficients for these ions were estimated.

  7. Synergistic effect of mixing dimethyl ether with methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and soot formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, S.S.; Anh, D.H.; Chung, S.H.

    2008-08-15

    Characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and soot formation in counterflow diffusion flames of methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels mixed with dimethyl ether (DME) have been investigated. Planar laser-induced incandescence and fluorescence techniques were employed to measure relative soot volume fractions and PAH concentrations, respectively. Results showed that even though DME is known to be a clean fuel in terms of soot formation, DME mixture with ethylene fuel increases PAH and soot formation significantly as compared to the pure ethylene case, while the mixture of DME with methane, ethane, and propane decreases PAH and soot formation. Numerical calculations adopting a detailed kinetics showed that DME can be decomposed to produce a relatively large number of methyl radicals in the low-temperature region where PAH forms and grows; thus the mixture of DME with ethylene increases CH{sub 3} radicals significantly in the PAH formation region. Considering that the increase in the concentration of O radicals is minimal in the PAH formation region with DME mixture, the enhancement of PAH and soot formation in the mixture flames of DME and ethylene can be explained based on the role of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation. Methyl radicals can increase the concentration of propargyls, which could enhance incipient benzene ring formation through the propargyl recombination reaction and subsequent PAH growth. Thus, the result substantiates the importance of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation, especially in the PAH formation region of diffusion flames. (author)

  8. Acetonitrile cluster solvation in a cryogenic ethane-methane-propane liquid: Implications for Titan lake chemistry.

    PubMed

    Corrales, L René; Yi, Thomas D; Trumbo, Samantha K; Shalloway, David; Lunine, Jonathan I; Usher, David A

    2017-03-14

    The atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon, exhibits interesting UV- and radiation-driven chemistry between nitrogen and methane, resulting in dipolar, nitrile-containing molecules. The assembly and subsequent solvation of such molecules in the alkane lakes and seas found on the moon's surface are of particular interest for investigating the possibility of prebiotic chemistry in Titan's hydrophobic seas. Here we characterize the solvation of acetonitrile, a product of Titan's atmospheric radiation chemistry tentatively detected on Titan's surface [H. B. Niemann et al., Nature 438, 779-784 (2005)], in an alkane mixture estimated to match a postulated composition of the smaller lakes during cycles of active drying and rewetting. Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to determine the potential of mean force of acetonitrile (CH3CN) clusters moving from the alkane vapor into the bulk liquid. We find that the clusters prefer the alkane liquid to the vapor and do not dissociate in the bulk liquid. This opens up the possibility that acetonitrile-based microscopic polar chemistry may be possible in the otherwise nonpolar Titan lakes.

  9. Acetonitrile cluster solvation in a cryogenic ethane-methane-propane liquid: Implications for Titan lake chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, L. René; Yi, Thomas D.; Trumbo, Samantha K.; Shalloway, David; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Usher, David A.

    2017-03-01

    The atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon, exhibits interesting UV- and radiation-driven chemistry between nitrogen and methane, resulting in dipolar, nitrile-containing molecules. The assembly and subsequent solvation of such molecules in the alkane lakes and seas found on the moon's surface are of particular interest for investigating the possibility of prebiotic chemistry in Titan's hydrophobic seas. Here we characterize the solvation of acetonitrile, a product of Titan's atmospheric radiation chemistry tentatively detected on Titan's surface [H. B. Niemann et al., Nature 438, 779-784 (2005)], in an alkane mixture estimated to match a postulated composition of the smaller lakes during cycles of active drying and rewetting. Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to determine the potential of mean force of acetonitrile (CH3CN) clusters moving from the alkane vapor into the bulk liquid. We find that the clusters prefer the alkane liquid to the vapor and do not dissociate in the bulk liquid. This opens up the possibility that acetonitrile-based microscopic polar chemistry may be possible in the otherwise nonpolar Titan lakes.

  10. Desorption Kinetics of Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, O2, CO, Methane, Ethane, and Propane from Graphene and Amorphous Solid Water Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; May, Robert A.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2016-03-03

    The desorption kinetics for Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, O2, CO, methane, ethane, and propane from grapheme covered Pt(111) and amorphous solid water (ASW) surfaces are investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The TPD spectra for all of the adsorbates from graphene have well-resolved first, second, third, and multi- layer desorption peaks. The alignment of the leading edges is consistent the zero-order desorption for all of the adsorbates. An Arrhenius analysis is used to obtain desorption energies and prefactors for desorption from graphene for all of the adsorbates. In contrast, the leading desorption edges for the adsorbates from ASW do not align (for coverages < 2 ML). The non-alignment of TPD leading edges suggests that there are multiple desorption binding sites on the ASW surface. Inversion analysis is used to obtain the coverage dependent desorption energies and prefactors for desorption from ASW for all of the adsorbates.

  11. Development of a pre-concentration system and auto-analyzer for dissolved methane, ethane, propane, and butane concentration measurements with a GC-FID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepigin, A.; Leonte, M.; Colombo, F.; Kessler, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved methane, ethane, propane, and butane concentrations in natural waters are traditionally measured using a headspace equilibration technique and gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). While a relatively simple technique, headspace equilibration suffers from slow equilibration times and loss of sensitivity due to concentration dilution with the pure gas headspace. Here we present a newly developed pre-concentration system and auto-analyzer for use with a GC-FID. This system decreases the time required for each analysis by eliminating the headspace equilibration time, increases the sensitivity and precision with a rapid pre-concentration step, and minimized operator time with an autoanalyzer. In this method, samples are collected from Niskin bottles in newly developed 1 L plastic sample bags rather than glass vials. Immediately following sample collection, the sample bags are placed in an incubator and individually connected to a multiport sampling valve. Water is pumped automatically from the desired sample bag through a small (6.5 mL) Liqui-Cel® membrane contactor where the dissolved gas is vacuum extracted and directly flushed into the GC sample loop. The gases of interest are preferentially extracted with the Liqui-Cel and thus a natural pre-concentration effect is obtained. Daily method calibration is achieved in the field with a five-point calibration curve that is created by analyzing gas standard-spiked water stored in 5 L gas-impermeable bags. Our system has been shown to substantially pre-concentrate the dissolved gases of interest and produce a highly linear response of peak areas to dissolved gas concentration. The system retains the high accuracy, precision, and wide range of measurable concentrations of the headspace equilibration method while simultaneously increasing the sensitivity due to the pre-concentration step. The time and labor involved in the headspace equilibration method is eliminated and replaced with the

  12. Titan ocean: Ethane, methane, nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Detection of the atmosphere of Saturn's satellite Titan by the Voyager I spacecraft indicated an abundance of only 3 mol % methane (CH4). Recently J.I. Lunine, D.J. Stevenson, and Y.L. Yung calculated that 3 mol % methane is sufficiently low to preclude the stable coexistence of liquid methane on Titan's surface, which has a temperature of 94 K (Science, 222, 1229, 1983). Instead, Lunine et al. suggest that Titan's atmospheric methane may have broken down by a catalyzed photochemical reaction to ethane (C2H6). The resulting ocean would consist of a mixture of C2H6 and CH4 in the proportion of 3 to 1.

  13. Reversal of global atmospheric ethane and propane trends largely due to US oil and natural gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Detlev; Rossabi, Samuel; Hueber, Jacques; Tans, Pieter; Montzka, Stephen A.; Masarie, Ken; Thoning, Kirk; Plass-Duelmer, Christian; Claude, Anja; Carpenter, Lucy J.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Punjabi, Shalini; Reimann, Stefan; Vollmer, Martin K.; Steinbrecher, Rainer; Hannigan, James W.; Emmons, Louisa K.; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Franco, Bruno; Smale, Dan; Pozzer, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Non-methane hydrocarbons such as ethane are important precursors to tropospheric ozone and aerosols. Using data from a global surface network and atmospheric column observations we show that the steady decline in the ethane mole fraction that began in the 1970s halted between 2005 and 2010 in most of the Northern Hemisphere and has since reversed. We calculate a yearly increase in ethane emissions in the Northern Hemisphere of 0.42 (+/-0.19) Tg yr-1 between mid-2009 and mid-2014. The largest increases in ethane and the shorter-lived propane are seen over the central and eastern USA, with a spatial distribution that suggests North American oil and natural gas development as the primary source of increasing emissions. By including other co-emitted oil and natural gas non-methane hydrocarbons, we estimate a Northern Hemisphere total non-methane hydrocarbon yearly emission increase of 1.2 (+/-0.8) Tg yr-1. Atmospheric chemical transport modelling suggests that these emissions could augment summertime mean surface ozone by several nanomoles per mole near oil and natural gas production regions. Methane/ethane oil and natural gas emission ratios could suggest a significant increase in associated methane emissions; however, this increase is inconsistent with observed leak rates in production regions and changes in methane's global isotopic ratio.

  14. Demonstration of an ethane spectrometer for methane source identification.

    PubMed

    Yacovitch, Tara I; Herndon, Scott C; Roscioli, Joseph R; Floerchinger, Cody; McGovern, Ryan M; Agnese, Michael; Pétron, Gabrielle; Kofler, Jonathan; Sweeney, Colm; Karion, Anna; Conley, Stephen A; Kort, Eric A; Nähle, Lars; Fischer, Marc; Hildebrandt, Lars; Koeth, Johannes; McManus, J Barry; Nelson, David D; Zahniser, Mark S; Kolb, Charles E

    2014-07-15

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and tropospheric ozone precursor. Simultaneous observation of ethane with methane can help identify specific methane source types. Aerodyne Ethane-Mini spectrometers, employing recently available mid-infrared distributed feedback tunable diode lasers (DFB-TDL), provide 1 s ethane measurements with sub-ppb precision. In this work, an Ethane-Mini spectrometer has been integrated into two mobile sampling platforms, a ground vehicle and a small airplane, and used to measure ethane/methane enhancement ratios downwind of methane sources. Methane emissions with precisely known sources are shown to have ethane/methane enhancement ratios that differ greatly depending on the source type. Large differences between biogenic and thermogenic sources are observed. Variation within thermogenic sources are detected and tabulated. Methane emitters are classified by their expected ethane content. Categories include the following: biogenic (<0.2%), dry gas (1-6%), wet gas (>6%), pipeline grade natural gas (<15%), and processed natural gas liquids (>30%). Regional scale observations in the Dallas/Fort Worth area of Texas show two distinct ethane/methane enhancement ratios bridged by a transitional region. These results demonstrate the usefulness of continuous and fast ethane measurements in experimental studies of methane emissions, particularly in the oil and natural gas sector.

  15. Novel Pt/Mg(In)(Al)O catalysts for ethane and propane dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Pingping; Siddiqi, Georges; Vining, William C.; Chi, Miaofang; Bell, Alexis T.

    2011-10-28

    Catalysts for the dehydrogenation of light alkanes were prepared by dispersing Pt on the surface of a calcined hydrotalcite-like support containing indium, Mg(In)(Al)O. Upon reduction in H{sub 2} at temperatures above 673 K, bimetallic particles of PtIn are observed by TEM, which have an average diameter of 1 nm. Analysis of Pt LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data shows that the In content of the bimetallic particles increases with increasing bulk In/Pt ratio and reduction temperature. Pt LIII-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) indicates that an increasing donation of electronic charge from In to Pt occurs with increasing In content in the PtIn particles. The activity and selectivity of the Pt/Mg(In)(Al)O catalysts for ethane and propane dehydrogenation reactions are strongly dependent on the bulk In/Pt ratio. For both reactants, maximum activity was achieved for a bulk In/Pt ratio of 0.48, and at this In/Pt ratio, the selectivity to alkene was nearly 100%. Coke deposition was observed after catalyst use for either ethane or propane dehydrogenation, and it was observed that the alloying of Pt with In greatly reduced the amount of coke deposited. Characterization of the deposit by Raman spectroscopy indicates that the coke is present as highly disordered graphite particles <30 nm in diameter. While the amount of coke deposited during ethane and propane dehydrogenation are comparable, the effects on activity are dependent on reactant composition. Coke deposition had no effect on ethane dehydrogenation activity, but caused a loss in propane dehydrogenation activity. This difference is attributed to the greater ease with which coke produced on the surface of PtIn nanoparticles migrates to the support during ethane dehydrogenation versus propane dehydrogenation.

  16. Attainable superheat of ethane-methane solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidakov, V. G.; Pankov, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    Methods of measuring lifetime and continuous pressure decrease were used to study kinetics of spontaneous boiling-up of superheated ethane-methane solutions. The attainable superheats of solutions at two pressure values (1.0 and 1.6 MPa) and two concentrations of methane (2.1 and 6.0 mole %) were determined experimentally in the range of nucleation rate J = 1·104-3·108 s-1m-3. At temperatures 266.5, 270.0, and 273.15 K, the attainable stretching of the studied solutions was measured. The experimental results were compared with the theory of homogeneous nucleation. At nucleation rates J ≥ 2.5·106 s-1m-3, there is a fair agreement of the theory and experiment. The discrepancy in attainable superheat temperatures T n does not exceed 0.8 K. It is shown that significant underheating of solution to theoretical values T n at J < 2.5·106 s-1m-3 cannot be bound only with heterogeneous nucleation but is conditioned by other factors as well.

  17. Methane, Ethane, and Nitrogen Liquid Stability on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Jennifer; Thompson, Garrett Leland; Roe, Henry G.; Grundy, Will; Tegler, Stephen C.; Lindberg, Gerrick Eugene; Trilling, David E.

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the lakes of Titan are composed of methane and/or ethane, but the relative proportions are mostly unclear. Understanding the past and current stability of these lakes requires characterizing the interactions of liquid methane and ethane, along with nitrogen. Previous studies have shown that the freezing point of methane is depressed when mixed with nitrogen. Our cryogenic laboratory setup allows us to explore ices down to 30 K through imaging and transmission spectroscopy. Recent work (see Thompson et al., this conference) discovered that although methane and ethane have similar freezing points, when mixed they can remain liquid down to 72 K. Concurrently with the freezing point measurements we acquire transmission spectra of these mixtures to understand how the spectral features change with concentration and temperature. Any mixing of these two species together will depress the freezing point of the lake below Titan's surface temperature, preventing them from freezing. Also, when ethane ice forms, it freezes on the bottom of the liquid, while methane ice freezes at the top of the liquid, implying ethane ice is denser than the solution, while methane ice is less dense; this holds for all concentrations. We will present new results exploring the ternary system of methane, ethane and nitrogen. In particular we will map out the N2-C2H6 liquidus, as has been done for CH4-N2, as well as explore the effect of nitrogen on the eutectic of the methane-ethane system. This behavior has implications for not only the lakes on the surface of Titan, but also for the evaporation/condensation/cloud cycle in the atmosphere. These results will help interpretation of future observational data, and guide current theoretical models.

  18. Airborne Ethane Observations in the Barnett Shale: Quantification of Ethane Flux and Attribution of Methane Emissions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mackenzie L; Kort, Eric A; Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Herndon, Scott C; Yacovitch, Tara I

    2015-07-07

    We present high time resolution airborne ethane (C2H6) and methane (CH4) measurements made in March and October 2013 as part of the Barnett Coordinated Campaign over the Barnett Shale formation in Texas. Ethane fluxes are quantified using a downwind flight strategy, a first demonstration of this approach for C2H6. Additionally, ethane-to-methane emissions ratios (C2H6:CH4) of point sources were observationally determined from simultaneous airborne C2H6 and CH4 measurements during a survey flight over the source region. Distinct C2H6:CH4 × 100% molar ratios of 0.0%, 1.8%, and 9.6%, indicative of microbial, low-C2H6 fossil, and high-C2H6 fossil sources, respectively, emerged in observations over the emissions source region of the Barnett Shale. Ethane-to-methane correlations were used in conjunction with C2H6 and CH4 fluxes to quantify the fraction of CH4 emissions derived from fossil and microbial sources. On the basis of two analyses, we find 71-85% of the observed methane emissions quantified in the Barnett Shale are derived from fossil sources. The average ethane flux observed from the studied region of the Barnett Shale was 6.6 ± 0.2 × 10(3) kg hr(-1) and consistent across six days in spring and fall of 2013.

  19. Second and third virial coefficients for methane + ethane and methane + ethane + carbon dioxide at (300 and 320) K

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, H.; Holste, J.C.; Hall, K.R.; Marsh, K.N.; Gammon, B.E.

    1996-03-01

    Measurements of pVT made using the Burnett technique at (300 and 320) K are reported for methane, ethane, three x{sub 1} methane + (1 {minus} x{sub 1}) ethane mixtures with x{sub 1} = 0.30623, 0.49971, and 0.70090, and two x{sub 1} methane + x{sub 2} ethane + (1 {minus} x{sub 1} {minus} x{sub 2}) carbon dioxide mixtures with x{sub 1} = 0.32125, x{sub 2} = 0.34099 and x{sub 1} = 0.24759, x{sub 2} = 0.56013. Second virial coefficients have been calculated from these results for the pure fluids, and the binary and ternary mixtures. Cross second and third virial coefficients have been derived, including the cross third virial coefficient which describes the simultaneous unlike interaction between methane, ethane, and carbon dioxide. The experimental results were used to test an approximation to the virial equation which greatly simplifies calculations for multicomponent mixtures and which requires only experimental virial coefficients for binary mixtures. Values calculated using the model agree with experimental values within the estimated uncertainties. The results are compared with literature values, where available.

  20. Adsorption of methane, ethane, and ethylene on zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Berlier, K.; Olivier, M.G.; Jadot, R.

    1995-11-01

    Adsorption isotherms at 283 and 303 K of methane, ethane, and ethylene on zeolite G5 have been obtained. Measurements have been made at pressures up to 1,200 kPa using an automated apparatus based on the volumetric method. This study is linked to a modeling interest because of the structure simplicity of the adsorbate molecules and because of the known geometric structure of the adsorbent.

  1. Laboratory studies, analysis, and interpretation of the spectra of hydrocarbons present in planetary atmospheres including cyanoacetylene, acetylene, propane, and ethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blass, William E.; Daunt, Stephen J.; Peters, Antoni V.; Weber, Mark C.

    1990-01-01

    Combining broadband Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) from the McMath facility at NSO and from NRC in Ottawa and narrow band TDL data from the laboratories with computational physics techniques has produced a broad range of results for the study of planetary atmospheres. Motivation for the effort flows from the Voyager/IRIS observations and the needs of Voyager analysis for laboratory results. In addition, anticipation of the Cassini mission adds incentive to pursue studies of observed and potentially observable constituents of planetary atmospheres. Current studies include cyanoacetylene, acetylene, propane, and ethane. Particular attention is devoted to cyanoacetylen (H3CN) which is observed in the atmosphere of Titan. The results of a high resolution infrared laboratory study of the line positions of the 663, 449, and 22.5/cm fundamental bands are presented. Line position, reproducible to better than 5 MHz for the first two bands, are available for infrared astrophysical searches. Intensity and broadening studies are in progress. Acetylene is a nearly ubiquitous atmospheric constituent of the outer planets and Titan due to the nature of methane photochemistry. Results of ambient temperature absolute intensity measurements are presented for the fundamental and two two-quantum hotband in the 730/cm region. Low temperature hotband intensity and linewidth measurements are planned.

  2. Airborne Ethane Observations over the Barnett and Bakken Shale Formations: Quantification of Ethane Fluxes and Attribution of Methane Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. L.; Kort, E. A.; Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    The largest emissions sources of methane, a potent greenhouse gas and the primary component of natural gas, are the fossil fuel sector and microbial processes that occur in agricultural settings, landfills, and wetlands. Attribution of methane to these different source sectors has proven difficult, as evidenced by persistent disagreement between the annual emissions estimated from atmospheric observations (top-down) and from inventories (bottom-up). Given the rapidly changing natural gas infrastructure in North America, and the implications of associated rapid changes in emissions of methane for climate, it is crucial we improve our ability to quantify and understand current and future methane emissions. Here, we present evidence that continuous in-situ airborne observations of ethane, which is a tracer for fossil fuel emissions, are a new and useful tool for attribution of methane emissions to specific source sectors. Additionally, with these new airborne observations we present the first tightly constrained ethane emissions estimates of oil and gas production fields using the well-known mass balance method. The ratios of ethane-to-methane (C2H6:CH4) of specific methane emissions sources were studied over regions of high oil and gas production from the Barnett, TX and Bakken, ND shale plays, using continuous (1Hz frequency) airborne ethane measurements paired with simultaneous methane measurements. Despite the complex mixture of sources in the Barnett region, the methane emissions were well-characterized by distinct C2H6:CH4 relationships indicative of a high-ethane fossil fuel source (e.g., "wet" gas), a low-ethane fossil fuel source (e.g., "dry" gas), and an ethane-free, or microbial source. The defined set of C2H6:CH4 that characterized the emissions input to the atmosphere was used in conjunction with the total ethane and methane fluxes to place bounds on the fraction of methane emissions attributable to each source. Additionally, substantial ethane fluxes

  3. Enhancing aerobic biodegradation of 1,2-dibromoethane in groundwater using ethane or propane and inorganic nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzinger, Paul B.; Streger, Sheryl H.; Begley, James F.

    2015-01-01

    1,2-Dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide; EDB) is a probable human carcinogen that was previously used as both a soil fumigant and a scavenger in leaded gasoline. EDB has been observed to persist in soils and groundwater, particularly under oxic conditions. The objective of this study was to evaluate options to enhance the aerobic degradation of EDB in groundwater, with a particular focus on possible in situ remediation strategies. Propane gas and ethane gas were observed to significantly stimulate the biodegradation of EDB in microcosms constructed with aquifer solids and groundwater from the FS-12 EDB plume at Joint Base Cape Cod (Cape Cod, MA), but only after inorganic nutrients were added. Ethene gas was also effective, but rates were appreciably slower than for ethane and propane. EDB was reduced to < 0.02 μg/L, the Massachusetts state Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL), in microcosms that received ethane gas and inorganic nutrients. An enrichment culture (BE-3R) that grew on ethane or propane gas but not EDB was obtained from the site materials. The degradation of EDB by this culture was inhibited by acetylene gas, suggesting that degradation is catalyzed by a monooxygenase enzyme. The BE-3R culture was also observed to biodegrade 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA), a compound commonly used in conjunction with EDB as a lead scavenger in gasoline. The data suggest that addition of ethane or propane gas with inorganic nutrients may be a viable option to enhance degradation of EDB in groundwater aquifers to below current state or federal MCL values.

  4. Performance of an Experimental Annular Turbojet Combustor with Methane and Propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, Carl T

    1957-01-01

    Combustion efficiencies obtained with gaseous methane were compared with reported data obtained with gaseous propane for the same experimental combustor configuration. The combustion efficiencies obtained with methane were 98, 91, and 77 percent at simulated flight altitudes of 56,000, 70,000 and 80,000 feet, corresponding to combustor inlet-air pressures from 15 to 5 inches of mercury absolute. Combustion efficiencies with propane were equivalent to those with methane up to a simulated altitude of 70,000 feet. At the most severe conditions investigated propane operated with a higher efficiency and over a wider range of fuel-air ratio than methane.

  5. The solubility of ethane, propane, and carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of sodium cumene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    King, A D

    2004-05-01

    Measurements have been made to determine the solubilities of ethane, C2H6, propane, C3H8, and carbon dioxide, CO2, in aqueous solutions of sodium cumene sulfonate (NaCS) at 25 degrees C. The solubilities measured for each gas satisfy Henry's law at all concentrations of NaCS. The solubilities of C2H6 and C3H8 exhibit quite similar behavior with respect to added NaCS. The solubilities of these two gases are very low in pure water and are found to be nearly independent of NaCS concentration over a concentration range of 0-0.4 mol NaCS/kg H2O. At intermediate concentrations of NaCS, the solubilities of C2H6 and C3H8 exhibit a gradual increase with added NaCS concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 2.0 mol NaCS/kg H2O. At NaCS concentrations greater than 2.0 mol NaCS/kg H2O, the solubilities of these two gases increase with added NaCS in an approximately linear manner, with the solubility of C3H8 increasing more rapidly than that for C2H6 (by a factor of approximately 2.5). CO2 is much more soluble in pure water than the hydrocarbon gases and exhibits markedly different behavior with respect to added NaCS. The solubility of CO2 decreases with added NaCS over a concentration range of 0-0.9 mol NaCS/kg H2O, passes through a minimum at a concentration of approximately 1.0 mol NaCS/kg H2O, and then increases with added NaCS at higher NaCS concentrations in a manner similar to that observed with C2H6 and C3H8. The trends in solubility observed for these three gases dissolved in aqueous solutions of NaCS resemble those found previously with aqueous solutions of ordinary surfactants. The solubility data measured for these three gases can be interpreted surprisingly well in terms of the mass-action model for micellization, in which salting-out effects due to monomer salt ions suppress gas solubility at low NaCS concentrations and gas solubilization by small micelles of NaCS acts to enhance gas solubility at the higher NaCS concentrations.

  6. Development of a Flight Instrument for in situ Measurements of Ethane and Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, J. P.; Sayres, D. S.; Anderson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Methane emissions data for natural gas and oil fields have high uncertainty. Better quantifying these emissions is crucial to establish an accurate methane budget for the United States. One obstacle is that these emissions often occur in areas near livestock facilities where biogenic methane abounds. Measuring ethane, which has no biogenic source, along with methane can tease these sources apart. However, ethane is typically measured by taking whole-air samples. This tactic has lower spatial resolution than making in situ measurements and requires the measurer to anticipate the location of emission plumes. This leaves unexpected plumes uncharacterized. Using Re-injection Mirror Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (RIM-ICOS), we can measure both methane and ethane in flight, allowing us to establish more accurate fugitive emissions data that can more readily distinguish between different sources of this greenhouse gas.

  7. Long-term decline of global atmospheric ethane concentrations and implications for methane.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Isobel J; Sulbaek Andersen, Mads P; Meinardi, Simone; Bruhwiler, Lori; Blake, Nicola J; Helmig, Detlev; Rowland, F Sherwood; Blake, Donald R

    2012-08-23

    After methane, ethane is the most abundant hydrocarbon in the remote atmosphere. It is a precursor to tropospheric ozone and it influences the atmosphere's oxidative capacity through its reaction with the hydroxyl radical, ethane's primary atmospheric sink. Here we present the longest continuous record of global atmospheric ethane levels. We show that global ethane emission rates decreased from 14.3 to 11.3 teragrams per year, or by 21 per cent, from 1984 to 2010. We attribute this to decreasing fugitive emissions from ethane's fossil fuel source--most probably decreased venting and flaring of natural gas in oil fields--rather than a decline in its other major sources, biofuel use and biomass burning. Ethane's major emission sources are shared with methane, and recent studies have disagreed on whether reduced fossil fuel or microbial emissions have caused methane's atmospheric growth rate to slow. Our findings suggest that reduced fugitive fossil fuel emissions account for at least 10-21 teragrams per year (30-70 per cent) of the decrease in methane's global emissions, significantly contributing to methane's slowing atmospheric growth rate since the mid-1980s.

  8. Study on synchronous detection method of methane and ethane with laser absorption spectroscopy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ying; Zhang, Yu-jun; You, Kun; Gao, Yan-wei; Chen, Chen; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2016-10-01

    The main ingredient of mash gas is alkenes, and methane is the most parts of mash gas and ethane is a small portion of it. Fast, accurate, real-time measurement of methane and ethane concentration is an important task for preventing coal mining disaster. In this research, a monitoring system with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology has been set up for simultaneous measurement of methane and ethane, and a DFB laser at wavelength of 1.653μm was used as the laser source. The absorption spectroscopy information of methane and ethane, especially the characteristic of the spectrum peak positions and relative intensity were determined by available spectral structures from previous study and available database. Then, the concentration inversion algorithm method based on the spectral resolution and feature extraction was designed for methane and ethane synchronous detection. At last, the continuously experimental results obtained by different concentration of methane and ethane sample gases with the multiple reflection cell and the standard distribution system. In this experiment, the standard distribution system made with the standard gas and two high precision mass flow meters of D07 Sevenstar series whose flow velocity is 1l/min and 5l/min respectively. When the multiple reflection cell work stably, the biggest detection error of methane concentration inversion was 3.7%, and the biggest detection error of ethane was 4.8%. So it is verified that this concentration inversion algorithm works stably and reliably. Thus, this technology could realize the real-time, fast and continuous measurement requirement of mash gas and it will provide the effective technical support to coal mining production in safety for our country.

  9. Activation of methane and ethane and their selective oxidation to the alcohols in protic media

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A.; Benvenuto, M.A.; Lin, M.; Hutson, A.C.; Basickes, N. )

    1994-02-09

    The selective oxidation of methane and ethane to the alcohols in solvents ranging from strong acids to neutral aqueous medium has been studied. In 98% sulfuric acid, methane is oxidized to CH[sub 3]OSO[sub 3]H by a variety of 1e[sup [minus

  10. Ethane's 12C/13C Ratio in Titan: Implications for Methane Replenishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Nixon, C. A.; Romani, P. N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Sada, P. V.; Lunsford, A. W.; Boyle, R. J.; Hesman, B. E.; McCabe, G. H.

    2009-01-01

    As the .main destination of carbon in the destruction of methane in the atmosphere of Titan, ethane provides information about the carbon isotopic composition of the reservoir from which methane is replenished. If the amount of methane entering the atmosphere is presently equal to the amount converted to ethane, the 12C/13C ratio in ethane should be close to the ratio in the reservoir. We have measured the 12C/13C ratio in ethane both with Cassini CIRS(exp 1) and from the ground and find that it is very close to the telluric standard and outer planet values (89), consistent with a primordial origin for the methane reservoir. The lower 12C/13C ratio measured for methane by Huygens GCMS (82.3) can be explained if the conversion of CH4 to CH3 (and C2H6) favors 12C over 13C with a carbon kinetic isotope effect of 1.08. The time required for the atmospheric methane to reach equilibrium, i.e., for replenishment to equal destruction, is approximately 5 methane atmospheric lifetimes.

  11. Recent decreases in fossil-fuel emissions of ethane and methane derived from firn air.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Murat; Verhulst, Kristal R; Saltzman, Eric S; Battle, Mark O; Montzka, Stephen A; Blake, Donald R; Tang, Qi; Prather, Michael J

    2011-08-10

    Methane and ethane are the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere and they affect both atmospheric chemistry and climate. Both gases are emitted from fossil fuels and biomass burning, whereas methane (CH(4)) alone has large sources from wetlands, agriculture, landfills and waste water. Here we use measurements in firn (perennial snowpack) air from Greenland and Antarctica to reconstruct the atmospheric variability of ethane (C(2)H(6)) during the twentieth century. Ethane levels rose from early in the century until the 1980s, when the trend reversed, with a period of decline over the next 20 years. We find that this variability was primarily driven by changes in ethane emissions from fossil fuels; these emissions peaked in the 1960s and 1970s at 14-16 teragrams per year (1 Tg = 10(12) g) and dropped to 8-10 Tg  yr(-1) by the turn of the century. The reduction in fossil-fuel sources is probably related to changes in light hydrocarbon emissions associated with petroleum production and use. The ethane-based fossil-fuel emission history is strikingly different from bottom-up estimates of methane emissions from fossil-fuel use, and implies that the fossil-fuel source of methane started to decline in the 1980s and probably caused the late twentieth century slow-down in the growth rate of atmospheric methane.

  12. C-12/C-13 Ratio in Ethane on Titan and Implications for Methane's Replenishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Romani, Paul N.; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Sada, Pedro V.; Nixon, Conor A.; Lunsford, Allen W.; Boyle, Robert J.; Hesman, Brigette E.; McCabe, George H.

    2009-01-01

    The C-12/C-13 abundance ratio in ethane in the atmosphere of Titan has been measured at 822 cm(sup -1) from high spectral resolution ground-based observations. The value 89(8), coincides with the telluric standard and also agrees with the ratio seen in the outer planets. It is almost identical to the result for ethane on Titan found by the composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini. The C-12/C-13 ratio for ethane is higher than the ratio measured in atmospheric methane by Cassini/Huygens GCMS, 82.3(l), representing an enrichment of C-12 in the ethane that might be explained by a kinetic isotope effect of approximately 1.1 in the formation of methyl radicals. If methane is being continuously resupplied to balance photochemical destruction, then we expect the isotopic composition in the ethane product to equilibrate at close to the same C-12/C-13 ratio as that in the supply. The telluric value of the ratio in ethane then implies that the methane reservoir is primordial.

  13. 12C/13C ratio in ethane on titan and implications for methane's replenishment.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Donald E; Romani, Paul N; Bjoraker, Gordon L; Sada, Pedro V; Nixon, Conor A; Lunsford, Allen W; Boyle, Robert J; Hesman, Brigette E; McCabe, George H

    2009-10-22

    The (12)C/(13)C abundance ratio in ethane in the atmosphere of Titan has been measured at 822 cm(-1) from high spectral resolution ground-based observations. The value, 89(8), coincides with the telluric standard and also agrees with the ratio seen in the outer planets. It is almost identical to the result for ethane on Titan found by the composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini. The (12)C/(13)C ratio for ethane is higher than the ratio measured in atmospheric methane by Cassini/Huygens GCMS, 82.3(1), representing an enrichment of (12)C in the ethane that might be explained by a kinetic isotope effect of approximately 1.1 in the formation of methyl radicals. If methane is being continuously resupplied to balance photochemical destruction, then we expect the isotopic composition in the ethane product to equilibrate at close to the same (12)C/(13)C ratio as that in the supply. The telluric value of the ratio in ethane then implies that the methane reservoir is primordial.

  14. Methane, black carbon, and ethane emissions from natural gas flares in the Bakken Shale, ND.

    PubMed

    Gvakharia, Alexander; Kort, Eric A; Brandt, Adam R; Peischl, Jeff; Ryerson, Thomas B; Schwarz, Joshua P; Smith, Mackenzie L; Sweeney, Colm

    2017-04-12

    Incomplete combustion during flaring can lead to production of black carbon (BC) and loss of methane and other pollutants to the atmosphere, impacting climate and air quality. However, few studies have measured flare efficiency in a real-world setting. We use airborne data of plume samples from 37 unique flares in the Bakken region of North Dakota in May 2014 to calculate emission factors for BC, methane, ethane, and combustion efficiency for methane and ethane. We find no clear relationship between emission factors and aircraft-level wind speed, nor between methane and BC emission factors. Observed median combustion efficiencies for methane and ethane are close to expected values for typical flares according to the US EPA (98%). However, we find that the efficiency distribution is skewed, exhibiting lognormal behavior. This suggests incomplete combustion from flares contributes almost 1/5 of the total field emissions of methane and ethane measured in the Bakken shale, more than double the expected value if 98\\% efficiency was representative. BC emission factors also have a skewed distribution, but we find lower emission values than previous studies. The direct observation for the first time of a heavy-tail emissions distribution from flares suggests the need to consider skewed distributions when assessing flare impacts globally.

  15. Cooling rate and ice-crystal measurement in biological specimens plunged into liquid ethane, propane, and Freon 22.

    PubMed

    Ryan, K P; Bald, W B; Neumann, K; Simonsberger, P; Purse, D H; Nicholson, D N

    1990-06-01

    Specimens sandwiched between copper planchettes were plunged up to a depth of 430 mm into coolants used for cryofixation. Hydrated gelatin containing a miniature thermocouple was used to mimic the behaviour of tissue during freezing. Gelatin and red blood cells were used for ice-crystal analysis. Ethane produced the fastest cooling rates and the smallest ice-crystal profiles, and Freon 22 produced the slowest cooling rates and the largest crystal profiles. Smaller crystal profiles were often seen in the centre of the specimens than in subsurface zones. The results show that ethane, rather than propane, should be used for freezing metal-sandwiched freeze-fracture specimens by the plunging method, and probably also in the jet-cooling method. They further suggest that good cryofixation could occur at the centre of thin specimens rather than only at their surfaces. Comparison between theoretical and experimental ice-crystal sizes was satisfactory, indicating that where the experimental parameters can be defined then realistic predictions can be made regarding cryofixation results.

  16. Methane source identification in Boston, Massachusetts using isotopic and ethane measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Down, A.; Jackson, R. B.; Plata, D.; McKain, K.; Wofsy, S. C.; Rella, C.; Crosson, E.; Phillips, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    Methane has substantial greenhouse warming potential and is the principle component of natural gas. Fugitive natural gas emissions could be a significant source of methane to the atmosphere. However, the cumulative magnitude of natural gas leaks is not yet well constrained. We used a combination of point source measurements and ambient monitoring to characterize the methane sources in the Boston urban area. We developed distinct fingerprints for natural gas and multiple biogenic methane sources based on hydrocarbon concentration and isotopic composition. We combine these data with periodic measurements of atmospheric methane and ethane concentration to estimate the fractional contribution of natural gas and biogenic methane sources to the cumulative urban methane flux in Boston. These results are used to inform an inverse model of urban methane concentration and emissions.

  17. 20th century ethane variability from polar firn air and implications for the methane budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltzman, E. S.; Verhulst, K. R.; Aydin, K. M.; Battle, M. O.; Montzka, S. A.; Tang, Q.; Prather, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Methane and ethane are the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere and they impact both atmospheric chemistry and climate. Both gases are emitted from fossil fuels and biomass burning, while methane alone has large sources from wetlands, agriculture, landfills and wastewater. Here we use measurements in firn air from Greenland and Antarctica to reconstruct the atmospheric variability of ethane during the 20th century. Ethane levels rose from early in the century until the 1980’s when the trend reverses, with a period of decline over the next 20 years. This variability is primarily driven by changes in ethane emissions from fossil fuels that peaked in the 1960’s and 1970’s at 14-16 Tg/y and dropped to 8-10 Tg/y before the end of the century. The reduction in fossil-fuel sources is likely related to changes in light hydrocarbon recovery during petroleum production and use. The ethane-based emission history implies that the decline in the fossil-fuel source of methane may have started prior to the 1980’s and that the magnitude of the decline is larger than previous estimates.

  18. Ethane and propane emissions to the ocean and atmosphere from 550-1200 m seeps in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, E. A.; Kastner, M.; Leifer, I.

    2009-12-01

    Ethane (C2) and propane (C3) are highly reactive trace gases in the atmosphere that are important precursors of organic aerosols and contribute to ozone formation. The global flux of C2 and C3 based on tropospheric removal are 13-15.5 and 12 Tg/yr, respectively. Current emission inventories that include fossil fuel, biomass burning, biofuels, and waste treatment underestimate the global flux by ~2-5 Tg/yr. Previous studies have indicated that the open ocean contributes only marginally to global C2 and C3 budgets, but very few studies have investigated the natural emissions from marine seeps and their potential significance to global C2 and C3 fluxes. During a recent study at 3 seeps at depths from 550-600 m in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), a submersible was used to collect water column samples immediately adjacent to 5 bubble plumes from the seafloor vents to the sea surface. Bottom water C2 and C3 concentrations above the seeps ranged from 24.3-2220 and 15.8-385 nM, respectively. Ethane and propane concentrations decrease by ~50-95% in the bottom 200 m. Mixed layer C2 and C3 concentrations were extremely high ranging from 6.3-147 and 4.0-110 nM. These mixed layer C2 and C3 concentrations are up to 1×105 and 5×105 times saturation with respect to atmospheric equilibrium. In general, C1/C2 and C2/C3 ratios decrease from the seafloor to the mixed layer with surface ratios lower than previously reported from marine seeps and the ocean, indicating preferential loss of light hydrocarbons from the plumes during water column transit. Preliminary results from numerical bubble models show the importance of bubble plume-driven upwelling flows, bubble size, and pressure effects for enhancing hydrocarbon transfer to the mixed layer. Based on contemporaneous wind speeds at the study sites, preliminary estimates for the diffusive C2 and C3 fluxes to the atmosphere above the seeps range from 10-400 μmol/m2d; 2-4 orders of magnitude greater than estimates from the open ocean

  19. ANALYSIS OF DISSOLVED METHANE, ETHANE, AND ETHYLENE IN GROUND WATER BY A STANDARD GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The measurement of dissolved gases such as methane, ethane, and ethylene in ground water is important in determining whether intrinsic bioremediation is occurring in a fuel- or solvent-contaminated aquifer. A simple procedure is described for the collection and subsequent analys...

  20. Renewed methane increase (2007-2014): contribution of oil and natural gas emissions determined from methane and ethane column observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Petra; Sussmann, Ralf; Smale, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Harmonized time series of column-averaged mole fractions of atmospheric methane and ethane over the period 1999-2014 are derived from solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements at the Zugspitze summit (47° N, 2964 m a.s.l.) and at Lauder (45° S, 370 m a.s.l.). Long-term trend analysis reveals a consistent renewed methane increase since 2007 of 6.2 [5.6, 6.9] ppb yr-1 at the Zugspitze and 6.0 [5.3, 6.7] ppb yr-1 at Lauder (95 % confidence intervals). Several recent studies provide pieces of evidence that the renewed methane increase is most likely driven by two main factors: (i) increased methane emissions from tropical wetlands, followed by (ii) increased thermogenic methane emissions due to growing oil and natural gas production. Here, we quantify the magnitude of the second class of sources, using long-term measurements of atmospheric ethane as tracer for thermogenic methane emissions. In 2007, after years of weak decline, the Zugspitze ethane time series shows the sudden onset of a significant positive trend (2.3 [1.8, 2.8] × 10-2 ppb yr-1 for 2007-2014), while a negative trend persists at Lauder after 2007 (-0.4 [-0.6, -0.1] × 10-2 ppb yr-1). Zugspitze methane and ethane time series are significantly correlated for the period 2007-2014 and can be assigned to thermogenic methane emissions with an ethane-to-methane ratio of 10-21 %. We present optimized emission scenarios for 2007-2014 derived from an atmospheric two-box model. From our trend observations we infer a total ethane emission increase over the period 2007-2014 from oil and natural gas sources of 1-11 Tg yr-1 along with an overall methane emission increase of 24-45 Tg yr-1. Based on these results, the oil and natural gas emission contribution C to the renewed methane increase is deduced using three different emission scenarios with dedicated ranges of methane-to-ethane ratios (MER). Reference scenario 1 assumes an oil and gas emission combination with MER = 3.3-7.6, which results in a

  1. Real-Time Measurements of Ethane for Source Attribution of Methane Plumes from Oil and Gas Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacovitch, T. I.; Floerchinger, C.; Roscioli, J. R.; Herndon, S.; Fortner, E.; Knighton, W. B.; Petron, G.; Sweeney, C.; Karion, A.; Kofler, J.; Iglesias, G.; Zavala, M. A.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    The Aerodyne Mobile Lab has conducted several recent studies of the methane emissions from Oil and Gas facilities at varying stages of production: well-heads; processing facilities; and compressor stations. Accurate quantification of methane emission rates are can be complicated by other local sources, notably livestock and microbial production. Methane emissions from oil and gas facilities are always accompanied by small amounts of ethane, while biogenic plumes contain no ethane. A prototype ethane spectrometer based on the Aerodyne-Mini chassis, has been deployed to oil and gas facilities in the Veracruz region of Mexico, as part of the 2013 Short-Lived Climate-Forcing project, and during ground-based measurements in the Barnett Shale in Texas as part of the Barnett Oil and Gas Observation Study. These results suggest a source-dependence in the ethane-to-methane ratio in oil and gas emissions. The results will be contrasted with 13CH4 methane isotope ratios determined using Aerodyne's Methane-Dual instrument. The limits and advantages of ethane-methane ratios and methane isotopes will be discussed. In the current instrumentation, the precision of determined ethane-to-methane ratios in a single plume encounter exceeds the analogous carbon isotope quantification.

  2. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Myers

    2005-04-15

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

  3. Methane and Ethane Measurements from a New TCCON Station in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunch, D.; Roehl, C. M.; Blavier, J. L.; Allen, N.; Treffers, R.; Toon, G. C.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2012-12-01

    The Los Angeles urban region emits large amounts of methane (~0.44Tg/year) into the atmosphere. It is currently unclear exactly how much of this is biogenic (landfills, cattle), and how much is from natural gas (natural seeps or fugitive emissions from the natural gas infrastructure). Since natural gas contains ethane, whereas biogenic emissions contain none, simultaneous measurements of ethane and methane offer the possibility of separating the biogenic versus natural gas emissions of methane. We investigate this using total column measurements from a new Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) remote sensing station in the Los Angeles suburb of Pasadena, which began measurements in July 2012. These measurements will be put into the context of historical remote sensing and in situ measurements described by Wennberg et al., 2012 (doi:10.1021/es301138y).

  4. Dissociation behavior of methane--ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II.

    PubMed

    Kida, Masato; Jin, Yusuke; Takahashi, Nobuo; Nagao, Jiro; Narita, Hideo

    2010-09-09

    Dissociation behavior of methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II at constant temperatures less than 223 K was studied with use of powder X-ray diffraction and solid-state (13)C NMR techniques. The diffraction patterns at temperatures less than 203 K showed both structures I and II simultaneously convert to Ih during the dissociation, but the diffraction pattern at temperatures greater than 208 K showed different dissociation behavior between structures I and II. Although the diffraction peaks from structure II decreased during measurement at constant temperatures greater than 208 K, those from structure I increased at the initial step of dissociation and then disappeared. This anomalous behavior of the methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II was examined by using the (13)C NMR technique. The (13)C NMR spectra revealed that the anomalous behavior results from the formation of ethane-rich structure I. The structure I hydrate formation was associated with the dissociation rate of the initial methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate.

  5. Estimates of methane and ethane emissions from the Texas Barnett Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Yacovitch, T.; Petron, G.; Wolter, S.; Conley, S. A.; Hardesty, R. M.; Brewer, A.; Kofler, J.; Newberger, T.; Herndon, S.; Miller, B. R.; Montzka, S. A.; Rella, C.; Crosson, E.; Tsai, T.; Tans, P. P.

    2013-12-01

    The recent development of horizontal drilling technology by the oil and gas industry has dramatically increased onshore U.S. natural gas and oil production in the last several years. This production boom has led to wide-spread interest from the policy and scientific communities in quantifying the climate impact of the use of natural gas as a replacement for coal. Because the primary component of natural gas is methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, natural gas leakage into the atmosphere affects its climate impact. Several recent scientific field studies have focused on using atmospheric measurements to estimate this leakage in different producing basins. Methane can be measured precisely with commercial analyzers, and deployment of such analyzers on aircraft, coupled with meteorological measurements, can allow scientists to estimate emissions from regions of concentrated production. Ethane and other light hydrocarbons, also components of raw gas, can be used as tracers for differentiating natural gas emissions from those of other methane sources, such as agriculture or landfills, which do not contain any non-methane hydrocarbons such as ethane. Here we present results from one such field campaign in the Barnett Shale near Fort Worth, Texas, in March 2013. Several 4-hour flights were conducted over the natural gas and oil production region with a small single-engine aircraft instrumented with analyzers for measuring ambient methane, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and ethane at high frequencies (0.3-1Hz). The aircraft also measured horizontal winds, temperature, humidity, and pressure, and collected whole air samples in flasks analyzed later for several light hydrocarbons. In addition to the aircraft, a ground-based High-Resolution Doppler Lidar was deployed in the basin to measure profiles of horizontal winds and estimate the boundary layer height 24 hours a day over the campaign period. The aircraft and lidar measurements are used together to estimate methane and

  6. Bottom-up simulations of methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas systems 1980 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höglund-Isaksson, Lena

    2017-02-01

    Existing bottom-up emission inventories of methane from global oil and gas systems do not satisfactorily explain year-on-year variation in atmospheric methane estimated by top-down models. Using a novel bottom-up approach this study quantifies and attributes methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas production from 1980 to 2012. Country-specific information on associated gas flows from published sources are combined with inter-annual variations in observed flaring of associated gas from satellite images from 1994 to 2010, to arrive at country-specific annual estimates of methane and ethane emissions from flows of associated gas. Results confirm trends from top-down models and indicate considerably higher methane and ethane emissions from oil production than previously shown in bottom-up inventories for this time period.

  7. Hydrogen Safety Issues Compared to Safety Issues with Methane andPropane

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2005-08-20

    The hydrogen economy is not possible if the safety standards currently applied to liquid hydrogen and hydrogen gas by many laboratories are applied to devices that use either liquid or gaseous hydrogen. Methane and propane are commonly used by ordinary people without the special training. This report asks, 'How is hydrogen different from flammable gasses that are commonly being used all over the world?' This report compares the properties of hydrogen, methane and propane and how these properties may relate to safety when they are used in both the liquid and gaseous state. Through such an analysis, sensible safety standards for the large-scale (or even small-scale) use of liquid and gaseous hydrogen systems can be developed. This paper is meant to promote discussion of issues related to hydrogen safety so that engineers designing equipment can factor sensible safety standards into their designs.

  8. Elastic wave speeds and moduli in polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2009-01-01

    We used ultrasonic pulse transmission to measure compressional, P, and shear, S, wave speeds in laboratory-formed polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate. From the wave speed's linear dependence on temperature and pressure and from the sample's calculated density, we derived expressions for bulk, shear, and compressional wave moduli and Poisson's ratio from -20 to 15??C and 22.4 to 32.8 MPa for ice Ih, -20 to 15??C and 30.5 to 97.7 MPa for si methane hydrate, and -20 to 10??C and 30.5 to 91.6 MPa for sll methane-ethane hydrate. All three materials had comparable P and S wave speeds and decreasing shear wave speeds with increasing applied pressure. Each material also showed evidence of rapid intergranular bonding, with a corresponding increase in wave speed, in response to pauses in sample deformation. There were also key differences. Resistance to uniaxial compaction, indicated by the pressure required to compact initially porous samples, was significantly lower for ice Ih than for either hydrate. The ice Ih shear modulus decreased with increasing pressure, in contrast to the increase measured in both hydrates ?? 2009.

  9. Ethene/ethane and propene/propane separation via the olefin and paraffin selective metal-organic framework adsorbents CPO-27 and ZIF-8.

    PubMed

    Böhme, Ulrike; Barth, Benjamin; Paula, Carolin; Kuhnt, Andreas; Schwieger, Wilhelm; Mundstock, Alexander; Caro, Jürgen; Hartmann, Martin

    2013-07-09

    Two types of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been synthesized and evaluated in the separation of C2 and C3 olefins and paraffins. Whereas Co2(dhtp) (=Co-CPO-27 = Co-MOF-74) and Mg2(dhtp) show an adsorption selectivity for the olefins ethene and propene over the paraffins ethane and propane, the zeolitic imidazolate framework ZIF-8 behaves in the opposite way and preferentially adsorbs the alkane. Consequently, in breakthrough experiments, the olefins or paraffins, respectively, can be separated.

  10. The Global Search for Abiogenic GHGs, via Methane Isotopes and Ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malina, Edward; Muller, Jan-Peter; Walton, David; Potts, Dale

    2015-04-01

    The importance of Methane as an anthropogenic Green House Gas (GHG) is well recognized in the scientific community, and is second only to Carbon Dioxide in terms of influence on the Earth's radiation budget (Parker, et al, 2011) suggesting that the ability to apportion the source of the methane (whether it is biogenic, abiogenic or thermogenic) has never been more important. It has been proposed (Etiope, 2009) that it may be possible to distinguish between a biogenic methane source (e.g. bacteria fermentation) and an abiogenic source (e.g. gas seepage or fugitive emissions) via the retrieval of the abundances of methane isotopes (12CH4 and 13CH4) and through the ratio of ethane (C2H6) to methane (CH4) concentrations. Using ultra fine spectroscopy (<0.2cm-1 spectral resolution) from Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS) based on the SCISAT-1 (ACE-FTS) and GOSAT (TANSO-FTS) we are developing a retrieval scheme to map global emissions of abiogenic and biogenic methane, and provide insight into how these variations in methane might drive atmospheric chemistry, focusing on the lower levels of the atmosphere. Using HiTran2012 simulations, we show that it is possible to distinguish between methane isotopes using the FTS based instruments on ACE and GOSAT, and retrieve the abundances in the Short Wave Infra-red (SWIR) at 1.65μm, 2.3μm, 3.3μm and Thermal IR, 7.8μm wavebands for methane, and the 3.3μm and 7μm wavebands for ethane. Initially we use the spectral line database HITRAN to determine the most appropriate spectral waveband to retrieve methane isotopes (and ethane) with minimal water vapour, CO2 and NO2 impact. Following this, we have evaluated the detectability of these trace gases using the more sophisticated Radiative Transfer Models (RTMs) SCIATRAN, the Oxford RFM and MODTRAN 5 in the SWIR, in order to determine the barriers to retrieving methane isotopes in both ACE (limb profile) and GOSAT (nadir measurements) instruments, including a preliminary

  11. Experimental study of surface tension of ethane-methane solution in temperature range 213-283 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andbaeva, V. N.; Khotienkova, M. N.

    2013-09-01

    The differential variation of the method of capillary rise was used to measure the capillary constant and to determine the surface tension of ethane-methane solution at "high" temperatures. Measurements were performed on the isotherms in the range of temperatures 213.15 ÷ 283.15 K at pressures up to 4 MPa. Decrease of ethane surface tension with the increase of pressure and concentration of methane in the solution is shown. The experimental data are compared with the results of surface tension calculation according to Rowlinson theory. Methane adsorption in the interface layer of solution is calculated.

  12. Analysis of Ignition Behavior in a Turbocharged Direct Injection Dual Fuel Engine Using Propane and Methane as Primary Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, A. C.; Gibson, C. M.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

    2013-05-24

    This paper presents experimental analyses of the ignition delay (ID) behavior for diesel-ignited propane and diesel-ignited methane dual fuel combustion. Two sets of experiments were performed at a constant speed (1800 rev/min) using a 4-cylinder direct injection diesel engine with the stock ECU and a wastegated turbocharger. First, the effects of fuel-air equivalence ratios (© pilot ¼ 0.2-0.6 and © overall ¼ 0.2-0.9) on IDs were quantified. Second, the effects of gaseous fuel percent energy substitution (PES) and brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) (from 2.5 to 10 bar) on IDs were investigated. With constant © pilot (> 0.5), increasing © overall with propane initially decreased ID but eventually led to premature propane autoignition; however, the corresponding effects with methane were relatively minor. Cyclic variations in the start of combustion (SOC) increased with increasing © overall (at constant © pilot), more significantly for propane than for methane. With increasing PES at constant BMEP, the ID showed a nonlinear (initially increasing and later decreasing) trend at low BMEPs for propane but a linearly decreasing trend at high BMEPs. For methane, increasing PES only increased IDs at all BMEPs. At low BMEPs, increasing PES led to significantly higher cyclic SOC variations and SOC advancement for both propane and methane. Finally, the engine ignition delay (EID) was also shown to be a useful metric to understand the influence of ID on dual fuel combustion.

  13. Comparative study of two theoretical models of methane and ethane steam reforming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brus, Grzegorz; Kaczmarczyk Marcin Tomiczek, Robert; Mozdzierz, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    From the chemical point of view the reforming process of heavy hydrocarbons such as Associated Petroleum Gas (APG) is very complex. One of the main issue is a set of undesired chemical reactions that causes deposition of solid carbon and consequently block catalytic property of a reactor. The experimental investigation is crucial to design APG reforming reactors. However, the experiment needs to be preceded by careful thermodynamical analysis to design safe operation conditions. In case of small number of reactants and reactions such as in case of steam reforming of pure methane, the problem can be solved by treating each equilibrium reaction constant as an element of the system of non-linear equations. The system of equations can be solved by Newton-Raphson method. However in case of large number of reactants and reaction, such as in case of APG reforming this method is inefficient. A large number of strongly non-linear equations leads often to converge problem. In this paper the authors suggest to use different approach called Parametric Equation Method. In this method a system of non-linear equations is replaced by a set of single non-linear equations solved separately. The methods were used to simulate steam reforming of methane-ethane rich fuel. The results of computations from both methods were juxtaposed and comparative study were conducted. Finally safe operation conditions for steam reforming of methane-ethane fuel were calculated and presented.

  14. Natural gas fugitive emissions rates constrained by global atmospheric methane and ethane.

    PubMed

    Schwietzke, Stefan; Griffin, W Michael; Matthews, H Scott; Bruhwiler, Lori M P

    2014-07-15

    The amount of methane emissions released by the natural gas (NG) industry is a critical and uncertain value for various industry and policy decisions, such as for determining the climate implications of using NG over coal. Previous studies have estimated fugitive emissions rates (FER)--the fraction of produced NG (mainly methane and ethane) escaped to the atmosphere--between 1 and 9%. Most of these studies rely on few and outdated measurements, and some may represent only temporal/regional NG industry snapshots. This study estimates NG industry representative FER using global atmospheric methane and ethane measurements over three decades, and literature ranges of (i) tracer gas atmospheric lifetimes, (ii) non-NG source estimates, and (iii) fossil fuel fugitive gas hydrocarbon compositions. The modeling suggests an upper bound global average FER of 5% during 2006-2011, and a most likely FER of 2-4% since 2000, trending downward. These results do not account for highly uncertain natural hydrocarbon seepage, which could lower the FER. Further emissions reductions by the NG industry may be needed to ensure climate benefits over coal during the next few decades.

  15. Promotional mechanism of propane on selective catalytic reduction of NOx by methane over In/H-BEA at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hua; Jian, Yanfei; Yu, Yanke; Chen, Ningna; He, Chi; He, Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Effects of propane/methane ratios on NOx reduction by mixtures of methane and propane over In/H-BEA catalyst were investigated at temperatures ranging from 250 to 550 °C. The higher catalytic activity of In/H-BEA was exhibited for CH4-SCR at high temperatures above 450 °C, while the higher NOx conversion was achieved in C3H8-SCR at below 425 °C. A broadened temperature window and enhanced CO2 selectivity were achieved by combining of methane and propane as the co-reductant. The mixtures with propane/methane of 1/2 showed the most superior T50 (325 °C) and T90 (500 °C) temperatures for NOx reduction over In/H-BEA catalyst. For the promotion mechanism of propane on NO reduction by methane at low temperature, the formation of carbonaceous species (e.g. R-COOH) were enhanced by the activation of C3H8 on Brønsted acid sites at low temperature, and further promoted the generation of sbnd NCO species, which was a crucial determining step for NO reduction.

  16. Vertical and meridional distribution of ethane, acetylene and propane in Saturn’s stratosphere from CIRS/Cassini limb observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerlet, Sandrine; Fouchet, Thierry; Bézard, Bruno; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Michael Flasar, F.

    2009-09-01

    Measuring the spatial distribution of chemical compounds in Saturn's stratosphere is critical to better understand the planet's photochemistry and dynamics. Here we present an analysis of infrared spectra in the range 600-1400 cm -1 acquired in limb geometry by the Cassini spacecraft between March 2005 and January 2008. We first determine the vertical temperature profiles from 3 to 0.01 hPa, at latitudes ranging from 70°N to 80°S. We infer a similar meridional temperature gradient at 1-2 hPa as in recent previous studies [Fletcher, L.N., Irwin, P.G.J., Teanby, N.A., Orton, G.S., Parrish, P.D., de Kok, R., Howett, C., Calcutt, S.B., Bowles, N., Taylor, F.W., 2007. Icarus 189, 457-478; Howett, C.J.A., Irwin, P.G.J., Teanby, N.A., Simon-Miller, A., Calcutt, S.B., Fletcher, L.N., de Kok, R., 2007. Icarus 190, 556-572]. We then retrieve the vertical profiles of C2H6 and C2H2 from 3 to 0.01 hPa and of C3H8 around 1 hPa. At 1 hPa, the meridional variation of C2H2 is found to follow the yearly averaged solar insolation, except for a strong equatorial mole fraction of 8×10-7, nearly two times higher than expected. This enhancement in abundance can be explained by the descent of hydrocarbon-rich air, with a vertical wind speed at the equator of 0.25±0.1 mm/s at 1 hPa and 0.4±0.15 mm/s at 0.1 hPa. The ethane distribution is relatively uniform at 1 hPa, with only a moderate 25% increase from 35°S to 80°S. Propane is found to increase from north to south by a factor of 1.9, suggesting that its lifetime may be shorter than Saturn's year at 1 hPa. At high altitudes (1 Pa), C2H2 and C2H6 abundances depart significantly from the photochemical model predictions of Moses and Greathouse [Moses, J.I., Greathouse, T.K., 2005. J. Geophys. Res. 110, 9007], except at high southern latitudes (62, 70 and 80°S) and near the equator. The observed abundances are found strongly depleted in the 20-40°S region and enhanced in the 20-30°N region, the latter coinciding with the ring

  17. Numerical Study of Contaminant Effects on Combustion of Hydrogen, Ethane, and Methane in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, H. T.; Thomas, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to assess the effects of vitiated air on the chemical kinetics of hydrogen, ethane, and methane combustion with air. A series of calculations in static reacting systems was performed, where the initial temperature was specified and reactions occurred at constant pressure. Three different types of test flow contaminants were considered: NP, H2O, and a combustion of H2O and CO2. These contaminants are present in the test flows of facilities used for hypersonic propulsion testing. The results were computed using a detailed reaction mechanism and are presented in terms of ignition and reaction times. Calculations were made for a wide range of contaminant concentrations, temperatures and pressures. The results indicate a pronounced kinetic effect over a range of temperatures, especially with NO contamination and, to a lesser degree, with H2O contamination. In all cases studied, CO2 remained kinetically inert, but had a thermodynamic effect on results by acting as a third body. The largest effect is observed with combustion using hydrogen fuel, less effect is seen with combustion of ethane, and little effect of contaminants is shown with methane combustion.

  18. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Myers

    2003-11-12

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This second six-month technical report summarizes the progress made towards defining, designing, and developing the hardware and software segments of the airborne, optical remote methane and ethane sensor. The most challenging task to date has been to identify a vendor capable of designing and developing a light source with the appropriate output wavelength and power. This report will document the work that has been done to identify design requirements, and potential vendors for the light source. Significant progress has also been made in characterizing the amount of light return available from a remote target at various distances from the light source. A great deal of time has been spent conducting laboratory and long-optical path target reflectance measurements. This is important since it helps to establish the overall optical output requirements for the sensor. It also reduces the relative uncertainty and risk associated with developing a custom light source. The data gathered from the optical path testing has been translated to the airborne transceiver design in such areas as: fiber coupling, optical detector selection, gas filters, and software analysis. Ophir will next, summarize the design progress of the transceiver hardware and software development. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  19. Active Thermochemical Tables: Sequential Bond Dissociation Enthalpies of Methane, Ethane, and Methanol and the Related Thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ruscic, Branko

    2015-07-16

    Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) thermochemistry for the sequential bond dissociations of methane, ethane, and methanol systems were obtained by analyzing and solving a very large thermochemical network (TN). Values for all possible C-H, C-C, C-O, and O-H bond dissociation enthalpies at 298.15 K (BDE298) and bond dissociation energies at 0 K (D0) are presented. The corresponding ATcT standard gas-phase enthalpies of formation of the resulting CHn, n = 4-0 species (methane, methyl, methylene, methylidyne, and carbon atom), C2Hn, n = 6-0 species (ethane, ethyl, ethylene, ethylidene, vinyl, ethylidyne, acetylene, vinylidene, ethynyl, and ethynylene), and COHn, n = 4-0 species (methanol, hydroxymethyl, methoxy, formaldehyde, hydroxymethylene, formyl, isoformyl, and carbon monoxide) are also presented. The ATcT thermochemistry of carbon dioxide, water, hydroxyl, and carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen atoms is also included, together with the sequential BDEs of CO2 and H2O. The provenances of the ATcT enthalpies of formation, which are quite distributed and involve a large number of relevant determinations, are analyzed by variance decomposition and discussed in terms of principal contributions. The underlying reasons for periodic appearances of remarkably low and/or unusually high BDEs, alternating along the dissociation sequences, are analyzed and quantitatively rationalized. The present ATcT results are the most accurate thermochemical values currently available for these species.

  20. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPLINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Myers

    2004-05-12

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The third six-month technical report contains a summary of the progress made towards finalizing the design and assembling the airborne, remote methane and ethane sensor. The vendor has been chosen and is on contract to develop the light source with the appropriate linewidth and spectral shape to best utilize the Ophir gas correlation software. Ophir has expanded upon the target reflectance testing begun in the previous performance period by replacing the experimental receiving optics with the proposed airborne large aperture telescope, which is theoretically capable of capturing many times more signal return. The data gathered from these tests has shown the importance of optimizing the fiber optic receiving fiber to the receiving optic and has helped Ophir to optimize the design of the gas cells and narrowband optical filters. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  1. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Myers

    2003-05-13

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This six-month technical report summarizes the progress for each of the proposed tasks, discusses project concerns, and outlines near-term goals. Ophir has completed a data survey of two major natural gas pipeline companies on the design requirements for an airborne, optical remote sensor. The results of this survey are disclosed in this report. A substantial amount of time was spent on modeling the expected optical signal at the receiver at different absorption wavelengths, and determining the impact of noise sources such as solar background, signal shot noise, and electronic noise on methane and ethane gas detection. Based upon the signal to noise modeling and industry input, Ophir finalized the design requirements for the airborne sensor, and released the critical sensor light source design requirements to qualified vendors. Responses from the vendors indicated that the light source was not commercially available, and will require a research and development effort to produce. Three vendors have responded positively with proposed design solutions. Ophir has decided to conduct short path optical laboratory experiments to verify the existence of methane and absorption at the specified wavelength, prior to proceeding with the light source selection. Techniques to eliminate common mode noise were also evaluated during the laboratory tests. Finally, Ophir has included a summary of the potential concerns for project success and has established future goals.

  2. Measured temperature and pressure dependence of Vp and Vs in compacted, polycrystalline sI methane and sII methane-ethane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on compressional- and shear-wave-speed measurements made on compacted polycrystalline sI methane and sII methane-ethane hydrate. The gas hydrate samples are synthesized directly in the measurement apparatus by warming granulated ice to 17??C in the presence of a clathrate-forming gas at high pressure (methane for sI, 90.2% methane, 9.8% ethane for sII). Porosity is eliminated after hydrate synthesis by compacting the sample in the synthesis pressure vessel between a hydraulic ram and a fixed end-plug, both containing shear-wave transducers. Wave-speed measurements are made between -20 and 15??C and 0 to 105 MPa applied piston pressure.

  3. METABOLISM OF CHLORINATED METHANES, ETHANES, AND ETHYLENES BY A MIXED BACTERIAL CUTLURE GROWING ON METHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil was taken from the top 10 cm of a soil column that removed halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons in the presence of natural gas. This soil was used as an enrichment inoculum to determine that the removals seen in the soil column were in fact of a microbiological nature. Methane...

  4. Contribution of oil and natural gas production to renewed increase of atmospheric methane (2007-2014): top-down estimate from ethane and methane column observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, P.; Sussmann, R.; Smale, D.

    2015-12-01

    Harmonized time series of column-averaged mole fractions of atmospheric methane and ethane over the period 1999-2014 are derived from solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements at the Zugspitze summit (47° N, 2964 m a.s.l.) and at Lauder (45° S, 370 m a.s.l.). Long-term trend analysis reveals a consistent renewed methane increase since 2007 of 6.2 [5.6, 6.9] ppb yr-1 at the Zugspitze and 6.0 [5.3, 6.7] ppb yr-1 at Lauder (95 % confidence intervals). Several recent studies provide pieces of evidence that the renewed methane increase is most likely driven by two main factors: (i) increased methane emissions from tropical wetlands, followed by (ii) increased thermogenic methane emissions due to growing oil and natural gas production. Here, we quantify the magnitude of the second class of sources, using long-term measurements of atmospheric ethane as tracer for thermogenic methane emissions. In 2007, after years of weak decline, the Zugspitze ethane time series shows the sudden onset of a significant positive trend (2.3 [1.8, 2.8] × 10-2 ppb yr-1 for 2007-2014), while a negative trend persists at Lauder after 2007 (-0.4 [-0.6, -0.1] × 10-2 ppb yr-1). Zugspitze methane and ethane time series are significantly correlated for the period 2007-2014 and can be assigned to thermogenic methane emissions with an ethane-to-methane ratio of 10-21 %. We present optimized emission scenarios for 2007-2014 derived from an atmospheric two-box model. From our trend observations we infer a total ethane emission increase over the period 2007-2014 from oil and natural gas sources of 1-11 Tg yr-1 along with an overall methane emission increase of 24-45 Tg yr-1. Based on these results, the oil and natural gas emission contribution C to the renewed methane increase is deduced using three different emission scenarios with dedicated ranges of methane-to-ethane ratios (MER). Reference scenario 1 assumes an oil and gas emission combination with MER = 3.3-7.6, which results in a

  5. Comparison of Propane and Methane Performance and Emissions in a Turbocharged Direct Injection Dual Fuel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, C. M.; Polk, A. C.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    With increasingly restrictive NO x and particulate matter emissions standards, the recent discovery of new natural gas reserves, and the possibility of producing propane efficiently from biomass sources, dual fueling strategies have become more attractive. This paper presents experimental results from dual fuel operation of a four-cylinder turbocharged direct injection (DI) diesel engine with propane or methane (a natural gas surrogate) as the primary fuel and diesel as the ignition source. Experiments were performed with the stock engine control unit at a constant speed of 1800 rpm, and a wide range of brake mean effective pressures (BMEPs) (2.7-11.6 bars) and percent energy substitutions (PESs) of C 3 H 8 and CH 4. Brake thermal efficiencies (BTEs) and emissions (NO x, smoke, total hydrocarbons (THCs), CO, and CO 2) were measured. Maximum PES levels of about 80-95% with CH 4 and 40-92% with C 3 H 8 were achieved. Maximum PES was limited by poor combustion efficiencies and engine misfire at low loads for both C 3 H 8 and CH 4, and the onset of knock above 9 bar BMEP for C 3 H 8. While dual fuel BTEs were lower than straight diesel BTEs at low loads, they approached diesel BTE values at high loads. For dual fuel operation, NO x and smoke reductions (from diesel values) were as high as 66-68% and 97%, respectively, but CO and THC emissions were significantly higher with increasing PES at all engine loads

  6. A Low Temperature Eutectic Methane-Ethane Liquid: A Potential Geologic Fluid in the Outermost Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Garrett Leland; Hanley, Jennifer; Grundy, Will; Tegler, Stephen C.; Roe, Henry G.; Lindberg, Gerrick Eugene; Trilling, David E.

    2016-10-01

    Many icy bodies and moons in the solar system contain methane and ethane, including Titan, Triton, Pluto, Eris, Makemake, and likely others. The material properties of these species and their interactions with one another are still inadequately characterized. To provide insight into the behaviors of these species we conducted a series of laboratory experiments to map the liquidus line as a function of temperature and composition. The interaction of ethane and methane yields a eutectic mixture and depresses the freezing point to ~72 K, almost 20 K colder than the normal freezing points of either pure species. The eutectic composition is 64% CH4 and 36% C2H6. This phenomenon may enable geological processes involving liquids in the near surface environments of bodies once thought too cold and/or that have surface pressures too low to support liquid phases. The addition of other cosmochemically abundant species may suppress freezing points even further (see Hanley et al., this conference).

  7. Contribution of oil and natural gas production to renewed increase in atmospheric methane (2007-2014): top-down estimate from ethane and methane column observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Petra; Sussmann, Ralf; Smale, Dan

    2016-03-01

    Harmonized time series of column-averaged mole fractions of atmospheric methane and ethane over the period 1999-2014 are derived from solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements at the Zugspitze summit (47° N, 11° E; 2964 m a.s.l.) and at Lauder (45° S, 170° E; 370 m a.s.l.). Long-term trend analysis reveals a consistent renewed methane increase since 2007 of 6.2 [5.6, 6.9] ppb yr-1 (parts-per-billion per year) at the Zugspitze and 6.0 [5.3, 6.7] ppb yr-1 at Lauder (95 % confidence intervals). Several recent studies provide pieces of evidence that the renewed methane increase is most likely driven by two main factors: (i) increased methane emissions from tropical wetlands, followed by (ii) increased thermogenic methane emissions due to growing oil and natural gas production. Here, we quantify the magnitude of the second class of sources, using long-term measurements of atmospheric ethane as a tracer for thermogenic methane emissions. In 2007, after years of weak decline, the Zugspitze ethane time series shows the sudden onset of a significant positive trend (2.3 [1.8, 2.8] × 10-2 ppb yr-1 for 2007-2014), while a negative trend persists at Lauder after 2007 (-0.4 [-0.6, -0.1] × 10-2 ppb yr-1). Zugspitze methane and ethane time series are significantly correlated for the period 2007-2014 and can be assigned to thermogenic methane emissions with an ethane-to-methane ratio (EMR) of 12-19 %. We present optimized emission scenarios for 2007-2014 derived from an atmospheric two-box model. From our trend observations we infer a total ethane emission increase over the period 2007-2014 from oil and natural gas sources of 1-11 Tg yr-1 along with an overall methane emission increase of 24-45 Tg yr-1. Based on these results, the oil and natural gas emission contribution (C) to the renewed methane increase is deduced using three different emission scenarios with dedicated EMR ranges. Reference scenario 1 assumes an oil and gas emission combination with EMR = 7

  8. Separating methane emissions from biogenic sources and natural gas by vertical column enhancements of ammonia, ethane, and methane in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, R.; Volkamer, R. M.; Blumenstock, T.; Hase, F.; Hannigan, J. W.; Kille, N.; Frey, M.; Kumar Sha, M.; Orphal, J.

    2015-12-01

    Methane sources in the Colorado Front Range include biogenic sources from cattle feedlots and natural gas operations. Although numerous studies have measured methane emissions, there remains significant uncertainty regarding the relative contributions of these various methane emission sources. Here we present data from a March 2015 field campaign that deployed two Bruker EM27 Sun Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS) and the University of Colorado Solar Occultation Flux (CU-SOF) FTS in Eaton, Colorado; the former were used to measure enhancements in the methane vertical column densities (VCD), while the latter was used to measure ethane and ammonia VCDs. A third EM27 FTS was deployed to a background site in Westminster, Colorado which was far removed from cattle and petroleum operations. Northerly winds make possible the determination of methane VCD column enhancement from Westminster to Eaton. All instruments were compared during several background days at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado. This presentation explores the potential of methane source attribution using ammonia as a tracer for feedlot emissions and ethane as a tracer for petroleum emissions.

  9. Ring-polymer molecular dynamics studies on the rate coefficient of the abstraction channel of hydrogen plus ethane, propane, and dimethyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyong; Chen, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To accurately compute the rates of the abstraction channels of hydrogen plus ethane (Et), propane (Pr), and dimethyl ether (DME), ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method is used in conjunction with the recently constructed local permutation invariant polynomial neural-networks potential energy surface of the parent H + CH4 system [Q. Meng et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 154312 (2016)]. For H + Et, one of the H atoms in CH4 of the parent system is replaced by a methyl group, while for the H + DME reaction, it is replaced by the methoxyl group. For the H + Pr reaction, replacing one of the H atoms in CH4 by an ethyl group, the terminal channel is built, meanwhile the middle channel is considered through replacing two H atoms in CH4 by two methyl groups. Since the potential energy barriers of the title reactions must differ from the H + CH4 barrier, the corrections have to be made by computing the ratio of free-energy barriers between H + CH4 and the title reactions at coupled cluster with a full treatment singles and doubles (where the triples contribution is calculated by perturbation theory, that is, CCSD(T)) level. Comparing the present RPMD rates with the previous theoretical and experimental results, good agreement can be found. Moreover, probable reasons for the deviation between the present RPMD rates and the previous experimental ones are discussed.

  10. Quantification of Methane and Ethane Emissions from the San Juan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. L.; Kort, E. A.; Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Gvakharia, A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, and the primary component of natural gas, is emitted from areas of high fossil fuel production and processing. Recently, persistent and large methane emissions (~0.59 Tg yr-1) from the four corners area of the United States have been identified using satellite (SCIAMACHY) observations taken over the years 2003 to 2009. These emissions appear to be the largest CH4 anomaly (positive deviation above background values) in the contiguous U.S., and exceed bottom-up inventory estimates for the area by 1.8 to 3.5 times. The majority of emissions sources expected to contribute to this anomalous CH4 signal are located in the San Juan basin of New Mexico, and include harvesting and processing of natural gas, coal, and coalbed CH4. The magnitude of CH4 emissions from the San Juan basin have not yet been directly quantified using airborne measurements. Additionally, changing fossil fuel-related activities in the basin may have altered the magnitude of CH4 emissions compared to estimates derived from 2003-2009 satellite measurements. Here, we present in-situ airborne observations of CH4 over the San Juan basin, which allow tight quantification of CH4 fluxes using the mass balance method. Observations over the basin were taken for multiple wind directions on multiple days in April, 2015 to obtain a robust estimate of CH4 emissions. The flux of ethane (C2H6), the second most abundant component of natural gas and a tracer species indicative of fossil-derived CH4, was also quantified. Substantial C2H6 emissions may affect regional air quality and chemistry through its influence on tropospheric ozone production.

  11. Methane Fingerprinting: Isotopic Methane and Ethane-to-Methane Ratio Analysis Using a Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Nabil; Fleck, Derek; Hoffnagle, John

    2016-04-01

    Emissions of Natural gas, and methane (CH4) specifically, have come under increased scrutiny by virtue of methane's 28-36x greenhouse warming potential compared to carbon dioxide (CO2) while accounting for 10% of the total greenhouse gas emissions in the US. Large uncontrolled leaks, such as the recent Aliso Canyon leak, originating from uncapped wells, coal mines and storage facilities have increased the total global contribution of methane missions even further. Determining the specific fingerprint of methane sources, by quantifying δ13C values and C2:C1 ratios, provides the means to understand methane producing processes and allows for sources of methane to be mapped and classified through these processes; i.e. biogenic vs. thermogenic, wet vs dry. In this study we present a fully developed Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS) that precisely measures 12CH4 concentration and its 13CH4 isotope concentration, yielding δ13C measurements, C2H6 concentration, along with CO2 and H2O. This provides real-time continuous measurements without an upfront separation requirement or multiple analyses to derive the origin of the gas samples. The highly sensitive analyzer allows for measurements of scarce molecules down to sub-ppb 1-σ precision in 5 minutes of measurement: with CH4 <0.1ppb, δ13C <1‰ C2H6 <1ppb and CO2 <1ppm. To complement this work, we provide the analysis of different methane sources providing a 2-dimensional mapping of methane sources as functions of δ13C and C2:C1 ratios, which can be thought of as a modified Bernard Plot. This dual ratio mapping can be used to discriminate between naturally occurring biogenic methane sources, naturally occurring enriched thermogenic sources, and natural gas distribution sources. This also shows future promise in aiding gas and oil exploration, in distinguishing oil vs coal gases, as well as a valuable tool in the development of methane sequestration.

  12. Phase equilibria of the system methane-ethane from temperature scaling Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhigang; Duan, Zhenhao

    2002-10-01

    A new technique of temperature scaling method combined with the conventional Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo simulation was used to study liquid-vapor phase equilibria of the methane-ethane (CH 4-C 2H 6) system. With this efficient method, a new set of united-atom Lennard-Jones potential parameters for pure C 2H 6 was found to be more accurate than those of previous models in the prediction of phase equilibria. Using the optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS) potential for CH 4 and the potential of this study for C 2H 6, together with a simple mixing rule, we simulated the equilibrium compositions and densities of the CH 4-C 2H 6 mixtures with accuracy close to experiments. The simulated data are supplements to experiments, and may cover a larger temperature-pressure-composition space than experiments. Compared with some well-established equations of state such as Peng-Robinson equation of state (PR-EQS), the simulated results are found to be closer to experiments, at least in some temperature and pressure ranges.

  13. Fate and transport of dissolved methane and ethane in cretaceous shales of the Williston Basin, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jim Hendry, M.; Lee Barbour, S.; Schmeling, Erin E.; Mundle, Scott O. C.; Huang, M.

    2016-08-01

    Baseline characteristics of dissolved methane (CH4) and ethane (C2H6) and their stable isotopes in thick, low hydraulic conductivity, Cretaceous shales were determined using high-resolution core profiling at four sites in the Williston Basin (WB), Canada. Positive correlations with the conservative natural tracer Cl- reflected a lack of measureable production or consumption of gases in the shale to the depth investigated (150 m below ground, BG) and suggest CH4 and C2H6 concentrations near the interface with overlying Quaternary sediments are controlled by lateral migration and dilution in permeable zones. Curvilinear increasing concentrations with depth in the shale at all sites coupled with 1-D solute transport modeling suggest long-term (over millions of years) upward diffusion of CH4 and C2H6 from deeper WB sources, likely the Second White Speckled Shale Formation (SWSS; ˜790 m BG). δ13C-CH4 profiles in the shale are consistent with upward diffusional fractionation of isotopes from the SWSS. Distinct CH4 and C2H6 isotope values of gases in the shales versus 13C-enriched thermogenic isotopic signatures of CH4 and C2H6 in deeper oil-producing WB intervals could be used to identify fugitive gases originating deeper in the Basin.

  14. Effect of Initial Mixture Temperature on Flame Speed of Methane-Air, Propane-Air, and Ethylene-Air Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugger, Gordon L

    1952-01-01

    Flame speeds based on the outer edge of the shadow cast by the laminar Bunsen cone were determined as functions of composition for methane-air mixtures at initial mixture temperatures ranging from -132 degrees to 342 degrees c and for propane-air and ethylene-air mixtures at initial mixture temperatures ranging from -73 degrees to 344 degrees c. The data showed that maximum flame speed increased with temperature at an increasing rate. The percentage change in flame speed with change in initial temperature for the three fuels followed the decreasing order, methane, propane, and ethylene. Empirical equations were determined for maximum flame speed as a function of initial temperature over the temperature range covered for each fuel. The observed effect of temperature on flame speed for each of the fuels was reasonably well predicted by either the thermal theory as presented by Semenov or the square-root law of Tanford and Pease.

  15. Kinetic modeling of propane aromatization reaction over HZSM-5 and GaHZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, D.B.; Gnep, N.S.; Guisnet, M.R. . Catalyse en Chimie Organique)

    1995-02-01

    A detailed kinetic model for a propane aromatization reaction over HZSM-5 and GaHZSM-5 is developed. Kinetic modeling results show that propane transformation over HZSM-5 occurs via protolytic cracking and hydrogen transfer routes. The contributions of both routes in propane conversion are established. Rate constants of propane transformation steps are found to be at least 1,000 times lower than the rate constants of diene formation steps, which, in turn, are the slowest among the acid-catalyzed olefin aromatization steps. Gallium introduced into ZSM-5 catalyst is active in dehydrogenation of propane into propene, of olefins into dienes, and of naphthenes into aromatics. At the same time, gallium species catalyze propane transformation into methane and ethene hydrogenation into ethane. Both latter reactions appear to be the main reasons for the limit to aromatics selectivity over GaHZSM-5 catalysts.

  16. Estimates of Methane and Ethane Emissions from the Barnett Shale Using Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Kort, E. A.; Shepson, P. B.; Conley, S. A.; Lauvaux, T.; Davis, K. J.; Deng, A.; Lyon, D. R.; Smith, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Recent development of horizontal drilling technology and advances in hydraulic fracturing techniques by the oil and gas industry have dramatically increased onshore U.S. natural gas and oil production in the last several years. The primary component of natural gas is methane (CH4), a powerful greenhouse gas; therefore, natural gas leakage into the atmosphere affects its climate impact. We present estimates of regional methane (CH4) and ethane (C2H6) emissions from oil and natural gas operations in the Barnett Shale, Texas, made in March and October 2013 as part of the Environmental Defense Fund's Barnett Coordinated Campaign. The Barnett is one of the largest production basins in the United States, with 8% of total U.S. natural gas production, and thus, our results represent a crucial step toward determining the greenhouse gas footprint of U.S. onshore natural gas production. Using a mass balance approach on eight different flight days the total CH4 emissions for the region are estimated to be 76 ± 13x 103 kg/hr, or 0.66 ± 0.11 Tg CH4 /yr; (95% CI). Repeated mass balance flights in the same basin on eight different days and two seasons demonstrate the consistency of the mass balance approach. On the basis of airborne C2H6 and CH4 measurements, we find 71-85% of the observed CH4 emissions quantified in the Barnett Shale are derived from fossil sources. The average C2H6 flux was 6.6 ± 0.2 x 103 kg/hr and consistent across six days in spring and fall of 2013. This result is the first demonstration of this approach for C2H6. We estimate that 60±11x103 kg CH4/hr (95% CI) are emitted by natural gas and oil operations, including production, processing, and distribution in the urban areas of Dallas and Fort Worth. This estimate is significantly higher than emissions reported by the EDGAR inventory or by industry to EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program.

  17. Photoabsorption cross sections of methane and ethane, 1380-1600 A, at T equals 295 K and T equals 200 K. [in Jupiter atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, G. H.; Moos, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    Photoabsorption cross sections of methane and ethane have been determined in the wavelength range from 1380 to 1600 A at room (295 K) and dry-ice (200 K) temperatures. It is found that the room-temperature ethane data are in excellent agreement with the older measurements of Okabe and Becker (1963) rather than with more recent determinations and that a small systematic blueshift occurs at the foot of the molecular absorption edges of both gases as the gases are cooled from room temperature to 200 K, a value close to the actual temperature of the Jovian atmosphere. It is concluded that methane photoabsorption will dominate until its cross section is about 0.01 that of ethane, which occurs at about 1440 A, and that ethane should be the dominant photoabsorber in the Jovian atmosphere in the region from above 1440 A to not farther than 1575 A.

  18. Rapid analysis of dissolved methane, ethylene, acetylene and ethane using partition coefficients and headspace-gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lomond, Jasmine S; Tong, Anthony Z

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of dissolved methane, ethylene, acetylene, and ethane in water is crucial in evaluating anaerobic activity and investigating the sources of hydrocarbon contamination in aquatic environments. A rapid chromatographic method based on phase equilibrium between water and its headspace is developed for these analytes. The new method requires minimal sample preparation and no special apparatus except those associated with gas chromatography. Instead of Henry's Law used in similar previous studies, partition coefficients are used for the first time to calculate concentrations of dissolved hydrocarbon gases, which considerably simplifies the calculation involved. Partition coefficients are determined to be 128, 27.9, 1.28, and 96.3 at 30°C for methane, ethylene, acetylene, and ethane, respectively. It was discovered that the volume ratio of gas-to-liquid phase is critical to the accuracy of the measurements. The method performance can be readily improved by reducing the volume ratio of the two phases. Method validation shows less than 6% variation in accuracy and precision except at low levels of methane where interferences occur in ambient air. Method detection limits are determined to be in the low ng/L range for all analytes. The performance of the method is further tested using environmental samples collected from various sites in Nova Scotia.

  19. Intermolecular hydrogen transfer between guest species in small and large cages of methane + propane mixed gas hydrates.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Tani, Atsushi; Inoue, Tatsuya; Ohgaki, Kazunari

    2012-03-15

    To investigate the molecular interaction between guest species inside of the small and large cages of methane + propane mixed gas hydrates, thermal stabilities of the methyl radical (possibly induced in small cages) and the normal propyl and isopropyl radicals (induced in large cages) were investigated by means of electron spin resonance measurements. The increase of the total amount of the normal propyl and isopropyl radicals reveals that the methyl radical in the small cage withdraws one hydrogen atom from the propane molecule enclathrated in the adjacent large cage of the structure-II hydrate. A guest species in a hydrate cage has the ability to interact closely with the other one in the adjacent cages. The clathrate hydrate may be utilized as a possible nanoscale reaction field.

  20. Flame Speeds of Methane-Air, Propane-Air, and Ethylene-Air Mixtures at Low Initial Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugger, Gordon L; Heimel, Sheldon

    1952-01-01

    Flame speeds were determined for methane-air, propane-air, and ethylene-air mixtures at -73 C and for methane-air mixtures at -132 C. The data extend the curves of maximum flame speed against initial mixture temperature previously established for the range from room temperature to 344 C. Empirical equations for maximum flame speed u(cm/ sec) as a function of initial mixture temperature T(sub O) were determined to be as follows: for methane, for T(sub O) from 141 to 615 K, u = 8 + 0.000160 T(sub O)(exp 2.11); for propane, for T(sub O) from 200 to 616 K, u = 10 + 0.000342 T(sub O)(exp 2.00); for ethylene, for T(sub O) from 200 to 617 K, u = 10 + 0.00259 T(sub O)(exp 1.74). Relative flame speeds at low initial temperatures were predicted within approximately 20 percent by either the thermal theory as presented by Semenov or by the diffusion theory of Tanford and Pease. The same order was found previously for high initial temperatures. The low-temperature data were also found to extend the linear correlations between maximum flame speed and calculated equilibrium active-radical concentrations, which were established by the previously reported high-temperature data.

  1. Bacterial ethane formation from reduced, ethylated sulfur compounds in anoxic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Whiticar, Michael J.; Strohmaier, F.E.; Kiene, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Trace levels of ethane were produced biologically in anoxic sediment slurries from five chemically different aquatic environments. Gases from these locations displayed biogenic characteristics, having 12C-enriched values of ??13CH4 (-62 to -86%.), ??13C2H6 (-35 to -55%.) and high ratios (720 to 140,000) of CH4 [C2H6 + C3H8]. Endogenous production of ethane by slurries was inhibited by autoclaving or by addition of the inhibitor of methanogenic bacteria, 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES). Ethane formation was stimulated markedly by ethanethiol (ESH), and, to a lesser extent, by diethylsulfide (DES). Formation of methane and ethane in ESH- or DES-amended slurries was blocked by BES. Experiments showed that ethionine (or an analogous compound) could be a precursor of ESH. Ethylamine or ethanol additions to slurries caused only a minor stimulation of ethane formation. Similarly, propanethiol additions resulted in only a minor enhancement of propane formation. Cell suspensions of a methyltrophic methanogen produced traces of ethane when incubated in the presence of DES, although the organism did not grow on this compound. These results indicate that methanogenic bacteria produce ethane from the traces of ethylated sulfur compounds present in recent sediments. Preliminary estimates of stable carbon isotope fractionation associated with sediment methane formation from dimethylsulfide was about 40%., while ethane formation from DES and ESH was only 4. 6 and 6.5%., respectively. ?? 1988.

  2. Room temperature dehydrogenation of ethane, propane, linear alkanes C4-C8, and some cyclic alkanes by titanium-carbon multiple bonds.

    PubMed

    Crestani, Marco G; Hickey, Anne K; Gao, Xinfeng; Pinter, Balazs; Cavaliere, Vincent N; Ito, Jun-Ichi; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Mindiola, Daniel J

    2013-10-02

    The transient titanium neopentylidyne, [(PNP)Ti≡C(t)Bu] (A; PNP(-)≡N[2-P(i)Pr2-4-methylphenyl]2(-)), dehydrogenates ethane to ethylene at room temperature over 24 h, by sequential 1,2-CH bond addition and β-hydrogen abstraction to afford [(PNP)Ti(η(2)-H2C═CH2)(CH2(t)Bu)] (1). Intermediate A can also dehydrogenate propane to propene, albeit not cleanly, as well as linear and volatile alkanes C4-C6 to form isolable α-olefin complexes of the type, [(PNP)Ti(η(2)-H2C═CHR)(CH2(t)Bu)] (R = CH3 (2), CH2CH3 (3), (n)Pr (4), and (n)Bu (5)). Complexes 1-5 can be independently prepared from [(PNP)Ti═CH(t)Bu(OTf)] and the corresponding alkylating reagents, LiCH2CHR (R = H, CH3(unstable), CH2CH3, (n)Pr, and (n)Bu). Olefin complexes 1 and 3-5 have all been characterized by a diverse array of multinuclear NMR spectroscopic experiments including (1)H-(31)P HOESY, and in the case of the α-olefin adducts 2-5, formation of mixtures of two diastereomers (each with their corresponding pair of enantiomers) has been unequivocally established. The latter has been spectroscopically elucidated by NMR via C-H coupled and decoupled (1)H-(13)C multiplicity edited gHSQC, (1)H-(31)P HMBC, and dqfCOSY experiments. Heavier linear alkanes (C7 and C8) are also dehydrogenated by A to form [(PNP)Ti(η(2)-H2C═CH(n)Pentyl)(CH2(t)Bu)] (6) and [(PNP)Ti(η(2)-H2C═CH(n)Hexyl)(CH2(t)Bu)] (7), respectively, but these species are unstable but can exchange with ethylene (1 atm) to form 1 and the free α-olefin. Complex 1 exchanges with D2C═CD2 with concomitant release of H2C═CH2. In addition, deuterium incorporation is observed in the neopentyl ligand as a result of this process. Cyclohexane and methylcyclohexane can be also dehydrogenated by transient A, and in the case of cyclohexane, ethylene (1 atm) can trap the [(PNP)Ti(CH2(t)Bu)] fragment to form 1. Dehydrogenation of the alkane is not rate-determining since pentane and pentane-d12 can be dehydrogenated to 4 and 4-d12 with comparable

  3. Mobile Measurement of Methane and Ethane for the Detection and Attribution of Natural Gas Pipeline Leaks Using Off-Axis Integrated Output Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leen, J. B.; Spillane, S.; Gardner, A.; Hansen, P. C.; Gupta, M.; Baer, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gas leaks pose a risk to public safety both because of potential explosions as well as from the greenhouse gas potential of fugitive methane. The rapid and cost effective detection of leaks in natural gas distribution is critical to providing a system that is safe for the public and the environment. Detection of methane from a mobile platform (vehicles, aircraft, etc.) is an accepted method of identifying leaks. A robust approach to differentiating pipeline gas (thermogenic) from other biogenic sources is the detection of ethane along with methane. Ethane is present in nearly all thermogenic gas but not in biogenic sources and its presence can be used to positively identify a gas sample. We present a mobile system for the simultaneous measurement of methane and ethane that is capable of detecting pipeline leaks and differentiating pipeline gas from other biogenic sources such as landfills, swamps, sewers, and enteric fermentation. The mobile system consists of a high precision GPS, sonic anemometer, and methane/ethane analyzer based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS). In order to minimize the system cost and facilitate the wide use of mobile leak detection, the analyzer operates in the near-infrared portion of the spectrum where lasers and optics are significantly less costly than in the mid-infrared. The analyzer is capable of detecting methane with a precision of <2 ppb (1σ in 1 sec) and detecting ethane with a precision of <30 ppb (1σ in 1 sec). Additionally, measurement rates of 5 Hz allow for detection of leaks at speeds up to 50 mph. The sonic anemometer, GPS and analyzer inlet are mounted to a generic roof rack for attachment to available fleet vehicles. The system can detect leaks having a downwind concentration of as little as 10 ppb of methane above ambient, while leaks 500 ppb above ambient can be identified as thermogenic with greater than 99% certainty (for gas with 6% ethane). Finally, analysis of wind data provides

  4. Quantifying the loss of processed natural gas within California's South Coast Air Basin using long-term measurements of ethane and methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunch, Debra; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Hedelius, Jacob K.; Vizenor, Nicholas; Roehl, Coleen M.; Saad, Katherine M.; Blavier, Jean-François L.; Blake, Donald R.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2016-11-01

    Methane emissions inventories for Southern California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) have underestimated emissions from atmospheric measurements. To provide insight into the sources of the discrepancy, we analyze records of atmospheric trace gas total column abundances in the SoCAB starting in the late 1980s to produce annual estimates of the ethane emissions from 1989 to 2015 and methane emissions from 2007 to 2015. The first decade of measurements shows a rapid decline in ethane emissions coincident with decreasing natural gas and crude oil production in the basin. Between 2010 and 2015, however, ethane emissions have grown gradually from about 13 ± 5 to about 23 ± 3 Gg yr-1, despite the steady production of natural gas and oil over that time period. The methane emissions record begins with 1 year of measurements in 2007 and continuous measurements from 2011 to 2016 and shows little trend over time, with an average emission rate of 413 ± 86 Gg yr-1. Since 2012, ethane to methane ratios in the natural gas withdrawn from a storage facility within the SoCAB have been increasing by 0.62 ± 0.05 % yr-1, consistent with the ratios measured in the delivered gas. Our atmospheric measurements also show an increase in these ratios but with a slope of 0.36 ± 0.08 % yr-1, or 58 ± 13 % of the slope calculated from the withdrawn gas. From this, we infer that more than half of the excess methane in the SoCAB between 2012 and 2015 is attributable to losses from the natural gas infrastructure.

  5. Autoignited laminar lifted flames of methane, ethylene, ethane, and n-butane jets in coflow air with elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B.C.; Chung, S.H.

    2010-12-15

    The autoignition characteristics of laminar lifted flames of methane, ethylene, ethane, and n-butane fuels have been investigated experimentally in coflow air with elevated temperature over 800 K. The lifted flames were categorized into three regimes depending on the initial temperature and fuel mole fraction: (1) non-autoignited lifted flame, (2) autoignited lifted flame with tribrachial (or triple) edge, and (3) autoignited lifted flame with mild combustion. For the non-autoignited lifted flames at relatively low temperature, the existence of lifted flame depended on the Schmidt number of fuel, such that only the fuels with Sc > 1 exhibited stationary lifted flames. The balance mechanism between the propagation speed of tribrachial flame and local flow velocity stabilized the lifted flames. At relatively high initial temperatures, either autoignited lifted flames having tribrachial edge or autoignited lifted flames with mild combustion existed regardless of the Schmidt number of fuel. The adiabatic ignition delay time played a crucial role for the stabilization of autoignited flames. Especially, heat loss during the ignition process should be accounted for, such that the characteristic convection time, defined by the autoignition height divided by jet velocity was correlated well with the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time for the critical autoignition conditions. The liftoff height was also correlated well with the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time. (author)

  6. Evaluating ethane and methane emissions associated with the development of oil and natural gas extraction in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, B.; Mahieu, E.; Emmons, L. K.; Tzompa-Sosa, Z. A.; Fischer, E. V.; Sudo, K.; Bovy, B.; Conway, S.; Griffin, D.; Hannigan, J. W.; Strong, K.; Walker, K. A.

    2016-04-01

    Sharp rises in the atmospheric abundance of ethane (C2H6) have been detected from 2009 onwards in the Northern Hemisphere as a result of the unprecedented growth in the exploitation of shale gas and tight oil reservoirs in North America. Using time series of C2H6 total columns derived from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) observations made at five selected Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change sites, we characterize the recent C2H6 evolution and determine growth rates of ˜5% yr-1 at mid-latitudes and of ˜3% yr-1 at remote sites. Results from CAM-chem simulations with the Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollutants, Phase II bottom-up inventory for anthropogenic emissions are found to greatly underestimate the current C2H6 abundances. Doubling global emissions is required to reconcile the simulations and the observations prior to 2009. We further estimate that North American anthropogenic C2H6 emissions have increased from 1.6 Tg yr-1 in 2008 to 2.8 Tg yr-1 in 2014, i.e. by 75% over these six years. We also completed a second simulation with new top-down emissions of C2H6 from North American oil and gas activities, biofuel consumption and biomass burning, inferred from space-borne observations of methane (CH4) from Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite. In this simulation, GEOS-Chem is able to reproduce FTIR measurements at the mid-latitudinal sites, underscoring the impact of the North American oil and gas development on the current C2H6 abundance. Finally we estimate that the North American oil and gas emissions of CH4, a major greenhouse gas, grew from 20 to 35 Tg yr-1 over the period 2008-2014, in association with the recent C2H6 rise.

  7. Kinetics of methane-ethane gas replacement in clathrate-hydrates studied by time-resolved neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Murshed, M Mangir; Schmidt, Burkhard C; Kuhs, Werner F

    2010-01-14

    The kinetics of CH(4)-C(2)H(6) replacement in gas hydrates has been studied by in situ neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Deuterated ethane structure type I (C(2)H(6) sI) hydrates were transformed in a closed volume into methane-ethane mixed structure type II (CH(4)-C(2)H(6) sII) hydrates at 5 MPa and various temperatures in the vicinity of 0 degrees C while followed by time-resolved neutron powder diffraction on D20 at ILL, Grenoble. The role of available surface area of the sI starting material on the formation kinetics of sII hydrates was studied. Ex situ Raman spectroscopic investigations were carried out to crosscheck the gas composition and the distribution of the gas species over the cages as a function of structure type and compared to the in situ neutron results. Raman micromapping on single hydrate grains showed compositional and structural gradients between the surface and core of the transformed hydrates. Moreover, the observed methane-ethane ratio is very far from the one expected for a formation from a constantly equilibrated gas phase. The results also prove that gas replacement in CH(4)-C(2)H(6) hydrates is a regrowth process involving the nucleation of new crystallites commencing at the surface of the parent C(2)H(6) sI hydrate with a progressively shrinking core of unreacted material. The time-resolved neutron diffraction results clearly indicate an increasing diffusion limitation of the exchange process. This diffusion limitation leads to a progressive slowing down of the exchange reaction and is likely to be responsible for the incomplete exchange of the gases.

  8. Measurement of position-specific 13C isotopic composition of propane at the nanomole level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita; Suda, Konomi; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a novel method for analyzing intramolecular carbon isotopic distribution of propane as a potential new tracer of its origin. The method is based on on-line pyrolysis of propane followed by analysis of carbon isotope ratios of the pyrolytic products methane, ethylene and ethane. Using propane samples spiked with 13C at the terminal methyl carbon, we characterize the origin of the pyrolytic fragments. We show that the exchange between C-atoms during the pyrolytic process is negligible, and thus that relative intramolecular isotope composition can be calculated. Preliminary data from 3 samples show that site-preference (SP) values, defined as the difference of δ13C values between terminal and sub-terminal C-atom positions of propane, range from -1.8‰ to -12.9‰. In addition, SP value obtained using our method for a thermogenic natural gas sample is consistent with that expected from theoretical models of thermal cracking, suggesting that the isotope fractionation associated with propane pyrolysis is negligible. The method will provide novel insights into the characterization of the origin of propane and will help better understand the biogeochemistry of natural gas deposits.

  9. Propane Basics

    SciTech Connect

    NREL

    2010-03-01

    Propane powers about 190,000 vehicles in the U.S. and more than 14 million worldwide. Propane vehicles are a good choice for many fleet applications including school buses, shuttle buses, taxies and light-duty trucks.

  10. Propane Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantner, Max

    1984-01-01

    Reports on a northern Illinois school bus fleet converted to propane fuel in 1981 and 1982. Includes tables showing, first, total annual fuel costs before and after conversion and, second, fuel efficiency for 16 buses using propane and three using gasoline. Notes precautions for propane use. (MCG)

  11. How Do Perfluorinated Alkanoic Acids Elicit Cytochrome P450 to Catalyze Methane Hydroxylation? An MD and QM/MM Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunsen; Shaik, Sason

    2013-03-07

    Recent experimental studies show that usage of perfluoro decanoic acid (PFDA), as a dummy substrate, can elicit P450BM3 to perform hydroxylation of small alkanes, such as methane (ref. 17) and propane (ref. 17 and ref. 18). To comprehend the mechanism whereby PFDA operates to potentiate P450BM3 to catalyze the hydroxylation of small alkanes, we used molecular dynamics (MD) and hybrid quantum mechanical / molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. The MD results show that without the PFDA, methane escapes the active site, while the presence of PFDA can potentially induce a productive Cpd I-Methane juxtaposition for rapid oxidation. Nevertheless, when only a single methane molecule is present near the PFDA, it still escapes the pocket within less than a nanosecond. However, when three methane molecules are present in the pocket, they alternate quasi-periodically such that at all times (within 10 ns), a molecule of methane is always present in the proximity of Cpd I in a reactive conformation. Our results further demonstrate that the PFDA does not exert any electrostatic catalysis, whether the PFDA is in the protonated or deprotonated forms. Taken together, we conclude that methane hydroxylation requires, in addition to PFDA, a high partial pressure of methane that will cause a high methane concentration in the active site. Further study of ethane and propane hydroxylations demonstrates that higher alkane concentration is helpful for all the three small alkanes. Thus for the smallest alkane, methane, at least three molecules are necessary whereas for the larger ethane, two molecules are needed to force one ethane to be closer to Cpd I. Finally, for propane a second molecule is helpful but not absolutely necessary; for this molecule the PFDA may well be sufficient to keep propane close to Cpd I for efficient oxidation. We therefore propose that high alkane pressure should assist small alkane hydroxylation by P450 in a manner inversely proportional to the size of the

  12. How Do Perfluorinated Alkanoic Acids Elicit Cytochrome P450 to Catalyze Methane Hydroxylation? An MD and QM/MM Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunsen; Shaik, Sason

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental studies show that usage of perfluoro decanoic acid (PFDA), as a dummy substrate, can elicit P450BM3 to perform hydroxylation of small alkanes, such as methane (ref. 17) and propane (ref. 17 and ref. 18). To comprehend the mechanism whereby PFDA operates to potentiate P450BM3 to catalyze the hydroxylation of small alkanes, we used molecular dynamics (MD) and hybrid quantum mechanical / molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. The MD results show that without the PFDA, methane escapes the active site, while the presence of PFDA can potentially induce a productive Cpd I-Methane juxtaposition for rapid oxidation. Nevertheless, when only a single methane molecule is present near the PFDA, it still escapes the pocket within less than a nanosecond. However, when three methane molecules are present in the pocket, they alternate quasi-periodically such that at all times (within 10 ns), a molecule of methane is always present in the proximity of Cpd I in a reactive conformation. Our results further demonstrate that the PFDA does not exert any electrostatic catalysis, whether the PFDA is in the protonated or deprotonated forms. Taken together, we conclude that methane hydroxylation requires, in addition to PFDA, a high partial pressure of methane that will cause a high methane concentration in the active site. Further study of ethane and propane hydroxylations demonstrates that higher alkane concentration is helpful for all the three small alkanes. Thus for the smallest alkane, methane, at least three molecules are necessary whereas for the larger ethane, two molecules are needed to force one ethane to be closer to Cpd I. Finally, for propane a second molecule is helpful but not absolutely necessary; for this molecule the PFDA may well be sufficient to keep propane close to Cpd I for efficient oxidation. We therefore propose that high alkane pressure should assist small alkane hydroxylation by P450 in a manner inversely proportional to the size of the

  13. Global corresponding states representation of the interfacial tension and capillary constant for the binary mixtures argon + krypton, methane + krypton, and krypton + ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, C.D.; Zollweg, J.A. )

    1993-05-06

    Corresponding states theories for surface tension and capillary constant have been evaluated using constant liquid mole fraction and constant [open quotes]fugacity fraction[close quotes] reference fluids for three binary systems. Experimental vapor-liquid equilibria, capillary constant, and surface tension data for argon + krypton, methane + krypton, and krypton + ethane systems were measured from 125 K to the critical line. These results form a database for phase behavior of varying complexity between simple compounds. The database has been used to compare the [open quotes]fugacity fraction[close quotes] corresponding states theory for capillary constant and surface tension with the traditional corresponding states theory which uses as a reference fluid a liquid with constant mole fraction. The database was also used to test the Moldover and Rainwater prediction for the surface tension coefficient in the fugacity fraction corresponding states theory. 33 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Parametric performance of circumferentially grooved heat pipes with homogeneous and graded-porosity slab wicks at cryogenic temperatures. [methane and ethane working fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groll, M.; Pittman, R. B.; Eninger, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A recently developed, potentially high-performance nonarterial wick was extensively tested. This slab wick has an axially varying porosity which can be tailored to match the local stress imposed on the wick. The purpose of the tests was to establish the usefulness of the graded-porosity slab wick at cryogenic temperatures between 110 and 260 K, with methane and ethane as working fluids. For comparison, a homogeneous (i.e., uniform porosity) slab wick was also tested. The tests included: maximum heat pipe performance as a function of fluid inventory, maximum performance as a function of operating temperature, maximum performance as a function of evaporator elevation, and influence of slab wick orientation on performance. The experimental data were compared with theoretical predictions obtained with the GRADE computer program.

  15. Relative rate studies of the reactions of chlorine atoms with simple alkanes and the chlorinated methanes

    SciTech Connect

    Wingen, L.; Lee, J.J.; Neavyn, R.

    1995-12-01

    The reactions of chlorine atoms with organics are of interest because atomic chlorine is a potential tropospheric oxidant. Relative rate constants for the reaction of pairs of simple alkanes (ethane/propane, ethane/n-butane, and isobutane/n-butane) and the chlorinated methanes (chloromethane, dichloromethane, and chloroform relative to methane) were measured, using the photolysis of Cl{sub 2} as the source of chlorine atoms and following the loss of the organics by GC-FID. The ratios of the relative rate constants were in excellent agreement with the literature except for ethane/n-butane, where our results are approximately 20% lower than recently published values, and for chloroform/methane, where our value is approximately 50% higher than the values recommended by JPL and JPCRD. Our results will be compard to previously published relative rate studies as well as to the results of absolute rate constant studies, and the differences will be discussed.

  16. Time-resolved infrared (TRIR) study on the formation and reactivity of organometallic methane and ethane complexes in room temperature solution

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Alexander J.; Portius, Peter; Kawanami, Hajime K.; Jina, Omar S.; Grills, David C.; Sun, Xue-Zhong; McMaster, Jonathan; George, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    We have used fast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy to characterize a series of organometallic methane and ethane complexes in solution at room temperature: W(CO)5(CH4) and M(η5C5R5)(CO)2(L) [where M = Mn or Re, R = H or CH3 (Re only); and L = CH4 or C2H6]. In all cases, the methane complexes are found to be short-lived and significantly more reactive than the analogous n-heptane complexes. Re(Cp)(CO)2(CH4) and Re(Cp*)(CO)2(L) [Cp* = η5C5(CH3)5 and L = CH4, C2H6] were found to be in rapid equilibrium with the alkyl hydride complexes. In the presence of CO, both alkane and alkyl hydride complexes decay at the same rate. We have used picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy to directly monitor the photolysis of Re(Cp*)(CO)3 in scCH4 and demonstrated that the initially generated Re(Cp*)(CO)2(CH4) forms an equilibrium mixture of Re(Cp*)(CO)2(CH4)/Re(Cp*)(CO)2(CH3)H within the first few nanoseconds (τ = 2 ns). The ratio of alkane to alkyl hydride complexes varies in the order Re(Cp)(CO)2(C2H6):Re(Cp)(CO)2(C2H5)H > Re(Cp*)(CO)2(C2H6):Re(Cp*)(CO)2(C2H5)H ≈ Re(Cp)(CO)2(CH4):Re(Cp)(CO)2(CH3)H > Re(Cp*)(CO)2(CH4):Re(Cp*)(CO)2(CH3)H. Activation parameters for the reactions of the organometallic methane and ethane complexes with CO have been measured, and the ΔH‡ values represent lower limits for the CH4 binding enthalpies to the metal center of WCH4 (30 kJ·mol−1), MnCH4 (39 kJ·mol−1), and ReCH4 (51 kJ·mol−1) bonds in W(CO)5(CH4), Mn(Cp)(CO)2(CH4), and Re(Cp)(CO)2(CH4), respectively. PMID:17409190

  17. Time-resolved infrared (TRIR) study on the formation and reactivity of organometallic methane and ethane complexes in room temperature solution.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Alexander J; Portius, Peter; Kawanami, Hajime K; Jina, Omar S; Grills, David C; Sun, Xue-Zhong; McMaster, Jonathan; George, Michael W

    2007-04-24

    We have used fast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy to characterize a series of organometallic methane and ethane complexes in solution at room temperature: W(CO)5(CH4) and M(eta5-C5R5)(CO)2(L) [where M = Mn or Re, R = H or CH3 (Re only); and L = CH4 or C2H6]. In all cases, the methane complexes are found to be short-lived and significantly more reactive than the analogous n-heptane complexes. Re(Cp)(CO)2(CH4) and Re(Cp*)(CO)2(L) [Cp* = eta5-C5(CH3)(5) and L = CH4, C2H6] were found to be in rapid equilibrium with the alkyl hydride complexes. In the presence of CO, both alkane and alkyl hydride complexes decay at the same rate. We have used picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy to directly monitor the photolysis of Re(Cp*)(CO)3 in scCH4 and demonstrated that the initially generated Re(Cp*)(CO)2(CH4) forms an equilibrium mixture of Re(Cp*)(CO)2(CH4)/Re(Cp*)(CO)2(CH3)H within the first few nanoseconds (tau = 2 ns). The ratio of alkane to alkyl hydride complexes varies in the order Re(Cp)(CO)2(C2H6):Re(Cp)(CO)2(C2H5)H > Re(Cp*)(CO)2(C2H6):Re(Cp*)(CO)2(C2H5)H approximately equal to Re(Cp)(CO)2(CH4):Re(Cp)(CO)2(CH3)H > Re(Cp*)(CO)2(CH4):Re(Cp*)(CO)2(CH3)H. Activation parameters for the reactions of the organometallic methane and ethane complexes with CO have been measured, and the DeltaH++ values represent lower limits for the CH4 binding enthalpies to the metal center of W-CH4 (30 kJ.mol(-1)), Mn-CH4 (39 kJ.mol(-1)), and Re-CH4 (51 kJ.mol(-1)) bonds in W(CO)5(CH4), Mn(Cp)(CO)2(CH4), and Re(Cp)(CO)2(CH4), respectively.

  18. Oxidative Condensation of Methane — a New Pathway to the Synthesis of Ethane, Ethylene, and Other Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minachev, Khabib M.; Usachev, Nikolay Ya; Udut, V. N.; Khodakov, Yu S.

    1988-03-01

    During the last five years, the chemistry of methane has been enriched by the possibility of obtaining C2 and other hydrocarbons as a result of the oxidative condensation of methane in the presence of a series of catalytic systems. The availability of the starting materials (CH4 and O2) leads to extensive prospects for the replacement of the petroleum raw materials by natural gas in single-stage syntheses of valuable compounds and in the first place ethylene. This review gives a systematic account of the results of the selection of effective catalysts and surveys the information leading to the elucidation of the mechanism for the formation of the products of the extensive oxidation and oxidative condensation of methane. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  19. Diffusion of methane and other alkanes in metal-organic frameworks for natural gas storage

    SciTech Connect

    Borah, B; Zhang, HD; Snurr, RQ

    2015-03-03

    Diffusion of methane, ethane, propane and n-butane was studied within the micropores of several metal organic frameworks (MOFs) of varying topologies, including the MOFs PCN-14, NU-125, NU-1100 and DUT-49. Diffusion coefficients of the pure components, as well as methane/ethane, methane/ propane and methane/butane binary mixtures, were calculated using molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of the longer alkanes on uptake of natural gas in MOB. The calculated self diffusion coefficients of all four components are on the order of 10(-8) m(2)/s. The diffusion coefficients of the pure components decrease as a function of chain length in all of the MOFs studied and show different behaviour as a function of loading in different MOB. The self-diffusivities follow the trend DPCN-14 < DNU-125 approximate to DNU-1100 < DDUT-49, which is exactly the reverse order of the densities of the MOFs: PCN-14 > NU-125 approximate to NU-1100 > DUT-49. By comparing the diffusion of pure methane and methane mixtures vvith the higher alkancs, it is observed that the diffusivity of methane is unaffected by the presence of the higher alkanes in the MOFs considered, indicating that the diffusion path of methane is not blocked by the higher alkanes present in natural gas. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection of abundant ethane and methane, along with carbon monoxide and water, in comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake: evidence for interstellar origin.

    PubMed

    Mumma, M J; DiSanti, M A; Dello Russo, N; Fomenkova, M; Magee-Sauer, K; Kaminski, C D; Xie, D X

    1996-05-31

    The saturated hydrocarbons ethane (C2H6) and methane (CH4) along with carbon monoxide (CO) and water (H2O) were detected in comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake with the use of high-resolution infrared spectroscopy at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The inferred production rates of molecular gases from the icy, cometary nucleus (in molecules per second) are 6.4 X 10(26) for C2H6, 1.2 X 10(27) for CH4, 9.8 X 10(27) for CO, and 1.7 X 10(29) for H2O. An abundance of C2H6 comparable to that of CH4 implies that ices in C/1996 B2 Hyakutake did not originate in a thermochemically equilibrated region of the solar nebula. The abundances are consistent with a kinetically controlled production process, but production of C2H6 by gas-phase ion molecule reactions in the natal cloud core is energetically forbidden. The high C2H6/CH4 ratio is consistent with production of C2H6 in icy grain mantles in the natal cloud, either by photolysis of CH4-rich ice or by hydrogen-addition reactions to acetylene condensed from the gas phase.

  1. Development of highly sensitive sensor system for methane utilizing cataluminescence.

    PubMed

    Gong, Gu; Zhu, Hua

    2016-02-01

    A gaseous sensor system was developed for the detection of methane based on its cataluminescence emission. Cataluminescence characteristics and optimal conditions were studied in detail under optimized experimental conditions. Results showed that the methane cataluminescence sensor system could cover a linear detection range from 10 to 5800 ppm (R = 0.9963, n = 7) and the detection limit was about 7 ppm (S/N = 3), which was below the standard permitted concentration. Moreover, a linear discriminant analysis method was used to test the recognizable performance of the methane sensor. It was found that methane, ethane, propane and pentane could be distinguished clearly. Its methane sensing properties, including improved sensitivity, selectivity, stability and recognition demonstrated the TiO2/SnO2 materials to be promising candidates for constructing a cataluminescence-based gas sensor that could be used for detecting explosive gas contaminants.

  2. Rate constants and temperature dependences for the reactions of hydroxyl radical with several halogenated methanes, ethanes, and propanes by relative rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, K.-J.; DeMore, W. B.

    1995-01-01

    Rate constants of 15 OH reactions with halogen-substituted alkanes, C1 to C3, were studied using a relative rate technique in the temperature range 283-403 K. Compounds studied were CHF2Cl (22), CHF2Br (22B), CH3F (41), CH2F2 (32), CHF3 (23), CHClFCCl2F (122a), CHCl2CF3 (123), CHClFCF3 (124), CH3CF3 (143a), CH3CH2F (161), CF3CHFCF3 (227ea), CF3CH2CF3 (236fa), CF3CHFCHF2 (236ea), and CHF2CF2CH2F (245ca). Using CH4, CH3CCl3, CF3CF2H, and C2H6 as primary reference standards (JPL 92-20 rate constants), absolute rate constants are derived. Results are in good agreement with previous experimental results for six of the compounds studied, including CHF2Cl, CHF2Br, CH2F2, CH3CF3, CHFClCFCl2, and CF3CHFCF3. For the remainder the relative rate constants are lower than those derived from experiments in which OH loss was used to measure the reaction rate. Comparisons of the derived Arrhenius A factors with previous literature transition-state calculations show order of magnitude agreement in most cases. However, the experimental A factors show a much closer proportionality to the number of H atoms in the molecule than is evident from the transition state calculations. For most of the compounds studied, an A factor of (8 +/- 3)E-13 cm(exp 3)/(molecule s) per C-H bond is observed. A new measurement of the ratio k(CH3CCl3)/k(CH4) is reported that is in good agreement with previous data.

  3. Position-specific and clumped stable isotope studies: comparison of the Urey and path-integral approaches for carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, and propane.

    PubMed

    Webb, Michael A; Miller, Thomas F

    2014-01-16

    We combine path-integral Monte Carlo methods with high-quality potential energy surfaces to compute equilibrium isotope effects in a variety of systems relevant to 'clumped' isotope analysis and isotope geochemistry, including CO2, N2O, methane, and propane. Through a systematic study of heavy-atom isotope-exchange reactions, we quantify and analyze errors that arise in the widely used Urey model for predicting equilibrium constants of isotope-exchange reactions using reduced partition function ratios. These results illustrate that the Urey model relies on a nontrivial cancellation of errors that can shift the apparent equilibrium temperature by as much as 35 K for a given distribution of isotopologues. The calculations reported here provide the same level of precision as the best existing analytical instrumentation, resolving the relative enrichment of certain isotopologues to as little as 0.01‰. These findings demonstrate path-integral methods to be a rigorous and viable alternative to more approximate methods for heavy-atom geochemical applications.

  4. Low-temperature superacid catalysis: Reactions of n - butane and propane catalyzed by iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Tsz-Keung, Cheung; d`Itri, J.L.; Lange, F.C.; Gates, B.C.

    1995-12-31

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate the potential value of solid superacid catalysts of the sulfated zirconia type for light hydrocarbon conversion. The key experiments catalytic testing of the performance of such catalysts in a flow reactor fed with streams containing, for example, n-butane or propane. Fe- and Mn-promoted sulfated zirconia was used to catalyze the conversion of n-butane at atmospheric pressure, 225-450{degrees}C, and n-butane partial pressures in the range of 0.0025-0.01 atm. At temperatures <225{degrees}C, these reactions were accompanied by cracking; at temperatures >350{degrees}C, cracking and isomerization occurred. Catalyst deactivation, resulting at least in part from coke formation, was rapid. The primary cracking products were methane, ethane, ethylene, and propylene. The observation of these products along with an ethane/ethylene molar ratio of nearly 1 at 450{degrees}C is consistent with cracking occurring, at least in part, by the Haag-Dessau mechanism, whereby the strongly acidic catalyst protonates n-butane to give carbonium ions. The rate of methane formation from n-butane cracking catalyzed by Fe- and Mn-promoted sulfated zirconia at 450{degrees}C was about 3 x 10{sup -8} mol/(g of catalyst {center_dot}s). The observation of butanes, pentanes, and methane as products is consistent with Olah superacid chemistry, whereby propane is first protonated by a very strong acid to form a carbonium ion. The carbonium ion then decomposes into methane and an ethyl cation which undergoes oligocondensation reactions with propane to form higher molecular weight alkanes. The results are consistent with the identification of iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia as a superacid.

  5. Use of propane as a quench gas in argon-filled proportional counters and comparison with other quench gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. C.; Ramsey, B. D.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of propane and six other quench gases was carried out in argon-filled proportional counters. The objective of the study was to find the best gas mixture for optimizing the gas gain and the energy resolution as well as to understand the role of the ionization potential of quench gases in determining these parameters. It was found that the best gas gains and energy resolutions are obtained with propane, ethane, and isobutane in that order. The ionization potentials of these three lie below the argon metastable potentials and have the lowest value of resonance defect compared to the other quench gases. The better results obtained with these mixtures can be explained by an increased ionization yield resulting from the Penning effect. Propylene and trans-2-butene give inferior performance compared to the above three gases. Methane and carbon dioxide, the most commonly used quench gases in the argon-filled detectors, provide the worst results.

  6. Geologic seepage of methane and light alkanes in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doezema, L. A.; Chang, K.; Baril, R.; Nwachuku, I.; Contreras, P.; Marquez, A.; Howard, D.

    2013-12-01

    Natural geologic seepage of methane from underground oil and natural gas reservoirs has been suggested to be an underreported part of the global methane budget. Other light alkanes are also given off in combination with the methane seepage, making it possible that geologic seepage is also a potentially significant global source of these light alkanes. This study reports C1-C5 findings from geologic seepage made in the Los Angeles region. Microseepage, invisible escape of gases, was measured primarily at Kenneth Hahn Regional Park, while macroseepage, the visible release of gases, was measured at the La Brea Tar Pits. Samples were collected using stainless steel canisters and flux chambers and were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID). Average microseepage flux rates of 0.95 μg m-2 h-1 for ethane and 0.51 μg m-2 h-1 were found for propane, while average macroseepage rates for methane, ethane, and propane were 664, 19.8, and 18.1 mg m-2 h-1 respectively. Relationships between microseepage flux rate and location of underground oil and natural deposit and earthquake fault lines are presented. Additionally, the relative importance of findings in context with global budgets and local air quality is discussed.

  7. Methane-derived hydrocarbons produced under upper-mantle conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2009-08-13

    There is widespread evidence that petroleum originates from biological processes. Whether hydrocarbons can also be produced from abiogenic precursor molecules under the high-pressure, high-temperature conditions characteristic of the upper mantle remains an open question. It has been proposed that hydrocarbons generated in the upper mantle could be transported through deep faults to shallower regions in the Earth's crust, and contribute to petroleum reserves. Here we use in situ Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells to monitor the chemical reactivity of methane and ethane under upper-mantle conditions. We show that when methane is exposed to pressures higher than 2 GPa, and to temperatures in the range of 1,000-1,500 K, it partially reacts to form saturated hydrocarbons containing 2-4 carbons (ethane, propane and butane) and molecular hydrogen and graphite. Conversely, exposure of ethane to similar conditions results in the production of methane, suggesting that the synthesis of saturated hydrocarbons is reversible. Our results support the suggestion that hydrocarbons heavier than methane can be produced by abiogenic processes in the upper mantle.

  8. Photocatalytic oxidation of methane over silver decorated zinc oxide nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuxing; Li, Yunpeng; Pan, Xiaoyang; Cortie, David; Huang, Xintang; Yi, Zhiguo

    2016-07-20

    The search for active catalysts that efficiently oxidize methane under ambient conditions remains a challenging task for both C1 utilization and atmospheric cleansing. Here, we show that when the particle size of zinc oxide is reduced down to the nanoscale, it exhibits high activity for methane oxidation under simulated sunlight illumination, and nano silver decoration further enhances the photo-activity via the surface plasmon resonance. The high quantum yield of 8% at wavelengths <400 nm and over 0.1% at wavelengths ∼470 nm achieved on the silver decorated zinc oxide nanostructures shows great promise for atmospheric methane oxidation. Moreover, the nano-particulate composites can efficiently photo-oxidize other small molecular hydrocarbons such as ethane, propane and ethylene, and in particular, can dehydrogenize methane to generate ethane, ethylene and so on. On the basis of the experimental results, a two-step photocatalytic reaction process is suggested to account for the methane photo-oxidation.

  9. Photocatalytic oxidation of methane over silver decorated zinc oxide nanocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuxing; Li, Yunpeng; Pan, Xiaoyang; Cortie, David; Huang, Xintang; Yi, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    The search for active catalysts that efficiently oxidize methane under ambient conditions remains a challenging task for both C1 utilization and atmospheric cleansing. Here, we show that when the particle size of zinc oxide is reduced down to the nanoscale, it exhibits high activity for methane oxidation under simulated sunlight illumination, and nano silver decoration further enhances the photo-activity via the surface plasmon resonance. The high quantum yield of 8% at wavelengths <400 nm and over 0.1% at wavelengths ∼470 nm achieved on the silver decorated zinc oxide nanostructures shows great promise for atmospheric methane oxidation. Moreover, the nano-particulate composites can efficiently photo-oxidize other small molecular hydrocarbons such as ethane, propane and ethylene, and in particular, can dehydrogenize methane to generate ethane, ethylene and so on. On the basis of the experimental results, a two-step photocatalytic reaction process is suggested to account for the methane photo-oxidation. PMID:27435112

  10. Ethane: A Key to Evaluating Natural Gas Industrial Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacovitch, T. I.; Herndon, S. C.; Agnese, M.; Roscioli, J. R.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Knighton, W. B.; Pusede, S. E.; Diskin, G. S.; DiGangi, J. P.; Sachse, G. W.; Eichler, P.; Mikoviny, T.; Müller, M.; Wisthaler, A.; Conley, S. A.; Petron, G.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne and mobile-surface measurements of ethane at 1Hz in the Denver-Julesberg oil and gas production basin in NE Colorado reveal a rich set of emission sources and magnitudes. Although ethane has only a mild influence on hemispheric ozone levels, it is often co-emitted with larger hydrocarbons including hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and ozone precursors that impact local and regional air quality. Ethane/methane enhancement ratios provide a map of expected emission source types in different areas around greater Denver. Links are drawn between the ethane content of isolated methane emission plumes and the prevalence of concomitant HAP and ozone precursor species. The efficacy of using ethane as a dilution tracer specific to the oil & gas footprint will be demonstrated.

  11. Microbial Formation of Ethane in Anoxic Estuarine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Oremland, Ronald S.

    1981-01-01

    Estuarine sediment slurries produced methane and traces of ethane when incubated under hydrogen. Formation of methane occurred over a broad temperature range with an optimum above 65°C. Ethane formation had a temperature optimum at 40°C. Formation of these two gases was inhibited by air, autoclaving, incubation at 4 and 80°C, and by the methanogenic inhibitor, 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. Ethane production was stimulated by addition of ethylthioethanesulfonic acid, and production from ethylthioethanesulfonic acid was blocked by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. A highly purified enrichment culture of a methanogenic bacterium obtained from sediments produced traces of ethane from ethylthioethanesulfonic acid. These results indicate that the small quantities of ethane found in anaerobic sediments can be formed by certain methanogenic bacteria. PMID:16345805

  12. Microbial formation of ethane in anoxic estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.

    1981-01-01

    Estuarine sediment slurries produced methane and traces of ethane when incubated under hydrogen. Formation of methane occurred over a broad temperature range with an optimum above 65°C. Ethane formation had a temperature optimum at 40°C. Formation of these two gases was inhibited by air, autoclaving, incubation at 4 and 80°C, and by the methanogenic inhibitor, 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. Ethane production was stimulated by addition of ethylthioethanesulfonic acid, and production from ethylthioethanesulfonic acid was blocked by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. A highly purified enrichment culture of a methanogenic bacterium obtained from sediments produced traces of ethane from ethylthioethanesulfonic acid. These results indicate that the small quantities of ethane found in anaerobic sediments can be formed by certain methanogenic bacteria.

  13. A two-state computational investigation of methane C--H and ethane C--C oxidative addition to [CpM(PH3)]n+ (M = Co, Rh, Ir; n = 0, 1).

    PubMed

    Petit, Alban; Richard, Philippe; Cacelli, Ivo; Poli, Rinaldo

    2006-01-11

    Reductive elimination of methane from methyl hydride half-sandwich phosphane complexes of the Group 9 metals has been investigated by DFT calculations on the model system [CpM(PH(3))(CH(3))(H)] (M = Co, Rh, Ir). For each metal, the unsaturated product has a triplet ground state; thus, spin crossover occurs during the reaction. All relevant stationary points on the two potential energy surfaces (PES) and the minimum energy crossing point (MECP) were optimized. Spin crossover occurs very near the sigma-CH(4) complex local minimum for the Co system, whereas the heavier Rh and Ir systems remain in the singlet state until the CH(4) molecule is almost completely expelled from the metal coordination sphere. No local sigma-CH(4) minimum was found for the Ir system. The energetic profiles agree with the nonexistence of the Co(III) methyl hydride complex and with the greater thermal stability of the Ir complex relative to the Rh complex. Reductive elimination of methane from the related oxidized complexes [CpM(PH(3))(CH(3))(H)](+) (M = Rh, Ir) proceeds entirely on the spin doublet PES, because the 15-electron [CpM(PH(3))](+) products have a doublet ground state. This process is thermodynamically favored by about 25 kcal mol(-1) relative to the corresponding neutral system. It is essentially barrierless for the Rh system and has a relatively small barrier (ca. 7.5 kcal mol(-1)) for the Ir system. In both cases, the reaction involves a sigma-CH(4) intermediate. Reductive elimination of ethane from [CpM(PH(3))(CH(3))(2)](+) (M = Rh, Ir) shows a similar thermodynamic profile, but is kinetically quite different from methane elimination from [CpM(PH(3))(CH(3))(H)](+): the reductive elimination barrier is much greater and does not involve a sigma-complex intermediate. The large difference in the calculated activation barriers (ca. 12.0 and ca. 30.5 kcal mol(-1) for the Rh and Ir systems, respectively) agrees with the experimental observation, for related systems, of oxidatively

  14. Catalytic functionalization of methane and light alkanes in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, M Ángeles; Olmos, Andrea; Muñoz, Bianca K; Jacob, Kane; González-Núñez, M Elena; Mello, Rossella; Asensio, Gregorio; Caballero, Ana; Etienne, Michel; Pérez, Pedro J

    2014-08-25

    The development of catalytic methods for the effective functionalization of methane yet remains a challenge. The best system known to date is the so-called Catalytica Process based on the use of platinum catalysts to convert methane into methyl bisulfate with a TOF rate of 10(-3) s. In this contribution, we report a series of silver complexes containing perfluorinated tris(indazolyl)borate ligands that catalyze the functionalization of methane into ethyl propionate upon reaction with ethyl diazoacetate (EDA) by using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as the reaction medium. The employment of this reaction medium has also allowed the functionalization of ethane, propane, butane, and isobutane.

  15. Evaluation of methyl fluoride and dimethyl ether as inhibitors of aerobic methane oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Culbertson, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Methyl fluoride (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) were effective inhibitors of aerobic methanotrophy in a variety of soils. MF and DME blocked consumption of CH4 as well as the oxidation of 14CH4 to 14CO2, but neither MF nor DME affected the oxidation of [14C]methanol or [14C]formate to 14CO2. Cooxidation of ethane and propane by methane-oxidizing soils was also inhibited by MF. Nitrification (ammonia oxidation) in soils was inhibited by both MF and DME. Production of N2O via nitrification was inhibited by MF; however, MF did not affect N2O production associated with denitrification. Methanogenesis was partially inhibited by MF but not by DME. Methane oxidation was ~100-fold more sensitive to MF than was methanogenesis, indicating that an optimum concentration could be employed to selectively block methanotrophy. MF inhibited methane oxidation by cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus; however, DME was a much less effective inhibitor.

  16. Detection of (C-13)-ethane in Jupiter's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, Guenter; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Jennings, Donald E.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution (C-12)- and (C-13)-ethane spectra of Jupiter were acquired with the Kitt Peak 4 m Fourier spectrometer and the Goddard postdisperser in June 1987. A relative abundance ratio (C-12/C-13) of 94 +/- 12 was derived from the measurements. This nearly terrestrial value indicates little or no fractionation of carbon isotopes when ethane is produced in the photolysis of methane in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  17. Interannual Variability and Trends of C2-C11 Non-Methane Hydrocarbons in a Subtropical Area close to the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglück, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Speciated C2-C11 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) have been measured online on an hourly basis at Lake Jackson/TX close to the Gulf of Mexico. Altogether 48 NMHCs, including the GAW NMHC compounds, along with NO, NO2, NOx, O3 have been collected continuously from January 2004-December 2013 under the auspices of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. Data was screened for background conditions representing marine wind sectors. The data set represents a combination of marine air masses mixed with local biogenic emissions. The data analysis addresses photochemical processing of air masses as reflected in the relationship of ln(n-butane/ethane) vs. ln(propane/ethane) and ln(i-butane/ethane) vs. ln(n-butane/ethane). In addition, key NMHC relationships for radical chemistry, e.g. i-butane vs n-butane for OH and Cl chemistry and i-pentane vs. n-pentane for NO3 chemistry, are discussed. Seasonal analysis revealed a clear trend with maximum NMHC mixing ratios in winter time and lowest mixing ratios in summer reflecting the impact of photochemical processes in summer. Propene equivalents were highest during summertime, with significant contributions from alkenes, including isoprene. The relation of propane/ethane vs ethane indicates seasonal variation with lowest values (i.e. most aged air masses) in winter. Contrary to usual GAW NMHC sampling procedures, which at least requires routine daytime samples (e.g. for canister samplings), continuous NMHC data collection allows to analyze nighttime data, which is least impacted by photochemical processes and potentially well-suited for trend analysis. Corresponding trend analysis for the Lake Jackson data suggests an overall slight decrease of selected NMHCs over the 2004-2013 period.

  18. Supercritical extraction of lycopene from tomato industrial wastes with ethane.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Beatriz P; Gouveia, Luisa; Matos, Patricia G S; Cristino, Ana F; Palavra, António F; Mendes, Rui L

    2012-07-11

    Supercritical fluid extraction of all-E-lycopene from tomato industrial wastes (mixture of skins and seeds) was carried out in a semi-continuous flow apparatus using ethane as supercritical solvent. The effect of pressure, temperature, feed particle size, solvent superficial velocity and matrix initial composition was evaluated. Moreover, the yield of the extraction was compared with that obtained with other supercritical solvents (supercritical CO₂ and a near critical mixture of ethane and propane). The recovery of all-E-lycopene increased with pressure, decreased with the increase of the particle size in the initial stages of the extraction and was not practically affected by the solvent superficial velocity. The effect of the temperature was more complex. When the temperature increased from 40 to 60 °C the recovery of all-E-lycopene increased from 80 to 90%. However, for a further increase to 80 °C, the recovery remained almost the same, indicating that some E-Z isomerization could have occurred, as well as some degradation of lycopene. The recovery of all-E-lycopene was almost the same for feed samples with different all-E-lycopene content. Furthermore, when a batch with a higher all-E-lycopene content was used, supercritical ethane and a near critical mixture of ethane and propane showed to be better solvents than supercritical CO₂ leading to a faster extraction with a higher recovery of the carotenoid.

  19. Macroseepage of Methane and Light Alkanes at the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doezema, L. A.; Weber, D.; Schuffels, S.; Marquez, A.; Taylor, C.; Raya, P.; Howard, D.; Contreras, P.; Fusco, K.; Morales, F.; Nwachuku, I.

    2015-12-01

    Natural seepage of methane has been theorized to be an underreported source of global methane. Recent studies have also suggested that light alkane flux that is given off in combination with the methane also is underreported in local and global budgets. This study investigated macroseepage, visible seepage, at the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, CA. More than 100 samples were collected from individual seeps using stainless steel flux chambers and canisters and were analyzed for methane and C2-C5 alkanes using gas chromatography equipped with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID). Maximum hourly fluxes from individual seeps were over 70 g of methane and over 720 mg, 670 mg, 200 mg, 20 mg, 14 mg, and 0.2 mg for ethane, propane, i-butane, n-butane, i-pentane, and n-pentane respectively. In addition to the active seepage sites, a significant amount of methane and light alkanes was also found to come from outgassing from standing tar deposits. Using gas ratios found in this study along with overall methane emission estimates from another recent study, the La Brea Tar Pits were found to be a significant source of light alkanes in the South Coast Air Basin, contributing approximately 2% towards the overall budget.

  20. Titan's carbon budget and the case of the missing ethane.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Eric H; Atreya, Sushil K

    2009-10-22

    The retrieval of data from the Cassini-Huygens mission has revealed much about Titan's atmospheric-surface system and has precipitated more questions. One of these questions involves the lack of large reservoirs of ethane that were predicted by a variety of studies prior to the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft. Using an updated and comprehensive photochemical model, we examine the nature of Titan's carbon budget, initiated by the destruction of methane, and the role that ethane condensation plays in this budget. Model results show that 40% of methane destruction results in ethane formation, with a net production rate of 2.7 x 10(9) molecules cm(-2) s(-1), due primarily to acetylenic catalysis in Titan's stratosphere. This corresponds to a liquid ethane layer of several hundred meters over geologic time. However, episodic methane outgassing, subsurface sequestration, and chemical processing of Titan's surface are likely responsible for the limiting of ethane condensate on Titan's surface to less than 10 m globally averaged.

  1. Titan's missing ethane: From the atmosphere to the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliam, Ashley E.; Lerman, Abraham

    2016-09-01

    The second most abundant component of the present-day Titan atmosphere, methane (CH4), is known to undergo photolytic conversion to ethane (C2H6) that accumulates as a liquid on Titan's surface. Condensation temperature of ethane is higher than that of methane, so that ethane "rain" may be expected to occur before the liquefaction of methane. At present, the partial pressure of ethane in the atmosphere is 1E-5 bar, much lower than 1E-1 bar of CH4. Estimated 8.46E17 kg or 1.37E6 km3 of C2H6 have been produced on Titan since accretion. The Titan surface reservoirs of ethane are lakes and craters, of estimated volume of 50,000 km3 and 61,000 km3, respectively. As these are smaller than the total volume of liquid ethane produced in the course of Titan's history, the excess may be stored in the subsurface of the crust, made primarily of water ice. The minimum porosity of the crust needed to accommodate all the liquid ethane would be only 0.9% of the uppermost 2 km of the crust. The occurrence of CH4 and liquid C2H6 on Titan has led to much speculation on the possibility of life on that satellite. The aggregation of organic molecules in a "primordial soup or bullion" depends in part on the viscosity of the medium, diffusivity of organic molecules in it, and rates of polymerization reactions. The temperatures on Titan, much lower than on primordial Earth, are less favorable to the "Second Coming of life" on Titan.

  2. Stratospheric ethane on Neptune - Comparison of groundbased and Voyager IRIS retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodor; Romani, Paul; Espenak, Fred; Bezard, Bruno

    1992-01-01

    Near-simultaneous ground and spacecraft measurements of 12-micron ethane emission spectra during the Voyager encounter with Neptune have furnished bases for the determination of stratospheric ethane abundance and the testing and constraining of Neptune methane-photochemistry models. The ethane retrievals were sensitive to the thermal profile used. Contribution functions for warm thermal profiles peaked at higher altitudes, as expected, with the heterodyne functions covering lower-pressure regions. Both constant- and nonconstant-with-height profiles remain candidate distributions for Neptune's stratospheric ethane.

  3. Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Mallinger

    2004-08-27

    Project Description: Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants The Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants was established to demonstrate the benefits of new propane equipment. The US Department of Energy, the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) and the Propane Vehicle Council (PVC) partnered in this program. The project impacted ten different states, 179 vehicles, and 15 new propane fueling facilities. Based on estimates provided, this project generated a minimum of 1,441,000 new gallons of propane sold for the vehicle market annually. Additionally, two new off-road engines were brought to the market. Projects originally funded under this project were the City of Portland, Colorado, Kansas City, Impco Technologies, Jasper Engines, Maricopa County, New Jersey State, Port of Houston, Salt Lake City Newspaper, Suburban Propane, Mutual Liquid Propane and Ted Johnson.

  4. Direct measurements of methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mary; Kanno, Cynthia M.; Reid, Matthew C.; Zhang, Xin; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Celia, Michael A.; Chen, Yuheng; Onstott, Tullis C.

    2014-01-01

    Abandoned oil and gas wells provide a potential pathway for subsurface migration and emissions of methane and other fluids to the atmosphere. Little is known about methane fluxes from the millions of abandoned wells that exist in the United States. Here, we report direct measurements of methane fluxes from abandoned oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania, using static flux chambers. A total of 42 and 52 direct measurements were made at wells and at locations near the wells (“controls”) in forested, wetland, grassland, and river areas in July, August, October 2013 and January 2014, respectively. The mean methane flow rates at these well locations were 0.27 kg/d/well, and the mean methane flow rate at the control locations was 4.5 × 10−6 kg/d/location. Three out of the 19 measured wells were high emitters that had methane flow rates that were three orders of magnitude larger than the median flow rate of 1.3 × 10−3 kg/d/well. Assuming the mean flow rate found here is representative of all abandoned wells in Pennsylvania, we scaled the methane emissions to be 4–7% of estimated total anthropogenic methane emissions in Pennsylvania. The presence of ethane, propane, and n-butane, along with the methane isotopic composition, indicate that the emitted methane is predominantly of thermogenic origin. These measurements show that methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells can be significant. The research required to quantify these emissions nationally should be undertaken so they can be accurately described and included in greenhouse gas emissions inventories. PMID:25489074

  5. Direct measurements of methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mary; Kanno, Cynthia M; Reid, Matthew C; Zhang, Xin; Mauzerall, Denise L; Celia, Michael A; Chen, Yuheng; Onstott, Tullis C

    2014-12-23

    Abandoned oil and gas wells provide a potential pathway for subsurface migration and emissions of methane and other fluids to the atmosphere. Little is known about methane fluxes from the millions of abandoned wells that exist in the United States. Here, we report direct measurements of methane fluxes from abandoned oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania, using static flux chambers. A total of 42 and 52 direct measurements were made at wells and at locations near the wells ("controls") in forested, wetland, grassland, and river areas in July, August, October 2013 and January 2014, respectively. The mean methane flow rates at these well locations were 0.27 kg/d/well, and the mean methane flow rate at the control locations was 4.5 × 10(-6) kg/d/location. Three out of the 19 measured wells were high emitters that had methane flow rates that were three orders of magnitude larger than the median flow rate of 1.3 × 10(-3) kg/d/well. Assuming the mean flow rate found here is representative of all abandoned wells in Pennsylvania, we scaled the methane emissions to be 4-7% of estimated total anthropogenic methane emissions in Pennsylvania. The presence of ethane, propane, and n-butane, along with the methane isotopic composition, indicate that the emitted methane is predominantly of thermogenic origin. These measurements show that methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells can be significant. The research required to quantify these emissions nationally should be undertaken so they can be accurately described and included in greenhouse gas emissions inventories.

  6. Methane and propane micro-inclusions in olivine in titanoclinohumite-bearing dunites from the Sanbagawa high-P metamorphic belt, Japan: Hydrocarbon activity in a subduction zone and Ti mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Shoji; Ishimaru, Satoko; Mizukami, Tomoyuki

    2012-11-01

    Micro-inclusions of methane and propane were examined in olivine and titanoclinohumite in dunite from Fujiwara, Sanbagawa high-P/T metamorphic belt, Japan, in order to understand the behavior of hydrocarbons in the subduction zone and mantle wedge. In the Fujiwara dunite, olivines coexist with magnetite and exhibit a wide range of chemical compositions (Fo88-96 and 0.2-0.6 wt% NiO), possibly indicating a deserpentinization origin for the dunite. The primary chromian spinel shows an intermediate Cr/(Cr+Al) atomic ratio, 0.5-0.6, and 1-3 wt% TiO2, and are enclosed by its alteration phases (ferritechromite and magnetite) that contain less than 0.8 wt% TiO2. Titanoclinohumite is frequently accompanied with the altered spinels, suggesting its Ti was provided by spinel alteration. Thin (<1 cm) titanoclinohumite veinlets are commonly found, indicating Ti was mobile during the metamorphic formation of the Fujiwara meta-dunite. Hydrocarbons are usually associated with serpentine and brucite, almost free of magnetite, in individual micro-inclusions, suggesting initial entrapment of hydrocarbon-rich aqueous fluids and subsequent reaction only between their water component and the wall olivine. The primary dunite of Fujiwara, originally formed as a cumulate from intra-plate magma, and was serpentinized and brecciated to contain carbonaceous matter in the matrix part before incorporation in the subduction zone. The hydrocarbons possibly formed with maturation of the carbonaceous matter in the process of subduction. The continuously formed hydrocarbons mobilized Ti from chromian spinel to leave low-Ti ferritechromite and magnetite in the Fujiwara dunite, and finally stabilized as titanoclinohumite and other Ti-rich minerals during deserpentinization at high pressures. The titanoclinohumite veinlet formation suggests the Ti mobility, although in a short distance in this specific case. Ti is possibly mobile within the mantle wedge if hydrocarbons are available from the slab, but

  7. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of methane and C2+ alkanes in electrical spark discharge: implications for identifying sources of hydrocarbons in terrestrial and extraterrestrial settings.

    PubMed

    Telling, Jon; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2013-05-01

    The low-molecular-weight alkanes--methane, ethane, propane, and butane--are found in a wide range of terrestrial and extraterrestrial settings. The development of robust criteria for distinguishing abiogenic from biogenic alkanes is essential for current investigations of Mars' atmosphere and for future exobiology missions to other planets and moons. Here, we show that alkanes synthesized during gas-phase radical recombination reactions in electrical discharge experiments have values of δ(2)H(methane)>δ(2)H(ethane)>δ(2)H(propane), similar to those of the carbon isotopes. The distribution of hydrogen isotopes in gas-phase radical reactions is likely due to kinetic fractionations either (i) from the preferential incorporation of (1)H into longer-chain alkanes due to the more rapid rate of collisions of the smaller (1)H-containing molecules or (ii) by secondary ion effects. Similar δ(13)C(C1-C2+) and δ(2)H(C1-C2+) patterns may be expected in a range of extraterrestrial environments where gas-phase radical reactions dominate, including interstellar space, the atmosphere and liquid hydrocarbon lakes of Saturn's moon Titan, and the outer atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus. Radical recombination reactions at high temperatures and pressures may provide an explanation for the combined reversed δ(13)C(C1-C2+) and δ(2)H(C1-C2+) patterns of terrestrial alkanes documented at a number of high-temperature/pressure crustal sites.

  8. Low-Latitude Ethane Rain on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R. N.; Lawrence, K. J.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Cassini ISS observed multiple widespread changes in surface brightness in Titan's equatorial regions over the past three years. These brightness variations are attributed to rainfall from cloud systems that appear to form seasonally. Determining the composition of this rainfall is an important step in understanding the "methanological" cycle on Titan. I use data from Cassini VIMS to complete a spectroscopic investigation of multiple rain-wetted areas. I compute "before-and-after" spectral ratios of any areas that show either deposition or evaporation of rain. By comparing these spectral ratios to a model of liquid ethane, I find that the rain is most likely composed of liquid ethane. The spectrum of liquid ethane contains multiple absorption features that fall within the 2-micron and 5-micron spectral windows in Titan's atmosphere. I show that these features are visible in the spectra taken of Titan's surface and that they are characteristically different than those in the spectrum of liquid methane. Furthermore, just as ISS saw the surface brightness reverting to its original state after a period of time, I show that VIMS observations of later flybys show the surface composition in different stages of returning to its initial form.

  9. First observations of light non-methane hydrocarbons (C2-C5) over a high altitude site in the central Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Tapaswini; Naja, Manish; Lal, S.; Venkataramani, S.; Bhardwaj, Piyush; Ojha, N.; Kumar, R.; Chandola, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents observations of methane (CH4) and light non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) for the first time from a high altitude site Nainital (29.4°N, 79.5°E, 1958 m amsl) in the central Himalayas. The whole air samples collected with a frequency of 3 samples per week during April 2009-December 2011 are analyzed using a Gas Chromatograph equipped with Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID). Additionally, samples were collected from two semi-urban sites (Haldwani and Pantnagar) in the adjoining Indo Gangetic plain region. CH4 and NMHCs show a distinct seasonal cycle over this region with more frequent observations of higher levels during winter (DJF) and late autumn (SON) and lower levels during the summer-monsoon (JJA). Different NMHCs exhibit better correlations during autumn/winter as compared to the summer-monsoon season. The annual mean mixing ratios of methane, ethane, ethene, propane, propene, i-butane, n-butane, acetylene, and i-pentane at Nainital are measured to be 1.9 ± 0.1 ppmv, 1.8 ± 1.0, 0.7 ± 0.9, 0.6 ± 0.8, 0.6 ± 0.7, 0.6 ± 0.7, 0.5 ± 0.6, 1.0 ± 0.8, and 0.5 ± 0.6, respectively (all in ppbv). The seasonal cycle of CH4 at Nainital is found to be similar to other global high altitude sites (Jungfraujoch and Mauna Loa) but somewhat different than a high altitude site Mt. Abu in India. NMHCs, other than ethane and propane, are found to be higher over this central Himalayan region than other sites. Additionally, composition of NMHCs is shown to be different over the study region when compared with other sites in the IGP region. A correlation study between ln((n-butane)/(ethane)) and ln((i-butane)/(ethane)) showed that oxidation by the OH radical is the main removal mechanism of these species over the central Himalaya and dilution maintains the ratios of these species. The lowest slope of propane and acetylene with CO during summer and spring are indicating absence of fresh air mass over this region. This study fills a major gap in

  10. Occurrence and origin of methane in groundwater in Alberta (Canada): Gas geochemical and isotopic approaches.

    PubMed

    Humez, P; Mayer, B; Ing, J; Nightingale, M; Becker, V; Kingston, A; Akbilgic, O; Taylor, S

    2016-01-15

    To assess potential future impacts on shallow aquifers by leakage of natural gas from unconventional energy resource development it is essential to establish a reliable baseline. Occurrence of methane in shallow groundwater in Alberta between 2006 and 2014 was assessed and was ubiquitous in 186 sampled monitoring wells. Free and dissolved gas sampling and measurement approaches yielded comparable results with low methane concentrations in shallow groundwater, but in 28 samples from 21 wells methane exceeded 10mg/L in dissolved gas and 300,000 ppmv in free gas. Methane concentrations in free and dissolved gas samples were found to increase with well depth and were especially elevated in groundwater obtained from aquifers containing coal seams and shale units. Carbon isotope ratios of methane averaged -69.7 ± 11.1‰ (n=63) in free gas and -65.6 ± 8.9‰ (n=26) in dissolved gas. δ(13)C values were not found to vary with well depth or lithology indicating that methane in Alberta groundwater was derived from a similar source. The low δ(13)C values in concert with average δ(2)HCH4 values of -289 ± 44‰ (n=45) suggest that most methane was of biogenic origin predominantly generated via CO2 reduction. This interpretation is confirmed by dryness parameters typically >500 due to only small amounts of ethane and a lack of propane in most samples. Comparison with mud gas profile carbon isotope data revealed that methane in the investigated shallow groundwater in Alberta is isotopically similar to hydrocarbon gases found in 100-250 meter depths in the WCSB and is currently not sourced from thermogenic hydrocarbon occurrences in deeper portions of the basin. The chemical and isotopic data for methane gas samples obtained from Alberta groundwater provide an excellent baseline against which potential future impact of deeper stray gases on shallow aquifers can be assessed.

  11. Characteristics of atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons during high PM 10 episodes and normal days in Foshan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Songjun; Tan, Jihua; Ma, Yongliang; Yang, Fumo; Yu, Yongchan; Wang, Jiewen

    2011-08-01

    Atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were firstly studied during high PM 10 episodes and normal days in December 2008 in Foshan, China. Ethyne, ethene, i-pentane, toluene, ethane and propane are six abundant hydrocarbons, accounting for round 80% of total NMHCs. Both diurnal variations and concentration ratios of morning (evening)/afternoon implied vehicular emission for most hydrocarbons. Correlation coefficients (R 2) of ethene, propene, i-butene, benzene, toluene and i-/n-butanes with ethyne were 0.60-0.88 (they were 0.64-0.88 during high PM 10 episode and 0.60-0.85 in normal days) except for ethene and i-butene in normal days, indicating these hydrocarbons are mainly related to vehicular emission. It suggests liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and natural gas (NG) leakages are responsible for propane and ethane, respectively. The measured mean benzene/toluene (B/T) ratio (wt/wt) was 0.45 ± 0.29 during total sampling periods together with R 2 analysis, again indicating vehicular emission is main contributor to ambient hydrocarbons. And the lower B/T ratio (0.29 ± 0.11) during high PM 10 episodes than that (0.75 ± 0.29) in normal days is likely caused by air transport containing low B/T value (0.23) from Guangzhou as well as solvent application containing toluene in Foshan.

  12. Geodetic data support trapping of ethane in Titan's polar crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, Christophe; Rambaux, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Titan's surface is characterized by polar depressions that strongly influence interpretations of the gravity data. This study investigates several geodynamical models that can explain these depressions. For each model, the values of the three moments of inertia are computed numerically by discretizing the interior in spherical coordinates. The study shows that a Pratt model where the polar subsurface is made of ethane clathrates can explain the polar depression, the abrupt jump in altitude at about 60 degrees latitude, and the values of the degree 2 gravity coefficients. This model, proposed by Choukroun and Sotin [1], is based on the stability of ethane clathrate hydrates relative to methane clathrate hydrates. In addition to fitting the geodetic data, it explains the absence of ethane in Titan's atmosphere although ethane is the main product of the photolysis of methane. Other geophysical models based on latitudinal variations in the tidal heating production or in the heat flux at the base of the icy crust do not provide such a good match to the gravity and topographic observations. The ethane-clathrate model predicts that all the ethane produced by photolysis of methane at the present rate during the last billion years could be stored in the polar subsurface. It is consistent with the age of Titan's surface and that of Titan's atmospheric methane inferred from geological and geochemical observations by the Cassini/Huygens mission. The present study also emphasizes the role of mass anomalies on the interpretation of the degree 2 gravity coefficients. It shows that for Titan, a slow rotator, the values of the two equatorial moments of inertia (MoI) are largely affected by the polar depressions whereas the value of polar MoI is not. Therefore, as pointed out by previous calculations [2], calculating the moment of inertia (MoI) factor from the value of J2 could lead to major errors. This is not the case for our preferred Titan's model for which the negative polar

  13. Partial oxidation of ethane to oxygenates using Fe- and Cu-containing ZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Forde, Michael M; Armstrong, Robert D; Hammond, Ceri; He, Qian; Jenkins, Robert L; Kondrat, Simon A; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Lopez-Sanchez, Jose Antonio; Taylor, Stuart H; Willock, David; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham John

    2013-07-31

    Iron and copper containing ZSM-5 catalysts are effective for the partial oxidation of ethane with hydrogen peroxide giving combined oxygenate selectivities and productivities of up to 95.2% and 65 mol kgcat(-1) h(-1), respectively. High conversion of ethane (ca. 56%) to acetic acid (ca. 70% selectivity) can be observed. Detailed studies of this catalytic system reveal a complex reaction network in which the oxidation of ethane gives a range of C2 oxygenates, with sequential C-C bond cleavage generating C1 products. We demonstrate that ethene is also formed and can be subsequently oxidized. Ethanol can be directly produced from ethane, and does not originate from the decomposition of its corresponding alkylperoxy species, ethyl hydroperoxide. In contrast to our previously proposed mechanism for methane oxidation over similar zeolite catalysts, the mechanism of ethane oxidation involves carbon-based radicals, which lead to the high conversions we observe.

  14. Identification and characterization of high methane-emitting abandoned oil and gas wells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mary; Christian, Shanna; Celia, Michael A.; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Bill, Markus; Miller, Alana R.; Chen, Yuheng; Conrad, Mark E.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Jackson, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of methane emissions from abandoned oil/gas wells show that these wells can be a substantial source of methane to the atmosphere, particularly from a small proportion of high-emitting wells. However, identifying high emitters remains a challenge. We couple 163 well measurements of methane flow rates; ethane, propane, and n-butane concentrations; isotopes of methane; and noble gas concentrations from 88 wells in Pennsylvania with synthesized data from historical documents, field investigations, and state databases. Using our databases, we (i) improve estimates of the number of abandoned wells in Pennsylvania; (ii) characterize key attributes that accompany high emitters, including depth, type, plugging status, and coal area designation; and (iii) estimate attribute-specific and overall methane emissions from abandoned wells. High emitters are best predicted as unplugged gas wells and plugged/vented gas wells in coal areas and appear to be unrelated to the presence of underground natural gas storage areas or unconventional oil/gas production. Repeat measurements over 2 years show that flow rates of high emitters are sustained through time. Our attribute-based methane emission data and our comprehensive estimate of 470,000–750,000 abandoned wells in Pennsylvania result in estimated state-wide emissions of 0.04–0.07 Mt (1012 g) CH4 per year. This estimate represents 5–8% of annual anthropogenic methane emissions in Pennsylvania. Our methodology combining new field measurements with data mining of previously unavailable well attributes and numbers of wells can be used to improve methane emission estimates and prioritize cost-effective mitigation strategies for Pennsylvania and beyond. PMID:27849603

  15. Identification and characterization of high methane-emitting abandoned oil and gas wells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mary; Christian, Shanna; Celia, Michael A; Mauzerall, Denise L; Bill, Markus; Miller, Alana R; Chen, Yuheng; Conrad, Mark E; Darrah, Thomas H; Jackson, Robert B

    2016-11-29

    Recent measurements of methane emissions from abandoned oil/gas wells show that these wells can be a substantial source of methane to the atmosphere, particularly from a small proportion of high-emitting wells. However, identifying high emitters remains a challenge. We couple 163 well measurements of methane flow rates; ethane, propane, and n-butane concentrations; isotopes of methane; and noble gas concentrations from 88 wells in Pennsylvania with synthesized data from historical documents, field investigations, and state databases. Using our databases, we (i) improve estimates of the number of abandoned wells in Pennsylvania; (ii) characterize key attributes that accompany high emitters, including depth, type, plugging status, and coal area designation; and (iii) estimate attribute-specific and overall methane emissions from abandoned wells. High emitters are best predicted as unplugged gas wells and plugged/vented gas wells in coal areas and appear to be unrelated to the presence of underground natural gas storage areas or unconventional oil/gas production. Repeat measurements over 2 years show that flow rates of high emitters are sustained through time. Our attribute-based methane emission data and our comprehensive estimate of 470,000-750,000 abandoned wells in Pennsylvania result in estimated state-wide emissions of 0.04-0.07 Mt (10(12) g) CH4 per year. This estimate represents 5-8% of annual anthropogenic methane emissions in Pennsylvania. Our methodology combining new field measurements with data mining of previously unavailable well attributes and numbers of wells can be used to improve methane emission estimates and prioritize cost-effective mitigation strategies for Pennsylvania and beyond.

  16. Ethane ocean on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.; Stevenson, D. J.; Yung, Y.L.

    1983-01-01

    Voyager I radio occultation data is employed to develop a qualitative model of an ethane ocean on Titan. It is suggested that the ocean contains 25 percent CH4 and that the ocean is in dynamic equilibrium with an N2 atmosphere. Previous models of a CH4 ocean are discounted due to photolysis rates of CH4 gas. Tidal damping of Titan's orbital eccentricity is taken as evidence for an ocean layer approximately 1 km deep, with the ocean floor being covered with a solid C2H2 layer 100 to 200 m thick. The photolytic process disrupting the CH4, if the estimates of the oceanic content of CH4 are correct, could continue for at least one billion years. Verification of the model is dependent on detecting CH4 clouds in the lower atmosphere, finding C2H6 saturation in the lower troposphere, or obtaining evidence of a global ocean.

  17. Low-Latitude Ethane Rain on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, Paul; Buratti, B. J.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R. N.; Lawrence, K. J.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-10-01

    Cassini ISS observed multiple widespread changes in surface brightness in Titan's equatorial regions over the past three years (Barnes, J. W. et al. 2012, Icarus, submitted). These brightness variations are attributed to rainfall from cloud systems that appear to form seasonally (Turtle, E. P. et al. 2011, Science, 331, 1414-1417). Determining the composition of this rainfall is an important step in understanding the “methanological” cycle that dominates Titan's surface and atmosphere. In this study, we use data from Cassini VIMS to complete a thorough spectroscopic investigation of rain-wetted areas near Yalaing Terra, Hetpet Regio and central Adiri on Titan. We compute “before-and-after” spectral ratios of any areas that show either deposition or evaporation of rain at any point in the time span of August 2009 to January 2012. By comparing these spectral ratios to a model of liquid ethane that was calculated to match the resolution and sampling interval of VIMS (Brown, R. H. et al. 2008, Nature, 454, 607-610), we find that the rain is most likely composed of liquid ethane. The spectrum of liquid ethane contains multiple absorption features that fortunately fall within the 2-micron and 5-micron spectral windows in Titan's atmosphere. We show that these features are visible in the spectra taken of Titan's surface and that they are characteristically different than those in the spectrum of liquid methane. Furthermore, just as ISS saw the surface brightness reverting to its original state after a period of time, we show that VIMS observations of later flybys show the surface composition in different stages of returning to its initial form as well. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

  18. Low-latitude ethane rain on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, P. A.; Buratti, B. J.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R. N.; Lawrence, K. J.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    Cassini ISS observed multiple widespread changes in surface brightness in Titan's equatorial regions over the past three years (Barnes, J. W. et al. 2012, Icarus, submitted). These brightness variations are attributed to rainfall from cloud systems that appear to form seasonally (Turtle, E. P. et al. 2011, Science, 331, 1414-1417). Determining the composition of this rainfall is an important step in understanding the "methanological" cycle that dominates Titan's surface and atmosphere. In this study, we use data from Cassini VIMS to complete a thorough spectroscopic investigation of rain-wetted areas near Yalaing Terra, Hetpet Regio and central Adiri on Titan. We compute "before-and-after" spectral ratios of any areas that show either deposition or evaporation of rain at any point in the time span of August 2009 to January 2012. By comparing these spectral ratios to a model of liquid ethane that was calculated to match the resolution and sampling interval of VIMS (Brown, R. H. et al. 2008, Nature, 454, 607-610), we find that the rain is most likely composed of liquid ethane. The spectrum of liquid ethane contains multiple absorption features that fortunately fall within the 2-micron and 5-micron spectral windows in Titan's atmosphere. We show that these features are visible in the spectra taken of Titan's surface and that they are characteristically different than those in the spectrum of liquid methane. Furthermore, just as ISS saw the surface brightness reverting to its original state after a period of time, we show that VIMS observations of later flybys show the surface composition in different stages of returning to its initial form as well. Funded by NASA.

  19. The identification of liquid ethane in Titan's Ontario Lacus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Soderblom, J.M.; Clark, R.N.; Jaumann, R.; Barnes, J.W.; Sotin, C.; Buratti, B.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2008-01-01

    Titan was once thought to have global oceans of light hydrocarbons on its surface, but after 40 close flybys of Titan by the Cassini spacecraft, it has become clear that no such oceans exist. There are, however, features similar to terrestrial lakes and seas, and widespread evidence for fluvial erosion, presumably driven by precipitation of liquid methane from Titan's dense, nitrogen-dominated atmosphere. Here we report infrared spectroscopic data, obtained by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini spacecraft, that strongly indicate that ethane, probably in liquid solution with methane, nitrogen and other low-molecular-mass hydrocarbons, is contained within Titan's Ontario Lacus.

  20. Propane respiration jump-starts microbial response to a deep oil spill.

    PubMed

    Valentine, David L; Kessler, John D; Redmond, Molly C; Mendes, Stephanie D; Heintz, Monica B; Farwell, Christopher; Hu, Lei; Kinnaman, Franklin S; Yvon-Lewis, Shari; Du, Mengran; Chan, Eric W; Garcia Tigreros, Fenix; Villanueva, Christie J

    2010-10-08

    The Deepwater Horizon event resulted in suspension of oil in the Gulf of Mexico water column because the leakage occurred at great depth. The distribution and fate of other abundant hydrocarbon constituents, such as natural gases, are also important in determining the impact of the leakage but are not yet well understood. From 11 to 21 June 2010, we investigated dissolved hydrocarbon gases at depth using chemical and isotopic surveys and on-site biodegradation studies. Propane and ethane were the primary drivers of microbial respiration, accounting for up to 70% of the observed oxygen depletion in fresh plumes. Propane and ethane trapped in the deep water may therefore promote rapid hydrocarbon respiration by low-diversity bacterial blooms, priming bacterial populations for degradation of other hydrocarbons in the aging plume.

  1. High-pressure/high-temperature gas-solubility study in hydrogen-phenanthrene and methane-phenanthrene systems using static and chromatographic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, P.V.

    1987-01-01

    The design and discovery of sources for alternative energy such as coal liquefaction has become of major importance over the past two decades. One of the major problems in such design in the lack of available data, particularly, for gas solubility in polycyclic aromatics at high temperature and pressure. Static and gas-liquid partition chromatographic methods were used for the study of hydrogen-phenanthrene and methane-phenanthrene systems. The static data for these two binaries were taken along 398.2, 423.2, 448.2, and 473.2 K isotherms up to 25.23 MPa. Gas-liquid partition chromatography was used to study the infinite dilution behavior of methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, and carbon dioxide in the hydrogen-phenanthrene system as well as hydrogen, ethane, n-butane, and carbon dioxide in the methane-phenanthrene binary. The principle objective was to examine the role of the elution gas. Temperatures were along the same isotherms as the static data and up to 20.77 MPa. With the exception of carbon dioxide, Henry's constants were calculated for all systems. Expressions for the heat of solution as a function of pressure were derived for both binary and chromatographic data. Estimates of delta H/sub i/sup sol/ at high pressure were presented.

  2. Methane as a biomarker in the search for extraterrestrial life: Lessons learned from Mars analog hypersaline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, B.; Tazaz, A.; Kelley, C. A.; Poole, J. A.; Davila, A.; Chanton, J.

    2010-12-01

    Methane released from discrete regions on Mars, together with previous reports of methane determined with ground-based telescopes, has revived the possibility of past or even extant life near the surface on Mars, since 90% of the methane on Earth has a biological origin. This intriguing possibility is supported by the abundant evidence of large bodies of liquid water, and therefore of conditions conducive to the origin of life, early in the planet's history. The detection and analysis of methane is at the core of NASA’s strategies to search for life in the solar system, and on extrasolar planets. Because methane is also produced abiotically, it is important to generate criteria to unambiguously assess biogenicity. The stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic signature of methane, as well as its ratio to other low molecular weight hydrocarbons (the methane/(ethane + propane) ratio: C1/(C2 + C3)), has been suggested to be diagnostic for biogenic methane. We report measurements of the concentrations and stable isotopic signature of methane from hypersaline environments. We focus on hypersaline environments because spectrometers orbiting Mars have detected widespread chloride bearing deposits resembling salt flats. Other evaporitic minerals, e.g., sulfates, are also abundant in several regions, including those studied by the Mars Exploration Rovers. The presence of evaporitic minerals, together with the known evolution of the Martian climate, from warmer and wetter to cold and hyper-arid, suggest that evaporitic and hypersaline environments were common in the past. Hypersaline environments examined to date include salt ponds located in Baja California, the San Francisco Bay, and the Atacama Desert. Methane was found in gas produced both in the sediments, and in gypsum- and halite-hosted (endolithic) microbial communities. Maximum methane concentrations were as high as 40% by volume. The methane carbon isotopic (δ13C) composition showed a wide range of values, from about

  3. Measuring In situ Dissolved Methane Concentrations in Gas Hydrate-Rich Systems. Part 2: Investigating Mechanisms Controlling Hydrate Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. M.; Lapham, L.; Riedel, M.; Chanton, J.

    2010-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, twenty times more infrared-active than CO2, and an important energy source. For these reasons, methane hydrate, one of the largest potential reservoirs of methane on earth, is of considerable interest to scientists and industry alike. In particular, questions relating to the stability of methane hydrate are becoming more important as concern about the release of methane into overlying ocean (and eventually the atmosphere) and interest in the recovery of methane from this resource increase. Three primary factors control hydrate stability: pressure (P), temperature (T), and the gas concentration in the surrounding environment. Pressure and temperature govern the stability of the hydrate structure. When hydrate is exposed to P/T regimes outside of the stability zone (HSZ), the hydrate decomposes by dissociation, a relatively fast process resulting in the release of gaseous phase methane (CH4(g)). However, if the P/T regime is within the HSZ, but the concentration of the guest gas (typically CH4) in the surroundings is below saturation, the hydrate will decompose by dissolution resulting in a phase change between hydrate and the dissolved gas phase (CH4(aq)). OsmoSamplers were deployed at a methane hydrate outcrop in Barkley Canyon, Northern Cascadia Margin, collecting porewater samples in a gradient at 1cm increments away from the hydrate surface. Methane, ethane, and propane concentrations in the porewater samples were measured at 6-day resolution over a period of 9 months. At three centimeters from the hydrate face, methane concentrations were significantly lower than predicted saturation for conditions at this site. Curiously, in situ observations of natural hydrate dissolution are up to two orders of magnitude lower than predicted diffusion-controlled dissolution based on surrounding methane concentrations. Since diffusion of methane away from the hydrate surface has been implicated as the dominant control of hydrate dissolution

  4. Propane-d6 Heterogeneously Hyperpolarized by Parahydrogen

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Long-lived spin states of hyperpolarized propane-d6 gas were demonstrated following pairwise addition of parahydrogen gas to propene-d6 using heterogeneous parahydrogen-induced polarization (HET-PHIP). Hyperpolarized molecules were synthesized using Rh/TiO2 solid catalyst with 1.6 nm Rh nanoparticles. Hyperpolarized (PH ∼ 1%) propane-d6 was detected at high magnetic field (9.4 T) spectroscopically and by high-resolution 3D gradient-echo MRI (4.7 T) as the gas flowed through the radiofrequency coil with a spatial and temporal resolution of 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm3 and 17.7 s, respectively. Stopped-flow hyperpolarized propane-d6 gas was also detected at 0.0475 T with an observed nuclear spin polarization of PH ∼ 0.1% and a relatively long lifetime with T1,eff = 6.0 ± 0.3 s. Importantly, it was shown that the hyperpolarized protons of the deuterated product obtained via pairwise parahydrogen addition could be detected directly at low magnetic field. Importantly, the relatively long low-field T1,eff of HP propane-d6 gas is not susceptible to paramagnetic impurities as tested by exposure to ∼0.2 atm oxygen. This long lifetime and nontoxic nature of propane gas could be useful for bioimaging applications including potentially pulmonary low-field MRI. The feasibility of high-resolution low-field 2D gradient-echo MRI was demonstrated with 0.88 × 0.88 mm2 spatial and ∼0.7 s temporal resolution, respectively, at 0.0475 T. PMID:25506406

  5. Genetic and temporal relations between formation waters and biogenic methane: Upper Devonian Antrim Shale, Michigan Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, A. M.; Walter, L. M.; Budai, J. M.; Ku, T. C. W.; Kaiser, C. J.; Schoell, M.

    1998-05-01

    Controversy remains regarding how well geochemical criteria can distinguish microbial from thermogenic methane. Natural gas in most conventional deposits has migrated from a source rock to a reservoir, rarely remaining associated with the original or cogenetic formation waters. We investigated an unusual gas reservoir, the Late Devonian Antrim Shale, in which large volumes of variably saline water are coproduced with gas. The Antrim Shale is organic-rich, of relatively low thermal maturity, extensively fractured, and is both source and reservoir for methane that is generated dominantly by microbial activity. This hydrogeologic setting permits integration of chemical and isotopic compositions of coproduced water and gas, providing a unique opportunity to characterize methane generating mechanisms. The well-developed fracture network provides a conduit for gas and water mass transport within the Antrim Shale and allows invasion of meteoric water from overlying aquifers in the glacial drift. Steep regional concentration gradients in chemical and isotopic data are observed for formation waters and gases; dilute waters grade into dense brines (300,000 ppm) over lateral distances of less than 30 km. Radiogenic ( 14C and 3H) and stable isotope ( 18O and D) analyses of shallow Antrim Shale formation waters and glacial drift groundwaters indicate recharge times from modern to 20,000 yr BP. Carbon isotope compositions of methane from Antrim Shale wells are typical of the established range for thermogenic or mixed gas (δ 13C = -47 to -56‰). However, the unusually high δ 13C values of CO 2 coproduced with methane (˜+22‰) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in formation waters (˜+28‰) require bacterial mediation. The δD values of methane and coproduced formation water provide the strongest evidence of bacterial methanogenesis. Methane/[ethane + propane] ratios and δ 13C values for ethane indicate: (1) the presence of a thermogenic gas component that increases

  6. [1,2-Bis(diphenyl­phosphino)ethane]­chlorido(η5-penta­methyl­cyclo­penta­dien­yl)iron(II) dichloro­methane solvate

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Ya-ping; Feng, Dan; Yuan, Jing-jing

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound, [Fe(C10H15)Cl(C26H24P2)]·CH2Cl2, the FeII atom is coordinated by two P atoms from a 1,2-bis­(diphenyl­phosphino)ethane ligand [Fe—P = 2.2130 (7) and 2.2231 (7) Å], a chloride anion [Fe—Cl = 2.3329 (7) Å] and a penta­methyl­cyclo­penta­dienyl (Cp*) ligand [Fe—centroid(Cp*) = 1.732 (3) Å] in a typical piano-stool geometry. In the crystal structure, the complex and solvent mol­ecules are paired via weak C—H⋯Cl inter­actions. PMID:21588156

  7. The sequestration of ethane on Titan in smog particles.

    PubMed

    Hunten, D M

    2006-10-12

    Saturn's largest satellite, Titan, has a dense atmosphere of nitrogen with a few per cent of methane. At visible wavelengths its surface is hidden by dense orange-brown smog, which is produced in the stratosphere by photochemical reactions following the dissociation of methane by solar ultraviolet light. The most abundant of the products of these reactions is ethane, and enough of it should have been generated over the life of the Solar System to form a satellite-wide ocean one kilometre deep. Radar observations have found specular reflections in 75 per cent of the surface spots observed, but optical searches for a sun-glint off an ocean have been negative. Here I explain the mysterious absence or rarity of liquid ethane: it condenses onto the smog particles, instead of into liquid drops, at the cold temperatures in Titan's atmosphere. This dusty combination of smog and ethane, forming deposits several kilometres thick on the surface, including the observed dunes and dark areas, could be named 'smust'. This satellite-wide deposit replaces the ocean long thought to be an important feature of Titan.

  8. Raman spectra of ethane adn ethylene adsorbed of surface of catalyst Sm 2 O 3/MgO at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, A. V.; Plate, S. E.; Kadushin, A. A.; Kimel'feld, Ya. M.; Seleznev, V. A.; Tulenin, Yu. P.

    1992-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied for the investigation in situ of catalytic transformations of ethane ethylene and deuterated ethylene on the surface of catalyst Sm 2O 3/MgO at high temperatures (up to 980 K). Ethane and ethylene are the products of the oxidation dehydration of methane. For the understanding of mechanism of this process it is interesting to study of the spectra of ethane and ethylene in the conditions of the real process at high temperature. In the previous paper [1] we have shown that during the flowring of mixture methane with oxygen through the catalyst Sm 2O 3/MgO methane dissociates on CH 3 and CH 2 groups. It has been confirmed by experiment with deuterated methane. The purpose of this work is to study the interaction of ethane and ethylene with Sm 2O 3/MgO in similar conditions by Raman spectroscopy.

  9. Simulation of ethane steam cracking with severity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, M. N.; Aziz, N.

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the influence of operating parameters towards cracking severity is paramount in ensuring optimum operation of an ethylene plant. However, changing the parameters in an actual plant for data collection can be dangerous. Thus, a simulation model for ethane steam cracking furnace is developed using ASPEN Plus for the assessment. The process performance is evaluated with cracking severity factors and main product yields. Three severity factors are used for evaluation due to their ease of measurement, which are methane yield (Ymet), Ethylene-Ethane Ratio (EER) and Propylene-Ethylene Ratio (PER). The result shows that cracking severity is primarily influenced by reactor temperature. Operating the furnace with coil outlet temperature ranging between 850°C to 950°C and steam-to-hydrocarbon ratio of 0.3 to 0.5 has led to optimum main product yield.

  10. Evaluation of Methyl Fluoride and Dimethyl Ether as Inhibitors of Aerobic Methane Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Culbertson, Charles W.

    1992-01-01

    Methyl fluoride (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) were effective inhibitors of aerobic methanotrophy in a variety of soils. MF and DME blocked consumption of CH4 as well as the oxidation of 14CH4 to 14CO2, but neither MF nor DME affected the oxidation of [14C]methanol or [14C]formate to 14CO2. Cooxidation of ethane and propane by methane-oxidizing soils was also inhibited by MF. Nitrification (ammonia oxidation) in soils was inhibited by both MF and DME. Production of N2O via nitrification was inhibited by MF; however, MF did not affect N2O production associated with denitrification. Methanogenesis was partially inhibited by MF but not by DME. Methane oxidation was ∼100-fold more sensitive to MF than was methanogenesis, indicating that an optimum concentration could be employed to selectively block methanotrophy. MF inhibited methane oxidation by cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus; however, DME was a much less effective inhibitor. PMID:16348771

  11. Quantifying Methane Emissions from the Arctic Ocean Seabed to the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, Stephen; Pisso, Ignacio; Schmidbauer, Norbert; Hermansen, Ove; Silyakova, Anna; Ferré, Benedicte; Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Myhre, Gunnar; Mienert, Jürgen; Stohl, Andreas; Myhre, Cathrine Lund

    2016-04-01

    Large quantities of methane are stored under the seafloor in the shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean. Some of this is in the form of hydrates which may be vulnerable to deomposition due to surface warming. The Methane Emissions from Arctic Ocean to Atmosphere MOCA, (http://moca.nilu.no/) project was established in collaboration with the Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate (CAGE, https://cage.uit.no/). In summer 2014, and summer and autumn 2015 we deployed oceanographic CTD (Conductivity, Temperature, Depth) stations and performed state-of-the-art atmospheric measurements of CH4, CO2, CO, and other meteorological parameters aboard the research vessel Helmer Hanssen west of Prins Karl's Forland, Svalbard. Air samples were collected for isotopic analysis (13C, 2H) and quantification of other hydrocarbons (ethane, propane, etc.). Atmospheric measurements are also available from the nearby Zeppelin Observatory at a mountain close to Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard. We will present data from these measurements that show an upper constraint of the methane flux in measurement area in 2014 too low to influence the annual CH4 budget. This is further supported by top-down constraints (maximum release consistent with observations at the Helmer Hansen and Zeppelin Observatory) determined using FLEXPART foot print sensitivities and the OsloCTM3 model. The low flux estimates despite the presence of active seeps in the area (numerous gas flares were observed using echo sounding) were apparently due to the presence of a stable ocean pycnocline at ~50 m.

  12. Atmospheric chemistry: The return of ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakola, Hannele; Hellén, Heidi

    2016-07-01

    Ethane emissions can lead to ozone pollution. Measurements at 49 sites show that long-declining atmospheric ethane concentrations started rising in 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere, largely due to greater oil and gas production in the USA.

  13. Speciated non-methane organic compounds emissions from food cooking in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugica, V.; Vega, E.; Chow, J.; Reyes, E.; Sánchez, G.; Arriaga, J.; Egami, R.; Watson, J.

    Non-methane organic compound (NMOC) emissions from different sorts of food preparation sites, were quantified for the first time in Mexico, in order to develop emission profiles for further application in the chemical mass balance receptor model (CMB). Restaurants using charcoal grills and LP gas stoves, "tortillerı´as", food frying places and rotisseries were sampled using SUMMA ® stainless-steel canisters to analyse NMOC by high-resolution gas chromatography. The results obtained show that profiles determined from food cooking processes have similarities to those found in LP gas combustion, which is the most common fuel in Mexico used for this purpose, although there were differences in the relative composition of propane and butane in both cases. This suggests that, the rates of combustion of propane and butane are different. It has also been detected that propene, a reactive olefin is produced during the combustion process. The obtained profiles of restaurants, rotisseries and fried food show an important contribution of two carbon compounds (ethane, ethylene and acetylene) that can be attributed to the complex process of grease and meat cooking. The presence of these compounds cannot be attributed to vehicular sources since the concentrations are higher than in ambient air. These were also determined from aromatic compounds such as benzene, toluene and xylene in the combustion of vegetal charcoal. The measured concentrations indicate that NMOC emissions from cooking may become an important indoor source of NMOC under crowded conditions in closed places.

  14. a Hamiltonian to Obtain a Global Frequency Analysis of all the Vibrational Bands of Ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazzen-Ahmadi, Nasser; Norooz Oliaee, Jalal

    2016-06-01

    The interest in laboratory spectroscopy of ethane stems from the desire to understand the methane cycle in the atmospheres of planets and their moons and from the importance of ethane as a trace species in the terrestrial atmosphere. Solar decomposition of methane in the upper part of these atmospheres followed by a series of reactions leads to a variety of hydrocarbon compounds among which ethane is often the second most abundant species. Because of its high abundance, ethane spectra have been measured by Voyager and Cassini in the regions around 30, 12, 7, and 3 μm. Therefore, a complete knowledge of line parameters of ethane is crucial for spectroscopic remote sensing of planetary atmospheres. Experimental characterization of torsion-vibration states of ethane lying below 1400 cm-1 have been made previously, but extension of the Hamiltonian model for treatment of the strongly perturbed νb{8} fundamental and the complex band system of ethane in the 3 micron region requires careful examination of the operators for many new torsionally mediated vibration-rotation interactions. Following the procedures outlined by Hougen, we have re-examined the transformation properties of the total angular momentum, the translational and vibrational coordinates and momenta of ethane, and for vibration-torsion-rotation interaction terms constructed by taking products of these basic operators. It is found that for certain choices of phase, the doubly degenerate vibrational coordinates with and symmetry can be made to transform under the group elements in such a way as to yield real matrix elements for the torsion-vibration-rotation couplings whereas other choices of phase may require complex algebra. In this talk, I will discuss the construction of a very general torsion-vibration-rotation Hamiltonian for ethane, as well as the prospect for using such a Hamiltonian to obtain a global frequency analysis (based in large part on an extension of earlier programs and ethane fits^a from

  15. Oxidation of ethane by an Acremonium species.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J S; Wellman, A M; Zajic, J E

    1976-01-01

    Ethane oxidation was studied in ethane-grown resting cells (mycelia) of an Acremonium sp. and in cell-free preparations of such mycelia. From resting cell experiments evidence was found for a pathway of ethane oxidation via ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetic acid. In vitro studies indicated that ethane-oxidizing activity in such mycelia occurred predominantly in the microsomal fraction of crude homogenates. Microsomal preparations were inactive in the absence of added coenzyme. Marked stimulation of activity was obtained in such preparations with reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and to a much lesser degree with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Ethane oxidation was inhibited by sodium azide and carbon monoxide. PMID:9900

  16. Costs Associated With Propane Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

    2014-08-05

    This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with propane vehicle fueling infrastructure. It provides an overview of the equipment and processes necessary to develop a propane fueling station and offers estimated cost ranges.

  17. Costs Associated With Propane Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

    2014-08-01

    This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with propane vehicle fueling infrastructure. It provides an overview of the equipment and processes necessary to develop a propane fueling station and offers estimated cost ranges.

  18. Identifying Methane Sources in Groundwater; Quantifying Changes in Compositional and Stable Isotope Values during Multiphase Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, T.; Sathaye, K.

    2014-12-01

    A dramatic expansion of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling for natural gas in unconventional reserves is underway. This expansion is fueling considerable public concern, however, that extracted natural gas, reservoir brines and associated fracking fluids may infiltrate to and contaminate shallower (< 500m depth) groundwater reservoirs, thereby posing a health threat. Attributing methane found in shallow groundwater to either deep thermogenic 'fracking' operations or locally-derived shallow microbial sources utilizes geochemical methods including alkane wetness and stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of short chain (C1-C5) hydrocarbons. Compared to shallow microbial gas, thermogenic gas is wetter and falls within a different range of δ13C and δD values. What is not clear, however, is how the transport of natural gas through water saturated geological media may affect its compositional and stable isotope values. What is needed is a means to differentiate potential flow paths of natural gas including 'fast paths' along preexisting fractures and drill casings vs. 'slow paths' through low permeability rocks. In this study we attempt quantify transport-related effects using experimental 1-dimensional two-phase column experiments and analytical solutions to multi-phase gas injection equations. Two-phase experimental results for an injection of natural gas into a water saturated column packed with crushed illite show that the natural gas becomes enriched in methane compared to ethane and propane during transport. Carbon isotope measurements are ongoing. Results from the multi-phase gas injection equations that include methane isotopologue solubility and diffusion effects predict the development of a 'bank' of methane depleted in 13C relative to 12C at the front of a plume of fugitive natural gas. These results, therefore, suggest that transport of natural gas through water saturated geological media may complicate attribution methods needed to distinguish

  19. Comparison of combustion characteristics of ASTM A-1, propane, and natural-gas fuels in an annular turbojet combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wear, J. D.; Jones, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The performance of an annular turbojet combustor using natural-gas fuel is compared with that obtained using ASTM A-1 and propane fuels. Propane gas was used to simulate operation with vaporized kerosene fuels. The results obtained at severe operating conditions and altitude relight conditions show that natural gas is inferior to both ASTM A-1 and propane fuels. Combustion efficiencies were significantly lower and combustor pressures for relight were higher with natural-gas fuel than with the other fuels. The inferior performance of natural gas is shown to be caused by the chemical stability of the methane molecule.

  20. The identification of liquid ethane in Titan's Ontario Lacus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Soderblom, J.M.; Clark, R.N.; Jaumann, R.; Barnes, J.W.; Sotin, C.; Buratti, B.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2008-01-01

    Titan was once thought to have global oceans of light hydrocarbons on its surface, but after 40 close flybys of Titan by the Cassini spacecraft, it has become clear that no such oceans exist. There are, however, features similar to terrestrial lakes and seas, and widespread evidence for fluvial erosion, presumably driven by precipitation of liquid methane from Titan's dense, nitrogen-dominated atmosphere. Here we report infrared spectroscopic data, obtained by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini spacecraft, that strongly indicate that ethane, probably in liquid solution with methane, nitrogen and other low-molecular-mass hydrocarbons, is contained within Titan's Ontario Lacus. ??2008 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  1. Remote Sensing and Sea-Truth Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX project)

    SciTech Connect

    Ian MacDonald

    2011-05-31

    A multi-disciplinary investigation of distribution and magnitude of methane fluxes from seafloor gas hydrate deposits in the Gulf of Mexico was conducted based on results obtained from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) remote sensing and from sampling conducted during a research expedition to three sites where gas hydrate occurs (MC118, GC600, and GC185). Samples of sediments, water, and air were collected from the ship and from an ROV submersible using sediments cores, niskin bottles attached to the ROV and to a rosette, and an automated sea-air interface collector. The SAR images were used to quantify the magnitude and distribution of natural oil and gas seeps that produced perennial oil slicks on the ocean surface. A total of 176 SAR images were processed using a texture classifying neural network algorithm, which segmented the ocean surface into oil-free and oil-covered water. Geostatistical analysis indicates that there are a total of 1081 seep formations distributed over the entire Gulf of Mexico basin. Oil-covered water comprised an average of 780.0 sq. km (sd 86.03) distributed with an area of 147,370 sq. km. Persistent oil and gas seeps were also detected with SAR sampling on other ocean margins located in the Black Sea, western coast of Africa, and offshore Pakistan. Analysis of sediment cores from all three sites show profiles of sulfate, sulfide, calcium and alkalinity that indicated anaerobic oxidation of methane with precipitation of authigenic carbonates. Difference among the three sampling sites may reflect the relative magnitude of methane flux. Methane concentrations in water column samples collected by ROV and rosette deployments from MC118 ranged from {approx}33,000 nM at the seafloor to {approx}12 nM in the mixed layer with isolated peaks up to {approx}13,670 nM coincident with the top of the gas hydrate stability field. Average plume methane, ethane, and propane concentrations in the mixed layer are 7, 630, and 9,540 times saturation

  2. Developing receptor-oriented methods for non-methane hydrocarbon characterisation in urban air. Part II: source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borbon, Agnès; Fontaine, Hervé; Locoge, Nadine; Veillerot, Marc; Galloo, J. C.

    The methods and the results of non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) source apportionment are described at urban scale on a spatial and temporal basis. Here, hourly ambient concentrations of nearly 40 C 2-C 9 NMHC are used. Methods are based on the knowledge of the wintertime NMHC vehicle-exhaust emission ratio generally determined by simple regression analysis taking acetylene, ethylene, propene and 1,3-butadiene as auto-exhaust tracers. The RSD of the estimated source contributions is lower than 20%; the developed receptor-oriented methods are flexible and easily transposable to other areas. In winter, vehicle-exhaust emissions explain 100% of the NMHC majority levels and even isoprene. From May to November, our models revealed the temperature-dependent contribution of additional sources (0.71< r<0.90). On the one hand, the evaporation of fuel and solvent affects the whole C 4-C 9 NMHC fraction, and fluctuates between 20% and 50%, even for a northern France urban area. On the other hand, both vehicle-exhaust and biogenic emissions control the highly photoreactive isoprene distribution whatever the site; the traffic is responsible for a third of its levels in summer. Finally, the particular behaviour of the C 2-C 4 compounds pointed out dominant contributions, generally other than traffic. Suspected sources are numerous: natural gas leakage for ethane and propane, wintertime fuel evaporation for butanes and butenes, non-automotive combustion for ethylene and acetylene. Ethane and propane also showed that long-range advective transport, responsible for background concentrations, could significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon levels with a high atmospheric residence time (from 20% to 50%).

  3. Observation of propane cluster size distributions during nucleation and growth in a Laval expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreiro, Jorge J.; Chakrabarty, Satrajit; Schläppi, Bernhard; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-12-01

    We report on molecular-level studies of the condensation of propane gas and propane/ethane gas mixtures in the uniform (constant pressure and temperature) postnozzle flow of Laval expansions using soft single-photon ionization by vacuum ultraviolet light and mass spectrometric detection. The whole process, from the nucleation to the growth to molecular aggregates of sizes of several nanometers (˜5 nm), can be monitored at the molecular level with high time-resolution (˜3 μs) for a broad range of pressures and temperatures. For each time, pressure, and temperature, a whole mass spectrum is recorded, which allows one to determine the critical cluster size range for nucleation as well as the kinetics and mechanisms of cluster-size specific growth. The detailed information about the size, composition, and population of individual molecular clusters upon condensation provides unique experimental data for comparison with future molecular-level simulations.

  4. Natural flux of greenhouse methane from the Timor Sea to the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunskill, G. J.; Burns, K. A.; Zagorskis, I.

    2011-06-01

    Methane gas bubbles from the Cornea Seep were sampled at the sea surface in the Timor Sea continental shelf area in June 2005. Total bubble gas flux was 0.076 to 0.76 L m-2 h-1 during the 6 h d-1 periods of low neap tides in June 2005. This bubble gas contained an average of 26 mmol CH4 L-1 and about 0.16 and 0.006 mmol L-1 of ethane and propane. We estimate the daily flux from the sea surface to the atmosphere to be 0.012 to 0.12 mol CH4 m-2 d-1 or 0.13 to 1.3 t CH4 d-1 from an area of about 0.7 km2. This methane flux came from a 500 × 1400 m carbonate pavement dome on the seafloor at 84 m water depth. The seep hard ground was swath mapped, and 3.5 kHz subbottom profile data indicate that the seep dome was strongly reflective with poor penetration into the subsurface, consistent with the presence of a carbonate hard ground. Carbon and deuterium isotope ratios (δ13C = -41 to -42‰, δD = -157 to -158‰) of the seep bubble gas indicate that this methane had a thermogenic origin and was in the same isotopic range as gas within the Late Cretaceous Cornea oil and gas field. We could not detect inputs of fluids containing nutrients or short-lived radium isotopes at this site, commonly associated with other cold seeps. Tens to a hundred of kilometers seaward from the Cornea seep site, water column dissolved methane concentrations in this sector of the Timor Sea shelf and slope were 100-500 times supersaturated with respect to the atmosphere, and thus the water column is expected to be degassing additional methane to the atmosphere. Perhaps there are thousands of other methane seeps (of similar magnitude to the Cornea Seep) on this shelf and slope to account for all the excess dissolved methane (˜86,000 t) measured in the water column. These measured and calculated fluxes provide evidence for the hypothesis that shallow sea seeps may be a significant source of atmospheric methane, in contrast to deep sea vents, where most of the methane is dissolved and oxidized in

  5. Surface Termination of M1 Phase and Rational Design of Propane Ammoxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Guliants, Vadim

    2015-02-16

    This final report describes major accomplishments in this research project which has demonstrated that the M1 phase is the only crystalline phase required for propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile and that a surface monolayer terminating the ab planes of the M1 phase is responsible for their activity and selectivity in this reaction. Fundamental studies of the topmost surface chemistry and mechanism of propane ammoxidation over the Mo-V-(Te,Sb)-(Nb,Ta)-O M1 and M2 phases resulted in the development of quantitative understanding of the surface molecular structure – reactivity relationships for this unique catalytic system. These oxides possess unique catalytic properties among mixed metal oxides, because they selectively catalyze three alkane transformation reactions, namely propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile, propane oxidation to acrylic acid and ethane oxidative dehydrogenation, all of considerable economic significance. Therefore, the larger goal of this research was to expand this catalysis to other alkanes of commercial interest, and more broadly, demonstrate successful approaches to rational design of improved catalysts that can be applied to other selective (amm)oxidation processes.

  6. Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotrophic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, David

    2012-09-30

    process as a biofilter by studying the distribution of methane oxidation and disposition of methanotrophic populations in the Pacific Ocean. We investigated several environments including the basins offshore California, the continental margin off Central America, and the shallow waters around gas seeps. We succeeded in identifying the distributions of activity in these environments, identified potential physical and chemical controls on methanotrophic activity, we further revealed details about the methanotrophic communities active in these settings, and we developed new approaches to study methanotrophic communities. These findings should improve our capacity to predict the methanotrophic response in ocean waters, and further our ability to generate specific hypotheses as to the ecology and efficacy of pelagic methanotrophic communites. The discharge of methane and other hydrocarbons to Gulf of Mexico that followed the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon provided a unique opportunity to study the methanotorphic biofilter in the deep ocean environment. We set out to understand the consumption of methane and the bloom of methanotrophs resulting from this event, as a window into the regional scale release of gas hydrate under rapid warming scenarios. We found that other hydrocarbon gases, notably propane and ethane, were preferred for consumption over methane, but that methane consumption accelerated rapidly and drove the depletion of methane within a matter of months after initial release. These results revealed the identity of the responsible community, and point to the importance of the seed population in determining the rate at which a methanotrophic community is able to respond to an input of methane. Collectively, these results provide a significant advance in our understanding of the marine methanotrohic biofilter, and further provide direction and context for future investigations of this important phenomenon. This project has resulted in fourteen publications to date

  7. Silane-propane ignitor/burner

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Richard W.; Skinner, Dewey F.; Thorsness, Charles B.

    1985-01-01

    A silane propane burner for an underground coal gasification process which is used to ignite the coal and to controllably retract the injection point by cutting the injection pipe. A narrow tube with a burner tip is positioned in the injection pipe through which an oxidant (oxygen or air) is flowed. A charge of silane followed by a supply of fuel, such as propane, is flowed through the tube. The silane spontaneously ignites on contact with oxygen and burns the propane fuel.

  8. Silane-propane ignitor/burner

    DOEpatents

    Hill, R.W.; Skinner, D.F. Jr.; Thorsness, C.B.

    1983-05-26

    A silane propane burner for an underground coal gasification process which is used to ignite the coal and to controllably retract the injection point by cutting the injection pipe. A narrow tube with a burner tip is positioned in the injection pipe through which an oxidant (oxygen or air) is flowed. A charge of silane followed by a supply of fuel, such as propane, is flowed through the tube. The silane spontaneously ignites on contact with oxygen and burns the propane fuel.

  9. Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane. Quarterly technical progress report No. 13, April 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, R.L.; Alptekin, G.O.

    1996-07-30

    This document is the thirteenth quarterly technical progress report under Contract No. DE-AC22-92PC92110 {open_quotes}Development of Vanadium-Phosphate Catalysts for Methanol Production by Selective Oxidation of Methane{close_quotes} and covers the period April-June 1996. The basic premise of this project is that vanadyl pyrophosphate (VPO), a catalyst used commercially in the selective oxidation of butane to maleic anhydride, can be developed as a catalyst for selective methane oxidation. Data supporting this idea include published reports indicating moderate to high selectivity in oxidation of ethane, propane, and pentane, as well as butane. Methane oxidation is a much more difficult reaction to catalyze than that of other alkanes and it is expected that considerable modification of vanadyl pyrophosphate will be required for this application. It is well known that VPO can be modified extensively with a large number of different promoters and in particular that promoters can enhance selectivity and lower the temperature required for butane conversion.

  10. SUPPRESSION OF COKE FORMATION IN THE STEAM CRACKING OF ALKANES: ETHANE AND PROPANE. (R825412)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. Phase equilibria and thermodynamic modeling of ethane and propane hydrates in porous silica gels.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yongwon; Lee, Seungmin; Cha, Inuk; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Huen

    2009-04-23

    In the present study, we examined the active role of porous silica gels when used as natural gas storage and transportation media. We adopted the dispersed water in silica gel pores to substantially enhance active surface for contacting and encaging gas molecules. We measured the three-phase hydrate (H)-water-rich liquid (L(W))-vapor (V) equilibria of C(2)H(6) and C(3)H(8) hydrates in 6.0, 15.0, 30.0, and 100.0 nm silica gel pores to investigate the effect of geometrical constraints on gas hydrate phase equilibria. At specified temperatures, the hydrate stability region is shifted to a higher pressure region depending on pore size when compared with those of bulk hydrates. Through application of the Gibbs-Thomson relationship to the experimental data, we determined the values for the C(2)H(6) hydrate-water and C(3)H(8) hydrate-water interfacial tensions to be 39 +/- 2 and 45 +/- 1 mJ/m(2), respectively. By using these values, the calculation values were in good agreement with the experimental ones. The overall results given in this study could also be quite useful in various fields, such as exploitation of natural gas hydrate in marine sediments and sequestration of carbon dioxide into the deep ocean.

  12. LABORATORY STUDIES ON THE IRRADIATION OF SOLID ETHANE ANALOG ICES AND IMPLICATIONS TO TITAN'S CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. S.; Bennett, C. J.; Chen, L-H; Kaiser, R. I.; O'Brien, K.

    2010-03-10

    Pure ethane ices (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were irradiated at 10, 30, and 50 K under contamination-free, ultrahigh vacuum conditions with energetic electrons generated in the track of galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) particles to simulate the interaction of GCRs with ethane ices in the outer solar system. The chemical processing of the samples was monitored by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and a quadrupole mass spectrometer during the irradiation phase and subsequent warm-up phases on line and in situ in order to extract qualitative (products) and quantitative (rate constants and yields) information on the newly synthesized molecules. Six hydrocarbons, methane (CH{sub 4}), acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}), ethylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}), and the ethyl radical (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}), together with n-butane (C{sub 4}H{sub 10}) and butene (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}), were found to form at the radiation dose reaching 1.4 eV per molecule. The column densities of these species were quantified in the irradiated ices at each temperature, permitting us to elucidate the temperature and phase-dependent production rates of individual molecules. A kinetic reaction scheme was developed to fit column densities of those species produced during irradiation of amorphous/crystalline ethane held at 10, 30, or 50 K. In general, the yield of the newly formed molecules dropped consistently for all species as the temperature was raised from 10 K to 50 K. Second, the yield in the amorphous samples was found to be systematically higher than in the crystalline samples at constant temperature. A closer look at the branching ratios indicates that ethane decomposes predominantly to ethylene and molecular hydrogen, which may compete with the formation of n-butane inside the ethane matrix. Among the higher molecular products, n-butane dominates. Of particular relevance to the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan is the radiation-induced methane production from ethane-an alternative source of replenishing methane into the

  13. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy Sensor for Calibration Free Humidity Measurements in Pure Methane and Low CO2 Natural Gas.

    PubMed

    Nwaboh, Javis Anyangwe; Pratzler, Sonja; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2016-07-08

    We report a new direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) sensor for absolute measurements of H2O in methane, ethane, propane, and low CO2 natural gas. The sensor is operated with a 2.7 µm DFB laser, equipped with a high pressure single pass gas cell, and used to measure H2O amount of substance fractions in the range of 0.31-25 000 µmol/mol. Operating total gas pressures are up to 5000 hPa. The sensor has been characterized, addressing the traceability of the spectrometric results to the SI and the evaluation of the combined uncertainty, following the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). The relative reproducibility of H2O amount of substance fraction measurements at 87 µmol/mol is 0.26% (0.23 µmol/mol). The maximum precision of the sensor was determined using a H2O in methane mixture, and found to be 40 nmol/mol for a time resolution of 100 s. This corresponds to a normalized detection limit of 330 nmol mol(-1)·m Hz(-1/2) The relative combined uncertainty of H2O amount fraction measurements delivered by the sensor is 1.2%.

  14. Identifying sources, formation pathways and geological controls of methane in shallow groundwater above unconventional natural gas plays in Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, B.; Humez, P.; Nightingale, M.; Ing, J.; Kingston, A. W.; Clarkson, C.; Cahill, A.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.; Millot, R.; Kloppmann, W.; Osadetz, K.; Lawton, D.

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of shale gas development facilitated by hydraulic fracturing it has become increasingly important to develop tracer tools to scientifically determine potential impacts of stray gases on shallow aquifers. To assess potential future impacts on shallow aquifers by leakage of natural gas from unconventional energy resource development, it is essential to establish a reliable baseline. Occurrence of methane in shallow groundwater in Alberta (Canada) between 2006 and 2014 was assessed and was ubiquitous in 186 sampled monitoring wells. Free and dissolved gas sampling and measurement approaches yielded comparable results with often low methane concentrations in shallow groundwater, but in 28 samples methane exceeded 10 mg/L in dissolved gas and 300,000 ppmv in free gas. Methane concentrations in free and dissolved gas samples were found to increase with well depth and were especially elevated in groundwater obtained from aquifers containing coal seams and shale units. Carbon isotope ratios of methane averaged -69.7 ± 11.1 ‰ in free gas and -65.6 ± 8.9 ‰ in dissolved gas. δ13C values were not found to vary with well depth or lithology indicating that the methane in Alberta groundwater was formed via a similar mechanism. The low δ13C values in concert with average δ2H values of -289 ± 44 ‰ suggest that most methane was of biogenic origin predominantly generated via CO2 reduction. This interpretation is confirmed by gas dryness parameters typically >500 due to only small amounts of ethane and a lack of propane in most samples. Novel approaches of in-situ concentration and isotope measurements for methane during drilling of a 530 m deep well yielded a mud-gas profile characterizing natural gas occurrences in the intermediate zone. Comparison with mudgas profile carbon isotope data revealed that methane in the investigated shallow groundwater in Alberta is isotopically similar to hydrocarbon gases found in 100-250 meter depths in the Western

  15. High-Resolution Tunable Diode Laser Spectroscopy of Methane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    quantitative data from test 14. This table shows that ethylene is by far the most abundant species, with propane and acetylene also being major species. The...Test 14 1. Ethane 2.21 2. Ethylene 77.80 3. Propane 0.75 4. Acetylene 18.61 5. Propene 26.52 6. Acetaldehyde 1.83 7. 1-Butene 5.83 8. 1,3...21. Benzene 9.07 22. l-Heptene 3.16 23. N-Heptane 0.44 24. Toluene 3.33 25. Hexanal 1.09 26. 1- Octene 2.13 27. N-Octane 0.63 28. Ethylbenzene

  16. Transformation of γ-Ray-Formed Methyl Radicals in Methane Hydrate at 10 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Tani, Atsushi; Otsuka, Takahiro; Nakashima, Satoru

    2007-01-01

    The stability of methyl radicals formed in synthetic methane hydrate by γ-ray irradiation at 77 K was studied at 200-273 K and 10 MPa. The methyl radicals decayed under these conditions, despite the stability of methane hydrate, and changed into other molecules that could not be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR). Decay products were investigated by gas cell infrared (IR) spectroscopy by measuring the decomposed gas from the γ-irradiated methane hydrate. Only ethane molecules were detected from the irradiated sample, while these were absent in an unirradiated sample. The molar ratio of ethane to methane (C2H6/CH4) was 12± 1 ppm, which did not contradict with that of methyl radical to methane (CH3{}\\bullet/CH4) in the literature. Hence, most of the methyl radicals generated by irradiation were supposed to be transformed to ethane in methane hydrate.

  17. Benzene-Ethane Co-Crystals on the Surface of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, T. H.; Hodyss, R. P.; Cable, M. L.; Maynard-Casely, H. E.; Malaska, M. J.; Beauchamp, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    Benzene is found at high abundance in Titan's atmosphere and is a likely constituent of evaporite deposits formed around the hydrocarbon lakes. This work aims to understand the composition and nature of the surface evaporites by focusing on the interaction between benzene and ethane, a principal component of the lake fluids. We have discovered a new benzene-ethane co-crystalline structure which forms under Titan-like conditions (90-150 K and 1 bar), resulting in recrystallization of the benzene lattice that can be detected via micro-Raman spectroscopy. Evidence for ethane incorporation includes two new distinctive ethane features at 2873 and 1455 cm-1 and marked red shifts of the benzene peaks in the Raman spectra. Vibrational analysis reveals a C-H…π interaction between the aromatic ring of benzene and the hydrogen atoms of ethane through a monodentate contact. The kinetics of co-crystal formation is also determined, giving a relatively mild activation energy of 10.2 kJ/mol. It is shown that the formation process would reach completion in ~18 hours, and that benzene precipitates selectively as the co-crystal from a mixture of liquid ethane and methane. Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data confirms the crystalline nature of the new material. These results imply that benzene and similar organics may act as potential hydrocarbon reservoirs due to this incorporation mechanism. These novel structures represent a new class of materials for Titan's surface that may influence evaporite characteristics, such as particle size and infrared spectral properties.

  18. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Stratospheric Ethane Following the Jupiter Impact of 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, Kelly; Kostiuk, Theodor; Livengood, Timothy A.; Hewagama, Tilak; Amen, John

    2010-01-01

    We report on high-resolution infrared spectroscopy of ethane (C2H6) performed at the latitude of an impact site on Jupiter discovered on 19 July 2009 by A. Wesley from a location in Murrumbateman, Australia. The observations used the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind and Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. HIPWAC is a mid-infrared (9-12 microns) heterodyne spectrometer operating at the highest limit of spectral resolving power (lambda\\Delta\\lambda > l06), providing information on atmospheric constituent abundance and temperature through fully resolved tine shapes. Ethane is a stable trace product of methane photochemistry that is nearly uniformly mixed in Jupiter's stratosphere, providing an effective probe of that altitude region. Ethane emission line profiles near 11,74 microns in the Ug band were measured in Jupiter's stratosphere at 25 MHz (11.00083/cm) resolution. A sequence of spectra of ethane acquired over a range of longitude at the impact latitude (56S planetocentric) probes constituent abundance and temperature profile, both on and off the impact region. Near the site of the impact, ethane emission increased above levels measured well outside the impact region. Radiative transfer analysis indicates increased ethane mole fraction (30% greater). Variation in the measured continuum level and line intensities within 75deg of the impact longitude indicate the presence of an opacity source (haze) at altitudes near and above the tropopause and as high as the 10-mbar level near the impact site. The indication of possible haze opacity up to the 10-mbar level in the atmosphere is consistent with measurements made by HIPWAC's predecessor as part of the IRTF Shoemaker Levy-9 campaign in 1994.

  19. Sources and turnover of organic carbon and methane in fjord and shelf sediments off northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Simone; Hong, Wei-Li; Knies, Jochen; Lepland, Aivo; Forwick, Matthias; Klug, Martin; Eichinger, Florian; Baranwal, Soma; Crémière, Antoine; Chand, Shyam; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2016-10-01

    To better understand the present and past carbon cycling and transformation processes in methane-influenced fjord and shelf areas of northern Norway, we compared two sediment cores from the Hola trough and from Ullsfjorden. We investigated (1) the organic matter composition and sedimentological characteristics to study the sources of organic carbon (Corg) and the factors influencing Corg burial, (2) pore water geochemistry to determine the contribution of organoclastic sulfate reduction and methanogenesis to total organic carbon turnover, and (3) the carbon isotopic signature of hydrocarbons to identify the carbon transformation processes and gas sources. High sedimentation and Corg accumulation rates in Ullsfjorden support the notion that fjords are important Corg sinks. The depth of the sulfate-methane-transition (SMT) in the fjord is controlled by the supply of predominantly marine organic matter to the sediment. Organoclastic sulfate reduction accounts for 60% of the total depth-integrated sulfate reduction in the fjord. In spite of the presence of ethane, propane, and butane, we suggest a purely microbial origin of light hydrocarbons in the sediments based on their low δ13C values. In the Hola trough, sedimentation and Corg accumulation rates changed during the deglacial-to-post-glacial transition from approximately 80 cm ka-1 to erosion at present. Thus, Corg burial in this part of the shelf is presently absent. Low organic matter content in the sediment and low rates of organoclastic sulfate reduction (only 3% of total depth-integrated sulfate reduction) entail that the shallow depth of the SMT is controlled mostly by ascending thermogenic methane from deeper sources.

  20. Ambient air/near-field measurements of methane and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from a natural gas facility in Northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudic, Alexia; Gros, Valérie; Bonsang, Bernard; Baisnee, Dominique; Vogel, Félix; Yver Kwok, Camille; Ars, Sébastien; Finlayson, Andrew; Innocenti, Fabrizio; Robinson, Rod

    2015-04-01

    Since the 1970's, the natural gas consumption saw a rapid growth in large urban centers, thus becoming an important energy resource to meet continuous needs of factories and inhabitants. Nevertheless, it can be a substantial source of methane (CH4) and pollutants in urban areas. For instance, we have determined that about 20% of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in downtown Paris are originating from this emission source (Baudic, Gros et al., in preparation). Within the framework of the "Fugitive Methane Emissions" (FuME) project (Climate-KIC, EIT); 2-weeks gas measurements were conducted at a gas compressor station in Northern Europe. Continuous ambient air measurements of methane and VOCs concentrations were performed using a cavity ring-down spectrometer (model G2201, Picarro Inc., Santa Clara, USA) and two portable GC-FID (Chromatotec, Saint-Antoine, France), respectively. On-site near-field samplings were also carried out at the source of two pipelines using stainless steel flasks (later analyzed with a laboratory GC-FID). The objective of this study aims to use VOCs as additional tracers in order to better characterize the fugitive methane emissions in a complex environment, which can be affected by several urban sources (road-traffic, others industries, etc.). Moreover, these measurements have allowed determining the chemical composition of this specific source. Our results revealed that the variability of methane and some VOCs was (rather) well correlated, especially for alkanes (ethane, propane, etc.). An analysis of selected events with strong concentrations enhancement was performed using ambient air measurements; thus allowing the preliminary identification of different emission sources. In addition, some flasks were also sampled in Paris to determine the local natural gas composition. A comparison between both was then performed. Preliminary results from these experiments will be presented here.

  1. Redox controls on methane formation, migration and fate in shallow aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humez, Pauline; Mayer, Bernhard; Nightingale, Michael; Becker, Veith; Kingston, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen; Bayegnak, Guy; Millot, Romain; Kloppmann, Wolfram

    2016-07-01

    geochemistry data revealed that the elevated δ13CCH4 values were caused by microbial oxidation of biogenic methane or post-sampling degradation of low CH4 content samples rather than migration of deep thermogenic gas. A significant number of samples (39.2 %) contained methane with predominantly biogenic C isotope ratios (δ13CCH4 < -55 ‰) accompanied by elevated concentrations of ethane and sometimes trace concentrations of propane. These gases, observed in 28.1 % of the samples, bearing both biogenic (δ13C) and thermogenic (presence of C3) characteristics, are most likely derived from shallow coal seams that are prevalent in the Cretaceous Horseshoe Canyon and neighboring formations in which some of the groundwater wells are completed. The remaining 3.7 % of samples were not assigned because of conflicting parameters in the data sets or between replicates samples. Hence, despite quite variable gas concentrations and a wide range of δ13CCH4 values in baseline groundwater samples, we found no conclusive evidence for deep thermogenic gas migration into shallow aquifers either naturally or via anthropogenically induced pathways in this baseline groundwater survey. This study shows that the combined interpretation of aqueous geochemistry data in concert with chemical and isotopic compositions of dissolved and/or free gas can yield unprecedented insights into formation and potential migration of methane in shallow groundwater. This enables the assessment of cross-formational methane migration and provides an understanding of alkane gas sources and pathways necessary for a stringent baseline definition in the context of current and future unconventional hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation.

  2. Propane vehicles : status, challenges, and opportunities.

    SciTech Connect

    Rood Werpy, M.; Burnham, A.; Bertram, K.; Energy Systems

    2010-06-17

    Propane as an auto fuel has a high octane value and has key properties required for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. To operate a vehicle on propane as either a dedicated fuel or bi-fuel (i.e., switching between gasoline and propane) vehicle, only a few modifications must be made to the engine. Until recently propane vehicles have commonly used a vapor pressure system that was somewhat similar to a carburetion system, wherein the propane would be vaporized and mixed with combustion air in the intake plenum of the engine. This leads to lower efficiency as more air, rather than fuel, is inducted into the cylinder for combustion (Myers 2009). A newer liquid injection system has become available that injects propane directly into the cylinder, resulting in no mixing penalty because air is not diluted with the gaseous fuel in the intake manifold. Use of a direct propane injection system will improve engine efficiency (Gupta 2009). Other systems include the sequential multi-port fuel injection system and a bi-fuel 'hybrid' sequential propane injection system. Carbureted systems remain in use but mostly for non-road applications. In the United States a closed-loop system is used in after-market conversions. This system incorporates an electronic sensor that provides constant feedback to the fuel controller to allow it to measure precisely the proper air/fuel ratio. A complete conversion system includes a fuel controller, pressure regulator valves, fuel injectors, electronics, fuel tank, and software. A slight power loss is expected in conversion to a vapor pressure system, but power can still be optimized with vehicle modifications of such items as the air/fuel mixture and compression ratios. Cold start issues are eliminated for vapor pressure systems since the air/fuel mixture is gaseous. In light-duty propane vehicles, the fuel tank is typically mounted in the trunk; for medium- and heavy-duty vans and trucks, the tank is located under the body of the vehicle

  3. Exhaust gas measurements in a propane fueled swirl stabilized combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aanad, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Exhaust gas temperature, velocity, and composition are measured and combustor efficiencies are calculated in a lean premixed swirl stabilized laboratory combustor. The radial profiles of the data between the co- and the counter swirl cases show significant differences. Co-swirl cases show evidence of poor turbulent mixing across the combustor in comparison to the counter-swirl cases. NO sub x levels are low in the combustor but substantial amounts of CO are present. Combustion efficiencies are low and surprisingly constant with varying outer swirl in contradiction to previous results under a slightly different inner swirl condition. This difference in the efficiency trends is expected to be a result of the high sensitivity of the combustor to changes in the inner swirl. Combustor operation is found to be the same for propane and methane fuels. A mechanism is proposed to explain the combustor operation and a few important characteristics determining combustor efficiency are identified.

  4. Seasonal behavior of non-methane hydrocarbons in the firn air at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, D.; Stephens, C. R.; Caramore, J.; Hueber, J.

    2014-03-01

    Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) were measured in the ambient air and in the snowpack interstitial firn air at ˜1 m depth continuously for nearly two years at Summit, Greenland, from fall 2008 through summer 2010. Additionally, five firn air depth profiles were conducted to a depth of 3 m spanning winter, spring, and summer seasons. Here we report measurements of ethane, ethene, ethyne, propane, propene, i-butane, n-butane, i-pentane, n-pentane, and benzene and discuss the seasonal behavior of these species in the ambient and firn air. The alkanes, ethyne, and benzene in the firn air closely reflect the ambient air concentrations during all the seasons of the year. In spring and summer seasons, ethene and propene were enhanced in the near-surface firn over that in the ambient air, indicating a photochemical production mechanism for these species within the snowpack interstitial air. Evaluation of the NMHC ratios of i-butane/n-butane, i-pentane/n-pentane, and benzene/ethyne in both ambient and firn air does not provide evidence for chlorine or bromine radical chemistry significantly affecting these gases, except in a few summer samples, where individual data points may suggest bromine oxidation influence.

  5. Does the vertical profile of ethane contain more insight into mixing layer height than carbon monoxide?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, Scott; Yacovitch, Tara; Pusede, Sally; Diskin, Glenn; DiGangi, Joshua; Sachse, Glenn; Crawford, James

    2015-04-01

    To improve the interpretation of satellite data measurements near the surface, the DISCOVER-AQ project embarked on a four year campaign to produce an integrated dataset of airborne and surface based measurements at various locations in North America. One of the key metrics when pursuing the the goal of measuring the surface air quality from space is the mixing layer height. The measurement phase in 2014 included the novel 1-Hz Aerodyne Research, Inc. fast Ethane Spectrometer to distinguish the methane emissions from thermogenic (oil&gas) and biogenic sources in the Denver-Julesberg basin. A second potential use of ethane as a determinant of mixing layer height is revealed in the analysis of 213 vertical profiles collected at 7 points during 21 flights. The findings are evaluated relative to other in-situ metrics, such as carbon monoxide and remote sensing attributions of mixing layer height.

  6. 75 FR 14131 - Effect on Propane Consumers of the Propane Education and Research Council's Operations, Market...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ..., agricultural, process and nonfuel users of propane. This notice of inquiry is part of an effort to collect information to fulfill requirements under the Propane Education and Research Act of 1996 that established PERC...., Suite 4053, Washington, DC 20230. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For questions on the submission...

  7. An unnatural death by propan-1-ol and propan-2-ol.

    PubMed

    Skopp, Gisela; Gutmann, Isabelle; Schwarz, Clara-Sophie; Schmitt, Georg

    2016-07-01

    A fatality of an inpatient ingesting a disinfectant containing ethanol, propan-1-ol, and propan-2-ol is reported. The alleged survival time was about 1 h. Major findings at autopsy were an extended hemorrhagic lung edema, an edematous brain, and shock kidneys. Concentrations of alcohols and acetone, a major metabolite of propan-2-ol, were determined from body fluids (blood from the heart and the femoral vein, urine, gastric contents) and tissues (brain, muscle, liver, kidneys, lungs) by headspace/gas chromatography using 2-methylpropan-2-ol as the internal standard. All samples investigated were positive for propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethanol, and acetone except stomach contents, where acetone was not detectable. The low concentration of acetone compared to propan-2-ol likely supports the short survival time. The concentration ratios estimated from the results are in accordance with the physico-chemical properties of the particular alcohols, their different affinities towards alcohol dehydrogenase as well as their interdependence during biotransformation. Autopsy did not reveal the cause of death. According to the few published data, blood concentrations of 1.44 and 1.70 mg/g of propan-2-ol and propan-1-ol, respectively, are considered sufficient to have caused the death. This case also points to the need to restrict access to antiseptic solutions containing alcohols in wards with patients at risk.

  8. Ethane C-C clumping in natural gas : a proxy for cracking processes ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clog, M. D.; Ferreira, A. A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Eiler, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is the second-most abundant alkane in most natural gas reservoirs, and is used to produce ethylene for petrochemical industries. It is arguably the simplest molecule that can manifest multiple 13C substitutions. There are several plausible controls on ∆13C2H6in natural gas: thermodynamically controlled homogeneous isotope exchange reactions analogous to those behind carbonate clumped isotope thermometry; inheritance from larger biomolecules that undergo thermal degradation to produce natural gas; mixing of natural gases that differ markedly in bulk isotopic composition; diffusive fractionation; or combinations of these and/or other, less expected fractionations. There is little basis for predicting which of these will control isotopic variations among natural ethanes, but we think it likely that addition of this new isotopic proxy will reveal new insights into the natural chemistry of ethane. We have developed a method to measure the abundance of 13C2H6 in natural samples, using high-resolution mass spectrometry. We define ∆13C2H6 as 1000 . ((13C2H6/12C2H6)measured/(13C2H6/12C2H6)stochastic -1). We studied several suites of natural gas samples and experimentally produced or modified ethane. Natural ethanes, including closely related samples from a single natural gas field, exhibit surprisingly large ranges in ∆13C2H6 (4 ‰ overall; up to 3 ‰ in one gas field). Such ranges cannot be explained by thermodynamic equilibrium at a range of different temperatures, or by diffusive fractionation. Kinetic isotope effects associated with 'cracking' reactions, and/or inheritance of non-equilibrium carbon isotope structures from source organics are more likely causes. We observe a correlation between ∆13C2H6 and the concentration of alkanes other than methane in several suites of natural gases, suggesting the causes of clumped isotope variations are tied to the controls on gas wetness. An experiment examining ethane residual to high

  9. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flicker, Dawn; Magyar, Rudolph; Root, Seth; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Mixtures of light and heavy elements arise in inertial confinement fusion and planetary science. We present results on the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT/QMD) at elevated-temperature and pressure is used to obtain the properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. To validate the QMD simulations, we performed high-precision shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis of the simulations correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with completion of dissociation in ethane. DFT-based simulation results compare well with experimental data and are used to provide insight into the dissociation as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for ethane, Xe-ethane, polymethyl-pentene, and polystyrene, suggesting that a limiting compression exists for C-C bonded systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. The Energy of Substituted Ethanes. Asymmetry Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Lionel; Hoffmann, Roald; Otto, Peter

    1973-01-01

    The leading terms in the energy of a general substituted ethane are derived in explicit form as a function of the torsional angle θ, the substituent electronegativities, and their mutual overlaps. The energy is found to be the sum of all four overlaps between pairs of asymmetry orbitals, and satisfies the requisite symmetry properties. PMID:16592060

  11. Characterization of non-methane hydrocarbons in Asian summer monsoon outflow observed by the CARIBIC aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. K.; Schuck, T. J.; Slemr, F.; van Velthoven, P.; Zahn, A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.

    2010-07-01

    Between April and December 2008 the CARIBIC commercial aircraft conducted monthly measurement flights between Frankfurt, Germany and Chennai, India. These flights covered the period of the Asian summer monsoon (June-September), during which enhancements in a number of atmospheric species were observed in monsoon outflow. In addition to in situ measurements of trace gases and aerosols, whole air samples were collected during the flights, and these were subsequently analyzed for a suite of trace gases that included the non-methane hydrocarbons. Non-methane hydrocarbons are relatively short-lived compounds and the large enhancements in their mixing ratios in the upper troposphere over Southwest Asia between June and September, sometimes more than double their spring and fall means, provides qualitative evidence for the influence of convectively uplifted boundary layer air. The particularly large enhancements of the combustion tracers benzene and ethyne, along with the similarity of their ratios to carbon monoxide and emission ratios from the burning of household biofuels, indicate a strong influence of biofuel burning to NMHC emissions in this region. Conversely, the ratios of ethane and propane to carbon monoxide, along with the ratio between i-butane and n-butane, indicate a significant source of these compounds from the use of LPG and natural gas, and comparison to previous campaigns suggests that this source could be increasing. Photochemical aging patterns of NMHCs showed that the CARIBIC samples were collected in two distinctly different regions of the monsoon circulation: a southern region where air masses had been recently influenced by low level contact and a northern region, where air parcels had spent substantial time in transit in the upper troposphere before being probed. Estimates of age using ratios of individual NMHCs have ranges of 3-6 d in the south and 9-12 d in the north.

  12. Characterization of non-methane hydrocarbons in Asian summer monsoon outflow observed by the CARIBIC aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. K.; Schuck, T. J.; Slemr, F.; van Velthoven, P.; Zahn, A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Between April and December 2008 the CARIBIC commercial aircraft conducted monthly measurement flights between Frankfurt, Germany and Chennai, India. These flights covered the period of the Asian summer monsoon (June-September), during which enhancements in a number of atmospheric species were observed in the upper troposphere over southwestern Asia. In addition to in situ measurements of trace gases and aerosols, whole air samples were collected during the flights, and these were subsequently analyzed for a suite of trace gases that included a number of C2-C8 non-methane hydrocarbons. Non-methane hydrocarbons are relatively short-lived compounds and the large enhancements in their mixing ratios in the upper troposphere over southwestern Asia during the monsoon, sometimes more than double their spring and fall means, provides qualitative evidence for the influence of convectively uplifted boundary layer air. The particularly large enhancements of the combustion tracers benzene and ethyne, along with the similarity of their ratios with carbon monoxide and emission ratios from the burning of household biofuels, indicate a strong influence of biofuel burning to NMHC emissions in this region. Conversely, the ratios of ethane and propane to carbon monoxide, along with the ratio between i-butane and n-butane, indicate a significant source of these compounds from the use of fossil fuels, and comparison to previous campaigns suggests that this source could be increasing. Photochemical aging patterns of NMHCs showed that the CARIBIC samples were collected in two distinctly different regions of the monsoon circulation: a southern region where air masses had been recently influenced by low level contact and a northern region, where air parcels had spent substantial time in transit in the upper troposphere before being probed. Estimates of age using ratios of individual NMHCs have ranges of 3-6 days in the south and 9-12 days in the north.

  13. Enhanced ethylene and ethane production with free-radical cracking catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kolts, J H; Delzer, G A

    1986-05-09

    A series of free-radical catalysts have been discovered that increase the yield of highly valuable olefins from the cracking of low molecular weight paraffins. For example, catalytic cracking of n-butane, isobutane, and propane over manganese or iron supported on magnesium oxide (MgO) gave product distributions different from those given by thermal (free-radical) cracking or cracking over traditional acid catalysts. With n-butane and propane feeds, the products from catalytic cracking included large amounts of ethylene and ethane; with isobutane feed, propylene was the major product. Physical characterization of the MgO-supported catalyst showed the manganese to be in a 2+ oxidation state in the reduced catalyst and a 4+ oxidation state in the fully oxidized catalyst. Manganese was also shown to be uniformly distributed in the support material with very little enrichment at the surface. Matrix isolation of the gasphase radicals from n-butane feed showed that ethyl and methyl radicals were produced over the active catalysts. In the thermal process, only methyl radicals were produced. The mechanism of the catalytic reaction appears to be selective formation of primary carbanions at the catalyst surface followed by electron transfer and release of primary hydrocarbon radicals to the gas phase.

  14. Emission of methane, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and short‐chain hydrocarbons from vegetation foliage under ultraviolet irradiation

    PubMed Central

    FRASER, WESLEY T.; BLEI, EMANUEL; FRY, STEPHEN C.; NEWMAN, MARK F.; REAY, DAVID S.; SMITH, KEITH A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The original report that plants emit methane (CH 4) under aerobic conditions caused much debate and controversy. Critics questioned experimental techniques, possible mechanisms for CH 4 production and the nature of estimating global emissions. Several studies have now confirmed that aerobic CH 4 emissions can be detected from plant foliage but the extent of the phenomenon in plants and the precise mechanisms and precursors involved remain uncertain. In this study, we investigated the role of environmentally realistic levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in causing the emission of CH 4 and other gases from foliage obtained from a wide variety of plant types. We related our measured emissions to the foliar content of methyl esters and lignin and to the epidermal UV absorbance of the species investigated. Our data demonstrate that the terrestrial vegetation foliage sampled did emit CH 4, with a range in emissions of 0.6–31.8 ng CH 4 g−1 leaf DW h−1, which compares favourably with the original reports of experimental work. In addition to CH 4 emissions, our data show that carbon monoxide, ethene and propane are also emitted under UV stress but we detected no significant emissions of carbon dioxide or ethane. PMID:25443986

  15. RMP Guidance for Propane Storage Facilities - Main Text

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is intended as comprehensive Risk Management Program guidance for larger propane storage or distribution facilities who already comply with propane industry standards. Includes sample RMP, and release calculations.

  16. Advanced Thermally Stable Jet Fuel Development Program Annual Report. Volume 2. Compositional Factors Affecting Thermal Degradation of Jet Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    the purpose of identification of peaks in the gas chromatogram, the retention times of methane, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, ethylene , propylene...olefinic hydrocarbons). While ethane and ethylene do not separate on the SP- 1700 column, it appears that the main products from thermal...decomposition of the three model compounds are methane, ethane+ ethylene , propane, propylene, butane and butene. The distribution patterns of the components in the

  17. . . . While Others Conserve Cash by Converting from Gasoline to Propane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Scott A.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1983, when the David Douglas Public Schools (Portland, Oregon) converted 30 buses to propane fuel, the district has saved $75,000 in fuel and maintenance costs. Propane is priced consistently lower than gasoline and burns cleaner. Since propane engines do not require a carburetor, there are fewer maintenance problems. (MLH)

  18. Photoinduced ethane formation from reaction of ethene with matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew G K; Parnis, J Mark

    2005-10-27

    The reactions of matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms with ethene (C(2)H(4)) have been studied by FTIR absorption spectroscopy. Under conditions where the ethene dimer forms, metal atoms react with the ethene dimer to yield matrix-isolated ethane (C(2)H(6)) and methane. Under lower ethene concentration conditions ( approximately 1:70 ethene/Ar), hydridic intermediates of the types HMC(2)H(3) and H(2)MC(2)H(2) are also observed, and the relative yield of hydrocarbons is diminished. Reactions of these metals with perdeuterioethene, and equimolar mixtures of C(2)H(4) and C(2)D(4), yield products that are consistent with the production of ethane via a metal atom reaction involving at least two C(2)H(4) molecules. The absence of any other observed products suggests the mechanism also involves production of small, highly symmetric species such as molecular hydrogen and metal carbides. Evidence is presented suggesting that ethane production from the ethene dimer is a general photochemical process for the reaction of excited-state transition-metal atoms with ethene at high concentrations of ethene.

  19. Case Study - Propane School Bus Fleets

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, M; Burnham, A.

    2014-08-31

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) effort to deploy transportation technologies that reduce U.S. dependence on imported petroleum, this study examines five school districts, one in Virginia and four in Texas, successful use of propane school buses. These school districts used school buses equipped with the newly developed liquid propane injection system that improves vehicle performance. Some of the school districts in this study saved nearly 50% on a cost per mile basis for fuel and maintenance relative to diesel. Using Argonne National Laboratory’s Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Environmental and Economic Transportation (AFLEET) Tool developed for the DOE’s Clean Cities program to help Clean Cities stakeholders estimate petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, air pollutant emissions and cost of ownership of light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles, the results showed payback period ranges from 3—8 years, recouping the incremental cost of the vehicles and infrastructure. Overall, fuel economy for these propane vehicles is close to that of displaced diesel vehicles, on an energy-equivalent basis. In addition, the 110 propane buses examined demonstrated petroleum displacement, 212,000 diesel gallon equivalents per year, and GHG benefits of 770 tons per year.

  20. 21 CFR 582.1655 - Propane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... used in accordance with good manufacturing or feeding practice. ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Propane. 582.1655 Section 582.1655 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS,...

  1. 77 FR 31842 - Thrifty Propane, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Thrifty Propane, Inc. v. Enterprise TE Products Pipeline Co., LLC; Notice of... Enterprise TE Products Pipeline Co., LLC (Respondent) alleging that the Respondent intends to make...

  2. Portland Public School Children Move with Propane

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-04-01

    This 2-page Clean Cities fact sheet describes the use of propane as a fuel source for Portland Public Schools' fleet of buses. It includes information on the history of the program, along with contact information for the local Clean Cities Coordinator and Portland Public Schools.

  3. Case Study - Propane Bakery Delivery Step Vans

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, M.; Burnham, A.

    2016-04-01

    A switch to propane from diesel by a major Midwest bakery fleet showed promising results, including a significant displacement of petroleum, a drop in greenhouse gases and a fuel cost savings of seven cents per mile, according to a study recently completed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory for the Clean Cities program.

  4. Reduction of halogenated ethanes by green rust.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Loughlin, E. J.; Burris, D. R.; Environmental Research; Air Force Research Lab.; Integrated Science and Technology, Inc.

    2004-01-01

    Green rusts, mixed Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup III} hydroxide minerals present in many suboxic environments, have been shown to reduce a number of organic and inorganic contaminants. The reduction of halogenated ethanes was examined in aqueous suspensions of green rust, both alone and with the addition of Ag{sup I} (AgGR) and Cu{sup II} (CuGR). Hexachloroethane (HCA), pentachloroethane (PCA), 1,1,1,2-tetrachloroethane (1,1,1,2-TeCA), 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (1,1,2,2-TeCA), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA), 1,1,2-trichloroethane (1,1,2-TCA), 1,1-dichloroethane (1,1-DCA), and 1,2-dibromoethane were reduced in the presence of green rust alone, AgGR, or CuGR; only 1,2-dichloroethane and chloroethane were nonreactive. The reduction was generally more rapid for more highly substituted ethanes than for ethanes having fewer halogen groups (HCA > PCA > 1,1,1,2-TeCA > 1,1,1-TCA > 1,1,2,2-TeCA > 1,1,2-TCA > 1,1-DCA), and isomers with the more asymmetric distributions of halogen groups were more rapidly reduced than the isomer with greater symmetry (e.g., 1,1,1-TCA > 1,1,2-TCA). The addition of Ag{sup I} or Cu{sup II} to green rust suspensions resulted in a substantial increase in the rate of halogenated ethane reduction as well as significant differences in the product distributions with respect to green rust alone.

  5. CASSINI VIMS OBSERVATIONS SHOW ETHANE IS PRESENT IN TITAN'S RAINFALL

    SciTech Connect

    Dalba, Paul A.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Baines, Kevin H.; Sotin, Christophe; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Brown, Robert H.; Barnes, Jason W.; Clark, Roger N.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2012-12-20

    Observations obtained over two years by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem suggest that rain showers fall on the surface. Using measurements obtained by the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer, we identify the main component of the rain to be ethane, with methane as an additional component. We observe five or six probable rainfall events, at least one of which follows a brief equatorial cloud appearance, suggesting that frequent rainstorms occur on Titan. The rainfall evaporates, sublimates, or infiltrates on timescales of months, and in some cases it is associated with fluvial features but not with their creation or alteration. Thus, Titan exhibits frequent 'gentle rainfall' instead of, or in addition to, more catastrophic events that cut rivers and lay down large fluvial deposits. Freezing rain may also be present, and the standing liquid may exist as puddles interspersed with patches of frost. The extensive dune deposits found in the equatorial regions of Titan imply multi-season arid conditions there, which are consistent with small, but possibly frequent, amounts of rain, in analogy to terrestrial deserts.

  6. Investigations on the "Extreme" Microbial Methane Cycle within the Sediments of an Acidic Impoundment of the Inactive Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine: Herman Pit, Clear Lake, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.; Wei, J. H. C.; Welander, P. V.

    2014-12-01

    The inactive Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine is located in a volcanic region having geothermal flow and gas inputs into the Herman Pit impoundment. The acidic (pH 2 - 4) waters of the Herman Pit are permeated by hundreds of continuous flow gas seeps that contain CO2, H2S and CH4. We sampled one seep and found it to be composed of 95 % CO2 and 5 % CH4, in agreement with earlier measurements. Only a trace of ethane (10 - 20 ppm) was found and propane was below detection, resulting in a high CH4/C2H6 + C3H8 ratio of > 5,000, while the δ13CH4 and the δ13CO2 were respectively - 24 and - 11 per mil. Collectively, these results suggested a complex origin for the methane, being made up of a thermogenic component resulting from pyrolysis of buried organics, along with an active methanogenic portion. The relatively 12C-enriched value for the CO2 suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. We found that dissolved methane in the collected water from 2-4 m depth was high (~ 400 µM), which would support methanotrophy in the lake's aerobic biomes. We therefore tested the ability of bottom sediments to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried bottom sediments. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane to the headspace over the course of 2-3 months resulted in faster removal rates suggesting a buildup of the population of methanotrophs. This activity could be transferred to an artificial medium originally devised for the cultivation of acidophilic iron oxidizing bacteria (Silverman and Lundgren, 1959; J. Bacteriol. 77: 642 - 647), suggesting the possibility of future cultivation of acidophilic methanotrophs. A successful extraction of some hopanoid compounds from the sediments was achieved, although the results were too preliminary at the time of this writing to identify any hopanoids specifically linked to methanotrophic bacteria. Further efforts to amplify functional genes for

  7. Identifying different types of catalysts for CO2 reduction by ethane through dry reforming and oxidative dehydrogenation

    DOE PAGES

    Marc D. Porosoff; Chen, Jingguang G.; Myint, Myat Noe Zin; ...

    2015-11-10

    In this study, the recent shale gas boom combined with the requirement to reduce atmospheric CO2 have created an opportunity for using both raw materials (shale gas and CO2) in a single process. Shale gas is primarily made up of methane, but ethane comprises about 10 % and reserves are underutilized. Two routes have been investigated by combining ethane decomposition with CO2 reduction to produce products of higher value. The first reaction is ethane dry reforming which produces synthesis gas (CO+H2). The second route is oxidative dehydrogenation which produces ethylene using CO2 as a soft oxidant. The results of thismore » study indicate that the Pt/CeO2 catalyst shows promise for the production of synthesis gas, while Mo2C-based materials preserve the C—C bond of ethane to produce ethylene. These findings are supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) characterization of the catalysts under in situ reaction conditions.« less

  8. Identifying different types of catalysts for CO2 reduction by ethane through dry reforming and oxidative dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Marc D. Porosoff; Chen, Jingguang G.; Myint, Myat Noe Zin; Kattel, Shyam; Xie, Zhenhua; Gomez, Elaine; Liu, Ping

    2015-11-10

    In this study, the recent shale gas boom combined with the requirement to reduce atmospheric CO2 have created an opportunity for using both raw materials (shale gas and CO2) in a single process. Shale gas is primarily made up of methane, but ethane comprises about 10 % and reserves are underutilized. Two routes have been investigated by combining ethane decomposition with CO2 reduction to produce products of higher value. The first reaction is ethane dry reforming which produces synthesis gas (CO+H2). The second route is oxidative dehydrogenation which produces ethylene using CO2 as a soft oxidant. The results of this study indicate that the Pt/CeO2 catalyst shows promise for the production of synthesis gas, while Mo2C-based materials preserve the C—C bond of ethane to produce ethylene. These findings are supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) characterization of the catalysts under in situ reaction conditions.

  9. Adsorptive separation of propylene-propane mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Jaervelin, H.; Fair, J.R. )

    1993-10-01

    The separation of propylene-propane mixtures is of great commercial importance and is carried out by fractional distillation. It is claimed to be the most energy-intensive distillation practiced in the United States. The purpose of this paper is to describe experimental work that suggests a practical alternative to distillation for separating the C[sub 3] hydrocarbons: adsorption. As studied, the process involves three adsorptive steps: initial separation with molecular sieves with heavy dilution with an inert gas; separation of propylene and propane separately from the inert gas, using activated carbon; and drying of the product streams with any of several available desiccants. The research information presented here deals with the initial step and includes both equilibrium and kinetic data. Isotherms are provided for propylene and propane adsorbed on three zeolites, activated alumina, silica gel, and coconut-based activated carbon. Breakthrough data are provided for both adsorption and regeneration steps for the zeolites, which were found to be superior to the other adsorbents for breakthrough separations. A flow diagram for the complete proposed process is included.

  10. Gas carburizing of steel with furnace atmospheres formed in situ from methane and air and from butane and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickels, C. A.; Mack, C. M.; Pieprzak, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Carburizing experiments were conducted at 927 °C (1700 °F) and 843 °C (1550 °F) using furnace atmospheres formed from methane and air and from butane and air introduced directly into the carburizing furnace. Gas flow rates were low to promote equilibration of the reaction products within the furnace. The air flow rate was held constant while the methane or butane flow was automatically regulated to maintain a constant oxygen potential, as measured by a zirconia oxygen sensor, within the furnace. In comparing the results of these experiments with earlier results obtained using propane and air, several differences were noted: (a) The methane content of the furnace atmosphere, measured by infrared analysis, was about twice as great when methane was the feed gas rather than propane or butane. This was true despite the fact that the mean residence time of the gas within the furnace was greater in the methane experiments. Methane appears to be less effective than propane or butane in reducing the CO2 and H2O contents to the levels required for carburizing. (b) There was a greater tendency for the CO content of the furnace atmosphere to decrease at high carbon potentials when methane is used instead of propane or butane. The decrease in CO content is due to hydrogen dilution caused by sooting in the furnace vestibule. These differences in behavior make propane or butane better suited than methane for in situ generation of carburizing atmospheres. However, there is no difference in the amount of carburizing occurring at a specified carbon potential when methane, propane, or butane are used as the feed gas in this process.

  11. Ethane Ices in the Outer Solar System: Spectroscopy and Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Raines, L. L.

    2009-01-01

    We report recent experiments on ethane ices made at temperatures applicable to the outer Solar System. New near- and mid-infrared data for crystalline and amorphous ethane, including new spectra for a seldom-studied solid phase that exists at 35-55 K, are presented along with radiation-chemical experiments showing the formation of more-complex hydrocarbons

  12. Ethane Ices in the Outer Solar System: Spectroscopy and Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Raines, L. L.

    2009-01-01

    We report recent experiments on ethane ices made at temperatures applicable to the outer Solar System. New near- and mid-infrared data for crystalline and amorphous ethane, including new spectra for a seldom-studied solid phase that exists at 35-55 K, are presented along with radiation-chemical experiments showing the formation of more-complex hydrocarbons,

  13. 10 CFR 221.11 - Natural gas and ethane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Natural gas and ethane. 221.11 Section 221.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL PRIORITY SUPPLY OF CRUDE OIL AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS TO THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE UNDER THE DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT Exclusions § 221.11 Natural gas and ethane. The supply of natural...

  14. 10 CFR 221.11 - Natural gas and ethane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Natural gas and ethane. 221.11 Section 221.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL PRIORITY SUPPLY OF CRUDE OIL AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS TO THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE UNDER THE DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT Exclusions § 221.11 Natural gas and ethane. The supply of natural...

  15. 10 CFR 221.11 - Natural gas and ethane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Natural gas and ethane. 221.11 Section 221.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL PRIORITY SUPPLY OF CRUDE OIL AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS TO THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE UNDER THE DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT Exclusions § 221.11 Natural gas and ethane. The supply of natural...

  16. 10 CFR 221.11 - Natural gas and ethane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Natural gas and ethane. 221.11 Section 221.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL PRIORITY SUPPLY OF CRUDE OIL AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS TO THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE UNDER THE DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT Exclusions § 221.11 Natural gas and ethane. The supply of natural...

  17. 10 CFR 221.11 - Natural gas and ethane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Natural gas and ethane. 221.11 Section 221.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL PRIORITY SUPPLY OF CRUDE OIL AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS TO THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE UNDER THE DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT Exclusions § 221.11 Natural gas and ethane. The supply of natural...

  18. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Magyar, Rudolph J.; Root, Seth; Mattsson, Thomas; ...

    2015-04-22

    Mixtures of light elements with heavy elements are important in inertial confinement fusion. We explore the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) at elevated temperature and pressure is used to obtain the thermodynamic state properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. In order to validate these simulations, we have performed shock compression experiments using the Sandia Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with the completion of dissociation in ethane. Furthermore, themore » DFT-based simulation results compare well with the experimental data along the principal Hugoniots and are used to provide insight into the dissociation and temperature along the Hugoniots as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for several compositions suggesting a limiting compression for C-C bonded systems.« less

  19. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Magyar, Rudolph J.; Root, Seth; Mattsson, Thomas; Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Flicker, Dawn G.

    2015-04-22

    Mixtures of light elements with heavy elements are important in inertial confinement fusion. We explore the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) at elevated temperature and pressure is used to obtain the thermodynamic state properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. In order to validate these simulations, we have performed shock compression experiments using the Sandia Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with the completion of dissociation in ethane. Furthermore, the DFT-based simulation results compare well with the experimental data along the principal Hugoniots and are used to provide insight into the dissociation and temperature along the Hugoniots as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for several compositions suggesting a limiting compression for C-C bonded systems.

  20. Anaerobic degradation of propane and butane by sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from marine hydrocarbon cold seeps

    PubMed Central

    Jaekel, Ulrike; Musat, Niculina; Adam, Birgit; Kuypers, Marcel; Grundmann, Olav; Musat, Florin

    2013-01-01

    The short-chain, non-methane hydrocarbons propane and butane can contribute significantly to the carbon and sulfur cycles in marine environments affected by oil or natural gas seepage. In the present study, we enriched and identified novel propane and butane-degrading sulfate reducers from marine oil and gas cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico and Hydrate Ridge. The enrichment cultures obtained were able to degrade simultaneously propane and butane, but not other gaseous alkanes. They were cold-adapted, showing highest sulfate-reduction rates between 16 and 20 °C. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries, followed by whole-cell hybridizations with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that each enrichment culture was dominated by a unique phylotype affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster within the Deltaproteobacteria. These phylotypes formed a distinct phylogenetic cluster of propane and butane degraders, including sequences from environments associated with hydrocarbon seeps. Incubations with 13C-labeled substrates, hybridizations with sequence-specific probes and nanoSIMS analyses showed that cells of the dominant phylotypes were the first to become enriched in 13C, demonstrating that they were directly involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Furthermore, using the nanoSIMS data, carbon assimilation rates were calculated for the dominant cells in each enrichment culture. PMID:23254512

  1. Mechanism of Oxidation of Ethane to Ethanol at Iron(IV)-Oxo Sites in Magnesium-Diluted Fe2(dobdc).

    PubMed

    Verma, Pragya; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos D; Planas, Nora; Borycz, Joshua; Xiao, Dianne J; Long, Jeffrey R; Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-05-06

    The catalytic properties of the metal-organic framework Fe2(dobdc), containing open Fe(II) sites, include hydroxylation of phenol by pure Fe2(dobdc) and hydroxylation of ethane by its magnesium-diluted analogue, Fe0.1Mg1.9(dobdc). In earlier work, the latter reaction was proposed to occur through a redox mechanism involving the generation of an iron(IV)-oxo species, which is an intermediate that is also observed or postulated (depending on the case) in some heme and nonheme enzymes and their model complexes. In the present work, we present a detailed mechanism by which the catalytic material, Fe0.1Mg1.9(dobdc), activates the strong C-H bonds of ethane. Kohn-Sham density functional and multireference wave function calculations have been performed to characterize the electronic structure of key species. We show that the catalytic nonheme-Fe hydroxylation of the strong C-H bond of ethane proceeds by a quintet single-state σ-attack pathway after the formation of highly reactive iron-oxo intermediate. The mechanistic pathway involves three key transition states, with the highest activation barrier for the transfer of oxygen from N2O to the Fe(II) center. The uncatalyzed reaction, where nitrous oxide directly oxidizes ethane to ethanol is found to have an activation barrier of 280 kJ/mol, in contrast to 82 kJ/mol for the slowest step in the iron(IV)-oxo catalytic mechanism. The energetics of the C-H bond activation steps of ethane and methane are also compared. Dehydrogenation and dissociation pathways that can compete with the formation of ethanol were shown to involve higher barriers than the hydroxylation pathway.

  2. Photolysis of methane and the ionosphere of Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, S. K.; Ponthieu, J. J.

    1983-08-01

    Photochemical calculations for Uranus predict an extensive region of condensation of acetylene, ethane and methane in the vicinity of the temperature inversion layer. This could explain why ethane was not detected on Uranus, unlike Neptune which has a much warmer inversion layer. Subsequent snow-out of the condensibles is expected to result in reduced visibility in the troposphere. Ionospheric calculations for the equatorial region to be probed by Voyager, indicate peak electron concentrations on the order of 5×103 cm-3, if dynamical effects are important. Upper limit to the electron peak is 3×104 cm-3. Exospheric temperatures as high as 200-250K are conceivable.

  3. Attributing Atmospheric Methane to Anthropogenic Emission Sources.

    PubMed

    Allen, David

    2016-07-19

    Methane is a greenhouse gas, and increases in atmospheric methane concentration over the past 250 years have driven increased radiative forcing of the atmosphere. Increases in atmospheric methane concentration since 1750 account for approximately 17% of increases in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, and that percentage increases by approximately a factor of 2 if the effects of the greenhouse gases produced by the atmospheric reactions of methane are included in the assessment. Because of the role of methane emissions in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, the identification and quantification of sources of methane emissions is receiving increased scientific attention. Methane emission sources include biogenic, geogenic, and anthropogenic sources; the largest anthropogenic sources are natural gas and petroleum systems, enteric fermentation (livestock), landfills, coal mining, and manure management. While these source categories are well-known, there is significant uncertainty in the relative magnitudes of methane emissions from the various source categories. Further, the overall magnitude of methane emissions from all anthropogenic sources is actively debated, with estimates based on source sampling extrapolated to regional or national scale ("bottom-up analyses") differing from estimates that infer emissions based on ambient data ("top-down analyses") by 50% or more. To address the important problem of attribution of methane to specific sources, a variety of new analytical methods are being employed, including high time resolution and highly sensitive measurements of methane, methane isotopes, and other chemical species frequently associated with methane emissions, such as ethane. This Account describes the use of some of these emerging measurements, in both top-down and bottom-up methane emission studies. In addition, this Account describes how data from these new analytical methods can be used in conjunction with chemical mass balance (CMB) methods for source

  4. New directions for the catalytic conversion of methane. Final report, November 1987-October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, J.H.

    1994-11-01

    Three classes of catalysts have been studied for the oxidative coupling of methane to form ethane and ethylene. These include (1) molten lithium carbonate that was modified to improve activity and selectivity; (2) lithium-promoted magnesium oxide that contained chloride ions, and (3) selected transition metal ions on magnesium oxide or silicon oxide. Some of the most highly selective catalysts for producing ethane and ethylene from methane may be formed by the addition of manganese ions and sodium tungstate to either magnesium oxide or silica gel. These catalysts are effective at reagent pressures up to 5 atm.

  5. Characteristics of atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons during haze episode in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Songjun; Tan, Jihua; Duan, Jingchun; Ma, Yongliang; Yang, Fumo; He, Kebin; Hao, Jimin

    2012-12-01

    This study firstly focused on non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) during three successive days with haze episode (16-18 August 2006) in Beijing. Concentrations of alkanes, alkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons, and ethyne all peaked at traffic rush hour, implying vehicular emission; and alkanes also peaked at non-traffic rush hour in the daytime, implying additional source. Especially, alkanes and aromatics clearly showed higher levels in the nighttime than that in the daytime, implying their active photochemical reactions in the daytime. Correlation coefficients (R (2)) showed that propane, n-butane, i-butane, ethene, propene, and benzene correlated with ethyne (R (2) = 0.61-0.66), suggesting that their main source is vehicular emission; 2-methylpentane and n-hexane correlated with i-pentane (R (2) = 0.61-0.64), suggesting that gasoline evaporation is their main source; and ethylbezene, m-/p-xylene, and o-xylene correlated with toluene (R (2) = 0.60-0.79), suggesting that their main source is similar to that of toluene (e.g., solvent usage). The R (2) of ethyne, i-pentane, and toluene with total NMHCs were 0.58, 0.76, and 0.60, respectively, indicating that ambient hydrocarbons are associated with vehicular emission, gasoline evaporation, and solvent usage. The sources of other hydrocarbons (e.g., ethane) might be natural gas leakage, biogenic emission, or long-range transport of air pollutants. Measured higher mean B/T ratio (0.78 ± 0.27) was caused by the more intensive photochemical activity of toluene than benzene, still indicating the dominant emission from vehicles.

  6. Titan's Propane from Cassini Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Flaud, J.-M.; Bezard, B.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Ansty, T. M.; Coustenis, A.; Flasar, F. M.

    2009-04-01

    Propane gas (C3H8) was first detected in the atmosphere of Titan by the Voyager 1 IRIS spectrometer, during the 1980 encounter (Maguire et al., 1981), and remains the heaviest saturated hydrocarbon (alkane) found there to date. Although the identification was based on the detection of several bands (including 748, 922, 1054, 1158 cm-1), only the ν26 band at 748 cm-1 has been subsequently modeled to retrieve the abundance, due to the unique availability of its line parameters in the GEISA database (Husson et al. 1992). Subsequent measurements from the ground (Roe et al., 2003) and Earth-orbit (ISO - Coustenis et al. 2003) have also focused on this one band, deriving an abundance of ~0.5 ppm, although it remains compromised by coincidence with the R-branch of the much stronger acetylene (C2H2) gas. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument carried on-board the Cassini spacecraft in Saturn orbit has now been observing Titan during more than 50 flybys over 5 years, and offers a fresh perspective on the prevalence of propane. With much improved spectral and spatial resolution and sensitivity over IRIS, CIRS is also able to perform repeated limb sounding (viewing through the atmosphere above the surface) to increase signal-to-noise still further. Modeling and removal of the emissions of other gases now shows clearly for the first time a multitude of propane bands: including the four seen by IRIS and at least four others (869, 1338, 1376, 1472 cm-1). In addition, a new line atlas for three bands of propane at shorter wavelengths (1300-1500 cm-1) has now been compiled, based on the work of Flaud et al. (2001). With this, we now have the potential to model these weaker bands, and to check the measurements made by CIRS using the 748 cm-1 band alone. Preliminary analysis has shown that the retrievals are very sensitive to the spectral baseline (haze model) assumed, and that existing lab tholin spectral properties (Khare et al. 1984) do not well match the opacity

  7. Source attribution of methane emissions from global oil and gas production: results of bottom-up simulations over three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höglund-Isaksson, Lena

    2016-04-01

    Existing bottom-up emission inventories of historical methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas systems do not well explain year-on-year variations estimated by top-down models from atmospheric measurements. This paper develops a bottom-up methodology which allows for country- and year specific source attribution of methane and ethane emissions from global oil and natural gas production for the period 1980 to 2012. The analysis rests on country-specific simulations of associated gas flows which are converted into methane and ethane emissions. The associated gas flows are constructed from country-specific information on oil and gas production and associated gas generation and recovery, and coupled with generic assumptions to bridge regional information gaps on the fractions of unrecovered associated gas that is vented instead of flared. Summing up emissions from associated gas flows with global estimates of emissions from unintended leakage and natural gas transmission and distribution, the resulting global emissions of methane and ethane from oil and gas systems are reasonably consistent with corresponding estimates from top-down models. Also revealed is that the fall of the Soviet Union in 1990 had a significant impact on methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas systems.

  8. 77 FR 2293 - AmeriGas Propane, L.P., AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P., and Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... AmeriGas Propane, L.P., AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P., and Energy Transfer...'') with AmeriGas Propane, L.P. (``AmeriGas''), AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P. (``ETP''), and Energy Transfer Partners GP, L.P. (``ETP GP''), which is designed to guard...

  9. Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eckhard; Span, Roland; Herrmann, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    A new representation of the viscosity for the fluid phase of ethane includes a zero-density correlation and a contribution for the critical enhancement, initially both developed separately, but based on experimental data. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρc and of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = Tc/T (ρc—critical density and Tc—critical temperature). The final formulation contains 14 coefficients obtained using a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the selected primary data sets is reviewed, in particular with respect to the assessment used in earlier viscosity correlations. The new viscosity surface correlation makes use of the reference equation of state for the thermodynamic properties of ethane by Bücker and Wagner [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 35, 205 (2006)] and is valid in the fluid region from the melting line to temperatures of 675 K and pressures of 100 MPa. The viscosity in the limit of zero density is described with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 290 < T/K < 625, increasing to 1.0% at temperatures down to 212 K. The uncertainty of the correlated values is 1.5% in the range 290 < T/K < 430 at pressures up to 30 MPa on the basis of recent measurements judged to be very reliable as well as 4.0% and 6.0% in further regions. The uncertainty in the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2) increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0% considering the available reliable data. Tables of the viscosity calculated from the correlation are listed in an appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor-liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region.

  10. A Search for Ethane on Pluto and Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMeo, Francesca E.; Dumas, C.; de Bergh, C.; Protopapa, S.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Geballe, T. R.; Alvarez-Candal, A.; Merlin, F.; Barucci, M. A.

    2009-09-01

    We present near-infrared spectral observations in the H and K bands (1.4-2.45 microns) of Pluto over four regions of the surface and Triton for one observation using the VLT and UKIRT. On both Pluto and Triton, a weak 2.405-micron feature is present in our spectra, which was previously detected on Pluto by Cruikshank et al. (DPS meeting abstract, 38, 21.03, 2006) and Verbiscer et al. (Lunar and Planetary Science Abstract XXXVIII - 2007) and on Triton by Cruikshank et al. (Science, 261, 742-745, 1993), Quirico et al. (Icarus, 139, 159-178, 1999) and Cruikshank et al. (Icarus, 147, 309-316, 2000). On Triton, the depth and position of this feature varies but is seen in all high-resolution, published spectra. Both ethane (C2H6) and 13CO display features at this wavelength. To assess whether unexplained absorption bands such as the 2.405 micron feature could be due to ethane, we interpret the spectral behavior if each surface using a modeling algorithm (Protopapa et al., A&A, 490, 365-375, 2008) based on the radiative transfer model of Hapke (Hapke, 1993) with three basic models: a general model without ethane, with ethane, and with ethane diluted in nitrogen. While ethane diluted in nitrogen could potentially explain the 1.69- and 1.75-micron features on Triton and pure ethane could explain the 2.405-micron feature seen on Pluto, the lack of features in the 2.27- to 2.32-micron region limits the abundance of ethane to only a few percent on each body. It is likely that 13CO contributes significantly to the 2.405-micron band, which explains why this band is stronger in spectra of both bodies than other characteristic ethane features.

  11. Reduced chemical kinetics for propane combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ying, Shuh-Jing; Nguyen, Hung Lee

    1990-01-01

    It is pointed out that a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism for the combustion of propane consists of 40 chemical species and 118 elementary chemical reactions. An attempt is made to reduce the number of chemical species and elementary chemical reactions so that the computer run times and storage requirements may be greatly reduced in three-dimensional gas turbine combustion flow calculations, while maintaining accurate predictions of the propane combustion and exhaust emissions. By way of a sensitivity analysis, the species of interest and chemical reactions are classified in descending order of importance. Nineteen species are chosen, and their pressure, temperature, and concentration profiles are presented for the reduced mechanisms, which are then compared with those from the full 118 reactions. It is found that 45 reactions involving 27 species have to be kept for comparable agreement. A comparison of the results obtained from the 45 reactions to that of the full 118 shows that the pressure and temperature profiles and concentrations of C3H8, O2, N2, H2O, CO, and CO2 are within 10 percent of maximum change.

  12. Solubility of crude oil in methane as a function of pressure and temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, L.C.; Wenger, L.M.; Ging, T.; Blount, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The solubility of a 44?? API (0.806 sp. gr.) whole crude oil has been measured in methane with water present at temperatures of 50 to 250??C and pressures of 740 to 14,852 psi, as have the solubilities of two high molecular weight petroleum distillation fractions at temperatures of 50 to 250??C and pressures of 4482 to 25,266 psi. Both increases in pressure and temperature increase the solubility of crude oil and petroleum distillation fractions in methane, the effect of pressure being greater than that of temperature. Unexpectedly high solubility levels (0.5-1.5 grams of oil per liter of methane-at laboratory temperature and pressure) were measured at moderate conditions (50-200??C and 5076-14504 psi). Similar results were found for the petroleum distillation fractions, one of which was the highest molecular weight material of petroleum (material boiling above 266??C at 6 microns pressure). Unexpectedly mild conditions (100??C and 15,200 psi; 200??C and 7513 psi) resulted in cosolubility of crude oil and methane. Under these conditions, samples of the gas-rich phase gave solubility values of 4 to 5 g/l, or greater. Qualitative analyses of the crude-oil solute samples showed that at low pressure and temperature equilibration conditions, the solute condensate would be enriched in C5-C15 range hydrocarbons and in saturated hydrocarbons in the C15+ fraction. With increases in temperature and especially pressure, these tendencies were reversed, and the solute condensate became identical to the starting crude oil. The data of this study, compared to that of previous studies, shows that methane, with water present, has a much greater carrying capacity for crude oil than in dry systems. The presence of water also drastically lowers the temperature and pressure conditions required for cosolubility. The data of this and/or previous studies demonstrate that the addition of carbon dioxide, ethane, propane, or butane to methane also has a strong positive effect on crude oil

  13. Extending the Lifetime of Hyperpolarized Propane Gas through Reversible Dissolution.

    PubMed

    Burueva, Dudari B; Romanov, Alexey S; Salnikov, Oleg G; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V; Chen, Yu-Wen; Barskiy, Danila A; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Hwang, Dennis W; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Koptyug, Igor V

    2017-03-02

    Hyperpolarized (HP) propane produced by the parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) technique has been recently introduced as a promising contrast agent for functional lung magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. However, its short lifetime due to a spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of less than 1 s in the gas phase is a significant translational challenge for its potential biomedical applications. The previously demonstrated approach for extending the lifetime of the HP propane state through long-lived spin states allows the HP propane lifetime to be increased by a factor of ∼3. Here, we demonstrate that a remarkable increase in the propane hyperpolarization decay time at high magnetic field (7.1 T) can be achieved by its dissolution in deuterated organic solvents (acetone-d6 or methanol-d4). The approximate values of the HP decay time for propane dissolved in acetone-d6 are 35.1 and 28.6 s for the CH2 group and the CH3 group, respectively (similar values were obtained for propane dissolved in methanol-d4), which are ∼50 times larger than the gaseous propane T1 value. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to retrieve HP propane from solution to the gas phase with the preservation of hyperpolarization.

  14. Evidence for a polar ethane cloud on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, C.A.; Penteado, P.; Rannou, P.; Brown, R.; Boudon, V.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.; Drossart, P.; Buratti, B.; Nicholson, P.; McKay, C.P.; Coustenis, A.; Negrao, A.; Jaumann, R.

    2006-01-01

    Spectra from Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer reveal the presence of a vast tropospheric cloud on Titan at latitudes 51?? to 68?? north and all longitudes observed (10?? to 190?? west). The derived characteristics indicate that this cloud is composed of ethane and forms as a result of stratospheric subsidence and the particularly cool conditions near the moon's north pole. Preferential condensation of ethane, perhaps as ice, at Titan's poles during the winters may partially explain the lack of liquid ethane oceans on Titan's surface at middle and lower latitudes.

  15. Simultaneous monitoring of atmospheric methane and speciated non-methane hydrocarbon concentrations using Peltier effect sub-ambient pre-concentration and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Harrison, D; Seakins, P W; Lewis, A C

    2000-02-01

    Sub-ambient trapping, used to pre-concentrate atmospheric samples for non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) analysis by gas chromatography, can also be used to measure ambient methane concentrations. Above a sample volume of 40 ml, a dynamic equilibrium is established between ambient and trapped methane allowing for simultaneous quantitative determinations of methane and NMHC. The temperature stability of the trap is critical for quantitative methane analysis and this can be achieved by Peltier effect cooling. Simultaneous measurements of methane and NMHC reduce the equipment required for field trips and can ease the interpretation and modelling of atmospheric data. The feasibility for deployment of the system in remote locations was demonstrated by running the apparatus virtually unattended for a 5-day period. The correlations between the concentrations of methane, ethane and ethene measured during this period are discussed.

  16. Following The Carbon: Structure, Chemistry, And Spectroscopy Of Frozen Ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raines, Lily; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.

    2008-09-01

    Oort Cloud comets, as well as TNOs 2005 FY9, Quaoar, and Pluto, are known to contain ethane. Even though this molecule is found in several outer solar system objects, relatively little information is available about its amorphous, metastable, and crystalline phases. In new experiments, we have prepared ethane ices at various temperatures, and heated and ion-irradiated these ices to study phase changes and ethane's radiation chemistry with near- and mid-IR spectroscopy. Recent results will be presented at this meeting. An improved understanding of solid-phase ethane may contribute to future searches for this and other hydrocarbons in the outer solar system. This work was conducted by LLR while a summer research intern at the Goddard Center for Astrobiology, Goddard Space Flight Center. Additional support from NASA's Outer Planets, Planetary Atmospheres, and Planetary Geology and Geophysics programs is acknowledged by all of the authors.

  17. Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Eckhard; Span, Roland; Herrmann, Sebastian

    2015-12-15

    A new representation of the viscosity for the fluid phase of ethane includes a zero-density correlation and a contribution for the critical enhancement, initially both developed separately, but based on experimental data. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρ{sub c} and of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = T{sub c}/T (ρ{sub c}—critical density and T{sub c}—critical temperature). The final formulation contains 14 coefficients obtained using a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the selected primary data sets is reviewed, in particular with respect to the assessment used in earlier viscosity correlations. The new viscosity surface correlation makes use of the reference equation of state for the thermodynamic properties of ethane by Bücker and Wagner [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 35, 205 (2006)] and is valid in the fluid region from the melting line to temperatures of 675 K and pressures of 100 MPa. The viscosity in the limit of zero density is described with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 290 < T/K < 625, increasing to 1.0% at temperatures down to 212 K. The uncertainty of the correlated values is 1.5% in the range 290 < T/K < 430 at pressures up to 30 MPa on the basis of recent measurements judged to be very reliable as well as 4.0% and 6.0% in further regions. The uncertainty in the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2) increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0% considering the available reliable data. Tables of the viscosity calculated from the correlation are listed in an appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor–liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region.

  18. bdGas carburizing of steel with furnace atmospheres formed in situ from methane and air and from butane and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickels, C. A.; Mack, C. M.; Pieprzak, J. A.

    1982-12-01

    Carburizing experiments were conducted at 927°C (1700°F) and 843°C (1550°F) using furnace atmospheres formed from methane and air and from butane and air introduced directly into the carburizing furnace. Gas flow rates were low to promote equilibration of the reaction products within the furnace. The air flow rate was held constant while the methane or butane flow was automatically regulated to maintain a constant oxygen potential, as measured by a zirconia oxygen sensor, within the furnace. In comparing the results of these experiments with earlier results obtained using propane and air, several differences were noted: (a) The methane content of the furnace atmosphere, measured by infrared analysis, was about twice as great when methane was the feed gas rather than propane or butane. This was true despite the fact that the mean residence time of the gas within the furnace was greater in the methane experiments. Methane appears to be less effective than propane or butane in reducing the CO2 and H2O contents to the levels required for carburizing. (b) There was a greater tendency for the CO content of the furnace atmosphere to decrease at high carbon potentials when methane is used instead of propane or butane. The decrease in CO content is due to hydrogen dilution caused by sooting in the furnace vestibule. These differences in behavior make propane or butane better suited than methane for in situ generation of carburizing atmospheres. However, there is no difference in the amount of carburizing occurring at a specified carbon potential when methane, propane, or butane are used as the feed gas in this process.

  19. Emissions results for dedicated propane Chrysler minivans: the 1996 propane vehicle challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, C.; Sluder, S.; Larsen, R.

    1997-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE), through Argonne National Laboratory, and in cooperation with Natural Resources-Canada and Chrysler Canada, sponsored and organized the 1996 Propane Vehicle Challenge (PVC). For this competition , 13 university teams from North America each received a stock Chrysler minivan to be converted to dedicated propane operation while maintaining maximum production feasibility. The converted vehicles were tested for performance (driveability, cold- and hot-start, acceleration, range, and fuel economy) and exhaust emissions. Of the 13 entries for the 1996 PVC, 10 completed all of the events scheduled, including the emissions test. The schools used a variety of fuel-management, fuel-phase and engine-control strategies, but their strategies can be summarized as three main types: liquid fuel-injection, gaseous fuel-injection, and gaseous carburetor. The converted vehicles performed similarly to the gasoline minivan. The University of Windsor`s minivan had the lowest emissions attaining ULEV levels with a gaseous-injected engine. The Texas A&M vehicle, which had a gaseous-fuel injection system, and the GMI Engineering and Management Institute`s vehicle, which had a liquid-injection system both reached LEV levels. Vehicles with an injection fuel system (liquid or gaseous) performed better in terms of emissions than carbureted systems. Liquid injection appeared to be the best option for fuel metering and control for propane, but more research and calibration are necessary to improve the reliability and performance of this design.

  20. Titan's Methane Cycle is Closed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofgartner, J. D.; Lunine, J. I.

    2013-12-01

    Doppler tracking of the Cassini spacecraft determined a polar moment of inertia for Titan of 0.34 (Iess et al., 2010, Science, 327, 1367). Assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, one interpretation is that Titan's silicate core is partially hydrated (Castillo-Rogez and Lunine, 2010, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L20205). These authors point out that for the core to have avoided complete thermal dehydration to the present day, at least 30% of the potassium content of Titan must have leached into an overlying water ocean by the end of the core overturn. We calculate that for probable ammonia compositions of Titan's ocean (compositions with greater than 1% ammonia by weight), that this amount of potassium leaching is achievable via the substitution of ammonium for potassium during the hydration epoch. Formation of a hydrous core early in Titan's history by serpentinization results in the loss of one hydrogen molecule for every hydrating water molecule. We calculate that complete serpentinization of Titan's core corresponds to the release of more than enough hydrogen to reconstitute all of the methane atoms photolyzed throughout Titan's history. Insertion of molecular hydrogen by double occupancy into crustal clathrates provides a storage medium and an opportunity for ethane to be converted back to methane slowly over time--potentially completing a cycle that extends the lifetime of methane in Titan's surface atmosphere system by factors of several to an order of magnitude over the photochemically-calculated lifetime.

  1. Study on propane-butane gas storage by hydrate technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Nurkholis; Wijayanti, Widya; Widhiyanuriyawan, Denny

    2016-03-01

    Different technology has been applied to store and transport gas fuel. In this work the storage of gas mixture of propane-butane by hydrate technology was studied. The investigation was done on the effect of crystallizer rotation speed on the formation of propane-butane hydrate. The hydrates were formed using crystallizer with rotation speed of 100, 200, and 300 rpm. The formation of gas hydrates was done at initial pressure of 3 bar and temperature of 274K. The results indicated that the higher rotation speed was found to increase the formation rate of propane-butane hydrate and improve the hydrates stability.

  2. A Quantification of Methane Emissions from Oil and Natural Gas Extraction Regions in the Central/Western U.S. and a Comparison to Previous Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peischl, J.; Aikin, K. C.; Eilerman, S. J.; Gilman, J.; De Gouw, J. A.; Herndon, S. C.; Lerner, B. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Tokarek, T. W.; Trainer, M.; Warneke, C.; Ryerson, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    We present airborne measurements of methane and ethane taken aboard a NOAA WP-3D research aircraft over five regions of oil and natural gas extraction in March and April, 2015, as part of the Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) field study. The five regions are the (1) Haynesville, (2) Barnett, and (3) Eagle Ford regions in Texas, (4) the Denver-Julesburg region of Colorado, and (5) the Bakken region of North Dakota. From these measurements, we derive methane emission rates from these regions using the mass balance method. Next, we attribute the methane emissions to oil and natural gas extraction, livestock operations, and other source sectors based on correlations of methane with ethane and ammonia. We then compare these emissions to those reported from previous studies, where applicable. Finally, we compare reported methane emissions from multiple regional-scale studies with inventory estimates of methane emissions from U.S. oil and natural gas production.

  3. Multi-year levels and trends of non-methane hydrocarbon concentrations observed in ambient air in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waked, Antoine; Sauvage, Stéphane; Borbon, Agnès; Gauduin, Julie; Pallares, Cyril; Vagnot, Marie-Pierre; Léonardis, Thierry; Locoge, Nadine

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of 31 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were carried out at three urban (Paris, 2003-2014, Strasbourg, 2002-2014 and Lyon, 2007-2014) sites in France over the period of a decade. A trend analysis was applied by means of the Mann-Kendall non-parametric test to annual and seasonal mean concentrations in order to point out changes in specific emission sources and to assess the impact of emission controls and reduction strategies. The trends were compared to those from three rural sites (Peyrusse-Vieille, 2002-2013, Tardière, 2003-2013 and Donon, 1997-2007). The results obtained showed a significant yearly decrease in pollutant concentrations over the study period and for the majority of species in the range of -1 to -7% in accordance with the decrease of NMHC emissions in France (-5 to -9%). Concentrations of long-lived species such as ethane and propane which are recognized as tracers of distant sources and natural gas remained constant. Compounds associated with combustion processes such as acetylene, propene, ethylene and benzene showed a significant decline in the range of -2% to -5% yr-1. These trends are consistent with those recently described at urban and background sites in the northern mid-latitudes and with emission inventories. C7-C9 aromatics such as toluene and xylenes as well as C4-C5 alkanes such as isopentane and isobutane also showed a significant decrease in the range of -3% to -7% yr-1. The decreasing trends in terms of % yr-1 observed at these French urban sites were typically higher for acetylene, ethylene and benzene than those reported for French rural sites of the national observatory of Measurement and Evaluation in Rural areas of trans-boundary Air pollution (MERA). The study also highlighted the difficult choice of a long term sampling site representative of the general trends of pollutant concentrations.

  4. Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and their contribution to ozone formation potential in a petrochemical industrialized city, Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chenhui; Mao, Xiaoxuan; Huang, Tao; Liang, Xiaoxue; Wang, Yanan; Shen, Yanjie; Jiang, Wanyanhan; Wang, Huiqin; Bai, Zhilin; Ma, Minquan; Yu, Zhousuo; Ma, Jianmin; Gao, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Hourly air concentrations of fifty-three non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were measured at downtown and suburb of Lanzhou, a petrochemical industrialized city, Northwest China in 2013. The measured data were used to investigate the seasonal characteristics of NMHCs air pollution and their contributions to the ozone formation in Lanzhou. Annually averaged NMHCs concentration was 38.29 ppbv in downtown Lanzhou. Among 53 NMHCs, alkanes, alkenes, and aromatics accounted for 57%, 23% and 20% of the total NMHCs air concentration, respectively. The atmospheric levels of toluene and propane with mean values of 4.62 and 4.56 ppbv were higher than other NMHCs, respectively. The ambient levels of NMHCs in downtown Lanzhou were compared with measured NMHCs data collected at a suburban site of Lanzhou, located near a large-scale petrochemical industry. Results show that the levels of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatics in downtown Lanzhou were lower by factors of 3-11 than that in west suburb of the city. O3-isopleth plots show that ozone was formed in VOCs control area in downtown Lanzhou and NOx control area at the west suburban site during the summertime. Propylene-equivalent (Prop-Equiv) concentration and the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) in downtown Lanzhou indicate that cis-2-butene, propylene, and m/p-xylene were the first three compounds contributing to ozone formation potentials whereas in the petrochemical industrialized west suburb, ethane, propene, and trans-2-Butene played more important role in the summertime ozone formation. Principal component analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) were further applied to identify the dominant emission sources and examine their fractions in total NMHCs. Results suggest that vehicle emission, solvent usage, and industrial activities were major sources of NMHCs in the city, accounting for 58.34%, 22.19%, and 19.47% of the total monitored NMHCs in downtown Lanzhou, respectively. In the west suburb of the city

  5. The Stable Carbon Isotope Ratio Analysis of Atmospheric Non-Methane Hydrocarbons in Los Angeles, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, A. A.; Tyler, S. C.; Meinardi, S.; Gervais, K.; Blake, D. R.

    2003-12-01

    Los Angeles type photochemical air pollution is caused by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) reacting with hydroxyl radicals and nitrous oxides in the presence of light. To create more effective control strategies in reducing such air pollution, it is essential to have both a better understanding of the complex photochemical processes of NMHCs and the sources of these compounds. From the past successful studies of other atmospheric trace gases such as methane and carbon monoxide, we expect that the stable carbon ratio (13C/12C, reported as a δ 13C value) of each of these hydrocarbons will also reflect the δ 13C value of the source material and/or provide formation on chemical loss processes that fractionate C isotopes. We have developed a NMHC preconcentrator system which enables us to measure δ 13C values using a continuous-flow gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometer (cf-GC/C/IRMS). Our system is similar to the successful design pioneered in Rudolph et al. (1997), but is custom designed by our laboratory. Stable carbon isotope measurements of any of the C2-C5 NMHCs in field and/or lab studies are scarce to date. Our system allows us to report on δ 13C measurements of ethane, ethene, ethyne, propane, propene, n-butane, i-butane, 1-butene, n-pentane, i-pentane, and methyl chloride. To see if we can learn the specific sources contributing to the emissions of a given NMHC within a region by comparing isotopic signatures of its potential sources to δ 13C measurements of it within the local air mass, urban air samples were collected in 3 different cities of Los Angeles County, California, USA, during the summer of 2003 and analyzed for the concentrations and δ 13C values of NMHCs. To our knowledge, this is the first δ 13C analysis of ambient NMHCs conducted in the United States. We report the results of the δ 13C analyses and concentration measurements for selected NMHC species from the urban air samples, and their implications for the local

  6. Temperature-dependent high resolution absorption cross sections of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Christopher A.; Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2016-10-01

    High resolution (0.005 cm-1) absorption cross sections have been measured for pure propane (C3H8). These cross sections cover the 2550-3500 cm-1 region at five temperatures (from 296 to 700 K) and were measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer and a quartz cell heated by a tube furnace. Calibrations were made by comparison to the integrated cross sections of propane from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. These are the first high resolution absorption cross sections of propane for the 3 μm region at elevated temperatures. The cross sections provided may be used to monitor propane in combustion environments and in astronomical sources such as the auroral regions of Jupiter, brown dwarfs and exoplanets.

  7. 2. View of Liquified Propane Air Plant (New), former Exhaust ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of Liquified Propane Air Plant (New), former Exhaust and Compressor Building and former Purifying Plant in background. - Concord Gas Light Company, South Main Street, Concord, Merrimack County, NH

  8. Crystal structures of two mononuclear complexes of terbium(III) nitrate with the tripodal alcohol 1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane.

    PubMed

    Gregório, Thaiane; Giese, Siddhartha O K; Nunes, Giovana G; Soares, Jaísa F; Hughes, David L

    2017-02-01

    Two new mononuclear cationic complexes in which the Tb(III) ion is bis-chelated by the tripodal alcohol 1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane (H3L(Et), C6H14O3) were prepared from Tb(NO3)3·5H2O and had their crystal and mol-ecular structures solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis after data collection at 100 K. Both products were isolated in reasonable yields from the same reaction mixture by using different crystallization conditions. The higher-symmetry complex dinitratobis[1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane]-terbium(III) nitrate di-meth-oxy-ethane hemisolvate, [Tb(NO3)2(H3L(Et))2]NO3·0.5C4H10O2, 1, in which the lanthanide ion is 10-coordinate and adopts an s-bicapped square-anti-prismatic coordination geometry, contains two bidentate nitrate ions bound to the metal atom; another nitrate ion functions as a counter-ion and a half-mol-ecule of di-meth-oxy-ethane (completed by a crystallographic twofold rotation axis) is also present. In product aqua-nitratobis[1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane]-terbium(III) dinitrate, [Tb(NO3)(H3L(Et))2(H2O)](NO3)2, 2, one bidentate nitrate ion and one water mol-ecule are bound to the nine-coordinate terbium(III) centre, while two free nitrate ions contribute to charge balance outside the tricapped trigonal-prismatic coordination polyhedron. No free water mol-ecule was found in either of the crystal structures and, only in the case of 1, di-meth-oxy-ethane acts as a crystallizing solvent. In both mol-ecular structures, the two tripodal ligands are bent to one side of the coordination sphere, leaving room for the anionic and water ligands. In complex 2, the methyl group of one of the H3L(Et) ligands is disordered over two alternative orientations. Strong hydrogen bonds, both intra- and inter-molecular, are found in the crystal structures due to the number of different donor and acceptor groups present.

  9. Solubility of methane in water under natural conditions: a laboratory study. Final report, April 1, 1978-June 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, C.W.; Price, L.C.

    1982-06-01

    The solubility of methane in aqueous solutions has been determined over a broad range of temperature, pressure and salinities. The effect of dissolved carbon dioxide and ethane on methane solubility has been determined at 302{sup 0}F. Also the solubility of crude oil and water in methane has been determined over a broad range of temperatures and pressures. The solubility of methane is raised by increasing pressure and temperature (above about 170{sup 0}F). There is a solubility minimum near 170{sup 0}F at constant pressure and salinity. Ionic salts effectively salt methane out of solution at all concentrations investigated. The effect of the addition of small amounts of carbon dioxide or ethane to the gas dissolved in aqueous solutions is to enhance methane solubility compared to solutions without other gases. Higher concentrations of dissolved gases, depending upon the salinity and the gas involved, decrease aqueous methane solubility. The addition of carbon dioxide always increased total gas content even when reducing the concentration of methane. With increasing concentration of ethane in the dissolved gases the total gas content reaches a maximum and then both methane and total gas content decrease. Comparison of experimental methane solubilities with gas/water ratios, salinities, bottom hole temperatures and pressures of geopressure test wells suggests that some formation fluids may be near saturation, while many others seem to be undersaturated. Petroleum is soluble in methane. Increasing pressure increases the solubility of crude oil in methane gas. At an elevated pressure, which depends upon the temperature, oil and gas form a single fluid phase.

  10. Breaking methane

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2015-01-01

    The most powerful oxidant found in nature is compound Q, an enzymatic intermediate that oxidizes methane. New spectroscopic data have resolved the long-running controversy about Q’s chemical structure. PMID:25607367

  11. Harnessing methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The total methane resource in hydrates—ice-like substances found in deep ocean sediments and Arctic permafrost—exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuel resources,such as coal, oil, and conventional gas, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).The Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act, signed into law by U.S. President Bill Clinton on May 3, establishes a new federal commitment to developing methane hydrates, which has been touted as a potentially clean energy source that could make the U.S. less dependent on foreign sources of energy. The bill authorizes $47.5 million over five years for the Department of Energy to establish a federal methane hydrate research and development program.

  12. Priori calculations of pK/sub a/'s for organic compounds in water. The pK/sub a/ of ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, W.L.; Briggs, J.M.; Gao, J.

    1987-10-28

    The enduring fascination of organic chemists with acidities and basicities reflects the fundamental importance of these concepts in understanding organic reactivity. Developing scales of aqueous acidities for weak organic acids is challenging in view of the need for extrapolations from organic solvents to water, ion-pairing and aggregation effects for organometallic compounds, and the derivation of thermodynamic quantities from kinetic measurements. The problems are reflected in the experimental ranges for the pK/sub a/'s of the simplest alkanes, methane and ethane, which cover from 40 to 60. In the present communication, they demonstrate how simulation methodology can be used to obtain a priori predictions for the relative pK/sub a/'s of organic compounds in water. The first applications are for the pK/sub a/'s of acetonitrile and ethane relative to methanethiol.

  13. A Detailed Modeling Study of Propane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Jayaweera, T M; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J

    2004-03-19

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been used to simulate ignition delay times recorded by a number of experimental shock tube studies over the temperature range 900 {le} T {le} 1800 K, in the pressure range 0.75-40 atm and in the equivalence ratio range 0.5 {le} {phi} {le} 2.0. Flame speed measurements at 1 atm in the equivalence ratio range 0.4 {le} {phi} {le} 1.8 have also been simulated. Both of these data sets, particularly those recorded at high pressure, are of particular importance in validating a kinetic mechanism, as internal combustion engines operate at elevated pressures and temperatures and rates of fuel oxidation are critical to efficient system operation. Experiments in which reactant, intermediate and product species were quantitatively recorded, versus temperature in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) and versus time in a flow reactor are also simulated. This data provide a stringent test of the kinetic mechanism as it must reproduce accurate quantitative profiles for all reactant, intermediate and product species. The JSR experiments were performed in the temperature range 1000-1110 K, in the equivalence ratio range 0.5 {le} {phi} {le} 4.0, at a pressure of 5 atm. These experiments are complemented by those carried out in a flow reactor in the temperature range 660-820 K, at 10 atm and at an equivalence ratio of 0.4. In addition, burner stabilized flames were simulated, where chemical species profiles were measured at atmospheric pressure for two propane-air flat flames. Overall, reasonably good agreement is observed between the model simulations and the experimental results.

  14. New Formulation for the Viscosity of Propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eckhard; Herrmann, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    A new viscosity formulation for propane, using the reference equation of state for its thermodynamic properties by Lemmon et al. [J. Chem. Eng. Data 54, 3141 (2009)] and valid in the fluid region from the triple-point temperature to 650 K and pressures up to 100 MPa, is presented. At the beginning, a zero-density contribution and one for the critical enhancement, each based on the experimental data, were independently generated in parts. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = Tc/T and of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρc (Tc—critical temperature, ρc—critical density). The final formulation includes 17 coefficients inferred by applying a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the primary data sets are detailed due to its importance. The viscosity at low pressures p ≤ 0.2 MPa is represented with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 273 ≤ T/K ≤ 625. The expanded uncertainty in the vapor phase at subcritical temperatures T ≥ 273 K as well as in the supercritical thermodynamic region T ≤ 423 K at pressures p ≤ 30 MPa is assumed to be 1.5%. In the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2), the expanded uncertainty increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0%. It is further increased to 4.0% in regions of less reliable primary data sets and to 6.0% in ranges in which no primary data are available but the equation of state is valid. Tables of viscosity computed for the new formulation are given in an Appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor-liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region.

  15. Methane in Crystalline Bedrock: the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kietäväinen, R.; Ahonen, L.; Niinikoski, P.; Itävaara, M.; Kukkonen, I. T.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon is a key element for life. One of the most interesting forms of carbon is methane, as it is both consumed and produced by microorganisms. Methane has also several possible ways of abiotic origin, some of which could provide understanding of the origin of life itself. The study of methane is thus important in order to understand deep subsurface ecosystems such as those found in the 2516 m deep Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole within the Precambrian Fennoscandian Shield in eastern Finland. There rock types differ from graphite-bearing mica schist and black schist to serpentinite and pegmatitic granodiorite and saline, gas-rich water, with up to 32 mmol l-1 of methane, and residence times of tens of millions of years occupies the fracture zones which host diverse microbial life, including methanogenic archaea. In order to understand methane systematics in crystalline bedrock, we analysed several forms of carbon, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), methane and ethane from the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole for their isotopic composition. In addition, isotopic compositions of water and hydrogen were determined. The results show that hydrogen is in isotopic equilibrium in the system H2O-H2-CH4 at ambient temperatures, which could either indicate equilibration due to long residence time or relatively recent production of methane in situ. Therefore hydrogen is not a very useful indicator for the origin of methane in this case. Carbon isotope analysis shows that both methane and DIC becomes generally more enriched in 13C with depth, which could indicate higher amounts of microbial methane in the upper part of the bedrock. Based on carbon isotope composition, two types of ethane can be discerned. Taken all the evidence together, this leads us to suggest that at least two mechanisms are responsible for the methane production in Outokumpu: 1) Biotic which comprise most of methane and 2) abiotic which dominates in the deeper parts of the bedrock. The former type may include

  16. Use of stable isotopes to identify sources of methane in Appalachian Basin shallow groundwaters: a review.

    PubMed

    Hakala, J Alexandra

    2014-09-20

    Development of unconventional shale gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin has raised questions regarding the potential for these activities to affect shallow groundwater resources. Geochemical indicators, such as stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes of methane, stable carbon isotopes of ethane, and hydrocarbon ratios, have been used to evaluate methane sources however their utility is complicated by influences from multiple physical (e.g., mixing) and geochemical (e.g., redox) processes. Baseline sampling of shallow aquifers prior to development, and measurement of additional geochemical indicators within samples from across the Appalachian Basin, may aid in identifying natural causes for dissolved methane in shallow groundwater versus development-induced pathways.

  17. 40 CFR 721.10474 - Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10474 Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic). (a... generically as substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (PMN P-04-107) is subject to reporting under...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10474 - Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10474 Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic). (a... generically as substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (PMN P-04-107) is subject to reporting under...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10086 - Ethane, 2-(difluoromethoxy)-1,1,1-trifluoro-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethane, 2-(difluoromethoxy)-1,1,1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10086 Ethane, 2-(difluoromethoxy)-1,1,1-trifluoro-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethane,...

  20. 40 CFR 721.3248 - Ethane, 1,2,2- trichlorodifluoro-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethane, 1,2,2- trichlorodifluoro-. 721... Substances § 721.3248 Ethane, 1,2,2- trichlorodifluoro-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethane, 1,2,2-trichlorodifluoro- (CAS...

  1. 40 CFR 721.3248 - Ethane, 1,2,2- trichlorodifluoro-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethane, 1,2,2- trichlorodifluoro-. 721... Substances § 721.3248 Ethane, 1,2,2- trichlorodifluoro-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethane, 1,2,2-trichlorodifluoro- (CAS...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10086 - Ethane, 2-(difluoromethoxy)-1,1,1-trifluoro-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethane, 2-(difluoromethoxy)-1,1,1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10086 Ethane, 2-(difluoromethoxy)-1,1,1-trifluoro-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as ethane,...

  3. The TNT equivalence of an optimum propane oxygen mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    Measurements of the times of arrival of the primary shock produced by the explosion of a nominal 20 tn propane-oxygen mixture have been analysed to provide the variation of the peak hydrostatic overpressure as a function of distance. The results have been scaled to those for a charge of unit mass at normal temperature and pressure, based on the masses of the propane and oxygen and of the propane alone. The scaled results are compared with those produced by the explosion of a hemispherical unit mass of TNT to provide the TNT equivalence factor as a function of overpressure and distance. For overpressures greater than 1 atm there is a strong dependence on the distance from the centre of the explosion, but at lower overpressures the equivalence factors have almost constant values of 0.55 for the propane-oxygen mixture and 1.95 for the propane alone. The significance of these findings, in relationship to vapour cloud explosions and boiling liquid expanding vapour explosions, is discussed.

  4. Theoretical CI study of the vertical electronic spectrum of ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Chantranupong, L.; Hirsch, G.; Buenker, R.J.; Dillon, M.A.

    1994-06-01

    Ab initio multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRD-CI) calculations are reported for the ground and 32 excited electronic states of ethane, as well as its two lowest ionic states, {sup 2}E{sub g} and {sup 2}A{sub 1g}. The transition energy results indicate that the 3a{sub 1g} molecular orbital is 0.3--0.6 eV more stable than the 1e{sub g} LUMO for the ethane D{sub 3d} equilibrium conformation. The strongest transition is computed to occur for the 3a{sub 1g} {yields} 3p{sigma} {sup 1}A{sub 2u}--{sup 1}A{sub 1g} excitation at 9.933 eV, with an optical f value of 0.1152. The n = 4 Rydberg transitions are also calculated and are found to occur with roughly 40% of their n = 3 counterparts. The observed broadness of the ethane UV spectrum is believed to be caused primarily by the high density of Rydberg upper states, as well as significant relaxation effects which occur upon excitation from the ethane electronic ground state.

  5. High ethylene to ethane processes for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Chafin, Richard B.; Warren, Barbara K.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidative coupling of lower alkane to higher hydrocarbon is conducted using catalyst comprising barium and/or strontium component and a metal oxide combustion promoter in the presence of vapor phase halogen component. High ethylene to ethane mole ratios in the product can be obtained over extended operating periods.

  6. Determination of Ethane-1,2-diamine in Inert Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searle, Graeme H.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a procedure for determining ethane-1,2-diamine (EN) which is generally applicable for inert or labile complexes or for EN in its salts, although it cannot be used directly with ammonium or coordinated ammonia. It gives results with five percent accuracy or better and requires less than one hour laboratory time. (JN)

  7. High ethylene to ethane processes for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Chafin, R.B.; Warren, B.K.

    1991-12-17

    Oxidative coupling of lower alkane to higher hydrocarbon is conducted using a catalyst comprising barium and/or strontium component and a metal oxide combustion promoter in the presence of vapor phase halogen component. High ethylene to ethane mole ratios in the product can be obtained over extended operating periods.

  8. Non Methane Hydrocarbons (NMHCs) at the centre of Athens: variability and relative contribution of traffic and wood burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panopoulou, Anastasia; Liakakou, Eleni; Psiloglou, Basil; Gros, Valerie; Bonsang, Bernard; Sauvage, Stephane; Locoge, Nadine; Lianou, Maria; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) can be found in significant concentrations in urban areas. They are emitted by biogenic and anthropogenic sources like vehicle exhaust, gasoline evaporation and solvent use. Once emitted they mainly react with hydroxyl radicals (OH) and in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx) lead to the formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone (O3), peroxy acetyl nitrate (PAN) and secondary organic aerosols. In Great Athens Area (GAA) despite the numerous air quality issues especially with exceedances in ozone and particulate matter (PM), continuous monitoring of NMHCs is absent. This work presents the first results of a ChArMEX/TRANSEMED project dealing with VOC source apportionment and emission inventory evaluation in megacities around the Mediterranean basin. A representative site in the centre of Athens is progressively equipped with high performance instruments in order to measure continuously NMHCs (time resolution of 30 min) over a long period. The main objective of this presentation is the determination of the ambient level and temporal variability of C2-C6 NMHCs, as well as the impact of the sources controlling their variability. The importance of this work is attributed to the high time resolution measurements providing a detailed light hydrocarbons profile of the area for first time in the GAA. An automatic gas chromatograph (airmoVOC C2-C6 Chromatrap GC, Chromatotec, France) equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID) has been used for the in-situ measurements of NMHCS with two to six carbon atoms (C2-C6 NMHCs) during the period from the 16 of October to end of December 2015. In addition, meteorological and auxiliary data for major gases (CO, O3, NOx) and particulates (PM and Black Carbon (BC) are also available. Atmospheric concentrations of NMHCs range from below the detection limit to a few ppbs, for example almost 14 ppb, 20 ppb and 25 ppb for ethane, propane and acetylene respectively. Between the NMHCs being monitored

  9. An Atmosphere-based Method for Detection and Quantification of Methane Emisions from Natural Gas Infrastructure in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKain, K.; Down, A.; Raciti, S. M.; Budney, J.; Hutyra, L.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Herndon, S. C.; Nehrkorn, T.; Zahniser, M. S.; Sargent, M. R.; Jackson, R. B.; Phillips, N. G.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Methane emissions from the natural gas supply-chain are highly uncertain and can vary widely among components and processes. We present an atmosphere-based method for detecting and quantifying the area and time-averaged surface flux of methane from natural gas infrastructure, and its application to the case-study of Boston, Massachusetts. Continuous measurements of atmospheric methane at a network of stations, inside and outside the city, are used to quantify the atmospheric methane gradient due to emissions from the urban area. Simultaneous observations of atmospheric ethane, and data on the ethane and methane content of the pipeline gas flowing through the region, are used to trace the atmospheric methane enhancement to the natural gas source. An atmospheric transport model is used to quantitatively relate the observed methane enhancement to a surface flux from the whole urban region. We find that methane emissions from natural gas in the urban region over one year was equal to 2.7 ± 0.6 % of the natural gas delivered to the region. Our findings for Boston suggest natural-gas-consuming regions, generally, may be larger sources of methane to the atmosphere than is current estimated and represent areas of significant resource loss.

  10. An engineered pathway for the biosynthesis of renewable propane.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Thiel, Kati; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-09-02

    The deployment of next-generation renewable biofuels can be enhanced by improving their compatibility with the current infrastructure for transportation, storage and utilization. Propane, the bulk component of liquid petroleum gas, is an appealing target as it already has a global market. In addition, it is a gas under standard conditions, but can easily be liquefied. This allows the fuel to immediately separate from the biocatalytic process after synthesis, yet does not preclude energy-dense storage as a liquid. Here we report, for the first time, a synthetic metabolic pathway for producing renewable propane. The pathway is based on a thioesterase specific for butyryl-acyl carrier protein (ACP), which allows native fatty acid biosynthesis of the Escherichia coli host to be redirected towards a synthetic alkane pathway. Propane biosynthesis is markedly stimulated by the introduction of an electron-donating module, optimizing the balance of O2 supply and removal of native aldehyde reductases.

  11. An engineered pathway for the biosynthesis of renewable propane

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Thiel, Kati; Akhtar, M. Kalim; Jones, Patrik R.

    2014-01-01

    The deployment of next-generation renewable biofuels can be enhanced by improving their compatibility with the current infrastructure for transportation, storage and utilization. Propane, the bulk component of liquid petroleum gas, is an appealing target as it already has a global market. In addition, it is a gas under standard conditions, but can easily be liquefied. This allows the fuel to immediately separate from the biocatalytic process after synthesis, yet does not preclude energy-dense storage as a liquid. Here we report, for the first time, a synthetic metabolic pathway for producing renewable propane. The pathway is based on a thioesterase specific for butyryl-acyl carrier protein (ACP), which allows native fatty acid biosynthesis of the Escherichia coli host to be redirected towards a synthetic alkane pathway. Propane biosynthesis is markedly stimulated by the introduction of an electron-donating module, optimizing the balance of O2 supply and removal of native aldehyde reductases. PMID:25181600

  12. Sampling, storage, and analysis of C2-C7 non-methane hydrocarbons from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Cooperative Air Sampling Network glass flasks.

    PubMed

    Pollmann, Jan; Helmig, Detlev; Hueber, Jacques; Plass-Dülmer, Christian; Tans, Pieter

    2008-04-25

    An analytical technique was developed to analyze light non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), including ethane, propane, iso-butane, n-butane, iso-pentane, n-pentane, n-hexane, isoprene, benzene and toluene from whole air samples collected in 2.5l-glass flasks used by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division (NOAA ESRL GMD, Boulder, CO, USA) Cooperative Air Sampling Network. This method relies on utilizing the remaining air in these flasks (which is at below-ambient pressure at this stage) after the completion of all routine greenhouse gas measurements from these samples. NMHC in sample aliquots extracted from the flasks were preconcentrated with a custom-made, cryogen-free inlet system and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection (FID). C2-C7 NMHC, depending on their ambient air mixing ratios, could be measured with accuracy and repeatability errors of generally < or =10-20%. Larger deviations were found for ethene and propene. Hexane was systematically overestimated due to a chromatographic co-elution problem. Saturated NMHC showed less than 5% changes in their mixing ratios in glass flask samples that were stored for up to 1 year. In the same experiment ethene and propene increased at approximately 30% yr(-1). A series of blank experiments showed negligible contamination from the sampling process and from storage (<10 pptv yr(-1)) of samples in these glass flasks. Results from flask NMHC analyses were compared to in-situ NMHC measurements at the Global Atmospheric Watch station in Hohenpeissenberg, Germany. This 9-months side-by-side comparison showed good agreement between both methods. More than 94% of all data comparisons for C2-C5 alkanes, isoprene, benzene and toluene fell within the combined accuracy and precision objectives of the World Meteorological Organization Global Atmosphere Watch (WMO-GAW) for NMHC measurements.

  13. Oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over Mg-Mo-O catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Cadus, L.E.; Abello, M.C.; Gomez, M.F.; Rivarola, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    Mg-Mo-O catalysts have been investigated with different techniques (XRD, XPS, IR, and EPR spectroscopies) in order to explain the difference in catalytic behavior in the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane to propene. The active site would be a coordinatively unsaturated form of Mo{sup 5+}. The active Mo{sup 5+} could be generated on the surface by propane reduction. The slight excess of MoO{sub 3} which is necessary for the catalyst to become an active one probably contributes to the formation of Mo{sup 5+}.

  14. Diacetonitrile[N,N′-bis(2,6-diisopropyl­phenyl)ethane-1,2-diimine]dichloridochromium(II) acetonitrile solvate

    PubMed Central

    Peitz, Stephan; Peulecke, Normen; Müller, Bernd H.; Spannenberg, Anke; Rosenthal, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, [CrCl2(CH3CN)2(C26H36N2)]·CH3CN, was synthesized by the reaction of CrCl2(THF)2 with N,N′-bis­(2,6-diisopropyl­phen­yl)ethane-1,2-diimine in dichloro­methane/acetonitrile. The chromium center is coordinated by two N atoms of the chelating diimine ligand, two chloride ions in a trans configuration with respect to each other, and by two N atoms of two acetonitrile mol­ecules in a distorted octa­hedral geometry. PMID:21578093

  15. Laboratory measurements of cross sections of propane in the 7 - 15 μm using FT-IR at cold temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, K.; Toon, G. C.; Brown, L. R.; Mantz, A. W.; Smith, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Propane (C3H8) is one of the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) in the natural environment of the Earth. In addition to biogenic and anthropogenic emissions, the natural degassing from geological processes is also reported to be a significant source (Etiope and Ciccioli, Science, 323, 478, 1999). At Titan, propane is an important component of the photochemistry and may provide insights into pre-biotic chemistry. To support atmospheric remote sensing of propane, absorption cross sections of N2-broadened C3H8 were obtained at temperatures between 145 and 296 K at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. For this, 17 spectra of pure- and N2-broadened propane were recorded in the 690 to 1550 cm-1 region using a Fourier transform spectrometer (Bruker IFS-125HR) configured with a 20.38 cm long temperature-stabilized cryogenic absorption cell, developed at Connecticut College (Mantz, et al., Mol.Spectrosc. Symposium at OSU, 2010; Sung et al. JMS, 262, 122, 2010). We report the absorption cross sections at the various cold temperatures for several strong propane bands in the region. In addition, we present empirical positions, intensities, and lower state energies' determined by fitting "pseudo-lines" to the high-resolution laboratory spectra, (see http://mark4sun.jpl.nasa.gov/data/ spec/Pseudo/Readme). The resulting compilation will be compared to earlier work, including the C3H8+N2 spectra recorded at PNNL (Sharpe, et al. Appl Spectrosc 58, 1452, 2004) and available line-by-line predictions (Flaud et al., J Chem Phys 114, 9361, 2001; Flaud et al. Mol Phys 108, 699, 2010). [ Research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Connecticut College, and NASA Langley Research Center, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. Reconciling divergent estimates of oil and gas methane emissions

    PubMed Central

    Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Lyon, David R.; Alvarez, Ramón A.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Harriss, Robert; Herndon, Scott C.; Karion, Anna; Kort, Eric Adam; Lamb, Brian K.; Lan, Xin; Marchese, Anthony J.; Pacala, Stephen W.; Robinson, Allen L.; Shepson, Paul B.; Sweeney, Colm; Talbot, Robert; Townsend-Small, Amy; Yacovitch, Tara I.; Zimmerle, Daniel J.; Hamburg, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Published estimates of methane emissions from atmospheric data (top-down approaches) exceed those from source-based inventories (bottom-up approaches), leading to conflicting claims about the climate implications of fuel switching from coal or petroleum to natural gas. Based on data from a coordinated campaign in the Barnett Shale oil and gas-producing region of Texas, we find that top-down and bottom-up estimates of both total and fossil methane emissions agree within statistical confidence intervals (relative differences are 10% for fossil methane and 0.1% for total methane). We reduced uncertainty in top-down estimates by using repeated mass balance measurements, as well as ethane as a fingerprint for source attribution. Similarly, our bottom-up estimate incorporates a more complete count of facilities than past inventories, which omitted a significant number of major sources, and more effectively accounts for the influence of large emission sources using a statistical estimator that integrates observations from multiple ground-based measurement datasets. Two percent of oil and gas facilities in the Barnett accounts for half of methane emissions at any given time, and high-emitting facilities appear to be spatiotemporally variable. Measured oil and gas methane emissions are 90% larger than estimates based on the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Greenhouse Gas Inventory and correspond to 1.5% of natural gas production. This rate of methane loss increases the 20-y climate impacts of natural gas consumed in the region by roughly 50%. PMID:26644584

  17. Reconciling divergent estimates of oil and gas methane emissions.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Lyon, David R; Alvarez, Ramón A; Davis, Kenneth J; Harriss, Robert; Herndon, Scott C; Karion, Anna; Kort, Eric Adam; Lamb, Brian K; Lan, Xin; Marchese, Anthony J; Pacala, Stephen W; Robinson, Allen L; Shepson, Paul B; Sweeney, Colm; Talbot, Robert; Townsend-Small, Amy; Yacovitch, Tara I; Zimmerle, Daniel J; Hamburg, Steven P

    2015-12-22

    Published estimates of methane emissions from atmospheric data (top-down approaches) exceed those from source-based inventories (bottom-up approaches), leading to conflicting claims about the climate implications of fuel switching from coal or petroleum to natural gas. Based on data from a coordinated campaign in the Barnett Shale oil and gas-producing region of Texas, we find that top-down and bottom-up estimates of both total and fossil methane emissions agree within statistical confidence intervals (relative differences are 10% for fossil methane and 0.1% for total methane). We reduced uncertainty in top-down estimates by using repeated mass balance measurements, as well as ethane as a fingerprint for source attribution. Similarly, our bottom-up estimate incorporates a more complete count of facilities than past inventories, which omitted a significant number of major sources, and more effectively accounts for the influence of large emission sources using a statistical estimator that integrates observations from multiple ground-based measurement datasets. Two percent of oil and gas facilities in the Barnett accounts for half of methane emissions at any given time, and high-emitting facilities appear to be spatiotemporally variable. Measured oil and gas methane emissions are 90% larger than estimates based on the US Environmental Protection Agency's Greenhouse Gas Inventory and correspond to 1.5% of natural gas production. This rate of methane loss increases the 20-y climate impacts of natural gas consumed in the region by roughly 50%.

  18. 78 FR 62323 - MarkWest Liberty Ethane Pipeline L.L.C.; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission MarkWest Liberty Ethane Pipeline L.L.C.; Notice of Petition for Declaratory... Practices and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.207(a)(2)(2013), MarkWest Liberty Ethane Pipeline L.L.C. (MarkWest... new ethane pipeline system that will transport ethane from the vicinity of Majorsville, West...

  19. Landfill Methane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Landfill methane (CH4) accounts for approximately 1.3% (0.6 Gt) of global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions relative to total emissions from all sectors of about 49 Gt CO2-eq yr-1. For countries with a history of controlled landfilling, landfills can be one of the larger national sources of ant...

  20. Three new olanzapine structures: the acetic acid monosolvate, and the propan-2-ol and propan-2-one hemisolvate monohydrates.

    PubMed

    Bojarska, Joanna; Maniukiewicz, Waldemar; Sieroń, Lesław

    2013-07-01

    The crystal structures of three new solvates of olanzapine [systematic name: 2-methyl-4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-10H-thieno[2,3-b][1,5]benzodiazepine], namely olanzapine acetic acid monosolvate, C17H20N4S·C2H4O2, (I), olanzapine propan-2-ol hemisolvate monohydrate, C17H20N4S·0.5C3H8O·H2O, (II), and olanzapine propan-2-one hemisolvate monohydrate, C17H20N4S·0.5C3H6O·H2O, (III), are presented and compared with other known olanzapine forms. There is a fairly close resemblance of the molecular conformation for all studied analogues. The crystal structures are built up through olanzapine dimers, which are characterized via C-H...π interactions between the aliphatic fragment (1-methylpiperazin-4-yl) and the aromatic fragment (benzene system). All solvent (guest) molecules participate in hydrogen-bonding networks. The crystal packing is sustained via intermolecular N(host)-H···O(guest), O(guest)-H···N(host), O(guest)-H···O(guest) and C(host)-H···O(guest) hydrogen bonds. It should be noted that the solvent propan-2-ol in (II) and propan-2-one in (III) show orientational disorder. The propan-2-ol molecule lies close to a twofold axis, while the propan-2-one molecule resides strictly on a twofold axis through the carbonyl C atom. In both cases, the water molecules present positional disorder of the H atoms.

  1. Bis[N,N′-bis­(2,6-diisopropyl­phen­yl)ethane-1,2-diimine]-1κ2 N,N′;2κ2 N,N′-tri-μ-trichlorido-1:2κ6 Cl:Cl-chlorido-1κCl-tetra­hydro­furan-2κO-dichromium(II) dichloro­methane 4.5-solvate

    PubMed Central

    Peitz, Stephan; Peulecke, Normen; Müller, Bernd H.; Spannenberg, Anke; Rosenthal, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    In the mol­ecular structure of the title compound, [Cr2Cl4(C26H36N2)2(C4H8O)]·4.5CH2Cl2, the two CrII centers are bridged by three Cl atoms, forming a dinuclear complex. Each CrII center is coordinated by one chelating bis­(2,6-diisopropyl­phen­yl)ethane-1,2-diimine ligand via both N atoms. An additional chloride ion binds to one chromium center, whereas an additional tetra­hydro­furan mol­ecule coordinates to the second CrII center. The coordination geometry at each CrII center can be best described as distorted octa­hedral. PMID:21578607

  2. Complex Hydrocarbon Chemistry in Interstellar and Solar System Ices Revealed: A Combined Infrared Spectroscopy and Reflectron Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Ethane (C2H6) and D6-Ethane (C2D6) Ices Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abplanalp, Matthew J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-08-01

    The irradiation of pure ethane (C2H6/C2D6) ices at 5.5 K, under ultrahigh vacuum conditions was conducted to investigate the formation of complex hydrocarbons via interaction with energetic electrons simulating the secondary electrons produced in the track of galactic cosmic rays. The chemical modifications of the ices were monitored in situ using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and during temperature-programmed desorption via mass spectrometry exploiting a quadrupole mass spectrometer with electron impact ionization (EI-QMS) as well as a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled to a photoionization source (PI-ReTOF-MS). FTIR confirmed previous ethane studies by detecting six molecules: methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), ethylene (C2H4), the ethyl radical (C2H5), 1-butene (C4H8), and n-butane (C4H10). However, the TPD phase, along with EI-QMS, and most importantly, PI-ReTOF-MS, revealed the formation of at least 23 hydrocarbons, many for the first time in ethane ice, which can be arranged in four groups with an increasing carbon-to-hydrogen ratio: C n H2n+2 (n = 3, 4, 6, 8, 10), C n H2n (n = 3-10), {{{C}}}n{{{H}}}2n-2 (n = 3-10), and {{{C}}}n{{{H}}}2n-4 (n = 4-6). The processing of simple ethane ices is relevant to the hydrocarbon chemistry in the interstellar medium, as ethane has been shown to be a major product of methane, as well as in the outer solar system. These data reveal that the processing of ethane ices can synthesize several key hydrocarbons such as C3H4 and C4H6 isomers, which ha­ve been found to synthesize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like indene (C9H8) and naphtha­lene (C10H8) in the ISM and in hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons such as Titan.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10339 - Adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol, acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adipic acid, substituted propane... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10339 Adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol... substance identified generically as adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol, acrylate (PMN P-04-113)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10339 - Adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol, acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adipic acid, substituted propane... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10339 Adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol... substance identified generically as adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol, acrylate (PMN P-04-113)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10339 - Adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol, acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adipic acid, substituted propane... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10339 Adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol... substance identified generically as adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol, acrylate (PMN P-04-113)...

  6. Recent increase of ethane detected in the remote atmosphere of the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Bruno; Bader, Whitney; Bovy, Benoît; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Fischer, Emily V.; Strong, Kimberly; Conway, Stephanie; Hannigan, James W.; Nussbaumer, Eric; Bernath, Peter F.; Boone, Chris D.; Walker, Kaley A.

    2015-04-01

    Ethane (C2H6) has a large impact on tropospheric composition and air quality because of its involvement in the global VOC (volatile organic compound) - HOx - NOx chemistry responsible for generating and destroying tropospheric ozone. By acting as a major sink for tropospheric OH radicals, the abundance of C2H6 influences the atmospheric content of carbon monoxide and impacts the lifetime of methane. Moreover, it is an important source of PAN, a thermally unstable reservoir for NOx radicals. On a global scale, the main sources of C2H6 are leakage from the production, transport of natural gas loss, biofuel consumption and biomass burning, mainly located in the Northern Hemisphere. Due to its relatively long lifetime of approximately two months, C2H6 is a sensitive indicator of tropospheric pollution and transport. Using an optimized retrieval strategy (see Franco et al., 2014), we present here a 20-year long-term time series of C2H6 column abundance retrieved from ground-based Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) solar spectra recorded from 1994 onwards at the high-altitude station of Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps, 46.5° N, 3580 m a.s.l.), part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, see http://www.ndacc.org). After a regular 1994 - 2008 decrease of the C2H6 amounts, which is very consistent with prior major studies (e.g., Aydin et al., 2011; Simpson et al., 2012) and our understanding of global C2H6 emissions, trend analysis using a bootstrap resampling tool reveals a C2H6 upturn and a statistically-significant sharp burden increase from 2009 onwards (Franco et al., 2014). We hypothesize that this observed recent increase in C2H6 could affect the whole Northern Hemisphere and may be related to the recent massive growth in the exploitation of shale gas and tight oil reservoirs. This hypothesis is supported by measurements derived from solar occultation observations performed since 2004 by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment - Fourier

  7. Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks for kinetic separation of propane and propene

    DOEpatents

    Li, Jing; Li, Kunhao; Olson, David H.

    2014-08-05

    Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIFs) characterized by organic ligands consisting of imidazole ligands that are either essentially all 2-chloroimidazole ligands or essentially all 2-bromoimidazole ligands are disclosed. Methods for separating propane and propene with the ZIFs of the present invention, as well as other ZIFs, are also disclosed.

  8. Retrievals of ethane from ground-based high-resolution FTIR solar observations with updated line parameters: determination of the optimum strategy for the Jungfraujoch station.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, W.; Perrin, A.; Jacquemart, D.; Sudo, K.; Yashiro, H.; Gauss, M.; Demoulin, P.; Servais, C.; Mahieu, E.

    2012-04-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is the most abundant Non-Methane HydroCarbon (NMHC) in the Earth's atmosphere, with a lifetime of approximately 2 months. C2H6 has both anthropogenic and natural emission sources such as biomass burning, natural gas loss and biofuel consumption. Oxidation by the hydroxyl radical is by far the major C2H6 sink as the seasonally changing OH concentration controls the strong modulation of the ethane abundance throughout the year. Ethane lowers Cl atom concentrations in the lower stratosphere and is a major source of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and carbon monoxide (by reaction with OH). Involved in the formation of tropospheric ozone and in the destruction of atmospheric methane through changes in OH, C2H6 is a non-direct greenhouse gas with a net-global warming potential (100-yr horizon) of 5.5. The retrieval of ethane from ground-based infrared (IR) spectra is challenging. Indeed, the fitting of the ethane features is complicated by numerous interferences by strong water vapor, ozone and methane absorptions. Moreover, ethane has a complicated spectrum with many interacting vibrational modes and the current state of ethane parameters in HITRAN (e.g. : Rothman et al., 2009, see http://www.hitran.com) was rather unsatisfactory in the 3 μm region. In fact, PQ branches outside the 2973-3001 cm-1 range are not included in HITRAN, and most P and R structures are missing. New ethane absorption cross sections recorded at the Molecular Spectroscopy Facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (Harrison et al., 2010) are used in our retrievals. They were calibrated in intensity by using reference low-resolution spectra from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) IR database. Pseudoline parameters fitted to these ethane spectra have been combined with HITRAN 2004 line parameters (including all the 2006 updates) for all other species encompassed in the selected microwindows. Also, the improvement brought by the update of the line positions and intensities

  9. Thermal Vacuum Testing of Swift XRT Ethane Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobel, Mark; Ku, Jentung

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from a recent ethane heat pipe program. Three identical ethane heat pipes were tested individually, and then two selected heat pipes were tested collectively in their system configuration. Heat transport, thermal conductance, and non-condensable gas tests were performed on each heat pipe. To gain insight into the reflux operation as seen at spacecraft level ground testing, the test fixture was oriented in a vertical configuration. The system level test included a computer-controlled heater designed to emulate the heat load generated at the thermoelectric cooler interface. The system performance was successfully characterized for a wide range of environmental conditions while staying within the operating limits.

  10. Microfluidic Separation of Ethylene and Ethane Using Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Dan; Stephan, Douglas W; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2015-12-21

    Separation of gaseous olefins and paraffins is one of the most important separation processes in the industry. Development of new cost-effective technologies aims at reducing the high energy consumption during the separation process. Here, we took advantage of the reaction of frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) with ethylene to achieve reactive extraction of ethylene from ethylene-ethane mixtures. The extraction was studied using a microfluidic platform, which enabled a rapid, high-throughput assessment of reaction conditions to optimize gas separation efficiency. A separation factor of 7.3 was achieved for ethylene from a 1:1 volume ratio mixture of ethylene and ethane, which corresponded to an extracted ethylene purity of 88 %. The results obtained in the microfluidic studies were validated using infrared spectroscopy. This work paves the way for further development of the FLPs and optimization of reaction conditions, thereby maximizing the separation efficiency of olefins from their mixtures with paraffins.

  11. Extraction of Peace River bitumen using supercritical ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Jeffrey Lawrence

    2000-10-01

    As the supply of conventional crude oil continues to decline, petroleum companies are looking for alternative hydrocarbon sources. The vast reserves of heavy oil and bitumen located in northern Alberta are among the alternatives. The challenge facing engineers is to develop a process for recovering this oil which is economic, efficient and environmentally acceptable. Supercritical fluid extraction is one method being investigated which could potentially meet all of these criteria. In this study, Peace River bitumen was extracted using supercritical ethane. The bitumen was mixed with sand and packed into a semi-batch extractor. Ethane contacted the bitumen/sand mixture and the fraction of the bitumen soluble in the ethane was removed and subsequently collected in a two phase separator. The flow of ethane was such that the experiments were governed by equilibrium and not mass transfer. Experimental temperatures and pressures were varied in order to observe the effect of these parameters on the mass and composition of the extracted material. The extraction yields increased as the temperature decreased and pressure increased. Samples were collected at various time intervals to measure changes in the properties of the extracted bitumen over the duration of the process. As the extraction proceeded, the samples became heavier and more viscous. The bitumen feed was characterised and the experimental data was then modelled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state. The characterisation process involved the distillation of the bitumen into five fractions. The distillation curve and density of each fraction was measured and this data was used in conjunction with correlations to determine the critical properties of the bitumen. Interaction parameters in the equation of state were then optimised until the predicted composition of extracted bitumen matched the experimental results.

  12. Use of the HadGEM2 climate-chemistry model to investigate interannual variability in methane sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, Garry; O'Connor, Fiona; Clark, Douglas; Huntingford, Chris; Gedney, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    The global mean atmospheric concentration of methane (CH4) has more than doubled during the industrial era [1] and now constitutes ? 20% of the anthropogenic climate forcing by greenhouse gases [2]. The globally-averaged CH4 growth rate, derived from surface measurements, has fallen significantly from a high of 16 ppb yr-1 in the late 1970s/early 1980s and was close to zero between 1999 and 2006 [1]. This overall period of declining or low growth was however interspersed with years of positive growth-rate anomalies (e.g., in 1991-1992, 1998-1999 and 2002-2003). Since 2007, renewed growth has been evident [1, 3], with the largest increases observed over polar northern latitudes and the Southern Hemisphere in 2007 and in the tropics in 2008. The observed inter-annual variability in atmospheric methane concentrations and the associated changes in growth rates have variously been attributed to changes in different methane sources and sinks [1, 4]. In this paper, we report results from runs of the HadGEM2 climate-chemistry model [5] using year- and month-specific emission datasets. The HadGEM2 model includes the comprehensive atmospheric chemistry and aerosol package, the UK Chemistry Aerosol community model (UKCA, http://www.ukca.ac.uk/wiki/index.php). The Standard Tropospheric Chemistry scheme was selected for this work. This chemistry scheme simulates the Ox, HOx and NOx chemical cycles and the oxidation of CO, methane, ethane and propane. Year- and month-specific emission datasets were generated for the period from 1997 to 2009 for the emitted species in the chemistry scheme (CH4, CO, NOx, HCHO, C2H6, C3H8, CH3CHO, CH3CHOCH3). The approach adopted varied depending on the source sector: Anthropogenic: The emissions from anthropogenic sources were based on decadal-averaged emission inventories compiled by [6] for the Coupled Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project (C4MIP). These were then used to derive year-specific emission datasets by scaling the

  13. MODELING AROMATIC AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION IN PREMIXED METHANE AND ETHANE FLAMES. (R825412)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. Relative effects on stratospheric ozone of halogenated methanes and ethanes of social and industrial interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Donald A.; Hales, Charles H.; Filkin, David L.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, N. Dak; Connell, Peter S.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Isaksen, Ivar S. A.; Stordal, Frode

    1990-01-01

    Four atmospheric modeling groups have calculated relative effects of several halocarbons (chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's)-11, 12, 113, 114, and 115; hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC's) 22, 123, 124, 141b, and 142b; hydrofluorocarbons (HFC's) 125, 134a, 143a, and 152a, carbon tetrachloride; and methyl chloroform) on stratospheric ozone. Effects on stratospheric ozone were calculated for each compound and normalized relative to the effect of CFC-11. These models include the representations for homogeneous physical and chemical processes in the middle atmosphere but do no account for either heterogeneous chemistry or polar dynamics which are important in the spring time loss of ozone over Antarctica. Relative calculated effects using a range of models compare reasonably well. Within the limits of the uncertainties of these model results, compounds now under consideration as functional replacements for fully halogenated compounds have modeled stratospheric ozone reductions of 10 percent or less of that of CFC-11. Sensitivity analyses examined the sensitivity of relative calculated effects to levels of other trace gases, assumed transport in the models, and latitudinal and seasonal local dependencies. Relative effects on polar ozone are discussed in the context of evolving information on the special processes affecting ozone, especially during polar winter-springtime. Lastly, the time dependency of relative effects were calculated.

  15. Relative effects on global warming of halogenated methanes and ethanes of social and industrial interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Donald A.; Hales, Charles H.; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, N. Dak

    1990-01-01

    The relative potential global warming effects for several halocarbons (chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's)-11, 12, 113, 114, and 115; hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC's) 22, 123, 124, 141b, and 142b; and hydrofluorocarbons (HFC's) 125, 134a, 143a, and 152a; carbon tetrachloride; and methyl chloroform) were calculated by two atmospheric modeling groups. These calculations were based on atmospheric chemistry and radiative convective models to determine the chemical profiles and the radiative processes. The resulting relative greenhouse warming when normalized to the effect of CFC-11 agree reasonably well as long as we account for differences between modeled lifetimes. Differences among results are discussed. Sensitivity of relative warming values is determined with respect to trace gas levels assumed. Transient relative global warming effects are analyzed.

  16. Coalbed Methane Outreach Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Coalbed Methane Outreach Program, voluntary program seeking to reduce methane emissions from coal mining activities. CMOP promotes profitable recovery/use of coal mine methane (CMM), addressing barriers to using CMM instead of emitting it to atmosphere.

  17. METHANE: INDUSTRIAL SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter provides qualitative information on the magnitude of industrial sources of methane and, where possible, provides information to allow the reader to quantify methane emissions. One difficulty in quantifying methane emissions from industry is the inconsistent treatment ...

  18. Activation energy of methyl radical decay in methane hydrate.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Kei; Nango, Kouhei; Sugahara, Takeshi; Ohgaki, Kazunari; Tani, Atsushi

    2005-11-10

    The thermal stability of gamma-ray-induced methyl radicals in methane hydrate was studied using the ESR method at atmospheric pressure and 210-260 K. The methyl radical decay proceeded with the second-order reaction, and ethane molecules were generated from the dimerization process. The methyl radical decay proceeds by two different temperature-dependent processes, that is, the respective activation energies of these processes are 20.0 +/- 1.6 kJ/mol for the lower temperature region of 210-230 K and 54.8 +/- 5.7 kJ/mol for the higher temperature region of 235-260 K. The former agrees well with the enthalpy change of methane hydrate dissociation into ice and gaseous methane, while the latter agrees well with the enthalpy change into liquid water and gaseous methane. The present findings reveal that methane hydrates dissociate into liquid (supercooled) water and gaseous methane in the temperature range of 235-260 K.

  19. Processing of polyolefin blends in supercritical propane solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Suh Joon

    New polymer blending methods are developed and studied by processing polyolefins in supercritical propane in this research. Polypropylene and ethylene copolymers were dissolved in supercritical propane, and processed via various paths and reactions, i.e., RESS (rapid expansion of supercritical solution), ICSS (isobaric crystallization from supercritical solution), and thermoplastic vulcanizate (TPV) formation. Each process resulted in a unique morphology of polyolefin blends. The effect of polyolefin microstructure on the solution behavior in supercritical propane was investigated, and the relationship between the morphology of the polyolefin blends and processing paths in supercritical propane solutions was established. To understand the thermodynamic properties of polyolefins in bulk and solutions, the solubility parameter was estimated by measurement of the internal pressure from the experimental P-V-T data for polyolefins in the melt state. As the short chain branch content in the ethylene copolymers increased, the internal pressure decreased. The cloud-point pressures of binary polymer solutions in propane decreased as the extent of short chain branching increased in the ethylene copolymers. At the same degree of branching, the cloud-point pressure decreased slightly with increasing branch length. The cloud-point pressures of a ternary polymer solution in the pressure-temperature phase diagrams were higher than those of binary polymer solutions at the same composition (indicating poorer solubility). Microfibers and microparticles (10 ˜ 50 mum diameter) were precipitated from the RESS process while microcellular foams were obtained from the ICSS process. The phase domains of the ethylene-butene (EB) copolymer in the polypropylene from the RESS process were smaller for highly branched EB copolymer. The surface morphology of ethylene copolymers in the microcelluar foams was also changed by increasing the branch content from microparticles to a viscous layer. New

  20. Dynamics of Alkane Hydroxylation at the Non-Heme Diiron Center in Methane Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Guallar, Victor; Gherman, Benjamin F.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Friesner, Richard A.

    2002-03-12

    Semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations have been combined with quantum chemistry calculations to provide detailed modeling of the methane and ethane hydroxylation reactions catalyzed by the hydroxylase enzymes of the soluble methane monooxygenase system. The experimental distribution of enantiomeric alcohols in the reaction of ethanes made chiral by the use of hydrogen isotopes is quantitatively reproduced and explained. The reaction dynamics involve a mixture of concerted and bound radical trajectories, and we characterize each of these reactive channels in detail. Diffusion of the bound radical intermediate at the active site core determines the global rate constant. The results also provide a qualitative rationale for the lack of ring-opened products derived from certain radical clock substrate probes and for the relative rate constants and kinetic isotope effects exhibited by a variety of substrates.

  1. Dissociation of methane under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guoying; Oganov, Artem R; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Hui; Li, Peifang; Li, Yinwei; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Zou, Guangtian

    2010-10-14

    Methane is an extremely important energy source with a great abundance in nature and plays a significant role in planetary physics, being one of the major constituents of giant planets Uranus and Neptune. The stable crystal forms of methane under extreme conditions are of great fundamental interest. Using the ab initio evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction, we found three novel insulating molecular structures with P2(1)2(1)2(1), Pnma, and Cmcm space groups. Remarkably, under high pressure, methane becomes unstable and dissociates into ethane (C(2)H(6)) at 95 GPa, butane (C(4)H(10)) at 158 GPa, and further, carbon (diamond) and hydrogen above 287 GPa at zero temperature. We have computed the pressure-temperature phase diagram, which sheds light into the seemingly conflicting observations of the unusually low formation pressure of diamond at high temperature and the failure of experimental observation of dissociation at room temperature. Our results support the idea of diamond formation in the interiors of giant planets such as Neptune.

  2. Electric Field-Enhanced Catalytic Conversion of Methane: AN Experimental Study on the Effects of Corona Discharge on Methane Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafee, Abdulathim M. J.

    The oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) is currently being actively studied for the production of higher hydrocarbons from natural gas. The present study concentrates on the oxidative conversion of methane in a high-pressure (one atmosphere), nonthermal plasma formed by corona discharge. Here, methyl radicals are formed by the reaction of methane with negatively-charged oxygen species created in the corona discharge. The results of methane conversion in the presence of both AC and DC corona discharges revealed that ethane and ethylene product selectivity is affected by electrode polarity, frequency, and oxygen partial pressure in the feed. Higher C_2 yields were obtained with the AC corona. All of the AC corona discharges specified here were initiated at room temperature (i.e., no oven or other heat source used), with temperature increases from 300 to 500^circC due to the exothermic gas discharge and exothermic reaction. A reaction mechanism is presented to explain the observed phenomena. The results suggest that AC and/or DC gas discharge techniques should be further studied for improved economics of methane conversion. The oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane in DC corona discharges was investigated. The atomic oxygen radicals initiated by corona discharges are thought to be active for the OXD of ethane. The selectivity to ethylene is affected by the reaction temperature, the DC applied voltage, voltage polarity, and the C_2H _6/O_2 ratio. The results of this study suggest the corona discharge process to be very efficient and selective in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane. The effects of DC corona discharge were examined in the presence of a typical OCM catalyst, Sr/La _2O_3. Experimental investigations have correspondingly been conducted, in which all reactive gases passed through a catalyst bed situated within the corona-induced plasma zone. The methane conversion and C_2 yield increased (with O_2 partial pressure) during the corona-enhanced catalytic

  3. SmoXYB1C1Z of Mycobacterium sp. Strain NBB4: a Soluble Methane Monooxygenase (sMMO)-Like Enzyme, Active on C2 to C4 Alkanes and Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kiri E.; Ozsvar, Jazmin

    2014-01-01

    Monooxygenase (MO) enzymes initiate the aerobic oxidation of alkanes and alkenes in bacteria. A cluster of MO genes (smoXYB1C1Z) of thus-far-unknown function was found previously in the genomes of two Mycobacterium strains (NBB3 and NBB4) which grow on hydrocarbons. The predicted Smo enzymes have only moderate amino acid identity (30 to 60%) to their closest homologs, the soluble methane and butane MOs (sMMO and sBMO), and the smo gene cluster has a different organization from those of sMMO and sBMO. The smoXYB1C1Z genes of NBB4 were cloned into pMycoFos to make pSmo, which was transformed into Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2-155. Cells of mc2-155(pSmo) metabolized C2 to C4 alkanes, alkenes, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The activities of mc2-155(pSmo) cells were 0.94, 0.57, 0.12, and 0.04 nmol/min/mg of protein with ethene, ethane, propane, and butane as substrates, respectively. The mc2-155(pSmo) cells made epoxides from ethene, propene, and 1-butene, confirming that Smo was an oxygenase. Epoxides were not produced from larger alkenes (1-octene and styrene). Vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane were biodegraded by cells expressing Smo, with production of inorganic chloride. This study shows that Smo is a functional oxygenase which is active against small hydrocarbons. M. smegmatis mc2-155(pSmo) provides a new model for studying sMMO-like monooxygenases. PMID:25015887

  4. SmoXYB1C1Z of Mycobacterium sp. strain NBB4: a soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO)-like enzyme, active on C2 to C4 alkanes and alkenes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kiri E; Ozsvar, Jazmin; Coleman, Nicholas V

    2014-09-01

    Monooxygenase (MO) enzymes initiate the aerobic oxidation of alkanes and alkenes in bacteria. A cluster of MO genes (smoXYB1C1Z) of thus-far-unknown function was found previously in the genomes of two Mycobacterium strains (NBB3 and NBB4) which grow on hydrocarbons. The predicted Smo enzymes have only moderate amino acid identity (30 to 60%) to their closest homologs, the soluble methane and butane MOs (sMMO and sBMO), and the smo gene cluster has a different organization from those of sMMO and sBMO. The smoXYB1C1Z genes of NBB4 were cloned into pMycoFos to make pSmo, which was transformed into Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)-155. Cells of mc(2)-155(pSmo) metabolized C2 to C4 alkanes, alkenes, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The activities of mc(2)-155(pSmo) cells were 0.94, 0.57, 0.12, and 0.04 nmol/min/mg of protein with ethene, ethane, propane, and butane as substrates, respectively. The mc(2)-155(pSmo) cells made epoxides from ethene, propene, and 1-butene, confirming that Smo was an oxygenase. Epoxides were not produced from larger alkenes (1-octene and styrene). Vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane were biodegraded by cells expressing Smo, with production of inorganic chloride. This study shows that Smo is a functional oxygenase which is active against small hydrocarbons. M. smegmatis mc(2)-155(pSmo) provides a new model for studying sMMO-like monooxygenases.

  5. Development of a 100 nmol mol(-1) propane-in-air SRM for automobile-exhaust testing for new low-emission requirements.

    PubMed

    Rhoderick, George C

    2007-04-01

    New US federal low-level automobile emission requirements, for example zero-level-emission vehicle (ZLEV), for hydrocarbons and other species, have resulted in the need by manufacturers for new certified reference materials. The new emission requirement for hydrocarbons requires the use, by automobile manufacturing testing facilities, of a 100 nmol mol(-1) propane in air gas standard. Emission-measurement instruments are required, by federal law, to be calibrated with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable reference materials. Because a NIST standard reference material (SRM) containing 100 nmol mol(-1) propane was not available, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Automobile Industry/Government Emissions Research Consortium (AIGER) requested that NIST develop such an SRM. A cylinder lot of 30 gas mixtures containing 100 nmol mol(-1) propane in air was prepared in 6-L aluminium gas cylinders by a specialty gas company and delivered to the Gas Metrology Group at NIST. Another mixture, contained in a 30-L aluminium cylinder and included in the lot, was used as a lot standard (LS). Using gas chromatography with flame-ionization detection all 30 samples were compared to the LS to obtain the average of six peak-area ratios to the LS for each sample with standard deviations of <0.31%. The average sample-to-LS ratio determinations resulted in a range of 0.9828 to 0.9888, a spread of 0.0060, which corresponds to a relative standard deviation of 0.15% of the average for all 30 samples. NIST developed its first set of five propane in air primary gravimetric standards covering a concentration range 91 to 103 nmol mol(-1) with relative uncertainties of 0.15%. This new suite of propane gravimetric standards was used to analyze and assign a concentration value to the SRM LS. On the basis of these data each SRM sample was individually certified, furnishing the desired relative expanded uncertainty of +/-0.5%. Because automobile companies

  6. Gas Phase UTE MRI of Propane and Propene

    PubMed Central

    Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Romanov, Alexey S.; Salnikov, Oleg G.; Barskiy, Danila A.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Koptyug, Igor V.

    2016-01-01

    1H MRI of gases can potentially enable functional lung imaging to probe gas ventilation and other functions. In this work, 1H MR images of hyperpolarized and thermally polarized propane gas were obtained using UTE (ultrashort echo time) pulse sequence. A 2D image of thermally polarized propane gas with ~0.9×0.9 mm2 spatial resolution was obtained in less than 2 seconds, demonstrating that even non-hyperpolarized hydrocarbon gases can be successfully utilized for conventional proton MRI. The experiments were also performed with hyperpolarized propane gas and demonstrated acquisition of high-resolution multi-slice FLASH 2D images in ca. 510 s and non slice-selective 2D UTE MRI images in ca. 2 s. The UTE approach adopted in this study can be potentially used for medical lung imaging. Furthermore, the possibility to combine UTE with selective suppression of 1H signals from one of the two gases in a mixture is demonstrated in this MRI study. The latter can be useful for visualizing industrially important processes where several gases may be present, e.g., gas-solid catalytic reactions. PMID:27478870

  7. Differential microbial transformation of nitrosamines by an inducible propane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Homme, Carissa L; Sharp, Jonathan O

    2013-07-02

    The toxicity of N-nitrosamines, their presence in drinking and environmental water supplies, and poorly understood recalcitrance collectively necessitate a better understanding of their potential for bioattenuation. Here, we show that the bacterial strain Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 can biotransform N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine (NDPA), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), and possibly N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) in addition to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). Growth of cells on propane as the sole carbon source greatly enhanced degradation rates when contrasted with cells grown on complex organics. Propane-induced rates in order of fastest to slowest were NDMA > NDEA > NDPA > NPYR > NMOR at concentrations <2000 μg/L. Removal rates for linear functional groups scaled inversely with mass and cyclic nitrosamines were more recalcitrant than linear nitrosamines. Controls demonstrated significant NDEA and NDPA losses independent of biomass, suggesting abiotic processes may play a role in attenuation of these two compounds under experimental conditions tested here. In contrast to NDMA, a transition from first to zero order kinetics was not observed for the other nitrosamines included in this study over a concentration range of 20-2000 μg/L. A genetic knockout for the propane monooxygenase enzyme (PrMO) confirmed the role of this enzyme in the biotransformation of NDEA and NPYR. This study furthers our understanding of environmental nitrosamine attenuation by revealing an enzymatic mechanism for the biotransformation of multiple nitrosamines, their relative recalcitrance to transformation, and potential for abiotic loss.

  8. Crystal structures of two mononuclear complexes of terbium(III) nitrate with the tripodal alcohol 1,1,1-tris­(hy­droxy­meth­yl)propane

    PubMed Central

    Gregório, Thaiane; Giese, Siddhartha O. K.; Nunes, Giovana G.; Soares, Jaísa F.; Hughes, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Two new mononuclear cationic complexes in which the TbIII ion is bis-chelated by the tripodal alcohol 1,1,1-tris­(hy­droxy­meth­yl)propane (H3 L Et, C6H14O3) were prepared from Tb(NO3)3·5H2O and had their crystal and mol­ecular structures solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis after data collection at 100 K. Both products were isolated in reasonable yields from the same reaction mixture by using different crystallization conditions. The higher-symmetry complex dinitratobis[1,1,1-tris­(hy­droxy­meth­yl)propane]­terbium(III) nitrate di­meth­oxy­ethane hemisolvate, [Tb(NO3)2(H3 L Et)2]NO3·0.5C4H10O2, 1, in which the lanthanide ion is 10-coordinate and adopts an s-bicapped square-anti­prismatic coordination geometry, contains two bidentate nitrate ions bound to the metal atom; another nitrate ion functions as a counter-ion and a half-mol­ecule of di­meth­oxy­ethane (completed by a crystallographic twofold rotation axis) is also present. In product aqua­nitratobis[1,1,1-tris­(hy­droxy­meth­yl)propane]­terbium(III) dinitrate, [Tb(NO3)(H3 L Et)2(H2O)](NO3)2, 2, one bidentate nitrate ion and one water mol­ecule are bound to the nine-coordinate terbium(III) centre, while two free nitrate ions contribute to charge balance outside the tricapped trigonal-prismatic coordination polyhedron. No free water mol­ecule was found in either of the crystal structures and, only in the case of 1, di­meth­oxy­ethane acts as a crystallizing solvent. In both mol­ecular structures, the two tripodal ligands are bent to one side of the coordination sphere, leaving room for the anionic and water ligands. In complex 2, the methyl group of one of the H3 L Et ligands is disordered over two alternative orientations. Strong hydrogen bonds, both intra- and inter­molecular, are found in the crystal structures due to the number of different donor and acceptor groups present. PMID:28217359

  9. Dissociation heat transfer characteristics of methane hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, V.A.; Holder, G.D.

    1987-02-01

    Knowledge of the interfacial heat transfer phenomenon during the dissociation of gas hydrates is essential in modeling the hydrate dissociation process. Such knowledge has applications in natural gas processing, storage, or transportation; in the drilling and recovery of oil and gas in the presence of gas hydrates; in the desalination of sea water; and in the production of natural gas from hydrate reservoirs. The process of hydrate dissociation is a unique phenomenon in which gas and water are simultaneously produced at the dissociated hydrate surface and play an important role in the mechanism of heat transfer to hydrates. An earlier study of propane hydrate dissociation showed that hydrate dissociation is a heat-transfer-limited process and somewhat similar to the nucleate boiling of liquids. In the present study, heat transfer limitations for methane hydrate dissociation were studied for two reasons. First, a comparison of the results of this study with propane hydrate was desired. Second, the effect of hydrate structure and gas molecule type on the rate of heat transfer during hydrate dissociation was sought.

  10. Environmental analysis of higher brominated diphenyl ethers and decabromodiphenyl ethane.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, Amelie; Sellström, Ulla; McLachlan, Michael S

    2009-01-16

    Methods for environmental analysis of higher brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), in particular decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209), and the recently discovered environmental contaminant decabromodiphenyl ethane (deBDethane) are reviewed. The extensive literature on analysis of BDE209 has identified several critical issues, including contamination of the sample, degradation of the analyte during sample preparation and GC analysis, and the selection of appropriate detection methods and surrogate standards. The limited experience with the analysis of deBDethane suggests that there are many commonalities with BDE209. The experience garnered from the analysis of BDE209 over the last 15 years will greatly facilitate progress in the analysis of deBDethane.

  11. Experimental study on transmission of an overdriven detonation wave from propane/oxygen to propane/air

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Lai, W.H.; Chung, K.; Lu, F.K.

    2008-08-15

    Two sets of experiments were performed to achieve a strong overdriven state in a weaker mixture by propagating an overdriven detonation wave via a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) process. First, preliminary experiments with a propane/oxygen mixture were used to evaluate the attenuation of the overdriven detonation wave in the DDT process. Next, experiments were performed wherein a propane/oxygen mixture was separated from a propane/air mixture by a thin diaphragm to observe the transmission of an overdriven detonation wave. Based on the characteristic relations, a simple wave intersection model was used to calculate the state of the transmitted detonation wave. The results showed that a rarefaction effect must be included to ensure that there is no overestimate of the post-transmission wave properties when the incident detonation wave is overdriven. The strength of the incident overdriven detonation wave plays an important role in the wave transmission process. The experimental results showed that a transmitted overdriven detonation wave occurs instantaneously with a strong incident overdriven detonation wave. The near-CJ state of the incident wave leads to a transmitted shock wave, and then the transition to the overdriven detonation wave occurs downstream. The attenuation process for the overdriven detonation wave decaying to a near-CJ state occurs in all tests. After the attenuation process, an unstable detonation wave was observed in most tests. This may be attributed to the increase in the cell width in the attenuation process that exceeds the detonability cell width limit. (author)

  12. Oxidative Coupling of Methane over Li/MgO: Catalyst and Nanocatalyst Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsi, Ali; Moradi, Ali; Ghader, Sattar; Shadravan, Vahid

    2011-02-01

    The Li/MgO catalyst and nanocatalyst were prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation and sol-gel method, respectively. The catalytic performance of the Li/MgO catalyst and nanocatalyst on oxidative coupling of methane was compared. The catalysts prepared in two ways were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface and transmission electron microscope. The catalyst was tested at temperature of 973-1073 K with constant total pressure of 101 kPa. Experimental results showed that Li/MgO nanocatalyst in the oxidative coupling of methane would result in higher conversion of methane, higher selectivity, and higher yield of main products (ethane and ethylene) compared to ordinary catalyst. The results show the improved influence of nanoscale Li/MgO catalyst performance on oxidative coupling of methane.

  13. A quantification of methane emissions from the Bakken shale play region of North Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Karion, A.; Aikin, K. C.; Kort, E. A.; Newberger, T.; Smith, M. L.; Sweeney, C.; Trainer, M.; Wolter, S.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas extracted from shale formations accounts for 40% of the domestic U.S. natural gas supply. Although natural gas combustion emits less carbon dioxide per energy produced than other fossil fuels, this climate benefit may be offset by the methane emitted to the atmosphere through leaks in the natural gas production and distribution infrastructure. To better understand the climate impacts of the oil and natural gas extracted from the Bakken shale play in North Dakota, we present airborne measurements of methane taken over this region aboard a NOAA Twin Otter aircraft during Spring 2014. Using the mass balance technique, we estimate methane emissions from the region with four flights intended for this purpose in May 2014. We further attribute these methane emissions to the oil and gas industry using measurements of ethane and other hydrocarbons aboard the Twin Otter.

  14. Partial ionisation cross-sections of 2-propanol and ethanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacher, J. R.; Jorand, F.; Blin-Simiand, N.; Pasquiers, S.

    2006-04-01

    Electron impact ionisation of 2-propanol and ethanal is studied using mass spectrometry. Cross-sections of the formation of molecular ions and ionic fragments are measured between 14 and 86 eV. Free energy changes are evaluated using ab initio calculations. For 2-propanol, two ions, identified as CH 3CHOH + (45 amu) and CH3CHCH3+ (43 amu), contribute more than 75% to the total cross-section over the whole range of electron energies and are produced by simple bond cleavage in the molecular ion. Both processes occur spontaneously, leaving the molecular ion as a minority species. For ethanal, two ions, identified as HCO + (29 amu) and CH 3CO + (43 amu), and the molecular ion (44 amu) contribute more than 80% to the total cross-section. The ions of 29 and 43 amu result from a simple bond cleavage in the molecular ion. These sprocesses are not spontaneous and the contribution of the molecular ion becomes predominant at 15 eV and is therefore significant over the whole range of ionisation energies.

  15. The rotational barrier in ethane: a molecular orbital study.

    PubMed

    Quijano-Quiñones, Ramiro F; Quesadas-Rojas, Mariana; Cuevas, Gabriel; Mena-Rejón, Gonzalo J

    2012-04-20

    The energy change on each Occupied Molecular Orbital as a function of rotation about the C-C bond in ethane was studied using the B3LYP, mPWB95 functional and MP2 methods with different basis sets. Also, the effect of the ZPE on rotational barrier was analyzed. We have found that σ and π energies contribution stabilize a staggered conformation. The σ(s) molecular orbital stabilizes the staggered conformation while the stabilizes the eclipsed conformation and destabilize the staggered conformation. The π(z) and molecular orbitals stabilize both the eclipsed and staggered conformations, which are destabilized by the π(v) and molecular orbitals. The results show that the method of calculation has the effect of changing the behavior of the energy change in each Occupied Molecular Orbital energy as a function of the angle of rotation about the C-C bond in ethane. Finally, we found that if the molecular orbital energy contribution is deleted from the rotational energy, an inversion in conformational preference occurs.

  16. Identification of the flame retardant decabromodiphenyl ethane in the environment.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, Amelie; Björklund, Jonas; Fridén, Ulrika

    2004-06-15

    The brominated flame retardant decabromodiphenyl ethane, DeBDethane, is marketed as an alternative to decabromodiphenyl ether, BDE209. There are currently no data available about the presence of DeBDethane in the environment. In this study, DeBDethane was positively identified by high-resolution mass spectrometry and quantified by low-resolution mass spectrometry with electron capture negative ionization in sewage sludge, sediment, and indoor air. It was found in 25 of the 50 Swedish sewage treatment plants investigated, with estimated levels up to about 100 ng/g dry weight. The concentration of DeBDethane in sediment from Western Scheldt in The Netherlands was 24 ng/g dry weight, and in an air sample from a Swedish electronics dismantling facility it was 0.6 ng/m3. DeBDethane was also found together with nonabromodiphenyl ethanes in water piping insulation. All samples contained BDE209 in higher concentrations as compared to DeBDethane (DeBDethane/BDE209 ratios ranging from 0.02 to 0.7), probably reflecting the higher and longer usage of BDE209. There is an ongoing risk assessment within the European Union regarding BDE209. Since DeBDethane has similar applications, it is important to investigate its environmental behavior before using it to replace BDE209.

  17. Fugitive Emissions from the Bakken Shale Illustrate Role of Shale Production in Global Ethane Shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kort, E. A.; Smith, M. L.; Murray, L. T.; Gvakharia, A.; Brandt, A. R.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Sweeney, C.; Travis, K.

    2016-01-01

    Ethane is the second most abundant atmospheric hydrocarbon, exerts a strong influence on tropospheric ozone, and reduces the atmosphere's oxidative capacity. Global observations showed declining ethane abundances from 1984 to 2010, while a regional measurement indicated increasing levels since 2009, with the reason for this subject to speculation. The Bakken shale is an oil and gas-producing formation centered in North Dakota that experienced a rapid increase in production beginning in 2010. We use airborne data collected over the North Dakota portion of the Bakken shale in 2014 to calculate ethane emissions of 0.23 +/- 0.07 (2 sigma) Tg/yr, equivalent to 1-3% of total global sources. Emissions of this magnitude impact air quality via concurrent increases in tropospheric ozone. This recently developed large ethane source from one location illustrates the key role of shale oil and gas production in rising global ethane levels.

  18. Partial oxidation of methane by pulsed corona discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeben, W. F. L. M.; Boekhoven, W.; Beckers, F. J. C. M.; van Heesch, E. J. M.; Pemen, A. J. M.

    2014-09-01

    Pulsed corona-induced partial oxidation of methane in humid oxygen or carbon dioxide atmospheres has been investigated for future fuel synthesis applications. The obtained product spectrum is wide, i.e. saturated, unsaturated and oxygen-functional hydrocarbons. The generally observed methane conversion levels are 6-20% at a conversion efficiency of about 100-250 nmol J-1. The main products are ethane, ethylene and acetylene. Higher saturated hydrocarbons up to C6 have been detected. The observed oxygen-functional hydrocarbons are methanol, ethanol and lower concentrations of aldehydes, ketones, dimethylether and methylformate. Methanol seems to be exclusively produced with CH4/O2 mixtures at a maximum production efficiency of 0.35 nmol J-1. CH4/CO2 mixtures appear to yield higher hydrocarbons. Carboxylic acids appear to be mainly present in the aqueous reactor phase, possibly together with higher molecular weight species.

  19. Catalysts for conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1993-01-01

    Catalysts for converting methane to higher hydrocarbons such as ethane and ethylene in the presence of oxygen at temperatures in the range of about 700.degree. to 900.degree. C. are described. These catalysts comprise calcium oxide or gadolinium oxide respectively promoted with about 0.025-0.4 mole and about 0.1-0.7 mole sodium pyrophosphate. A preferred reaction temperature in a range of about 800.degree. to 850.degree. C. with a preferred oxygen-to-methane ratio of about 2:1 provides an essentially constant C.sub.2 hydrocarbon yield in the range of about 12 to 19 percent over a period of time greater than about 20 hours.

  20. A novel predictive model for formation enthalpies of Si and Ge hydrides with propane- and butane-like structures.

    PubMed

    Weng, C; Kouvetakis, J; Chizmeshya, A V G

    2011-04-15

    erratic predictions. Our approach also provides quantitative bond-additivity rules for the chlorination of these heavier species. Finally, we discuss structure and bonding trends across the entire sequence of butane-, propane-, and ethane-like molecules with a special focus on the isomeric variations.

  1. Computational modeling of a direct propane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakdaman, H.; Bourgault, Y.; Ternan, M.

    2011-03-01

    The first two dimensional mathematical model of a complete direct propane fuel cell (DPFC) is described. The governing equations were solved using FreeFem software that uses finite element methods. Robin boundary conditions were used to couple the anode, membrane, and cathode sub-domains successfully. The model showed that a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane having its pores filled with zirconium phosphate (ZrP-PTFE), in a DPFC at 150 °C performed much the same as other electrolytes; Nafion, aqueous H3PO4, and H2SO4 doped polybenzimidazole, when they were used in DPFCs. One advantage of a ZrP-PTFE at 150 °C is that it operates without liquid phase water. As a result corrosion will be much less severe and it may be possible for non-precious metal catalysts to be used. Computational results showed that the thickness of the catalyst layer could be increased sufficiently so that the pressure drop between the reactant and product channels of the interdigitated flow fields is small. By increasing the width of the land and therefore the reactant's contact time with the catalyst it was possible to approach 100% propane conversion. Therefore fuel cell operation with a minimum concentration of propane in the product stream should be possible. Finally computations of the electrical potential in the ZrP phase, the electron flux in the Pt/C phase, and the overpotential in both the anode and cathode catalyst layers showed that serious errors in the model occurred because proton diffusion, caused by the proton concentration gradient, was neglected in the equation for the conservation of protons.

  2. Supercritical convection, critical heat flux, and coking characteristics of propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Gross, R. S.; Boyd, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of propane at subcritical and supercritical pressure were experimentally evaluated using electrically heated Monel K-500 tubes. A design correlation for supercritical heat transfer coefficient was established using the approach previously applied to supercritical oxygen. Flow oscillations were observed and the onset of these oscillations at supercritical pressures was correlated with wall-to-bulk temperature ratio and velocity. The critical heat flux measured at subcritical pressure was correlated with the product of velocity and subcooling. Long duration tests at fixed heat flux conditions were conducted to evaluate coking on the coolant side tube wall and coking rates comparable to RP-1 were observed.

  3. Spatial patterns and source attribution of urban methane in the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Francesca M.; Kort, Eric A.; Bush, Susan E.; Ehleringer, James R.; Lai, Chun-Ta; Blake, Donald R.; Randerson, James T.

    2016-03-01

    Urban areas are increasingly recognized as a globally important source of methane to the atmosphere; however, the location of methane sources and relative contributions of source sectors are not well known. Recent atmospheric measurements in Los Angeles, California, USA, show that more than a third of the city's methane emissions are unaccounted for in inventories and suggest that fugitive fossil emissions are the unknown source. We made on-road measurements to quantify fine-scale structure of methane and a suite of complementary trace gases across the Los Angeles Basin in June 2013. Enhanced methane levels were observed across the basin but were unevenly distributed in space. We identified 213 methane hot spots from unknown emission sources. We made direct measurements of ethane to methane (C2H6/CH4) ratios of known methane emission sources in the region, including cattle, geologic seeps, landfills, and compressed natural gas fueling stations, and used these ratios to determine the contribution of biogenic and fossil methane sources to unknown hot spots and to local urban background air. We found that 75% of hot spots were of fossil origin, 20% were biogenic, and 5% of indeterminate source. In regionally integrated air, we observed a wider range of C2H6/CH4 values than observed previously. Fossil fuel sources accounted for 58-65% of methane emissions, with the range depending on the assumed C2H6/CH4 ratio of source end-members and model structure. These surveys demonstrated the prevalence of fugitive methane emissions across the Los Angeles urban landscape and suggested that uninventoried methane sources were widely distributed and primarily of fossil origin.

  4. Ground truthing for methane hotspots at Railroad Valley, NV - application to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detweiler, A. M.; Kelley, C. A.; Bebout, B.; McKay, C. P.; DeMarines, J.; Yates, E. L.; Iraci, L. T.

    2011-12-01

    During the 2010 Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT) calibration and validation campaign at Railroad Valley (RRV) playa, NV, unexpected methane and carbon dioxide fluctuations were observed at the dry lakebed. Possible sources included the presence of natural gas (thermogenic methane) from oil deposits in the surrounding playa, and/or methane production from microbial activity (biogenic) in the subsurface of the playa. In the summer of 2011, measurements were undertaken to identify potential methane sources at RRV. The biogenicity of the methane was determined based on δ13C values and methane/ethane ratios. Soil gas samples and sediments were collected at different sites in the playa and surrounding areas. The soils of the playa consist of a surface crust layer (upper ~ 10 cm) grading to a dense clay below about 25 cm. Soil gas from the playa, sampled at about 20 and 80 cm depths, reflected atmospheric methane concentrations, ranging from 2 to 2.4 ppm, suggesting that no methane was produced within the playa. Natural springs on the northeast and western border of the playa, detected as methane hotspots from a flyover by the Sensor Integrated Environmental Remote Research Aircraft (SIERRA), were also sampled. Bubbles in these springs had methane concentrations that ranged from 69 to 84% by volume. In addition, ethane was detected at very low concentrations, giving methane/ethane ratios in excess of 100,000, indicating biogenic methane in the springs. Soils and sediments collected at the playa and spring sites were incubated in vials over a period of ~23 days. Methane production was observed in the spring sites (avg. 228.6 ± 49.1 nmol/g/d at Kate Springs), but was not evident for the playa sites. The incubation data, therefore, corroborated in situ methane concentration measurements. Particulate organic carbon (POC) was low for all sites samples (0.05-0.38%), with the exception of Kate Springs, which had a much higher POC concentration of 3.4 ± 0

  5. Assessment of potential for natural attenuation of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in ground water at a petrochemical reclamation site, Harris County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huff, Glenn F.; Braun, Christopher L.; Lee, Roger W.

    2000-01-01

    Redox conditions in the Numerous Sand Channels Zone beneath a petrochemical reclamation site in Harris County, Texas, range from sulfate reducing to methanogenic as indicated by the presence of methane in ground water and the range of molecular hydrogen concentrations. Assessment of the potential for reductive dechlorination using BIOCHLOR as a screening tool indicated conditions favoring anaerobic degradation of chlorinated organic compounds in the Numerous Sand Channels Zone. Evidence supporting reductive dechlorination includes apparently biogenic cis-1,2-dichloroethene; an increased ratio of 1,2-dichloroethane to 1,1,2-trichloroethane downgradient from the assumed contaminant source area; ethene and methane concentrations greater than background concentrations within the area of the contaminant plume; and a positive correlation of the ratio of ethene to vinyl chloride as a function of methane concentrations. The body of evidence presented in this report argues for hydrogenolysis of trichloroethene to cis-1,2-dichloroethene; of 1,1,2-trichloroethane to 1,2-dichloroethane; and of vinyl chloride to ethene within the Numerous Sand Channels Zone. Simulations using BIOCHLOR yielded apparent first-order decay constants for reductive dechlorination in the sequence Tetrachloroethene --> trichloroethene --> cis-1,2-dichloroethene --> vinyl chloride --> ethene within the range of literature values reported for each compound and apparent first-order decay constants for reductive dechlorination in the sequence 1,1,2-trichloroethane --> 1,2-dichloroethane slightly greater than literature values reported for each compound along the upgradient segment of a simulated ground-water flowpath. Except for vinyl chloride, apparent rates of reductive dechlorination for all simulated species show a marked decrease along the downgradient segment of the simulated ground-water flowpath. Evidence for reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes within the Numerous Sand Channels Zone

  6. Gold(I) chloride adducts of 1,3-bis(di-2-pyridylphosphino)propane: synthesis, structural studies and antitumour activity

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, Anthony S.; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Berners-Price, Susan J.; Koutsantonis, George A.; Skelton, Brian W.; White, Allan H.

    2008-06-30

    The novel water soluble bidentate phosphine ligand 1,3-bis(di-2-pyridylphosphino)propane (d2pypp) has been synthesized by a convenient route involving treatment of 2-pyridyllithium with Cl{sub 2}P(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}PCl{sub 2} and isolation in crystalline form as the hydrochloride salt. The synthesis of the precursor Cl{sub 2}P(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}PCl{sub 2} has been optimized by the use of triphosgene as the chlorinating agent. The 2:1 and 1:2 AuCl:d2pypp adducts have been synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray studies, and shown to be of the form (AuCl){sub 2}({mu}-d2pypp-P,P{prime}) and Au(d2pypp-P,P{prime}){sub 2}Cl(-3.75H{sub 2}O), respectively. The latter is more lipophilic than analogous 1:2 adducts of gold(I) chloride with the diphosphine ligands 1,2-bis(di-n-pyridylphosphino)ethane (dnpype) for n = 2, 3 and 4, based on measurement of the n-octanol-water partition coefficient (log P = -0.46). A single crystal structure determination of the 1:2 Au(I) complex of the 3-pyridyl ethane ligand shows it to be of the form [Au(d3pype-P,P{prime}){sub 2}]Cl {center_dot} 5H{sub 2}O. The in vitro cytotoxic activity of [Au(d2pypp){sub 2}]Cl was assessed in human normal and cancer breast cells and selective toxicity to the cancer cells found. The significance of these results to the antitumour properties of chelated 1:2 Au(I) diphosphine complexes is discussed.

  7. Formation of a new benzene-ethane co-crystalline structure under cryogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Vu, Tuan Hoang; Cable, Morgan L; Choukroun, Mathieu; Hodyss, Robert; Beauchamp, Patricia

    2014-06-12

    We report the first experimental finding of a solid molecular complex between benzene and ethane, two small apolar hydrocarbons, at atmospheric pressure and cryogenic temperatures. Considerable amounts of ethane are found to be incorporated inside the benzene lattice upon the addition of liquid ethane onto solid benzene at 90-150 K, resulting in formation of a distinctive co-crystalline structure that can be detected via micro-Raman spectroscopy. Two new features characteristic of these co-crystals are observed in the Raman spectra at 2873 and 1455 cm(-1), which are red-shifted by 12 cm(-1) from the υ1 (a1g) and υ11 (eg) stretching modes of liquid ethane, respectively. Analysis of benzene and ethane vibrational bands combined with quantum mechanical modeling of isolated molecular dimers reveal an interaction between the aromatic ring of benzene and the hydrogen atoms of ethane in a C-H···π fashion. The most favored configuration for the benzene-ethane dimer is the monodentate-contact structure, with a calculated interaction energy of 9.33 kJ/mol and an equilibrium bonding distance of 2.66 Å. These parameters are comparable to those for a T-shaped co-crystalline complex between benzene and acetylene that has been previously reported in the literature. These results are relevant for understanding the hydrocarbon cycle of Titan, where benzene and similar organics may act as potential hydrocarbon reservoirs due to this incorporation mechanism.

  8. Documentation for propane fleet conversion cost-effectiveness model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, D.; Euritt, M.; Mahmassani, H.

    1992-10-01

    Increased emphasis on energy efficiency and air quality has resulted in a number of state and federal initiatives examining the use of alternative fuels for motor vehicles. Texas instituted an alternative fuels program for public fleet operations beginning in the 1991-92 fiscal year. Life-cycle cost/benefit models for evaluating the economic implications of the action have been developed at the University of Texas at Austin Center for Transportation Research for both compressed natural gas (CNG) and propane. The report documents the various input data, calculations, and assumptions of the Propane Net Present Value (NPV) model. A similar report (number 983-1) documents the same for the CNG model. Input data with constant values across different fleets and locations are discussed first and include basic parameters for on-board storage capacity, vehicle conversion costs, equipment salvage values, etc. Variable input data, reflecting a given fleet size, composition, and location, include the number and types of vehicles, fuel consumption, etc. The next section presents the formulas for the internal model calculations. The final section discusses the basic assumptions underlying the model.

  9. Up with methane

    SciTech Connect

    Barlaz, M.A.; Milke, M.W.; Ham, R.K.

    1986-12-01

    Methane production from municipal refuse represents a rapidly developing source of energy which remains underutilized. Part of the problem is the small amount of methane which is typically collected relative to the refuse's methane generation potential. This study was undertaken to define the parameters which affect the onset of methane production and methane yields in sanitary landfills. Ultimately, we need to develop refuse disposal methods which enhance its methane production potential. Included in the study were tests of how introduction of old refuse, use of sterile cover soil, addition of acetate to refuse, and use of leachate, recycling and neutralization affect methane generation. A more thorough understanding of how the microbes present in refuse react to different variables is the first step in the development of techniques for stimulating methane production in sanitary landfills.

  10. Methane Plumes on Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    Spectrometer instruments attached to several telescopes detect plumes of methane emitted from Mars during its summer and spring seasons. High levels of methane are indicated by warmer colors. The m...

  11. Mobile Methane Measurements of Natural Gas Distribution and End-use Emissions in Indianapolis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, B. K.; Roscioli, J. R.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Herndon, S. C.; Ferrara, T.

    2015-12-01

    Indianapolis is the site of the INFLUX program to investigate greenhouse gas emissions from a large metropolitan area. A key question in INFLUX is the relative contributions of methane emissions from the local gas distribution system in comparison to biogenic sources, such as the wastewater treatment system and landfills, and of end use emissions from furnaces and other combustion devices downstream of customer gas meters. During February and March, 2015, the Aerodyne van was used to measure methane, ethane, CO2 and other trace gases during mobile sampling traverses through a number of urban and suburban Indianapolis neighborhoods. Signatures of distinct natural gas emissions, biogenic emissions, and combustion emissions were observed in small plumes. In a number of cases, these sources were identified as manhole covers in city streets, where nearby leaks can seep into the local wastewater system. Quantification of ethane and methane from 45 manholes reveal that some had emissions that were clearly biogenic while others had a distinct natural gas signature. This paper describes the results from the analysis of these mobile data in the context of the current Indianapolis methane emission inventory.

  12. Methane emissions from natural gas infrastructure and use in the urban region of Boston, Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    McKain, Kathryn; Down, Adrian; Raciti, Steve M.; Budney, John; Hutyra, Lucy R.; Floerchinger, Cody; Herndon, Scott C.; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Zahniser, Mark S.; Jackson, Robert B.; Phillips, Nathan; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Methane emissions from natural gas delivery and end use must be quantified to evaluate the environmental impacts of natural gas and to develop and assess the efficacy of emission reduction strategies. We report natural gas emission rates for 1 y in the urban region of Boston, using a comprehensive atmospheric measurement and modeling framework. Continuous methane observations from four stations are combined with a high-resolution transport model to quantify the regional average emission flux, 18.5 ± 3.7 (95% confidence interval) g CH4⋅m−2⋅y−1. Simultaneous observations of atmospheric ethane, compared with the ethane-to-methane ratio in the pipeline gas delivered to the region, demonstrate that natural gas accounted for ∼60–100% of methane emissions, depending on season. Using government statistics and geospatial data on natural gas use, we find the average fractional loss rate to the atmosphere from all downstream components of the natural gas system, including transmission, distribution, and end use, was 2.7 ± 0.6% in the Boston urban region, with little seasonal variability. This fraction is notably higher than the 1.1% implied by the most closely comparable emission inventory. PMID:25617375

  13. Methane emissions from natural gas infrastructure and use in the urban region of Boston, Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    McKain, Kathryn; Down, Adrian; Raciti, Steve M; Budney, John; Hutyra, Lucy R; Floerchinger, Cody; Herndon, Scott C; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Zahniser, Mark S; Jackson, Robert B; Phillips, Nathan; Wofsy, Steven C

    2015-02-17

    Methane emissions from natural gas delivery and end use must be quantified to evaluate the environmental impacts of natural gas and to develop and assess the efficacy of emission reduction strategies. We report natural gas emission rates for 1 y in the urban region of Boston, using a comprehensive atmospheric measurement and modeling framework. Continuous methane observations from four stations are combined with a high-resolution transport model to quantify the regional average emission flux, 18.5 ± 3.7 (95% confidence interval) g CH4 ⋅ m(-2) ⋅ y(-1). Simultaneous observations of atmospheric ethane, compared with the ethane-to-methane ratio in the pipeline gas delivered to the region, demonstrate that natural gas accounted for ∼ 60-100% of methane emissions, depending on season. Using government statistics and geospatial data on natural gas use, we find the average fractional loss rate to the atmosphere from all downstream components of the natural gas system, including transmission, distribution, and end use, was 2.7 ± 0.6% in the Boston urban region, with little seasonal variability. This fraction is notably higher than the 1.1% implied by the most closely comparable emission inventory.

  14. Methane emissions from natural gas infrastructure and use in the urban region of Boston, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKain, Kathryn; Down, Adrian; Raciti, Steve M.; Budney, John; Hutyra, Lucy R.; Floerchinger, Cody; Herndon, Scott C.; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Zahniser, Mark S.; Jackson, Robert B.; Phillips, Nathan; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2015-02-01

    Methane emissions from natural gas delivery and end use must be quantified to evaluate the environmental impacts of natural gas and to develop and assess the efficacy of emission reduction strategies. We report natural gas emission rates for 1 y in the urban region of Boston, using a comprehensive atmospheric measurement and modeling framework. Continuous methane observations from four stations are combined with a high-resolution transport model to quantify the regional average emission flux, 18.5 ± 3.7 (95% confidence interval) g CH4ṡm-2ṡy-1. Simultaneous observations of atmospheric ethane, compared with the ethane-to-methane ratio in the pipeline gas delivered to the region, demonstrate that natural gas accounted for ∼60-100% of methane emissions, depending on season. Using government statistics and geospatial data on natural gas use, we find the average fractional loss rate to the atmosphere from all downstream components of the natural gas system, including transmission, distribution, and end use, was 2.7 ± 0.6% in the Boston urban region, with little seasonal variability. This fraction is notably higher than the 1.1% implied by the most closely comparable emission inventory.

  15. Oxidation of C1 Compounds by Particulate fractions from Methylococcus capsulatus: distribution and properties of methane-dependent reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase (methane hydroxylase).

    PubMed Central

    Ribbons, D W

    1975-01-01

    Cell-free particulate fractions of extracts from the obligate methylotroph Methylococcus capsulatus catalyze the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and O2-dependent oxidation of methane (methane hydroxylase). The only oxidation product detected was formate. These preparations also catalyze the oxidation of methanol and formaldehyde to formate in the presence or absence of phenazine methosulphate with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. Methane hydroxylase activity cannot be reproducibly obtained from disintegrated cell suspensions even though the whole cells actively respired when methane was presented as a substrate. Varying the disintegration method or extraction medium had no significant effect on the activities obtained. When active particles were obtained, hydroxylase activity was stable at 0 C for days. Methane hydroxylase assays were made by measuring the methane-dependent oxidation of NADH by O2. In separate experiments, methane consumption and the accumulation of formate were also demonstrated. Formate is not oxidized by these particulate fractions. The effects of particle concentration, temperature, pH, and phosphate concentration on enzymic activity are described. Ethane is utilized in the presence of NADH and O2. The stoichiometric relationships of the reaction(s) with methane as substrate were not established since (i) the presumed initial product, methanol, is also oxidized to formate, and (ii) the contribution that NADH oxidase activity makes to the observed consumption of reactants could not be assessed in the presence of methane. Studies with known inhibitors of electron transport systems indicate that the path of electron flow from NADH to oxygen is different for the NADH oxidase, methane hydroxylase, and methanol oxidase activities. Images PMID:238946

  16. Location dependent orientational structure and dynamics of ethane in ZSM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Siddharth; Liu, Tingting; Patankar, Sumant; Tomasko, David; Cole, David

    2016-03-01

    Orientational structure and dynamics of ethane confined in ZSM5 zeolite at four different loadings are reported. The effect of pore geometry on ethane is studied by isolating the contribution from ethane molecules in different locations, viz. straight channels, sinusoidal channels and their intersections. Orientational dynamics is found to be hindered in general and exhibits librational motion, with the extant of hindrance being the greatest in sinusoidal channels. Librational motion becomes faster with an increase in loading. This counterintuitive finding is consistent with experiments reported elsewhere and is explained on the basis of a decreased orientational anisotropy at higher loadings.

  17. Heat pipe methanator

    DOEpatents

    Ranken, William A.; Kemme, Joseph E.

    1976-07-27

    A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

  18. Biodegradation of individual and multiple chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane-oxidizing cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, H L; Alvarez-Cohen, L

    1996-01-01

    The microbial degradation of chlorinated and nonchlorinated methanes, ethanes, and ethanes by a mixed methane-oxidizing culture grown under chemostat and batch conditions is evaluated and compared with that by two pure methanotrophic strains: CAC1 (isolated from the mixed culture) and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. With the exception of 1,1-dichloroethylene, the transformation capacity (Tc) for each chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon was generally found to be in inverse proportion to its chlorine content within each aliphatic group (i.e., methanes, ethanes, and ethenes), whereas similar trends were not observed for degradation rate constants. Tc trends were similar for all methane-oxidizing cultures tested. None of the cultures were able to degrade the fully chlorinated aliphatics such as perchloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride. Of the four cultures tested, the chemostat-grown mixed culture exhibited the highest Tc for trichloroethylene, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and 1,2-dichloroethane, whereas the pure batch-grown OB3b culture exhibited the highest Tc for all other compounds tested. The product toxicity of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in a mixture containing multiple compounds was cumulative and predictable when using parameters measured from the degradation of individual compounds. The Tc for each chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon in a mixture (Tcmix) and the total Tc for the mixture (sigma Tcmix) are functions of the individual Tc, the initial substrate concentration (S0), and the first-order rate constant (k/Ks) of each compound in the mixture, indicating the importance of identifying the properties and compositions of all potentially degradable compounds in a contaminant mixture. PMID:8795228

  19. Homicide by methane gas.

    PubMed

    De-Giorgio, Fabio; Grassi, Vincenzo M; Vetrugno, Giuseppe; Rossi, Riccardo; Fucci, Nadia; d'Aloja, Ernesto; Pascali, Vincenzo L

    2012-09-10

    Methane is a suffocating gas, and "methane deaths" are largely the result of suffocation by gas-air displacement after accidental or deliberate exposure. Neither methane gas nor other suffocating gases are a common means of homicide, with the potential exception of the use of gas in chemical weapons or gas chambers. Here, we report the case of a 53-year-old woman who was killed by her husband with methane gas. The man had given his wife a dose of Lorazepam before setting up a hose that conveyed methane from the kitchen into the apartment's bedroom. The man subsequently faked his own suicide, which was later discovered.

  20. Large-Scale Computational Screening of Zeolites for Ethane/Ethene Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J; Lin, LC; Martin, RL; Swisher, JA; Haranczyk, M; Smit, B

    2012-08-14

    Large-scale computational screening of thirty thousand zeolite structures was conducted to find optimal structures for seperation of ethane/ethene mixtures. Efficient grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were performed with graphics processing units (GPUs) to obtain pure component adsorption isotherms for both ethane and ethene. We have utilized the ideal adsorbed solution theory (LAST) to obtain the mixture isotherms, which were used to evaluate the performance of each zeolite structure based on its working capacity and selectivity. In our analysis, we have determined that specific arrangements of zeolite framework atoms create sites for the preferential adsorption of ethane over ethene. The majority of optimum separation materials can be identified by utilizing this knowledge and screening structures for the presence of this feature will enable the efficient selection of promising candidate materials for ethane/ethene separation prior to performing molecular simulations.

  1. An integral proton conducting SOFC for simultaneous production of ethylene and power from ethane.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xian-Zhu; Luo, Jing-Li; Sanger, Alan R; Danilovic, Nemanja; Chuang, Karl T

    2010-03-28

    A novel, integral, tri-layered, proton conducting membrane SOFC was readily fabricated for simultaneous conversion of ethane at 650-700 degrees C to electrical power and ethylene with high selectivity.

  2. Propane spectral resolution enhancement by the maximum entropy method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Stewart, K. P.; Hurley, E. J.; Yeh, K. C.; Inguva, R.

    1990-01-01

    The Burg algorithm for maximum entropy power spectral density estimation is applied to a time series of data obtained from a Michelson interferometer and compared with a standard FFT estimate for resolution capability. The propane transmittance spectrum was estimated by use of the FFT with a 2 to the 18th data sample interferogram, giving a maximum unapodized resolution of 0.06/cm. This estimate was then interpolated by zero filling an additional 2 to the 18th points, and the final resolution was taken to be 0.06/cm. Comparison of the maximum entropy method (MEM) estimate with the FFT was made over a 45/cm region of the spectrum for several increasing record lengths of interferogram data beginning at 2 to the 10th. It is found that over this region the MEM estimate with 2 to the 16th data samples is in close agreement with the FFT estimate using 2 to the 18th samples.

  3. Chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the combustion of propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the combustion of propane is presented and discussed. The mechanism consists of 27 chemical species and 83 elementary chemical reactions. Ignition and combustion data as determined in shock tube studies were used to evaluate the mechanism. Numerical simulation of the shock tube experiments showed that the kinetic behavior predicted by the mechanism for stoichiometric mixtures is in good agrement with the experimental results over the entire temperature range examined (1150-2600K). Sensitivity and theoretical studies carried out using the mechanism revealed that hydrocarbon reactions which are involved in the formation of the HO2 radical and the H2O2 molecule are very important in the mechanism and that the observed nonlinear behavior of ignition delay time with decreasing temperature can be interpreted in terms of the increased importance of the HO2 and H2O2 reactions at the lower temperatures.

  4. [1,3-Bis(diphenylphosphino)propane]trichlorooxorhenium(V).

    PubMed

    Suescun, L; Mombrú, A W; Mariezcurrena, R A; Pardo, H; Russi, S; Kremer, C; Rivero, M; Kremer, E

    2000-08-01

    Trichlorooxo[1,3-propanediylbis(diphenylphosphine)-P,P ']rhenium(V), [ReCl(3)O(C(27)H(26)P(2))], crystallizes with four formula units per unit cell. The crystal structure consists of neutral complexes of [ReOCl(3)(dppp)] [dppp is 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane] packed by H.pi-ring interactions. The Re atom is octahedrally coordinated to the oxo anion, three Cl atoms and two P atoms from the dppp ligand. The six-membered ring formed by the bidentate dppp ligand and the rhenium metal centre is in a chair conformation. The title compound is an intermediate in the synthesis of bis(dppp) complexes of rhenium.

  5. Propane-1,3-diammonium dichromate(VI).

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Sonia; Marouani, Houda; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Rzaigui, Mohamed

    2012-08-01

    The title compound, (C(3)H(12)N(2))[Cr(2)O(7)], consists of a discrete dichromate anion with an eclipsed conformation and a propane-1,3-diammonium cation. Both kinds of ions have a mirror plane passing through the bridging O atom and the central methyl-ene C atom of the Cr(2)O(7) (2-) and C(3)H(12)N(2) (2+) moieties, respectively. Anions and cations are alternately stacked to form columns parallel to the b axis. Ions are linked by intra- and inter-column hydrogen bonds of types N-H⋯O and C-H⋯O, involving O atoms of the dichromate anions as acceptors, and ammonium or methyl-ene groups as donors.

  6. Protonated ethane. A theoretical investigation of C[sub 2]H[sub 7][sup +] structures and energies

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.W.M. de; Schleyer, P.R. von ); Saunders, M. ); Remington, R.; Schaefer, H.F. III ); Rauk, A.; Sorensen, T.S. )

    1994-04-20

    The C[sub 2]H[sub 7][sup +] potential energy surface was characterized by high-level ab initio calculations. The effects of electron correlation on geometries and relative energies are substantial. At MP4(SDTQ)/6-311G**//MP2(full)/6-31G**, the global minimum is the C-C protonated structure 1, 4.4 kcal/mol (corrected to 298 K) more stable than the C-H protonated form 3. The proton affinity of ethane to give 1 (142.5 kcal/mol) is 12.5 kcal/mol greater than that of methane (130 kcal/mol). Methane adds to the methyl cation, leading to 1 without activation energy. Barriers for intramolecular hydrogen interchange are lower than the dissociation energy into the ethyl cation and hydrogen, consistent with the experimental observation that deuterium scrambling is faster than dissociation. C[sub 2]H[sub 7][sup +] loses H[sub 2] by 1,1-elimination in an endothermic (10.6 kcal/mol) process. Three frequencies deduced experimentally for C[sub 2]H[sub 7][sup +] correspond to those computed for 1, but neither 2, the H[sub 2]-rotated C-H protonated form, nor 3 can explain the other set of experimental spectral data. Complexes between H[sub 2] and bridged C[sub 2]H[sub 5][sup +] were located, but they are too weakly bonded to be detected experimentally. 45 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. On the role of ethenol in equilibrium gas-phase ethanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanina, Zdeněk

    1984-03-01

    The ethenol content in gas-phase ethanal has been evaluated under equilibrium conditions within a broad temperature interval, and it has been shown that the content thresholds of 1% and 1% can be crossed at about 650 and 1000 K, respectively. At moderate and higher temperatures the presence of ethenol is manifested by contributions to thermodynamic functions of the equilibrium gas-phase ethanal which can be even higher than the usual anharmonicity and non-rigidity corrections.

  8. Modeling and Measurements of Atmospheric Methane at Four Corners, NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigan, K. R.; Lindenmaier, R.; Dubey, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Methane (CH4) fugitive emissions from fossil energy mining remain highly uncertain and scrutinized with the rapid expansion in domestic production by hydraulic fracturing. Top down observational studies of reported bottom up inventories are limited, but the latter may be biased low. We focus on the Four Corners region of the Southwestern United States, a region with extensive coal bed methane production, to verify its current emissions. At our site we measured methane over a range of scales using ground-based, in-situ instruments and a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), which is part of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). Measurements of CH4 produced much higher concentrations of methane in this rural area than previously expected. The diurnal variation and wind direction dependence in the CH4 concentrations suggest a source location tied to topographically induced winds and consistent with oil and gas production. This paper presents the results of WRF-Chem simulations that are performed to simulate methane concentrations in this region. Emissions from the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) indicate large CH4 emissions, associated with the gas production and distribution sector, in one 0.1 x 0.1 degree grid cell within the region and these emissions are employed in the simulations. A series of six simulations are run at two-month intervals during 2012. Each simulates a six-day time series to demonstrate the diurnal and seasonal characteristics of the methane concentrations that would be expected at the FTS location, from the sources reported in the EDGAR data set. The results of these simulations will be presented, along with the implications for interpretation of the FTS measurements. We will also interpret our FTS measurements of ethane (C2H6), which is emitted only from fossil fuel mining, to attribute leaks.

  9. International comparison CCQM-K66: Impurity analysis of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kenji; Watanabe, Takuro; Heine, Hans-Joachim; Boissiere, C.; Schulz, G.; Woo, Jin-Chun; Seog Kim, Jin; Hyup Oh, Sang; Bae, Hyun Kil; Du Kim, Yong; Qiao, Han; Guenther, Frank R.; Rhoderick, George C.; Miller, Walter; Smeulders, Damian; Botha, Angelique; Janse van Rensburg, Mellisa; Tshilongo, James; Leshabane, Nompumelelo; Ntsasa, Napo; Milton, Martin J. T.; Vargha, Gergely; Harling, Alice; Konopelko, L. A.; Kustikov, Y. A.; Vasserman, I. I.; Zavyalov, S. V.; Popova, T. A.; Pankratov, V. V.; Pir, M. N.; Maltsev, M. A.; Oudwater, Rutger; Persijn, Stefan; van Wijk, Janneke; Wessel, Rob M.

    2012-01-01

    This key comparison was performed to demonstrate the capability of NMIs to analyse the purity of methane for use as a source gas in the preparation of standard gas mixtures. This capability is an essential requirement for the preparation of accurate standards of natural gas and some other fuels. Since it is difficult to carry out a comparison with individual samples of pure gas, the sample for this comparison was a synthetic mixture of high purity methane with selected added impurities of nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide and ethane. These mixtures were prepared by a gas company as a batch of 10 cylinders and their homogeneity and stability were evaluated by NMIJ. The KCRVs for the four different analytes in this key comparison are based on a consensus of values reported by participants. The uncertainties in the degrees of equivalence were calculated by combining the reported uncertainties with the homogeneity of the samples and the uncertainty of the KCRV. The results submitted are generally consistent with the KCRV within the estimated uncertainties. Finally, this comparison demonstrates that the analysis of nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide and ethane in methane at amount fractions of 1 µmol/mol to 5 µmol/mol is generally possible with an uncertainty of 5% to 10%. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  10. Biogenic methane from abyssal brine seeps at the base of the Florida escarpment

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, C.S.; Chanton, J.P.; Paull, C.K. )

    1991-08-01

    Dissolved methane is present at concentrations exceeding 10mM in the pore waters of sulfidic, salt-brine-enriched sediments underlying chemosynthetic communities at the base of the Florida escarpment. Light hydrocarbon samples were obtained from brine seep sediments by means of an in situ probe and push cores deployed by the deep submersible Alvin. Pore-water methane had a {delta}{sup 13}C value of {minus}83.3 {plus minus}7.0 (Peedee belemnite, N = 17), contained < 1.3% modern carbon, and was enriched over ethane concentrations by 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5}; these results all indicate a fossil, biogenic carbon source within the Florida platform. Methane-rich brine fluids arriving at seep sites are depleted in dissolved sulfate, although they have been diluted twenty-fold with sulfate-rich seawater during transit. It appears that sulfate reduction and methano-genesis are important processes within the platform.

  11. Methane photochemistry and methane production on Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, P. N.; Atreya, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The Neptune stratosphere's methane photochemistry is presently studied by means of a numerical model in which the observed mixing ratio of methane prompts photolysis near the CH4 homopause. Haze generation by methane photochemistry has its basis in the formation of hydrocarbon ices and polyacetylenes; the hazes can furnish the requisite aerosol haze at the appropriate pressure levels required by observations of Neptune in the visible and near-IR. Comparisons of model predictions with Uranus data indicate a lower ratio of polyacetylene production to hydrocarbon ice, as well as a lower likelihood of UV postprocessing of the acetylene ice to polymers on Neptune, compared to Uranus.

  12. Methane photochemistry and methane production on Neptune

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, P.N.; Atreya, S.K.

    1988-06-01

    The Neptune stratosphere's methane photochemistry is presently studied by means of a numerical model in which the observed mixing ratio of methane prompts photolysis near the CH4 homopause. Haze generation by methane photochemistry has its basis in the formation of hydrocarbon ices and polyacetylenes; the hazes can furnish the requisite aerosol haze at the appropriate pressure levels required by observations of Neptune in the visible and near-IR. Comparisons of model predictions with Uranus data indicate a lower ratio of polyacetylene production to hydrocarbon ice, as well as a lower likelihood of UV postprocessing of the acetylene ice to polymers on Neptune, compared to Uranus. 65 references.

  13. Methane photochemistry and methane production on Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, P. N.; Atreya, S. K.

    1988-06-01

    The Neptune stratosphere's methane photochemistry is presently studied by means of a numerical model in which the observed mixing ratio of methane prompts photolysis near the CH4 homopause. Haze generation by methane photochemistry has its basis in the formation of hydrocarbon ices and polyacetylenes; the hazes can furnish the requisite aerosol haze at the appropriate pressure levels required by observations of Neptune in the visible and near-IR. Comparisons of model predictions with Uranus data indicate a lower ratio of polyacetylene production to hydrocarbon ice, as well as a lower likelihood of UV postprocessing of the acetylene ice to polymers on Neptune, compared to Uranus.

  14. Clumped Methane Isotopologue Temperatures of Microbial Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, S.; Wang, D. T.; Gruen, D.; Delwiche, K.; Hemond, H.; Pohlman, J.

    2014-12-01

    We will report the abundance of 13CH3D, a clumped isotopologue of methane, in microbial methane sampled from natural environments. They yield some expected and some unexpected results reflecting both equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects controlling the abundance of 13CH3D in low temperature environments. The four isotopologues of methane (12CH4, 13CH4, 12CH3D and 13CH3D) were measured by a tunable infrared spectroscopy method at a precision of 0.2‰ and accuracy of 0.5‰ (Ono et al., 2014). Similar to carbonate clumped isotope thermometry, clumped isotopologues of methane become more stable at lower temperatures. The equilibrium constant for the isotope exchange reaction 13CH4 + 12CH3D ⇌ 13CH3D + 12CH4 deviates from unity by +6.3 to +3.5 ‰ for methane equilibrated between 4 and 121 °C, a range expected for microbial methanogenesis. This would be measurably-distinct from a thermogenic methane signal, which typically have apparent 13CH3D-based temperatures ranging from 150 to 220 °C (+3.0 to +2.2 ‰ clumped isotope effect; Ono et al., 2014; Stolper et al. 2014). Marine samples, such as methane clathrates and porewater methane from the Cascadia margin, have 13CH3D-based temperatures that appear to be consistent with isotopic equilibration at in situ temperatures that are reasonable for deep sedimentary environments. In contrast, methane from freshwater environments, such as a lake and a swamp, yield apparent temperatures that are much higher than the known or inferred environmental temperature. Mixing of two or more distinct sources of methane could potentially generate this high temperature bias. We suggest, however, that this high-temperature bias likely reflects a kinetic isotope fractionation intrinsic to methanogenesis in fresh water environments. In contrast, the low-temperature signals from marine methane could be related to the slow metabolic rates and reversibility of microbial methanogenesis and methanotrophy in marine sedimentary environments

  15. Investigating model deficiencies in the global budget of ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzompa Sosa, Z. A.; Keller, C. A.; Turner, A. J.; Mahieu, E.; Franco, B.; Fischer, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    Many locations in the Northern Hemisphere show a statistically-significant sharp increase in measurements of ethane (C2H6) since 2009. It is hypothesized that the recent massive growth of shale gas exploitation in North America could be the source of this change. However, state-of-the-science chemical transport models are currently unable to reproduce the hemispheric burden of C2H6 or the recent sharp increase, pointing to a potential problem with current emission inventories. To resolve this, we used space-borne CH4 observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to derive C2H6 emissions. By using known emission ratios to CH4, we estimated emissions of C2H6 from oil and gas activities, biofuels, and biomass burning over North America. The GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model was used to simulate atmospheric abundances of C2H6 with the new emissions estimates. The model is able to reproduce Northern Hemisphere surface concentrations. However, the model significantly under-predicts the amount of C2H6 throughout the column and the observed Northern Hemispheric gradient as diagnosed by comparisons to aircraft observations from the Hiaper Pole-to-Pole (HIPPO) Campaign.

  16. Jovian Northern Ethane Aurora and the Solar Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk,T.; Livengood, T.; Fast, K.; Buhl, D.; Goldstein, J.; Hewagama, T.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal infrared auroral spectra from Jupiter's North polar region have been collected from 1979 to 1998 in a continuing study of long-term variability in the northern thermal IR aurora, using C2H6 emission lines near 12 microns as a probe. Data from Voyager I and 2 IRIS measurements and ground based spectral measurements were analyzed using the same model atmosphere to provide a consistent relative comparison. A retrieved equivalent mole fraction was used to compare the observed integrated emission. Short term (days), medium term (months) and long term (years) variability in the ethane emission was observed. The variability Of C2H6 emission intensities was compared to Jupiter's seasonal cycle and the solar activity cycle. A positive correlation appears to exist, with significantly greater emission and short term variability during solar maxima. Observations on 60 N latitude during increased solar activity in 1979, 1989, and most recently in 1998 show up to 5 times brighter integrated line emission of C2H6 near the north polar "hot spot" (150-210 latitude) than from the north quiescent region. Significantly lower enhancement was observed during periods of lower solar activity in 1982, 1983, 1993, and 1995. Possible sources and mechanisms for the enhancement and variability will be discussed.

  17. Methane emission from sewers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Sharma, Keshab R; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-08-15

    Recent studies have shown that sewer systems produce and emit a significant amount of methane. Methanogens produce methane under anaerobic conditions in sewer biofilms and sediments, and the stratification of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria may explain the simultaneous production of methane and sulfide in sewers. No significant methane sinks or methanotrophic activities have been identified in sewers to date. Therefore, most of the methane would be emitted at the interface between sewage and atmosphere in gravity sewers, pumping stations, and inlets of wastewater treatment plants, although oxidation of methane in the aeration basin of a wastewater treatment plant has been reported recently. Online measurements have also revealed highly dynamic temporal and spatial variations in methane production caused by factors such as hydraulic retention time, area-to-volume ratio, temperature, and concentration of organic matter in sewage. Both mechanistic and empirical models have been proposed to predict methane production in sewers. Due to the sensitivity of methanogens to environmental conditions, most of the chemicals effective in controlling sulfide in sewers also suppress or diminish methane production. In this paper, we review the recent studies on methane emission from sewers, including the production mechanisms, quantification, modeling, and mitigation.

  18. Variation of the pressure limits of flame propagation with tube diameter for propane-air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belles, Frank E; Simon, Dorothy M

    1951-01-01

    An investigation was made of the variation of the pressure limits of flame propagation with tube diameter for quiescent propane with tube diameter for quiescent propane-air mixtures. Pressure limits were measured in glass tubes of six different inside diameters, with a precise apparatus. Critical diameters for flame propagation were calculated and the effect of pressure was determined. The critical diameters depended on the pressure to the -0.97 power for stoichiometric mixtures. The pressure dependence decreased with decreasing propane concentration. Critical diameters were related to quenching distance, flame speeds, and minimum ignition energy.

  19. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yunyan; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Dai, Jinxing; Katz, Barry; Zhang, Shuichang; Tang, Yongchun

    2011-05-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2 cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using δD values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the δ 13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that δD values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that δD values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane.

  20. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Methane-Powered Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Liquid methane is beginning to become an energy alternative to expensive oil as a power source for automotive vehicles. Methane is the principal component of natural gas, costs less than half as much as gasoline, and its emissions are a lot cleaner than from gasoline or diesel engines. Beech Aircraft Corporation's Boulder Division has designed and is producing a system for converting cars and trucks to liquid methane operation. Liquid methane (LM) is a cryogenic fuel which must be stored at a temperature of 260 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The LM system includes an 18 gallon fuel tank in the trunk and simple "under the hood" carburetor conversion equipment. Optional twin-fuel system allows operator to use either LM or gasoline fuel. Boulder Division has started deliveries for 25 vehicle conversions and is furnishing a liquid methane refueling station. Beech is providing instruction for Northwest Natural Gas, for conversion of methane to liquid state.

  2. Mars methane engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Hung; Coletta, Chris; Debois, Alain

    1994-01-01

    The feasibility of an internal combustion engine operating on a mixture of methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen has been verified by previous design groups for the Mars Methane Engine Project. Preliminary stoichiometric calculations examined the theoretical fuel-air ratios needed for the combustion of methane. Installation of a computer data acquisition system along with various ancillary components will enable the performance of the engine, running on the described methane mixture, to be optimized with respect to minimizing excess fuel. Theoretical calculations for stoichiometric combustion of methane-oxygen-carbon dioxide mixtures yielded a ratio of 1:2:4.79 for a methane-oxygen-carbon dioxide mixture. Empirical data shows the values to be closer to 1:2.33:3.69 for optimum operation.

  3. Detecting Methane Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.; Hinkley, E. D.

    1984-01-01

    Remote sensor uses laser radiation backscattered from natural targets. He/Ne Laser System for remote scanning of Methane leaks employs topographic target to scatter light to receiver near laser transmitter. Apparatus powered by 1.5kW generator transported to field sites and pointed at suspected methane leaks. Used for remote detection of natural-gas leaks and locating methane emissions in landfill sites.

  4. State heating oil and propane program: Final report. Survey of No.2 heating oil and propane prices at the retail level, October 1997 through March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The Energy Efficiency Division of the Vermont Department of Public Service (DPS) monitored the price and inventory of residential heating oil and propane during the 1997--98 heating season under a grant from the US Department of Energy`s Energy Information Administration (EIA). DPS staff collected data biweekly between October 5, 1997 and March 16, 1998 on the retail price of {number_sign}2 home heating oil and propane by telephone survey. Propane price quoted was based on the rate for a residential home heating customer using 1,000+ per year. The survey included a sample of fuel dealers selected by the EIA, plus additional dealers and fuels selected by the DPS. The EIA weighted, analyzed, and reported the data collected from their sample.

  5. Burning of the Supersonic Propane-Air Mixture in the Aerodynamic Channel With the Stagnant Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    V.Chernikov, V.Shibkov, O.Surkont. Mechanisms of transversal electric discharge sustention in supersonic air and propane-air flows. -American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, AIAA Paper, 2003, No.03-0872, p. 1 -6 .

  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Propane Price Model

    EIA Publications

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential propane price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 Census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  7. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF FLUORINATED PROPANE AND BUTANE DERIVATIVES AS ALTERNATIVE REFRIGERANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physical property measurements are presented for 24 fluorinated propane and butane derivatives and one fluorinated ether. These measurements include melting point, boiling point, vapor pressure below the boiling point, heat of vaporization at the boiling point, critical propertie...

  8. School Districts Move to the Head of the Class with Propane

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    Propane has been a proven fuel for buses for decades. For the first time in 2007, Blue Bird rolled out a propane school bus using direct liquid injection, which was later followed by Thomas Built Buses and Navistar. Because this new technology is much more reliable than previous designs, it is essentially reintroducing propane buses to many school districts. During this same time period, vehicle emissions standards have tightened. To meet them, diesel engine manufacturers have added diesel particulate filters (DPF) and, more recently, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems. As an alternative to diesel buses with these systems, many school districts have looked to other affordable, clean alternatives, and they've found that propane fits the bill.

  9. Effect of preprocessing and compressed propane extraction on quality of cilantro (Coriandrum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Jasreen K; Maness, Niels O; Jones, Carol L

    2015-05-15

    Dehydration leads to quality defects in cilantro such as loss in structure, color, aroma and flavor. Solvent extraction with compressed propane may improve the dehydrated quality. In the present study, effect of drying temperature, particle size, and propane extraction on color, volatile composition, and fatty acid composition of cilantro was evaluated. Cilantro was dehydrated (40°C or 60°C), size reduced and separated into three particles sizes, and extracted with compressed propane at 21-27°C. Major volatile compounds found in dried cilantro were E-2-tetradecenal, dodecanal, E-2-dodecenal, and tetradecanal. Major fatty acids were linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid. Drying at 60°C compared to 40°C resulted in better preservation of color (decrease in browning index values) and volatile compounds. Propane extraction led to a positive change in color values and a decrease in volatile composition, oil content, and fatty acid composition.

  10. Deposit formation in hydrocarbon rocket fuels with an evaluation of a propane heat transfer correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, P. A.; Aukerman, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    A high pressure fuel coking testing apparatus was designed and developed and was used to evaluate thermal decomposition limits and carbon decomposition rates in heated copper tubes for hydrocarbon fuels. A commercial propane (90% grade) and chemically pure (CP) propane were tested. Heat transfer to supercritical propane was evaluated at 136 atm, bulk fluid velocities of 6 to 30 m/s, and tube wall temperatures in the range of 422 to 811 K. A forced convection heat transfer correlation developed in a previous test effort verified a prediction of most of the experimental data within a + or - 30% range, with good agreement for the CP propane data. No significant differences were apparent in the predictions derived from the correlation when the carbon resistance was included with the film resistance. A post-test scanning electron microprobe analysis indicated occurrences of migration and interdiffusion of copper into the carbon deposit.

  11. Shock-tube and modeling study of methane pyrolysis and oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hidaka, Yoshiaki; Sato, Kazutaka; Henmi, Yusuke; Tanaka, Hiroya; Inami, Koji

    1999-08-01

    Methane pyrolysis and oxidation were studied behind reflected shock waves in the temperature range 1350--2400 K at pressures of 1.6 to 4.4 atm. Methane decay in both the pyrolysis and oxidation reactions was measured by using time-resolved infrared (IR) laser absorption at 3.39 {micro}m. CO{sub 2} production was also measured by time-resolved IR emission at 4.24 {micro}m. The production yields were also studied using a single-pulse method. The pyrolysis and oxidation of methane were modeled using a kinetic reaction mechanism including the most recent mechanism for formaldehyde, ketene, acetylene, ethylene, and ethane oxidations. The present and earlier shock tube data is reproduced by the proposed mechanism with 157 reaction steps and 48 species. The reactions and the rate constants, which were important to predict these and earlier shock tube data for methane pyrolysis and the oxidation with mixtures of wide composition from methane-rich to methane-lean, are discussed in detail.

  12. Revisiting global fossil fuel and biofuel emissions of ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzompa-Sosa, Z. A.; Mahieu, E.; Franco, B.; Keller, C. A.; Turner, A. J.; Helmig, D.; Fried, A.; Richter, D.; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Yacovitch, T. I.; Herndon, S. C.; Blake, D. R.; Hase, F.; Hannigan, J. W.; Conway, S.; Strong, K.; Schneider, M.; Fischer, E. V.

    2017-02-01

    Recent measurements over the Northern Hemisphere indicate that the long-term decline in the atmospheric burden of ethane (C2H6) has ended and the abundance increased dramatically between 2010 and 2014. The rise in C2H6 atmospheric abundances has been attributed to oil and natural gas extraction in North America. Existing global C2H6 emission inventories are based on outdated activity maps that do not account for current oil and natural gas exploitation regions. We present an updated global C2H6 emission inventory based on 2010 satellite-derived CH4 fluxes with adjusted C2H6 emissions over the U.S. from the National Emission Inventory (NEI 2011). We contrast our global 2010 C2H6 emission inventory with one developed for 2001. The C2H6 difference between global anthropogenic emissions is subtle (7.9 versus 7.2 Tg yr-1), but the spatial distribution of the emissions is distinct. In the 2010 C2H6 inventory, fossil fuel sources in the Northern Hemisphere represent half of global C2H6 emissions and 95% of global fossil fuel emissions. Over the U.S., unadjusted NEI 2011 C2H6 emissions produce mixing ratios that are 14-50% of those observed by aircraft observations (2008-2014). When the NEI 2011 C2H6 emission totals are scaled by a factor of 1.4, the Goddard Earth Observing System Chem model largely reproduces a regional suite of observations, with the exception of the central U.S., where it continues to underpredict observed mixing ratios in the lower troposphere. We estimate monthly mean contributions of fossil fuel C2H6 emissions to ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate surface mixing ratios over North America of 1% and 8%, respectively.

  13. School Districts Move to the Head of the Class with Propane

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-12

    School districts across the country are under pressure to reduce their cost of operations and ensure their budgets are spent wisely. School bus fleets operate more than 675,000 buses in the United States, and many school districts have found the answer to their budget woes in the form of propane, or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Propane is a reliable, domestic fuel, and it's used in approximately 2% of school buses nationwide.

  14. The future of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    Natural gas, mainly methane, produces lower CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions than either oil or coal; thus further substitutions of methane for these fuels could help mitigate air pollution. Methane is, however, a potent greenhouse gas and the domestication of ruminants, cultivation of rice, mining of coal, drilling for oil, and transportation of natural gas have all contributed to a doubling of the amount of atmospheric methane since 1800. Today nearly 300,000 wells yearly produce ca. 21 trillion cubic feet of methane. Known reserves suggest about a 10 year supply at the above rates of recovery; and the potential for undiscovered resources is obscured by uncertainty involving price, new technologies, and environmental restrictions steming from the need to drill an enormous number of wells, many in ecologically sensitive areas. Until all these aspects of methane are better understood, its future role in the world`s energy mix will remain uncertain. The atomic simplicity of methane, composed of one carbon and four hydrogen atoms, may mask the complexity and importance of this, the most basic of organic molecules. Within the Earth, methane is produced through thermochemical alteration of organic materials, and by biochemical reactions mediated by metabolic processes of archaebacteria; some methane may even be primordial, a residue of planetary accretion. Methane also occurs in smaller volumes in landfills, rice paddies, termite complexes, ruminants, and even many humans. As an energy source, its full energy potential is controversial. Methane is touted by some as a viable bridge to future energy systems, fueled by the sun and uranium and carried by electricity and hydrogen.

  15. Methanation assembly using multiple reactors

    DOEpatents

    Jahnke, Fred C.; Parab, Sanjay C.

    2007-07-24

    A methanation assembly for use with a water supply and a gas supply containing gas to be methanated in which a reactor assembly has a plurality of methanation reactors each for methanating gas input to the assembly and a gas delivery and cooling assembly adapted to deliver gas from the gas supply to each of said methanation reactors and to combine water from the water supply with the output of each methanation reactor being conveyed to a next methanation reactor and carry the mixture to such next methanation reactor.

  16. Spectroscopic studies of cryogenic fluids: Benzene in propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, R.; Bernstein, E. R.

    1987-03-01

    Energy shifts and bandwidths for the 1B2u↔1A1g optical absorption and emission transitions of benzene dissolved in propane are presented as a function of pressure, temperature, and density. Both absorption and emission spectra exhibit shifts to lower energy as a function of density, whereas no shifts are observed if density is kept constant and temperature and pressure are varied simultaneously. Density is thus the fundamental microscopic parameter for energy shifts of optical transitions. The emission half-width is a linear function of both temperature and pressure but the absorption half-width is dependent only upon pressure. These results are interpreted qualitatively in terms of changes occurring in the intermolecular potentials of the ground and excited states. Both changes in shape of and separation between the ground and excited state potentials are considered as a function of density. Classical dielectric (Onsager-Böttcher), microscopic dielectric (Wertheim) and microscopic quantum statistical mechanical (Schweizer-Chandler) theories of solvent effects on solute electronic spectra are compared with the experimental results. Calculations suggest limited applicability of dielectric theories but good agreement between experiment and microscopic theory. The results demonstrate the usefulness of cryogenic solutions for high pressure, low temperature spectroscopic studies of liquids.

  17. CFD Modeling of a Laser-Induced Ethane Pyrolysis in a Wall-less Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnichenko, Olga; Snytnikov, Valeriy; Yang, Junfeng; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    Ethylene, as the most important feedstock, is widely used in chemical industry to produce various rubbers, plastics and synthetics. A recent study found the IR-laser irradiation induced ethane pyrolysis yields 25% higher ethylene production rates compared to the conventional steam cracking method. Laser induced pyrolysis is initiated by the generation of radicals upon heating of the ethane, then, followed by ethane/ethylene autocatalytic reaction in which ethane is converted into ethylene and other light hydrocarbons. This procedure is governed by micro-mixing of reactants and the feedstock residence time in reactor. Under mild turbulent conditions, the turbulence enhances the micro-mixing process and allows a high yield of ethylene. On the other hand, the high flow rate only allows a short residence time in the reactor which causes incomplete pyrolysis. This work attempts to investigate the interaction between turbulence and ethane pyrolysis process using large eddy simulation method. The modelling results could be applied to optimize the reactor design and operating conditions. Skolkovo Foundation through the UNIHEAT Project.

  18. Adsorption of binary mixtures of ethane and acetylene on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.V.; Huang, J.C.; Rothstein, D.; Madey, R.

    1984-01-01

    Dynamic measurement of the adsorption of binary mixtures of ethane and acetylene (and also of each gas alone) in a helium carrier gas were made on an (Columbia 4LXC 12/28) activated carbon adsorber bed at 25/sup 0/C. The adsorption capacities of the activated carbon for the pure gases and for each component in the mixtures are extracted from the transmission curves by the use of a mass balance equation. Transmission is the ratio of the concentration at the outlet of the adsorber bed to that at the inlet. The adsorption isotherms for pure ethane and acetylene can be presented by a modified Langmuir isotherm known as the Chakravarti-Dhar isotherm at gas concentrations up to at least 4.2 X 19/sup -7/ mol/cm/sup 3/ (viz., 7.8 mmHg). The gas-adsorbate equilibrium composition and the adsorption capacity of each component in the binary mixture of ethane and acetylene are estimated from the corresponding single-component isotherms by applying ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST). The fact that the estimated values of the adsorption capacities and the gas-adsorbate equilibrium compositions are in good agreement with those extracted from the measurements for the binary mixtures of ethane and acetylene confirms that the ethane-acetylene system forms an ideal adsorbed phase on activated carbon at a pressure of about 7.3 mmHg and a temperature of 25/sup 0/C. 20 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Geoengineering treatment of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockley, Andrew; Gardian, Alan

    2010-05-01

    Methane is a significant GHG, and substantial reservoirs are vulnerable to instability due to AGW. Excursions, from permafrost and clathrates especially, act a positive feedback to AGW. Existing concentrations of well-mixed atmospheric methane substantially exceed pre-industrial levels. Various geoengineering methods are herein proposed for containment of methane, and/or accelerated oxidation to CO2 (a gas with a lower GWP over all timescales). A basic qualitative analysis of each technique is undertaken, to direct further study. Consideration is also given to the potential capacity of each technique to treat the total likely excursions of methane expected as a result of AGW. Proposed techniques: Section 0 SRM (comparison option) Section 1 Pre-emptive treatment of methane reservoirs Soil heating (polytunnels, heat pumps); Soil aeration; Mining of clathrates; Burning of clathrates Section 2 Remediation of aquatic methane excursions Lake sealing; Mixing of aquatic strata; Bubble capture; Lake aeration; Biological oxidation in aquatic environments Section 3 Remediation of concentrated atmospheric methane Regenerative thermal oxidation; Electrical ignition; Thermal ignition; Using incendiary munitions Section 4 Remediation of diffuse atmospheric methane Thermal oxidation by concentrated solar power; Compression ignition; Chemical degradation Assessment criteria: Infrastructure/implementation cost; Energy cost; Expected efficacy; Complexity/development path; Environmental impacts; Potential for CCS

  20. Cassini/Huygens Investigations of Titan's Methane Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, C. A.; Penteado, P.

    2008-12-01

    the Methane Cycle in Titan's Atmosphere. Phil. Trans. Royal Society A. In Press (2008). Penteado, P.F. & C.A. Griffith Ground-based measurements of the methane distribution on Titan. In Preparation for submission to Icarus Griffith C.A. et al. Evidence for a Polar Ethane Cloud on Titan, Science, 313, 1620 (2006). Griffith C.A. et al. The Evolution of Titan's Mid-Latitude Clouds, Science, 310, 474 (2005).

  1. Effect of Propellant Flowrate and Purity on Carbon Deposition in LO2/Methane Gas Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossard, J. A.; Burkhardt, W. M.; Niiya, K. Y.; Braam, F.

    1989-01-01

    The generation and deposition of carbon was studied in the Carbon Deposition Program using subscale hardware with LO2/Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) and LO2/Methane propellants at low mixture ratios. The purpose of the testing was to evaluate the effect of methane purity and full scale injection density on carbon deposition. The LO2/LNG gas generator/preburner testing was performed at mixture ratios between 0.24 and 0.58 and chamber pressures from 5.8 to 9.4 MPa (840 to 1370 psia). A total of seven 200 second duration tests were performed. The LNG testing occurred at low injection densities, similar to the previous LO2/RP-1, LO2/propane, and LO2/methane testing performed on the carbon deposition program. The current LO2/methane test series occurred at an injection density factor of approximately 10 times higher than the previous testing. The high injection density LO2/methane testing was performed at mixture ratios between from 0.23 to 0.81 and chamber pressures from 6.4 to 15.2 MPa (925 to 2210 psia). A total of nine high injection density tests were performed. The testing performed demonstrated that low purity methane (LNG) did not produce any detectable change in carbon deposition when compared to pure methane. In addition, the C* performance and the combustion gas temperatures measured were similar to those obtained for pure methane. Similar results were obtained testing pure methane at higher propellant injection densities with coarse injector elements.

  2. On the Sources of Methane to the Los Angeles Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennberg, Paul O.; Mui, Wilton; Fischer, Marc L.; Wunch, Debra; Kort, Eric A.; Blake, Donald R.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Jeong, Seongeun

    2012-01-01

    We use historical and new atmospheric trace gas observations to refine the estimated source of methane (CH4) emitted into California's South Coast Air Basin (the larger Los Angeles metropolitan region). Referenced to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) CO emissions inventory, total CH4 emissions are 0.44 +/- 0.15 Tg each year. To investigate the possible contribution of fossil fuel emissions, we use ambient air observations of methane (CH4), ethane (C2H6), and carbon monoxide (CO), together with measured C2H6 to CH4 enhancement ratios in the Los Angeles natural gas supply. The observed atmospheric C2H6 to CH4 ratio during the ARCTAS (2008) and CalNex (2010) aircraft campaigns is similar to the ratio of these gases in the natural gas supplied to the basin during both these campaigns. Thus, at the upper limit (assuming that the only major source of atmospheric C2H6 is fugitive emissions from the natural gas infrastructure) these data are consistent with the attribution of most (0.39 +/- 0.15 Tg yr-1) of the excess CH4 in the basin to uncombusted losses from the natural gas system (approximately 2.5-6% of natural gas delivered to basin customers). However, there are other sources of C2H6 in the region. In particular, emissions of C2H6 (and CH4) from natural gas seeps as well as those associated with petroleum production, both of which are poorly known, will reduce the inferred contribution of the natural gas infrastructure to the total CH4 emissions, potentially significantly. This study highlights both the value and challenges associated with the use of ethane as a tracer for fugitive emissions from the natural gas production and distribution system.

  3. Assessment of the risk of transporting propane by truck and train

    SciTech Connect

    Geffen, C.A.

    1980-03-01

    The risk of shipping propane is discussed and the risk assessment methodology is summarized. The risk assessment model has been constructed as a series of separate analysis steps to allow the risk to be readily reevaluated as additional data becomes available or as postulated system characteristics change. The transportation system and accident environment, the responses of the shipping system to forces in transportation accidents, and release sequences are evaluated to determine both the likelihood and possible consequences of a release. Supportive data and analyses are given in the appendices. The risk assessment results are related to the year 1985 to allow a comparison with other reports in this series. Based on the information presented, accidents involving tank truck shipments of propane will be expected to occur at a rate of 320 every year; accidents involving bobtails would be expected at a rate of 250 every year. Train accidents involving propane shipments would be expected to occur at a rate of about 60 every year. A release of any amount of material from propane trucks, under both normal transportation and transport accident conditions, is to be expected at a rate of about 110 per year. Releases from propane rail tank cars would occur about 40 times a year. However, only those releases that occur during a transportation accident or involve a major tank defect will include sufficient propane to present the potential for danger to the public. These significant releases can be expected at the lower rate of about fourteen events per year for truck transport and about one event every two years for rail tank car transport. The estimated number of public fatalities resulting from these significant releases in 1985 is fifteen. About eleven fatalities per year result from tank truck operation, and approximately half a death per year stems from the movement of propane in rail tank cars.

  4. Lean and ultralean stretched propane-air counterflow flames

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Zhongxian; Pitz, Robert W.; Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.

    2006-06-15

    Stretched laminar flame structures for a wide range of C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air mixtures vs hot products are investigated by laser-based diagnostics and numerical simulation. The hot products are produced by a lean H{sub 2}-air premixed flame. The effect of stretch rate and equivalence ratio on four groups of C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air flame structures is studied in detail by Raman scattering measurements and by numerical calculations of the major species concentration and temperature profiles. The equivalence ratio, f, is varied from a near-stoichiometric condition (f=0.86) to the sublean limit (f=0.44) and the stretch rate varies from 90 s{sup -1} to near extinction. For most of these C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air lean mixtures, hot products are needed to maintain the flame. The significant feature of these flames is the relatively low flame temperatures (1200-1800 K). For this temperature range, the predicted C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air flame structure is sensitive to the specific chemical kinetic mechanism. Two types of flame structures (a lean self-propagating flame and a lean diffusion-controlled flame) are obtained based on the combined effect of stretch and equivalence ratio. Three different mechanisms, the M5 mechanism, the Optimized mechanism, and the San Diego mechanism, are chosen for the numerical simulations. None of the propane chemical mechanisms give good agreement with the data over the entire range of flame conditions. (author)

  5. Comparison between transport parameters for K+ and Li+ in 1, 2-dimethoxy ethane (DXE) gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitović, Ž.; Gilić, M.; Raspopović, Z.; Stojanović, V.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a theoretical study of 1, 2-dimethoxy ethane (DXE) and \\text{K}^+/\\text{Li}+ binary mixture in low-temperature plasmas is reported. The most probable reactions of alkali metal ions K+ and Li+ with dimethoxy ethane molecule and its fragment ions are selected in order to obtain appropriate gas phase enthalpies of formation for the products. The scattering cross-sections set as a function of kinetic energy and transport parameters as a function of E/N (E is the electric field, N the gas density) were obtained by using the Monte Carlo technique.

  6. Methane Emission by Camelids

    PubMed Central

    Dittmann, Marie T.; Runge, Ullrich; Lang, Richard A.; Moser, Dario; Galeffi, Cordula; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Methane emissions from ruminant livestock have been intensively studied in order to reduce contribution to the greenhouse effect. Ruminants were found to produce more enteric methane than other mammalian herbivores. As camelids share some features of their digestive anatomy and physiology with ruminants, it has been proposed that they produce similar amounts of methane per unit of body mass. This is of special relevance for countrywide greenhouse gas budgets of countries that harbor large populations of camelids like Australia. However, hardly any quantitative methane emission measurements have been performed in camelids. In order to fill this gap, we carried out respiration chamber measurements with three camelid species (Vicugna pacos, Lama glama, Camelus bactrianus; n = 16 in total), all kept on a diet consisting of food produced from alfalfa only. The camelids produced less methane expressed on the basis of body mass (0.32±0.11 L kg−1 d−1) when compared to literature data on domestic ruminants fed on roughage diets (0.58±0.16 L kg−1 d−1). However, there was no significant difference between the two suborders when methane emission was expressed on the basis of digestible neutral detergent fiber intake (92.7±33.9 L kg−1 in camelids vs. 86.2±12.1 L kg−1 in ruminants). This implies that the pathways of methanogenesis forming part of the microbial digestion of fiber in the foregut are similar between the groups, and that the lower methane emission of camelids can be explained by their generally lower relative food intake. Our results suggest that the methane emission of Australia's feral camels corresponds only to 1 to 2% of the methane amount produced by the countries' domestic ruminants and that calculations of greenhouse gas budgets of countries with large camelid populations based on equations developed for ruminants are generally overestimating the actual levels. PMID:24718604

  7. Methane emission by camelids.

    PubMed

    Dittmann, Marie T; Runge, Ullrich; Lang, Richard A; Moser, Dario; Galeffi, Cordula; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Methane emissions from ruminant livestock have been intensively studied in order to reduce contribution to the greenhouse effect. Ruminants were found to produce more enteric methane than other mammalian herbivores. As camelids share some features of their digestive anatomy and physiology with ruminants, it has been proposed that they produce similar amounts of methane per unit of body mass. This is of special relevance for countrywide greenhouse gas budgets of countries that harbor large populations of camelids like Australia. However, hardly any quantitative methane emission measurements have been performed in camelids. In order to fill this gap, we carried out respiration chamber measurements with three camelid species (Vicugna pacos, Lama glama, Camelus bactrianus; n = 16 in total), all kept on a diet consisting of food produced from alfalfa only. The camelids produced less methane expressed on the basis of body mass (0.32±0.11 L kg⁻¹ d⁻¹) when compared to literature data on domestic ruminants fed on roughage diets (0.58±0.16 L kg⁻¹ d⁻¹). However, there was no significant difference between the two suborders when methane emission was expressed on the basis of digestible neutral detergent fiber intake (92.7±33.9 L kg⁻¹ in camelids vs. 86.2±12.1 L kg⁻¹ in ruminants). This implies that the pathways of methanogenesis forming part of the microbial digestion of fiber in the foregut are similar between the groups, and that the lower methane emission of camelids can be explained by their generally lower relative food intake. Our results suggest that the methane emission of Australia's feral camels corresponds only to 1 to 2% of the methane amount produced by the countries' domestic ruminants and that calculations of greenhouse gas budgets of countries with large camelid populations based on equations developed for ruminants are generally overestimating the actual levels.

  8. Divergent Metabolic Pathways for Propane and Propionate Utilization by a Soil Isolate1

    PubMed Central

    Vestal, J. R.; Perry, Jerome J.

    1969-01-01

    The metabolism of propane and propionate by a soil isolate (Brevibacterium sp. strain JOB5) was investigated. The presence of isocitrate lyase in cells grown on isopropanol, acetate, or propane and the absence of this inducible enzyme in n-propanol- and propionate-grown cells suggested that propane is not metabolized via C-terminal oxidation. Methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase and malate synthase are constitutive in this organism. The incorporation of 14CO2 into pyruvate accumulated during propionate utilization suggests that propionate is metabolized via the methyl-malonyl-succinate pathway. These results were further substantiated by radiorespirometric studies with propionate-1-14C, -2-14C, and -3-14C as substrate. Propane -2-14C was shown, by unlabeled competitor experiments, to be oxidized to acetone; acetone and isopropanol are oxidized in this organism to acetol. Cleavage of acetol to acetate and CO2 would yield the inducer for the isocitrate lyase present in propane-grown cells. PMID:5802607

  9. State Heating Oil & Propane Program. Final report 1997/98 heating season

    SciTech Connect

    Hunton, G.

    1998-06-01

    The following is a summary report of the New Hampshire Governor`s Office of Energy and Community Services (ECS) participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) for the 1997/98 heating season. SHOPP is a cooperative effort, linking energy offices in East Coast and Midwest states, with the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the purpose of collecting retail price data for heating oil and propane. The program is funded by the participating state with a matching grant from DOE. SHOPP was initiated in response to congressional inquires into supply difficulties and price spikes of heating oil and propane associated with the winter of 1989/90. This is important to New Hampshire because heating oil controls over 55% of the residential heating market statewide. Propane controls 10% of the heating market statewide and is widely used for water heating and cooking in areas of the state where natural gas is not available. Lower installation cost, convenience, lower operating costs compared to electricity, and its perception as a clean heating fuel have all worked to increase the popularity of propane in New Hampshire and should continue to do so in the future. Any disruption in supply of these heating fuels to New Hampshire could cause prices to skyrocket and leave many residents in the cold.

  10. Epoxidation of Short-Chain Alkenes by Resting-Cell Suspensions of Propane-Grown Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ching T.; Patel, Ramesh; Laskin, Allen I.; Barnabe, Nancy; Barist, Irene

    1983-01-01

    Sixteen new cultures of propane-utilizing bacteria were isolated from lake water from Warinanco Park, Linden, N.J. and from lake and soil samples from Bayway Refinery, Linden, N.J. In addition, 19 known cultures obtained from culture collections were also found to be able to grow on propane as the sole carbon and energy source. In addition to their ability to oxidize n-alkanes, resting-cell suspensions of both new cultures and known cultures grown on propane oxidize short-chain alkenes to their corresponding 1,2-epoxides. Among the substrate alkenes, propylene was oxidized at the highest rate. In contrast to the case with methylotrophic bacteria, the product epoxides are further metabolized. Propane and other gaseous n-alkanes inhibit the epoxidation of propylene. The optimum conditions for in vivo epoxidation are described. Results from inhibition studies indicate that a propane monooxygenase system catalyzes both the epoxidation and hydroxylation reactions. Experiments with cell-free extracts show that both hydroxylation and epoxidation activities are located in the soluble fraction obtained after 80,000 × g centrifugation. PMID:16346338

  11. Heteroepitaxially grown zeolitic imidazolate framework membranes with unprecedented propylene/propane separation performances.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk Taek; Jeong, Hae-Kwon; Lee, Albert S; An, He Seong; Lee, Jong Suk

    2015-09-30

    Propylene/propane separation is one of the most challenging separations, currently achieved by energy-intensive cryogenic distillation. Despite the great potential for energy-efficient membrane-based separations, no commercial membranes are currently available due to the limitations of current polymeric materials. Zeolitic imidazolate framework, ZIF-8, with the effective aperture size of ∼4.0 Å, has been shown to be very promising for propylene/propane separation. Despite the extensive research on ZIF-8 membranes, only a few reported ZIF-8 membranes have displayed good propylene/propane separation performances presumably due to the challenges of controlling the microstructures of polycrystalline membranes. Here we report the first well-intergrown membranes of ZIF-67 (Co-substituted ZIF-8) by heteroepitaxially growing ZIF-67 on ZIF-8 seed layers. The ZIF-67 membranes exhibited impressively high propylene/propane separation capabilities. Furthermore, when a tertiary growth of ZIF-8 layers was applied to heteroepitaxially grown ZIF-67 membranes, the membranes exhibited unprecedentedly high propylene/propane separation factors of ∼200 possibly due to enhanced grain boundary structure.

  12. No. 2 heating oil/propane program 1994--1995. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McBrien, J.

    1995-05-01

    During the 1994--95 heating season, the Massachusetts Division of Energy Resources (DOER) participated in a joint data collection program between several state energy offices and the federal Department of Energy`s (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA). The purpose of the program was to collect and monitor retail and wholesale heating oil and propane prices and inventories from October 1994 through March 1995. This program augmented the existing Massachusetts data collection system and served several important functions. The information helped the federal and state governments respond to consumer, congressional and media inquiries regarding No. 2 oil and propane. The information also provided policy decision-makers with timely, accurate and consistent data to monitor current heating oil and propane markets and develop appropriate state responses when necessary. In addition, the communication network between states and the DOE was strengthened through this program. This final report begins with an overview of the unique events that had an impact on the petroleum markets prior to and during the reporting period. Next, the report summarizes the results from residential heating oil and propane price surveys conducted by DOER over the 1994--95 heating season. The report also incorporates the wholesale heating oil and propane prices and inventories collected by EIA and distributed to the states. Finally, the report outlines DOER`s use of the data.

  13. Direct conversion of methane to C sub 2 's and liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, B.K.; Campbell, K.D.

    1989-11-22

    Objectives of the project are to discover and evaluate novel catalytic systems for the conversion of methane or by-product light hydrocarbon gases either indirectly (through intermediate light gases rich in C{sub 2}'s) or directly to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, and to evaluate, from an engineering perspective, different conceptualized schemes. The approach is to carry out catalyst testing on several specific classes of potential catalysts for the conversion of methane selectively to C{sub 2} products. Promoted metal oxide catalysts were tested. Several of these exhibited similar high ethylene to ethane ratios and low carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide ratios observed for the NaCl/{alpha}-alumina catalyst system reported earlier. Research on catalysts containing potentially activated metals began with testing of metal molecular sieves. Silver catalysts were shown to be promising as low temperature catalysts. Perovskites were tested as potential methane coupling catalysts. A layered perovskite (K{sub 2}La{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 10}) gave the highest C{sub 2} yield. Work continued on the economic evaluation of a hypothetical process converting methane to ethylene. An engineering model of the methane coupling system has been prepared. 47 refs., 17 figs., 57 tabs.

  14. Enzymatic Oxidation of Methane

    SciTech Connect

    Sirajuddin, S; Rosenzweig, AC

    2015-04-14

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. As potential targets for new gas-to-liquid methane bioconversion processes, MMOs have attracted intense attention in recent years. There are two distinct types of MMO, a soluble, cytoplasmic MMO (sMMO) and a membrane-bound, particulate MMO (pMMO). Both oxidize methane at metal centers within a complex, multisubunit scaffold, but the structures, active sites, and chemical mechanisms are completely different. This Current Topic review article focuses on the overall architectures, active site structures, substrate reactivities, proteinprotein interactions, and chemical mechanisms of both MMOs, with an emphasis on fundamental aspects. In addition, recent advances, including new details of interactions between the sMMO components, characterization of sMMO intermediates, and progress toward understanding the pMMO metal centers are highlighted. The work summarized here provides a guide for those interested in exploiting MMOs for biotechnological applications.

  15. Methane heat transfer investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Future high chamber pressure LOX/hydrocarbon booster engines require copper base alloy main combustion chamber coolant channels similar to the SSME to provide adequate cooling and reusable engine life. Therefore, it is of vital importance to evaluate the heat transfer characteristics and coking thresholds for LNG (94% methane) cooling, with a copper base alloy material adjacent to he fuel coolant. High pressure methane cooling and coking characteristics recently evaluated at Rocketdyne using stainless steel heated tubes at methane bulk temperatures and coolant wall temperatures typical of advanced engine operation except at lower heat fluxes as limited by the tube material. As expected, there was no coking observed. However, coking evaluations need be conducted with a copper base surface exposed to the methane coolant at higher heat fluxes approaching those of future high chamber pressure engines.

  16. Methane heat transfer investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Future high chamber pressure LOX/hydrocarbon booster engines require copper-base alloy main combustion chamber coolant channels similar to the SSME to provide adequate cooling and resuable engine life. Therefore, it is of vital importance to evaluate the heat transfer characteristics and coking thresholds for LNG (94% methane) cooling, with a copper-base alloy material adjacent to the fuel coolant. High-pressure methane cooling and coking characteristics were recently evaluated using stainless-steel heated tubes at methane bulk temperatures and coolant wall temperatures typical of advanced engine operation except at lower heat fluxes as limited by the tube material. As expected, there was no coking observed. However, coking evaluations need be conducted with a copper-base surface exposed to the methane coolant at higher heat fluxes approaching those of future high chamber pressure engines.

  17. Determination of the Minimum Energy Conformation of Allylbenzene and Its Clusters with Methane, Ethane, Water and Ammonia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    Lennard - Jones potential energy 6-12-1 atom-atom calculation is used to characterize the structures of these clusters. Experiments and calculations demonstrate that the four different solvent molecules studies can form stable clusters with allylbenzene by coordinating to the Pi-system of allyl substituent in addition to that of the aromatic

  18. Laser beam methane detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, E. D., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Instrument uses infrared absorption to determine methane concentration in liquid natural gas vapor. Two sensors measure intensity of 3.39 mm laser beam after it passes through gas; absorption is proportional to concentration of methane. Instrument is used in modeling spread of LNG clouds and as leak detector on LNG carriers and installations. Unit includes wheels for mobility and is both vertically and horizontally operable.

  19. Electrochemical methane sensor

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, S.; Otagawa, T.; Stetter, J.R.

    1984-08-27

    A method and instrument including an electrochemical cell for the detection and measurement of methane in a gas by the oxidation of methane electrochemically at a working electrode in a nonaqueous electrolyte at a voltage about 1.4 volts vs R.H.E. (the reversible hydrogen electrode potential in the same electrolyte), and the measurement of the electrical signal resulting from the electrochemical oxidation.

  20. A Convenient Synthetic Protocol to 1,2-Bis(dialkylphosphino)ethanes

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Laurence R; Heath, Alex; Low, Choon Heng; Ashley, Andrew E

    2014-01-01

    1,2-Bis(dialkylphosphino)ethanes are readily prepared from the parent phosphine oxides, via a novel sodium aluminium hydride/sodium hydride reduction protocol of intermediate chlorophosphonium chlorides. This approach is amenable to multi-gram syntheses, utilises readily available and inexpensive reagents, and benefits from a facile non-aqueous work-up in the final reductive step. PMID:26190960

  1. Laboratory Studies of Ethane Ice Relevant to Outer Solar System Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Marla H.; Hudson, R. L.; Raines, L.

    2009-09-01

    Oort Cloud comets, as well as TNOs Makemake (2005 FY9), Quaoar, and Pluto, are known to contain ethane. However, even though this molecule is found on several outer Solar System objects relatively little information is available about its amorphous and crystalline phases. In new experiments, we have prepared ethane ices at temperatures applicable to the outer Solar System, and have heated and ion-irradiated these ices to study phase changes and ethane's radiation chemistry using mid-IR spectroscopy (2.2 - 16.6 microns). Included in our work is the meta-stable phase that exists at 35 - 55 K. These results, including newly obtained optical constants, are relevant to ground-based observational campaigns, the New Horizons mission, and supporting laboratory work. An improved understanding of solid-phase ethane may contribute to future searches for this and other hydrocarbons in the outer Solar System. This work was funded by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics, Planetary Atmospheres, and Outer Planets programs. LR was supported by a summer research internship at the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Goddard Center for Astrobiology.

  2. GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO ETHANE DIMETHANESULFONATE (EDS) ALTERS DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO ETHANE DIMETHANESULFONATE (EDS) ALTERS DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE TESTIS. D.K. Tarka*1,2, J.D. Suarez*2, N.L. Roberts*2, J.M. Rogers*1,2, M.P. Hardy3, and G.R. Klinefelter1,2. 1University of North Carolina, Curriculum in Toxicology, Chapel Hill, NC; 2USEPA,...

  3. Chiral separation of metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid as a groundwater dating tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have studied the hydrologic fate of metolachlor and its two predominant metabolites, metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (MESA) and metolachlor oxanilic acid, in groundwater and base flows of streams for several years. These two metabolites are excellent markers for groundwater processes related to...

  4. Using chiral identification of metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid as a groundwater dating tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have studied the hydrologic fate of metolachlor and its two predominant metabolites, metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (MESA) and metolachlor oxanilic acid, in groundwater and base flows of streams for several years. These two metabolites are excellent markers for groundwater processes related to...

  5. Determination of the Rotational Barrier in Ethane by Vibrational Spectroscopy and Statistical Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ercolani, Gianfranco

    2005-01-01

    The finite-difference boundary-value method is a numerical method suited for the solution of the one-dimensional Schrodinger equation encountered in problems of hindered rotation. Further, the application of the method, in combination with experimental results for the evaluation of the rotational energy barrier in ethane is presented.

  6. GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO ETHANE DIMETHANESULFONATE PERMANENTLY ALTERS REPRODUCTIVE COMPETENCE IN THE CD-1 MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    While the adult mouse Leydig cell (LC) has been considered refractory to cytotoxic destruction by ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS), the potential consequences of exposure during reproductive development in this species are unknown. Herein pregnant CD-1 mice were treated with 160 m...

  7. EFFECTS OF GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO ETHANE DIMETHANESULFONATE IN CD-1 MICE: MICROTIA AND PRELIMINARY HEARING TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microtia is a reduction in pinna size, usually seen in humans in conjunction with other medical conditions. Here we report microtia in CD-1 mice following gestational exposure to ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS), an alkylating agent and adult rat Leydig cell toxicant. Methods...

  8. Key amino acid residues in the regulation of soluble methane monooxygenase catalysis by component B.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, Brian J; Lipscomb, John D

    2003-05-20

    The regulatory component MMOB of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) has been hypothesized to control access of substrates into the active site of the hydroxylase component (MMOH) through formation of a size specific channel or region of increased structural flexibility tuned to methane and O(2). Accordingly, a decrease in the size of four MMOB residues (N107G/S109A/S110A/T111A, the Quad mutant) was shown to accelerate the reaction of substrates larger than methane with the reactive MMOH intermediate Q [Wallar, B. J., and Lipscomb, J. D. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 2220-2233]. Here, this hypothesis is tested by construction of single and double mutations involving the residues of the Quad mutant. It is shown that mutations of residues that extend into the core structure of MMOB alter many aspects of the MMOH catalyzed reaction but do not mimic the effects of the Quad mutant. In contrast, the MMOB residues that are thought to form part of the interface in the MMOH-MMOB complex increase active site accessibility as observed for the Quad mutant. In particular, the mutant T111A mimics most of the effects of the Quad mutant; thus, Thr111 is proposed to most directly control access. Unexpectedly, mutation of Thr111 to the larger Tyr greatly increases the rate constant for the reaction of larger substrates such as ethane, furan, and nitrobenzene with Q while decreasing the rate constant for the reaction with methane. Other steps in the cycle are dramatically slowed, the regiospecificity for nitrobenzene oxidation is altered, and 10-fold more T111Y than wild-type MMOB is required to maximize the rate of turnover. Thus, T111Y appears to make a more extensive change in local interface structure that allows hydrocarbons at least as large as ethane to bind and react with Q similarly. As a result, the bond cleavage rates for methane, ethane, and their deuterated analogues are shown for the first time to correlate with bond strength in accord with a mechanism in which C-H bond

  9. Enthalpies and entropies of vaporization of propan-2-ol-2-methylpropan-1-ol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baev, A. A.; Baev, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    P-T-x dependences are measured for the solutions of a propan-2-ol-2-methylpropan-1-ol binary system and the enthalpies and entropies of vaporization are determined. Dimerization in propan-2-ol and 2-methylpropan-1-ol is rationalized and the contribution from energy introduced by isostructural methyl groups to the enthalpy of vaporization is determined. Structural and energy analyses of solutions with networks of specific interactions are performed. The formation of heterodimers in solutions and vapors with reduced hydrogen bond energies and specific interactions with the 2 s 2(C) unshared electron pairs of the carbon atoms of terminal methyl groups in ethyl and propyl fragments of propan-2-ol and 2-methylpropan-1-ol, respectively, is substantiated. The hydrogen bond energy of heterodimers is estimated.

  10. Concentration of mechanical pulp mill effluents and NaCl solutions through propane hydrate formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ngan, Y.T.; Englezos, P.

    1996-06-01

    In this work, recovery of water from mechanical pulp mill effluents and 2.5 wt% NaCl solutions through propane hydrate formation was investigated. A new apparatus in which hydrate nucleation, growth, separation, and melting occur in one vessel was designed and built. The emphasis of the work was on crystal separation. The average reduction in the salt content of the recovered water from the NaCl solutions was found to be 31%. Displacement with propane could increase the amount of recovered water at the same purity level. Further improvement in the purity could be accomplished with washing with water. The results with the effluents showed that the total organic carbon and the salt content of the recovered water were lower by 23 and 26%, respectively, from the levels in the effluent. Improved separation could be achieved by displacement with liquid propane.

  11. Explosive-driven shock wave and vortex ring interaction with a propane flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannuzzi, P. M.; Hargather, M. J.; Doig, G. C.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments were performed to analyze the interaction of an explosively driven shock wave and a propane flame. A 30 g explosive charge was detonated at one end of a 3-m-long, 0.6-m-diameter shock tube to produce a shock wave which propagated into the atmosphere. A propane flame source was positioned at various locations outside of the shock tube to investigate the effect of different strength shock waves. High-speed retroreflective shadowgraph imaging visualized the shock wave motion and flame response, while a synchronized color camera imaged the flame directly. The explosively driven shock tube was shown to produce a repeatable shock wave and vortex ring. Digital streak images show the shock wave and vortex ring propagation and expansion. The shadowgrams show that the shock wave extinguishes the propane flame by pushing it off of the fuel source. Even a weak shock wave was found to be capable of extinguishing the flame.

  12. Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, R.L.; Jha, M.C.

    1993-03-04

    Amax R D will perform laboratory scale development of a promising, practical catalyst for the selective oxidation of methane to methanol. The primary component of this catalyst is vanadium-phosphate (VPO) which has shown good activity and selectivity in the partial oxidation of n-butane and propane but has not been studied in detail for methane oxidation. The goal of the project is to develop a catalyst which allows methane oxidation to methanol to be conducted at high conversion and selectivity. A low CH[sub 4]/O[sub 2] ratio will be employed with air as the source of oxygen. Temperatures below 600[degrees]C and pressures up to 20 atm are to be investigated. The use of steam in the feed gas will also be investigated. The catalyst development strategy will be to utilize promoters and supports to improve the activity and selectivity of the unmodified VPO catalyst. The catalyst testing reactor system was used to perform blank (empty) reactor runs over a wide range of temperatures, pressure, and flow rates. No methane conversion was observed at temperatures of 500[degrees]C or lower in any of the tests. At higher temperatures, significant methane conversion to carbon dioxide was observed. At 550[degrees]C, 300 psig, and the highest flow rate studied, reactor ignition was observed. Based on the results of these blank runs, we conclude that catalyst testing should be performed at temperatures not to exceed 500[degrees]C.

  13. Design and Operation of the Synthesis Gas Generator System for Reformed Propane and Glycerin Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, Derek Kyle

    Due to an increased interest in sustainable energy, biodiesel has become much more widely used in the last several years. Glycerin, one major waste component in biodiesel production, can be converted into a hydrogen rich synthesis gas to be used in an engine generator to recover energy from the biodiesel production process. This thesis contains information detailing the production, testing, and analysis of a unique synthesis generator rig at the University of Kansas. Chapter 2 gives a complete background of all major components, as well as how they are operated. In addition to component descriptions, methods for operating the system on pure propane, reformed propane, reformed glycerin along with the methodology of data acquisition is described. This chapter will serve as a complete operating manual for future students to continue research on the project. Chapter 3 details the literature review that was completed to better understand fuel reforming of propane and glycerin. This chapter also describes the numerical model produced to estimate the species produced during reformation activities. The model was applied to propane reformation in a proof of concept and calibration test before moving to glycerin reformation and its subsequent combustion. Chapter 4 first describes the efforts to apply the numerical model to glycerin using the calibration tools from propane reformation. It then discusses catalytic material preparation and glycerin reformation tests. Gas chromatography analysis of the reformer effluent was completed to compare to theoretical values from the numerical model. Finally, combustion of reformed glycerin was completed for power generation. Tests were completed to compare emissions from syngas combustion and propane combustion.

  14. Toxicological investigation of liquid petroleum gas explosion: human model for propane/ethyl mercaptan exposures.

    PubMed

    Lowry, W T; Gamse, B; Armstrong, A T; Corn, J M; Juarez, L; McDowell, J L; Owens, R

    1991-03-01

    Four individuals died as the result of a propane explosion. As with many propane explosions, the question was raised as to the adequacy of the product's odorization after the autopsy studies had been conducted. In most cases, this question leads to litigation. Ethyl mercaptan is a widely used odorant for propane and was used in this instance. Three of the four victims had blood available at autopsy for study. Quantitative analyses of the victims' blood, obtained during autopsy, were performed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, without subjecting the samples to hydrolysis. These analyses determined the relative amounts of propane and ethyl mercaptan in the blood to be 90, 63, and 175 mL/m3 headspace, and 0.36, 0.34, and 0.77 microgram/L blood, respectively. Since mercaptans have been reported in human blood as products of metabolism, modeling studies were conducted to establish the validity of the autopsy data and to develop an autopsy toxicology protocol for investigating explosion deaths. When subjects were not exposed to an atmosphere containing ethyl mercaptan, dimethylsulfide was the only mercaptan detectable in their blood without severe hydrolysis prior to analysis. Metabolic ethyl mercaptan is sufficiently bound to be undetectable by the methods used without hydrolysis. Human subjects were exposed to a flammable mixture of air and propane odorized with ethyl mercaptan. The analyses of the blood from these subjects produced results which were comparable with those for the explosion victims, establishing that the question of odorant adequacy can be addressed at the autopsy of propane explosion victims. It is extremely important that the pathologist and toxicologist investigating gas explosion deaths recognize the valuable evidence existing in the victim's blood.

  15. Equilibrium clumped-isotope effects in doubly substituted isotopologues of ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Michael A.; Wang, Yimin; Braams, Bastiaan J.; Bowman, Joel M.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    We combine path-integral Monte Carlo methods with a new intramolecular potential energy surface to quantify the equilibrium enrichment of doubly substituted ethane isotopologues due to clumped-isotope effects. Ethane represents the simplest molecule to simultaneously exhibit 13C-13C, 13C-D, and D-D clumped-isotope effects, and the analysis of corresponding signatures may provide useful geochemical and biogeochemical proxies of formation temperatures or reaction pathways. Utilizing path-integral statistical mechanics, we predict equilibrium fractionation factors that fully incorporate nuclear quantum effects, such as anharmonicity and rotational-vibrational coupling which are typically neglected by the widely used Urey model. The magnitude of the calculated fractionation factors for the doubly substituted ethane isotopologues indicates that isotopic clumping can be observed if rare-isotope substitutions are separated by up to three chemical bonds, but the diminishing strength of these effects suggests that enrichment at further separations will be negligible. The Urey model systematically underestimates enrichment due to 13C-D and D-D clumped-isotope effects in ethane, leading to small relative errors in the apparent equilibrium temperature, ranging from 5 K at 273.15 K to 30 K at 873.15 K. We additionally note that the rotameric dependence of isotopologue enrichment must be carefully considered when using the Urey model, whereas the path-integral calculations automatically account for such effects due to configurational sampling. These findings are of direct relevance to future clumped-isotope studies of ethane, as well as studies of 13C-13C, 13C-D, and D-D clumped-isotope effects in other hydrocarbons.

  16. Methane Emissions from Upland Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megonigal, Patrick; Pitz, Scott; Wang, Zhi-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Global budgets ascribe 4-10% of atmospheric methane sinks to upland soils and assume that soils are the sole surface for methane exchange between upland forests and the atmosphere. The dogma that upland forests are uniformly atmospheric methane sinks was challenged a decade ago by the discovery of abiotic methane production from plant tissue. Subsequently a variety of relatively cryptic microbial and non-microbial methane sources have been proposed that have the potential to emit methane in upland forests. Despite the accumulating evidence of potential methane sources, there are few data demonstrating actual emissions of methane from a plant surface in an upland forest. We report direct observations of methane emissions from upland tree stems in two temperate forests. Stem methane emissions were observed from several tree species that dominate a forest located on the mid-Atlantic coast of North America (Maryland, USA). Stem emissions occurred throughout the growing season while soils adjacent to the trees simultaneously consumed methane. Scaling fluxes by stem surface area suggested the forest was a net methane source during a wet period in June, and that stem emissions offset 5% of the soil methane sink on an annual basis. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycles in stem methane emission rates, pointing to soils as the methane source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for gas transport. Similar observations were made in an upland forest in Beijing, China. However, in this case the evidence suggested the methane was not produced in soils, but in the heartwood by microbial or non-microbial processes. These data challenge the concept that forests are uniform sinks of methane, and suggest that upland forests are smaller methane sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Tree emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration.

  17. Line Positions, Intensities, - and N_2-BROADENING Parameters in the ν_9 Band of Ethane (C_2H_6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Sams, Robert L.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2009-06-01

    High-resolution infrared spectra of ethane have been recorded using the Bruker IFS 120 HR Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in Richland, Washington. Several spectra of pure ethane and ethane in N_2 mixtures were obtained with absorption paths of 20 cm and 3.2 m. Room temperature spectra were obtained in both 20 cm and 3.2 m paths while cold spectra were obtained using only the 20 cm path cell. The spectra were obtained at ˜0.0028 cm^{-1} resolution with sample pressures ranging from 0.3 to ˜36 torr for pure ethane and 11 to 180 torr in ethane-N_2 mixtures. The volume mixing ratios of ethane in the ethane-N_2 mixtures varied between 0.01 and 0.2. The gas temperatures varied from -66^°C to 24^°C. Positions, intensities, self- and N_2-broadening parameters were determined by processing 16 or 17 room temperature spectra using the multispectrum nonlinear least squares spectrum fitting technique. The results obtained for transitions in a few select ^PQ and ^RQ sub-bands will be reported at this time. D. Chris Benner, C.P. Rinsland, V. Malathy Devi, M.A.H. Smith, and D. Atkins, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 53, 705-721 (1995)

  18. Role of Confinement on Adsorption and Dynamics of Ethane and an Ethane–CO 2 Mixture in Mesoporous CPG Silica

    DOE PAGES

    Patankar, Sumant; Gautam, Siddharth; Rother, Gernot; ...

    2016-02-10

    It was found that ethane is confined to mineral and organic pores in certain shale formations. Effects of confinement on structural and dynamic properties of ethane in mesoporous controlled pore glass (CPG) were studied by gravimetric adsorption and quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements. The obtained isotherms and scattering data complement each other by quantifying the relative strength of the solid–fluid interactions and the transport properties of the fluid under confinement, respectively. We used a magnetic suspension balance to measure the adsorption isotherms at two temperatures and over a range of pressures corresponding to a bulk density range of 0.01–0.35 g/cm3.more » Key confinement effects were highlighted through differences between isotherms for the two pore sizes. A comparison was made with previously published isotherms for CO2 on the same CPG materials. Behavior of ethane in the smaller pore size was probed further using quasi-elastic neutron scattering. By extracting the self-diffusivity and residence time, we were able to study the effect of pressure and transition from gaseous to supercritical densities on the dynamics of confined ethane. Moreover, a temperature variation QENS study was also completed with pure ethane and a CO2–ethane mixture. Activation energies extracted from the Arrhenius plots show the effects of CO2 addition on ethane mobility.« less

  19. 41 CFR 102-74.280 - Are privately owned vehicles converted for propane carburetion permitted in underground parking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... vehicles converted for propane carburetion permitted in underground parking facilities? 102-74.280 Section... underground parking facilities? Federal agencies must not permit privately owned vehicles converted for propane carburetion to enter underground parking facilities unless the owner provides to the...

  20. 41 CFR 102-74.280 - Are privately owned vehicles converted for propane carburetion permitted in underground parking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... vehicles converted for propane carburetion permitted in underground parking facilities? 102-74.280 Section... underground parking facilities? Federal agencies must not permit privately owned vehicles converted for propane carburetion to enter underground parking facilities unless the owner provides to the...

  1. ACTION CONCENTRATION FOR MIXTURES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOC) & METHANE & HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    MARUSICH, R.M.

    2006-07-10

    Waste containers may contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methane, hydrogen and possibly propane. These constituents may occur individually or in mixtures. Determining if a waste container contains a flammable concentration of flammable gases and vapors (from VOCs) is important to the safety of the handling, repackaging and shipping activities. This report provides the basis for determining the flammability of mixtures of flammable gases and vapors. The concentration of a mixture that is at the lowest flammability limit for that mixture is called the action concentration. The action concentration can be determined using total VOC concentrations or actual concentration of each individual VOC. The concentrations of hydrogen and methane are included with the total VOC or individual VOC concentration to determine the action concentration. Concentrations below this point are not flammable. Waste containers with gas/vapor concentrations at or above the action concentration are considered flammable.

  2. Hydrocarbon emissions and characterization of methane sources in the Barnett Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, J. E.; Townsend-Small, A.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    As energy demand and costs continue to rise worldwide, so does the development of energy from natural gas. The United States in particular has expanded its natural gas industry, becoming one of the world's top gas producing countries. The Barnett Shale of northern Texas is one of the most developed and productive natural gas shale plays in the United States. However, emissions from the many oil and gas system components in the region have not been fully characterized. An extensive list of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was measured from 120 whole air canisters collected throughout the Barnett shale in October 2013. Known methane sources were targeted and included oil and natural gas well pads, compressor stations, distribution pipelines and city gates, cattle feedlots and landfills. C1-C5 alkanes were elevated throughout the region and were similar to or greater than concentrations in major U.S. cities. The VOC source signature for oil and gas operations was distinguished from biogenic sources. Average ethane content relative to methane was calculated for each of the source types, and ranged from 0.7 to 12.8%. For the whole region, the ethane content was 7.2±6.1%, illustrating the high variability and effect of the various hydrocarbon sources on the local air.

  3. Counterflow diffusion flames of hydrogen, and hydrogen plus methane, ethylene, propane, and silane vs. air - Strain rates at extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, L. G.

    1991-01-01

    Five coaxial tubular opposed jet burners (OJBs) with tube diameter D(T) of 1.8-10 mm and 5 mm conical nozzles were used to form dish-shaped counterflow diffusion flames centered by opposing laminar jets of nitrogen and hydrocarbon-diluted H2 versus air in an argon-purged chamber at 1 atm. Area-averaged air jet velocities at blowoff of the central flame, U(air), characterized extinction of the airside flame as functions of input H2 concentration on the fuelside. A master plot of extensive U(air) data at blowoff versus D(T) shows that U(air) varies linearly with D(T). This and other data sets are used to find that nozzle OJB results for U(air)/diameter average 4.24 + or - 0.28 times larger than tubular OJB results for the same fuel compositions. Critical radial velocity gradients consistent with one-dimensional stagnation point boundary theory and with plug flow inputs are estimated. The results compare favorably with published numerical results based only on potential flow.

  4. Carbon dioxide absorption methanol process

    SciTech Connect

    Apffel, F.

    1989-08-29

    This patent describes a process for removing carbon dioxide from a feed stream of natural gas having at least methane, ethane and heavier. It comprises: first, separating the feed stream in a first separator to form a first stream having substantially all of the propane and heavier hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide and ethane and a second stream, having methane, carbon dioxide and ethane; separating the second stream in a second separator into a stream of carbon dioxide product and a third stream having ethane, methane and carbon dioxide: mixing at least a portion of the third stream with a polar compound; stream after the mixing in an absorber; separating the vapor and liquid of the third stream after the mixing in an absorber; absorbing the remaining unabsorbed carbon dioxide in a lean portion of the polar compound in the absorber, the absorber carbon dioxide and ethane with the polar; separating the first stream in a third separator to separate the propane and heavier hydrocarbons from the carbon dioxide and ethane, which carbon dioxide and ethane forms a fifth stream; and separating the polar compound/carbon dioxide effluent of the absorber in a fourth separator, to separate the carbon dioxide from the polar compound, the polar compound forming a sixth stream.

  5. Carbon dioxide absorption methanol process

    SciTech Connect

    Apffel, F.P.

    1987-06-23

    A process is described for removing carbon dioxide from a feed stream of natural gas, having at least methane, ethane and heavier hydrocarbon, comprising: separating the feed stream in a first separator to form a first stream, having substantially all of the propane and heavier hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide and ethane, and a second stream, having methane, carbon dioxide and ethane; mixing the second stream with a polar compound to form a third stream; separating the vapor and liquid of the third stream in the bottom portion of an absorber; absorbing carbon dioxide and ethane from the separated vapor of Step C in a lean portion of the polar compound in the absorber, the absorber carbon dioxide and ethane forming a fourth stream; separating the ethane from the polar compound and carbon dioxide in a separator; separating the first stream in a third separator to separate the propane and heavier hydrocarbons from the carbon dioxide and ethane: carbon dioxide and ethane forms a fifth stream; and separating the polar compound/carbon dioxide effluent of the second separator in a fourth separator, to separate the carbon dioxide from the polar compound. The polar compound forming a sixth stream.

  6. Combustion of Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshandell, Melika

    A significant methane storehouse is in the form of methane hydrates on the sea floor and in the arctic permafrost. Methane hydrates are ice-like structures composed of water cages housing a guest methane molecule. This caged methane represents a resource of energy and a potential source of strong greenhouse gas. Most research related to methane hydrates has been focused on their formation and dissociation because they can form solid plugs that complicate transport of oil and gas in pipelines. This dissertation explores the direct burning of these methane hydrates where heat from the combustion process dissociates the hydrate into water and methane, and the released methane fuels the methane/air diffusion flame heat source. In contrast to the pipeline applications, very little research has been done on the combustion and burning characteristics of methane hydrates. This is the first dissertation on this subject. In this study, energy release and combustion characteristics of methane hydrates were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experimental study involved collaboration with another research group, particularly in the creation of methane hydrate samples. The experiments were difficult because hydrates form at high pressure within a narrow temperature range. The process can be slow and the resulting hydrate can have somewhat variable properties (e.g., extent of clathration, shape, compactness). The experimental study examined broad characteristics of hydrate combustion, including flame appearance, burning time, conditions leading to flame extinguishment, the amount of hydrate water melted versus evaporated, and flame temperature. These properties were observed for samples of different physical size. Hydrate formation is a very slow process with pure water and methane. The addition of small amounts of surfactant increased substantially the hydrate formation rate. The effects of surfactant on burning characteristics were also studied. One finding

  7. Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Final report, October 1, 1986--July 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Posin, B.M.; Chan, Yee-Wai

    1995-06-01

    This project explored conversion of methane to useful products by two techniques that do not involve oxidative coupling. The first approach was direct catalytic dehydrocoupling of methane to give hydrocarbons and hydrogen. The second approach was oxidation of methane to methanol by using heterogenized versions of catalysts that were developed as homogeneous models of cytochrome-P450, an enzyme that actively hydroxylates hydrocarbons by using molecular oxygen. Two possibilities exist for dehydrocoupling of methane to higher hydrocarbons: The first, oxidative coupling to ethane/ethylene and water, is the subject of intense current interest. Nonoxidative coupling to higher hydrocarbons and hydrogen is endothermic, but in the absence of coke formation the theoretical thermodynamic equilibrium yield of hydrocarbons varies from 25% at 827{degrees}C to 65% at 1100{degrees}C (at atmospheric pressure). In this project we synthesized novel, highly dispersed metal catalysts by attaching metal clusters to inorganic supports. The second approach mimics microbial metabolism of methane to produce methanol. The methane mono-oxygenase enzyme responsible for the oxidation of methane to methanol in biological systems has exceptional selectivity and very good rates. Enzyme mimics are systems that function as the enzymes do but overcome the problems of slow rates and poor stability. Most of that effort has focused on mimics of cytochrome P-450, which is a very active selective oxidation enzyme and has a metalloporphyrin at the active site. The interest in nonporphyrin mimics coincides with the interest in methane mono-oxygenase, whose active site has been identified as a {mu}-oxo dinuclear iron complex.We employed mimics of cytochrome P-450, heterogenized to provide additional stability. The oxidation of methane with molecular oxygen was investigated in a fixed-bed, down-flow reactor with various anchored metal phthalocyanines (PC) and porphyrins (TPP) as the catalysts.

  8. Methane formation and methane oxidation by methanogenic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Zehnder, A J; Brock, T D

    1979-01-01

    Methanogenic bacteria were found to form and oxidize methane at the same time. As compared to the quantity of methane formed, the amount of methane simultaneously oxidized varied between 0.3 and 0.001%, depending on the strain used. All the nine tested strains of methane producers (Methanobacterium ruminantium, Methanobacterium strain M.o.H., M. formicicum, M. thermoautotrophicum, M. arbophilicum, Methanobacterium strain AZ, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanospirillum hungatii, and the "acetate organism") reoxidized methane to carbon dioxide. In addition, they assimilated a small part of the methane supplied into cell material. Methanol and acetate also occurred as oxidation products in M. barkeri cultures. Acetate was also formed by the "acetate organism," a methane bacterium unable to use methanogenic substrates other than acetate. Methane was the precursor of the methyl group of the acetate synthesized in the course of methane oxidation. Methane formation and its oxidation were inhibited equally by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. Short-term labeling experiments with M. thermoautotrophicum and M. hungatii clearly suggest that the pathway of methane oxidation is not identical with a simple back reaction of the methane formation process. Images PMID:762019

  9. Leaking methane reservoirs offshore Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minshull, T. A.; Westbrook, G. K.; Weitemeyer, K. A.; Sinha, M. C.; Goswami, B. K.; Marsset, B.

    2012-10-01

    Methane hydrate—a solid substance in which methane is trapped within ice-like crystals—is stable at low temperatures and high pressures and may be destabilized by ocean warming on both geological and human time scales. Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, and methane released from hydrate provides a potential positive feedback mechanism in global climate change [e.g., Archer and Buffett, 2005]—in theory, the more methane is released by the hydrates, the warmer the climate gets, causing the ocean to warm and release more methane. However, methane escaping from the seabed is oxidized and dissolved in the ocean, and insufficient methane may reach the atmosphere to affect the climate significantly. Its importance for climate change therefore depends on whether the flux from the seabed is great enough to overcome solution in the ocean and perturb atmospheric concentrations over sufficiently long time scales.

  10. The basics of coalbed methane

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-15

    The report is an overview of coalbed methane (CBM), also known as coal seam gas. It provides an overview of what coalbed methane is and the current status of global coalbed methane exploration and production. Topics covered in the report include: An analysis of the natural gas industry, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; A detailed description of coalbed methane, its characteristics, and future potential; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in coalbed methane; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of coalbed methane; An overview of the technologies used for coalbed methane production and water treatment; and Profiles of key coalbed methane producing countries. 25 figs., 5 tabs., 1 app.

  11. Transformations in methane hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Sharma, A.; Burruss, R.C.; Shu, J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, R.J.; Goncharov, A.F.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed study of pure methane hydrate in a diamond cell with in situ optical, Raman, and x-ray microprobe techniques reveals two previously unknown structures, structure II and structure H, at high pressures. The structure II methane hydrate at 250 MPa has a cubic unit cell of a = 17.158(2) A?? and volume V = 5051.3(13) A??3; structure H at 600 MPa has a hexagonal unit cell of a = 11.980(2) A??, c = 9.992(3) A??, and V = 1241.9(5) A??3. The compositions of these two investigated phases are still not known. With the effects of pressure and the presence of other gases in the structure, the structure II phase is likely to dominate over the known structure I methane hydrate within deep hydrate-bearing sediments underlying continental margins.

  12. Metabolism of Propane, n-Propylamine, and Propionate by Hydrocarbon-Utilizing Bacteria1

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, W. T.; Perry, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the oxidation and assimilation of various three-carbon compounds by a gram-positive rod isolated from soil and designated strain R-22. This organism can utilize propane, propionate, or n-propylamine as sole source of carbon and energy. Respiration rates, enzyme assays, and 14CO2 incorporation experiments suggest that propane is metabolized via methyl ketone formation; propionate and n-propylamine are metabolized via the methylmalonyl-succinate pathway. Isocitrate lyase activity was found in cells grown on acetate and was not present in cells grown on propionate or n-propylamine. 14CO2 was incorporated into pyruvate when propionate and n-propylamine were oxidized in the presence of NaAsO2, but insignificant radioactivity was found in pyruvate produced during the oxidation of propane and acetone. The n-propylamine dissimilatory mechanism was inducible in strain R-22, and amine dehydrogenase activity was detected in cells grown on n-propylamine. Radiorespirometer and 14CO2 incorporation studies with several propane-utilizing organisms indicate that the methylmalonyl-succinate pathway is the predominant one for the metabolism of propionate. PMID:16559164

  13. Performance and emissions of a catalytic reactor with propane, diesel, and Jet A fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the performance and emissions of a catalytic reactor operated with propane, No. 2 diesel, and Jet A fuels. A 12-cm diameter and 16-cm long catalytic reactor using a proprietary noble metal catalyst was operated at an inlet temperature of 800 K, a pressure of 300,000 Pa and reference velocities of 10 to 15 m/s. No significant differences between the performance of the three fuels were observed when 98.5 percent purity propane was used. The combustion efficiency for 99.8-percent purity propane tested later was significantly lower, however. The diesel fuel contained 135 ppm of bound nitrogen and consequently produced the highest NOx emissions of the three fuels. As much as 85 percent of the bound nitrogen was converted to NOx. Steady-state emissions goals based on half the most stringent proposed automotive standards were met when the reactor was operated at an adiabatic combustion temperature higher than 1350 K with all fuels except the 99.8-percent purity propane. With that fuel, a minimum temperature of 1480 K was required.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of energetic salts based on the new propan-2-ylidene methanetriamium cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Liu, Long; Li, Chunshan; Zhang, Yanqiang; Li, Zengxi; Zhang, Suojiang

    2014-06-01

    Development of new hypergolic ionic liquids is the key in replacing toxic N,N-dimethylhydrazine as green liquids propellants. Three salts based on the new propan-2-ylidene methanetriamium cations and dicyanamide anion were synthesized and characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, IR and Raman spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and TG/DTA. In addition, their crystal structures were determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction. N-(propan-2-ylidene) methanetriamium dicyanamide (1) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/n, N,N‧-bi(propan-2-ylidene) methanetriamium dicyanamide (2) in triclinic P - 1, and N,N‧,N″-tri(propan-2-ylidene) methanetriamium dicyanamide (3) in monoclinic C2/c. With heats of formation (from 1.56 to 1.80 kJ g-1) and densities (from 1.19 to 1.31 g cm-3) in hand, the detonation pressure (P) and velocity (D), and specific impulse (Isp) values of salts were calculated as 8.94 GPa, 4989 m s-1 and 174.3 s (1), 7.91 GPa, 4815 m s-1 and 179.0 s (2), and 7.33 GPa, 4693 m s-1 and 180.6 s (3), respectively. Impact sensitivities of 1, 2 and 3 were measured to be no less than 40 J by hammer tests, which places these salts in the insensitive class. Moreover, the resulting salts are hypergolic with white fuming nitric acid and exhibit potential as bipropellants.

  15. 40 CFR 721.10360 - 1-Substituted propane, 3-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono-(branched tridecyl) ether (generic). 721.10360... Substances § 721.10360 1-Substituted propane, 3-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol...)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono-(branched tridecyl) ether (PMN P-09-628) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10360 - 1-Substituted propane, 3-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono-(branched tridecyl) ether (generic). 721.10360... Substances § 721.10360 1-Substituted propane, 3-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol...)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono-(branched tridecyl) ether (PMN P-09-628) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10360 - 1-Substituted propane, 3-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono-(branched tridecyl) ether (generic). 721.10360... Substances § 721.10360 1-Substituted propane, 3-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol...)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono-(branched tridecyl) ether (PMN P-09-628) is subject...

  18. A Theoretical Study of the Methyl and Aldehyde Torsion FIR Spectra in Symmetric Propanal Isotopomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeyers, Y. G.; Villa, M.; Uc, V. H.; Vivier-Bunge, A.

    2000-05-01

    This paper is an extension of the techniques developed by us [A. Vivier-Bunge, V. H. Uc, and Y. G. Smeyers, J. Chem. Phys. 109, 2279 (1998)] for standard propanal. In that paper the potential energy surface for the simultaneous methyl and asymmetric aldehydic torsions was calculated at RHF/MP2 level using the 6-311(3df,p) basis set for propanal. The fit of the energy values to symmetry-adapted functional forms was carried out by using the 28 energy values which retain the C3 dynamical symmetry of the methyl group in the optimization procedure. With this potential, as well as with the kinetic parameters and the electric dipole moment variations, the FIR frequencies and intensities for the methyl and aldehyde torsions of seven symmetric isotopomers of propanal were determined theoretically using two-dimensional calculations. The calculated spectra of propanal and three of its isotopomers were compared with the available experimental data. It is found that the calculations for the cis conformer satisfactorily reproduce the aldehyde and methyl torsion spectra and furnish also methyl torsionally excited progressions for the aldehyde torsion modes. The methyl torsion frequencies agree especially well whenever the methyl group is nondeuterated. The small deviations encountered for the deuterated compound are probably due to some mass effect, such as the zero-point vibrational energy correction, which is not taken into account in the present calculations. Finally, the influence of the deuteration on the intensities is discussed.

  19. RETENTION OF HALOCARBONS ON A HEXAFLUOROPROPYLENE EPOXIDE-MODIFIED GRAPHITIZED CARBON BLACK - IV. PROPANE- BASED COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The retention characteristics of 25 propane-based bromofluorocarbon, chlorocarbon, chlorofluorocarbon, and fluorocarbon fluids have been studied as a function of temperature on a stationary phase consisting of a 5% (m/m) coating of a low-molecular-mass polymer of hexafluoropropyl...

  20. Analysis of U.S. Propane Markets Winter 1996-97, An

    EIA Publications

    1997-01-01

    This study constitutes an examination of propane supply, demand, and price developments and trends. The Energy Information Administration's approach focused on identifying the underlying reasons for the tight supply/demand balance in the fall of 1996, and on examining the potential for a recurrence of these events next year.

  1. Zinc-substituted ZIF-67 nanocrystals and polycrystalline membranes for propylene/propane separation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chongqing; Yang, Fan; Sheng, Luqian; Yu, Jian; Yao, Kexin; Zhang, Lixiong; Pan, Yichang

    2016-10-18

    Continuous ZIF-67 polycrystalline membranes with effective propylene/propane separation performances were successfully fabricated through the incorporation of zinc ions into the ZIF-67 framework. The separation factor increases from 1.4 for the pure ZIF-67 membrane to 50.5 for the 90% zinc-substituted ZIF-67 membrane.

  2. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  3. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  4. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  5. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  6. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.341 - CVS and batch sampler verification (propane check).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Flow-Related... from the piping configuration upstream of the flow meter adversely affect the flow measurement. (7... measurements and CVS flow rate measurements with the reference value. (c) Prepare for the propane check...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.341 - CVS, PFD, and batch sampler verification (propane check).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Flow... from the piping configuration upstream of the flow meter adversely affect the flow measurement. (7... measurements and CVS flow rate measurements with the reference value. (c) Prepare for the propane check...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.341 - CVS and batch sampler verification (propane check).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Flow-Related... from the piping configuration upstream of the flow meter adversely affect the flow measurement. (7... measurements and CVS flow rate measurements with the reference value. (c) Prepare for the propane check...

  10. THE HEAT CAPACITY OF FLUORINATED PROPANE AND BUTANE DERIVATIVES BY DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of the measurement (to 3% accuracy) of the constant-pressure liquid-phase heat capacities of 21 hydrogen-containing fluorinated propane and butane derivatives and one fluorinated ether (CF3OCF2H) with boiling points ranging from -34.6 to 76.7 C, using diff...

  11. Developing synthesis techniques for zeolitic-imidazolate framework membranes for high resolution propylene/propane separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyuk Taek

    Propylene/propane separation is one of the most challenging separations, currently achieved by energy-intensive cryogenic distillation. Despite the great potentials for energy-efficient membrane-based propylene/propane separation processes, no commercial membranes are available due to the limitations (i.e., low selectivity) of current polymeric materials. Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) are promising membrane materials primarily due to their well-defined ultra-micropores with controllable surface chemistry along with their relatively high thermal/chemical stabilities. In particular, ZIF-8 with the effective aperture size of ~ 4.0 A has been shown very promising for propylene/propane separation. Despite the extensive research on ZIF-8 membranes, only a few of ZIF-8 membranes have displayed good propylene/propane separation performances presumably due to the challenges of controlling the microstructures of polycrystalline membranes. Since the membrane microstructures are greatly influenced by processing techniques, it is critically important to develop new techniques. In this dissertation, three state-of-the-art ZIF membrane synthesis techniques are developed. The first is a one-step in-situ synthesis technique based on the concept of counter diffusion. The technique enabled us to obtain highly propylene selective ZIF-8 membranes in less than a couple of hours with exceptional mechanical strength. Most importantly, due to the nature of the counter-diffusion concept, the new method offered unique opportunities such as healing defective membranes (i.e., poorly-intergrown) as well as significantly reducing the consumption of costly ligands and organic solvents. The second is a microwave-assisted seeding technique. Using this new seeding technique, we were able to prepare seeded supports with a high packing density in a couple of minutes, which subsequently grown into highly propylene-selective ZIF-8 membranes with an average propylene/propane selectivity of ~40

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A CATALYST/SORBENT FOR METHANE REFORMING

    SciTech Connect

    B.H. Shanks; T.D. Wheelock; Justinus A. Satrio; Timothy Diehl; Brigitte Vollmer

    2004-09-27

    This work has led to the initial development of a very promising material that has the potential to greatly simplify hydrocarbon reforming for the production of hydrogen and to improve the overall efficiency and economics of the process. This material, which was derived from an advanced calcium-based sorbent, was composed of core-in-shell pellets such that each pellet consisted of a CaO core and an alumina-based shell. By incorporating a nickel catalyst in the shell, a combined catalyst and sorbent was prepared to facilitate the reaction of hydrocarbons with steam. It was shown that this material not only catalyzes the reactions of methane and propane with steam, it also absorbs CO{sub 2} simultaneously, and thereby separates the principal reaction products, H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Furthermore, the absorption of CO{sub 2} permits the water gas shift reaction to proceed much further towards completion at temperatures where otherwise it would be limited severely by thermodynamic equilibrium. Therefore, an additional water gas shift reaction step would not be required to achieve low concentrations of CO. In a laboratory test of methane reforming at 600 C and 1 atm it was possible to produce a gaseous product containing 96 mole% H{sub 2} (dry basis) while also achieving a H{sub 2} yield of 95%. Methane reforming under these conditions without CO{sub 2} absorption provided a H{sub 2} concentration of 75 mole% and yield of 82%. Similar results were achieved in a test of propane reforming at 560 C and 1 atm which produced a product containing 96 mole% H{sub 2} while CO{sub 2} was being absorbed but which contained only 69 mole% H{sub 2} while CO{sub 2} was not being absorbed. These results were achieved with an improved catalyst support that was developed by replacing a portion of the {alpha}-alumina in the original shell material with {gamma}-alumina having a much greater surface area. This replacement had the unfortunate consequence of reducing the overall compressive

  13. Real-time monitoring of ethane in human breath using mid-infrared cavity leak-out spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahnke, H.; Kleine, D.; Hering, P.; Mürtz, M.

    2001-06-01

    We report on spectroscopic real-time analysis of ethane traces in exhaled human breath. Ethane is considered the most important volatile marker of free-radical induced lipid peroxidation and cell damage in the human body. Our measurements were carried out by means of mid-infrared cavity leak-out spectroscopy in the 3 μm region, a cw variant of cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The spectrometer is based on a CO overtone laser with tunable microwave sidebands. The resulting system proved to be an unique tool with high sensitivity and selectivity for rapid and precise breath testing. With a 5 s integration time, we achieved a detection limit on the order of 100 parts per trillion ethane in human breath. Thus, sample preconcentration is unnecessary. Time-resolved monitoring of the decaying ethane fraction in breath after smoking a cigarette is demonstrated.

  14. Study of ethane hydrate formation kinetics using the chemical affinity model with and without presence of surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Reza; Varaminian, Farshad; Izadpanah, Amir A.

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we examine ethane hydrate formation kinetics with and without the presence of various surfactants. Firstly, the influences of stirring rate and initial pressure without the presence of surfactants are studied. The effects of four surfactants containing Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), Polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitanmonopalmitate (Tween® 40), and TritonX-100 (TX-100) on ethane hydrate formation kinetics were experimentally investigated. Then the chemical affinity model is applied to model the ethane hydrate formation kinetics with and without surfactants. The kinetic parameters of the chemical affinity model were computed for the ethane hydrate formation with and without surfactants. We will see that the results of the modeling are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Highly Selective Adsorption of Ethylene over Ethane in a MOF Featuring the Combination of Open Metal Site and -Complexation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yiming; Li, Baiyan; Wu, Zili; ...

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of the combination of open metal site (OMS) and -complexation into MOF has led to very high ethylene/ethane adsorption selectivity at 318K, as illustrated in the context of MIL-101-Cr-SO3Ag. The interactions with ethylene from both OMS and -complexation in MIL-101-Cr-SO3Ag have been investigated by in situ IR spectroscopic studies and computational calculations, which suggest -complexation contributes dominantly to the high ethylene/ethane adsorption selectivity.

  16. Atmospheric pressure ionization of chlorinated ethanes in ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Benson, Michael T.

    2015-05-16

    This study investigates the APCI mechanisms associated with chlorinated ethanes in an attempt to define conditions under which unique pseudo-molecular adducts, in addition to chloride ion, can be produced for analytical measurements using IMS and MS. The ionization chemistry of chlorinated compounds typically leads to the detection of only the halide ions. Using molecular modeling, which provides insights into the ion formation and relative binding energies, predictions for the formation of pseudo-molecular adducts are postulated. Predicted structures of the chloride ion with multiple hydrogens on the ethane backbone was supported by the observation of specific pseudo-molecular adducts in IMS and MS spectra. With the proper instrumental conditions, such as short reaction times and low temp.

  17. Hydrogen component fugacity coefficients in binary mixtures with ethane: Pressure dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, T. J.; Schroeder, J. A.; Outcalt, S. L.

    1990-09-01

    The fugacity coefficients of hydrogen in binary mixtures with ethane were measured. Data were taken using an experimental chamber which is divided into two regions by a semipermeable membrane through which hydrogen, but not ethane, can penetrate. The measurement of the gas pressures inside and outside the membrane gives the hydrogen component fugacity at a given temperature, binary mixture mole fraction, and mixture pressure. In this paper, results are reported at mixture pressures of 5.25, 6.97, 10.21, and 13.47 MPa. In each case, the temperature of the mixture was maintained at an average value of 130°C (403.15 K). The general qualitative features of the data are discussed, and comparisons are made with predictions obtained from the Redlich-Kwong and Peng-Robinson equations of state.

  18. Comparison of experimental and theoretical electron-impact-ionization triple-differential cross sections for ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Esam; Nixon, Kate; Murray, Andrew; Ning, Chuangang; Colgan, James; Madison, Don

    2015-10-01

    We have recently examined electron-impact ionization of molecules that have one large atom at the center, surrounded by H nuclei (H2O , N H3 , C H4 ). All of these molecules have ten electrons; however, they vary in their molecular symmetry. We found that the triple-differential cross sections (TDCSs) for the highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs) were similar, as was the character of the HOMO orbitals which had a p -type "peanut" shape. In this work, we examine ethane (C2H6 ) which is a molecule that has two large atoms surrounded by H nuclei, so that its HOMO has a double-peanut shape. The experiment was performed using a coplanar symmetric geometry (equal final-state energies and angles). We find the TDCS for ethane is similar to the single-center molecules at higher energies, and is similar to a diatomic molecule at lower energies.

  19. Alternative hybrid electrolytes based on a series of bis(trialkoxysilyl)alkanes and 3-(trihydroxysilyl)-1-propane sulfonic acid applied in gas diffusion electrodes of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. W.; Chung, L. C.; Veerapur, R. S.; Yang, F. C.

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the electrolyte distribution in catalyst layers and enhancing the utilization of catalyst existing in primary pores. Bis(trialkoxysilyl)alkanes (BTAS-alkanes) and 3-(trihydroxysilyl)-1-propane sulfonic acid (THS)Pro-SO 3H) precursors have been used to prepare a series of hybrid electrolytes with various organic segment lengths of BTAS-alkanes and ratios of organic moiety and sulfonic acid groups. Investigations of BTAS-alkanes series includes bis(triethoxysilyl)octane (BTES-Oct), bis(trimethoxysilyl)hexane (BTMS-Hex), and bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTES-Eth). Small angle X-ray spectroscopy (SAXS) identifies morphological phase separation in BTES-Oct and BTMS-Hex hybrid electrolytes. The results of mercury porosimetry and BET porosimetry show that the hybrid electrolytes have better capability than Nafion ionomer to penetrate into primary pores of the catalyst layers. Electrochemical measurements including electrode polarization, electrochemical active surface (EAS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are discussed. The BTES-Oct or BTMS-Hex hybrid electrolytes with higher ratio of organic moiety and sulfonic acid group have achieved better electrode performance. Oxygen benefit current (OBC) results indicate that higher ratios of BTES-Oct/(THS)Pro-SO 3H provides higher hydrophobicity with better gas transport properties. However, the hybrid electrodes exhibit lower cathode performance than Nafion ®-based electrodes due to excessive electrolyte incorporated in the catalyst layer.

  20. Methane emissions from natural wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.L.; Burke, R.A. Jr.

    1993-09-01

    Analyses of air trapped in polar ice cores in conjunction with recent atmospheric measurements, indicate that the atmospheric methane concentration increased by about 250% during the past two or three hundred years (Rasmussen and Khalil, 1984). Because methane is a potent ``greenhouse`` gas, the increasing concentrations are expected to contribute to global warning (Dickinson and Cicerone, 1986). The timing of the methane increase suggests that it is related to the rapid growth of the human population and associated industrialization and agricultural development. The specific causes of the atmospheric methane concentration increase are not well known, but may relate to either increases in methane sources, decreases in the strengths of the sinks, or both.

  1. Methane Clathrate Hydrate Prospecting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N.; Romanovsky, V.

    2003-01-01

    A method of prospecting for methane has been devised. The impetus for this method lies in the abundance of CH4 and the growing shortages of other fuels. The method is intended especially to enable identification of subpermafrost locations where significant amounts of methane are trapped in the form of methane gas hydrate (CH4(raised dot)6H2O). It has been estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey that the total CH4 resource in CH4(raised dot) 6H2O exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuels (oil, coal, and natural gas from non-hydrate sources). Also, CH4(raised dot)6H2O is among the cleanest-burning fuels, and CH4 is the most efficient fuel because the carbon in CH4 is in its most reduced state. The method involves looking for a proxy for methane gas hydrate, by means of the combination of a thermal-analysis submethod and a field submethod that does not involve drilling. The absence of drilling makes this method easier and less expensive, in comparison with prior methods of prospecting for oil and natural gas. The proposed method would include thermoprospecting in combination with one more of the other non-drilling measurement techniques, which could include magneto-telluric sounding and/or a subsurface-electrical-resistivity technique. The method would exploit the fact that the electrical conductivity in the underlying thawed region is greater than that in the overlying permafrost.

  2. Wintertime Methane and Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Measurements Utah's Uintah Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    As a part of the winter 2011/2012 Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study, ambient methane (CH4) and total non-methane hydrocarbons (TNMHC) were measured at a population center (Roosevelt) and within the oil/gas field (Horse Pool). At Horse Pool, near real-time CH4/TNMHC were monitored using a GC-FID analyzer. Samples were collected for 30 seconds once every five minutes. The TNMHC concentrations were reported in ppb-C3, or parts per billion in C3 (propane) equivalents. At Roosevelt, discrete volatile organic carbon (VOC) samples were collected for two weeks beginning on Feb. 14, 2012 using evacuated stainless steel Summa canisters. The samples were collected over four 1-hr time periods spaced throughout the day. After collection, the canisters were shipped to a commercial laboratory for GC-MS quantification. Methane samples were obtained at Roosevelt by whole vial collection and subsequently analyzed via GC-FID. Nominally, the CH4 vials were collected at the start and end of each canister collection period, as well as intermittently throughout the daily periods. Furthermore, CH4 grab samples were collected at several other locations throughout the Basin when possible. For the full wintertime study period (Jan. 19 - Mar. 15, 2012), the CH4 and TNMHC at Horse Pool averaged 3.47±1.8 ppm and 243±253 ppb-C3 (± 1σ), respectively. A very strong diurnal behavior was seen for both classes of compounds, with CH4 maximums approaching 30 ppm in the early morning hours. During the comparative February time period, CH4 concentrations at Horse Pool averaged 3.25±0.07 ppm (± 95% CI), while CH4 at Roosevelt averaged 2.52±0.08 ppm. No strong diurnal behavior was observed at Roosevelt and the maximum CH4 levels only reached 4.08 ppm. Grab samples from the other locations found similar or slightly lower CH4 concentrations, with the exception of Ouray (3.91±1.27 ppm) which was also located in the production/exploration area, but was among the lowest elevation of the sampling sites. It

  3. Methane Leakage from Oil & Gas Operations. What have we learned from recent studies in the U.S.?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Hamburg, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Methane, the principal component of natural gas, is a powerful greenhouse gas. Methane losses from the natural gas supply chain erode the climate benefits of fuel switching to natural gas from other fossil fuels, reducing or eliminating them for several decades or longer. Global data on methane emissions from the oil and gas sector is uncertain and as a consequence, measuring and characterizing methane emissions is critical to the design of effective mitigation strategies. In this work, we synthesize lessons learned from dozens of U.S. studies that characterized methane emissions along each stage of the natural gas supply chain. These results are relevant to the design of methane measurement campaigns outside the U.S. A recurring theme in the research conducted in the U.S. is that public emissions inventories (e.g., The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Greenhouse gas Inventory) tend to underestimate emissions for two key reasons: (1) use of non-representative emission factors and (2) inaccurate activity data (incomplete counts of facilities and equipment). Similarly, the accuracy of emission factors and the effectiveness of mitigation strategies are heavily affected by the existence of low-probability, unpredictable high emitters-which have been observed all along the supply chain- and are spatiotemporally variable. We conducted a coordinated campaign to measure methane emissions in a major gas producing region of the U.S. (Barnett Shale region of Texas) using a diversity of approaches. As part of this study we identified methods for effective quantification of regional fossil methane emissions using atmospheric data (through replicate mass balance flights and source apportionment using methane to ethane ratios) as well as how to build an accurate inventory that includes a statistical estimator that more rigorously captures the magnitude and frequency of high emitters. We found agreement between large-scale atmospheric sampling estimates and source

  4. The relationship between methane migration and shale-gas well operations near Dimock, Pennsylvania, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Patrick A.

    2016-03-01

    Migration of stray methane gas near the town of Dimock, Pennsylvania, has been at the center of the debate on the safety of shale gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing in the United States. The presented study relates temporal variations in molecular concentrations and stable isotope compositions of methane and ethane to shale-gas well activity (i.e., vertical/horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing and remedial actions). This was accomplished by analyzing data collected, between 2008 and 2012, by state and federal agencies and the gas well operator. In some cases, methane migration started prior to hydraulic fracturing. Methane levels of contaminated water wells sampled were one to several orders of magnitude greater than the concentrations due to natural variation in water wells of the local area. Isotope analyses indicate that all samples had a thermogenic origin at varying maturity levels, but from formations above the hydraulically fractured Marcellus Shale. The results from the initial water well samples were similar to annular gas values, but not those of production gases. This indicates that leakage by casing cement seals most likely caused the impacts, not breaks in the production casing walls. Remediation by squeeze cementing was partially effective in mitigating impacts of gas migration. In several cases where remediation caused a substantial reduction in methane levels, there were also substantial changes in the isotope values, providing evidence of two sources, one natural and the other man-induced. Sampling water wells while venting gas wells appears to be a cost-effective method for determining if methane migration has occurred.

  5. Proceedings of the International Cryocooler Conference (7th) Held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 17-19 November 1992. Part 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    contamination. 949 PL-CP--93-1001 High Pressure During the ABB program we Gas In have gone one step further. Capillay Channel I We’ve developed a capillary J...much help with solubility problemts. Therefore, a mixturc of nitrogenl, methane , ethane. and propane has been chosen for analysis as the operating...following steps. (I) The maximum solubility of methane in nitrogen (i.e. mol fraction ratio) is followed by a determination of the maximum solubility of

  6. Electrophilic nitration of alkanes with nitronium hexafluorophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Ramaiah, Pichika; Prakash, G. K. Surya

    1997-01-01

    Nitration of alkanes such as methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, isobutane, neopentane, and cyclohexane was carried out with nitronium hexafluorophosphate in methylene chloride or nitroethane solution. Nitration of methane, albeit in poor yield, required protolytic activation of the nitronium ion. The results indicate direct electrophilic insertion of NO2+ into C 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 H and CC σ-bonds. PMID:11038587

  7. Comparison of facility-level methane emission rates from natural gas production well pads in the Marcellus, Denver-Julesburg, and Uintah Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omara, M.; Li, X.; Sullivan, M.; Subramanian, R.; Robinson, A. L.; Presto, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    The boom in shale natural gas (NG) production, brought about by advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, has yielded both economic benefits and concerns about environmental and climate impacts. In particular, leakages of methane from the NG supply chain could substantially increase the carbon footprint of NG, diminishing its potential role as a transition fuel between carbon intensive fossil fuels and renewable energy systems. Recent research has demonstrated significant variability in measured methane emission rates from NG production facilities within a given shale gas basin. This variability often reflect facility-specific differences in NG production capacity, facility age, utilization of emissions capture and control, and/or the level of facility inspection and maintenance. Across NG production basins, these differences in facility-level methane emission rates are likely amplified, especially if significant variability in NG composition and state emissions regulations are present. In this study, we measured methane emission rates from the NG production sector in the Marcellus Shale Basin (Pennsylvania and West Virginia), currently the largest NG production basin in the U.S., and contrast these results with those of the Denver-Julesburg (Colorado) and Uintah (Utah) shale basins. Facility-level methane emission rates were measured at 106 NG production facilities using the dual tracer flux (nitrous oxide and acetylene), Gaussian dispersion simulations, and the OTM 33A techniques. The distribution of facility-level average methane emission rate for each NG basin will be discussed, with emphasis on how variability in NG composition (i.e., ethane-to-methane ratios) and state emissions regulations impact measured methane leak rates. While the focus of this presentation will be on the comparison of methane leak rates among NG basins, the use of three complimentary top-down methane measurement techniques provides a unique opportunity to explore the

  8. Methane cycling. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane.

    PubMed

    Wang, David T; Gruen, Danielle S; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C; Holden, James F; Hristov, Alexander N; Pohlman, John W; Morrill, Penny L; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B; Reeves, Eoghan P; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N; Ritter, Daniel J; Seewald, Jeffrey S; McIntosh, Jennifer C; Hemond, Harold F; Kubo, Michael D; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-04-24

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle, with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply substituted "clumped" isotopologues (for example, (13)CH3D) has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures. However, the effect of biological processes on methane's clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on (13)CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation-temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  9. Project identification for methane reduction options

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses efforts directed at reduction in emission of methane to the atmosphere. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, which on a 20 year timeframe may present a similar problem to carbon dioxide. In addition, methane causes additional problems in the form of smog and its longer atmospheric lifetime. The author discusses strategies for reducing methane emission from several major sources. This includes landfill methane recovery, coalbed methane recovery, livestock methane reduction - in the form of ruminant methane reduction and manure methane recovery. The author presents examples of projects which have implemented these ideas, the economics of the projects, and additional gains which come from the projects.

  10. Detection of CO and Ethane in Comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner: Evidence for Variable Chemistry in the Outer Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.; DiSanti, M. A.; DelloRusso, N.; Magee-Sauer, K.; Rettig, T. W.

    1999-01-01

    Ethane and carbon monoxide were detected in a short-period comet of probable Kuiper belt origin. Ethane is substantially less abundant compared with Hyakutake and Hale-Bopp, two comets from the giant-planets region of the solar nebula, suggesting a heliocentric gradient in ethane in pre-cometary ices. It is argued that processing by X-rays from the young sun may be responsible.

  11. Detection of CO and Ethane in Comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner: Evidence for Variable Chemistry in the Outer Solar Nebula.

    PubMed

    Mumma; DiSanti; Dello Russo N; Magee-Sauer; Rettig

    2000-03-10

    Ethane and carbon monoxide were detected in a short-period comet of probable Kuiper Belt origin. Ethane is substantially less abundant compared with Hyakutake and Hale-Bopp, two comets from the giant-planet region of the solar nebula, suggesting a heliocentric gradient in ethane in precometary ices. It is argued that processing by X-rays from the young Sun may be responsible.

  12. [Fire disaster due to deflagration of a propane gas-air mixture].

    PubMed

    Nadjem, Hadi; Vogt, Susanne; Simon, Karl-Heinz; Pollak, Stefan; Geisenberger, Dorothee; Kramer, Lena; Pircher, Rebecca; Perdekampl, Markus Große; Thierauf-Emberger, Annette

    2015-01-01

    On 26 Nov 2012, a serious fire occurred at Neustadt/Black Forest in which 14 persons in a sheltered workshop died and 10 other individuals were injured. The fire was caused by the unbridled escape of propane gas due to accidental disconnection of the screw fixing between a gas bottle and a catalytic heater. Deflagration of the propane gas-air mixture set the workshop facilities on fire. In spite of partly extensive burns the fatally injured victims could be rapidly identified. The results of the fire investigations at the scene and the autopsy findings are presented. Carboxyhemoglobin concentrations ranged between 8 and 56 % and signs of fire fume inhalation were present in all cases. Three victims had eardrum ruptures due to the sudden increase in air pressure during the deflagration.

  13. Thermophysical properties of propane from 85 to 700/sup 0/K at pressures to 70 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, R.D.; Haynes, W.M.

    1982-04-01

    Thermophysical properties of propane are tabulated at integral temperatures over the entire range of fluid states from 85 to 700/sup 0/K along isobars to 70 MPa by using a modified form of the nonanalytic equation of state. These tables, along with a table for the saturated liquid, include values for density, compressibility factor, internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, heat capacities, fugacity, sound velocity, dielectric constant, and isochore and isotherm derivatives. In addition to the equation of state, equations are presented for vapor pressures, orthobaric vapor and liquid densities, ideal gas properties, virial coefficients, dielectric constants, heats of vaporization, melting C, and orthobaric liquid specific heats, enthalpies, and entropies. Coefficients were determined by a least squares fit of selected experimental data, including several new sets of data not included in previous propane correlations. Comparisons between experimental and calculated values are given, including those for sound velocities, heat capacities, P-rho-T data, etc.

  14. Electrochemical promotion of propane oxidation on Pt deposited on a dense β"-Al2O3 ceramic Ag+ conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsampas, Michail; Kambolis, Anastasios; Obeid, Emil; Lizarraga, Leonardo; Sapountzi, Foteini; Vernoux, Philippe

    2013-08-01

    A new kind of electrochemical catalyst based on a Pt porous catalyst film deposited on a β"-Al2O3 ceramic Ag+ conductor was developed and evaluated during propane oxidation. It was observed that upon anodic polarization, the rate of propane combustion was significantly electropromoted up to 400%. Moreover, for the first time, exponential increase of the catalytic rate was evidenced during galvanostatic transient experiment in excellent agreement with EPOC equation.

  15. Analysis of the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane by gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A. A.; Neto, E. V. Santos; Eiler, John M.

    2016-09-01

    Site-specific isotope ratio measurements potentially provide valuable information about the formation and degradation of complex molecules-information that is lost in conventional bulk isotopic measurements. Here we discuss the background and possible applications of such measurements, and present a technique for studying the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane at natural abundance based on mass spectrometric analysis of the intact propane molecule and its fragment ions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach through measurements of mixtures of natural propane and propane synthesized with site-specific 13C enrichment, and we document the limits of precision of our technique. We show that mass balance calculations of the bulk δ13C of propane based on our site-specific measurements is generally consistent with independent constraints on bulk δ13C. We further demonstrate the accuracy of the technique, and illustrate one of its simpler applications by documenting the site-specific carbon isotope signature associated with gas phase diffusion of propane, confirming that our measurements conform to the predictions of the kinetic theory of gases. This method can be applied to propane samples of moderate size (tens of micromoles) isolated from natural gases. Thus, it provides a means of studying the site-specific stable isotope systematics of propane at natural isotope abundances on sample sizes that are readily recovered from many natural environments. This method may also serve as a model for future techniques that apply high-resolution mass spectrometry to study the site-specific isotopic distributions of larger organic molecules, with potential applications to biosynthesis, forensics and other geochemical subjects.

  16. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  17. Catalytic ozonation of propanal using wood fly ash and metal oxide nanoparticle impregnated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kastner, James R; Ganagavaram, Rangan; Kolar, Praveen; Teja, Amyn; Xu, Chunbao

    2008-01-15

    Catalytic ozonation of propanal at ambient temperatures (23-25 degrees C) was investigated by varying propanal and ozone concentrations and catalyst type. The catalysts tested included wood fly ash (WFA), magnetically separated ash, synthetic hematite and magnetite, and metal oxide nanoparticle impregnated activated carbon and peanut hull char. A power law model independent of ozone concentration for WFA (r(w), moles g(-1) s(-1)) and magnetite (r(m)) were, respectively, r(w) = k'(w) C(R(0.89)) and r(m) = k'(m)C(R(1.55)), where kw, and k'(m) were 2.36 x 10(-6) g(-1) s(-1) (moles)(-0.11) (m3)(0.89) and 6.5 x 10(-4) g(-1) s(-1) (moles)(-0.55) (m3)(1.55), respectively (5-15 ppmv). Magnetite and hematite present in the WFA were theorized to be the primary active sites, since magnetically separated WFA had a significantly higher reaction rate (approximately 12x, mol m(-2) s(-1)) than that of WFA. X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated a qualitative increase in magnetite and hematite in the magnetically separated ash, and synthetic magnetite and hematite had reaction rates >80x and 200x that of WFA or activated carbon (surface area basis). Supercritical deposition of hematite on/in peanut hull char successfully generated a porous, pelleted catalystfrom an agricultural residue capable of oxidizing propanal at rates 12x activated carbon and similar to commercially available catalysts (per mass basis). Water vapor significantly increased the propanal reaction rate when using wood fly ash and activated carbon.

  18. Numerical and experimental analysis of propane-hydrogen mixture ignition in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevrouk, K. L.; Krivosheyev, P. N.; Penyazkov, O. G.; Torohov, S. A.; Titova, N. S.; Starik, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    The addition of hydrogen to the various hydrocarbon fuels being examined as a promising method for increasing the efficiency of the engine while improving their emission characteristics. This work is dedicated to experimental investigation of the ignition delay time C3H8-H2 mixture in the air and analysis of the mechanisms responsible for the acceleration of chain reactions with the addition of hydrogen in propane, based on numerical simulation.

  19. Update from the Analysis of High Resolution Propane Spectra and the Interpretation of Titan's Infrared Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavans, V.; Nixon, C.; Hewagama, T.; Jennings, D. E.

    2012-04-01

    Titan has an extremely thick atmosphere dominated by nitrogen, but includes a range of trace species such as hydrocarbons and nitriles. One such hydrocarbon is propane (C3H8). Propane has 21 active IR bands covering broad regions of the mid-infrared. Therefore, its ubiquitous signature may potentially mask weaker signatures of other undetected species with important roles in Titan's chemistry. Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) observations of Titan's atmosphere hint at the presence of such molecules. Unfortunately, C3H8 line atlases for the vibration bands ν8, ν21, ν20, and ν7 (869, 922, 1054, and 1157 cm-1, respectively) are not currently available for subtracting the C3H8 signal to reveal, or constrain, the signature of underlying chemical species. Using spectra previously obtained by Jennings, D. E., et al. at the McMath-Pierce FTIR at Kitt Peak, AZ, as the source and automated analysis utilities developed for this application, we are compiling an atlas of spectroscopic parameters for propane that characterize the ro-vibrational transitions in the above bands. In this paper, we will discuss our efforts for inspecting and fitting the aforementioned bands, present updated results for spectroscopic parameters including absolute line intensities and transition frequencies in HITRAN and GEISA formats, and show how these optical constants will be used in searching for other trace chemical species in Titan's atmosphere. Our line atlas for the ν21 band contains a total number of 2971 lines. The band integrated strength calculated for the ν21 band is 1.003 cm-1/(cm-atm). Fig. 1: Demonstration of Gaussian fit for sample spectral region 927.25 to 927.50 cm-1 (ν21). References: Jennings, D. E., et al.: "Foreign-gas pressure broadening parameters of propane near 748 cm-1". JQSRT, Vol. 42, pp. 399-403, 1989.

  20. Characterization of non-methane volatile organic compounds sources in Houston during 2001 using positive matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eugene; Brown, Steven G.; Hafner, Hilary R.; Hopke, Philip K.

    Non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMOC) that were most likely to contribute to ozone formation in the Houston, Texas area were measured by Texas Commission on Environmental Quality using AutoSystem Gas Chromatograph. Hourly, integrated NMOC measured between 9 pm and 6 am at the three monitoring sites (Deer Park, Haden Rd., and Clinton Dr.) in Houston were analyzed with Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). Only NMOC data collected during the nighttime was utilized to minimize the influence of photochemistry, motor vehicles, and biogenic sources. A total of 401-883 samples and 38 to 40 NMOC species measured between July 2001 and October 2001 were analyzed. PMF identified seven sources at Deer Park (flare emissions, industrial source, petrochemical source, natural gas/propane, refinery, isoprene source, and motor vehicle), Haden Rd. (flare emissions, petrochemical source, industrial source, solvent, natural gas/propane, refinery, and motor vehicle), and Clinton Dr. (flare emissions, two industrial sources, refinery, natural gas/propane, motor vehicle, and isoprene source). Five similar source types were found among three sites although the sources were differently located. Conditional probability function analysis using surface wind data and identified source contributions aided the identifications of local point sources by providing indications of likely directions for the sources. The results agreed well with the locations of known local NMOC sources.

  1. Michigan residential heating oil and propane price survey: 1995--1996 heating season. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, C.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of residential No. 2 distillate fuel (home heating oil) and liquefied petroleum gas (propane) prices over the 1995--1996 heating season in Michigan. The Michigan`s Public Service Commission (MPSC) conducted the survey under a cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA). This survey was funded in part by a grant from the DOE. From October 1995 through March 1996, the MPSC surveyed participating distributors by telephone for current residential retail home heating oil and propane prices. The MPSC transmitted the data via a computer modem to the EIA using the Petroleum Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). Survey results were published in aggregate on the MPSC World Wide Web site at http://ermisweb.state.mi.us/shopp. The page was updated with both residential and wholesale prices immediately following the transmission of the data to the EIA. The EIA constructed the survey using a sample of Michigan home heating oil and propane retailers. The sample accounts for different sales volumes, geographic location, and sources of primary supply.

  2. Theoretical Investigation of the Gas-Phase Reaction of CrO(+) with Propane.

    PubMed

    Beck, Jennifer E; Dudley, Timothy J

    2017-03-02

    Transition metal oxide cations (e.g., MO(+)) have been shown to oxidize small alkanes in the gas phase. The chromium oxide cation is of particular interest because it is more reactive than oxides of earlier transition metals but is more selective than oxides of later transition metals. The reaction of CrO(+) with propane has been shown to produce a number of products: propanol, propene, ethene, and hydrogen. Few theoretical studies exist for reactions of simple transition metal oxide cations with larger alkanes. We have analyzed the potential energy surfaces associated with the reaction of CrO(+) with propane using two DFT methods, B3LYP and M06-L. Energetically viable reaction paths leading to each experimentally observed product have been characterized. Each reaction path begins with formation of a reactive intermediate in which either an α- or β-hydrogen from propane is extracted by the oxygen atom of CrO(+). While pathways leading to formation of hydrogen and ethene were found to occur on a single spin surface, energetically viable pathways to forming propanol and propene require a transition from the quartet spin surface to the sextet surface. The minimum-energy crossing points between the quartet and sextet surfaces were found to be well below the energy level of the reactants and structurally resemble the initial reactive intermediates.

  3. Thermocatalytic Destruction of Gas-Phase Perchloroethylene Using Propane as a Hydrogen Source

    PubMed Central

    Willinger, Marty; Rupp, Erik; Barbaris, Brian; Gao, Song; Arnolda, Robert; Betterton, Eric; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The use of propane in combination with oxygen to promote the destruction of perchloroethylene (PCE) over a platinum (Pt)/rhodium (Rh) catalyst on a cerium/zirconium oxide washcoat supported on an alumina monolith was explored. Conversions of PCE were measured in a continuous flow reactor with residence times less than 0.5 s and temperatures ranging from 200 to 600°C. The presence of propane was shown to increase significantly the conversion of PCE over oxygen-only conditions. Conversions close to 100% were observed at temperatures lower than 450°C with 20% oxygen and 2% propane in the feed, which makes this process attractive from a practical standpoint. In the absence of oxygen, PCE conversion is even higher, but the catalyst suffers significant deactivation in less than an hour. Even though results show that oxygen competes with reactants for active sites on the catalyst, the long-term stability that oxygen confers to the catalyst makes the process an efficient alternative to PCE oxidation. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood competitive adsorption model is proposed to quantify PCE conversion. PMID:19217713

  4. Kinetics of Hydrogen Oxidation Downstream of Lean Propane and Hydrogen Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fine, Burton

    1961-01-01

    The decay of hydrogen was measured downstream of lean, flat, premixed hydrogen and propane-air flames seated on cooled porous burners. Experimental variables included temperature, pressure, initial equivalence ratio and diluent. Sampling of burned gas was done through uncooled quartz orifice probes, and the analysis was based on gas chromatography. An approximate treatment of the data in which diffusion was neglected led to the following rate expression for the zone downstream of hydrogen flames d[H (sub 2)] divided by (d times t) equals 1.7 times 10 (sup 10) [H (sub 2)] (sup 3) divided by (sub 2) [O (sub 2)]e (sup (-8100 divided by RT)) moles per liters per second. On the basis of a rate expression of this form, the specific rate constant for the reaction downstream of hydrogen flames was about three times as great as that determined downstream of propane flames. This result was explained on the basis of the existence of a steady state between hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the burned gas downstream of propane flames.

  5. Cometabolic biodegradation of 1,2,3-trichloropropane by propane-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baixin; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2017-02-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is an emerging groundwater pollutant and suspected human carcinogen. TCP, a recalcitrant contaminant, has been detected in the subsurface near TCP manufacture facilities and many superfund sites. Considering the toxicity and the occurence of TCP, there is a need to seek for cost-effective treatment technologies for TCP-contaminated sites. This paper investigated TCP biodegradation by propane-oxidizing bacteria (PrOB) which are known to express propane monooxygenase (PrMO). PrMO can cometabolically degrade many different contaminants. Four PrOB, Rhodococus jostii RHA1, Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5, Rhodococcus rubber ENV425 and one isolate Sphingopyxis sp. AX-A were examined for their ability to degrade TCP. All the four PrOB resting cells were able to degrade TCP. Strain JOB5 exhibited the best TCP degradation ability (vinitial = 9.7 ± 0.7 μg TCP (mg protein)(-1)h(-1)). No TCP was degraded in the presence of acetylene (an inhibitor for PrMO), suggesting that PrMO might be responsible for TCP degradation. Furthermore, competitive inhibition was observed between propane and TCP, and between trichloroethylene (TCE) and TCP.

  6. Propanal synthesis from aqueous propylene glycol/hydrogen peroxide on a Ru/alumina catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Disselkamp, Robert S.; Harris, Benjamin D.; Patel, Jayshribe N.; Hart, Todd R.; Peden, Charles HF

    2008-05-01

    The conversion of polyol materials, including 1,2-diols, into higher commodity chemicals is actively being pursued by many researchers. Here we report the production of propanal from propylene glycol and hydrogen peroxide using a Ru/alumina catalyst. Experiments were conducted by adding up to four peroxide equivalents under steady-state reflux conditions at 371 K. The product propanal and its subsequent reaction product with substrate, 1,3-dioxolane-2-ethyl-4-methyl, was observed to be an intermediate achieving a maximum concentration of 3% of substrate. Buffering using Mg(OH)2 at pH~10 resulted in propanal formation, whereas buffering at similar pH using Na2HSO4 did not, from which we propose that magnesium acts as a promoter in the reaction. The mechanism appears to be a dehydration to enol, followed by rearrangement to product. Experiments utilizing Ru/carbon did not yield any propanol suggesting that the acidic sites of alumina aid the dehydration reaction. To our knowledge, this represents the first time hydrogen peroxide has been used in an alcohol dehydration reaction.

  7. Atmospheric methane isotopic record favors fossil sources flat in 1980s and 1990s with recent increase

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Andrew L.; Butenhoff, Christopher L.; Teama, Doaa G.; Röger, Florian H.; Khalil, M. Aslam K.; Rasmussen, Reinhold A.

    2016-01-01

    Observations of atmospheric methane (CH4) since the late 1970s and measurements of CH4 trapped in ice and snow reveal a meteoric rise in concentration during much of the twentieth century. Since 1750, levels of atmospheric CH4 have more than doubled to current globally averaged concentration near 1,800 ppb. During the late 1980s and 1990s, the CH4 growth rate slowed substantially and was near or at zero between 1999 and 2006. There is no scientific consensus on the drivers of this slowdown. Here, we report measurements of the stable isotopic composition of atmospheric CH4 (13C/12C and D/H) from a rare air archive dating from 1977 to 1998. Together with more modern records of isotopic atmospheric CH4, we performed a time-dependent retrieval of methane fluxes spanning 25 y (1984–2009) using a 3D chemical transport model. This inversion results in a 24 [18, 27] Tg y−1 CH4 increase in fugitive fossil fuel emissions since 1984 with most of this growth occurring after year 2000. This result is consistent with some bottom-up emissions inventories but not with recent estimates based on atmospheric ethane. In fact, when forced with decreasing emissions from fossil fuel sources our inversion estimates unreasonably high emissions in other sources. Further, the inversion estimates a decrease in biomass-burning emissions that could explain falling ethane abundance. A range of sensitivity tests suggests that these results are robust. PMID:27621453

  8. Atmospheric methane isotopic record favors fossil sources flat in 1980s and 1990s with recent increase.

    PubMed

    Rice, Andrew L; Butenhoff, Christopher L; Teama, Doaa G; Röger, Florian H; Khalil, M Aslam K; Rasmussen, Reinhold A

    2016-09-27

    Observations of atmospheric methane (CH4) since the late 1970s and measurements of CH4 trapped in ice and snow reveal a meteoric rise in concentration during much of the twentieth century. Since 1750, levels of atmospheric CH4 have more than doubled to current globally averaged concentration near 1,800 ppb. During the late 1980s and 1990s, the CH4 growth rate slowed substantially and was near or at zero between 1999 and 2006. There is no scientific consensus on the drivers of this slowdown. Here, we report measurements of the stable isotopic composition of atmospheric CH4 ((13)C/(12)C and D/H) from a rare air archive dating from 1977 to 1998. Together with more modern records of isotopic atmospheric CH4, we performed a time-dependent retrieval of methane fluxes spanning 25 y (1984-2009) using a 3D chemical transport model. This inversion results in a 24 [18, 27] Tg y(-1) CH4 increase in fugitive fossil fuel emissions since 1984 with most of this growth occurring after year 2000. This result is consistent with some bottom-up emissions inventories but not with recent estimates based on atmospheric ethane. In fact, when forced with decreasing emissions from fossil fuel sources our inversion estimates unreasonably high emissions in other sources. Further, the inversion estimates a decrease in biomass-burning emissions that could explain falling ethane abundance. A range of sensitivity tests suggests that these results are robust.

  9. Atmospheric methane isotopic record favors fossil sources flat in 1980s and 1990s with recent increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Andrew L.; Butenhoff, Christopher L.; Teama, Doaa G.; Röger, Florian H.; Khalil, M. Aslam K.; Rasmussen, Reinhold A.

    2016-09-01

    Observations of atmospheric methane (CH4) since the late 1970s and measurements of CH4 trapped in ice and snow reveal a meteoric rise in concentration during much of the twentieth century. Since 1750, levels of atmospheric CH4 have more than doubled to current globally averaged concentration near 1,800 ppb. During the late 1980s and 1990s, the CH4 growth rate slowed substantially and was near or at zero between 1999 and 2006. There is no scientific consensus on the drivers of this slowdown. Here, we report measurements of the stable isotopic composition of atmospheric CH4 (13C/12C and D/H) from a rare air archive dating from 1977 to 1998. Together with more modern records of isotopic atmospheric CH4, we performed a time-dependent retrieval of methane fluxes spanning 25 y (1984-2009) using a 3D chemical transport model. This inversion results in a 24 [18, 27] Tg y-1 CH4 increase in fugitive fossil fuel emissions since 1984 with most of this growth occurring after year 2000. This result is consistent with some bottom-up emissions inventories but not with recent estimates based on atmospheric ethane. In fact, when forced with decreasing emissions from fossil fuel sources our inversion estimates unreasonably high emissions in other sources. Further, the inversion estimates a decrease in biomass-burning emissions that could explain falling ethane abundance. A range of sensitivity tests suggests that these results are robust.

  10. Biological and biochemical methane reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, H.; Pienkos, P. T.; Stirling, D. I.

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of the project was to characterize the nature of the active site involved in methane activation by enzymes from well characterized and newly isolated methane-oxidizing bacteria. Kinetic and structural studies provided an initial picture of how the soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) enzyme is structured and operates to selectively oxidize methane to methanol under ambient conditions. Cloning and sequencing of gene coding for some of the sMMO proteins were completed, and 72 strains of methanotrophs were isolated from extreme environments.

  11. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Pinnau, Ingo; Segelke, Scott

    1997-01-01

    A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

  12. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

    1997-09-23

    A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

  13. On methane pyrolysis special applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toncu, D. C.; Toncu, G.; Soleimani, S.

    2015-11-01

    Methane pyrolysis represents one of the most important processes in industrial use, with applications rising from the chemical and petrochemical industry, combustion, materials and protective coatings. Despite the intense research, experimental data lack kinetic aspects, and the thermodynamics involved often leads to inaccurate results when applied to various systems. Carrying out a comparative analysis of several available data on methane pyrolysis, the paper aims to study the phenomenon of methane pyrolysis under different environments (combustion and plasma), concluding on the most possible reaction pathways involved in many of its applications. Computer simulation using different database underlines the conclusion, helping to the understanding of methane pyrolysis importance in future technologies.

  14. Redefining the isotopic boundaries of biogenic methane: Methane from endoevaporites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazaz, Amanda M.; Bebout, Brad M.; Kelley, Cheryl A.; Poole, Jennifer; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    2013-06-01

    The recent reports of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, as well as the findings of hypersaline paleoenvironments on that planet, have underscored the need to evaluate the importance of biological (as opposed to geological) trace gas production and consumption, particularly in hypersaline environments. Methane in the atmosphere of Mars may be an indication of extant life, but it may also be a consequence of geologic activity and/or the thermal alteration of ancient organic matter. On Earth these methane sources can be distinguished using stable isotopic analyses and the ratio of methane (C1) to C2 and C3 alkanes present in the gas source (C1/(C2 + C3)). We report here that methane produced in hypersaline environments on Earth has an isotopic composition and alkane content outside the values presently considered to indicate a biogenic origin. Methane-rich bubbles released from sub-aqueous substrates contained δ13CCH4 and δ2HCH4 values ranging from -65‰ to -35‰ and -350‰ to -140‰ respectively. Higher salinity endoevaporites yielded what would be considered non-biogenic methane based upon stable isotopic and alkane content, however incubation of crustal and algal mat samples resulted in methane production with similar isotopic values. Radiocarbon analysis indicated that the production of the methane was from recently fixed carbon. An extension of the isotopic boundaries of biogenic methane is necessary in order to avoid the possibility of false negatives returned from measurements of methane on Mars and other planetary bodies.

  15. Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 6, January 16, 1988--April 15, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Chan, Yee Wai; Posin, B.M.

    1988-05-20

    The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that later can be converted to either liquid fuels or value-added chemicals, as economics dictate. During this reporting period, we synthesized several phthalocyanine catalysts supported on magnesia (MgO) in Task 3. In Task 4 we have tested these catalysts for oxidation of methane and did a number of blank experiments to determine the cause of the low methanol yield we have observed. Magnesia supported catalysts were prepared by first synthesizing the various metal tetrasulfophthalocyanines (TSPCs), converting them to the acid form, and then supporting these complexes on a basic support (MgO) by a neutralization reaction. The metals used were Ru, Pd, Cu, Fe, Co, Mn, and Mo. CoTSPC was also synthesized in zeolite Y using our standard template techniques described in Quarterly Report No. 1. These complexes were examined for catalytic activity in the oxidation of methane. The PdTSPC/MgO had greater activity, and oxidized some of the methane (selectivity of 2.8% from the methane oxidized at 375{degrees}C) to ethane. This is a much lower temperature for this reaction than previously reported in the literature. We also examined the reactivity of various components of the system in the oxidation of the product methanol. The reactor showed some activity for the oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide. When zeolite or magnesia were added, this activity increased. The magnesia oxidized most of the methanol to carbon dioxide, while the zeolite reduced some of the methanol to hydrocarbons. With oxygen in the feed gas stream (i.e., the conditions of our methane oxidation), a very large fraction of the methanol was oxidized to carbon dioxide when passed over magnesia. From this, we can conclude that any methanol formed in the oxidation of methane would probably be destroyed very quickly on the catalyst bed.

  16. Occurrence of decabromodiphenyl ethane in captive Chinese alligators (Alligator sinensis) from China.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bing; Wu, Ting; Zhao, Guangchao; Sun, Yuxin; Wang, Xinming; Zhao, Juan; Yi, Zhigang; Wu, Xiaobing; Mai, Bixian

    2015-01-01

    Decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), a replacement for decabromodiphenyl ether (deca-BDE), was investigated in captive Chinese alligators from China. DBDPE was detected in adult tissues, neonates and eggs of Chinese alligators with concentrations ranging from 4.74-192, 0.24-1.94, and 0.01-0.51 ng g(-1) lipid weight, respectively. Compared to PBDEs and PCBs, DBDPE contamination was limited in Chinese alligators. Additionally, DBDPE concentrations in adult muscles were one to three orders of magnitude higher than those in neonates and eggs, suggesting the limited maternal transfer potential of DBDPE in Chinese alligators. This is the first study to report the occurrence of DBDPE in Chinese alligators.

  17. A study of ethane on Saturn in the 3 micron region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjoraker, G. L.; Larson, H. P.; Fink, U.

    1981-09-01

    C2H6 has been detected in absorption on Saturn from 3-micron airborne spectra. Based on comparisons with laboratory spectra of C2H6, the ethane abundance has been estimated at 7.5 plus or minus 3.5 cm-amagat, equivalent to a column abundance of 3.0 plus or minus 1.4 cm-amagat. The results support expectations that CH4 photolysis is a major disequilibrating mechanism in the upper atmosphere of the outer planets and Titan.

  18. Synthesis and crystal structure of 1,1'-Bis(2-bromobenzoyl thioureido)ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abosaadiya, Salima M.; Yamin, Bohari M.; Hasbullah, Aishah

    2016-11-01

    1,1'-Bis(2-bromobenzoylthioureido)ethane was synthesized from the reaction of 2-bromobenzoylisothiocyanate and ethylenediamine in acetonitrile. The compound was characterized by FT-IR, 1H, and 13C NMR spectroscopy techniques. Furthermor compound was found to crystallized in monoclinic system with space group of P2(1)/c. In each thiourea moiety the thiono group is trans to the benzoyl across their C-N bonds. The crystal structures are stabilized by N-H...S intermolecular hydrogen bonds to form infinite two dimensional network.

  19. Decomposition of chlorinated ethylenes and ethanes in an electron beam generated plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vitale, Steven A.

    1996-02-01

    An electron beam generated plasma reactor (EBGPR) is used to determine the plasma chemistry kinetics, energetics and decomposition pathways of six chlorinated ethylenes and ethanes: 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, ethyl chloride, trichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride. A traditional chemical kinetic and chemical engineering analysis of the data from the EBGPR is performed, and the following hypothesis was verified: The specific energy required for chlorinated VOC decomposition in the electron beam generated plasma reactor is determined by the electron attachment coefficient of the VOC and the susceptibility of the molecule to radical attack. The technology was demonstrated at the Hanford Reservation to remove VOCs from soils.

  20. Consumption of atmospheric methane by tundra soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, S. C.; Reeburgh, W. S.

    1990-01-01

    The results of field and laboratory experiments on methane consumption by tundra soils are reported. For methane concentrations ranging from below to well above ambient, moist soils are found to consume methane rapidly; in nonwaterlogged soils, equilibration with atmospheric methane is fast relative to microbial oxidation. It is concluded that lowering of the water table in tundra as a resulting from a warmer, drier climate will decrease methane fluxes and could cause these areas to provide negative feedback for atmospheric methane.