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Sample records for methanesulfonic acid monooxygenase

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Methanesulfonic Acid-Degrading Bacteria from the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A. S.; Owens, N.; Murrell, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Two methylotrophic bacterial strains, TR3 and PSCH4, capable of growth on methanesulfonic acid as the sole carbon source were isolated from the marine environment. Methanesulfonic acid metabolism in these strains was initiated by an inducible NADH-dependent monooxygenase, which cleaved methanesulfonic acid into formaldehyde and sulfite. The presence of hydroxypyruvate reductase and the absence of ribulose monophosphate-dependent hexulose monophosphate synthase indicated the presence of the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation. Cell suspensions of bacteria grown on methanesulfonic acid completely oxidized methanesulfonic acid to carbon dioxide and sulfite with a methanesulfonic acid/oxygen stoichiometry of 1.0:2.0. Oxygen electrode-substrate studies indicated the dissimilation of formaldehyde to formate and carbon dioxide for energy generation. Carbon dioxide was not fixed by ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. It was shown that methanol is not an intermediate in methanesulfonic acid metabolism, although these strains grew on methanol and other one-carbon compounds, as well as a variety of heterotrophic carbon sources. These two novel marine facultative methylotrophs have the ability to mineralize methanesulfonic acid and may play a role in the cycling of global organic sulfur. PMID:16535055

  2. Strongly Acidic Auxin Indole-3-Methanesulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jerry D.; Baldi, Bruce G.; Bialek, Krystyna

    1985-01-01

    A radiochemical synthesis is described for [14C]indole-3-methanesulfonic acid (IMS), a strongly acidic auxin analog. Techniques were developed for fractionation and purification of IMS using normal and reverse phase chromatography. In addition, the utility of both Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry for analysis of IMS has been demonstrated. IMS was shown to be an active auxin, stimulating soybean hypocotyl elongation, bean first internode curvature, and ethylene production. IMS uptake by thin sections of soybean hypocotyl was essentially independent of solution pH and, when applied at a 100 micromolar concentration, IMS exhibited a basipetal polarity in its transport in both corn coleoptile and soybean hypocotyl sections. [14C]IMS should, therefore, be a useful compound to study fundamental processes related to the movement of auxins in plant tissues and organelles. PMID:16664007

  3. Comparison of Bacillus monooxygenase genes for unique fatty acid production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper reviews Bacillus genes encoding monooxygenase enzymes producing unique fatty acid metabolites. Specifically, it examines standard monooxygenase electron transfer schemes and related domain structures of these fused domain enzymes on route to understanding the observed oxygenase activiti...

  4. The methanesulfonic acid (MSA) record in a Svalbard ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Elisabeth; Kekonen, Teija; Moore, John; Mulvaney, Robert

    Svalbard ice cores have not yet been fully exploited for studies of climate and environmental conditions. In one recently drilled ice core from Lomonosovfonna, we have studied the methanesulfonic acid (MSA) records in relation to temperature and sea ice. Under the present climatic conditions, MSA appears to be negatively correlated with the sea-ice conditions in the Barents Sea, and positively correlated with the instrumental temperature record from Svalbard. However, prior to about 1920 the MSA concentrations were about twice as high, despite the more extensive sea-ice coverage. After exploring different possibilities, we suggest that MSA concentrations were higher in the 19th century than in the 20th century due to increased primary production, in response to increased vertical stability of the sea surface layers, caused by increased meltwater production from the more extensive sea-ice cover. Thus, the MSA record from Lomonosovfonna probably both is a measure of the regional sea-ice variability on the multi-decadal scale and reflects locally favorable conditions for marine biogenic dimethyl sulfide (DMS) production on the sub-decadal scale.

  5. Metagenomic survey of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) catabolic genes in an Atlantic Ocean surface water sample and in a partial enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana C.; Azevedo, Rui M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Methanesulfonic acid (MSA) is a relevant intermediate of the biogeochemical cycle of sulfur and environmental microorganisms assume an important role in the mineralization of this compound. Several methylotrophic bacterial strains able to grow on MSA have been isolated from soil or marine water and two conserved operons, msmABCD coding for MSA monooxygenase and msmEFGH coding for a transport system, have been repeatedly encountered in most of these strains. Homologous sequences have also been amplified directly from the environment or observed in marine metagenomic data, but these showed a base composition (G + C content) very different from their counterparts from cultivated bacteria. The aim of this study was to understand which microorganisms within the coastal surface oceanic microflora responded to MSA as a nutrient and how the community evolved in the early phases of an enrichment by means of metagenome and gene-targeted amplicon sequencing. From the phylogenetic point of view, the community shifted significantly with the disappearance of all signals related to the Archaea, the Pelagibacteraceae and phylum SAR406, and the increase in methylotroph-harboring taxa, accompanied by other groups so far not known to comprise methylotrophs such as the Hyphomonadaceae. At the functional level, the abundance of several genes related to sulfur metabolism and methylotrophy increased during the enrichment and the allelic distribution of gene msmA diagnostic for MSA monooxygenase altered considerably. Even more dramatic was the disappearance of MSA import-related gene msmE, which suggests that alternative transporters must be present in the enriched community and illustrate the inadequacy of msmE as an ecofunctional marker for MSA degradation at sea. PMID:27761315

  6. Metagenomic survey of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) catabolic genes in an Atlantic Ocean surface water sample and in a partial enrichment.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Ana C; Azevedo, Rui M S; De Marco, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Methanesulfonic acid (MSA) is a relevant intermediate of the biogeochemical cycle of sulfur and environmental microorganisms assume an important role in the mineralization of this compound. Several methylotrophic bacterial strains able to grow on MSA have been isolated from soil or marine water and two conserved operons, msmABCD coding for MSA monooxygenase and msmEFGH coding for a transport system, have been repeatedly encountered in most of these strains. Homologous sequences have also been amplified directly from the environment or observed in marine metagenomic data, but these showed a base composition (G + C content) very different from their counterparts from cultivated bacteria. The aim of this study was to understand which microorganisms within the coastal surface oceanic microflora responded to MSA as a nutrient and how the community evolved in the early phases of an enrichment by means of metagenome and gene-targeted amplicon sequencing. From the phylogenetic point of view, the community shifted significantly with the disappearance of all signals related to the Archaea, the Pelagibacteraceae and phylum SAR406, and the increase in methylotroph-harboring taxa, accompanied by other groups so far not known to comprise methylotrophs such as the Hyphomonadaceae. At the functional level, the abundance of several genes related to sulfur metabolism and methylotrophy increased during the enrichment and the allelic distribution of gene msmA diagnostic for MSA monooxygenase altered considerably. Even more dramatic was the disappearance of MSA import-related gene msmE, which suggests that alternative transporters must be present in the enriched community and illustrate the inadequacy of msmE as an ecofunctional marker for MSA degradation at sea.

  7. Methanesulfonic acid sodium salt protects retina from acute light damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Gu, Qing; Xu, Xun

    2012-07-01

    Methanesulfonic acid sodium salt (Dipyrone), an antipyretic and analgesic drug, has been demonstrated to improve cerebral ischemia through the inhibition of mitochondrial cell death cascades. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential photoprotective activity of methanesulfonic acid sodium salt in a model of light-induced retinopathy. One hundred mice were assigned randomly into vehicle (V), methanesulfonic acid sodium salt (D), light damage model plus vehicle (MV) and light damage model plus methanesulfonic acid sodium salt (MD) groups (n = 25 each). In the MD group, methanesulfonic acid sodium salt (100 mg/kg) was administered by intraperitoneal injection 30 minutes before light exposure. Twenty-four hours after light exposure, hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for histological evaluation. The thickness of the outer plus inner-segment and outer nuclear layer was measured on sections parallel to the vertical meridian of the eye at a distance of 1000 mm from the optic nerve. Electroretinography (ERG) test was performed to assess the functional change. The morphology of mitochondria was also revealed by TEM. Finally, the expression of cytochrome c (CytC) and the relative apoptotic proteins were detected by Western blotting, and the interaction between mitochondrial proteins was investigated by co-immunoprecipitation. The photoreceptor inner and outer segments of the MV group were significantly disorganized than the MD group. The thicknesses of the outer plus inner-segment layers and the outer nuclear layer, and the amplitudes of the a and b waves of the scotopic ERG response markedly decreased in the MV group compared to those in the MD group (P < 0.05). TEM examination revealed that the mitochondria of the MV group were distinctly swollen and contained disrupted cristae. In contrast, the morphology of mitochondria in the MD group was unaffected. Western blotting analysis showed that CytC, apoptosis

  8. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids: A new class of organic micropollutants in the water cycle.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Daniel; Frömel, Tobias; Knepper, Thomas P

    2016-09-15

    Mobile and persistent organic micropollutants may impact raw and drinking waters and are thus of concern for human health. To identify such possible substances of concern nineteen water samples from five European countries (France, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Spain and Germany) and different compartments of the water cycle (urban effluent, surface water, ground water and drinking water) were enriched with mixed-mode solid phase extraction. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry non-target screening of these samples led to the detection and structural elucidation of seven novel organic micropollutants. One structure could already be confirmed by a reference standard (trifluoromethanesulfonic acid) and six were tentatively identified based on experimental evidence (chloromethanesulfonic acid, dichloromethanesulfonic acid, trichloromethanesulfonic acid, bromomethanesulfonic acid, dibromomethanesulfonic acid and bromochloromethanesulfonic acid). Approximated concentrations for these substances show that trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, a chemical registered under the European Union regulation REACH with a production volume of more than 100 t/a, is able to spread along the water cycle and may be present in concentrations up to the μg/L range. Chlorinated and brominated methanesulfonic acids were predominantly detected together which indicates a common source and first experimental evidence points towards water disinfection as a potential origin. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids were detected in drinking waters and thus may be new substances of concern.

  9. The Role of Oxalic Acid in New Particle Formation from Methanesulfonic Acid, Methylamine, and Water.

    PubMed

    Arquero, Kristine D; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2017-02-21

    Atmospheric particles are notorious for their effects on human health and visibility and are known to influence climate. Though sulfuric acid and ammonia/amines are recognized as main contributors to new particle formation (NPF), models and observations have indicated that other species may be involved. It has been shown that nucleation from methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and amines, which is enhanced with added water, can also contribute to NPF. While organics are ubiquitous in air and likely to be involved in NPF by stabilizing small clusters for further growth, their effects on the MSA-amine system are not known. This work investigates the effect of oxalic acid (OxA) on NPF from the reaction of MSA and methylamine (MA) at 1 atm and 294 K in the presence and absence of water vapor using an aerosol flow reactor. OxA and MA do not efficiently form particles even in the presence of water, but NPF is enhanced when adding MSA to OxA-MA with and without water. The addition of OxA to MSA-MA mixtures yields a modest NPF enhancement, whereas the addition of OxA to MSA-MA-H2O has no effect. Possible reasons for these effects are discussed.

  10. Infrared studies of the reaction of methanesulfonic acid with trimethylamine on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Noriko; Arquero, Kristine D; Dawson, Matthew L; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Organosulfur compounds generated from a variety of biological as well as anthropogenic sources are oxidized in air to form sulfuric acid and methanesulfonic acid (MSA). Both of these acids formed initially in the gas phase react with ammonia and amines in air to form and grow new particles, which is important for visibility, human health and climate. A competing sink is deposition on surfaces in the boundary layer. However, relatively little is known about reactions after they deposit on surfaces. We report here diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometry (DRIFTS) studies of the reaction of MSA with trimethylamine (TMA) on a silicon powder at atmospheric pressure in synthetic air and at room temperature, either in the absence or in the presence of water vapor. In both cases, DRIFTS spectra of the product surface species are essentially the same as the transmission spectrum obtained for trimethylaminium methanesulfonate, indicating the formation of the salt on the surface with a lower limit to the reaction probability of γ > 10(-6). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first infrared study to demonstrate this chemistry from the heterogeneous reaction of MSA with an amine on a surface. This heterogeneous chemistry appears to be sufficiently fast that it could impact measurements of gas-phase amines through reactions with surface-adsorbed acids on sampling lines and inlets. It could also represent an additional sink for amines in the boundary layer, especially at night when the gas-phase reactions of amines with OH radical and ozone are minimized.

  11. A cerium-lead redox flow battery system employing supporting electrolyte of methanesulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Zhaolin; Xu, Shengnan; Yin, Dongming; Wang, Limin

    2015-11-01

    A novel cerium-lead redox flow battery (RFB) employing Ce(IV)/Ce(III) and Pb(II)/Pb redox couples in the supporting electrolyte of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) is developed and preliminarily investigated. The RFB requires no additional catalyst and uses kinetically favorable reactions between low-cost reactants, and provides a desirable discharge voltage of approximately 1.7 V, with high average coulombic efficiency (CE) of 92% and energy efficiency (EE) of 86% over 800 cycles at 298 K. Stable cycling with an acceptable performance is achieved for a board operating temperature range of 253 K-313 K. The excellent performance obtained from the preliminary study suggests that the cerium-lead RFB promises to be applicable to large-scale energy storage for electricity grids.

  12. Methanesulfonic acid cataylzed cyclization of 3-arylpropanoic and 4-arylbutanoic acids to 1-indanones and 1-tetralones

    SciTech Connect

    Premasagar, V.; Palaniswamy, V.A.; Eisenbraun, E.J.

    1981-07-03

    Since methanesulfonic acid (MSA), does not cause sulfonation of aromatic rings, it was used at elevated temperatures to prepare 1-indanones and 1-tetralones through cyclization of 3-arylpropanoic and 4-arylbutanoic acids. The twelve ketones which were prepared from MSA-catalyzed cyclization of 3 and 4-aryl substituted carboxylic acids are pesented in a table, along with their yields, time and temperature. Studies under a variety of temperatures, concentrations and reaction times show that 30 min. to 3 hours is needed for cyclization depending on the reactivity of the starting material. The use of neat MSA as a substitute for Friedel-Crafts catalyst was not promising. Trial studies in which m-xylene was treated with acetic acid in the presence of anhydrous MSA at 110/sup 0/C for 3 hours gave low yields of acetylation product (ca. 30%), and gas chromatography analysis of the product showed unreacted m-xylene.

  13. Effect of light transition metal complexes of methanesulfonic acid hydrazide on the viability of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Miloshev, George A; Peycheva, Ekaterina N; Dodoff, Nicolay I; Kushev, Daniel N; Lalia-Kantouri, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The effect of methanesulfonic acid hydrazide (MSH) and its complexes [M(MSH)4Cl2] (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) and [Zn(MSH)2Cl2] on culture growth suppression and viability (Colony Forming Units) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied. The highest culture growth suppression was exhibited by [Co(MSH)4Cl2], whereas the most cytotoxic appeared [Mn(MSH)4Cl2]. The changes in cell morphology were also traced by means of FACS analysis.

  14. A convenient iodination method for alcohols using cesium iodide/methanesulfonic acid and its comparison using cesium iodide/p-toluenesulfonic acid or cesium iodide/aluminium chloride.

    PubMed

    Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Zia-Ullah; Perveen, Shahnaz; Hayat, Safdar; Ali, Muhammad; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    In situ generation of hydrogen iodide from cesium iodide/methanesulfonic acid was found to be an attractive reagent combination for the conversion of alkyl, allyl, and benzyl alcohols to their corresponding iodides under mild conditions. The method is compared with that using cesium iodide/p-toluenesulfonic acid or cesium iodide/aluminium chloride.

  15. Experimental and theoretical studies on methanesulfonic acid 1-methylhydrazide: Antimicrobial activities of its sulfonyl hydrazone derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özbek, Neslihan; Alyar, Saliha; Karacan, Nurcan

    2009-12-01

    Methanesulfonic acid 1-methylhydrazide ( msmh) and its sulfonyl hydrazone derivatives, salicylaldehyde- N-methylmethanesulfonylhydrazone ( salmsmh) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde- N-methylmethanesulfonylhydrazone ( nafmsmh) were synthesized and characterized by using FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, LC-MS and elemental analysis. Conformation analysis of msmh based on DFT/B3LYP/6-311G(d) method was performed. 1H and 13C shielding tensors of msmh for the most stable conformer were calculated with GIAO/DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(2d, 2p) methods in vacuo and various solvents such as DMSO, THF, acetonitrile, methanol and aqueous solution. The harmonic vibrational wavenumbers for the most stable conformer were calculated using at B3LYP/6-311G(d) level. Antimicrobial activity of the compounds was also screened against Gram-positive bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Bacillus cereus RSKK 863) and Gram-negative bacteria ( Escherichia coli ATCC 11230, Salmonella enterititis ATCC 40376, Pseudomonos aeruginosa ATCC 28753) by both disc diffusion and micro dilution methods.

  16. Modeled methanesulfonic acid (MSA) deposition in Antarctica and its relationship to sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezel, P. J.; Alexander, B.; Bitz, C. M.; Steig, E. J.; Holmes, C. D.; Yang, X.; Sciare, J.

    2011-12-01

    Methanesulfonic acid (MSA) has previously been measured in ice cores in Antarctica as a proxy for sea ice extent and Southern Hemisphere circulation. In a series of chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) sensitivity experiments, we identify mechanisms that control the MSA concentrations recorded in ice cores. Sea ice is linked to MSA via dimethylsulfide (DMS), which is produced biologically in the surface ocean and known to be particularly concentrated in the sea ice zone. Given existing ocean surface DMS concentration data sets, the model does not demonstrate a strong relationship between sea ice and MSA deposition in Antarctica. The variability of DMS emissions associated with sea ice extent is small (11-30%) due to the small interannual variability of sea ice extent. Wind plays a role in the variability in DMS emissions, but its contribution relative to that of sea ice is strongly dependent on the assumed DMS concentrations in the sea ice zone. Atmospheric sulfur emitted as DMS from the sea ice undergoes net transport northward. Our model runs suggest that DMS emissions from the sea ice zone may account for 26-62% of MSA deposition at the Antarctic coast and 36-95% in inland Antarctica. Though our results are sensitive to model assumptions, it is clear that an improved understanding of both DMS concentrations and emissions from the sea ice zone are required to better assess the impact of sea ice variability on MSA deposition to Antarctica.

  17. Surface and free tropospheric sources of methanesulfonic acid over the tropical Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuzhong; Wang, Yuhang; Gray, Burton A.; Gu, Dasa; Mauldin, L.; Cantrell, Chris; Bandy, Alan R.

    2014-07-28

    The production of sulfate aerosols through marine sulfur chemistry is critical to the climate system. However, not all sulfur compounds have been studied in detail. One such compound is methanesulfonic acid (MSA). In this study, we use a one-dimensional chemical transport model to analyze observed vertical profiles of gas-phase MSA during the Pacific Atmospheric Sulfur Experiment (PASE). The observed sharp decrease in MSA from the surface to 600m implies a surface source of 4.0×107 molecules/cm2/s. Evidence suggests that this source is photolytically enhanced. We also find that the observed large increase of MSA from the boundary layer into the lower free troposphere (1000-2000m) results mainly from the degassing of MSA from dehydrated aerosols. We estimate a source of 1.2×107 molecules/cm2/s through this pathway. This source of soluble MSA potentially provides an important precursor for new particle formation in the free troposphere over tropics, affecting the climate system through aerosol-cloud interactions.

  18. New Particle Formation and Growth from Methanesulfonic Acid, Amines, Water, and Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Particles in the atmosphere can influence visibility, negatively impact human health, and affect climate. The largest uncertainty in determining global radiative forcing is attributed to atmospheric aerosols. While new particle formation in many locations is correlated with sulfuric acid in air, neither the gas-phase binary nucleation of H2SO4-H2O nor the gas-phase ternary nucleation of H2SO4-NH3-H2O alone can fully explain observations. An additional potential particle source, based on previous studies in this laboratory, is methanesulfonic acid (MSA) with amines and water vapor. However, organics are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) being a major component of particles. Organics could be involved in the initial stages of particle formation by enhancing or inhibiting nucleation from sulfuric acid or MSA, in addition to contributing to their growth to form SOA. Experiments to measure the effects of a series of organics of varying structure on particle formation and growth from MSA, amines, and water were performed in a custom-built small volume aerosol flow tube reactor. Analytical instruments and techniques include a scanning mobility particle sizer to measure particle size distributions, sampling onto a weak cation exchange resin with analysis by ion chromatography to measure amine concentrations, and filter collection and analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to measure MSA concentrations. Organics were measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The impact of these organics on the initial particle formation as well as growth will be reported. The outcome is an improved understanding of fundamental chemistry of nucleation and growth to ultimately be incorporated into climate models to better predict how particles affect the global climate budget.

  19. Binary nucleation in acid-water systems. II. Sulfuric acid-water and a comparison with methanesulfonic acid-water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyslouzil, B. E.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Flagan, R. C.; Okuyama, K.

    1991-05-01

    This work presents a systematic investigation of binary nucleation rates for sulfuric acid and water and the effect of temperature on these rates at isothermal, subsaturated conditions. The results from nucleation rate measurements for the sulfuric acid (H2SO4) -water system are discussed and compared to those previously presented for methanesulfonic acid (MSA)-water [B. E. Wyslouzil, J. H. Seinfeld, R. C. Flagan, and K. Okuyama, J. Chem. Phys. (submitted)]. Experiments were conducted at relative humidities (Rh) ranging from 0.006acidities (Ra) in the range of 0.04acid molecules in the critical nucleus for both the H2SO4 -water and MSA-water systems.

  20. Glyceryl ether monooxygenase resembles aromatic amino acid hydroxylases in metal ion and tetrahydrobiopterin dependence.

    PubMed

    Watschinger, Katrin; Keller, Markus A; Hermetter, Albin; Golderer, Georg; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele; Werner, Ernst R

    2009-01-01

    Glyceryl ether monooxygenase is a tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent membrane-bound enzyme which catalyses the cleavage of lipid ethers into glycerol and the corresponding aldehyde. Despite many different characterisation and purification attempts, so far no gene and primary sequence have been assigned to this enzyme. The seven other tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent enzymes can be divided in the family of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases - comprising phenylalanine hydroxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase and the two tryptophan hydroxylases - and into the three nitric oxide synthases. We tested the influences of different metal ions and metal ion chelators on glyceryl ether monooxygenase, phenylalanine hydroxylase and nitric oxide synthase activity to elucidate the relationship of glyceryl ether monooxygenase to these two families. 1,10-Phenanthroline, an inhibitor of non-heme iron-dependent enzymes, was able to potently block glyceryl ether monooxygenase as well as phenylalanine hydroxylase, but had no effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase. Two tetrahydrobiopterin analogues, N(5)-methyltetrahydrobiopterin and 4-aminotetrahydrobiopterin, had a similar impact on glyceryl ether monooxygenase activity, as has already been shown for phenylalanine hydroxylase. These observations point to a close analogy of the role of tetrahydrobiopterin in glyceryl ether monooxygenase and in aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and suggest that glyceryl ether monooxygenase may require a non-heme iron for catalysis.

  1. Origin of dimethylsulfide, non-sea-salt sulfate, and methanesulfonic acid in eastern Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosme, E.; Hourdin, F.; Genthon, C.; Martinerie, P.

    2005-02-01

    Ignoring the origin of atmospheric chemicals is often a strong limitation to the full interpretation of their measurement. In this article, this question is addressed in the case of the sulfur species in Antarctica, with an original method of retrotransport of tracers. The retrotransport model is derived from the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique Zoom-Tracers (LMD-ZT) atmospheric general circulation model, optimized for polar climate and expanded to simulate atmospheric sulfur chemistry. For two East Antarctic scientific stations (Dumont d'Urville and Vostok) the effects of transport and chemistry and the influence of oceanic, volcanic, and anthropogenic sources on dimethylsulfide (DMS), non-sea-salt (nss) sulfate, and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentrations are evaluated in summer and winter. The oceanic source largely dominates, but other sources can episodically be significant. The meridional origin and the age of DMS, MSA, and biogenic nss sulfate are also estimated. The latitudes of origin of MSA and nss sulfate are similar in summer, but they differ markedly in winter. This is a signature of their different chemical production scheme. Also, the interannual variability of the origin of the sulfur species at Vostok is weak compared to that at Dumont d'Urville. Acknowledging that the DMS concentrations in the ocean have no interannual variability in the model, this result suggests unsurprisingly that inland Antarctic stations may be better observation sites to monitor large-scale DMS bioproductivity variability than coastal sites are. The combination of slower chemistry and more intense atmospheric circulation in winter leads to unexpected results, such as a younger DMS in winter than in summer at Vostok.

  2. Post-depositional migration and preservation of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) in polar ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, M.; Marchal, O.; Guo, W.; Das, S. B.; Evans, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Methanesulfonic acid (MSA; CH3SO3-) in ice cores is a unique, high-resolution proxy of regional sea ice behavior, marine primary productivity, and synoptic climatology. Significant uncertainties remain, however, in both our understanding of the production and transfer of MSA to the ice sheet, as well as its preservation over time, compromising the paleoclimatological utility of the proxy. Here we apply a numerical modeling approach to quantitatively investigate the post-depositional processes affecting MSA migration and preservation within the firn and ice column, building on recent observational and theoretical studies. Our model allows us to evaluate the timing and magnitude of the vertical movement of MSA in response to varying influences, including the competing effects of 1) concentration gradients of sea-salts typically deposited asynchronously to MSA, 2) snow accumulation and densification rates, and 3) in situ temperature gradients. We first test the model against a recently collected ice core from a high accumulation site in coastal West Antarctica, where monthly-resolved MSA records show an abrupt shift from a summer-to-winter maximum in MSA at ~23m depth (ρ ≈ 650 kg/m3), near the firn-ice transition. We find our model to be a robust predictor of the observed migrational features in this record, capturing both (i) the abrupt shift in summer-to-winter maximal concentrations of MSA (steady state ≈ 3.2 yrs), and (ii) the depression of the seasonal amplitude at depth. Further, our modeling results suggest post-depositional effects can lead to substantial interannual alteration of the MSA signal, contrary to previous assumptions that MSA migration is confined within annual layers at high accumulation sites. Using a broad range of polar MSA records and their associated, site-specific environmental conditions, we will evaluate the fidelity of subannual to interannual variability of MSA records and systematically determine the factors conducive to its

  3. Distributions and Sources of Methanesulfonic Acid (MSA) over the Tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Gray, B. A.; Gu, D.; Mauldin, L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Bandy, A. R.

    2012-12-01

    Sulfur chemistry in the marine atmosphere is critical to the production of sulfate aerosols, which play an important role in the climate system. Methanesulfonic acid (MSA) is a major yet not well studied oxidation product of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), which is emitted from the ocean. In this study, gas-phase MSA was measured in the lower troposphere over the tropical Pacific on the NCAR C-130 aircraft during the Pacific Atmospheric Sulfur Experiment (PASE). A 1-dimensional chemical transport model (REAM) was used to analyze the vertical profiles of MSA driven by chemistry and turbulent transport. The observed vertical profiles of MSA revealed two remarkable features. First, the measured MSA concentration was enhanced near the ocean surface, decreasing rapidly in the boundary layer from the surface to ~600 m. The model analysis suggests that this sharp gradient cannot be explained by the OH oxidation of DMS or the oxidation by a reasonable level of BrO near the surface. The gradient would imply an unidentified MSA source of 4.0×10 7 molecule/cm2/s close to the ocean surface. Secondly, a large peak of MSA was observed in the lower free troposphere (FT, 1000~2000m). The MSA concentration in the lower FT was an order of magnitude larger than that in the boundary and buffer layers. The anti-correlation between the lower FT MSA concentration and relative humidity (RH) suggests that the enhancement in gas-phase MSA is related to the dehydration of aerosols due to the decreased RH at higher altitudes. The dehydrated aerosols in lower FT lose their capacity to take up gaseous MSA. In addition, our model analysis suggests that a fraction (10-20%) of aerosol-phase MSA must degas from dry aerosols to reproduce the observed vertical profile. The degassing mechanism provides a source of 1.2×10 7 molecule/cm2/s of MSA to the lower free troposphere.

  4. Electrochemical Study of AISI C1018 Steel in Methanesulfonic Acid Containing an Acetylenic Alcohol-Based Corrosion Inhibitor Formulation.

    PubMed

    Finšgar, Matjaž; Jackson, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the electrochemical potentiodynamic behavior of AISI C1018 lower-grade steel material was investigated in 20 wt.% methanesulfonic acid (MSA) solutions with or without different components to design corrosion inhibitor formulations based on acetylenic alcohol, cinnamaldehyde, 1-dodecylpyridinium chloride, and methanol. MSA has recently been considered as a new potential acid to be used in the matrix stimulation procedure and in well cleaning. It is demonstrated that AISI C1018 steel MSA needs to be inhibited. Inhibition type is determined for single components as well as for formulations. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  5. Simplified mechanism for new particle formation from methanesulfonic acid, amines, and water via experiments and ab initio calculations

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Matthew L.; Varner, Mychel E.; Perraud, Véronique; Ezell, Michael J.; Gerber, R. Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Airborne particles affect human health and significantly influence visibility and climate. A major fraction of these particles result from the reactions of gaseous precursors to generate low-volatility products such as sulfuric acid and high-molecular weight organics that nucleate to form new particles. Ammonia and, more recently, amines, both of which are ubiquitous in the environment, have also been recognized as important contributors. However, accurately predicting new particle formation in both laboratory systems and in air has been problematic. During the oxidation of organosulfur compounds, gas-phase methanesulfonic acid is formed simultaneously with sulfuric acid, and both are found in particles in coastal regions as well as inland. We show here that: (i) Amines form particles on reaction with methanesulfonic acid, (ii) water vapor is required, and (iii) particle formation can be quantitatively reproduced by a semiempirical kinetics model supported by insights from quantum chemical calculations of likely intermediate clusters. Such an approach may be more broadly applicable in models of outdoor, indoor, and industrial settings where particles are formed, and where accurate modeling is essential for predicting their impact on health, visibility, and climate. PMID:23090988

  6. North Atlantic sea-surface variability reflected in an array of Greenlandic methanesulfonic acid (MSA) records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Matthew; Das, Sarah B.; Trusel, Luke D.; McConnell, Joseph R.; Evans, Matthew J.; Saltzman, Eric S.; Grieman, Mackenzie

    2017-04-01

    Marine processes, including rising sea-surface temperatures (SST) and the diminished stabilizing effects of sea ice extent (SIE) on marine-terminating outlet glaciers, are known to play a significant role in modulating Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) mass balance. However, observations of these processes are largely limited to the past few decades. If proxies can be developed, ice cores have the potential to extend our understanding of ocean-ice coupling well beyond the satellite era. In polar regions, atmospheric methanesulfonic acid (MSA) appears to be uniquely traced to summertime phytoplankton blooms occurring near the sea ice margin and has a relatively short lifetime (<7 days); hence, MSA may be uniquely suited for delineating past ocean-ice feedbacks local to Greenland. Here, we present a unique array of annually resolved MSA records from five GrIS ice cores (including two previously unpublished records) spanning the past two to three centuries, and covering a broad geographic area of the GrIS accumulation zone. We use long-term Lagrangian particle back-trajectories in order to derive probabilistic spatial-estimates of the maritime source regions of precipitating airmasses arriving at each site in our array. Across all sites we observe the most likely maritime source region to be the south-southeast Greenland coast, suggesting that a common MSA signal is embedded across our Greenlandic ice core sites. Our analyses of the MSA array reveals two distinct modes of variance common amongst all records. The first is a conspicuous 200-year decline in MSA concentrations into the present. This trend is similar to that observed in the anomalous, centennial-scale cooling of SST's within the south Irminger Sea region of the North Atlantic, where spatial correlations of the MSA array to historical SST reanalyses also show the highest significant correlations (p < 0.001; n = 154 years). The second mode of variability recorded within the MSA records emulates centennial

  7. Modeling methanesulfonic acid (MSA) deposition on Antarctica to understand the MSA-sea ice link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezel, P. J.; Alexander, B.; Steig, E. J.; Bitz, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    Sea ice plays a large role in global energy balance and climate. Much research has focused on methanesulfonic acid (MSA) as measured in Antarctic ice cores as a proxy for sea ice extent, but observations suggest that even the sign of the relationship between sea ice and MSA varies by region. The proxy is predicated on assumptions that dimethyl sulfide (DMS) emitted from the sea ice zone, for which MSA is an oxidation product, varies sufficiently from the open ocean across the ice edge to imprint a signal in MSA deposition, though just how DMS emissions in sea ice differ from open water DMS emissions has yet to be fully understood. Expansive winter sea ice cover followed by a sharp reduction in summer may stimulate biological productivity and hence DMS emissions; Diatoms within sea ice may release DMS at high enough rates to equal or exceed emissions from open water; and the sea-to-air gas flux parameterization may be fundamentally different in the stratified waters of melting sea ice. We have modified surface DMS concentrations in sea ice in a series of global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) simulations driven by reanalysis meteorological data, in an effort to mimic different plausible scenarios of DMS emissions from within sea ice. We show that variability in MSA deposition on Antarctica is primarily driven by wind speeds that govern the DMS fluxes from the ocean, as determined by the sea-to-air gas flux parameterization; Interannual variability in ice extent insufficiently modulates DMS emissions above this wind-driven variability. We also show that one-third to two-thirds of MSA deposition on Antarctica originates from north of the sea ice zone (i.e., North of 60 S), though the fraction is strongly dependent on the assumed seasonal concentrations of DMS within the sea ice zone. Given the limitations of the model processes and scenarios, we also demonstrate where a MSA signal associated with sea ice might be found on Antarctica.

  8. Post-depositional migration and signal reconstruction of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) in polar ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Matthew; Das, Sarah B.; Marchal, Olivier; Evans, Matthew J.

    2017-04-01

    Methanesulfonic acid (MSA; CH3SO3H) in polar ice cores is a unique proxy of marine primary productivity, synoptic atmospheric transport, and regional sea ice behavior. However, MSA can be unstable within the ice column, leading to uncertainties surrounding the integrity of its paleoclimatic signal. Here, we use ice core records coupled with forward and inverse numerical models to investigate the post-depositional processes affecting the migration of MSA within the firn and ice column, and attempt to reconstruct the original signal in the ice column. The forward model, detailing the vertical diffusive transport of soluble impurities through supercooled liquid pathways, allows us to systematically assess the contribution of varying influences on the post-depositional migration of MSA. Our results show that two site-specific variables in particular, i) snow accumulation rate, and ii) seasonal concentration gradients of Na+(typically the highest concentration sea salt), may be sufficient to reasonably predict the timing and magnitude of MSA migration within the ice column. However, at present the temporal accuracy of the forward MSA migration model remains limited by inadequate constraints on the diffusion coefficient of MSA, DMS-. Specifically, we find that previous estimates of DMS-are unable to reproduce, within significant uncertainty, the progressive phase alignment of the MSA and Na+signals observed in real Antarctic ice cores. To attempt to correct for the effects of post-depositional migration, we combine recent high-resolution West Antarctic MSA data using sequential methods from optimal control theory (a Kalman filter and a related fixed-interval smoother) to reconstruct and provide uncertainty estimates on the original, pre-migrated MSA profile. We find that although the reconstructed MSA profile provides a reasonable estimate of the original MSA signal, the large uncertainties associated with this reconstructed signal cannot be objectively discriminated

  9. Application of hydrophilic interaction chromatography retention coefficients for predicting peptide elution with TFA and methanesulfonic acid ion-pairing reagents.

    PubMed

    Wujcik, Chad E; Tweed, Joseph; Kadar, Eugene P

    2010-03-01

    Hydrophilic retention coefficients for 17 peptides were calculated based on retention coefficients previously published for TSKgel silica-60 and were compared with the experimental elution profile on a Waters Atlantis HILIC silica column using TFA and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) as ion-pairing reagents. Relative peptide retention could be accurately determined with both counter-ions. Peptide retention and chromatographic behavior were influenced by the percent acid modifier used with increases in both retention and peak symmetry observed at increasing modifier concentrations. The enhancement of net peptide polarity through MSA pairing shifted retention out by nearly five-fold for the earliest eluting peptide, compared with TFA. Despite improvements in retention and efficiency (N(eff)) for MSA over TFA, a consistent reduction in calculated selectivity (alpha) was observed. This result is believed to be attributed to the stronger polar contribution of MSA masking and diminishing the underlying influence of the amino acid residues of each associated peptide. Finally, post-column infusion of propionic acid and acetic acid was evaluated for their potential to recover signal intensity for TFA and MSA counter-ions for LC-ESI-MS applications. Acetic acid generally yielded more substantial signal improvements over propionic acid on the TFA system while minimal benefits and some further reductions were noted with MSA.

  10. Oxygenation of Organoboronic Acids by a Nonheme Iron(II) Complex: Mimicking Boronic Acid Monooxygenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayanti; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2015-10-19

    Phenolic compounds are important intermediates in the bacterial biodegradation of aromatic compounds in the soil. An Arthrobacter sp. strain has been shown to exhibit boronic acid monooxygenase activity through the conversion of different substituted phenylboronic acids to the corresponding phenols using dioxygen. While a number of methods have been reported to cleave the C-B bonds of organoboronic acids, there is no report on biomimetic iron complex exhibiting this activity using dioxygen as the oxidant. In that direction, we have investigated the reactivity of a nucleophilic iron-oxygen oxidant, generated upon oxidative decarboxylation of an iron(II)-benzilate complex [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(benzilate)] (Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate), toward organoboronic acids. The oxidant converts different aryl/alkylboronic acids to the corresponding oxygenated products with the incorporation of one oxygen atom from dioxygen. This method represents an efficient protocol for the oxygenation of boronic acids with dioxygen as the terminal oxidant.

  11. Modeled methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentrations in Antarctica: the influence of meteorology in explaining modern versus LGM differences in ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezel, P. J.; Alexander, B.; Bitz, C. M.; Steig, E. J.

    2011-12-01

    Methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentrations measured in ice cores in Antarctica for the last glacial maximum (LGM) are higher than modern day concentrations on the East Antarctic Plateau (Vostok), but are lower than modern concentrations in West Antarctica (Siple Dome). MSA concentrations measured in ice cores have been interpreted as an indicator of both local sea ice extent (via modulation of dimethylsulfide (DMS) emissions) and regional circulation on decadal time scales, but there has been no assessment of the importance of these two processes in determining MSA concentrations on glacial-interglacial time scales. Explanations for the modern - LGM MSA differences at Vostok invoke increased DMS emissions caused by increased dust fertilization in the LGM (Legrand et al., 1991). Saltzman et al. (2006) show that the MSA measurements at Siple Dome do not corroborate stronger DMS emissions in the Pacific sector during the LGM. We use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model forced with GISS-ModelE meteorology from modern and LGM boundary conditions to simulate Antarctic MSA concentrations. We estimate the contribution of transport and precipitation to the modern-LGM difference at each location. Changes in DMS emissions, sea ice extent, and oxidant concentrations are evaluated as additional important factors in explaining modern versus LGM MSA concentrations in Antarctic ice cores.

  12. Mutational and crystallographic analysis of l-amino acid oxidase/monooxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. AIU 813: Interconversion between oxidase and monooxygenase activities.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Daisuke; Im, Do-Hyun; Sugawara, Asami; Fukuta, Yasuhisa; Fushinobu, Shinya; Isobe, Kimiyasu; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, it was shown for the first time that l-amino acid oxidase of Pseudomonas sp. AIU813, renamed as l-amino acid oxidase/monooxygenase (l-AAO/MOG), exhibits l-lysine 2-monooxygenase as well as oxidase activity. l-Lysine oxidase activity of l-AAO/MOG was increased in a p-chloromercuribenzoate (p-CMB) concentration-dependent manner to a final level that was five fold higher than that of the non-treated enzyme. In order to explain the effects of modification by the sulfhydryl reagent, saturation mutagenesis studies were carried out on five cysteine residues, and we succeeded in identifying l-AAO/MOG C254I mutant enzyme, which showed five-times higher specific activity of oxidase activity than that of wild type. The monooxygenase activity shown by the C254I variant was decreased significantly. Moreover, we also determined a high-resolution three-dimensional structure of l-AAO/MOG to provide a structural basis for its biochemical characteristics. The key residue for the activity conversion of l-AAO/MOG, Cys-254, is located near the aromatic cage (Trp-418, Phe-473, and Trp-516). Although the location of Cys-254 indicates that it is not directly involved in the substrate binding, the chemical modification by p-CMB or C254I mutation would have a significant impact on the substrate binding via the side chain of Trp-516. It is suggested that a slight difference of the binding position of a substrate can dictate the activity of this type of enzyme as oxidase or monooxygenase.

  13. Diffusion Coefficient of Tin(II) Methanesulfonate in Ionic Liquid and Methane Sulfonic Acid (MSA) Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kok Kee; Mahmoudian, M. R.; Ebadi, Mehdi; Koay, Hun Lee; Basirun, Wan Jeffrey

    2011-12-01

    Voltammetry and chronoamperometry for the electrodeposition of tin from Tin(II) methane sulfonate mixed with ionic liquid and methane sulfonate acid at room temperature was studied. Cyclic voltammetry shows redox waves of Tin(II), which proves that the electrodeposition of tin from Tin(II) methane sulfonate is a diffusion-controlled process. The diffusion coefficient of Tin(II) ions in the solvent mixture showed good agreement from both voltammetry and chronoamperometry results. The diffusion coefficient of Tin(II) in the mixture was much smaller than in aqueous solution, and it depends on the anion of the ionic liquid.

  14. EFFECTS OF ANESTHESIA (TRICAINE METHANESULFONATE, MS-222) BIOTRANSFORMATION IN RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tricaine methanesulfonate (3-aminobenzoic acid eithyl ester methanesulfonate, tricaine, MS-222, Finquel), an anesthetic for fish, has been used extensively in aquatic toxicology to allow surgical procedures for in vivo studies and to permit in vitro preparations of isolated perfu...

  15. EFFECTS OF ANESTHESIA (TRICAINE METHANESULFONATE, MS-222) BIOTRANSFORMATION IN RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tricaine methanesulfonate (3-aminobenzoic acid eithyl ester methanesulfonate, tricaine, MS-222, Finquel), an anesthetic for fish, has been used extensively in aquatic toxicology to allow surgical procedures for in vivo studies and to permit in vitro preparations of isolated perfu...

  16. Catalytic activity of the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa toward cinnamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Kino, Kuniki

    2014-02-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylases (HPAHs) of the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase family are attractive enzymes that possess the catalytic potential to synthesize valuable ortho-diphenol compounds from simple monophenol compounds. In this study, we investigated the catalytic activity of HPAH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 toward cinnamic acid derivatives. We prepared Escherichia coli cells expressing the hpaB gene encoding the monooxygenase component and the hpaC gene encoding the oxidoreductase component. E. coli cells expressing HpaBC exhibited no or very low oxidation activity toward cinnamic acid, o-coumaric acid, and m-coumaric acid, whereas they rapidly oxidized p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid. Interestingly, after p-coumaric acid was almost completely consumed, the resulting caffeic acid was further oxidized to 3,4,5-trihydroxycinnamic acid. In addition, HpaBC exhibited oxidation activity toward 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid, ferulic acid, and coniferaldehyde to produce the corresponding ortho-diphenols. We also investigated a flask-scale production of caffeic acid from p-coumaric acid as the model reaction for HpaBC-catalyzed syntheses of hydroxycinnamic acids. Since the initial concentrations of the substrate p-coumaric acid higher than 40 mM markedly inhibited its HpaBC-catalyzed oxidation, the reaction was carried out by repeatedly adding 20 mM of this substrate to the reaction mixture. Furthermore, by using the HpaBC whole-cell catalyst in the presence of glycerol, our experimental setup achieved the high-yield production of caffeic acid, i.e., 56.6 mM (10.2 g/L) within 24 h. These catalytic activities of HpaBC will provide an easy and environment-friendly synthetic approach to hydroxycinnamic acids.

  17. Behavioural Effects of the Commonly Used Fish Anaesthetic Tricaine Methanesulfonate (MS-222) on Zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Its Relevance for the Acetic Acid Pain Test

    PubMed Central

    Nordgreen, Janicke; Tahamtani, Fernanda M.; Janczak, Andrew M.; Horsberg, Tor Einar

    2014-01-01

    The pros and cons of using anaesthesia when handling fish in connection with experiments are debated. A widely adopted practice is to wait thirty minutes after anaesthesia before behavioural observations are initiated, but information about immediate effects of a treatment is then lost. This is pertinent for responses to acute stressors, such as acid injection in the acetic acid pain test. However, omission of anaesthetics in order to obtain data on immediate responses will compromise the welfare of fish and contribute to experimental noise due to stress. We therefore tested the effect of tricaine methanesulfonate on the behaviour of zebrafish. We predicted that tricaine (MS 222) would decrease swimming velocity and that the control fish would show an increased level of anxiety- and stress-related behaviours compared to the tricaine group. Following acclimatization to the test tank, baseline behaviour was recorded before immersion in either tricaine (168 mg l−1, treatment group, N = 8) or tank water (control group, N = 7). Latencies to lose equilibrium and to lose response to touch were registered. The fish was then returned to the test tank, and the latency to regain equilibrium was registered in anaesthetized fish. When equilibrium was regained, and at five, thirty and sixty minutes after the fish had been returned to the test tank, behaviour was recorded. The tricaine fish showed the following responses (mean ± sd): latency to lose equilibrium 22.6 s±3.9; latency to lose response to touch 101.9 s±26.8; latency to regain equilibrium 92.0 s±54.4. Contrary to our predictions, neither treatment caused a change in any of the behaviours registered. This indicates that tricaine has no effect on several commonly used behavioural parameters, and that it may be unnecessary to postpone behavioural observations to 30 min after anaesthesia. PMID:24658262

  18. Ice core sulfur and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) records from southern Greenland document North American and European air pollution and suggest a decline in regional biogenic sulfur emissions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasteris, D. R.; McConnell, J. R.; Burkhart, J. F.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols have an important cooling effect on the Earth because they scatter sunlight back to space and form cloud condensation nuclei. However, understanding of the atmospheric sulfur cycle is incomplete, leading to uncertainty in the assessment of past, present and future climate forcing. Here we use annually resolved observations of sulfur and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentration in an array of precisely dated Southern Greenland ice cores to assess the history of sulfur pollution emitted from North America and Europe and the history of biogenic sulfate aerosol derived from the North Atlantic Ocean over the last 250 years. The ice core sulfur time series is found to closely track sulfur concentrations in North American and European precipitation since records began in 1965, and also closely tracks estimated sulfur emissions since 1850 within the air mass source region as determined by back trajectory analysis. However, a decline to near-preindustrial sulfur concentrations in the ice cores after 1995 that is not so extensive in the source region emissions indicates that there has been a change in sulfur cycling over the last 150 years. The ice core MSA time series shows a decline of 60% since the 1860s, and is well correlated with declining sea ice concentrations around Greenland, suggesting that the phytoplankton source of biogenic sulfur has declined due to a loss of marginal sea ice zone habitat. Incorporating the implied decrease in biogenic sulfur in our analysis improves the match between the ice core sulfur record and the source region emissions throughout the last 150 years, and solves the problem of the recent return to near-preindustrial levels in the Greenland ice. These findings indicate that the transport efficiency of sulfur air pollution has been relatively stable through the industrial era and that biogenic sulfur emissions in the region have declined.

  19. Alteration of seed fatty acid composition by an ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana affecting diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Katavic, V; Reed, D W; Taylor, D C; Giblin, E M; Barton, D L; Zou, J; Mackenzie, S L; Covello, P S; Kunst, L

    1995-01-01

    In characterizing the enzymes involved in the formation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in the Brassicaceae, we have generated a series of mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana that have reduced VLCFA content. Here we report the characterization of a seed lipid mutant, AS11, which, in comparison to wild type (WT), has reduced levels of 20:1 and 18:1 and accumulates 18:3 as the major fatty acid in triacylglycerols. Proportions of 18:2 remain similar to WT. Genetic analyses indicate that the fatty acid phenotype is caused by a semidominant mutation in a single nuclear gene, designated TAG1, located on chromosome 2. Biochemical analyses have shown that the AS11 phenotype is not due to a deficiency in the capacity to elongate 18:1 or to an increase in the relative delta 15 or delta 12 desaturase activities. Indeed, the ratio of desaturase/elongase activities measured in vitro is virtually identical in developing WT and AS11 seed homogenates. Rather, the fatty acid phenotype of AS11 is the result of reduced diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity throughout development, such that triacylglycerol biosynthesis is reduced. This leads to a reduction in 20:1 biosynthesis during seed development, leaving more 18:1 available for desaturation. Thus, we have demonstrated that changes to triacylglycerol biosynthesis can result in dramatic changes in fatty acid composition and, in particular, in the accumulation of VLCFAs in seed storage lipids. PMID:7784510

  20. A family of diiron monooxygenases catalyzing amino acid beta-hydroxylation in antibiotic biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Makris, Thomas M; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Münck, Eckard; Lipscomb, John D

    2010-08-31

    The biosynthesis of chloramphenicol requires a beta-hydroxylation tailoring reaction of the precursor L-p-aminophenylalanine (L-PAPA). Here, it is shown that this reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme CmlA from an operon containing the genes for biosynthesis of L-PAPA and the nonribosomal peptide synthetase CmlP. EPR, Mössbauer, and optical spectroscopies reveal that CmlA contains an oxo-bridged dinuclear iron cluster, a metal center not previously associated with nonribosomal peptide synthetase chemistry. Single-turnover kinetic studies indicate that CmlA is functional in the diferrous state and that its substrate is L-PAPA covalently bound to CmlP. Analytical studies show that the product is hydroxylated L-PAPA and that O(2) is the oxygen source, demonstrating a monooxygenase reaction. The gene sequence of CmlA shows that it utilizes a lactamase fold, suggesting that the diiron cluster is in a protein environment not previously known to effect monooxygenase reactions. Notably, CmlA homologs are widely distributed in natural product biosynthetic pathways, including a variety of pharmaceutically important beta-hydroxylated antibiotics and cytostatics.

  1. Key amino acid residues in the regulation of soluble methane monooxygenase catalysis by component B.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, Brian J; Lipscomb, John D

    2003-05-20

    The regulatory component MMOB of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) has been hypothesized to control access of substrates into the active site of the hydroxylase component (MMOH) through formation of a size specific channel or region of increased structural flexibility tuned to methane and O(2). Accordingly, a decrease in the size of four MMOB residues (N107G/S109A/S110A/T111A, the Quad mutant) was shown to accelerate the reaction of substrates larger than methane with the reactive MMOH intermediate Q [Wallar, B. J., and Lipscomb, J. D. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 2220-2233]. Here, this hypothesis is tested by construction of single and double mutations involving the residues of the Quad mutant. It is shown that mutations of residues that extend into the core structure of MMOB alter many aspects of the MMOH catalyzed reaction but do not mimic the effects of the Quad mutant. In contrast, the MMOB residues that are thought to form part of the interface in the MMOH-MMOB complex increase active site accessibility as observed for the Quad mutant. In particular, the mutant T111A mimics most of the effects of the Quad mutant; thus, Thr111 is proposed to most directly control access. Unexpectedly, mutation of Thr111 to the larger Tyr greatly increases the rate constant for the reaction of larger substrates such as ethane, furan, and nitrobenzene with Q while decreasing the rate constant for the reaction with methane. Other steps in the cycle are dramatically slowed, the regiospecificity for nitrobenzene oxidation is altered, and 10-fold more T111Y than wild-type MMOB is required to maximize the rate of turnover. Thus, T111Y appears to make a more extensive change in local interface structure that allows hydrocarbons at least as large as ethane to bind and react with Q similarly. As a result, the bond cleavage rates for methane, ethane, and their deuterated analogues are shown for the first time to correlate with bond strength in accord with a mechanism in which C-H bond

  2. Differences in metabolism of the marine biotoxin okadaic acid by human and rat cytochrome P450 monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Kolrep, Franziska; Hessel, Stefanie; These, Anja; Ehlers, Anke; Rein, Kathleen; Lampen, Alfonso

    2016-08-01

    The ingestion of seafood contaminated with the marine biotoxin okadaic acid (OA) can lead to diarrhetic shellfish poisoning with symptoms like nausea, vomiting and abdominal cramps. Both rat and the human hepatic cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP) metabolize OA. However, liver cell toxicity of metabolized OA is mainly unclear. The aim of our study was to detect the cellular effects in HepG2 cells exposed to OA in the presence of recombinant CYP enzymes of both rat and human for the investigation of species differences. The results should be set in correlation with a CYP-specific metabolite pattern. Comparative metabolite profiles of OA after incubation in rat and human recombinant CYP enzymes were established by using LC-MS/MS technique. Results demonstrated that metabolism of OA to oxygenated metabolites correlates with detoxification which was mainly catalyzed by human CYP3A4 and CYP3A5. Detoxification by rat Cyp3a1 was lower compared to human CYP3A enzymes and activation of OA by Cyp3a2 was observed, coincident with minor overall conversion capacity of OA. By contrast human and rat CYP1A2 seem to activate OA into cytotoxic intermediates. In conclusion, different mechanisms of OA metabolism may occur in the liver. At low OA doses, the human liver is likely well protected against cytotoxic OA, but for high shellfish consumers a potential risk cannot be excluded.

  3. Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases for Fatty Acids and Xenobiotics in Marine Macroalgae1

    PubMed Central

    Pflugmacher, Stephan; Sandermann, Heinrich

    1998-01-01

    The metabolism of xenobiotics has mainly been investigated in higher plant species. We studied them in various marine macroalgae of the phyla Chlorophyta, Chromophyta, and Rhodophyta. Microsomes contained high oxidative activities for known cytochrome (Cyt) P450 substrates (fatty acids, cinnamic acid, 3- and 4-chlorobiphenyl, 2,3-dichlorobiphenyl, and isoproturon; up to 54 pkat/mg protein). The presence of Cyt P450 (approximately 50 pmol/mg protein) in microsomes of the three algal families was demonstrated by CO-difference absorption spectra. Intact algal tissue converted 3-chlorobiphenyl to the same monohydroxy-metabolite formed in vitro. This conversion was 5-fold stimulated upon addition of phenobarbital, and was abolished by the known P450 inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole. It is concluded that marine macroalgae contain active species of Cyt P450 and could act as a metabolic sink for marine pollutants. PMID:9576781

  4. Evidence of methanesulfonate utilizers in the Sargasso Sea metagenome.

    PubMed

    Leitão, Elsa; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; De Marco, Paolo

    2009-09-01

    Methanesulfonate (MSA) is one of the products of the photo-oxidation of dimethylsulfide in the atmosphere. The genes responsible for the import of MSA into the cell (msm EFGH) and for its oxidation to formaldehyde (msm ABCD) have been previously sequenced from the soil bacterium Methylosulfonomonas methylovora str. M2 while genes for an MSA monooxygenase have been sequenced from marine bacterium Marinosulfonomonas methylotropha str. TR3. We performed a sequence-based screening of the Sargasso Sea metagenome for homologues of the MSA monooxygenase (MSAMO) and MSA import genes. Our search retrieved one scaffold bearing genes with high identity to the msm ABCD cluster plus two scaffolds bearing genes highly identical to the msm EFGH operon. We increased the available data by sequencing two metagenome plasmids, which revealed more msm genes. In these three cases synteny with the original msm operons was revealed. We also retrieved several singletons showing high identity to shorter segments of the msm clusters or individual msm genes. Furthermore, a characteristic 26-aa internal spacer of the MsmA Rieske-type motif was conserved. Our findings support the case for a significant role of MSA degraders in the marine sulfur cycle and seem to suggest that they may be prominent members of the methylotrophic community in surface ocean waters.

  5. Camphor revisited: involvement of a unique monooxygenase in metabolism of 2-oxo-delta 3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Ougham, H J; Taylor, D G; Trudgill, P W

    1983-01-01

    Previously, Pseudomonas putida was shown to degrade (+)-camphor, and cleavage of the first ring of the bicyclic structure involved two monooxygenases (a hydroxylase and a ring oxygen-inserting enzyme), a dehydrogenase, and spontaneous cleavage of an unstable oxygenation product (lactone). Cleavage of the second ring was not demonstrated but was assumed also to occur by ring oxygen insertion, since the predicted oxygenation product was extracted from whole-cell incubation systems. Our investigation established that metabolism of the first ring cleavage intermediate, 2-oxo-delta 3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid, occurred through the sequential action of two inducible enzymes, a coenzyme A ester synthetase and an oxygenase. The oxygenase was purified to homogeneity and had a molecular weight of 106,000. This enzyme carried a single molecule of flavin adenine dinucleotide and consisted of two identical subunits. Iron was not present at a significant level. The oxygenase was specific for NADPH as the electron donor and absolutely specific for the coenzyme A ester of 2-oxo-delta 3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid as the substrate. The reaction stoichiometry was compatible with this enzyme being a monooxygenase, and a mass spectral analysis of the methyl ester of the product confirmed the insertion of a single oxygen atom. The enzyme appeared to be analogous to, although distinct from. 2,5-diketocamphane 1,2-monooxygenase in catalyzing a "biological Baeyer-Villiger" reaction with the formation of a lactone. Structural analogy suggested that this lactone, like the first, was also unstable and susceptible to spontaneous ring opening, although this was not experimentally established. Images PMID:6848481

  6. Mutagenic Action of Ethyl Methanesulfonate in Maize.

    PubMed

    Neuffer, M G; Ficsor, G

    1963-03-29

    Pollen of corn plants carrying three closely linked genes (alpha beta Sh(2)) on chromosome 3 were treated by ethyl methanesulfonate in order to determine the nature of genetic changes produced. In this genetic material the loss of the beta gene alone represents a discrete genetic change, possibly a point mutation, while the loss of two or more markers represents chromosome aberrations. Ethyl methanesulfonate, x-rays, and ultraviolet light all induced numerous chromosome aberrations, but only ultraviolet light and probably ethyl methanesulfonate induced discrete genetic changes.

  7. Engineering of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase-based Escherichia coli biocatalyst for large scale biotransformation of ricinoleic acid into (Z)-11-(heptanoyloxy)undec-9-enoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Hwan-Hee; Jeon, Eun-Yeong; Song, Young-Ha; Shin, Chul-Soo; Park, Jin-Byung

    2016-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are able to catalyze regiospecific Baeyer-Villiger oxygenation of a variety of cyclic and linear ketones to generate the corresponding lactones and esters, respectively. However, the enzymes are usually difficult to express in a functional form in microbial cells and are rather unstable under process conditions hindering their large-scale applications. Thereby, we investigated engineering of the BVMO from Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and the gene expression system to improve its activity and stability for large-scale biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (1) into the ester (i.e., (Z)-11-(heptanoyloxy)undec-9-enoic acid) (3), which can be hydrolyzed into 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (5) (i.e., a precursor of polyamide-11) and n-heptanoic acid (4). The polyionic tag-based fusion engineering of the BVMO and the use of a synthetic promoter for constitutive enzyme expression allowed the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the BVMO and the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus to produce the ester (3) to 85 mM (26.6 g/L) within 5 h. The 5 L scale biotransformation process was then successfully scaled up to a 70 L bioreactor; 3 was produced to over 70 mM (21.9 g/L) in the culture medium 6 h after biotransformation. This study demonstrated that the BVMO-based whole-cell reactions can be applied for large-scale biotransformations. PMID:27311560

  8. Fungal cytochrome P450 monooxygenases of Fusarium oxysporum for the synthesis of ω-hydroxy fatty acids in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Durairaj, Pradeepraj; Malla, Sailesh; Nadarajan, Saravanan Prabhu; Lee, Pyung-Gang; Jung, Eunok; Park, Hyun Ho; Kim, Byung-Gee; Yun, Hyungdon

    2015-04-02

    Omega hydroxy fatty acids (ω-OHFAs) are multifunctional compounds that act as the basis for the production of various industrial products with broad commercial and pharmaceutical implications. However, the terminal oxygenation of saturated or unsaturated fatty acids for the synthesis of ω-OHFAs is intricate to accomplish through chemocatalysis, due to the selectivity and controlled reactivity in C-H oxygenation reactions. Cytochrome P450, the ubiquitous enzyme is capable of catalyzing the selective terminal omega hydroxylation naturally in biological kingdom. To gain a deep insight on the biochemical role of fungal P450s towards the production of omega hydroxy fatty acids, two cytochrome P450 monooxygenases from Fusarium oxysporum (FoCYP), FoCYP539A7 and FoCYP655C2; were identified, cloned, and heterologously expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For the efficient production of ω-OHFAs, the S. cerevisiae was engineered to disrupt the acyl-CoA oxidase enzyme and the β-oxidation pathway inactivated (ΔPox1) S. cerevisiae mutant was generated. To elucidate the significance of the interaction of redox mechanism, FoCYPs were reconstituted with the heterologous and homologous reductase systems--S. cerevisiae CPR (ScCPR) and F. oxysporum CPR (FoCPR). To further improve the yield, the effect of pH was analyzed and the homologous FoCYP-FoCPR system efficiently hydroxylated caprylic acid, capric acid and lauric acid into their respective ω-hydroxy fatty acids with 56%, 79% and 67% conversion. Furthermore, based on computational simulations, we identified the key residues (Asn106 of FoCYP539A7 and Arg235 of FoCYP655C2) responsible for the recognition of fatty acids and demonstrated the structural insights of the active site of FoCYPs. Fungal CYP monooxygenases, FoCYP539A7 and FoCYP655C2 with its homologous redox partner, FoCPR constitutes a promising catalyst due to its high regio- and stereo-selectivity in the hydroxylation of fatty acids and in the substantial

  9. Methanesulfonate (MSA) Catabolic Genes from Marine and Estuarine Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Ana C; De Marco, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Quantitatively, methanesulfonate (MSA) is a very relevant compound in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle. Its utilization by bacteria as a source of carbon and energy has been described and a specific enzyme, methanesulfonate monooxygenase (MSAMO), has been found to perform the first catabolic step of its oxidation. Other proteins seemingly involved in the import of MSA into bacterial cells have been reported. In this study, we obtained novel sequences of genes msmA and msmE from marine, estuary and soil MSA-degraders (encoding the large subunit of the MSAMO enzyme and the periplasmic component of the import system, respectively). We also obtained whole-genome sequences of two novel marine Filomicrobium strains, Y and W, and annotated two full msm operons in these genomes. Furthermore, msmA and msmE sequences were amplified from North Atlantic seawater and analyzed. Good conservation of the MsmA deduced protein sequence was observed in both cultured strains and metagenomic clones. A long spacer sequence in the Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster-binding motif within MsmA was found to be conserved in all instances, supporting the hypothesis that this feature is specific to the large (α) subunit of the MSAMO enzyme. The msmE gene was more difficult to amplify, from both cultivated isolates and marine metagenomic DNA. However, 3 novel msmE sequences were obtained from isolated strains and one directly from seawater. With both genes, our results combined with previous metagenomic analyses seem to imply that moderate to high-GC strains are somehow favored during enrichment and isolation of MSA-utilizing bacteria, while the majority of msm genes obtained by cultivation-independent methods have low levels of GC%, which is a clear example of the misrepresentation of natural populations that culturing, more often than not, entails. Nevertheless, the data obtained in this work show that MSA-degrading bacteria are abundant in surface seawater, which suggests ecological

  10. Methanesulfonate (MSA) Catabolic Genes from Marine and Estuarine Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana C.; De Marco, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Quantitatively, methanesulfonate (MSA) is a very relevant compound in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle. Its utilization by bacteria as a source of carbon and energy has been described and a specific enzyme, methanesulfonate monooxygenase (MSAMO), has been found to perform the first catabolic step of its oxidation. Other proteins seemingly involved in the import of MSA into bacterial cells have been reported. In this study, we obtained novel sequences of genes msmA and msmE from marine, estuary and soil MSA-degraders (encoding the large subunit of the MSAMO enzyme and the periplasmic component of the import system, respectively). We also obtained whole-genome sequences of two novel marine Filomicrobium strains, Y and W, and annotated two full msm operons in these genomes. Furthermore, msmA and msmE sequences were amplified from North Atlantic seawater and analyzed. Good conservation of the MsmA deduced protein sequence was observed in both cultured strains and metagenomic clones. A long spacer sequence in the Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster-binding motif within MsmA was found to be conserved in all instances, supporting the hypothesis that this feature is specific to the large (α) subunit of the MSAMO enzyme. The msmE gene was more difficult to amplify, from both cultivated isolates and marine metagenomic DNA. However, 3 novel msmE sequences were obtained from isolated strains and one directly from seawater. With both genes, our results combined with previous metagenomic analyses seem to imply that moderate to high-GC strains are somehow favored during enrichment and isolation of MSA-utilizing bacteria, while the majority of msm genes obtained by cultivation-independent methods have low levels of GC%, which is a clear example of the misrepresentation of natural populations that culturing, more often than not, entails. Nevertheless, the data obtained in this work show that MSA-degrading bacteria are abundant in surface seawater, which suggests ecological

  11. Amine-Amine Exchange in Aminium-Methanesulfonate Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Matthew L.; Varner, Mychel E.; Perraud, Veronique M.; Ezell, Michael J.; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Gerber, Robert B.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2014-12-18

    Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and have been shown to impact the Earth’s climate, reduce visibility, and adversely affect human health. Modeling the evolution of aerosol systems requires an understanding of the species and mechanisms involved in particle growth, including the complex interactions between particle- and gas-phase species. Here we report studies of displacement of amines (methylamine, dimethylamine or trimethylamine) in methanesulfonate salt particles by exposure to a different gas-phase amine, using a single particle mass spectrometer, SPLAT II. The variation of the displacement with the nature of the amine suggests that behavior is dependent on water in or on the particles. Small clusters of methanesulfonic acid with amines are used as a model in quantum chemical calculations to identify key structural elements that are expected to influence water uptake, and hence the efficiency of displacement by gas-phase molecules in the aminium salts. Such molecular-level understanding of the processes affecting the ability of gas-phase amines to displace particle-phase aminium species is important for modeling the growth of particles and their impacts in the atmosphere.

  12. Delineation of the Caffeine C-8 Oxidation Pathway in Pseudomonas sp. Strain CBB1 via Characterization of a New Trimethyluric Acid Monooxygenase and Genes Involved in Trimethyluric Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Sujit Kumar; Yu, Chi-Li; Das, Shuvendu; Louie, Tai Man; Gakhar, Lokesh

    2012-01-01

    The molecular basis of the ability of bacteria to live on caffeine via the C-8 oxidation pathway is unknown. The first step of this pathway, caffeine to trimethyluric acid (TMU), has been attributed to poorly characterized caffeine oxidases and a novel quinone-dependent caffeine dehydrogenase. Here, we report the detailed characterization of the second enzyme, a novel NADH-dependent trimethyluric acid monooxygenase (TmuM), a flavoprotein that catalyzes the conversion of TMU to 1,3,7-trimethyl-5-hydroxyisourate (TM-HIU). This product spontaneously decomposes to racemic 3,6,8-trimethylallantoin (TMA). TmuM prefers trimethyluric acids and, to a lesser extent, dimethyluric acids as substrates, but it exhibits no activity on uric acid. Homology models of TmuM against uric acid oxidase HpxO (which catalyzes uric acid to 5-hydroxyisourate) reveal a much bigger and hydrophobic cavity to accommodate the larger substrates. Genes involved in the caffeine C-8 oxidation pathway are located in a 25.2-kb genomic DNA fragment of CBB1, including cdhABC (coding for caffeine dehydrogenase) and tmuM (coding for TmuM). Comparison of this gene cluster to the uric acid-metabolizing gene cluster and pathway of Klebsiella pneumoniae revealed two major open reading frames coding for the conversion of TM-HIU to S-(+)-trimethylallantoin [S-(+)-TMA]. The first one, designated tmuH, codes for a putative TM-HIU hydrolase, which catalyzes the conversion of TM-HIU to 3,6,8-trimethyl-2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (TM-OHCU). The second one, designated tmuD, codes for a putative TM-OHCU decarboxylase which catalyzes the conversion of TM-OHCU to S-(+)-TMA. Based on a combination of enzymology and gene-analysis, a new degradative pathway for caffeine has been proposed via TMU, TM-HIU, TM-OHCU to S-(+)-TMA. PMID:22609920

  13. Human phenylalanine monooxygenase and thioether metabolism.

    PubMed

    Boonyapiwat, Boontarika; Panaretou, Barry; Forbes, Ben; Mitchell, Stephen C; Steventon, Glyn B

    2009-01-01

    The substrate specificity of wild-type human phenylalanine monooxygenase (wt-hPAH) has been investigated with respect to the mucoactive drug, S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine and its thioether metabolites. The ability of wt-hPAH to metabolise other S-substituted cysteines was also examined. Direct assays of PAH activity were by HPLC with fluorescence detection; indirect assays involved following disappearance of the cofactor by UV spectroscopy. wt-hPAH catalysed the S-oxygenation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine, its decarboxylated metabolite, S-methyl-L-cysteine, and both their corresponding N-acetylated forms. However, thiodiglycolic acid was not a substrate. The enzyme profiles for both phenylalanine and S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine showed allosteric kinetics at low substrate concentrations, with Hill constants of 2.0 and 1.9, respectively, for the substrate-activated wt-hPAH. At higher concentrations, both compounds followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with non-competitive substrate inhibition profiles. The thioether compounds, S-ethyl-L-cysteine, S-propyl-L-cysteine and S-butyl-L-cysteine were all found to be substrates for phenylalanine monooxygenase. Phenylalanine monooxygenase may play a wider role outside intermediary metabolism in the biotransformation of dietary-derived substituted cysteines and other exogenous thioether compounds.

  14. Inactivation of ultraviolet repair in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cells by methyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1982-03-01

    Excision repair of ultraviolet damage in the DNA of normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (Groups C, D, and variant) cells was inactivated by exposure of cells to methyl methanesulfonate immediately before irradiation independent of the presence of 0 to 10% fetal calf serum. The inactivation could be represented by a semilog relationship between the amount of repair and methyl methanesulfonate concentration up to approximately 5 mM. The inactivation can be considered to occur as the result of alkylation of a large (about 10(6) daltons) repair enzyme complex, and the dose required to reduce repair to 37% for most cells types was between 4 and 7 mM. No consistent, large difference in sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate was found in any xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group compared to normal cells, implying that reduced repair in these groups may be caused by small inherited changes in the amino acid composition (i.e., point mutations or small deletions) rather than by losses of major components of the repair enzyme complex.

  15. Temperature-dependent deliquescent and efflorescent properties of methanesulfonate sodium studied by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guang; Kelley, Judas; Kish, J Duncan; Liu, Yong

    2014-01-23

    Modeling of aerosols and cloud formation processes in the marine boundary layer (MBL) require extensive data on hygroscopic properties of relevant methanesulfonate particles, which are currently scarce. In this work, methanesulfonate sodium (CH3SO3Na, MSA-Na), the most abundant methanesulfonate salt, was selected, and its deliquescent and efflorescent properties at temperatures relevant to the lower troposphere were studied using an ATR-FTIR flow system. To validate the approach, we investigated hygroscopic properties of NaCl particles, and our measured deliquescent relative humidity (DRH) and efflorescent relative humidity (ERH) of the NaCl particles obtained from the changes in integrated absorbance of water peaks in infrared spectra agreed with literature data well. We then reported DRH and ERH of MSA-Na particles as a function of temperature for the first time using both the changes in integrated absorbance of water peaks and the changes in peak position and shape of CH3SO3(-) symmetric and asymmetric vibrational modes. Our experiments showed that MSA-Na particles present quite different temperature-dependent hygroscopic behaviors from NaCl. Both the DRH and ERH of MSA-Na particles increase with decreasing temperatures. Due to the significant differences in temperature-dependent DRH and ERH, NaCl particles, if processed in MBL by methanesulfonic acid, are expected to deliquesce slightly earlier during a hydration process but effloresce at a much earlier stage during a dehydration process, especially at lower temperatures. This could considerably influence phase, size, and water content of sea salt aerosols and consequently their reactivity, lifetime, and impacts on atmospheric chemistry and climate systems.

  16. The alkene monooxygenase from Xanthobacter strain Py2 is closely related to aromatic monooxygenases and catalyzes aromatic monohydroxylation of benzene, toluene, and phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, N.Y.; Jenkins, A.; Chan Kwo Chion, C.K.N.; Leak, D.J.

    1999-04-01

    The genes encoding the six polypeptide components of the alkene monooxygenase from Xanthobacter strain Py2 (Xamo) have been located on a 4.9-kb fragment of chromosomal DNA previously cloned in cosmid pNY2. Sequencing and analysis of the predicted amino acid sequences indicate that the components of Xamo are homologous to those of the aromatic monooxygenases, toluene 2-, 3-, and 4-monooxygenase and benzene monooxygenase, and that the gene order is identical. The genes and predicted polypeptides are aamA, encoding the 497-residue oxygenase {alpha}-subunit (XamoA); aamB, encoding the 88-residue oxygenase {gamma}-subunit (XamoB); aamC, encoding the 122-residue ferredoxin (XamoC); aamD, encoding the 101-residue coupling or effector protein (XamoD); aamE, encoding the 341-residue oxygenase {beta}-subunit (XamoE); and aamF, encoding the 327-residue reductase (XamoF). A sequence with > 60% concurrence with the consensus sequence of {sigma}{sup 5.4} (RpoN)-dependent promoters was identified upstream of the aamA gene. Detailed comparison of XamoA with the oxygenase {alpha}-subunits from aromatic monooxygenases, phenol hydroxylases, methane monooxygenase, and the alkene monooxygenase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous B276 showed that, despite the overall similarity to the aromatic monooxygenases, XamoA has some distinctive characteristics of the oxygenases which oxidize aliphatic, and particularly alkene, substrates. On the basis of the similarity between Xamo and the aromatic monooxygenases, Xanthobacter strain Py2 was tested and shown to oxidize benzene, toluene, and phenol, while the alkene monooxygenase-negative mutants NZ1 and NZ2 did not.

  17. Cavity residue leucine 95 and channel residues glutamine 204, aspartic acid 211, and phenylalanine 269 of toluene o-xylene monooxygenase influence catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Cansu; Sönmez, Burcu; Vardar, Nurcan; Yanık-Yıldırım, K Cansu; Vardar-Schara, Gönül

    2016-09-01

    Structural analysis of toluene-o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) hydroxylase revealed the presence of three hydrophobic cavities, a channel, and a pore leading from the protein surface to the active site. Here, saturation mutagenesis was used to investigate the catalytic roles of alpha-subunit (TouA) second cavity residue L95 and TouA channel residues Q204, D211, and F269. By testing the substrates toluene, phenol, nitrobenzene, and/or naphthalene, these positions were found to influence the catalytic activity of ToMO. Several regiospecific variants were identified from TouA positions Q204, F269, and L95. For example, TouA variant Q204H had the regiospecificity of nitrobenzene changed significantly from 30 to 61 % p-nitrophenol. Interestingly, a combination of mutations at Q204H and A106V altered the regiospecificity of nitrobenzene back to 27 % p-nitrophenol. TouA variants F269Y, F269P, Q204E, and L95D improved the meta-hydroxylating capability of nitrobenzene by producing 87, 85, 82, and 77 % m-nitrophenol, respectively. For naphthalene oxidation, TouA variants F269V, Q204A, Q204S/S222N, and F269T had the regiospecificity changed from 16 to 9, 10, 23, and 25 % 2-naphthol, respectively. Here, two additional TouA residues, S222 and A106, were also identified that may have important roles in catalysis. Most of the isolated variants from D211 remained active, whereas having a hydrophobic residue at this position appeared to diminish the catalytic activity toward naphthalene. The mutational effects on the ToMO regiospecificity described here suggest that it is possible to further fine tune and engineer the reactivity of multicomponent diiron monooxygenases toward different substrates at positions that are relatively distant from the active site.

  18. Brahmarasayana protects against Ethyl methanesulfonate or Methyl methanesulfonate induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine has given great emphasis to the promotion of health. Rasayana is one of the eight branches of Ayurveda which refers to rejuvenant therapy. It has been reported that rasayanas have immuno-modulatory, antioxidant and antitumor functions, however, the genotoxic potential and modulation of DNA repair of many rasayanas have not been evaluated. Methods The present study assessed the role of Brahmarasayana (BR) on Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-and Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced genotoxicity and DNA repair in in vivo mouse test system. The mice were orally fed with BR (5 g or 8 mg / day) for two months and 24 h later EMS or MMS was given intraperitoneally. The genotoxicity was analyzed by chromosomal aberrations, sperm count, and sperm abnormalities. Results The results have revealed that BR did not induce significant chromosomal aberrations when compared to that of the control animals (p >0.05). On the other hand, the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations induced by EMS (240 mg / kg body weight) or MMS (125 mg / kg body weight) were significantly higher (p<0.05) to that of the control group. The treatment of BR for 60 days and single dose of EMS or MMS on day 61, resulted in significant (p <0.05) reduction in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in comparison to EMS or MMS treatment alone, indicating a protective effect of BR. Constitutive base excision repair capacity was also increased in BR treated animals. Conclusion The effect of BR, as it relates to antioxidant activity was not evident in liver tissue however rasayana treatment was observed to increase constitutive DNA base excision repair and reduce clastogenicity. Whilst, the molecular mechanisms of such repair need further exploration, this is the first report to demonstrate these effects and provides further evidence for the role of brahmarasayana in the possible improvement of quality of life. PMID:22853637

  19. Brahmarasayana protects against Ethyl methanesulfonate or Methyl methanesulfonate induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Guruprasad, Kanive Parashiva; Subramanian, Advait; Singh, Vikram Jeet; Sharma, Raghavendra Sudheer Kumar; Gopinath, Puthiya Mundyat; Sewram, Vikash; Varier, Panniyampilly Madhavankutty; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2012-08-01

    Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine has given great emphasis to the promotion of health. Rasayana is one of the eight branches of Ayurveda which refers to rejuvenant therapy. It has been reported that rasayanas have immuno-modulatory, antioxidant and antitumor functions, however, the genotoxic potential and modulation of DNA repair of many rasayanas have not been evaluated. The present study assessed the role of Brahmarasayana (BR) on Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-and Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced genotoxicity and DNA repair in in vivo mouse test system. The mice were orally fed with BR (5 g or 8 mg / day) for two months and 24 h later EMS or MMS was given intraperitoneally. The genotoxicity was analyzed by chromosomal aberrations, sperm count, and sperm abnormalities. The results have revealed that BR did not induce significant chromosomal aberrations when compared to that of the control animals (p >0.05). On the other hand, the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations induced by EMS (240 mg / kg body weight) or MMS (125 mg / kg body weight) were significantly higher (p<0.05) to that of the control group. The treatment of BR for 60 days and single dose of EMS or MMS on day 61, resulted in significant (p <0.05) reduction in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in comparison to EMS or MMS treatment alone, indicating a protective effect of BR. Constitutive base excision repair capacity was also increased in BR treated animals. The effect of BR, as it relates to antioxidant activity was not evident in liver tissue however rasayana treatment was observed to increase constitutive DNA base excision repair and reduce clastogenicity. Whilst, the molecular mechanisms of such repair need further exploration, this is the first report to demonstrate these effects and provides further evidence for the role of brahmarasayana in the possible improvement of quality of life.

  20. A radiometric kynurenine monooxygenase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Wiseman, J.S.; Nichols, J.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the oxidation of L-kynurenine to 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. The enzyme requires NADH or NADPH as a cofactor. A discontinuous assay that utilizes L-(3H)kynurenine as substrate is described. The assay offers high precision and a wide range of accessible substrate and cofactor concentrations. The assay was used to measure kinetic isotope effects and the stereospecificity of oxidation of the cofactor. Hydride is transferred from the A-side (pro-R) of NADH and NADPH since primary deuterium isotope effects were observed for both cofactors when they were deuterated on the A-side but not on the B-side. The large isotope effect on Vmax/Km for NADH is sensitive to the concentration of kynurenine, which indicates that NADH can bind before kynurenine.

  1. Towards practical Baeyer-Villiger-monooxygenases: design of cyclohexanone monooxygenase mutants with enhanced oxidative stability.

    PubMed

    Opperman, Diederik J; Reetz, Manfred T

    2010-12-10

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) catalyze the conversion of ketones and cyclic ketones into esters and lactones, respectively. Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) from Acinetobacter sp. NCIMB 9871 is known to show an impressive substrate scope as well as exquisite chemo-, regio-, and enantioselectivity in many cases. Large-scale synthetic applications of CHMO are hampered, however, by the instability of the enzyme. Oxidation of cysteine and methionine residues contributes to this instability. Designed mutations of all the methionine and cysteine residues in the CHMO wild type (WT) showed that the amino acids labile towards oxidation are mostly either surface-exposed or located within the active site, whereas the two methionine residues identified for thermostabilization are buried within the folded protein. Combinatorial mutations gave rise to two stabilized mutants with either oxidative or thermal stability, without compromising the activity or stereoselectivity of the enzyme. The most oxidatively stabilized mutant retained nearly 40 % of its activity after incubation with H(2)O(2) (0.2 M), whereas the wild-type enzyme's activity was completely abolished at concentrations as low as 5 mM H(2)O(2). We propose that oxidation-stable mutants might well be a "prerequisite" for thermostabilization, because laboratory-evolved thermostability in CHMO might be masked by a high degree of oxidation instability.

  2. Colistin methanesulfonate against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an in vitro pharmacodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Lisa A; Hovde, Laurie B; Mitropoulos, Isaac F; Schafer, Jeremy; Rotschafer, John C

    2007-09-01

    Using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model, a multidrug-resistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii was exposed to colistin methanesulfonate alone and in combination with ceftazidime. Pre- and postexposure colistin sulfate MICs were determined. A single daily dose of colistin methanesulfonate combined with continuous-infusion ceftazidime prevented regrowth and postexposure MIC increases.

  3. Characterization of the Critical Amino Acids of an Aspergillus parasiticus Cytochrome P-450 Monooxygenase Encoded by ordA That Is Involved in the Biosynthesis of Aflatoxins B1, G1, B2, and G2

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiujiang; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Ehrlich, Kenneth C.; Cary, Jeffrey W.; Montalbano, Beverly; Dyer, John M.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    The conversion of O-methylsterigmatocystin (OMST) and dihydro-O-methylsterigmatocystin to aflatoxins B1, G1, B2, and G2 requires a cytochrome P-450 type of oxidoreductase activity. ordA, a gene adjacent to the omtA gene, was identified in the aflatoxin-biosynthetic pathway gene cluster by chromosomal walking in Aspergillus parasiticus. The ordA gene was a homolog of the Aspergillus flavus ord1 gene, which is involved in the conversion of OMST to aflatoxin B1. Complementation of A. parasiticus SRRC 2043, an OMST-accumulating strain, with the ordA gene restored the ability to produce aflatoxins B1, G1, B2, and G2. The ordA gene placed under the control of the GAL1 promoter converted exogenously supplied OMST to aflatoxin B1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast, the ordA gene homolog in A. parasiticus SRRC 2043, ordA1, was not able to carry out the same conversion in the yeast system. Sequence analysis revealed that the ordA1 gene had three point mutations which resulted in three amino acid changes (His-400→Leu-400, Ala-143→Ser-143, and Ile-528→Tyr-528). Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that the change of His-400 to Leu-400 resulted in a loss of the monooxygenase activity and that Ala-143 played a significant role in the catalytic conversion. In contrast, Ile-528 was not associated with the enzymatic activity. The involvement of the ordA gene in the synthesis of aflatoxins G1, and G2 in A. parasiticus suggests that enzymes required for the formation of aflatoxins G1 and G2 are not present in A. flavus. The results showed that in addition to the conserved heme-binding and redox reaction domains encoded by ordA, other seemingly domain-unrelated amino acid residues are critical for cytochrome P-450 catalytic activity. The ordA gene has been assigned to a new cytochrome P-450 gene family named CYP64 by The Cytochrome P450 Nomenclature Committee. PMID:9835571

  4. An improved choline monooxygenase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Lafontaine, P.J.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Glycine betaine accumulates in leaves of plants from several angiosperm families in response to drought or salinization. Its synthesis, from the oxidation of choline, is mediated by a two step pathway. In spinach the first enzyme of this pathway is a ferredoxin-dependent choline monooxygenase (CMO). In order to purify this enzyme a sensitive and reliable assay is necessary. Two types of modifications were explored to improve the existing assay. (1) Ferredoxin reduction - one way of providing reduced Fd to CMO is by the addition of isolated spinach thylakoids in the assay mixture. In order to optimize the reduction of Fd two different systems were compared: (a) where only PS is active, by adding DCMU to inhibit electron transport from PS II and DAD as electron donor for PS I; (b) where both PS II and PS I are active. (2) Betaine aldehyde estimation - to simplify this, it is possible to couple the CMO reaction with betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) from E. coli. BADH converts betaine aldehyde to betaine as it is formed in the assay, eliminating the need for a chemical oxidation step.

  5. Exploring the Structural Basis of Substrate Preferences in Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Stefano; van Beek, Hugo L.; Pennetta, Alessandra; Martinoli, Christian; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Steroid monooxygenase (STMO) from Rhodococcus rhodochrous catalyzes the Baeyer-Villiger conversion of progesterone into progesterone acetate using FAD as prosthetic group and NADPH as reducing cofactor. The enzyme shares high sequence similarity with well characterized Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases, including phenylacetone monooxygenase and cyclohexanone monooxygenase. The comparative biochemical and structural analysis of STMO can be particularly insightful with regard to the understanding of the substrate-specificity properties of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases that are emerging as promising tools in biocatalytic applications and as targets for prodrug activation. The crystal structures of STMO in the native, NADP+-bound, and two mutant forms reveal structural details on this microbial steroid-degrading enzyme. The binding of the nicotinamide ring of NADP+ is shifted with respect to the flavin compared with that observed in other monooxygenases of the same class. This finding fully supports the idea that NADP(H) adopts various positions during the catalytic cycle to perform its multiple functions in catalysis. The active site closely resembles that of phenylacetone monooxygenase. This observation led us to discover that STMO is capable of acting also on phenylacetone, which implies an impressive level of substrate promiscuity. The investigation of six mutants that target residues on the surface of the substrate-binding site reveals that enzymatic conversions of both progesterone and phenylacetone are largely insensitive to relatively drastic amino acid changes, with some mutants even displaying enhanced activity on progesterone. These features possibly reflect the fact that these enzymes are continuously evolving to acquire new activities, depending on the emerging availabilities of new compounds in the living environment. PMID:22605340

  6. Crystal structure, phase transition, and disorder in pyridinium methanesulfonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesariew, Dominik; Ilczyszyn, Maria M.

    2017-05-01

    Thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy have been used to investigate pyridinium methanesulfonate in order to verify its crystal structure and to have insight into its anomalous dynamical properties. This compound undergoes a solid-solid, reversible phase transition at 255.8/266.8 K (cooling/heating). It crystallizes in non-centrosymmetric Pna21 space group at the high-temperature phase (I) and in centrosymmetric Pbca one at the low-temperature phase (II). The entropy gain occurred at the II→I transition has shown that two independent orientations of ions in the disorder phase (I) are allowed. Infrared spectra have confirmed that the pyridinium cation as well as the -CH3 group of the anion exhibit changes in their dynamics when entering the phase I. These spectra have also suggested residual disorder of both, the pyridinium cation and the -CH3 group, in the low temperature phase (II).

  7. Use of Tricaine Methanesulfonate (MS222) for Euthanasia of Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, CJ; Papenfuss, T; Parker, J; Hahn, NE

    2009-01-01

    Tricaine methanesulfonate (MS222) injected into the intracoelomic cavity of reptiles was evaluated as a chemical euthanasia method. Three western fence lizards, 2 desert iguanas, 4 garter snakes, and 6 geckos were euthanized by intracoelomic injection of 250 to 500 mg/kg of 0.7% to 1% sodium-bicarbonate–buffered MS222 solution followed by intracoelomic injection of 0.1 to 1.0 ml unbuffered 50% (v/v) MS222 solution. A simple 2-stage protocol for euthanasia of reptiles by using MS222 is outlined. In addition, the conditions for safe use of MS222 are discussed. MS222 offers an alternative to sodium pentobarbital for euthanasia of reptiles. PMID:19245747

  8. Novel substrates and inhibitors of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Katopodis, A G; May, S W

    1990-05-15

    Peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM, EC 1.14.17.3) catalyzes the formation of alpha-amidated peptides from their glycine-extended precursors, thus playing a key role in the processing of peptide neurohormones. We now report that PAM readily catalyzes three alternate monooxygenase reactions--sulfoxidation, amine N-dealkylation, and O-dealkylation. Thus, (4-nitrobenzyl)thioacetic acid is converted to the analogous sulfoxide, N-(4-nitrobenzyl)glycine is converted to 4-nitrobenzylamine and glyoxylate, and [(4-nitrobenzyl)oxy]acetic acid is converted to 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol and glyoxylate. All these new activities display the characteristics expected for the normal PAM-catalyzed reductive oxygenation pathway and produce an equimolar amount of glyoxylate together with the heteroatom-containing dealkylation products. The ester [(4-methoxybenzoyl)oxy]acetic acid is not a PAM substrate, but is instead a good competitive inhibitor (KI = 0.48 mM). In addition, we report that the olefinic substrate analogues trans-benzoylacrylic acid and 4-phenyl-3-butenoic acid are potent time-dependent inactivators of PAM, with inactivation exhibiting the characteristics expected for mechanism-based inhibition. Monoethyl fumarate is also a time-dependent inactivator of PAM. Finally, we introduce several small non-peptide substrates for PAM by demonstrating that PAM catalyzes the transformation of hippuric acid and several ring-substituted derivatives to the corresponding benzamides and glyoxylic acid, with the most facile substrate of this class being 4-nitrohippuric acid. These compounds are the smallest amide substrates yet reported for PAM, and it is thus apparent that only the minimal structure of an acylglycine is required for PAM-catalyzed oxygenative amidation.

  9. Sea ice and pollution-modulated changes in Greenland ice core methanesulfonate and bromine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, Olivia J.; Chellman, Nathan J.; Grieman, Mackenzie; Layman, Lawrence; McConnell, Joseph R.; Pasteris, Daniel; Rhodes, Rachael H.; Saltzman, Eric; Sigl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Reconstruction of past changes in Arctic sea ice extent may be critical for understanding its future evolution. Methanesulfonate (MSA) and bromine concentrations preserved in ice cores have both been proposed as indicators of past sea ice conditions. In this study, two ice cores from central and north-eastern Greenland were analysed at sub-annual resolution for MSA (CH3SO3H) and bromine, covering the time period 1750-2010. We examine correlations between ice core MSA and the HadISST1 ICE sea ice dataset and consult back trajectories to infer the likely source regions. A strong correlation between the low-frequency MSA and bromine records during pre-industrial times indicates that both chemical species are likely linked to processes occurring on or near sea ice in the same source regions. The positive correlation between ice core MSA and bromine persists until the mid-20th century, when the acidity of Greenland ice begins to increase markedly due to increased fossil fuel emissions. After that time, MSA levels decrease as a result of declining sea ice extent but bromine levels increase. We consider several possible explanations and ultimately suggest that increased acidity, specifically nitric acid, of snow on sea ice stimulates the release of reactive Br from sea ice, resulting in increased transport and deposition on the Greenland ice sheet.

  10. METHYL METHANESULFONATE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    METHYL METHANESULFONATE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS. Geremy W. Knapp, Alan Tennant, and Russell D. Owen. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  11. METHYL METHANESULFONATE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    METHYL METHANESULFONATE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS. Geremy W. Knapp, Alan Tennant, and Russell D. Owen. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  12. The Origin and Evolution of Baeyer—Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs): An Ancestral Family of Flavin Monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Mascotti, Maria Laura; Lapadula, Walter Jesús; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano

    2015-01-01

    The Baeyer—Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs) are enzymes belonging to the “Class B” of flavin monooxygenases and are capable of performing exquisite selective oxidations. These enzymes have been studied from a biotechnological perspective, but their physiological substrates and functional roles are widely unknown. Here, we investigated the origin, taxonomic distribution and evolutionary history of the BVMO genes. By using in silico approaches, 98 BVMO encoding genes were detected in the three domains of life: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. We found evidence for the presence of these genes in Metazoa (Hydra vulgaris, Oikopleura dioica and Adineta vaga) and Haptophyta (Emiliania huxleyi) for the first time. Furthermore, a search for other “Class B” monooxygenases (flavoprotein monooxygenases –FMOs – and N-hydroxylating monooxygenases – NMOs) was conducted. These sequences were also found in the three domains of life. Phylogenetic analyses of all “Class B” monooxygenases revealed that NMOs and BVMOs are monophyletic, whereas FMOs form a paraphyletic group. Based on these results, we propose that BVMO genes were already present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) and their current taxonomic distribution is the result of differential duplication and loss of paralogous genes. PMID:26161776

  13. The Origin and Evolution of Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs): An Ancestral Family of Flavin Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Mascotti, Maria Laura; Lapadula, Walter Jesús; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano

    2015-01-01

    The Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs) are enzymes belonging to the "Class B" of flavin monooxygenases and are capable of performing exquisite selective oxidations. These enzymes have been studied from a biotechnological perspective, but their physiological substrates and functional roles are widely unknown. Here, we investigated the origin, taxonomic distribution and evolutionary history of the BVMO genes. By using in silico approaches, 98 BVMO encoding genes were detected in the three domains of life: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. We found evidence for the presence of these genes in Metazoa (Hydra vulgaris, Oikopleura dioica and Adineta vaga) and Haptophyta (Emiliania huxleyi) for the first time. Furthermore, a search for other "Class B" monooxygenases (flavoprotein monooxygenases--FMOs--and N-hydroxylating monooxygenases--NMOs) was conducted. These sequences were also found in the three domains of life. Phylogenetic analyses of all "Class B" monooxygenases revealed that NMOs and BVMOs are monophyletic, whereas FMOs form a paraphyletic group. Based on these results, we propose that BVMO genes were already present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) and their current taxonomic distribution is the result of differential duplication and loss of paralogous genes.

  14. Capillary ion chromatography with on-column focusing for ultra-trace analysis of methanesulfonate and inorganic anions in limited volume Antarctic ice core samples.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Estrella Sanz; Poynter, Sam; Curran, Mark; Haddad, Paul R; Shellie, Robert A; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2015-08-28

    Preservation of ionic species within Antarctic ice yields a unique proxy record of the Earth's climate history. Studies have been focused until now on two proxies: the ionic components of sea salt aerosol and methanesulfonic acid. Measurement of the all of the major ionic species in ice core samples is typically carried out by ion chromatography. Former methods, whilst providing suitable detection limits, have been based upon off-column preconcentration techniques, requiring larger sample volumes, with potential for sample contamination and/or carryover. Here, a new capillary ion chromatography based analytical method has been developed for quantitative analysis of limited volume Antarctic ice core samples. The developed analytical protocol applies capillary ion chromatography (with suppressed conductivity detection) and direct on-column sample injection and focusing, thus eliminating the requirement for off-column sample preconcentration. This limits the total sample volume needed to 300μL per analysis, allowing for triplicate sample analysis with <1mL of sample. This new approach provides a reliable and robust analytical method for the simultaneous determination of organic and inorganic anions, including fluoride, methanesulfonate, chloride, sulfate and nitrate anions. Application to composite ice-core samples is demonstrated, with coupling of the capillary ion chromatograph to high resolution mass spectrometry used to confirm the presence and purity of the observed methanesulfonate peak. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Phenylbutyrate inhibits homologous recombination induced by camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Gitte S; Germann, Susanne M; Westergaard, Tine; Lisby, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Homologous recombination is accompanied by extensive changes to chromatin organization at the site of DNA damage. Some of these changes are mediated through acetylation/deacetylation of histones. Here, we show that recombinational repair of DNA damage induced by the anti-cancer drug camptothecin (CPT) and the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) is blocked by sodium phenylbutyrate (PBA) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, PBA suppresses CPT- and MMS-induced genetic recombination as well as DNA double-strand break repair during mating-type interconversion. Treatment with PBA is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in histone H4 lysine 8 acetylation. Live cell imaging of homologous recombination proteins indicates that repair of CPT-induced DNA damage is redirected to a non-recombinogenic pathway in the presence of PBA without loss in cell viability. In contrast, the suppression of MMS-induced recombination by PBA is accompanied by a dramatic loss in cell viability. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PBA inhibits DNA damage-induced homologous recombination likely by mediating changes in chromatin acetylation. Moreover, the combination of PBA with genotoxic agents can lead to different cell fates depending on the type of DNA damage inflicted. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A review of tricaine methanesulfonate for anesthesia of fish

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Kathleen M.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Tricaine methanesulfonate (TMS) is the only FDA approved anesthetic for use in a select number of fish species, including salmonids. It is used widely in hatcheries and research to immobilize fish for marking or transport and to suppress sensory systems during invasive procedures. Improper use can decrease fish viability and possibly distort physiological data. Since animals may be anesthetized by junior staff or students who may have little experience in fish anesthesia, training in the proper use of TMS may decrease variability in results and increase fish survival. This document acts as a primer on the use of TMS for anesthetizing juvenile salmonids, with an emphasis on its use in surgical applications. Within, we briefly discuss many aspects TMS. We describe the legal uses for TMS, and what is currently known about the proper storage and preparation of the anesthetic. We outline methods and precautions for administration and changes in fish behavior during progressively deeper anesthesia. We also discuss the physiological effects of TMS and its potential for decreasing fish health.

  17. Characterization and Application of Xylene Monooxygenase for Multistep Biocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Bühler, Bruno; Witholt, Bernard; Hauer, Bernhard; Schmid, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    Xylene monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 catalyzes multistep oxidations of one methyl group of toluene and xylenes. Recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the monooxygenase genes xylM and xylA catalyzes the oxygenation of toluene, pseudocumene, the corresponding alcohols, and the corresponding aldehydes, all by a monooxygenation type of reaction (B. Bühler, A. Schmid, B. Hauer, and B. Witholt, J. Biol. Chem. 275:10085-10092, 2000). Using E. coli expressing xylMA, we investigated the kinetics of this one-enzyme three-step biotransformation. We found that unoxidized substrates like toluene and pseudocumene inhibit the second and third oxygenation steps and that the corresponding alcohols inhibit the third oxygenation step. These inhibitions might promote the energetically more favorable alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenations in the wild type. Growth of E. coli was strongly affected by low concentrations of pseudocumene and its products. Toxicity and solubility problems were overcome by the use of a two-liquid-phase system with bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate as the carrier solvent, allowing high overall substrate and product concentrations. In a fed-batch-based two-liquid-phase process with pseudocumene as the substrate, we observed the consecutive accumulation of aldehyde, acid, and alcohol. Our results indicate that, depending on the reaction conditions, product formation could be directed to one specific product. PMID:11823191

  18. 1-[4-[4[(4R,5R)-3,3-Dibutyl-7-(dimethylamino)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-4-hydroxy-1,1-dioxido-1-benzothiepin-5-yl]phenoxy]butyl]-4-aza-1-azoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octane methanesulfonate (SC-435), an ileal apical sodium-codependent bile acid transporter inhibitor alters hepatic cholesterol metabolism and lowers plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    West, Kristy L; Ramjiganesh, Tripurasundari; Roy, Suheeta; Keller, Bradley T; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2002-10-01

    Male Hartley guinea pigs (10/group) were assigned either to a control diet (no drug treatment) or to diets containing 0.4, 2.2, or 7.3 mg/day of an ileal apical sodium-codependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) inhibitor, 1-[4-[4[(4R,5R)-3,3-dibutyl-7-(dimethylamino)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-4-hydroxy-1,1-dioxido-1-benzothiepin-5-yl]phenoxy]butyl]-4-aza-1-azoniabicyclo[2.2.2] octane methanesulfonate (SC-435). Based on food consumption, guinea pigs received 0, 0.8, 3.7, or 13.4 mg/kg/day of the ASBT inhibitor. The amount of cholesterol in the four diets was maintained at 0.17%, equivalent to 1200 mg/day in the human situation. Guinea pigs treated with 13.4 mg/kg/day SC-435 had 41% lower total cholesterol and 44% lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol concentrations compared with control (P < 0.01), whereas no significant differences were observed with either of the lower doses of SC-435. Hepatic cholesterol esters were significantly reduced by 43, 56, and 70% in guinea pigs fed 0.8, 3.7, and 13.4 mg/kg/day of the ASBT inhibitor, respectively (P < 0.01). In addition, the highest dose of the inhibitor resulted in a 42% increase in the number of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) triacylglycerol molecules and a larger VLDL diameter compared with controls (P < 0.05). Acyl-CoA cholesterol/acyltransferase activity was 30% lower with the highest dose treatment, whereas cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, the regulatory enzyme of bile acid synthesis, was 30% higher with the highest ASBT inhibitor dose (P < 0.05). Furthermore, bile acid excretion increased 2-fold with the highest dose of SC-435 compared with the control group (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the reduction in total and LDL-cholesterol concentrations by the ASBT inhibitor is a result of alterations in hepatic cholesterol metabolism due to modifications in the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids.

  19. Protective effect of hawthorn extract against genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Tanha, Mohammad; Mahmodzadeh, Aziz; Mohammadifar, Sohila

    2011-05-01

    The preventive effect of hawthorn (Crataegus microphylla) fruit extract against genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) has been investigated in human cultured blood lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers at 0 (10 minutes before), and at 1 and 2 hours after a single oral ingestion of 1 g hawthorn powder extract. At each time point, the whole blood was treated in vitro with MMS (200 µmol) at 24 hours after cell culture, and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. The lymphocytes treated with hawthorn and MMS to exhibit a significant decreasing in the incidence of micronucleated binucleated cells, as compared with similarly MMS-treated lymphocytes from blood samples collected at 0 hour. The maximum protection and decreasing in frequency of micronuclei (36%) was observed at 1 hour after ingestion of hawthorn extract. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that hawthorn contained chlorogenic acid, epicatechin and hyperoside. It is obvious that hawthorn, particularly flavonoids constituents with antioxidative activity, reduced the oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by toxic compounds. This set of data may have an important application for the protection of human lymphocyte from the genetic damage and side effects induced by chemicals hazardous in people.

  20. Repair of Alkylation Damage: Stability of Methyl Groups in Bacillus subtilis Treated with Methyl Methanesulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Louise; Strauss, Bernard

    1970-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis was not inactivated and was able to replicate even though approximately 3 × 104 methyl groups added by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) were bound to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of each organism. No significant loss of methyl groups from the DNA occurred for several generations upon incubation of methylated wild-type or MMS-sensitive cells. Single-strand breaks were not observed in the DNA from cells treated at this low MMS dose. Higher doses of MMS resulted in significant killing of both wild-type and MMS-sensitive strains, and the DNA extracted from such treated cells sedimented more slowly than control DNA through alkaline sucrose gradients, indicating the presence of breaks or apurinic sites (or both). These breaks were repaired upon incubation of wild-type but not of MMS-sensitive strains. Repair of damage induced by alkylating agents is probably the repair of breaks which occur as a consequence of high levels of alkylation. PMID:4988041

  1. [Advances in biomolecular machine: methane monooxygenases].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jixue; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2015-07-01

    Methane monooxygenases (MMO), regarded as "an amazing biomolecular machine", catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol under aerobic conditions. MMO catalyze the oxidation of methane elaborately, which is a novel way to catalyze methane to methanol. Furthermore, MMO can inspire the biomolecular machine design. In this review, we introduced MMO including structure, gene and catalytic mechanism. The history and the taxonomy of MMO were also introduced.

  2. Toluene Monooxygenase-Catalyzed Epoxidation of Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Kevin; Fox, Brian G.; Steffan, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Several toluene monooxygenase-producing organisms were tested for their ability to oxidize linear alkenes and chloroalkenes three to eight carbons long. Each of the wild-type organisms degraded all of the alkenes that were tested. Epoxides were produced during the oxidation of butene, butadiene, and pentene but not hexene or octadiene. A strain of Escherichia coli expressing the cloned toluene-4-monooxygenase (T4MO) of Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 was able to oxidize butene, butadiene, pentene, and hexene but not octadiene, producing epoxides from all of the substrates that were oxidized. A T4MO-deficient variant of P. mendocina KR1 oxidized alkenes that were five to eight carbons long, but no epoxides were detected, suggesting the presence of multiple alkene-degrading enzymes in this organism. The alkene oxidation rates varied widely (ranging from 0.01 to 0.33 μmol of substrate/min/mg of cell protein) and were specific for each organism-substrate pair. The enantiomeric purity of the epoxide products also varied widely, ranging from 54 to >90% of a single epoxide enantiomer. In the absence of more preferred substrates, such as toluene or alkenes, the epoxides underwent further toluene monooxygenase-catalyzed transformations, forming products that were not identified. PMID:10788354

  3. Substrate and inhibitor specificity of kynurenine monooxygenase from Cytophaga hutchinsonii.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert S; Anderson, Andrew D; Gentry, Harvey G; Güner, Osman F; Bowen, J Phillip

    2017-04-15

    Kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO) is a potential drug target for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases. We have evaluated substituted kynurenines as substrates or inhibitors of KMO from Cytophaga hutchinsonii. Kynurenines substituted with a halogen at the 5-position are excellent substrates, with values of kcat and kcat/Km comparable to or higher than kynurenine. However, kynurenines substituted in the 3-position are competitive inhibitors, with KI values lower than the Km for kynurenine. Bromination also enhances inhibition, and 3,5-dibromokynurenine is a potent competitive inhibitor with a KI value of 1.5μM. A pharmacophore model of KMO was developed, and predicted that 3,4-dichlorohippuric acid would be an inhibitor. The KI for this compound was found to be 34μM, thus validating the pharmacophore model. We are using these results and our model to design more potent inhibitors of KMO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Preliminary Method for Direct Quantification of Colistin Methanesulfonate by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Niece, Krista L.

    2015-01-01

    Colistin use has increased in response to the advent of infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms. It is administered parenterally as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS). Various formulations of CMS and labeling conventions can lead to confusion about colistin dosing, and questions remain about the pharmacokinetics of CMS. Since CMS does not have strong UV absorbance, current methods employ a laborious process of chemical conversion to colistin followed by precolumn derivatization to detect formed colistin by high-performance liquid chromatography. Here, we report a method for direct quantification of colistin methanesulfonate by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FTIR). PMID:26124160

  5. Non-sea-salt sulfate and methanesulfonate at American Samoa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savoie, Dennis L.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Arimoto, Richard; Duce, Robert

    1994-01-01

    High-volume bulk aerosol samples have been collected at American Samoa (14.25 deg S, 170.58 deg W) on a semicontinuous basis since the system was erected as part of the Sea/Air Exchange Program (SEAREX) in March 1983. In this report we consider those samples collected through May 6, 1992. For most of this period the sample filters were changed once a week. However, during November 1989 and from May 10 to June 10, 1990, in conjunction with the aircraft missions of the NASA Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE), the filters were changed daily. All of the samples were analyzed for nonsea-salt (nss) SO4(2-) and NO3(-). Analyses for methanesulfonate (MSA) include all of the 53 daily samples, 22 weekly samples from March 19, 1983, through April 12, 1984, and 96 weekly samples from January 3, 1990, through May 6, 1992. The mean concentrations (in micrograms per cubic meter) were 0.37 for nss SO4(2-), 0.0229 for MSA, 0.114 for NO3(-), and 5.1 for Na(+). Nss SO4(2-) and MSA are strongly linearly correlated in these 171 samples (r(exp 2) = 0.66) and the regression intercept does not differ significantly from zero. The geometric mean (GM) nss SO4(2-)/MSA ratio, 18.1 +/- 0.9 (where +/- indicates the 95% confidence interval of the GM) is about 7% higher than had previously been reported for this station. The ratio exhibits no significant seasonal variation. Although the ratio appeared to be significantly lower in the May - June 1990 daily samples (GM = 15.3 +/- 1.2), a further examination of the results indicated that the variance of the measured ratios from 18.1 (the GM for the whole data set) was attributable almost exclusively to the typical random errors in the analyses as determined from the 1 sigma analytical uncertainties of 5% for MSA and SO4(2-) and 2% for Na(+).

  6. Non-sea-salt sulfate and methanesulfonate at American Samoa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savoie, Dennis L.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Arimoto, Richard; Duce, Robert

    1994-01-01

    High-volume bulk aerosol samples have been collected at American Samoa (14.25 deg S, 170.58 deg W) on a semicontinuous basis since the system was erected as part of the Sea/Air Exchange Program (SEAREX) in March 1983. In this report we consider those samples collected through May 6, 1992. For most of this period the sample filters were changed once a week. However, during November 1989 and from May 10 to June 10, 1990, in conjunction with the aircraft missions of the NASA Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE), the filters were changed daily. All of the samples were analyzed for nonsea-salt (nss) SO4(2-) and NO3(-). Analyses for methanesulfonate (MSA) include all of the 53 daily samples, 22 weekly samples from March 19, 1983, through April 12, 1984, and 96 weekly samples from January 3, 1990, through May 6, 1992. The mean concentrations (in micrograms per cubic meter) were 0.37 for nss SO4(2-), 0.0229 for MSA, 0.114 for NO3(-), and 5.1 for Na(+). Nss SO4(2-) and MSA are strongly linearly correlated in these 171 samples (r(exp 2) = 0.66) and the regression intercept does not differ significantly from zero. The geometric mean (GM) nss SO4(2-)/MSA ratio, 18.1 +/- 0.9 (where +/- indicates the 95% confidence interval of the GM) is about 7% higher than had previously been reported for this station. The ratio exhibits no significant seasonal variation. Although the ratio appeared to be significantly lower in the May - June 1990 daily samples (GM = 15.3 +/- 1.2), a further examination of the results indicated that the variance of the measured ratios from 18.1 (the GM for the whole data set) was attributable almost exclusively to the typical random errors in the analyses as determined from the 1 sigma analytical uncertainties of 5% for MSA and SO4(2-) and 2% for Na(+).

  7. Evolutionary history of a specialized P450 propane monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Fasan, Rudi; Meharenna, Yergalem T.; Snow, Christopher D.; Poulos, Thomas L.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The evolutionary pressures that shaped the specificity and catalytic efficiency of enzymes can only be speculated. While directed evolution experiments show that new functions can be acquired under positive selection with few mutations, the role of negative selection in eliminating undesired activities and achieving high specificity remains unclear. Here we examine intermediates along the ‘lineage’ from a naturally-occurring C12–C20 fatty acid hydroxylase (P450BM3) to a laboratory-evolved P450 propane monooxygenase (P450PMO) having 20 heme domain substitutions compared to P450BM3. Biochemical, crystallographic and computational analyses show that a minimal perturbation of the P450BM3 fold and substrate binding pocket accompanies a significant broadening of enzyme substrate range and the emergence of propane activity. In contrast, refinement of the enzyme catalytic efficiency for propane oxidation (~9,000-fold increase in kcat/Km) involves profound reshaping and partitioning of the substrate access pathway. Remodeling of the substrate recognition mechanisms ultimately results in remarkable narrowing of the substrate profile around propane and enables the acquisition of a basal iodomethane dehalogenase activity as yet unknown in natural alkane monooxygenases. A highly destabilizing L188P substitution in a region of the enzyme that undergoes a large conformational change during catalysis plays an important role in adaptation to the gaseous alkane. This work demonstrates that positive selection alone is sufficient to completely re-specialize the cytochrome P450 for function on a non-native substrate. PMID:18619466

  8. Evolving P450pyr Monooxygenase for Regio- and Stereoselective Hydroxylations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Li, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    P450pyr monooxygenase from Sphingomonas sp. HXN-200 catalysed the regio- and stereoselective hydroxylation at a non-activated carbon atom, a useful but challenging reaction in classic chemistry, with unique substrate specificity for a number of alicyclic compounds. New P450pyr mutants were developed by directed evolution with improved catalytic performance, thus significantly extending the application of the P450pyr monooxygenase family in biohydroxylation to prepare useful and valuable chiral alcohols. Directed evolution of P450pyr created new enzymes with improved S-enantioselectivity or R-enantioselectivity for the hydroxylation of N-benzyl pyrrolidine, enhanced regioselectivity for the hydroxylation of N-benzyl pyrrolidinone, and increased enantioselectivity for the hydroxylation of N-benzyl piperidinone, respectively. Directed evolution of P450pyr generated also mutants with fully altered regioselectivity (from terminal to subterminal) and newly created excellent S-enantioselectivity for the biohydroxylation of n-octane and propylbenzene, respectively, providing new opportunities for the regio- and enantioselective alkane functionalization. New P450pyr mutants were engineered as the first catalyst for highly selective terminal hydroxylation of n-butanol to 1,4-butanediol. Several novel, accurate, sensitive, simple, and HTS assays based on colorimetric or MS detection for measuring the enantio- and/or regioselectivity of hydroxylation were developed and proven to be practical in directed evolution. The P450pyr X-ray structure was obtained and used to guide the evolution. In silico modelling and substrate docking provided some insight into the influence of several important amino acid mutations of the engineered P450pyr mutants on the altered or enhanced regio- and enantioselectivity as well as new substrate acceptance. The obtained information and knowledge is useful for further engineering of P450pyr for other hydroxylations and oxidations.

  9. Effects of metomindate hydrochloride and tricaine methanesulfonate on the short term cortisol response in channel catfish

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of metomidate hydrochloride and tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) on cortisol stress response of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, were examined during 10 minutes of sedation. Channel catfish were assigned to three treatments: 1. Metomidate hydrochloride (12.5 mg/L), 2. MS-222 (100...

  10. Bacterial degradation of styrene involving a novel flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent styrene monooxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmans, S; van der Werf, M J; de Bont, J A

    1990-01-01

    By using styrene as the sole source of carbon and energy in concentrations of 10 to 500 microM, 14 strains of aerobic bacteria and two strains of fungi were isolated from various soil and water samples. In cell extracts of 11 of the bacterial isolates, a novel flavin adenine dinucleotide-requiring styrene monooxygenase activity that oxidized styrene to styrene oxide (phenyl oxirane) was detected. In one bacterial strain (S5), styrene metabolism was studied in more detail. In addition to styrene monooxygenase, cell extracts from strain S5 contained styrene oxide isomerase and phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities. A pathway for styrene degradation via styrene oxide and phenylacetaldehyde to phenylacetic acid is proposed. PMID:2339888

  11. Microbial monooxygenase amperometric biosensor for monitoring of Baeyer-Villiger biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Schenkmayerová, Andrea; Bučko, Marek; Gemeiner, Peter; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2013-12-15

    A whole-cell amperometric biosensor consisting of genetically engineered Escherichia coli immobilised in polyelectrolyte membrane onto a miniaturised oxygen electrode was developed and used for monitoring of biotransformation based on Baeyer-Villiger oxidation. Baeyer-Villiger oxidation is commonly performed using microorganisms overexpressing Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase enabling the production of enantiopure lactones or esters used in pharmaceutical industry. The biorecognition element, genetically modified E. coli overexpressing either cyclopentanone monooxygenase or cyclohexanone monooxygenase was immobilised in the form of solid polyelectrolyte complex gel membrane made of cellulose sulphate, sodium alginate and poly(methylene-co-guanidine) and attached to the surface of miniaturised oxygen electrode. The time response of the biosensor was 30s, the linear range of the calibration curve (R(2)=0.9993) was 8-130 μM and the sensitivity was 1.8 nA μM(-1) (RSD=5.0%) for substrate of Baeyer-Villiger oxidation (±)-cis-bicyclo[3.2.0]hept-2-en-6-one as analyte. The biosensor sensitivity was assessed for two other commercially available substrates, 4-methylcyclohexanone and 3-methylcyclohexanone. No interferences from ampicillin, citric acid, acetic acid, ethanol, methanol, glucose and products of Baeyer-Villiger oxidation (1R, 5S)-3-oxabicyclo[3.3.0]oct-6-en-2-one and (1S, 5R)-2-oxabicyclo[3.3.0]oct-6-en-3-one were detected. After 1 week of storage at 4°C the biosensor sensitivity was without changes. The biosensor was employed for monitoring of Baeyer-Villiger biotransformation and the results were correlated with gas chromatography. Till now, this is the first described biosensor based on Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase and the first reported application of biosensor for monitoring of biotransformation based on Baeyer-Villiger oxidation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetics of particulate methane monooxygenase in methanotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Peeples, T.L.; Lebron, J.; Costello, A.Y.

    1995-12-01

    The ability of methanotrophs to co-metabolize halocarbons such as trichloroethylene (TCE) by way of the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) is of interest in the development of bioremediation technologies. The presence and the regulation of expression of soluble (sMMO) and membrane-bound (pMMO) forms is important in the design and optimization of such processing schemes. Because the pMMO is found in all methanotrophic species, this form is relevant to in situ remediation technologies. Recently, multiple copies of genes encoding for pMMO have been identified in several species of methanotrophs. Genes encoding the 45 and 27 kDa subunits of the PMMO have been cloned and sequenced. We will discuss the possible implications of multiple copies of pMMO genes in the regulation of pMMO expression. These data may give insights into how MMO activity in natural environments may be manipulated for increased TCE biodegradation.

  13. Structural diversity of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Forsberg, Zarah; Loose, Jennifer Sm; Bissaro, Bastien; Eijsink, Vincent Gh

    2017-01-10

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) catalyze the oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds and represent a promising resource for development of industrial enzyme cocktails for biomass processing. LPMOs show high sequence and modular diversity and are known, so far, to cleave insoluble substrates such as cellulose, chitin and starch, as well as hemicelluloses such as beta-glucan, xyloglucan and xylan. All LPMOs share a catalytic histidine brace motif to bind copper, but differ strongly when it comes to the nature and arrangement of residues on the substrate-binding surface. In recent years, the number of available LPMO structures has increased rapidly, including the first structure of an enzyme-substrate complex. The insights gained from these structures is reviewed below.

  14. Structural basis of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Marta; Levy, Colin; Heyes, Derren J.; Lafite, Pierre; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Giorgini, Flaviano; Leys, David; Scrutton, Nigel S.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), an enzyme in the eukaryotic tryptophan catabolic pathway (i.e. kynurenine pathway), leads to amelioration of Huntington’s disease-relevant phenotypes in yeast, fruit fly, and mouse models1–5, as well as a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease3. KMO is a FAD-dependent monooxygenase, and is located in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it converts L-kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine. Perturbations in the levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites have been linked to the pathogenesis of a spectrum of brain disorders6, as well as cancer7,8, and several peripheral inflammatory conditions9. Despite the importance of KMO as a target for neurodegenerative disease, the molecular basis of KMO inhibition by available lead compounds has remained hitherto unknown. Here we report the first crystal structure of KMO, in the free form and in complex with the tight-binding inhibitor UPF 648. UPF 648 binds close to the FAD cofactor and perturbs the local active site structure, preventing productive binding of the substrate kynurenine. Functional assays and targeted mutagenesis revealed that the active site architecture and UPF 648 binding are essentially identical in human KMO, validating the yeast KMO:UPF 648 structure as a template for structure-based drug design. This will inform the search for new KMO inhibitors that are able to cross the blood-brain barrier in targeted therapies against neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s diseases. PMID:23575632

  15. Crystal structure of a phenol-coupling P450 monooxygenase involved in teicoplanin biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhi; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G.; Schuler, Mary A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2012-02-08

    The lipoglycopeptide antibiotic teicoplanin has proven efficacy against gram-positive pathogens. Teicoplanin is distinguished from the vancomycin-type glycopeptide antibiotics, by the presence of an additional cross-link between the aromatic amino acids 1 and 3 that is catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase Orf6* (CYP165D3). As a goal towards understanding the mechanism of this phenol-coupling reaction, we have characterized recombinant Orf6* and determined its crystal structure to 2.2-{angstrom} resolution. Although the structure of Orf6* reveals the core fold common to other P450 monooxygenases, there are subtle differences in the disposition of secondary structure elements near the active site cavity necessary to accommodate its complex heptapeptide substrate. Specifically, the orientation of the F and G helices in Orf6* results in a more closed active site than found in the vancomycin oxidative enzymes OxyB and OxyC. In addition, Met226 in the I helix replaces the more typical Gly/Ala residue that is positioned above the heme porphyrin ring, where it forms a hydrogen bond with a heme iron-bound water molecule. Sequence comparisons with other phenol-coupling P450 monooxygenases suggest that Met226 plays a role in determining the substrate regiospecificity of Orf6*. These features provide further insights into the mechanism of the cross-linking mechanisms that occur during glycopeptide antibiotics biosynthesis.

  16. Targeted Deletion of Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Giorgini, Flaviano; Huang, Shao-Yi; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V.; Notarangelo, Francesca M.; Thomas, Marian A. R.; Tararina, Margarita; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Schwarcz, Robert; Muchowski, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan degradation, has been suggested to play a major role in physiological and pathological events involving bioactive KP metabolites. To explore this role in greater detail, we generated mice with a targeted genetic disruption of Kmo and present here the first biochemical and neurochemical characterization of these mutant animals. Kmo−/− mice lacked KMO activity but showed no obvious abnormalities in the activity of four additional KP enzymes tested. As expected, Kmo−/− mice showed substantial reductions in the levels of its enzymatic product, 3-hydroxykynurenine, in liver, brain, and plasma. Compared with wild-type animals, the levels of the downstream metabolite quinolinic acid were also greatly decreased in liver and plasma of the mutant mice but surprisingly were only slightly reduced (by ∼20%) in the brain. The levels of three other KP metabolites: kynurenine, kynurenic acid, and anthranilic acid, were substantially, but differentially, elevated in the liver, brain, and plasma of Kmo−/− mice, whereas the liver and brain content of the major end product of the enzymatic cascade, NAD+, did not differ between Kmo−/− and wild-type animals. When assessed by in vivo microdialysis, extracellular kynurenic acid levels were found to be significantly elevated in the brains of Kmo−/− mice. Taken together, these results provide further evidence that KMO plays a key regulatory role in the KP and indicate that Kmo−/− mice will be useful for studying tissue-specific functions of individual KP metabolites in health and disease. PMID:24189070

  17. A Carbonate-Forming Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Youcai; Dietrich, David; Xu, Wei; Patel, Ashay; Thuss, Justin A. J.; Wang, Jingjing; Yin, Wen-Bing; Qiao, Kangjian; Houk, Kendall N.; Vederas, John C.; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Despite the remarkable versatility displayed by flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) in natural product biosynthesis, one notably missing activity is the oxidative generation of carbonate functional groups. We describe a multifunctional Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase CcsB, which catalyzes the formation of an in-line carbonate in the macrocyclic portion of cytochalasin E. This study expands the repertoire of activities of FMOs and provides a possible synthetic strategy for transformation of ketones into carbonates. PMID:24838010

  18. Effect on tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) on hematocrit values in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinitz, G.L.; Rix, J.

    1977-01-01

    1. Anesthesia of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) with 70 ppm tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) for 3-9 min resulted in a linear increase in hematocrit.2. Handling of unanesthetized trout caused a higher and more variable hematocrit reading than did exposure to MS-222 for up to 3 min.3. The range and standard error of hematocrit readings was smallest in trout treated with MS-222 for 1 min.

  19. Mutagenicity and induction of sister chromatid exchange by optically active enantiomers of secondary butyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.C.; Salmeen, I.T. ); Morris, S.M. )

    1989-01-01

    This report describes experiments in which a chiral alkyl methanesulfonate was used to investigate possible mechanisms by which alkylating agents cause their mutagenic, cytotoxic, and clastogenic effects. Optically active enantiomers and the racemic mixtures of 2-butyl methanesulfonate (2-BMS) were cytotoxic and mutagenic in Chinese hamster V79 cells and in AS52 cells and mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA100 and TA1535. Within the experimental uncertainties, the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity curves were the same for the R and S enantiomers and for the racemic mixture. The 2-BMS isomers were cytotoxic and induced sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in CHO-K{sub 1}-BH{sub 4} cells. The cytotoxicity curve was similar to that observed with V79 and AS52 cells. The results can be interpreted two ways. The first interpretation is that 2-BMS reacts via a carbocation, and the second interpretation involves an S{sub N}2 reaction of 2-BMS with DNA. The latter interpretation suggests that the mechanisms of mutagenesis, cytotoxicity, or the induction of SCE cannot distinguish between small (four-carbon) optically active DNA adducts. The authors favor the second interpretation because of solvolysis experiments showing the complete inversion of configuration of optically active 2-octyl methanesulfonate. While they assume that optically active 2-BMS will react using the same mechanism as chiral 2-OMS, they cannot exclude the possibility that 2-BMS reacts via a carbonation intermediate.

  20. Coupling Oxygen Consumption with Hydrocarbon Oxidation in Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weixue; Liang, Alexandria D; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-09-15

    A fundamental goal in catalysis is the coupling of multiple reactions to yield a desired product. Enzymes have evolved elegant approaches to address this grand challenge. A salient example is the biological conversion of methane to methanol catalyzed by soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), a member of the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) superfamily. sMMO is a dynamic protein complex of three components: a hydroxylase, a reductase, and a regulatory protein. The active site, a carboxylate-rich non-heme diiron center, is buried inside the 251 kDa hydroxylase component. The enzyme processes four substrates: O2, protons, electrons, and methane. To couple O2 activation to methane oxidation, timely control of substrate access to the active site is critical. Recent studies of sMMO, as well as its homologues in the BMM superfamily, have begun to unravel the mechanism. The emerging and unifying picture reveals that each substrate gains access to the active site along a specific pathway through the hydroxylase. Electrons and protons are delivered via a three-amino-acid pore located adjacent to the diiron center; O2 migrates via a series of hydrophobic cavities; and hydrocarbon substrates reach the active site through a channel or linked set of cavities. The gating of these pathways mediates entry of each substrate to the diiron active site in a timed sequence and is coordinated by dynamic interactions with the other component proteins. The result is coupling of dioxygen consumption with hydrocarbon oxidation, avoiding unproductive oxidation of the reductant rather than the desired hydrocarbon. To initiate catalysis, the reductase delivers two electrons to the diiron(III) center by binding over the pore of the hydroxylase. The regulatory component then displaces the reductase, docking onto the same surface of the hydroxylase. Formation of the hydroxylase-regulatory component complex (i) induces conformational changes of pore residues that may bring protons to the

  1. Diversity and evolution of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in Oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Sello, Mopeli Marshal; Jafta, Norventia; Nelson, David R; Chen, Wanping; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Parvez, Mohammad; Kgosiemang, Ipeleng Kopano Rosinah; Monyaki, Richie; Raselemane, Seiso Caiphus; Qhanya, Lehlohonolo Benedict; Mthakathi, Ntsane Trevor; Sitheni Mashele, Samson; Syed, Khajamohiddin

    2015-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are heme-thiolate proteins whose role as drug targets against pathogens, as well as in valuable chemical production and bioremediation, has been explored. In this study we performed comprehensive comparative analysis of P450s in 13 newly explored oomycete pathogens. Three hundred and fifty-six P450s were found in oomycetes. These P450s were grouped into 15 P450 families and 84 P450 subfamilies. Among these, nine P450 families and 31 P450 subfamilies were newly found in oomycetes. Research revealed that oomycetes belonging to different orders contain distinct P450 families and subfamilies in their genomes. Evolutionary analysis and sequence homology data revealed P450 family blooms in oomycetes. Tandem arrangement of a large number of P450s belonging to the same family indicated that P450 family blooming is possibly due to its members' duplications. A unique combination of amino acid patterns was observed at EXXR and CXG motifs for the P450 families CYP5014, CYP5015 and CYP5017. A novel P450 fusion protein (CYP5619 family) with an N-terminal P450 domain fused to a heme peroxidase/dioxygenase domain was discovered in Saprolegnia declina. Oomycete P450 patterns suggested host influence in shaping their P450 content. This manuscript serves as reference for future P450 annotations in newly explored oomycetes.

  2. Indigo formation by microorganisms expressing styrene monooxygenase activity.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, K E; Dobson, A D; Hartmans, S

    1997-01-01

    The transformation of indole to indigo by microorganisms expressing styrene monooxygenase (SMO) has been studied. Styrene and indole are structurally very similar, and thus we looked at a variety of styrene-degrading strains for indole transformation to indigo. Two strains, Pseudomonas putida S12 and CA-3, gave a blue color on solid media when grown in the presence of indole. Indole induces its own transformation on solid media but is a poor inducer in liquid media. Styrene is the best inducer of indole transformation in both strains. Arginine represses styrene consumption and indigo formation rates in P. putida S12 compared to phenylacetic acid-grown cells, while the opposite effect is seen for P. putida CA-3. Characterization of an SMO- and styrene oxide isomerase (SOI)-negative transposon mutant of P. putida CA-3 and an SOI-negative N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutant of P. putida S12 reveals the involvement of both SMO and SOI in indole transformation to indigo. Both strains stoichiometrically produce high-purity indigo from indole. PMID:9361415

  3. Diversity and evolution of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in Oomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Sello, Mopeli Marshal; Jafta, Norventia; Nelson, David R; Chen, Wanping; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Parvez, Mohammad; Kgosiemang, Ipeleng Kopano Rosinah; Monyaki, Richie; Raselemane, Seiso Caiphus; Qhanya, Lehlohonolo Benedict; Mthakathi, Ntsane Trevor; Sitheni Mashele, Samson; Syed, Khajamohiddin

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are heme-thiolate proteins whose role as drug targets against pathogens, as well as in valuable chemical production and bioremediation, has been explored. In this study we performed comprehensive comparative analysis of P450s in 13 newly explored oomycete pathogens. Three hundred and fifty-six P450s were found in oomycetes. These P450s were grouped into 15 P450 families and 84 P450 subfamilies. Among these, nine P450 families and 31 P450 subfamilies were newly found in oomycetes. Research revealed that oomycetes belonging to different orders contain distinct P450 families and subfamilies in their genomes. Evolutionary analysis and sequence homology data revealed P450 family blooms in oomycetes. Tandem arrangement of a large number of P450s belonging to the same family indicated that P450 family blooming is possibly due to its members’ duplications. A unique combination of amino acid patterns was observed at EXXR and CXG motifs for the P450 families CYP5014, CYP5015 and CYP5017. A novel P450 fusion protein (CYP5619 family) with an N-terminal P450 domain fused to a heme peroxidase/dioxygenase domain was discovered in Saprolegnia declina. Oomycete P450 patterns suggested host influence in shaping their P450 content. This manuscript serves as reference for future P450 annotations in newly explored oomycetes. PMID:26129850

  4. Characterization of a Novel Rieske-Type Alkane Monooxygenase System in Pusillimonas sp. Strain T7-7

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    The cold-tolerant bacterium Pusillimonas sp. strain T7-7 is able to utilize diesel oils (C5 to C30 alkanes) as a sole carbon and energy source. In the present study, bioinformatics, proteomics, and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR approaches were used to identify the alkane hydroxylation system present in this bacterium. This system is composed of a Rieske-type monooxygenase, a ferredoxin, and an NADH-dependent reductase. The function of the monooxygenase, which consists of one large (46.711 kDa) and one small (15.355 kDa) subunit, was further studied using in vitro biochemical analysis and in vivo heterologous functional complementation tests. The purified large subunit of the monooxygenase was able to oxidize alkanes ranging from pentane (C5) to tetracosane (C24) using NADH as a cofactor, with greatest activity on the C15 substrate. The large subunit also showed activity on several alkane derivatives, including nitromethane and methane sulfonic acid, but it did not act on any aromatic hydrocarbons. The optimal reaction condition of the large subunit is pH 7.5 at 30°C. Fe2+ can enhance the activity of the enzyme evidently. This is the first time that an alkane monooxygenase system belonging to the Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase family has been identified in a bacterium. PMID:23417490

  5. Substrate radical intermediates in soluble methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aimin; Jin, Yi; Zhang, Jingyan; Brazeau, Brian J; Lipscomb, John D

    2005-12-09

    EPR spin-trapping experiments were carried out using the three-component soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO). Spin-traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), alpha-4-pyridyl-1-oxide N-tert-butylnitrone (POBN), and nitrosobenzene (NOB) were used to investigate the possible formation of substrate radical intermediates during catalysis. In contrast to a previous report, the NADH-coupled oxidations of various substrates did not produce any trapped radical species when DMPO or POBN was present. However, radicals were detected by these traps when only the MMO reductase component and NADH were present. DMPO and POBN were found to be weak inhibitors of the MMO reaction. In contrast, NOB is a strong inhibitor for the MMO-catalyzed nitrobenzene oxidation reaction. When NOB was used as a spin-trap in the complete MMO system with or without substrate, EPR signals from an NOB radical were detected. We propose that a molecule of NOB acts simultaneously as a substrate and a spin-trap for MMO, yielding the long-lived radical and supporting a stepwise mechanism for MMO.

  6. A tale of two methane monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Matthew O.

    2017-01-01

    Methane monooxygenase (MMO) enzymes activate O2 for oxidation of methane. Two distinct MMOs exist in nature, a soluble form that uses a diiron active site (sMMO) and a membrane-bound form with a catalytic copper center (pMMO). Understanding the reaction mechanisms of these enzymes is of fundamental importance to biologists and chemists, and is also relevant to the development of new biocatalysts. The sMMO catalytic cycle has been elucidated in detail, including O2 activation intermediates and the nature of the methane-oxidizing species. By contrast, many aspects of pMMO catalysis remain unclear, most notably the nuclearity and molecular details of the copper active site. Here, we review the current state of knowledge for both enzymes, and consider pMMO O2 activation intermediates suggested by computational and synthetic studies in the context of existing biochemical data. Further work is needed on all fronts, with the ultimate goal of understanding how these two remarkable enzymes catalyze a reaction not readily achieved by any other metalloenzyme or biomimetic compound. PMID:27878395

  7. Antimutagenic Effect of Dioscorea Pentaphylla on Genotoxic Effect Induced By Methyl Methanesulfonate in the Drosophila Wing Spot Test

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, G.; Hosetti, B. B.; Dhananjaya, B. L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Plants as dietary sources are known to have several chemoprotective agents. Dioscorea pentaphylla is an important medicinal plant, which is often used as edible food. This study was undertaken to evaluate the antigenotoxic potential of D. pentaphylla extracts on the genotoxic effect induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in the Drosophila wing spot test. Materials and Methods: The somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) was carried out in Drosophila melanogaster. In transheterogyous larvae, multiple wing hair (mwh 3-0.3) and flare (flr3-38.8) genes were used as markers of the extent of mutagenicity. Results: It was observed thatall the three extracts (petroleum ether, choloroform, and ethyl alcohol) in the combined treatment had significantly inhibited the effect of MMS-induced genotoxic effects. When compared to others, the ethanol extract showed a very significant antimutagenic activity. Conclusion: The compounds that are present in the extracts may directly interact with the methyl radical groups of MMS and inactivate them by chemical reaction. It is also possible that the compounds in the extract compete to interact with the nucleophilic sites in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), thus altering the binding of the mutagen to these sites. Although our results indicate that the compounds present in the extracts may directly interact with the methyl radical groups of MMS and inactivate them by chemical reaction, it may also be quite interesting to investigate through the other different mechanisms by which D. pentaphylla could interfere in vivo on the effect of genotoxic agents. PMID:25948963

  8. Evaluation of organic acids as fuel cell electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, J.; Nguyen, T.H.; Foley, R.T.

    1981-11-01

    The electrochemical behavior of methanesulfonic acid, ethanesulfonic acid, and sulfoacetic acid as fuel cell electrolytes was studied in half-cell at various temperatures. The rate of the electro-oxidation of hydrogen at 115/degree/C was very high in methanesulfonic acid. The rate of the electro-oxidation of propane in all three acids was low even at 135/degree/C. Further, there is evidence for adsorption of these acids on the platinum electrode. It is concluded that anhydrous sulfonic acids are not good electrolytes; water solutions are required. Sulfonic acids containing unprotected carbon-hydrogen bonds are adsorbed on platinum and probably decompose during electrolysis. 9 refs.

  9. Adaptive and Behavioral Changes in Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase Knockout Mice: Relevance to Psychotic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Erhardt, Sophie; Pocivavsek, Ana; Repici, Mariaelena; Liu, Xi-Cong; Imbeault, Sophie; Maddison, Daniel C; Thomas, Marian A R; Smalley, Joshua L; Larsson, Markus K; Muchowski, Paul J; Giorgini, Flaviano; Schwarcz, Robert

    2016-12-16

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase converts kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine, and its inhibition shunts the kynurenine pathway-which is implicated as dysfunctional in various psychiatric disorders-toward enhanced synthesis of kynurenic acid, an antagonist of both α7 nicotinic acetylcholine and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Possibly as a result of reduced kynurenine 3-monooxygenase activity, elevated central nervous system levels of kynurenic acid have been found in patients with psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. In the present study, we investigated adaptive-and possibly regulatory-changes in mice with a targeted deletion of Kmo (Kmo(-/-)) and characterized the kynurenine 3-monooxygenase-deficient mice using six behavioral assays relevant for the study of schizophrenia. Genome-wide differential gene expression analyses in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of these mice identified a network of schizophrenia- and psychosis-related genes, with more pronounced alterations in cerebellar tissue. Kynurenic acid levels were also increased in these brain regions in Kmo(-/-) mice, with significantly higher levels in the cerebellum than in the cerebrum. Kmo(-/-) mice exhibited impairments in contextual memory and spent less time than did controls interacting with an unfamiliar mouse in a social interaction paradigm. The mutant animals displayed increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze and in a light/dark box. After a D-amphetamine challenge (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), Kmo(-/-) mice showed potentiated horizontal activity in the open field paradigm. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the elimination of Kmo in mice is associated with multiple gene and functional alterations that appear to duplicate aspects of the psychopathology of several neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Structure and boosting activity of a starch-degrading lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lo Leggio, Leila; Simmons, Thomas J; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Frandsen, Kristian E H; Hemsworth, Glyn R; Stringer, Mary A; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S; De Maria, Leonardo; Harris, Paul V; Soong, Chee-Leong; Dupree, Paul; Tryfona, Theodora; Lenfant, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2015-01-22

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered enzymes that oxidatively deconstruct polysaccharides. LPMOs are fundamental in the effective utilization of these substrates by bacteria and fungi; moreover, the enzymes have significant industrial importance. We report here the activity, spectroscopy and three-dimensional structure of a starch-active LPMO, a representative of the new CAZy AA13 family. We demonstrate that these enzymes generate aldonic acid-terminated malto-oligosaccharides from retrograded starch and boost significantly the conversion of this recalcitrant substrate to maltose by β-amylase. The detailed structure of the enzyme's active site yields insights into the mechanism of action of this important class of enzymes.

  11. Studies on in vitro S-methylation of naturally occurring thiol compounds with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and methyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Trezl, L.; Park, K.S.; Kim, S.; Paik, W.K.

    1987-08-01

    N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) were found to rapidly methylate glutathione (GSH) in vitro yielding S-methyl glutathione, as verified and quantitated by high-performance liquid chromatography and thin-layer chromatography. Formation of S-methylcysteine in the acid-hydrolyzate of the methylated GSH further confirmed the formation of S-methyl glutathione. Other naturally occurring thiol compounds such as cystein and homocysteine were also methylated by MNU. The observed pH dependency of GSH methylation by MNU suggests that the sulfide anion form of the thiol may represent the favored methyl acceptor. The high reactivity of GSH toward MNU and MMS may be of biological significance in that it could compete with macromolecular cellular components as a target for alkylation.

  12. Controlling the Regioselectivity of Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenases by Mutation of Active-Site Residues.

    PubMed

    Balke, Kathleen; Bäumgen, Marcus; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2017-08-17

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO)-mediated regiodivergent conversions of asymmetric ketones can lead to the formation of "normal" or "abnormal" lactones. In a previous study, we were able to change the regioselectivity of a BVMO by mutation of the active-site residues to smaller amino acids, which thus created more space. In this study, we demonstrate that this method can also be used for other BVMO/substrate combinations. We investigated the regioselectivity of 2-oxo-Δ(3) -4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-CoA monooxygenase from Pseudomonas putida (OTEMO) for cis-bicyclo[3.2.0]hept-2-en-6-one (1) and trans-dihydrocarvone (2), and we were able to switch the regioselectivity of this enzyme for one of the substrate enantiomers. The OTEMO wild-type enzyme converted (-)-1 into an equal (50:50) mixture of the normal and abnormal products. The F255A/F443V variant produced 90 % of the normal product, whereas the W501V variant formed up to 98 % of the abnormal product. OTEMO F255A exclusively produced the normal lactone from (+)-2, whereas the wild-type enzyme was selective for the production of the abnormal product. The positions of these amino acids were equivalent to those mutated in the cyclohexanone monooxygenases from Arthrobacter sp. and Acinetobacter sp. (CHMOArthro and CHMOAcineto ) to switch their regioselectivity towards (+)-2, which suggests that there are hot spots in the active site of BVMOs that can be targeted with the aim to change the regioselectivity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Mutagenicity and induction of sister chromatid exchange by optically active enantiomers of secondary butyl methanesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Ball, J C; Salmeen, I T; Morris, S M

    1989-01-01

    This report describes experiments in which a chiral alkyl methanesulfonate was used to investigate possible mechanisms by which alkylating agents cause their mutagenic, cytotoxic, and clastogenic effects. Optically active enantiomers and the racemic mixture of 2-butyl methanesulfonate (2-BMS) were cytotoxic and mutagenic in Chinese hamster V79 cells and in AS52 cells and mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA100 and TA1535 (without the addition of exogenous metabolizing systems). Within the experimental uncertainties, the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity curves were the same for the R and S enantiomers and for the racemic mixture. The 2-BMS isomers were cytotoxic and induced sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in CHO-K1-BH4 cells. The cytotoxicity curve was similar to that observed with V79 and AS52 cells. The induction of SCE was linear between 1 and 6 mM 2-BMS with no differences discernable between the isomers. The results can be interpreted two ways. The first interpretation is that 2-BMS reacts via a carbocation, and the second interpretation involves an SN2 reaction of 2-BMS with DNA. The latter interpretation suggests that the mechanisms of mutagenesis, cytotoxicity, or the induction of SCE cannot distinguish between small (four-carbon) optically active DNA adducts. We favor the second interpretation because of solvolysis experiments showing the complete inversion of configuration of optically active 2-octyl methanesulfonate (2-OMS, Weiner and Sneen: J American Chemical Society 87:287-291, 1965). While we assume that optically active 2-BMS will react using the same mechanism as chiral 2-OMS, we cannot exclude the possibility that 2-BMS reacts via a carbocation intermediate.

  14. Regioselective Versatility of Monooxygenase Reactions Catalyzed by CYP2B6 and CYP3A4: Examples with Single Substrates.

    PubMed

    Erratico, Claudio A; Deo, Anand K; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes have broad and overlapping substrate specificity and catalyze a variety of monooxygenase reactions, including aliphatic and aromatic hydroxylations, N-hydroxylations, oxygenations of heteroatoms (N, S, P and I), alkene and arene epoxidations, dehalogenations, dehydrogenations and N-, O- and S-dealkylations. Individual CYP enzymes typically catalyze the oxidative metabolism of a common substrate in a regioselective and stereoselective manner. In addition, different CYP enzymes often utilize different monooxygenase reactions when oxidizing a common substrate. This review examines various oxidative reactions catalyzed by a CYP enzyme acting on a single substrate. In the first example, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), a halogenated aromatic environmental contaminant, was oxidatively biotransformed by human CYP2B6. Nine different metabolites of BDE-47 were produced by CYP2B6 via monooxygenase reactions that included aromatic hydroxylation, with and without an NIH-shift, dealkylation and debromination. In the second example, lithocholic acid (3α-hydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid), an endogenous bile acid, served as a substrate for human CYP3A4 and yielded five different metabolites via aliphatic hydroxylation and dehydrogenation reactions.

  15. Hydrocarbon monooxygenase in Mycobacterium: recombinant expression of a member of the ammonia monooxygenase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Nicholas V; Le, Nga B; Ly, Mai A; Ogawa, Hitoha E; McCarl, Victoria; Wilson, Neil L; Holmes, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    The copper membrane monooxygenases (CuMMOs) are an important group of enzymes in environmental science and biotechnology. Areas of relevance include the development of green chemistry for sustainable exploitation of methane (CH4) reserves, remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination and monitoring human impact in the biogeochemical cycles of CH4 and nitrogen. Challenges for all these applications are that many aspects of the ecology, physiology and structure–function relationships in the CuMMOs are inadequately understood. Here, we describe genetic and physiological characterization of a novel member of the CuMMO family that has an unusual physiological substrate range (C2–C4 alkanes) and a distinctive bacterial host (Mycobacterium). The Mycobacterial CuMMO genes (designated hmoCAB) were amenable to heterologous expression in M. smegmatis—this is the first example of recombinant expression of a complete and highly active CuMMO enzyme. The apparent specific activity of recombinant cells containing hmoCAB ranged from 2 to 3 nmol min–1 per mg protein on ethane, propane and butane as substrates, and the recombinants could also attack ethene, cis-dichloroethene and 1,2-dichloroethane. No detectable activity of recombinants or wild-type strains was seen with methane. The specific inhibitor allylthiourea strongly inhibited growth of wild-type cells on C2–C4 alkanes, and omission of copper from the medium had a similar effect, confirming the physiological role of the CuMMO for growth on alkanes. The hydrocarbon monooxygenase provides a new model for studying this important enzyme family, and the recombinant expression system will enable biochemical and molecular biological experiments (for example, site-directed mutagenesis) that were previously not possible. PMID:21796219

  16. Intra-Pleural Colistin Methanesulfonate Therapy for Pleural Infection caused by Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii: A Successful Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Muhammad Asim; Rahman, Basheer Abd El; Mady, Ahmed Fouad; Odat, Mohammed Al; AlHarthy, Abdurehman; Ramadan, Omar El Sayed; Mumtaz, Shahzad Ahmed; Omrani, Ali S.

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by carbapenem-resistant, Gram-negative bacteria are an increasing clinical challenge, since the antimicrobial treatment options are often limited to colistin methanesulfonate. No data are available regarding the pharmacokinetics of colistin in pleural fluid. We report the case of a 92-year old man with ventilator-associated pneumonia and pleurisy caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli, which were both multidrug-resistant. After an unsuccessful treatment with intravenous colistin methanesulfonate and imipen-em-cilastatin, the addition of intra-pleural colistin methanesulfonate to the intravenous treatment led to a prompt clinical, radiological and microbiological resolution. This is the first report of a successful use of intra-pleural colistin in the literature. The intra-pleural colistin therapy should be considered in selected cases of pleurisy caused by multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25276329

  17. Crystal Structure of Dicamba Monooxygenase: A Rieske Nonheme Oxygenase that Catalyzes Oxidative Demethylation

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, Razvan; Jiang, Wen Zhi; Weeks, Donald P.; Wilson, Mark A.

    2009-08-28

    Dicamba (3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid) is a widely used herbicide that is efficiently degraded by soil microbes. These microbes use a novel Rieske nonheme oxygenase, dicamba monooxygenase (DMO), to catalyze the oxidative demethylation of dicamba to 3,6-dichlorosalicylic acid (DCSA) and formaldehyde. We have determined the crystal structures of DMO in the free state, bound to its substrate dicamba, and bound to the product DCSA at 2.10-1.75 {angstrom} resolution. The structures show that the DMO active site uses a combination of extensive hydrogen bonding and steric interactions to correctly orient chlorinated, ortho-substituted benzoic-acid-like substrates for catalysis. Unlike other Rieske aromatic oxygenases, DMO oxygenates the exocyclic methyl group, rather than the aromatic ring, of its substrate. This first crystal structure of a Rieske demethylase shows that the Rieske oxygenase structural scaffold can be co-opted to perform varied types of reactions on xenobiotic substrates.

  18. Surface and airborne measurements of organosulfur and methanesulfonate over the western United States and coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorooshian, Armin; Crosbie, Ewan; Maudlin, Lindsay C.; Youn, Jong-Sang; Wang, Zhen; Shingler, Taylor; Ortega, Amber M.; Hersey, Scott; Woods, Roy K.

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on ambient measurements of organosulfur (OS) and methanesulfonate (MSA) over the western United States and coastal areas. Particulate OS levels are highest in summertime and generally increase as a function of sulfate (a precursor) and sodium (a marine tracer) with peak levels at coastal sites. The ratio of OS to total sulfur is also highest at coastal sites, with increasing values as a function of normalized difference vegetation index and the ratio of organic carbon to elemental carbon. Correlative analysis points to significant relationships between OS and biogenic emissions from marine and continental sources, factors that coincide with secondary production, and vanadium due to a suspected catalytic role. A major OS species, methanesulfonate (MSA), was examined with intensive field measurements, and the resulting data support the case for vanadium's catalytic influence. Mass size distributions reveal a dominant MSA peak between aerodynamic diameters of 0.32-0.56 µm at a desert and coastal site with nearly all MSA mass (≥84%) in submicrometer sizes; MSA:non-sea-salt sulfate ratios vary widely as a function of particle size and proximity to the ocean. Airborne data indicate that relative to the marine boundary layer, particulate MSA levels are enhanced in urban and agricultural areas and also the free troposphere when impacted by biomass burning. Some combination of fires and marine-derived emissions leads to higher MSA levels than either source alone. Finally, MSA differences in cloud water and out-of-cloud aerosol are discussed.

  19. Hydroxylation of methane through component interactions in soluble methane monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jae

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydroxylation through methane monooxygenases (MMOs) is a key aspect due to their control of the carbon cycle in the ecology system and recent applications of methane gas in the field of bioenergy and bioremediation. Methanotropic bacteria perform a specific microbial conversion from methane, one of the most stable carbon compounds, to methanol through elaborate mechanisms. MMOs express particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in most strains and soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) under copper-limited conditions. The mechanisms of MMO have been widely studied from sMMO belonging to the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) superfamily. This enzyme has diiron active sites where different types of hydrocarbons are oxidized through orchestrated hydroxylase, regulatory and reductase components for precise control of hydrocarbons, oxygen, protons, and electrons. Recent advances in biophysical studies, including structural and enzymatic achievements for sMMO, have explained component interactions, substrate pathways, and intermediates of sMMO. In this account, oxidation of methane in sMMO is discussed with recent progress that is critical for understanding the microbial applications of C-H activation in one-carbon substrates.

  20. Diversity in Butane Monooxygenases among Butane-Grown Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hamamura, Natsuko; Storfa, Ryan T.; Semprini, Lewis; Arp, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Butane monooxygenases of butane-grown Pseudomonas butanovora, Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5, and an environmental isolate, CF8, were compared at the physiological level. The presence of butane monooxygenases in these bacteria was indicated by the following results. (i) O2 was required for butane degradation. (ii) 1-Butanol was produced during butane degradation. (iii) Acetylene inhibited both butane oxidation and 1-butanol production. The responses to the known monooxygenase inactivator, ethylene, and inhibitor, allyl thiourea (ATU), discriminated butane degradation among the three bacteria. Ethylene irreversibly inactivated butane oxidation by P. butanovora but not by M. vaccae or CF8. In contrast, butane oxidation by only CF8 was strongly inhibited by ATU. In all three strains of butane-grown bacteria, specific polypeptides were labeled in the presence of [14C]acetylene. The [14C]acetylene labeling patterns were different among the three bacteria. Exposure of lactate-grown CF8 and P. butanovora and glucose-grown M. vaccae to butane induced butane oxidation activity as well as the specific acetylene-binding polypeptides. Ammonia was oxidized by all three bacteria. P. butanovora oxidized ammonia to hydroxylamine, while CF8 and M. vaccae produced nitrite. All three bacteria oxidized ethylene to ethylene oxide. Methane oxidation was not detected by any of the bacteria. The results indicate the presence of three distinct butane monooxygenases in butane-grown P. butanovora, M. vaccae, and CF8. PMID:10508093

  1. Two Structures of an N-Hydroxylating Flavoprotein Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Olucha, Jose; Meneely, Kathleen M.; Chilton, Annemarie S.; Lamb, Audrey L.

    2011-01-01

    The ornithine hydroxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PvdA) catalyzes the FAD-dependent hydroxylation of the side chain amine of ornithine, which is subsequently formylated to generate the iron-chelating hydroxamates of the siderophore pyoverdin. PvdA belongs to the class B flavoprotein monooxygenases, which catalyze the oxidation of substrates using NADPH as the electron donor and molecular oxygen. Class B enzymes include the well studied flavin-containing monooxygenases and Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases. The first two structures of a class B N-hydroxylating monooxygenase were determined with FAD in oxidized (1.9 Å resolution) and reduced (3.03 Å resolution) states. PvdA has the two expected Rossmann-like dinucleotide-binding domains for FAD and NADPH and also a substrate-binding domain, with the active site at the interface between the three domains. The structures have NADP(H) and (hydroxy)ornithine bound in a solvent-exposed active site, providing structural evidence for substrate and co-substrate specificity and the inability of PvdA to bind FAD tightly. Structural and biochemical evidence indicates that NADP+ remains bound throughout the oxidative half-reaction, which is proposed to shelter the flavin intermediates from solvent and thereby prevent uncoupling of NADPH oxidation from hydroxylated product formation. PMID:21757711

  2. Evaluation of Rapid Cooling and Tricaine Methanesulfonate (MS222) as Methods of Euthanasia in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jolaine M; Bunte, Ralph M; Carty, Anthony J

    2009-01-01

    Despite the progressively increasing use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) in research, the most humane method of euthanasia for these fish has not been determined. Contemporary guidance documents state that hypothermia is an unacceptable method of euthanasia. The goal of this study was to compare rapid cooling and tricaine methanesulfonate (MS222) for zebrafish euthanasia. Zebrafish (n = 46) were euthanized by immersion in either an ice-water (4 °C or less) bath or unbuffered MS222 solution (250 mg/L; 25 to 30 °C). Another cohort (n = 10) was exposed to buffered MS222 to determine whether the acidity of the water alone caused distress. The times from exposure until the animals became unable to swim, right themselves, and death were measured, and signs of distress were recorded. Fish then were placed in a ‘recovery tank’ of system water to verify that recovery did not occur. Tissues were examined histologically. The mean time for euthanasia was longer and the number of fish exhibiting signs of distress was greater for fish exposed to MS222 than those exposed to chilled water. In addition, 4 of the 23 fish exposed to MS222 regained consciousness in the recovery tank, whereas none of 23 fish exposed to chilled water recovered. No histopathologic changes or evidence of ice crystal formation were seen in either group. In light of the faster time to death and fewer signs of distress in zebrafish euthanized by rapid cooling, we advocate this method as a humane veterinary practice. PMID:19930828

  3. Kinetic mechanism of phenylacetone monooxygenase from Thermobifida fusca.

    PubMed

    Torres Pazmiño, Daniel E; Baas, Bert-Jan; Janssen, Dick B; Fraaije, Marco W

    2008-04-01

    Phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO) from Thermobifida fusca is a FAD-containing Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO). To elucidate the mechanism of conversion of phenylacetone by PAMO, we have performed a detailed steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetic analysis. In the catalytic cycle ( k cat = 3.1 s (-1)), rapid binding of NADPH ( K d = 0.7 microM) is followed by a transfer of the 4( R)-hydride from NADPH to the FAD cofactor ( k red = 12 s (-1)). The reduced PAMO is rapidly oxygenated by molecular oxygen ( k ox = 870 mM (-1) s (-1)), yielding a C4a-peroxyflavin. The peroxyflavin enzyme intermediate reacts with phenylacetone to form benzylacetate ( k 1 = 73 s (-1)). This latter kinetic event leads to an enzyme intermediate which we could not unequivocally assign and may represent a Criegee intermediate or a C4a-hydroxyflavin form. The relatively slow decay (4.1 s (-1)) of this intermediate yields fully reoxidized PAMO and limits the turnover rate. NADP (+) release is relatively fast and represents the final step of the catalytic cycle. This study shows that kinetic behavior of PAMO is significantly different when compared with that of sequence-related monooxygenases, e.g., cyclohexanone monooxygenase and liver microsomal flavin-containing monooxygenase. Inspection of the crystal structure of PAMO has revealed that residue R337, which is conserved in other BVMOs, is positioned close to the flavin cofactor. The analyzed R337A and R337K mutant enzymes were still able to form and stabilize the C4a-peroxyflavin intermediate. The mutants were unable to convert either phenylacetone or benzyl methyl sulfide. This demonstrates that R337 is crucially involved in assisting PAMO-mediated Baeyer-Villiger and sulfoxidation reactions.

  4. Praseodymium methanesulfonate catalyzed one-pot synthesis of 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2-(1H)-ones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Song, Zhiguo; Gong, Hong; Jiang, Heng

    2008-01-01

    A series of 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2-(1H)-ones compounds was synthesized efficiently by a one-pot cyclocondensation of an aldehyde, 1,3-dicarbonyl compound, and urea in absolute ethanol under refluxing temperature using praseodymium methanesulfonate as catalyst. After the reaction, the catalyst can be easily recovered and reused several times without distinct decrease in reaction yields.

  5. 1,6-Hexanediamine methanesulfonate: a mild and efficient catalyst for the tetrahydropyranylation of alcohols under solvent-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Jiang, Heng

    2010-01-01

    Various alcohols react with 3,4-dihydro-2 H-pyran under mild conditions using a catalytic amount of 1,6-hexanediamine methanesulfonate. It affords the corresponding tetrahydropyranyl ethers in good yields at a faster rate in the absence of solvent.

  6. Efficacy of metomidate and tricaine methanesulfonate to modulate the short-term cortisol stress response in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ability of the anesthetics metomidate and tricaine methanesulfonate to mitigate the cortisol stress response of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus was evaluated during a 10 min confinement stress. Channel catfish (11.9 ± 0.5 g; mean ± SE) were transferred from holding tanks to confinement buck...

  7. Proposed involvement of a soluble methane monooxygenase homologue in the cyclohexane-dependent growth of a new Brachymonas species.

    PubMed

    Brzostowicz, Patricia C; Walters, Dana M; Jackson, Raymond E; Halsey, Kimberly H; Ni, Hao; Rouvière, Pierre E

    2005-02-01

    High-throughput mRNA differential display (DD) was used to identify genes induced by cyclohexane in Brachymonas petroleovorans CHX, a recently isolated beta-proteobacterium that grows on cyclohexane. Two metabolic gene clusters were identified multiple times in independent reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) in the course of this DD experiment. These clusters encode genes believed to be required for cyclohexane metabolism. One gene cluster (8 kb) encodes the subunits of a multicomponent hydroxylase related to the soluble butane of Pseudomonas butanovora and methane monooxygenases (sMMO) of methanotrophs. We propose that this butane monooxygenase homologue carries out the oxidation of cyclohexane into cyclohexanol during growth. A second gene cluster (11 kb) contains almost all the genes required for the oxidation of cyclohexanol to adipic acid. Real-time PCR experiments confirmed that genes from both clusters are induced by cyclohexane. The role of the Baeyer-Villiger cyclohexanone monooxygenase of the second cluster was confirmed by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli.

  8. Chromium (VI) potentiates mutagenesis by sodium azide but not ethyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    LaVelle, J.M.; Witmer, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    A fluctuation test using Salmonella typhimurium strain 1535 has been used in an experimental protocol to assess biological effects of interactions between chromium (VI), such as K/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/, and two DNA-damaging agents, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), and sodium azide. For the combination of K/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ and NaN/sub 3/, the response was significantly greater than expected suggesting a possible potentiation of mutagenesis. The opposite (a less-than-additive response) was found for the K/sub 2/CrO/sub 4//EMS combination. Both effects were found to be dose related to the concentration of potassium chromate used. Toxicity of the compounds or their combinations to the bacterial could not explain the results.

  9. Glacial/interglacial variations in methanesulfonate (MSA) in the Siple Dome ice core, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltzman, Eric S.; Dioumaeva, Irina; Finley, Brandon D.

    2006-06-01

    Methanesulfonate (MSA) in the Siple Dome ice core is a record of the deposition of biogenic sulfur to the West Antarctic ice sheet covering the past 100 kyr. Siple Dome MSA levels were low during the last glacial maximum, and increased to higher Holocene levels with a several kyr lag relative to the deglacial warming. The positive correlation between MSA and temperature at Siple Dome is similar to that in Greenland ice cores (Renland, GISP2, and GRIP), and stands in contrast to the negative correlation observed at Vostok, East Antarctica. The Siple Dome MSA data suggest that the sign of the high latitude dust/sulfur/climate feedback is negative, at least for the Pacific sector of the high latitude Southern ocean. These results challenge the idea that fertilization by increased dust deposition led to widespread increased DMS emissions from this region of the glacial Southern Ocean.

  10. Surface and Airborne Measurements of Organosulfur and Methanesulfonate Over the Western United States and Coastal Areas

    PubMed Central

    Sorooshian, Armin; Crosbie, Ewan; Maudlin, Lindsay C.; Youn, Jong-Sang; Wang, Zhen; Shingler, Taylor; Ortega, Amber M.; Hersey, Scott; Woods, Roy K.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on ambient measurements of organosulfur (OS) and methanesulfonate (MSA) over the western United States and coastal areas. Particulate OS levels are highest in summertime, and generally increase as a function of sulfate (a precursor) and sodium (a marine tracer) with peak levels at coastal sites. The ratio of OS to total sulfur (TS) is also highest at coastal sites, with increasing values as a function of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the ratio of organic carbon to elemental carbon. Correlative analysis points to significant relationships between OS and biogenic emissions from marine and continental sources, factors that coincide with secondary production, and vanadium due to a suspected catalytic role. A major OS species, methanesulfonate (MSA), was examined with intensive field measurements and the resulting data support the case for vanadium’s catalytic influence. Mass size distributions reveal a dominant MSA peak between aerodynamic diameters of 0.32—0.56 μm at a desert and coastal site with nearly all MSA mass (≥ 84%) in sub-micrometer sizes; MSA:non-sea salt sulfate ratios vary widely as a function of particle size and proximity to the ocean. Airborne data indicate that relative to the marine boundary layer, particulate MSA levels are enhanced in urban and agricultural areas, and also the free troposphere when impacted by biomass burning. Some combination of fires and marine-derived emissions leads to higher MSA levels than either source alone. Finally, MSA differences in cloud water and out-of-cloud aerosol are discussed. PMID:26413434

  11. Characterization and Crystal Structure of a Robust Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Romero, Elvira; Castellanos, J Rubén Gómez; Mattevi, Andrea; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-12-19

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) is a promising biocatalyst for industrial reactions owing to its broad substrate spectrum and excellent regio-, chemo-, and enantioselectivity. However, the low stability of many Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases is an obstacle for their exploitation in industry. Characterization and crystal structure determination of a robust CHMO from Thermocrispum municipale is reported. The enzyme efficiently converts a variety of aliphatic, aromatic, and cyclic ketones, as well as prochiral sulfides. A compact substrate-binding cavity explains its preference for small rather than bulky substrates. Small-scale conversions with either purified enzyme or whole cells demonstrated the remarkable properties of this newly discovered CHMO. The exceptional solvent tolerance and thermostability make the enzyme very attractive for biotechnology.

  12. Characterization and Crystal Structure of a Robust Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Elvira; Castellanos, J. Rubén Gómez

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) is a promising biocatalyst for industrial reactions owing to its broad substrate spectrum and excellent regio‐, chemo‐, and enantioselectivity. However, the low stability of many Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenases is an obstacle for their exploitation in industry. Characterization and crystal structure determination of a robust CHMO from Thermocrispum municipale is reported. The enzyme efficiently converts a variety of aliphatic, aromatic, and cyclic ketones, as well as prochiral sulfides. A compact substrate‐binding cavity explains its preference for small rather than bulky substrates. Small‐scale conversions with either purified enzyme or whole cells demonstrated the remarkable properties of this newly discovered CHMO. The exceptional solvent tolerance and thermostability make the enzyme very attractive for biotechnology. PMID:27873437

  13. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase lipid metabolites are significant second messengers in the resolution of choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Eiichi; Inafuku, Saori; Mulki, Lama; Okunuki, Yoko; Yanai, Ryoji; Smith, Kaylee E; Kim, Clifford B; Klokman, Garrett; Bielenberg, Diane R; Puli, Narender; Falck, John R; Husain, Deeba; Miller, Joan W; Edin, Matthew L; Zeldin, Darryl C; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Hammock, Bruce D; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen; Connor, Kip M

    2017-09-05

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness for individuals age 50 and above in the developed world. Abnormal growth of choroidal blood vessels, or choroidal neovascularization (CNV), is a hallmark of the neovascular (wet) form of advanced AMD and leads to significant vision loss. A growing body of evidence supports a strong link between neovascular disease and inflammation. Metabolites of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from the cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenase pathway serve as vital second messengers that regulate a number of hormones and growth factors involved in inflammation and vascular function. Using transgenic mice with altered CYP lipid biosynthetic pathways in a mouse model of laser-induced CNV, we characterized the role of these lipid metabolites in regulating neovascular disease. We discovered that the CYP-derived lipid metabolites epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs) and epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids (EEQs) are vital in dampening CNV severity. Specifically, overexpression of the monooxygenase CYP2C8 or genetic ablation or inhibition of the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) enzyme led to increased levels of EDP and EEQ with attenuated CNV development. In contrast, when we promoted the degradation of these CYP-derived metabolites by transgenic overexpression of sEH, the protective effect against CNV was lost. We found that these molecules work in part through their ability to regulate the expression of key leukocyte adhesion molecules, on both leukocytes and endothelial cells, thereby mediating leukocyte recruitment. These results suggest that CYP lipid signaling molecules and their regulators are potential therapeutic targets in neovascular diseases.

  14. Substrate Specificity and Enantioselectivity of 4-Hydroxyacetophenone Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Kamerbeek, Nanne M.; Olsthoorn, Arjen J. J.; Fraaije, Marco W.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2003-01-01

    The 4-hydroxyacetophenone monooxygenase (HAPMO) from Pseudomonas fluorescens ACB catalyzes NADPH- and oxygen-dependent Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of 4-hydroxyacetophenone to the corresponding acetate ester. Using the purified enzyme from recombinant Escherichia coli, we found that a broad range of carbonylic compounds that are structurally more or less similar to 4-hydroxyacetophenone are also substrates for this flavin-containing monooxygenase. On the other hand, several carbonyl compounds that are substrates for other Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are not converted by HAPMO. In addition to performing Baeyer-Villiger reactions with aromatic ketones and aldehydes, the enzyme was also able to catalyze sulfoxidation reactions by using aromatic sulfides. Furthermore, several heterocyclic and aliphatic carbonyl compounds were also readily converted by this BVMO. To probe the enantioselectivity of HAPMO, the conversion of bicyclohept-2-en-6-one and two aryl alkyl sulfides was studied. The monooxygenase preferably converted (1R,5S)-bicyclohept-2-en-6-one, with an enantiomeric ratio (E) of 20, thus enabling kinetic resolution to obtain the (1S,5R) enantiomer. Complete conversion of both enantiomers resulted in the accumulation of two regioisomeric lactones with moderate enantiomeric excess (ee) for the two lactones obtained [77% ee for (1S,5R)-2 and 34% ee for (1R,5S)-3]. Using methyl 4-tolyl sulfide and methylphenyl sulfide, we found that HAPMO is efficient and highly selective in the asymmetric formation of the corresponding (S)-sulfoxides (ee > 99%). The biocatalytic properties of HAPMO described here show the potential of this enzyme for biotechnological applications. PMID:12514023

  15. Occurrence of a barbiturate-inducible catalytically self-sufficient 119,000 dalton cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase in bacilli.

    PubMed

    Fulco, A J; Ruettinger, R T

    1987-05-04

    In a recent publication (Narhi, L.O. and Fulco, A.J.[1986] J. Biol. Chem. 261, 7160-7169) we described the characterization of a catalytically self-sufficient 119,000 Dalton cytochrome P-450 fatty acid monooxygenase (P-450BM-3) induced by barbiturates in Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581. We have now examined cell-free preparations from 12 distinct strains of B. megaterium and from one or two strains each of B. alvei, B. brevis, B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. macerans, B. pumilis and B. subtilis for the presence of this inducible enzyme. Using Western blot analyses in combination with assays for fatty acid hydroxylase activity and cytochrome P-450, we were able to show that 11 of the 12 B. megaterium strains contained not only a strongly pentobarbital-inducible fatty acid monooxygenase identical to or polymorphic with P-450BM-3 but also significant levels of two smaller P-450 cytochromes that were the same as or similar to cytochromes P-450BM-1 and P-450BM-2 originally found in ATCC 14581. Unlike the 119,000 Dalton P-450, however, the two smaller P-450s were generally easily detectable in cultures grown to stationary phase in the absence of barbiturates and, with some exceptions, were not strongly induced by pentobarbital. None of the non-megaterium species of Bacillus tested exhibited significant levels of either fatty acid monooxygenase activity or cytochrome P-450. The one strain of B. megaterium that lacked inducible P-450BM-3 was also negative for BM-1 and BM-2. However, this strain (ATCC 13368) did contain a small but significant level of another P-450 cytochrome that others have identified as the oxygenase component of a steroid 15-beta-hydroxylase system. Our evidence suggests that the BM series of P-450 cytochromes is encoded by chromosomal (rather than by plasmid) DNA.

  16. Alkane Oxidation: Methane Monooxygenases, Related Enzymes, and Their Biomimetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Vincent C-C; Maji, Suman; Chen, Peter P-Y; Lee, Hung Kay; Yu, Steve S-F; Chan, Sunney I

    2017-02-16

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) mediate the facile conversion of methane into methanol in methanotrophic bacteria with high efficiency under ambient conditions. Because the selective oxidation of methane is extremely challenging, there is considerable interest in understanding how these enzymes carry out this difficult chemistry. The impetus of these efforts is to learn from the microbes to develop a biomimetic catalyst to accomplish the same chemical transformation. Here, we review the progress made over the past two to three decades toward delineating the structures and functions of the catalytic sites in two MMOs: soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). sMMO is a water-soluble three-component protein complex consisting of a hydroxylase with a nonheme diiron catalytic site; pMMO is a membrane-bound metalloenzyme with a unique tricopper cluster as the site of hydroxylation. The metal cluster in each of these MMOs harnesses O2 to functionalize the C-H bond using different chemistry. We highlight some of the common basic principles that they share. Finally, the development of functional models of the catalytic sites of MMOs is described. These efforts have culminated in the first successful biomimetic catalyst capable of efficient methane oxidation without overoxidation at room temperature.

  17. Inhibition of human squalene monooxygenase by selenium compounds.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nisha; Porter, Todd D

    2002-01-01

    Selenosis in animals is characterized by a variety of neurological abnormalities, but the chemical species of selenium and the molecular targets that mediate this neurotoxicity are unknown. We have previously shown that selenite is a potent inhibitor of squalene monooxygenase, the second enzyme in the committed pathway for cholesterol biosynthesis; inhibition of this enzyme by dimethyltellurium leads to a peripheral demyelinating neuropathy similar to that seen in selenosis. To evaluate the role methylation plays in selenium toxicity, we examined the ability of three methylselenium compounds, methylselenol, dimethylselenide, and trimethylselenonium iodide, to inhibit purified recombinant human squalene monooxygenase. IC(50) values for methylselenol (95 microM) and dimethylselenide (680 microM) were greater than that previously obtained for selenite (37 microM), and inhibition by trimethylselenonium iodide was evident only at concentrations above 3 mM. Inhibition by methylselenol as well as by selenite was slow and irreversible, suggestive of covalent binding to the enzyme, and thiol-containing compounds could prevent and reverse this inhibition, indicating that these compounds were reacting with sulfhydryl groups on the protein. Monothiols such as glutathione and beta-mercaptoethanol provided better protection than did dithiols, suggesting that these selenium compounds bind to only one of the two proposed vicinal cysteines on squalene monooxygenase. Unexpectedly, the inhibition by selenite was significantly enhanced by dithiols, indicating that a more toxic species, possibly selenide, was formed in the presence of these dithiol reductants. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Investigating the coenzyme specificity of phenylacetone monooxygenase from Thermobifida fusca

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Hanna M.; Torres Pazmiño, Daniel E.; Rodríguez, Cristina; de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Gotor, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    Type I Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) strongly prefer NADPH over NADH as an electron donor. In order to elucidate the molecular basis for this coenzyme specificity, we have performed a site-directed mutagenesis study on phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO) from Thermobifida fusca. Using sequence alignments of type I BVMOs and crystal structures of PAMO and cyclohexanone monooxygenase in complex with NADP+, we identified four residues that could interact with the 2′-phosphate moiety of NADPH in PAMO. The mutagenesis study revealed that the conserved R217 is essential for binding the adenine moiety of the nicotinamide coenzyme while it also contributes to the recognition of the 2′-phosphate moiety of NADPH. The substitution of T218 did not have a strong effect on the coenzyme specificity. The H220N and H220Q mutants exhibited a ~3-fold improvement in the catalytic efficiency with NADH while the catalytic efficiency with NADPH was hardly affected. Mutating K336 did not increase the activity of PAMO with NADH, but it had a significant and beneficial effect on the enantioselectivity of Baeyer–Villiger oxidations and sulfoxidations. In conclusion, our results indicate that the function of NADPH in catalysis cannot be easily replaced by NADH. This finding is in line with the complex catalytic mechanism and the vital role of the coenzyme in BVMOs. PMID:20703875

  19. Investigating the coenzyme specificity of phenylacetone monooxygenase from Thermobifida fusca.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Hanna M; Torres Pazmiño, Daniel E; Rodríguez, Cristina; de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Gotor, Vicente; Fraaije, Marco W

    2010-11-01

    Type I Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) strongly prefer NADPH over NADH as an electron donor. In order to elucidate the molecular basis for this coenzyme specificity, we have performed a site-directed mutagenesis study on phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO) from Thermobifida fusca. Using sequence alignments of type I BVMOs and crystal structures of PAMO and cyclohexanone monooxygenase in complex with NADP(+), we identified four residues that could interact with the 2'-phosphate moiety of NADPH in PAMO. The mutagenesis study revealed that the conserved R217 is essential for binding the adenine moiety of the nicotinamide coenzyme while it also contributes to the recognition of the 2'-phosphate moiety of NADPH. The substitution of T218 did not have a strong effect on the coenzyme specificity. The H220N and H220Q mutants exhibited a ~3-fold improvement in the catalytic efficiency with NADH while the catalytic efficiency with NADPH was hardly affected. Mutating K336 did not increase the activity of PAMO with NADH, but it had a significant and beneficial effect on the enantioselectivity of Baeyer-Villiger oxidations and sulfoxidations. In conclusion, our results indicate that the function of NADPH in catalysis cannot be easily replaced by NADH. This finding is in line with the complex catalytic mechanism and the vital role of the coenzyme in BVMOs.

  20. Structure, dynamics, and function of the monooxygenase P450 BM-3: insights from computer simulations studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccatano, Danilo

    2015-07-01

    The monooxygenase P450 BM-3 is a NADPH-dependent fatty acid hydroxylase enzyme isolated from soil bacterium Bacillus megaterium. As a pivotal member of cytochrome P450 superfamily, it has been intensely studied for the comprehension of structure-dynamics-function relationships in this class of enzymes. In addition, due to its peculiar properties, it is also a promising enzyme for biochemical and biomedical applications. However, despite the efforts, the full understanding of the enzyme structure and dynamics is not yet achieved. Computational studies, particularly molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have importantly contributed to this endeavor by providing new insights at an atomic level regarding the correlations between structure, dynamics, and function of the protein. This topical review summarizes computational studies based on MD simulations of the cytochrome P450 BM-3 and gives an outlook on future directions.

  1. Structural basis for substrate targeting and catalysis by fungal polysaccharide monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Beeson, William T.; Phillips, Christopher M.; Marletta, Michael A.; Cate, Jamie H. D.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The use of cellulases remains a major cost in the production of renewable fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Fungi secrete copper-dependent polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) that oxidatively cleave crystalline cellulose and improve the effectiveness of cellulases. However, the means by which PMOs recognize and cleave their substrates in the plant cell wall remain unclear. Here we present structures of Neurospora crassa PMO-2 and PMO-3 at 1.10 Å and 1.37 Å resolution, respectively. In the structures, dioxygen species are found in the active sites, consistent with the proposed cleavage mechanism. Structural and sequence comparisons between PMOs also reveal that the enzyme substrate-binding surfaces contain highly varied aromatic amino acid and glycosylation positions. The structures reported here provide evidence for a wide range of PMO substrate recognition patterns in the plant cell wall, including binding modes that traverse multiple glucan chains. PMID:22578542

  2. Structure and boosting activity of a starch-degrading lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Lo Leggio, Leila; Simmons, Thomas J.; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N.; Frandsen, Kristian E. H.; Hemsworth, Glyn R.; Stringer, Mary A.; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S.; De Maria, Leonardo; Harris, Paul V.; Soong, Chee-Leong; Dupree, Paul; Tryfona, Theodora; Lenfant, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Davies, Gideon J.; Walton, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered enzymes that oxidatively deconstruct polysaccharides. LPMOs are fundamental in the effective utilization of these substrates by bacteria and fungi; moreover, the enzymes have significant industrial importance. We report here the activity, spectroscopy and three-dimensional structure of a starch-active LPMO, a representative of the new CAZy AA13 family. We demonstrate that these enzymes generate aldonic acid-terminated malto-oligosaccharides from retrograded starch and boost significantly the conversion of this recalcitrant substrate to maltose by β-amylase. The detailed structure of the enzyme’s active site yields insights into the mechanism of action of this important class of enzymes. PMID:25608804

  3. Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 "2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate monooxygenase" is an alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Fukumori, F; Hausinger, R P

    1993-01-01

    The Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 tfdA gene, encoding the enzyme responsible for the first step in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) biodegradation, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and several enzymatic properties of the partially purified gene product were examined. Although the tfdA-encoded enzyme is typically referred to as 2,4-D monooxygenase, we were unable to observe any reductant-dependent activity. Rather, we demonstrate that this enzyme is a ferrous ion-dependent dioxygenase that uses alpha-ketoglutarate as a cosubstrate. The alpha-ketoglutarate is converted to succinate concomitant with 2,4-D conversion to 2,4-dichlorophenol. By using [1-14C]alpha-ketoglutarate, we established that carbon dioxide is the second product derived from alpha-ketoglutarate. Finally, we verified the proposal that glyoxylate is the second product derived from 2,4-D. PMID:8458850

  4. Homology modeling and protein engineering of alkane monooxygenase in Burkholderia thailandensis MSMB121: in silico insights.

    PubMed

    Jain, Chakresh Kumar; Gupta, Money; Prasad, Yamuna; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar

    2014-07-01

    The degradation of hydrocarbons plays an important role in the eco-balancing of petroleum products, pesticides and other toxic products in the environment. The degradation of hydrocarbons by microbes such as Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, Burkhulderia, Gordonia sp. and Acinetobacter sp. has been studied intensively in the literature. The present study focused on the in silico protein engineering of alkane monooxygenase (ladA)-a protein involved in the alkane degradation pathway. We demonstrated the improvement in substrate binding energy with engineered ladA in Burkholderia thailandensis MSMB121. We identified an ortholog of ladA monooxygenase found in B. thailandensis MSMB121, and showed it to be an enzyme involved in an alkane degradation pathway studied extensively in Geobacillus thermodenitrificans. Homology modeling of the three-dimensional structure of ladA was performed with a crystal structure (protein databank ID: 3B9N) as a template in MODELLER 9v11, and further validated using PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D and WHATIF tools. Specific amino acids were substituted in the region corresponding to amino acids 305-370 of ladA protein, resulting in an enhancement of binding energy in different alkane chain molecules as compared to wild protein structures in the docking experiments. The substrate binding energy with the protein was calculated using Vina (Implemented in VEGAZZ). Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the dynamics of different alkane chain molecules inside the binding pockets of wild and mutated ladA. Here, we hypothesize an improvement in binding energies and accessibility of substrates towards engineered ladA enzyme, which could be further facilitated for wet laboratory-based experiments for validation of the alkane degradation pathway in this organism.

  5. Gaseous (DMS, MSA, SO2, H2SO4 and DMSO) and particulate (sulfate and methanesulfonate) sulfur species over the northeastern coast of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardouki, H.; Berresheim, H.; Vrekoussis, M.; Sciare, J.; Kouvarakis, G.; Oikonomou, K.; Schneider, J.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2003-07-01

    A detailed study of the levels, the temporal and diurnal variability of the main compounds involved in the biogenic sulfur cycle was carried out in Crete (Eastern Mediterranean) during the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidant Study (MINOS) field experiment in July-August 2001. Intensive measurements of gaseous dimethylsulfide (DMS), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfuric (H2SO4) and methanesulfonic acids (MSA) and particulate sulfate (SO42-) and methanesulfonate (MS-) have been performed during the campaign. Dimethylsulfide (DMS) levels ranged from 2.9 to 136 pmol · mol-1 (mean value of 21.7 pmol · mol-1) and showed a clear diurnal variation with daytime maximum. During nighttime DMS levels fall close or below the detection limit of 2 pmol ·mol-1. Concurrent measurements of OH and NO3 radicals during the campaign indicate that NO3 levels can explain most of the observed diurnal variation of DMS. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) ranged between 0.02 and 10.1 pmol · mol-1 (mean value of 1.7 pmol · mol-1) and presents a diurnal variation similar to that of DMS. SO2 levels ranged from 220 to 2970 pmol · mol-1 (mean value of 1030 pmol · mol-1), while nss-SO42- and MS- ranged from 330 to 7100 pmol · mol-1, (mean value of 1440 pmol · mol-1) and 1.1 to 37.5 pmol · mol- (mean value of 11.5 pmol · mol-1) respectively. Of particular interest are the measurements of gaseous MSA and H2SO4. MSA ranged from below the detection limit (3×104) to 3.7×107 molecules cm-3, whereas H2SO4 ranged between 1×105 and 9.0×107 molecules cm-3. The measured H2SO4 maxima are among the highest reported in literature and can be attributed to high insolation, absence of precipitation and increased SO2 levels in the area. From the concurrent SO2, OH, and H2SO4 measurements a sticking coefficient of 0.52±0.28 was calculated for H2SO4. From the concurrent MSA, OH, and DMS measurements the yield of gaseous MSA from the OH-initiated oxidation of DMS was calculated to range between 0

  6. Gaseous (DMS, MSA, SO2, H2SO4 and DMSO) and particulate (sulfate and methanesulfonate) sulfur species over the northeastern coast of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardouki, H.; Berresheim, H.; Vrekoussis, M.; Sciare, J.; Kouvarakis, G.; Oikonomou, K.; Schneider, J.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2003-10-01

    A detailed study of the levels, the temporal and diurnal variability of the main compounds involved in the biogenic sulfur cycle was carried out in Crete (Eastern Mediterranean) during the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidant Study (MINOS) field experiment in July-August 2001. Intensive measurements of gaseous dimethylsulfide (DMS), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfuric (H2SO4) and methanesulfonic acids (MSA) and particulate sulfate (SO42-) and methanesulfonate (MS-) have been performed during the campaign. Dimethylsulfide (DMS) levels ranged from 2.9 to 136 pmol·mol-1 (mean value of 21.7 pmol·mol-1) and showed a clear diurnal variation with daytime maximum. During nighttime DMS levels fall close or below the detection limit of 2 pmol·mol-1. Concurrent measurements of OH and NO3 radicals during the campaign indicate that NO3 levels can explain most of the observed diurnal variation of DMS. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) ranged between 0.02 and 10.1 pmol·mol-1 (mean value of 1.7 pmol·mol-1) and presents a diurnal variation similar to that of DMS. SO2 levels ranged from 220 to 2970 pmol·mol-1 (mean value of 1030 pmol·mol-1), while nss-SO42- and MS- ranged from 330 to 7100 pmol·mol-1, (mean value of 1440 pmol·mol-1) and 1.1 to 37.5 pmol·mol-1 (mean value of 11.5 pmol·mol-1) respectively. Of particular interest are the measurements of gaseous MSA and H2SO4. MSA ranged from below the detection limit (3x104) to 3.7x107 molecules cm-3, whereas H2SO4 ranged between 1x105 and 9.0x107 molecules cm-3. The measured H2SO4 maxima are among the highest reported in literature and can be attributed to high insolation, absence of precipitation and increased SO2 levels in the area. From the concurrent SO2, OH, and H2SO4 measurements a sticking coefficient of 0.52±0.28 was calculated for H2SO4. From the concurrent MSA, OH, and DMS measurements the yield of gaseous MSA from the OH-initiated oxidation of DMS was calculated to range between 0.1-0.4%. This low MSA

  7. The Response of Gray Treefrogs to Anesthesia by Tricaine Methanesulfonate (TMS or MS-222).

    PubMed

    Paduano, Mary; Colafrancesco, Kaitlen C; Wong, Sarah A; Caldwell, Michael S; Gridi-Papp, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The design of anesthetic protocols for frogs is commonly hindered by lack of information. Results from fishes and rodents do not always apply to frogs, and the literature in anurans is concentrated on a few species. We report on the response of treefrogs (Hyla chrysoscelis and H. versicolor) to tricaine methanesulfonate. Body mass did not differ significantly between the species or between sexes. In the first exposure of a frog to TMS, variation in induction time was best explained by species (H. chrysoscelis resisted longer) and body mass (larger animals resisted longer). Multiple exposures revealed a strong effect of individual variation on induction time and a significant increase of induction time with number of previous anesthesia events within the same day. Recovery time was mostly explained by individual variation, but it increased with total time in anesthetic and decreased with induction time. It also increased with number of days since the last series of anesthesias and decreased with number of previous uses of the anesthetic bath. This is one of the first studies of anesthesia in hylids and also one of the first assessments of the factors that influence the variability of the response to anesthesia within a species.

  8. Interaction of Colistin and Colistin Methanesulfonate with Liposomes: Colloidal Aspects and Implications for Formulation

    PubMed Central

    WALLACE, STEPHANIE J.; LI, JIAN; NATION, ROGER L.; PRANKERD, RICHARD J.; BOYD, BEN J.

    2012-01-01

    Interaction of colistin and colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) with liposomes has been studied with the view to understanding the limitations to the use of liposomes as a more effective delivery system for pulmonary inhalation of this important class of antibiotic. Thus, in this study, liposomes containing colistin or CMS were prepared and characterized with respect to colloidal behavior and drug encapsulation and release. Association of anionic CMS with liposomes induced negative charge on the particles. However, degradation of the CMS to form cationic colistin over time was directly correlated with charge reversal and particle aggregation. The rate of degradation of CMS was significantly more rapid when associated with the liposome bilayer than when compared with the same concentration in aqueous solution. Colistin liposomes carried positive charge and were stable. Encapsulation efficiency for colistin was approximately 50%, decreasing with increasing concentration of colistin. Colistin was rapidly released from liposomes on dilution. Although the studies indicate limited utility of colistin or CMS liposomes for long duration controlled-release applications, colistin liposomes were highly stable and may present a potential opportunity for coformulation of colistin with a second antibiotic to colocalize the two drugs after pulmonary delivery. PMID:22623044

  9. The Response of Gray Treefrogs to Anesthesia by Tricaine Methanesulfonate (TMS or MS-222)

    PubMed Central

    Paduano, Mary; Colafrancesco, Kaitlen C.; Wong, Sarah A.; Caldwell, Michael S.; Gridi-Papp, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    The design of anesthetic protocols for frogs is commonly hindered by lack of information. Results from fishes and rodents do not always apply to frogs, and the literature in anurans is concentrated on a few species. We report on the response of treefrogs (Hyla chrysoscelis and H. versicolor) to tricaine methanesulfonate. Body mass did not differ significantly between the species or between sexes. In the first exposure of a frog to TMS, variation in induction time was best explained by species (H. chrysoscelis resisted longer) and body mass (larger animals resisted longer). Multiple exposures revealed a strong effect of individual variation on induction time and a significant increase of induction time with number of previous anesthesia events within the same day. Recovery time was mostly explained by individual variation, but it increased with total time in anesthetic and decreased with induction time. It also increased with number of days since the last series of anesthesias and decreased with number of previous uses of the anesthetic bath. This is one of the first studies of anesthesia in hylids and also one of the first assessments of the factors that influence the variability of the response to anesthesia within a species. PMID:24851186

  10. DNA polymerase III requirement for repair of DNA damage caused by methyl methanesulfonate and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hagensee, M.E.; Bryan, S.K.; Moses, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    The pcbA1 mutation allows DNA replication dependent on DNA polymerase I at the restrictive temperature in polC(Ts) strains. Cells which carry pcbA1, a functional DNA polymerase I, and a temperature-sensitive DNA polymerase III gene were used to study the role of DNA polymerase III in DNA repair. At the restrictive temperature for DNA polymerase III, these strains were more sensitive to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydrogen peroxide than normal cells. The same strains showed no increase in sensitivity to bleomycin, UV light, or psoralen at the restrictive temperature. The sensitivity of these strains to MMS and hydrogen peroxide was not due to the pcbAl allele, and normal sensitivity was restored by the introduction of a chromosomal or cloned DNA polymerase III gene, verifying that the sensitivity was due to loss of DNA polymerase III alpha-subunit activity. A functional DNA polymerase III is required for the reformation of high-molecular-weight DNA after treatment of cells with MMS or hydrogen peroxide, as demonstrated by alkaline sucrose sedimentation results. Thus, it appears that a functional DNA polymerase III is required for the optimal repair of DNA damage by MMS or hydrogen peroxide.

  11. Depletion of Paraspeckle Protein 1 Enhances Methyl Methanesulfonate-Induced Apoptosis through Mitotic Catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiangjing; Zhang, Guanglin; Shan, Shigang; Shang, Yunlong; Chi, Linfeng; Li, Hongjuan; Cao, Yifei; Zhu, Xinqiang; Zhang, Meibian; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that paraspeckle protein 1 (PSPC1), a protein component of paraspeckles that was involved in cisplatin-induced DNA damage response (DDR), probably functions at the G1/S checkpoint. In the current study, we further examined the role of PSPC1 in another DNA-damaging agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced DDR, in particular, focusing on MMS-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. First, it was found that MMS treatment induced the expression of PSPC1. While MMS treatment alone can induce apoptosis, depletion of PSPC1 expression using siRNA significantly increased the level of apoptosis following MMS exposure. In contrast, overexpressing PSPC1 decreased the number of apoptotic cells. Interestingly, morphological observation revealed that many of the MMS-treated PSPC1-knockdown cells contained two or more nuclei, indicating the occurrence of mitotic catastrophe. Cell cycle analysis further showed that depletion of PSPC1 caused more cells entering the G2/M phase, a prerequisite of mitosis catastrophe. On the other hand, over-expressing PSPC1 led to more cells accumulating in the G1/S phase. Taken together, these observations suggest an important role for PSPC1 in MMS-induced DDR, and in particular, depletion of PSPC1 can enhance MMS-induced apoptosis through mitotic catastrophe. PMID:26785254

  12. Removal of tricaine methanesulfonate from aquaculture wastewater by adsorption onto pyrolysed paper mill sludge.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Catarina I A; Calisto, Vânia; Otero, Marta; Nadais, Helena; Esteves, Valdemar I

    2017-02-01

    Tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) has been widely used in intensive aquaculture systems to control stress during handling and confinement operations. This compound is dissolved in the water tanks and, once it is present in the Recirculating Aquaculture Systems (RASs), MS-222 can reach the environment by the discharge of contaminated effluents. The present work proposes the implementation of the adsorption process in the RASs, using pyrolysed biological paper mill sludge as adsorbent, to remove MS-222 from aquaculture wastewater. Adsorption experiments were performed under extreme operating conditions, simulating those corresponding to different farmed fish species: temperature (from 8 to 30 °C), salinity (from 0.8 to 35‰) and different contents of organic and inorganic matter in the aquaculture wastewater. Furthermore, the MS-222 adsorption from a real aquaculture effluent was compared with that from ultrapure water. Under the studied conditions, the performance of the produced adsorbent remained mostly the same, removing satisfactorily MS-222 from water. Therefore, it may be concluded that the produced adsorbent can be employed in intensive aquaculture wastewater treatment with the same performance independently of the farmed fish species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The antimicrobial effect of colistin methanesulfonate on Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    van Breda, Shane Vontelin; Buys, Antoinette; Apostolides, Zeno; Nardell, Edward Anthony; Stoltz, Anton Carel

    2015-07-01

    Polymyxins have previously been described to have activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), but further research was abandoned due to systemic toxicity concerns to achieve the required MIC. Colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), a polymyxin, is well tolerated when inhaled directly into the lungs, resulting in high local concentrations. We report here for the first time, MIC and MBC data for CMS determined by the microtiter Alamar Blue assay (MABA). We also determined how the MIC would be affected by the presence of pulmonary surfactant (PS) and if any synergy with isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF) exists. The effect of CMS on the ultrastructure of MTB was also determined. The MIC for CMS was 16 mg/L, while the MBC was 256 mg/L. MIC for CMS in PS was antagonised by eight fold. For synergy, indifference was determined while time-kill assays revealed a greater killing effect when CMS was used together with INH. Ultrastructure analysis suggests that the disruption of the outer polysaccharide layer of MTB by CMS may lead to enhanced uptake of INH. Our findings may provide insight for further investigations of CMS against MTB.

  14. Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases: The Microbial Power Tool for Lignocellulose Degradation.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Katja Salomon

    2016-11-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-enzymes that catalyze oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds. These enzymes are secreted by many microorganisms to initiate infection and degradation processes. In particular, the concept of fungal degradation of lignocellulose has been revised in the light of this recent finding. LPMOs require a source of electrons for activity, and both enzymatic and plant-derived sources have been identified. Importantly, light-induced electron delivery from light-harvesting pigments can efficiently drive LPMO activity. The possible implications of LPMOs in plant-symbiont and -pathogen interactions are discussed in the context of the very powerful oxidative capacity of these enzymes.

  15. The molecular basis of polysaccharide cleavage by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Kristian E. H.; Simmons, Thomas J.; Dupree, Paul; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N.; Hemsworth, Glyn R.; Ciano, Luisa; Johnston, Esther M.; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S.; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Marmuse, Laurence; Fort, Sébastien; Cottaz, Sylvain; Driguez, Hugues; Henrissat, Bernard; Lenfant, Nicolas; Tuna, Floriana; Baldansuren, Amgalanbaatar; Davies, Gideon J.; Leggio, Leila Lo; Walton, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-containing enzymes which oxidatively break down recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose and chitin. Since their discovery LPMOs have become integral factors in the industrial utilization of biomass, especially in the sustainable generation of cellulosic bioethanol. We report here the first structural determination of an LPMO–oligosaccharide complex, yielding detailed insights into the mechanism of action of these enzymes. Using a combination of structure and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we reveal the means by which LPMOs interact with saccharide substrates. We further uncover electronic and structural features of the enzyme active site, showing how LPMOs orchestrate the reaction of oxygen with polysaccharide chains. PMID:26928935

  16. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: solubility, activity, purification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X; Yard, B A; Iredale, J P; Auer, M; Webster, S P

    2014-03-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington's disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification.

  17. Escherichia coli Overexpressing a Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase from Acinetobacter radioresistens Becomes Resistant to Imipenem

    PubMed Central

    Minerdi, Daniela; Zgrablic, Ivan; Castrignanò, Silvia; Catucci, Gianluca; Medana, Claudio; Terlizzi, Maria Elena; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global issue currently resulting in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people a year worldwide. Data present in the literature illustrate the emergence of many bacterial species that display resistance to known antibiotics; Acinetobacter spp. are a good example of this. We report here that Acinetobacter radioresistens has a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (Ar-BVMO) with 100% amino acid sequence identity to the ethionamide monooxygenase of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. Both enzymes are only distantly phylogenetically related to other canonical bacterial BVMO proteins. Ar-BVMO not only is capable of oxidizing two anticancer drugs metabolized by human FMO3, danusertib and tozasertib, but also can oxidize other synthetic drugs, such as imipenem. The latter is a member of the carbapenems, a clinically important antibiotic family used in the treatment of MDR bacterial infections. Susceptibility tests performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method demonstrate that imipenem-sensitive Escherichia coli BL21 cells overexpressing Ar-BVMO become resistant to this antibiotic. An agar disk diffusion assay proved that when imipenem reacts with Ar-BVMO, it loses its antibiotic property. Moreover, an NADPH consumption assay with the purified Ar-BVMO demonstrates that this antibiotic is indeed a substrate, and its product is identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be a Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation product of the carbonyl moiety of the β-lactam ring. This is the first report of an antibiotic-inactivating BVMO enzyme that, while mediating its usual BV oxidation, also operates by an unprecedented mechanism of carbapenem resistance. PMID:26459905

  18. Escherichia coli Overexpressing a Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase from Acinetobacter radioresistens Becomes Resistant to Imipenem.

    PubMed

    Minerdi, Daniela; Zgrablic, Ivan; Castrignanò, Silvia; Catucci, Gianluca; Medana, Claudio; Terlizzi, Maria Elena; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Gianfranco; Sadeghi, Sheila J

    2015-10-12

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global issue currently resulting in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people a year worldwide. Data present in the literature illustrate the emergence of many bacterial species that display resistance to known antibiotics; Acinetobacter spp. are a good example of this. We report here that Acinetobacter radioresistens has a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (Ar-BVMO) with 100% amino acid sequence identity to the ethionamide monooxygenase of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. Both enzymes are only distantly phylogenetically related to other canonical bacterial BVMO proteins. Ar-BVMO not only is capable of oxidizing two anticancer drugs metabolized by human FMO3, danusertib and tozasertib, but also can oxidize other synthetic drugs, such as imipenem. The latter is a member of the carbapenems, a clinically important antibiotic family used in the treatment of MDR bacterial infections. Susceptibility tests performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method demonstrate that imipenem-sensitive Escherichia coli BL21 cells overexpressing Ar-BVMO become resistant to this antibiotic. An agar disk diffusion assay proved that when imipenem reacts with Ar-BVMO, it loses its antibiotic property. Moreover, an NADPH consumption assay with the purified Ar-BVMO demonstrates that this antibiotic is indeed a substrate, and its product is identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be a Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation product of the carbonyl moiety of the β-lactam ring. This is the first report of an antibiotic-inactivating BVMO enzyme that, while mediating its usual BV oxidation, also operates by an unprecedented mechanism of carbapenem resistance.

  19. Regulated O2 activation in flavin-dependent monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Rosanne E; Mayfield, Jeffery A; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2011-08-17

    Flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) are involved in important biosynthetic pathways in diverse organisms, including production of the siderophores used for the import and storage of essential iron in serious pathogens. We have shown that the FMO from Aspergillus fumigatus, an ornithine monooxygenase (Af-OMO), is mechanistically similar to its well-studied distant homologues from mammalian liver. The latter are highly promiscuous in their choice of substrates, while Af-OMO is unusually specific. This presents a puzzle: how do Af-OMO and other FMOs of the biosynthetic classes achieve such specificity? We have discovered substantial enhancement in the rate of O(2) activation in Af-OMO in the presence of L-arginine, which acts as a small molecule regulator. Such protein-level regulation could help explain how this and related biosynthetic FMOs manage to couple O(2) activation and substrate hydroxylation to each other and to the appropriate cellular conditions. Given the essentiality of Fe to Af and the avirulence of the Af-OMO gene knock out, inhibitors of Af-OMO are likely to be drug targets against this medically intractable pathogen.

  20. Regulated O2 Activation in Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, Rosanne E.; Mayfield, Jeffery A.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) are involved in important biosynthetic pathways in diverse organisms, including production of the siderophores used for the import and storage of essential iron in serious pathogens. We have shown that the FMO from Aspergillus fumigatus, an ornithine monooxygenase (Af-OMO), is mechanistically similar to its well-studied distant homologues from mammalian liver. The latter are highly promiscuous in their choice of substrates, while Af-OMO is unusually specific. This presents a puzzle: how do Af-OMO and other FMOs of the biosynthetic classes achieve such specificity? We have discovered substantial enhancement in the rate of O2 activation in Af-OMO in the presence of l-arginine, which acts as a small molecule regulator. Such protein-level regulation could help explain how this and related biosynthetic FMOs manage to couple O2 activation and substrate hydroxylation to each other and to the appropriate cellular conditions. Given the essentiality of Fe to Af and the avirulence of the Af-OMO gene knock out, inhibitors of Af-OMO are likely to be drug targets against this medically intractable pathogen. PMID:21774554

  1. Engineering Styrene Monooxygenase for Biocatalysis: Reductase-Epoxidase Fusion Proteins.

    PubMed

    Heine, Thomas; Tucker, Kathryn; Okonkwo, Nonye; Assefa, Berhanegebriel; Conrad, Catleen; Scholtissek, Anika; Schlömann, Michael; Gassner, George; Tischler, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    The enantioselective epoxidation of styrene and related compounds by two-component styrene monooxygenases (SMOs) has targeted these enzymes for development as biocatalysts. In the present work, we prepare genetically engineered fusion proteins that join the C-terminus of the epoxidase (StyA) to the N-terminus of the reductase (StyB) through a linker peptide and demonstrate their utility as biocatalysts in the synthesis of Tyrain purple and other indigoid dyes. A single-vector expression system offers a simplified platform for transformation and expansion of the catalytic function of styrene monooxygenases, and the resulting fusion proteins are self-regulated and couple efficiently NADH oxidation to styrene epoxidation. We find that the reductase domain proceeds through a sequential ternary-complex mechanism at low FAD concentration and a double-displacement mechanism at higher concentrations of FAD. Single-turnover studies indicate an observed rate constant for FAD-to-FAD hydride transfer of ~8 s(-1). This step is rate limiting in the styrene epoxidation reaction and helps to ensure that flavin reduction and styrene epoxidation reactions proceed without wasteful side reactions. Comparison of the reductase activity of the fusion proteins with the naturally occurring reductase, SMOB, and N-terminally histidine-tagged reductase, NSMOB, suggests that the observed changes in catalytic mechanism are due in part to an increase in flavin-binding affinity associated with the N-terminal extension of the reductase.

  2. Independent Recruitment of a Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenase for Safe Accumulation of Sequestered Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids in Grasshoppers and Moths

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linzhu; Beuerle, Till; Timbilla, James; Ober, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Several insect lineages have developed diverse strategies to sequester toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids from food-plants for their own defense. Here, we show that in two highly divergent insect taxa, the hemimetabolous grasshoppers and the holometabolous butterflies, an almost identical strategy evolved independently for safe accumulation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. This strategy involves a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase that transfers the pyrrolizidine alkaloids to their respective N-oxide, enabling the insects to avoid high concentrations of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the hemolymph. We have identified a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase, which is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase, of the grasshopper Zonocerus variegatus. After heterologous expression in E. coli, this enzyme shows high specificity for pyrrolizidine alkaloids of various structural types and for the tropane alkaloid atropine as substrates, a property that has been described previously for a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Grammia geneura. Phylogenetic analyses of insect flavin-dependent monooxygenase sequences suggest that independent gene duplication events preceded the establishment of this specific enzyme in the lineages of the grasshoppers and of arctiid moths. Two further flavin-dependent monooxygenase sequences have been identified from Z. variegatus sharing amino acid identities of approximately 78% to the pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase. After heterologous expression, both enzymes are also able to catalyze the N-oxygenation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, albeit with a 400-fold lower specific activity. With respect to the high sequence identity between the three Z. variegatus sequences this ability to N-oxygenize pyrrolizidine alkaloids is interpreted as a relict of a former bifunctional ancestor gene of which one of the gene copies optimized this activity for the specific adaptation to pyrrolizidine alkaloid containing food plants. PMID:22363737

  3. Independent recruitment of a flavin-dependent monooxygenase for safe accumulation of sequestered pyrrolizidine alkaloids in grasshoppers and moths.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linzhu; Beuerle, Till; Timbilla, James; Ober, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Several insect lineages have developed diverse strategies to sequester toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids from food-plants for their own defense. Here, we show that in two highly divergent insect taxa, the hemimetabolous grasshoppers and the holometabolous butterflies, an almost identical strategy evolved independently for safe accumulation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. This strategy involves a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase that transfers the pyrrolizidine alkaloids to their respective N-oxide, enabling the insects to avoid high concentrations of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the hemolymph. We have identified a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase, which is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase, of the grasshopper Zonocerus variegatus. After heterologous expression in E. coli, this enzyme shows high specificity for pyrrolizidine alkaloids of various structural types and for the tropane alkaloid atropine as substrates, a property that has been described previously for a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Grammia geneura. Phylogenetic analyses of insect flavin-dependent monooxygenase sequences suggest that independent gene duplication events preceded the establishment of this specific enzyme in the lineages of the grasshoppers and of arctiid moths. Two further flavin-dependent monooxygenase sequences have been identified from Z. variegatus sharing amino acid identities of approximately 78% to the pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase. After heterologous expression, both enzymes are also able to catalyze the N-oxygenation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, albeit with a 400-fold lower specific activity. With respect to the high sequence identity between the three Z. variegatus sequences this ability to N-oxygenize pyrrolizidine alkaloids is interpreted as a relict of a former bifunctional ancestor gene of which one of the gene copies optimized this activity for the specific adaptation to pyrrolizidine alkaloid containing food plants.

  4. Elevated ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) in nelfinavir mesylate (Viracept®, Roche): overview

    PubMed Central

    Pozniak, Anton; Müller, Lutz; Salgo, Miklos; Jones, Judith K; Larson, Peter; Tweats, David

    2009-01-01

    Roche's protease inhibitor nelfinavir mesylate (Viracept®) produced between March 2007-June 2007 was found to contain elevated levels of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), a known mutagen (alkylator) – leading to a global recall of the drug. EMS levels in a daily dose (2,500 mg Viracept/day) were predicted not to exceed a dose of ~2.75 mg/day (~0.055 mg/kg/day based on 50 kg patient). As existing toxicology data on EMS did not permit an adequate patient risk assessment, a comprehensive animal toxicology evaluation of EMS was conducted. General toxicity of EMS was investigated in rats over 28 days. Two studies for DNA damage were performed in mice; chromosomal damage was assessed using a micronucleus assay and gene mutations were detected using the MutaMouse transgenic model. In addition, experiments designed to extrapolate animal exposure to humans were undertaken. A general toxicity study showed that the toxicity of EMS occurred only at doses ≥ 60 mg/kg/day, which is far above that received by patients. Studies for chromosomal damage and mutations in mice demonstrated a clear threshold effect with EMS at 25 mg/kg/day, under chronic dosing conditions. Exposure analysis (Cmax) demonstrated that ~370-fold higher levels of EMS than that ingested by patients, are needed to saturate known, highly conserved, error-free, mammalian DNA repair mechanisms for alkylation. In summary, animal studies suggested that patients who took nelfinavir mesylate with elevated levels of EMS are at no increased risk for carcinogenicity or teratogenicity over their background risk, since mutations are prerequisites for such downstream events. These findings are potentially relevant to >40 marketed drugs that are mesylate salts. PMID:19660105

  5. Substantial Targeting Advantage Achieved by Pulmonary Administration of Colistin Methanesulfonate in a Large-Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Landersdorfer, Cornelia B; Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Lieu, Linh Thuy; Nguyen, Gary; Bischof, Robert J; Meeusen, Els N; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L; McIntosh, Michelle P

    2017-01-01

    Colistin, administered as its inactive prodrug colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), is often used in multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pulmonary infections. The CMS and colistin pharmacokinetics in plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) following intravenous and pulmonary dosing have not been evaluated in a large-animal model with pulmonary architecture similar to that of humans. Six merino sheep (34 to 43 kg body weight) received an intravenous or pulmonary dose of 4 to 8 mg/kg CMS (sodium) or 2 to 3 mg/kg colistin (sulfate) in a 4-way crossover study. Pulmonary dosing was achieved via jet nebulization through an endotracheal tube cuff. CMS and colistin were quantified in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). ELF concentrations were calculated via the urea method. CMS and colistin were comodeled in S-ADAPT. Following intravenous CMS or colistin administration, no concentrations were quantifiable in BALF samples. Elimination clearance was 1.97 liters/h (4% interindividual variability) for CMS (other than conversion to colistin) and 1.08 liters/h (25%) for colistin. On average, 18% of a CMS dose was converted to colistin. Following pulmonary delivery, colistin was not quantifiable in plasma and CMS was detected in only one sheep. Average ELF concentrations (standard deviations [SD]) of formed colistin were 400 (243), 384 (187), and 184 (190) mg/liter at 1, 4, and 24 h after pulmonary CMS administration. The population pharmacokinetic model described well CMS and colistin in plasma and ELF following intravenous and pulmonary administration. Pulmonary dosing provided high ELF and low plasma colistin concentrations, representing a substantial targeting advantage over intravenous administration. Predictions from the pharmacokinetic model indicate that sheep are an advantageous model for translational research.

  6. Colistin Methanesulfonate Is an Inactive Prodrug of Colistin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Phillip J.; Li, Jian; Rayner, Craig R.; Nation, Roger L.

    2006-01-01

    There is a dearth of information on the pharmacodynamics of “colistin,” despite its increasing use as a last line of defense for treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant gram-negative organisms. The antimicrobial activities of colistin and colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) were investigated by studying the time-kill kinetics of each against a type culture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth. The appearance of colistin from CMS spiked at 8.0 and 32 mg/liter was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, which generated colistin concentration-time profiles. These concentration-time profiles were subsequently mimicked in other incubations, independent of CMS, by incrementally spiking colistin. When the cultures were spiked with CMS at either concentration, there was a substantial delay in the onset of the killing effect which was not evident until the concentrations of colistin generated from the hydrolysis of CMS had reached approximately 0.5 to 1 mg/liter (i.e., ∼0.5 to 1 times the MIC for colistin). The time course of the killing effect was similar when colistin was added incrementally to achieve the same colistin concentration-time course observed from the hydrolysis of CMS. Given that the killing kinetics of CMS can be accounted for by the appearance of colistin, CMS is an inactive prodrug of colistin with activity against P. aeruginosa. This is the first study to demonstrate the formation of colistin in microbiological media containing CMS and to demonstrate that CMS is an inactive prodrug of colistin. These findings have important implications for susceptibility testing involving “colistin,” in particular, for MIC measurement and for microbiological assays and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. PMID:16723551

  7. Stability of Colistin Methanesulfonate in Pharmaceutical Products and Solutions for Administration to Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Stephanie J.; Li, Jian; Rayner, Craig. R.; Coulthard, Kingsley; Nation, Roger L.

    2008-01-01

    Colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) has the potential to hydrolyze in aqueous solution to liberate colistin, its microbiologically active and more toxic parent compound. While conversion of CMS to colistin in vivo is important for bactericidal activity, liberation of colistin during storage and/or use of pharmaceutical formulations may potentiate the toxicity of CMS. To date, there has been no information available regarding the stability of CMS in pharmaceutical preparations. Two commercial CMS formulations were investigated for stability with respect to colistin content, which was measured by a specific high-performance liquid chromatography method. Coly-Mycin M Parenteral (colistimethate lyophilized powder) was stable (<0.1% of CMS present as colistin) for at least 20 weeks at 4°C and 25°C at 60% relative humidity. When Coly-Mycin M was reconstituted with 2 ml of water to a CMS concentration of 200 mg/ml for injection, Coly-Mycin M was stable (<0.1% colistin formed) for at least 7 days at both 4°C and 25°C. When further diluted to 4 mg/ml in a glucose (5%) or saline (0.9%) infusion solution as directed, CMS hydrolyzed faster at 25°C (<4% colistin formed after 48 h) than at 4°C (0.3% colistin formed). The second formulation, CMS Solution for Inhalation (77.5 mg/ml), was stable at 4°C and 25°C for at least 12 months, as determined based on colistin content (<0.1%). This study demonstrated the concentration- and temperature-dependent hydrolysis of CMS. The information provided by this study has important implications for the formulation and clinical use of CMS products. PMID:18606838

  8. Pharmacokinetics of Colistin in Cerebrospinal Fluid after Intraventricular Administration of Colistin Methanesulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Cusato, Maria; Accetta, Giovanni; Marinò, Valeria; Procaccio, Francesco; Del Gaudio, Alfredo; Iotti, Giorgio A.; Regazzi, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Intraventricular colistin, administered as colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), is the last resource for the treatment of central nervous system infections caused by panresistant Gram-negative bacteria. The doses and daily regimens vary considerably and are empirically chosen; the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pharmacokinetics of colistin after intraventricular administration of CMS has never been characterized. Nine patients (aged 18 to 73 years) were treated with intraventricular CMS (daily doses of 2.61 to 10.44 mg). Colistin concentrations were measured using a selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay. The population pharmacokinetics analysis was performed with the P-Pharm program. The pharmacokinetics of colistin could be best described by the one-compartment model. The estimated values (means ± standard deviations) of apparent CSF total clearance (CL/Fm, where Fm is the unknown fraction of CMS converted to colistin) and terminal half-life (t1/2λ) were 0.033 ± 0.014 liter/h and 7.8 ± 3.2 h, respectively, and the average time to the peak concentration was 3.7 ± 0.9 h. A positive correlation between CL/Fm and the amount of CSF drained (range 40 to 300 ml) was observed. When CMS was administered at doses of ≥5.22 mg/day, measured CSF concentrations of colistin were continuously above the MIC of 2 μg/ml, and measured values of trough concentration (Ctrough) ranged between 2.0 and 9.7 μg/ml. Microbiological cure was observed in 8/9 patients. Intraventricular administration of CMS at doses of ≥5.22 mg per day was appropriate in our patients, but since external CSF efflux is variable and can influence the clearance of colistin and its concentrations in CSF, the daily dose of 10 mg suggested by the Infectious Diseases Society of America may be more prudent. PMID:22687507

  9. Metabolism of 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide by rat liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, D.D.; Cysyk, R.L.; Gormley, P.E.; DeSouza, J.J.; Malspeis, L.

    1984-05-01

    4'-(9-Acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA) is metabolized by a hepatic microsomal enzyme system composed of rat liver microsomes, a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-generating system, cytosolic protein (or glutathione), and oxygen. Omission of any one of the components, or incubation under an atmosphere of CO or N/sub 2/, results in inhibition of the reaction. Also, the addition of inhibitors of microsomal metabolism (alpha-naphthoflavone, metyrapone, or SKF 525-A) decreases m-AMSA metabolism. Metabolism of m-AMSA is more rapid with microsomes prepared from rats pretreated with phenobarbital or 3-methylcholanthrene. Two microsomal oxidation products of m-AMSA were isolated and identified as N1'-methanesulfonyl-N4'-(9-acridinyl)-3'-methoxy-2',5'-cyclohex adiene-1', 4'-dimine (m-AQDI) and 3'-methoxy-4'-(9-acridinylamino-2',5'-cyclohexadien-1'-one (m-AQI). m-AQDI reacts with glutathione to form a product previously identified in in vivo studies as the principal rat biliary metabolite and which is not cytotoxic to cultured L1210 cells. Thus, the end result of the microsomal metabolism of m-AMSA is detoxification. However, the two primary oxidation products (m-AQDI and m-AQI) are considerably more cytotoxic to L1210 cells in vitro than is m-AMSA. The concentration of m-AMSA required to produce a 5-log kill is 1.0 microgram/ml compared to 0.01 microgram/ml for m-AQDI and m-AQI. These results indicate that m-AMSA might undergo bioactivation to form the active cytotoxic species of the drug.

  10. Baccharin prevents genotoxic effects induced by methyl methanesulfonate and hydrogen peroxide in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Leandro, Luis Fernando; Montanheiro, Giovana; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp; da Silva Filho, Ademar Alves; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2012-08-01

    Baccharin is one of the major chemical compounds isolated from the aerial parts of Baccharis dracunculifolia DC (Asteraceae), a native plant of South America and the most important botanical source of the Brazilian green propolis that has been used in alternative medicine to treat inflammation, liver disorders, and stomach ulcers. The present study was carried out in V79 cells to determine the possible genotoxic and antigenotoxic activities of baccharin utilizing comet and micronucleus assays, where 2 known mutagenic agents with different mechanisms of DNA damage were used as positive controls. The V79 cells were treated with concentrations of baccharin (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μg/mL) and for to investigate the antigenotoxicity these concentrations were associated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS; 200 μM-comet assay and 400 μM-micronucleus assay) or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2;) 50 μM-comet assay and 100 μM-micronucleus assay). Statistically significant differences in the rate of DNA damage were observed in cultures treated with the highest concentration of baccharin when compared to the control group, but this difference was not found in the micronucleus assay. The results also showed that the frequencies of DNA damage and micronuclei induced by MMS and H(2)O(2) were significantly reduced after treatment with baccharin. The baccharin showed a chemoprevention effect and can be the chemical compound responsible for the antigenotoxicity also demonstrated by the B. dracunculifolia. The antioxidant potential of baccharin may be related to its chemoprevention activity induced against both genomic and chromosomal damages. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Stability of colistin methanesulfonate in pharmaceutical products and solutions for administration to patients.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Stephanie J; Li, Jian; Rayner, Craig R; Coulthard, Kingsley; Nation, Roger L

    2008-09-01

    Colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) has the potential to hydrolyze in aqueous solution to liberate colistin, its microbiologically active and more toxic parent compound. While conversion of CMS to colistin in vivo is important for bactericidal activity, liberation of colistin during storage and/or use of pharmaceutical formulations may potentiate the toxicity of CMS. To date, there has been no information available regarding the stability of CMS in pharmaceutical preparations. Two commercial CMS formulations were investigated for stability with respect to colistin content, which was measured by a specific high-performance liquid chromatography method. Coly-Mycin M Parenteral (colistimethate lyophilized powder) was stable (<0.1% of CMS present as colistin) for at least 20 weeks at 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C at 60% relative humidity. When Coly-Mycin M was reconstituted with 2 ml of water to a CMS concentration of 200 mg/ml for injection, Coly-Mycin M was stable (<0.1% colistin formed) for at least 7 days at both 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C. When further diluted to 4 mg/ml in a glucose (5%) or saline (0.9%) infusion solution as directed, CMS hydrolyzed faster at 25 degrees C (<4% colistin formed after 48 h) than at 4 degrees C (0.3% colistin formed). The second formulation, CMS Solution for Inhalation (77.5 mg/ml), was stable at 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C for at least 12 months, as determined based on colistin content (<0.1%). This study demonstrated the concentration- and temperature-dependent hydrolysis of CMS. The information provided by this study has important implications for the formulation and clinical use of CMS products.

  12. Genome-wide survey of artificial mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate and gamma rays in tomato.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki; Nunome, Tsukasa; Tabata, Satoshi; Isobe, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and gamma irradiation in the tomato Micro-Tom genome were identified by a whole-genome shotgun sequencing analysis to estimate the spectrum and distribution of whole-genome DNA mutations and the frequency of deleterious mutations. A total of ~370 Gb of paired-end reads for four EMS-induced mutants and three gamma-ray-irradiated lines as well as a wild-type line were obtained by next-generation sequencing technology. Using bioinformatics analyses, we identified 5920 induced single nucleotide variations and insertion/deletion (indel) mutations. The predominant mutations in the EMS mutants were C/G to T/A transitions, while in the gamma-ray mutants, C/G to T/A transitions, A/T to T/A transversions, A/T to G/C transitions and deletion mutations were equally common. Biases in the base composition flanking mutations differed between the mutagenesis types. Regarding the effects of the mutations on gene function, >90% of the mutations were located in intergenic regions, and only 0.2% were deleterious. In addition, we detected 1,140,687 spontaneous single nucleotide polymorphisms and indel polymorphisms in wild-type Micro-Tom lines. We also found copy number variation, deletions and insertions of chromosomal segments in both the mutant and wild-type lines. The results provide helpful information not only for mutation research, but also for mutant screening methodology with reverse-genetic approaches.

  13. Methyl-methanesulfonate sensitivity 19 expression is associated with metastasis and chemoradiotherapy response in esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin-Liang; Wang, Hui-Yun; Yang, Qing; Lin, Shi-Yong; Luo, Guang-Yu; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical significance of methyl-methanesulfonate sensitivity 19 (MMS19) expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS: Between June 2008 and May 2013, specimens from 103 patients who underwent endoscopic biopsy for the diagnosis of ESCC at the endoscopy center of Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center were collected; 52 matched-normal esophageal squamous epithelium samples were biopsied as controls. MMS19 protein expression was measured by immunohistochemistry. Of the 103 cases of ESCC, 49 received radical surgery following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy consisting of concurrent radiation in a total dose of 40 Gy and two cycles of chemotherapy with vinorelbine and cisplatin. Relationships between MMS19 expression, clinicopathologic characteristics and chemoradiotherapy response were analyzed. RESULTS: The MMS19 protein could be detected in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of most specimens. High cytoplasmic expression of MMS19 was detected in 63.1% of ESCC samples, whereas high nuclear expression of MMS19 was found in 35.0%. High cytoplasmic MMS19 expression was associated with regional lymph node metastases (OR = 11.3, 95%CI: 2.3-54.7; P < 0.001) and distant metastases (OR = 13.1, 95%CI: 1.7-103.0; P = 0.002). Furthermore, high cytoplasmic MMS19 expression was associated with a response of ESCC to chemoradiotherapy (OR = 11.5, 95%CI: 3.0-44.5; P < 0.001), with a high cytoplasmic MMS19 expression rates in 79.3% and 25.0% of patients from the good chemoradiotherapy response group and poor response group, respectively. Nuclear MMS19 expression did not show any significant association with clinicopathologic characteristics or chemoradiotherapy response in ESCC. CONCLUSION: The results of our preliminary study suggest that MMS19 may be a potential new predictor of metastasis and chemoradiotherapy response in ESCC. PMID:25892874

  14. TRICAINE METHANESULFONATE (MS-222) SEDATION AND ANESTHESIA IN THE PURPLE-SPINED SEA URCHIN (ARBACIA PUNCTULATA).

    PubMed

    Applegate, Jeffrey R; Dombrowski, Daniel S; Christian, Larry Shane; Bayer, Meredith P; Harms, Craig A; Lewbart, Gregory A

    2016-12-01

    The purple-spined sea urchin ( Arbacia punctulata ) is commonly found in shallow waters of the western Atlantic Ocean from the New England area of the United States to the Caribbean. Sea urchins play a major role in ocean ecology, echinoculture, and biomedical research. Additionally, sea urchins are commonly displayed in public aquaria. Baseline parameters were developed in unanesthetized urchins for righting reflex (time to regain oral recumbency) and spine response time to tactile stimulus. Tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) was used to sedate and anesthetize purple-spined sea urchins and assess sedation and anesthetic parameters, including adhesion to and release from a vertical surface, times to loss of response to tactile stimulus and recovery of righting reflex, and qualitative observations of induction of spawning and position of spines and pseudopodia. Sedation and anesthetic parameters were evaluated in 11 individuals in three circumstances: unaltered aquarium water for baseline behaviors, 0.4 g/L MS-222, and 0.8 g/L MS-222. Induction was defined as the release from a vertical surface with the loss of righting reflex, sedation as loss of righting reflex with retained tactile spine response, anesthesia as loss of righting reflex and loss of tactile spine response, and recovery as voluntary return to oral recumbency. MS-222 proved to be an effective sedative and anesthetic for the purple-spined sea urchin at 0.4 and 0.8 g/L, respectively. Sodium bicarbonate used to buffer MS-222 had no measurable sedative effects when used alone. Anesthesia was quickly reversed with transfer of each individual to anesthesia-free seawater, and no anesthetic-related mortality occurred. The parameters assessed in this study provide a baseline for sea urchin anesthesia and may provide helpful comparisons to similar species and populations that are in need of anesthesia for surgical procedures or research.

  15. Feedback regulation of methyl methanesulfonate and ultraviolet-sensitive gene clone 81 via ATM/Chk2 pathway contributes to the resistance of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Lv, Juan; Qian, Ying; Ni, Xiaoyan; Xu, Xiuping; Dong, Xuejun

    2017-03-01

    The methyl methanesulfonate and ultraviolet-sensitive gene clone 81 protein is a structure-specific nuclease that plays important roles in DNA replication and repair. Knockdown of methyl methanesulfonate and ultraviolet-sensitive gene clone 81 has been found to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapy. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is not well understood. We found that methyl methanesulfonate and ultraviolet-sensitive gene clone 81 was upregulated and the ATM/Chk2 pathway was activated at the same time when MCF-7 cells were treated with cisplatin. By using lentivirus targeting methyl methanesulfonate and ultraviolet-sensitive gene clone 81 gene, we showed that knockdown of methyl methanesulfonate and ultraviolet-sensitive gene clone 81 enhanced cell apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation in MCF-7 cells under cisplatin treatment. Abrogation of ATM/Chk2 pathway inhibited cell viability in MCF-7 cells in response to cisplatin. Importantly, we revealed that ATM/Chk2 was required for the upregulation of methyl methanesulfonate and ultraviolet-sensitive gene clone 81, and knockdown of methyl methanesulfonate and ultraviolet-sensitive gene clone 81 resulted in inactivation of ATM/Chk2 pathway in response to cisplatin. Meanwhile, knockdown of methyl methanesulfonate and ultraviolet-sensitive gene clone 81 activated the p53/Bcl-2 pathway in response to cisplatin. These data suggest that the ATM/Chk2 may promote the repair of DNA damage caused by cisplatin by sustaining methyl methanesulfonate and ultraviolet-sensitive gene clone 81, and the double-strand breaks generated by methyl methanesulfonate and ultraviolet-sensitive gene clone 81 may activate the ATM/Chk2 pathway in turn, which provide a novel mechanism of how methyl methanesulfonate and ultraviolet-sensitive gene clone 81 modulates DNA damage response and repair.

  16. Two Novel Flavin-Containing Monooxygenases Involved in Biosynthesis of Aliphatic Glucosinolates

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wenwen; Li, Jing; Yu, Qingyue; Cang, Wei; Xu, Rui; Wang, Yang; Ji, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates, a class of secondary metabolites from cruciferous plants, are derived from amino acids and have diverse biological activities, such as in biotic defense, depending on their side chain modification. The first structural modification step in the synthesis of aliphatic (methionine-derived) glucosinolates—S-oxygenation of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates—was found to be catalyzed by five flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), FMOGS-OX1-5. Here, we report two additional FMOGS-OX enzymes, FMOGS-OX6, and FMOGS-OX7, encoded by At1g12130 and At1g12160, respectively. The overexpression of both FMOGS-OX6 and FMOGS-OX7 decreased the ratio of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to the sum of methylthioalkyl and methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, suggesting that the introduction of the two genes converted methylthioalkyl glucosinolates into methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates. Analysis of expression pattern revealed that the spatial expression of the two genes is quite similar and partially overlapped with the other FMOGS-OX genes, which are primarily expressed in vascular tissue. We further analyzed the responsive expression pattern of all the seven FMOGS-OX genes to exogenous treatment with abscisic acid, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and low and high temperatures. Although these genes showed same tendency toward the changing stimulus, the sensitivity of each gene was quite different. The variety in spatial expression among the FMOGS-OX genes while responding to environmental stimulus indicated a complex and finely tuned regulation of glucosinolates modifications. Identification of these two novel FMOGS-OX enzymes will enhance the understanding of glucosinolates modifications and the importance of evolution of these duplicated genes. PMID:27621741

  17. Analysis of the gene cluster encoding toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoni, G.; Martino, M.; Galli, E.; Barbieri, P.

    1998-10-01

    The toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase cloned from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 displays a very broad range of substrates and a very peculiar regioselectivity, because it is able to hydroxylate more than one position on the aromatic ring of several hydrocarbons and phenols. The nucleotide sequence of the gene cluster coding for this enzymatic system has been determined. The sequence analysis revealed the presence of six open reading frames (ORFs) homologous to other genes clustered in operons coding for multicomponent monooxygenases found in benzene- and toluene-degradative pathways cloned from Pseudomonas strains. Significant similarities were also found with multicomponent monooxygenase systems for phenol, methane, alkene, and dimethyl sulfide cloned from different bacterial strains. The knockout of each ORF and complementation with the wild-type allele indicated that all six ORFs are essential for the full activity of the toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase in Escherichia coli. This analysis also shows that despite its activity on both hydrocarbons and phenols, toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase belongs to a toluene multicomponent monooxygenase subfamily rather than to the monooxygenases active on phenols.

  18. Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase activity in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, G.D.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1981-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase (AHM), an enzyme of key importance in metabolism of xenobiotic chemicals such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA), is present in human lymphocytes. Studies investing the relation of activity of AHM in human lymphocytes to parameters such as disease state, PNA exposure, in vitro mitogen stimulation, etc. have been summarized in this report. Some studies have demonstrated increased AHM activity in lymphocytes from cigarette smokers (compared to nonsmokers), and in lung cancer patients when compared to appropriate control groups. These observations are confused by extreme variability in human lymphocyte AHM activities, such variability arising from factors such as genetic variation in AHM activity, variation in in vitro culture conditions which affect AHM activity, and the problematical relationship of common AHM assays to actual PNA metabolism taking place in lymphocytes. If some of the foregoing problems can be adequately addressed, lymphocyte AHM activity could hold the promise of being a useful biomarker system for human PNA exposure.

  19. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases disrupt the cellulose fibers structure.

    PubMed

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Garajova, Sona; Foucat, Loïc; Falourd, Xavier; Saake, Bodo; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Cathala, Bernard

    2017-01-10

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a class of powerful oxidative enzymes that breakdown recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose. Here we investigate the action of LPMOs on cellulose fibers. After enzymatic treatment and dispersion, LPMO-treated fibers show intense fibrillation. Cellulose structure modifications visualized at different scales indicate that LPMO creates nicking points that trigger the disintegration of the cellulose fibrillar structure with rupture of chains and release of elementary nanofibrils. Investigation of LPMO action using solid-state NMR provides direct evidence of modification of accessible and inaccessible surfaces surrounding the crystalline core of the fibrils. The chains breakage likely induces modifications of the cellulose network and weakens fibers cohesion promoting their disruption. Besides the formation of new initiation sites for conventional cellulases, this work provides the first evidence of the direct oxidative action of LPMOs with the mechanical weakening of the cellulose ultrastructure. LPMOs can be viewed as promising biocatalysts for enzymatic modification or degradation of cellulose fibers.

  20. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases disrupt the cellulose fibers structure

    PubMed Central

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Garajova, Sona; Foucat, Loïc; Falourd, Xavier; Saake, Bodo; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Cathala, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a class of powerful oxidative enzymes that breakdown recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose. Here we investigate the action of LPMOs on cellulose fibers. After enzymatic treatment and dispersion, LPMO-treated fibers show intense fibrillation. Cellulose structure modifications visualized at different scales indicate that LPMO creates nicking points that trigger the disintegration of the cellulose fibrillar structure with rupture of chains and release of elementary nanofibrils. Investigation of LPMO action using solid-state NMR provides direct evidence of modification of accessible and inaccessible surfaces surrounding the crystalline core of the fibrils. The chains breakage likely induces modifications of the cellulose network and weakens fibers cohesion promoting their disruption. Besides the formation of new initiation sites for conventional cellulases, this work provides the first evidence of the direct oxidative action of LPMOs with the mechanical weakening of the cellulose ultrastructure. LPMOs can be viewed as promising biocatalysts for enzymatic modification or degradation of cellulose fibers. PMID:28071716

  1. The Oxygen Dilemma: A Severe Challenge for the Application of Monooxygenases?

    PubMed Central

    Holtmann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Monooxygenases are promising catalysts because they in principle enable the organic chemist to perform highly selective oxyfunctionalisation reactions that are otherwise difficult to achieve. For this, monooxygenases require reducing equivalents, to allow reductive activation of molecular oxygen at the enzymes' active sites. However, these reducing equivalents are often delivered to O2 either directly or via a reduced intermediate (uncoupling), yielding hazardous reactive oxygen species and wasting valuable reducing equivalents. The oxygen dilemma arises from monooxygenases' dependency on O2 and the undesired uncoupling reaction. With this contribution we hope to generate a general awareness of the oxygen dilemma and to discuss its nature and some promising solutions. PMID:27194219

  2. Safety assessment of dicamba mono-oxygenases that confer dicamba tolerance to various crops.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cunxi; Glenn, Kevin C; Kessenich, Colton; Bell, Erin; Burzio, Luis A; Koch, Michael S; Li, Bin; Silvanovich, Andre

    2016-11-01

    Dicamba tolerant (DT) soybean, cotton and maize were developed through constitutive expression of dicamba mono-oxygenase (DMO) in chloroplasts. DMO expressed in three DT crops exhibit 91.6-97.1% amino acid sequence identity to wild type DMO. All DMO forms maintain the characteristics of Rieske oxygenases that have a history of safe use. Additionally, they are all functionally similar in vivo since the three DT crops are all tolerant to dicamba treatment. None of these DMO sequences were found to have similarity to any known allergens or toxins. Herein, to further understand the safety of these DMO variants, a weight of evidence approach was employed. Each purified DMO protein was found to be completely deactivated in vitro by heating at temperatures 55 °C and above, and all were completely digested within 30 s or 5 min by pepsin and pancreatin, respectively. Mice orally dosed with each of these DMO proteins showed no adverse effects as evidenced by analysis of body weight gain, food consumption and clinical observations. Therefore, the weight of evidence from all these protein safety studies support the conclusion that the various forms of DMO proteins introduced into DT soybean, cotton and maize are safe for food and feed consumption, and the small amino acid sequence differences outside the active site of DMO do not raise any additional safety concerns.

  3. Monooxygenase-mediated 1,2-dichloroethane degradation by Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Hage, J.C.; Hartmans, S.

    1999-06-01

    A bacterial strain, designated Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1, was isolated from a 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA)-degrading biofilm. Strain DCA1 utilizes DCA as the sole carbon and energy source and does not require additional organic nutrients, such as vitamins, for optimal growth. The affinity of strain DCA1 for DCA is very high, with a K{sub m} value below the detection limit of 0.5 {micro}M. Instead of a hydrolytic dehalogenation, as in other DCA utilizers, the first step in DCA degradation in strain DCA1 is an oxidation reaction. Oxygen and NAD(P)H are required for this initial step. Propene was converted to 1,2-epoxypropane by DCA-grown cells and competitively inhibited DCA degradation. The authors concluded that a monooxygenase is responsible for the first step in DCA degradation in strain DCA1. Oxidation of DCA probably results in the formation of the unstable intermediate 1,2-dichloroethanol, which spontaneously releases chloride, yielding chloroacetaldehyde. The DCA degradation pathway is strain DCA1 proceeds from chloroacetaldehyde via chloroacetic acid and presumably glycolic acid, which is similar to degradation routes observed in other DCA-utilizing bacteria.

  4. Structure of nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase component B from Mycobacterium thermoresistibile

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Edwards, T. E.; Begley, D. W.; Abramov, A.; Thompkins, K. B.; Ferrell, M.; Guo, W. J.; Phan, I.; Olsen, C.; Napuli, A.; Sankaran, B.; Stacy, R.; Van Voorhis, W. C.; Stewart, L. J.; Myler, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis belongs to a large family of soil bacteria which can degrade a remarkably broad range of organic compounds and utilize them as carbon, nitrogen and energy sources. It has been proposed that a variety of mycobacteria can subsist on alternative carbon sources during latency within an infected human host, with the help of enzymes such as nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase (NTA-Mo). NTA-Mo is a member of a class of enzymes which consist of two components: A and B. While component A has monooxygenase activity and is responsible for the oxidation of the substrate, component B consumes cofactor to generate reduced flavin mononucleotide, which is required for component A activity. NTA-MoB from M. thermoresistibile, a rare but infectious close relative of M. tuberculosis which can thrive at elevated temperatures, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The 1.6 Å resolution crystal structure of component B of NTA-Mo presented here is one of the first crystal structures determined from the organism M. thermo­resistibile. The NTA-MoB crystal structure reveals a homodimer with the characteristic split-barrel motif typical of flavin reductases. Surprisingly, NTA-MoB from M. thermoresistibile contains a C-terminal tail that is highly conserved among myco­bacterial orthologs and resides in the active site of the other protomer. Based on the structure, the C-terminal tail may modulate NTA-MoB activity in mycobacteria by blocking the binding of flavins and NADH. PMID:21904057

  5. Comparative study of the comet assay and the micronucleus test in amphibian larvae (Xenopus laevis) using benzo(a)pyrene, ethyl methanesulfonate, and methyl methanesulfonate: establishment of a positive control in the amphibian comet assay.

    PubMed

    Mouchet, F; Gauthier, L; Mailhes, C; Ferrier, V; Devaux, A

    2005-02-01

    The present investigation explored the potential use of the comet assay (CA) as a genotoxicity test in the amphibian Xenopus laevis and compared it with the French standard micronucleus test (MNT). Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) were used as model compounds for assessing DNA damage. Damage levels were measured as DNA strand breaks after alkaline electrophoresis of nuclei isolated from larval amphibian erythrocytes using the CA in order to establish a positive control for further ecotoxicological investigations. The results led to the selection of MMS as a positive control on the basis of the higher sensitivity of Xenopus laevis to this compound. The CA and MNT were compared for their ability to detect DNA damage with the doses of chemical agents and exposure times applied. EMS and MMS were shown to increase micronucleus and DNA strand break formation in larval erythrocytes concurrently. However, B[a]P increased micronucleus formation but not that of DNA strand breaks. Time-dose experiments over 12 days of exposure suggest that the CA provides an earlier significant response to genotoxicants than does the MNT. In Xenopus the CA appears to be a sensitive and suitable method for detecting genotoxicity like that caused by EMS and MMS. It can be considered a genotoxicity-screening tool. The results for B[a]P show that both tests should be used in a complementary manner on Xenopus.

  6. Flow cytometric evaluation of cell-cycle progression in ethyl methanesulfonate and methyl methanesulfonate-exposed P3 cells: Relationship to the induction of sister-chromatid exchanges and cellular toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, S.M.; Domon, O.E.; McGarrity, L.J.; Kodell, R.L.; Casciano, D.A. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to determine the relationships among the reduction in relative cloning efficiency (RCE), sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) formation, and interference with progression through the cell-cycle, human teratocarcinoma-derived (P3) cells were exposed to either ethyl methanesulfonate or to methyl methanesulfonate. The relationship between SCE and toxicity was quantified, the progression through the cell-cycle was evaluated with flow cytometric methods, and the effects of these chemicals on cell growth and average generation time (AGT) were determined. A strong correlation existed between RCE and SCE which was accompanied by an inhibition of growth as evidenced by a significant negative linear effect of concentration on the he relative cell count from 24 to 72 hours after exposure and by a concentration-dependent increase. One interpretation of these results is that those effects of EMS and MMS exposure which result in S-phase delay and G{sub 2} arrest may be those elements common to the induction of SCE and cellular toxicity.

  7. Isolation and initial characterization of a novel type of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase activity from a marine microorganism.

    PubMed

    Willetts, Andrew; Joint, Ian; Gilbert, Jack A; Trimble, William; Mühling, Martin

    2012-07-01

    A novel type of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) has been found in a marine strain of Stenotrophomonas maltophila strain PML168 that was isolated from a temperate intertidal zone. The enzyme is able to use NADH as the source of reducing power necessary to accept the atom of diatomic oxygen not incorporated into the oxyfunctionalized substrate. Growth studies have establish that the enzyme is inducible, appears to serve a catabolic role, and is specifically induced by one or more unidentified components of seawater as well as various anthropogenic xenobiotic compounds. A blast search of the primary sequence of the enzyme, recovered from the genomic sequence of the isolate, has placed this atypical BVMO in the context of the several hundred known members of the flavoprotein monooxygenase superfamily. A particular feature of this BVMO lies in its truncated C-terminal domain, which results in a relatively small protein (357 amino acids; 38.4 kDa). In addition, metagenomic screening has been conducted on DNA recovered from an extensive range of marine environmental samples to gauge the relative abundance and distribution of similar enzymes within the global marine microbial community. Although low, abundance was detected in samples from many marine provinces, confirming the potential for biodiscovery in marine microorganisms.

  8. Flavin-containing monooxygenase S-oxygenation of a series of thioureas and thiones

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Marilyn C.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Stevens, J. Fred; Kedzie, Karen; Fang, Wenkui K.; Heidelbaugh, Todd; Nguyen, Phong; Chow, Ken; Garst, Michael; Gil, Daniel; Williams, David E.

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) is active towards many drugs with a heteroatom having the properties of a soft nucleophile. Thiocarbamides and thiones are S-oxygenated to the sulfenic acid which can either react with glutathione and initiate a redox-cycle or be oxygenated a second time to the unstable sulfinic acid. In this study, we utilized LC–MS/MS to demonstrate that the oxygenation by hFMO of the thioureas under test terminated at the sulfenic acid. With thiones, hFMO catalyzed the second reaction and the sulfinic acid rapidly lost sulfite to form the corresponding imidazole. Thioureas are often pulmonary toxicants in mammals and, as previously reported by our laboratory, are excellent substrates for hFMO2. This isoform is expressed at high levels in the lung of most mammals, including non-human primates. Genotyping to date indicates that individuals of African (up to 49%) or Hispanic (2–7%) ancestry have at least one allele for functional hFMO2 in lung, but not Caucasians nor Asians. In this study the major metabolite formed by hFMO2 with thioureas from Allergan, Inc. was the sulfenic acid that reacted with glutathione. The majority of thiones were poor substrates for hFMO3, the major form in adult human liver. However, hFMO1, the major isoform expressed in infant and neonatal liver and adult kidney and intestine, readily S-oxygenated thiones under test, with K{sub m}s ranging from 7 to 160 μM and turnover numbers of 30–40 min{sup −1}. The product formed was identified by LC–MS/MS as the imidazole. The activities of the mouse and human FMO1 and FMO3 orthologs were in good agreement with the exception of some thiones for which activity was much greater with hFMO1 than mFMO1.

  9. Role of sea ice and hemispheric circulation mode on sulphur oxidised compounds (Methanesulfonate and Sulfate) in the Artic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becagli, Silvia; Calzolai, Giulia; Dayan, Uri; Di Biagio, Claudia; di Sarra, Alcide; Frosini, Daniele; Mazzola, Mauro; Rugi, Francesco; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita; Vitale, Vito; Udisti, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    The recent decline in sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean is expected to affect the regional radiation budget and to influence the ocean-atmosphere exchange of dimethylsulfide (DMS), thus the amount of biogenic aerosols formed from its atmospheric oxidation, such as methanesulfonate (MS-) and non-sea salt sulphate (nssSO42-). This study examines the temporal evolution of atmospheric MS- and nssSO42-, as measured in atmospheric aerosols, at Ny-Ålesund, (78.9°N, 11.9°E, Svalbard islands) and Thule (76.5°N, 68.8°W, Greenland) during three years (2010-12). Aerosol sampling was carried out using a PM10 sampler with Teflon filters, and a 12-stage impactor (SDI, Small Deposit-area Impactor) with polycarbonate filters. Analyses were performed by ion chromatography, for ion composition, and ICP-SFMS, for selected metals; both techniques are sufficiently sensitive, accurate, and reproducible to be applied to very low atmospheric load of aerosol particles, typical of remote polar regions. The evolution of MS- and nssSO4 concentrations was analysed as a function of speciation (as acidic species or ammonium salt), size distribution, and airmass pathways. This study reveals that nssSO4 is meanly associated with long range transport from anthropic sources, and presents a relative maximum in spring. Conversely, MS- arises from natural local sources and shows a peak in mid-summer. A large interannual variability is observed in MS- concentration with values in spring-summer 2010 in both the stations higher than in the other summers. In the previous winter a larger sea ice extent and larger sea ice melting surface in the following spring were observed. Arrigo et al. (2008) have observed a 22% increase in the annual primary productivity, that has been attributed to a longer phytoplankton growing season connected with the progressive decline in sea ice coverage in the Arctic over the past decade. Modeling results (Gabric et al., 2005) suggest that an increase in DMS production would

  10. Pseudomonad Cyclopentadecanone Monooxygenase Displaying an Uncommon Spectrum of Baeyer-Villiger Oxidations of Cyclic Ketones†

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Hiroaki; Wang, Shaozhao; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Nagahashi, Ayako; Lertvorachon, Jittiwud; Yang, Jianzhong; Konishi, Yasuo; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Lau, Peter C. K.

    2006-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are biocatalysts that offer the prospect of high chemo-, regio-, and enantioselectivity in the organic synthesis of lactones or esters from a variety of ketones. In this study, we have cloned, sequenced, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli a new BVMO, cyclopentadecanone monooxygenase (CpdB or CPDMO), originally derived from Pseudomonas sp. strain HI-70. The 601-residue primary structure of CpdB revealed only 29% to 50% sequence identity to those of known BVMOs. A new sequence motif, characterized by a cluster of charged residues, was identified in a subset of BVMO sequences that contain an N-terminal extension of ∼60 to 147 amino acids. The 64-kDa CPDMO enzyme was purified to apparent homogeneity, providing a specific activity of 3.94 μmol/min/mg protein and a 20% yield. CPDMO is monomeric and NADPH dependent and contains ∼1 mol flavin adenine dinucleotide per mole of protein. A deletion mutant suggested the importance of the N-terminal 54 amino acids to CPDMO activity. In addition, a Ser261Ala substitution in a Rossmann fold motif resulted in an improved stability and increased affinity of the enzyme towards NADPH compared to the wild-type enzyme (Km = 8 μM versus Km = 24 μM). Substrate profiling indicated that CPDMO is unusual among known BVMOs in being able to accommodate and oxidize both large and small ring substrates that include C11 to C15 ketones, methyl-substituted C5 and C6 ketones, and bicyclic ketones, such as decalone and β-tetralone. CPDMO has the highest affinity (Km = 5.8 μM) and the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km ratio of 7.2 × 105 M−1 s−1) toward cyclopentadecanone, hence the Cpd designation. A number of whole-cell biotransformations were carried out, and as a result, CPDMO was found to have an excellent enantioselectivity (E > 200) as well as 99% S-selectivity toward 2-methylcyclohexanone for the production of 7-methyl-2-oxepanone, a potentially valuable chiral building block. Although

  11. A chicory cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase CYP71AV8 for the oxidation of (+)-valencene.

    PubMed

    Cankar, Katarina; van Houwelingen, Adèle; Bosch, Dirk; Sonke, Theo; Bouwmeester, Harro; Beekwilder, Jules

    2011-01-03

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.), which is known to have a variety of terpene-hydroxylating activities, was screened for a P450 mono-oxygenase to convert (+)-valencene to (+)-nootkatone. A novel P450 cDNA was identified in a chicory root EST library. Co-expression of the enzyme with a valencene synthase in yeast, led to formation of trans-nootkatol, cis-nootkatol and (+)-nootkatone. The novel enzyme was also found to catalyse a three step conversion of germacrene A to germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-oic acid, indicating its involvement in chicory sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis. Likewise, amorpha-4,11-diene was converted to artemisinic acid. Surprisingly, the chicory P450 has a different regio-specificity on (+)-valencene compared to germacrene A and amorpha-4,11-diene.

  12. Repeated exposure of goldfish (Carassius auratus) to tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222).

    PubMed

    Posner, Lysa Pam; Scott, Gregory N; Law, J McHugh

    2013-06-01

    Goldfish that have been repeatedly exposed to tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) require greater concentration of the drug to attain equivalent planes of anesthesia, but the mechanism for this increased anesthetic need is unknown. Minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) is a commonly used method with which to compare anesthetics. It was hypothesized that fish exposed to MS-222 daily would have an increased MAC. It was also hypothesized that fish exposed daily to MS-222 would develop histomorphologic changes to their gills to explain the increasing demand. Forty-nine Serasa comet goldfish were enrolled and were divided into three populations (n = 15, n = 15, and n = 19). In trial 1, using an up-down method, MAC was determined daily after 4 min of exposure to MS-222 for which the starting concentration was 160 mg/L. In trial 2, MAC was determined following 2 min of exposure to MS-222 for which the starting concentration was 260 mg/L. In trial 3, four naive fish were euthanatized and gills collected for histology and electron microscopy (EM). The remaining fish were exposed to MS-222 daily for 4 wk. Four fish were euthanatized and their gills submitted for similar examination at 2 wk and 4 wk. MAC for fish exposed to MS-222 for 4 min increased from 120 to 160 mg/L. The regression line had a slope of 1.51 +/- 0.26 (R2 = 0.65; P < 0.0001). MAC for fish exposed to MS-222 for 2 min increased from 210 pmm to 220 mg/L; the regression line had a slope of 0.52 +/- 0.38 (R2 = 0.12; P = 0.2). Histologic and EM examination of gills did not show morphologic changes indicative of a reaction to MS-222. Goldfish in this study had an increased requirement for MS-222 following daily exposure for 4 min but not following daily exposure for 2 min at a higher concentration. The cause of this increased anesthetic need is not related to morphologic changes to the gills.

  13. Cloning and expression of three ladA-type alkane monooxygenase genes from an extremely thermophilic alkane-degrading bacterium Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23.

    PubMed

    Boonmak, Chanita; Takahashi, Yasunori; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2014-05-01

    An extremely thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23, is capable of degrading a broad range of alkanes (with carbon chain lengths ranging between C11 and C32) at 70 °C. Whole-genome sequence analysis revealed that unlike most alkane-degrading bacteria, strain B23 does not possess an alkB-type alkane monooxygenase gene. Instead, it possesses a cluster of three ladA-type genes, ladAαB23, ladAβB23, and ladB B23, on its chromosome, whose protein products share significant amino acid sequence identities, 49.8, 34.4, and 22.7 %, respectively, with that of ladA alkane monooxygenase gene found on a plasmid of Geobacillus thermodetrificans NG 80-2. Each of the three genes, ladAαB23, ladAβB23, and ladB B23, was heterologously expressed individually in an alkB1 deletion mutant strain, Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2Δ1. It was found that all three genes were functional in P. fluorescens KOB2Δ1, and partially restored alkane degradation activity. In this study, we suggest that G. thermoleovorans B23 utilizes multiple LadA-type alkane monooxygenases for the degradation of a broad range of alkanes.

  14. Metabolic conditions determining the composition and catalytic activity of cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases in Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanglard, D; Käppeli, O; Fiechter, A

    1984-01-01

    In the microsomal fraction of Candida tropicalis cells, two distinct monooxygenases were detected, depending on the growth conditions. The distinction of the two monooxygenases was evident from: (i) the absorption maxima in the reduced CO difference spectra of the terminal oxidases (cytochromes P-450 and P-448); (ii) the contents of the monooxygenase components (cytochromes P-450/P-448, NADPH-cytochrome c (P-450) reductase, and cytochrome b5) and (iii) the catalytic activity of the complete system (aliphatic hydroxylation and N-demethylation activity). The occurrence of the respective monooxygenases could be related to the carbon source (n-alkanes or glucose). Oxygen limitation led to a significant increase of cytochrome P-450/P-448 content, independent of the carbon source utilized by the cells. An improved method for the isolation of microsomes enabled us to demonstrate the presence of cytochrome P-448 in glucose-grown cells. PMID:6690424

  15. Comprehensive Spectroscopic, Steady State, and Transient Kinetic Studies of a Representative Siderophore-associated Flavin Monooxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, Jeffery A.; Frederick, Rosanne E.; Streit, Bennett R.; Wencewicz, Timothy A.; Ballou, David P.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Many siderophores used for the uptake and intracellular storage of essential iron contain hydroxamate chelating groups. Their biosyntheses are typically initiated by hydroxylation of the primary amine side chains of l-ornithine or l-lysine. This reaction is catalyzed by members of a widespread family of FAD-dependent monooxygenases. Here the kinetic mechanism for a representative family member has been extensively characterized by steady state and transient kinetic methods, using heterologously expressed N5-l-ornithine monooxygenase from the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. Spectroscopic data and kinetic analyses suggest a model in which a molecule of hydroxylatable substrate serves as an activator for the reaction of the reduced flavin and O2. The rate acceleration is only ∼5-fold, a mild effect of substrate on formation of the C4a-hydroperoxide that does not influence the overall rate of turnover. The effect is also observed with the bacterial ornithine monooxygenase PvdA. The C4a-hydroperoxide is stabilized in the absence of hydroxylatable substrate by the presence of bound NADP+ (t½ = 33 min, 25 °C, pH 8). NADP+ therefore is a likely regulator of O2 and substrate reactivity in the siderophore-associated monooxygenases. Aside from the activating effect of the hydroxylatable substrate, the siderophore-associated monooxygenases share a kinetic mechanism with the hepatic microsomal flavin monooxygenases and bacterial Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases, with which they share only moderate sequence homology and from which they are distinguished by their acute substrate specificity. The remarkable specificity of the N5-l-ornithine monooxygenase-catalyzed reaction suggests added means of reaction control beyond those documented in related well characterized flavoenzymes. PMID:20650894

  16. Molecular phylogeny, long-term evolution, and functional divergence of flavin-containing monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Hao, Da Cheng; Chen, Shi Lin; Mu, Jun; Xiao, Pei Gen

    2009-11-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) metabolize xenobiotic compounds, many of which are clinically important, as well as endogenous substrates as part of a discrete physiological process. The FMO gene family is conserved and ancient with representatives present in all phyla so far examined. However, there is a lack of information regarding the long-term evolution and functional divergence of these proteins. This study represents the first attempt to characterize the long-term evolution followed by the members of this family. Our analysis shows that there is extensive silent divergence at the nucleotide level suggesting that this family has been subject to strong purifying selection at the protein level. Invertebrate FMOs have a polyphyletic origin. The functional divergence of FMOs 1-5 started before the split between amphibians and mammals. The vertebrate FMO5 is more ancestral than other four FMOs. Moreover, the existence of higher levels of codon bias was detected at the N-terminal ends, which can be ascribed to the critical role played by the FAD binding motif in this region. Finally, critical amino acid residues for FMO functional divergence (type I & II) after gene duplication were detected and characterized.

  17. A C4-oxidizing Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase Cleaving Both Cellulose and Cello-oligosaccharides*

    PubMed Central

    Isaksen, Trine; Westereng, Bjørge; Aachmann, Finn L.; Agger, Jane W.; Kracher, Daniel; Kittl, Roman; Ludwig, Roland; Haltrich, Dietmar; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Horn, Svein J.

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable resource that significantly can substitute fossil resources for the production of fuels, chemicals, and materials. Efficient saccharification of this biomass to fermentable sugars will be a key technology in future biorefineries. Traditionally, saccharification was thought to be accomplished by mixtures of hydrolytic enzymes. However, recently it has been shown that lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) contribute to this process by catalyzing oxidative cleavage of insoluble polysaccharides utilizing a mechanism involving molecular oxygen and an electron donor. These enzymes thus represent novel tools for the saccharification of plant biomass. Most characterized LPMOs, including all reported bacterial LPMOs, form aldonic acids, i.e., products oxidized in the C1 position of the terminal sugar. Oxidation at other positions has been observed, and there has been some debate concerning the nature of this position (C4 or C6). In this study, we have characterized an LPMO from Neurospora crassa (NcLPMO9C; also known as NCU02916 and NcGH61–3). Remarkably, and in contrast to all previously characterized LPMOs, which are active only on polysaccharides, NcLPMO9C is able to cleave soluble cello-oligosaccharides as short as a tetramer, a property that allowed detailed product analysis. Using mass spectrometry and NMR, we show that the cello-oligosaccharide products released by this enzyme contain a C4 gemdiol/keto group at the nonreducing end. PMID:24324265

  18. Subclade of Flavin-Monooxygenases Involved in Aliphatic Glucosinolate Biosynthesis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Ober, James A.; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2008-01-01

    Glucosinolates (GSLs) are amino acid-derived secondary metabolites with diverse biological activities dependent on chemical modifications of the side chain. We previously identified the flavin-monooxygenase FMOGS-OX1 as an enzyme in the biosynthesis of aliphatic GSLs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that catalyzes the S-oxygenation of methylthioalkyl to methylsulfinylalkyl GSLs. Here, we report the fine mapping of a quantitative trait locus for the S-oxygenating activity in Arabidopsis. In this region, there are three FMOs that, together with FMOGS-OX1 and a fifth FMO, form what appears to be a crucifer-specific subclade. We report the identification of these four uncharacterized FMOs, designated FMOGS-OX2 to FMOGS-OX5. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant protein combined with the analysis of GSL content in knockout mutants and overexpression lines show that FMOGS-OX2, FMOGS-OX3, and FMOGS-OX4 have broad substrate specificity and catalyze the conversion from methylthioalkyl GSL to the corresponding methylsulfinylalkyl GSL independent of chain length. In contrast, FMOGS-OX5 shows substrate specificity toward the long-chain 8-methylthiooctyl GSL. Identification of the FMOGS-OX subclade will generate better understanding of the evolution of biosynthetic activities and specificities in secondary metabolism and provides an important tool for breeding plants with improved cancer prevention characteristics as provided by the methylsulfinylalkyl GSL. PMID:18799661

  19. A soluble form of ammonia monooxygenase in Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Gilch, Stefan; Meyer, Ortwin; Schmidt, Ingo

    2009-09-01

    Ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) of Nitrosomonas europaea is a metalloenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of ammonia to hydroxylamine. This study shows that AMO resides in the cytoplasm of the bacteria in addition to its location in the membrane and is distributed approximately equally in both subcellular fractions. AMO in both fractions catalyzes the oxidation of ammonia and binds [(14)C]acetylene, a mechanism-based inhibitor which specifically interacts with catalytically active AMO. Soluble AMO was purified 12-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity with a yield of 8%. AMO has a molecular mass of approximately 283 kDa with subunits of ca. 27 kDa (alpha-subunit, AmoA), ca. 42 kDa (beta-subunit, AmoB), and ca. 24 kDa (gamma-subunit, cytochrome c(1)) in an alpha(3)beta(3)gamma(3) sub-unit structure. Different from the beta-subunit of membrane-bound AMO, AmoB of soluble AMO possesses an N-terminal signal sequence. AMO contains Cu (9.4+/-0.6 mol per mol AMO), Fe (3.9+/-0.3 mol per mol AMO), and Zn (0.5 to 2.6 mol per mol AMO). Upon reduction the visible absorption spectrum of AMO reveals absorption bands characteristic of cytochrome c. Electron para-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of air-oxidized AMO at 50 K shows a paramagnetic signal originating from Cu(2+) and at 10 K a paramagnetic signal characteristic of heme-Fe.

  20. Mechanism of Action of a Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Eswaramoorthy,S.; Bonanno, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Elimination of nonnutritional and insoluble compounds is a critical task for any living organism. Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) attach an oxygen atom to the insoluble nucleophilic compounds to increase solubility and thereby increase excretion. Here we analyze the functional mechanism of FMO from Schizosaccharomyces pombe using the crystal structures of the wild type and protein-cofactor and protein-substrate complexes. The structure of the wild-type FMO revealed that the prosthetic group FAD is an integral part of the protein. FMO needs NADPH as a cofactor in addition to the prosthetic group for its catalytic activity. Structures of the protein-cofactor and protein-substrate complexes provide insights into mechanism of action. We propose that FMOs exist in the cell as a complex with a reduced form of the prosthetic group and NADPH cofactor, readying them to act on substrates. The 4{alpha}-hydroperoxyflavin form of the prosthetic group represents a transient intermediate of the monooxygenation process. The oxygenated and reduced forms of the prosthetic group help stabilize interactions with cofactor and substrate alternately to permit continuous enzyme turnover.

  1. Differential microbial transformation of nitrosamines by an inducible propane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Homme, Carissa L; Sharp, Jonathan O

    2013-07-02

    The toxicity of N-nitrosamines, their presence in drinking and environmental water supplies, and poorly understood recalcitrance collectively necessitate a better understanding of their potential for bioattenuation. Here, we show that the bacterial strain Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 can biotransform N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine (NDPA), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), and possibly N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) in addition to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). Growth of cells on propane as the sole carbon source greatly enhanced degradation rates when contrasted with cells grown on complex organics. Propane-induced rates in order of fastest to slowest were NDMA > NDEA > NDPA > NPYR > NMOR at concentrations <2000 μg/L. Removal rates for linear functional groups scaled inversely with mass and cyclic nitrosamines were more recalcitrant than linear nitrosamines. Controls demonstrated significant NDEA and NDPA losses independent of biomass, suggesting abiotic processes may play a role in attenuation of these two compounds under experimental conditions tested here. In contrast to NDMA, a transition from first to zero order kinetics was not observed for the other nitrosamines included in this study over a concentration range of 20-2000 μg/L. A genetic knockout for the propane monooxygenase enzyme (PrMO) confirmed the role of this enzyme in the biotransformation of NDEA and NPYR. This study furthers our understanding of environmental nitrosamine attenuation by revealing an enzymatic mechanism for the biotransformation of multiple nitrosamines, their relative recalcitrance to transformation, and potential for abiotic loss.

  2. Product Repression of Alkane Monooxygenase Expression in Pseudomonas butanovora

    PubMed Central

    Doughty, D. M.; Sayavedra-Soto, L. A.; Arp, D. J.; Bottomley, P. J.

    2006-01-01

    Physiological and regulatory mechanisms that allow the alkane-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas butanovora to consume C2 to C8 alkane substrates via butane monooxygenase (BMO) were examined. Striking differences were observed in response to even- versus odd-chain-length alkanes. Propionate, the downstream product of propane oxidation and of the oxidation of other odd-chain-length alkanes following β-oxidation, was a potent repressor of BMO expression. The transcriptional activity of the BMO promoter was reduced with as little as 10 μM propionate, even in the presence of appropriate inducers. Propionate accumulated stoichiometrically when 1-propanol and propionaldehyde were added to butane- and ethane-grown cells, indicating that propionate catabolism was inactive during growth on even-chain-length alkanes. In contrast, propionate consumption was induced (about 80 nmol propionate consumed · min−1 · mg protein−1) following growth on the odd-chain-length alkanes, propane and pentane. The induction of propionate consumption could be brought on by the addition of propionate or pentanoate to the growth medium. In a reporter strain of P. butanovora in which the BMO promoter controls β-galactosidase expression, only even-chain-length alcohols (C2 to C8) induced β-galactosidase following growth on acetate or butyrate. In contrast, both even- and odd-chain-length alcohols (C3 to C7) were able to induce β-galactosidase following the induction of propionate consumption by propionate or pentanoate. PMID:16547046

  3. Effects of Zinc on Particulate Methane Monooxygenase Activity and Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Sirajuddin, Sarah; Barupala, Dulmini; Helling, Stefan; Marcus, Katrin; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a membrane-bound metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Zinc is a known inhibitor of pMMO, but the details of zinc binding and the mechanism of inhibition are not understood. Metal binding and activity assays on membrane-bound pMMO from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) reveal that zinc inhibits pMMO at two sites that are distinct from the copper active site. The 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure of Methylocystis species strain Rockwell pMMO reveals two previously undetected bound lipids, and metal soaking experiments identify likely locations for the two zinc inhibition sites. The first is the crystallographic zinc site in the pmoC subunit, and zinc binding here leads to the ordering of 10 previously unobserved residues. A second zinc site is present on the cytoplasmic side of the pmoC subunit. Parallels between these results and zinc inhibition studies of several respiratory complexes suggest that zinc might inhibit proton transfer in pMMO. PMID:24942740

  4. The yeast Geotrichum candidum encodes functional lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Ladevèze, Simon; Haon, Mireille; Villares, Ana; Cathala, Bernard; Grisel, Sacha; Herpoël-Gimbert, Isabelle; Henrissat, Bernard; Berrin, Jean-Guy

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a class of powerful oxidative enzymes that have revolutionized our understanding of lignocellulose degradation. Fungal LPMOs of the AA9 family target cellulose and hemicelluloses. AA9 LPMO-coding genes have been identified across a wide range of fungal saprotrophs (Ascomycotina, Basidiomycotina, etc.), but so far they have not been found in more basal lineages. Recent genome analysis of the yeast Geotrichum candidum (Saccharomycotina) revealed the presence of several LPMO genes, which belong to the AA9 family. In this study, three AA9 LPMOs from G. candidum were successfully produced and biochemically characterized. The use of native signal peptides was well suited to ensure correct processing and high recombinant production of GcLPMO9A, GcLPMO9B, and GcLPMO9C in Pichia pastoris. We show that GcLPMO9A and GcLPMO9B were both active on cellulose and xyloglucan, releasing a mixture of soluble C1- and C4-oxidized oligosaccharides from cellulose. All three enzymes disrupted cellulose fibers and significantly improved the saccharification of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass upon addition to a commercial cellulase cocktail. The unique enzymatic arsenal of G. candidum compared to other yeasts could be beneficial for plant cell wall decomposition in a saprophytic or pathogenic context. From a biotechnological point of view, G. candidum LPMOs are promising candidates to further enhance enzyme cocktails used in biorefineries such as consolidated bioprocessing.

  5. Engineering Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase for the Production of Methyl Propanoate.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Hugo L; Romero, Elvira; Fraaije, Marco W

    2017-01-20

    A previous study showed that cyclohexanone monooxygenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (AcCHMO) catalyzes the Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of 2-butanone, yielding ethyl acetate and methyl propanoate as products. Methyl propanoate is of industrial interest as a precursor of acrylic plastic. Here, various residues near the substrate and NADP(+) binding sites in AcCHMO were subjected to saturation mutagenesis to enhance both the activity on 2-butanone and the regioselectivity toward methyl propanoate. The resulting libraries were screened using whole cell biotransformations, and headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to identify improved AcCHMO variants. This revealed that the I491A AcCHMO mutant exhibits a significant improvement over the wild type enzyme in the desired regioselectivity using 2-butanone as a substrate (40% vs 26% methyl propanoate, respectively). Another interesting mutant is the T56S AcCHMO mutant, which exhibits a higher conversion yield (92%) and kcat (0.5 s(-1)) than wild type AcCHMO (52% and 0.3 s(-1), respectively). Interestingly, the uncoupling rate for the T56S AcCHMO mutant is also significantly lower than that for the wild type enzyme. The T56S/I491A double mutant combined the beneficial effects of both mutations leading to higher conversion and improved regioselectivity. This study shows that even for a relatively small aliphatic substrate (2-butanone), catalytic efficiency and regioselectivity can be tuned by structure-inspired enzyme engineering.

  6. Structural basis for pregnenolone biosynthesis by the mitochondrial monooxygenase system

    SciTech Connect

    Strushkevich, Natallia; MacKenzie, Farrell; Cherkesova, Tatyana; Grabovec, Irina; Usanov, Sergey; Park, Hee-Won

    2011-09-06

    In humans, the precursor to all steroid hormones, pregnenolone, is synthesized from cholesterol by an enzyme complex comprising adrenodoxin reductase (AdR), adrenodoxin (Adx), and a cytochrome P450 (P450scc or CYP11A1). This complex not only plays a key role in steroidogenesis, but also has long been a model to study electron transfer, multistep catalysis, and C-C bond cleavage performed by monooxygenases. Detailed mechanistic understanding of these processes has been hindered by a lack of structural information. Here we present the crystal structure of the complex of human Adx and CYP11A1 - the first of a complex between a eukaryotic CYP and its redox partner. The structures with substrate and a series of reaction intermediates allow us to define the mechanism underlying sequential hydroxylations of the cholesterol and suggest the mechanism of C-C bond cleavage. In the complex the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Adx is positioned 17.4 {angstrom} away from the heme iron of CYP11A1. This structure suggests that after an initial protein-protein association driven by electrostatic forces, the complex adopts an optimized geometry between the redox centers. Conservation of the interaction interface suggests that this mechanism is common for all mitochondrial P450s.

  7. A mechanistic structure-activity relationship for hepatic polysubstrate monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hollebone, B.R.; Davis, D.; Michelin, N.; Purdy, D. . Chemistry Dept.); Brownlee, L.J. )

    1995-01-01

    The polysubstrate monooxygenase (PSMO) system response to hydrophobic xenobiotics is both intensive in oxidizing power and extensive in enzyme quantity. Under in vitro pseudo-first-order rate conditions the extensive properties become irrelevant, and the intensive rate-determining step depends on chemical structure. Xenobiotics react with PSMO either as inducers (adaptation domain) or as substrates (reaction domain) to produce intended hydroxylation, but accidental oxidations may also occur. Both the induction of intensive oxidizing power in the adaptation domain and the efficiency of reaction in the reaction domain depend on the strength of the weakest C-H bond in the xenobiotic, consistent with either a free radical or an ionic S[sub E]2 reaction process. Only the ionic S[sub E]2 mechanism is sensitive to the electrical charge on the carbon atom of the weakest C-H bond. In this study systematic treatment of simple hydrocarbon structures by adjacent polarizing heteroatoms N, Cl, and O inhibited substrate metabolism in direct proportion to their polarizing power. With this evidence of preferential S[sub E]2 behavior, a QSAR is proposed that allows prediction of four types of disease end points. These arise as combination of conditions of intended or accidental oxidations combined with release of metabolites into cytosolic or lipid media.

  8. Versatile biocatalysis of fungal cytochrome P450 monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Durairaj, Pradeepraj; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Yun, Hyungdon

    2016-07-18

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases, the nature's most versatile biological catalysts have unique ability to catalyse regio-, chemo-, and stereospecific oxidation of a wide range of substrates under mild reaction conditions, thereby addressing a significant challenge in chemocatalysis. Though CYP enzymes are ubiquitous in all biological kingdoms, the divergence of CYPs in fungal kingdom is manifold. The CYP enzymes play pivotal roles in various fungal metabolisms starting from housekeeping biochemical reactions, detoxification of chemicals, and adaptation to hostile surroundings. Considering the versatile catalytic potentials, fungal CYPs has gained wide range of attraction among researchers and various remarkable strategies have been accomplished to enhance their biocatalytic properties. Numerous fungal CYPs with multispecialty features have been identified and the number of characterized fungal CYPs is constantly increasing. Literature reveals ample reviews on mammalian, plant and bacterial CYPs, however, modest reports on fungal CYPs urges a comprehensive review highlighting their novel catalytic potentials and functional significances. In this review, we focus on the diversification and functional diversity of fungal CYPs and recapitulate their unique and versatile biocatalytic properties. As such, this review emphasizes the crucial issues of fungal CYP systems, and the factors influencing efficient biocatalysis.

  9. Dioxygen activation in methane monooxygenase: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gherman, Benjamin F; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Lippard, Stephen J; Friesner, Richard A

    2004-03-10

    Using broken-symmetry unrestricted Density Functional Theory, the mechanism of enzymatic dioxygen activation by the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMOH) is determined to atomic detail. After a thorough examination of mechanistic alternatives, an optimal pathway was identified. The diiron(II) state H(red) reacts with dioxygen to give a ferromagnetically coupled diiron(II,III) H(superoxo) structure, which undergoes intersystem crossing to the antiferromagnetic surface and affords H(peroxo), a symmetric diiron(III) unit with a nonplanar mu-eta(2):eta(2)-O(2)(2)(-) binding mode. Homolytic cleavage of the O-O bond yields the catalytically competent intermediate Q, which has a di (mu-oxo)diiron(IV) core. A carboxylate shift involving Glu243 is essential to the formation of the symmetric H(peroxo) and Q structures. Both thermodynamic and kinetic features agree well with experimental data, and computed spin-exchange coupling constants are in accord with spectroscopic values. Evidence is presented for pH-independent decay of H(red) and H(peroxo). Key electron-transfer steps that occur in the course of generating Q from H(red) are also detailed and interpreted. In contrast to prior theoretical studies, a requisite large model has been employed, electron spins and couplings have been treated in a quantitative manner, potential energy surfaces have been extensively explored, and quantitative total energies have been determined along the reaction pathway.

  10. Oxidative cleavage and hydrolytic boosting of cellulose in soybean spent flakes by Trichoderma reesei Cel61A lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brian C; Agger, Jane Wittrup; Wichmann, Jesper; Meyer, Anne S

    2017-03-01

    The auxiliary activity family 9 (AA9) copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) from Trichoderma reesei (EG4; TrCel61A) was investigated for its ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides from soybean. The substrate specificity of the enzyme was assessed against a variety of substrates, including both soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry, and soy spent flake pretreated with sodium hydroxide. Products from enzymatic treatments were analyzed using mass spectrometry and high performance anion exchange chromatography. We demonstrate that TrCel61A is capable of oxidizing cellulose from both pretreated soy spent flake and phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, oxidizing at both the C1 and C4 positions. In addition, we show that the oxidative activity of TrCel61A displays a synergistic effect capable of boosting endoglucanase activity, and thereby substrate depolymerization of soy cellulose, by 27%.

  11. Characterization of a tryptophan 2-monooxygenase gene from Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici involved in auxin biosynthesis and rust pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chuntao; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gang, David R; Hulbert, Scot H

    2014-03-01

    The plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is best known as a regulator of plant growth and development but its production can also affect plant-microbe interactions. Microorganisms, including numerous plant-associated bacteria and several fungi, are also capable of producing IAA. The stem rust fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici induced wheat plants to accumulate auxin in infected leaf tissue. A gene (Pgt-IaaM) encoding a putative tryptophan 2-monooxygenase, which makes the auxin precursor indole-3-acetamide (IAM), was identified in the P. graminis f. sp. tritici genome and found to be expressed in haustoria cells in infected plant tissue. Transient silencing of the gene in infected wheat plants indicated that it was required for full pathogenicity. Expression of Pgt-IaaM in Arabidopsis caused a typical auxin expression phenotype and promoted susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

  12. Osmotic Regulation of a Novel Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase in Primary Cultured Cells from Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Gabriela; Aparicio-Fabre, Rosaura; Li, Qi; Schlenk, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a hepatic isoform of flavin-containing monooxygenase (hFMO) (EF063736) containing an open reading frame of 1792 base pairs (bp) and encoding 554 amino acids was cloned and sequenced from liver mRNA of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The genomic sequence of hFMO was also characterized and was 4.379 kilobases, possessing 10 exons and 9 introns (EU519462). Structural analysis of the promoter region showed several cis-acting elements including putative glucocorticoid and osmoregulatory response elements, which have been reported to be functionally related to induction of flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) proteins in vertebrates. The amino acid sequence showed 74% identity to a putative FMO gene from fugu (Takifugu rubripes; Q6ZZY9), 52 to 55% to zebrafish (Brachydanio rerio; Q5RGM6, Q5RGM3, Q6TLD2, Q7T1D7) FMO5, and 54 and 50% to human FMO1 (Q01740), FMO3 (P49326), and FMO5 (P49326). Southern blot analysis using a 180-bp fragment of the hFMO cDNA indicated at least seven potential genes. Treatment of primary trout hepatocytes with cortisol and sodium chloride for 24 h enhanced hFMO expression. Expression of hFMO was not detected in untreated or solute-treated primary cultures of gill epithelial cells, suggesting tissue-specific expression of hFMO. Induction of hFMO is consistent with the occurrence of cis-osmoregulatory and glucocorticoid response elements identified in the 5′-upstream sequence, indicating regulation of hFMO in response to hypersaline conditions and the osmoregulatory hormone cortisol. PMID:18372402

  13. Development of a plant viral-vector-based gene expression assay for the screening of yeast cytochrome p450 monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Kathleen; Nguyen, Long V; Khan, Faizah; Pogue, Gregory P; Vojdani, Fakhrieh; Panda, Sanjay; Pinot, Franck; Oriedo, Vincent B; Rasochova, Lada; Subramanian, Mani; Miller, Barbara; White, Earl L

    2003-02-01

    Development of a gene discovery tool for heterologously expressed cytochrome P450 monooxygenases has been inherently difficult. The activity assays are labor-intensive and not amenable to parallel screening. Additionally, biochemical confirmation requires coexpression of a homologous P450 reductase or complementary heterologous activity. Plant virus gene expression systems have been utilized for a diverse group of organisms. In this study we describe a method using an RNA vector expression system to phenotypically screen for cytochrome P450-dependent fatty acid omega-hydroxylase activity. Yarrowia lipolytica CYP52 gene family members involved in n-alkane assimilation were amplified from genomic DNA, cloned into a plant virus gene expression vector, and used as a model system for determining heterologous expression. Plants infected with virus vectors expressing the yeast CYP52 genes (YlALK1-YlALK7) showed a distinct necrotic lesion phenotype on inoculated plant leaves. No phenotype was detected on negative control constructs. YlALK3-, YlALK5-, and YlALK7-inoculated plants all catalyzed the terminal hydroxylation of lauric acid as confirmed using thin-layer and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods. The plant-based cytochrome P450 phenotypic screen was tested on an n-alkane-induced Yarrowia lipolytica plant virus expression library. A subset of 1,025 random library clones, including YlALK1-YlALK7 constructs, were tested on plants. All YlALK gene constructs scored positive in the randomized screen. Following nucleotide sequencing of the clones that scored positive using a phenotypic screen, approximately 5% were deemed appropriate for further biochemical analysis. This report illustrates the utility of a plant-based system for expression of heterologous cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and for the assignment of gene function.

  14. Next-Gen Sequencing-Based Mapping and Identification of Ethyl Methanesulfonate-Induced Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Millet, Yves; Ausubel, Frederick M; Borowsky, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Forward genetic analysis using ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis has proven to be a powerful tool in biological research, but identification and cloning of causal mutations by conventional genetic mapping approaches is a painstaking process. Recent advances in next-gen sequencing have greatly invigorated the process of identifying EMS-induced mutations corresponding to a specific phenotype in model genetic hosts, including the plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Next-gen sequencing of bulked F2 mutant recombinants produces a wealth of high-resolution genetic data, provides enhanced delimitation of the genomic location of mutations, and greatly reduces hands-on time while maintaining high accuracy and reproducibility. In this unit, a detailed procedure to simultaneously map and identify EMS mutations in Arabidopsis is described.

  15. The kynurenine pathway is activated in human obesity and shifted toward kynurenine monooxygenase activation.

    PubMed

    Favennec, Marie; Hennart, Benjamin; Caiazzo, Robert; Leloire, Audrey; Yengo, Loïc; Verbanck, Marie; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Marre, Michel; Pigeyre, Marie; Bessede, Alban; Guillemin, Gilles J; Chinetti, Giulia; Staels, Bart; Pattou, François; Balkau, Beverley; Allorge, Delphine; Froguel, Philippe; Poulain-Godefroy, Odile

    2015-10-01

    This study characterized the kynurenine pathway (KP) in human obesity by evaluating circulating levels of kynurenines and the expression of KP enzymes in adipose tissue. Tryptophan and KP metabolite levels were measured in serum of individuals from the D.E.S.I.R. cohort (case-cohort study: 212 diabetic, 836 randomly sampled) and in women with obesity, diabetic or normoglycemic, from the ABOS cohort (n = 100). KP enzyme gene expressions were analyzed in omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue of women from the ABOS cohort, in human primary adipocytes and in monocyte-derived macrophages. In the D.E.S.I.R. cohort, kynurenine levels were positively associated with body mass index (BMI) (P = 4.68 × 10(-19) ) and with a higher HOMA2-IR insulin resistance index (P = 6.23 × 10(-4) ). The levels of kynurenine, kynurenic acid, and quinolinic acid were associated with higher BMI (P < 0.05). The expression of several KP enzyme genes (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 [IDO1], kynureninase [KYNU], kynurenine 3-monooxygenase [KMO], and kynurenine aminotransferase III [CCBL2]) was increased in the omental adipose tissue of women with obesity compared to lean (P < 0.05), and their expression was induced by proinflammatory cytokines in human primary adipocytes (P < 0.05), except for KMO that is not expressed in these cells. The expressions of IDO1, KYNU, KMO, and CCBL2 were higher in proinflammatory than in anti-inflammatory macrophages (P < 0.05). In the context of obesity, the presence of macrophages in adipose tissue may contribute to diverting KP toward KMO activation. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  16. pH dependence on functional activity of human and mouse flavin-containing monooxygenase 5.

    PubMed

    Motika, Meike S; Zhang, Jun; Ralph, Erik C; Dwyer, Mary A; Cashman, John R

    2012-04-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) 5 belongs to a family of enzymes that catalyze the oxygenation of nucleophilic N- and S-containing compounds. The FMO enzyme family consists of five forms (FMOs1-5) that share about 50-60% sequence identity to each other. A comparison of FMOs showed that the pH-dependence profile for functional activity of FMO5 differed significantly from that of other FMO enzymes. The objective of this study was to examine the pH-dependence of FMO5 to gain insight into the mechanism of action of FMO5. Recombinant mouse and human FMO5 (mFMO5 and hFMO5, respectively) were expressed as maltose-binding fusion proteins from Escherichia coli, purified with affinity chromatography, and examined for their N-oxygenation functional activity at different pH values. hFMO5 showed a broader range and greater functional activity from pH 6 to 11 compared to mFMO5. mFMO5 lost almost all functional activity at pH 6, while hFMO5 maintained almost normal enzyme activity. In order to identify the amino acid residues involved in the effects of pH on hFMO5 and mFMO5 functional enzyme activity, pH-studies in the range of pH 6-9 were done with chimeras of recombinant mouse and human FMO5 and variants of both. Results of these studies and molecular modeling showed that residues responsible for the differences in the pH profile between mFMO5 and hFMO5 were located at positions 227 and 228 of the enzyme. Further variants were made to investigate the role of these amino acids. The results of this study may help to explain the mechanism of FMO function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase and the role of endobiotic metabolism enzymes in xenobiotic biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Steventon, Glyn B; Mitchell, Stephen C

    2009-10-01

    Phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase is the key enzyme in the sulfoxidation of the thioether drug S-carboxymethyl-l-cysteine and its thioether metabolites, S-methyl-l-cysteine, N-acetyl-S-carboxymethyl-l-cysteine and N-acetyl-S-methyl-l-cysteine in humans, and a number of other mammalian species. The kinetics constants of the sulfoxidation reaction (K(m), V(max) and CL(E)) have been investigated in cytosolic fractions derived from rat and human liver, in cytosolic fractions of HepG2 cells and using both human and mouse cDNA expressed phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase. Differences in K(m), V(max) and CL(E) of S-carboxymethyl-l-cysteine have been seen in HepG2 cells and human and mouse cDNA expressed phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase when compared to both rat and human hepatic cytosolic fractions. The association of the genetic polymorphism in the sulfoxidation of S-carboxymethyl-l-cysteine is highlighted with particular reference to this biotransformation reaction as being a biomarker of disease susceptibility in Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and motor neurone diseases and in rheumatoid arthritis. The possible underlying molecular genetics of the sulfoxidation polymorphism is also discussed in relation to the known allelic frequencies of phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase. Finally, the new found role phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase plays in xenobiotic metabolism is discussed.

  18. Membrane-associated methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, J A; DiSpirito, A A

    1996-01-01

    An active preparation of the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was isolated by ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography using dodecyl beta-D-maltoside as the detergent. The active preparation consisted of three major polypeptides with molecular masses of 47,000, 27,000, and 25,000 Da. Two of the three polypeptides (those with molecular masses of 47,000 and 27,000 Da) were identified as the polypeptides induced when cells expressing the soluble MMO are switched to culture medium in which the pMMO is expressed. The 27,000-Da polypeptide was identified as the acetylene-binding protein. The active enzyme complex contained 2.5 iron atoms and 14.5 copper atoms per 99,000 Da. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of the enzyme showed evidence for a type 2 copper center (g perpendicular = 2.057, g parallel = 2.24, and magnitude of A parallel = 172 G), a weak high-spin iron signal (g = 6.0), and a broad low-field (g = 12.5) signal. Treatment of the pMMO with nitric oxide produced the ferrous-nitric oxide derivative observed in the membrane fraction of cells expressing the pMMO. When duroquinol was used as a reductant, the specific activity of the purified enzyme was 11.1 nmol of propylene oxidized.min-1.mg of protein-1, which accounted for approximately 30% of the cell-free propylene oxidation activity. The activity was stimulated by ferric and cupric metal ions in addition to the cytochrome b-specific inhibitors myxothiazol and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide. PMID:8576034

  19. Discovery and industrial applications of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Katja S

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMOs) has opened up a vast area of research covering several fields of application. The biotech company Novozymes A/S holds patents on the use of these enzymes for the conversion of steam-pre-treated plant residues such as straw to free sugars. These patents predate the correct classification of LPMOs and the striking synergistic effect of fungal LPMOs when combined with canonical cellulases was discovered when fractions of fungal secretomes were evaluated in industrially relevant enzyme performance assays. Today, LPMOs are a central component in the Cellic CTec enzyme products which are used in several large-scale plants for the industrial production of lignocellulosic ethanol. LPMOs are characterized by an N-terminal histidine residue which, together with an internal histidine and a tyrosine residue, co-ordinates a single copper atom in a so-called histidine brace. The mechanism by which oxygen binds to the reduced copper atom has been reported and the general mechanism of copper-oxygen-mediated activation of carbon is being investigated in the light of these discoveries. LPMOs are widespread in both the fungal and the bacterial kingdoms, although the range of action of these enzymes remains to be elucidated. However, based on the high abundance of LPMOs expressed by microbes involved in the decomposition of organic matter, the importance of LPMOs in the natural carbon-cycle is predicted to be significant. In addition, it has been suggested that LPMOs play a role in the pathology of infectious diseases such as cholera and to thus be relevant in the field of medicine. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  20. Identification of the Monooxygenase Gene Clusters Responsible for the Regioselective Oxidation of Phenol to Hydroquinone in Mycobacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Toshiki; Hirose, Satomi; Osanai, Hisashi; Semba, Hisashi; Kino, Kuniki

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium goodii strain 12523 is an actinomycete that is able to oxidize phenol regioselectively at the para position to produce hydroquinone. In this study, we investigated the genes responsible for this unique regioselective oxidation. On the basis of the fact that the oxidation activity of M. goodii strain 12523 toward phenol is induced in the presence of acetone, we first identified acetone-induced proteins in this microorganism by two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of one of these acetone-induced proteins shares 100% identity with that of the protein encoded by the open reading frame Msmeg_1971 in Mycobacterium smegmatis strain mc2155, whose genome sequence has been determined. Since Msmeg_1971, Msmeg_1972, Msmeg_1973, and Msmeg_1974 constitute a putative binuclear iron monooxygenase gene cluster, we cloned this gene cluster of M. smegmatis strain mc2155 and its homologous gene cluster found in M. goodii strain 12523. Sequence analysis of these binuclear iron monooxygenase gene clusters revealed the presence of four genes designated mimABCD, which encode an oxygenase large subunit, a reductase, an oxygenase small subunit, and a coupling protein, respectively. When the mimA gene (Msmeg_1971) of M. smegmatis strain mc2155, which was also found to be able to oxidize phenol to hydroquinone, was deleted, this mutant lost the oxidation ability. This ability was restored by introduction of the mimA gene of M. smegmatis strain mc2155 or of M. goodii strain 12523 into this mutant. Interestingly, we found that these gene clusters also play essential roles in propane and acetone metabolism in these mycobacteria. PMID:21183637

  1. Mutations of Toluene-4-Monooxygenase That Alter Regiospecificity of Indole Oxidation and Lead to Production of Novel Indigoid Pigments

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Kevin; Boss, Corinne; Keresztes, Ivan; Steffan, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Broad-substrate-range monooygenase enzymes, including toluene-4-monooxygenase (T4MO), can catalyze the oxidation of indole. The indole oxidation products can then condense to form the industrially important dye indigo. Site-directed mutagenesis of T4MO resulted in the creation of T4MO isoforms with altered pigment production phenotypes. High-pressure liquid chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the indole oxidation products generated by the mutant T4MO isoforms revealed that the phenotypic differences were primarily due to changes in the regiospecificity of indole oxidation. Most of the mutations described in this study changed the ratio of the primary indole oxidation products formed (indoxyl, 2-oxindole, and isatin), but some mutations, particularly those involving amino acid G103 of tmoA, allowed for the formation of additional products, including 7-hydroxyindole and novel indigoid pigments. For example, mutant G103L converted 17% of added indole to 7-hydroxyindole and 29% to indigoid pigments including indigo and indirubin and two other structurally related pigments. The double mutant G103L:A107G converted 47% of indole to 7-hydroxyindole, but no detectable indigoid pigments were formed, similar to the product distribution observed with the toluene-2-monooxygenase (T2MO) of Burkholderia cepacia G4. These results demonstrate that modification of the tmoA active site can change the products produced by the enzyme and lead to the production of novel pigments and other indole oxidation products with potential commercial and medicinal utility. PMID:16151140

  2. Suicidal inactivation and labelling of ammonia mono-oxygenase by acetylene.

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, M R; Wood, P M

    1985-01-01

    Acetylene brings about a progressive inactivation of ammonia mono-oxygenase, the ammonia-oxidizing enzyme in Nitrosomonas europaea. High NH4+ ion concentrations were protective. The inactivation followed first-order kinetics, with a rate constant of 1.5 min-1 at saturating concentrations of acetylene. If acetylene was added in the absence of O2, the cells remained active until O2 was re-introduced. A protective effect was also demonstrated with thiourea, a reversible non-competitive inhibitor of ammonia oxidation. Incubation of cells with [14C]acetylene was found to cause labelling of a single membrane polypeptide. This ran on dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis with an Mr value of 28 000. It is concluded that acetylene is a suicide substrate for the mono-oxygenase. The labelling experiment provides the first identification of a constituent polypeptide of ammonia mono-oxygenase. Images Fig. 4. PMID:4004794

  3. Targeted deletion of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase in mice: a new tool for studying kynurenine pathway metabolism in periphery and brain.

    PubMed

    Giorgini, Flaviano; Huang, Shao-Yi; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Notarangelo, Francesca M; Thomas, Marian A R; Tararina, Margarita; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Schwarcz, Robert; Muchowski, Paul J

    2013-12-20

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan degradation, has been suggested to play a major role in physiological and pathological events involving bioactive KP metabolites. To explore this role in greater detail, we generated mice with a targeted genetic disruption of Kmo and present here the first biochemical and neurochemical characterization of these mutant animals. Kmo(-/-) mice lacked KMO activity but showed no obvious abnormalities in the activity of four additional KP enzymes tested. As expected, Kmo(-/-) mice showed substantial reductions in the levels of its enzymatic product, 3-hydroxykynurenine, in liver, brain, and plasma. Compared with wild-type animals, the levels of the downstream metabolite quinolinic acid were also greatly decreased in liver and plasma of the mutant mice but surprisingly were only slightly reduced (by ∼20%) in the brain. The levels of three other KP metabolites: kynurenine, kynurenic acid, and anthranilic acid, were substantially, but differentially, elevated in the liver, brain, and plasma of Kmo(-/-) mice, whereas the liver and brain content of the major end product of the enzymatic cascade, NAD(+), did not differ between Kmo(-/-) and wild-type animals. When assessed by in vivo microdialysis, extracellular kynurenic acid levels were found to be significantly elevated in the brains of Kmo(-/-) mice. Taken together, these results provide further evidence that KMO plays a key regulatory role in the KP and indicate that Kmo(-/-) mice will be useful for studying tissue-specific functions of individual KP metabolites in health and disease.

  4. Deoxyribonucleic acid repair in Bacillus subtilis: development of competent cells into a tester for carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Yasbin, R.E.; Miehl, R.

    1980-04-01

    The development of competent transformed Bacillus subtilis into a tester system for carcinogens is described. Precocious or noninduced activation of SOS functions occurs in competent cells. Thus, lower doses or concentrations of SOS inducing agents are needed to cause cell death due to indigenous prophage activation and lysis of bacteria. The two known defective prophages in B. subtilis enhance the sensitivity of competent cells to the carcinogens ultraviolet light, mitomycin C, and methyl methanesulfonate. However, these same cells have no enhanced sensitivity for the non-carcinogenic ethyl methanesulfonate or for nalidixic acid. Therefore, competent B. subtilis appears to be a sensitive tester for carcinogens.

  5. Transcriptional Regulation of the Grape Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase Gene CYP736B Expression in Response to Xylella fastidiosa Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are a group of versatile redox proteins that mediate the biosynthesis of lignins, terpenes, alkaloids, and a variety of other secondary compounds which act as plant defense agents. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in defense response to...

  6. Selective Usage of Transcription Initiation and Polyadenylation Sites in Grape Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase Gene CYP736B Expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are versatile redox proteins that mediate biosynthesis of lignins, terpenes, alkaloids, and a variety of other secondary compounds as plant defense agents against a range of pathogens and insects. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in the...

  7. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Ammonia Monooxygenase in Nitrosomonas europaea

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kristen; Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.; Yeager, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic nitrifying bacterium that oxidizes ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2−) through the sequential activities of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (HAO). Many alkynes are mechanism-based inactivators of AMO, and here we describe an activity-based protein profiling method for this enzyme using 1,7-octadiyne (17OD) as a probe. Inactivation of NH4+-dependent O2 uptake by N. europaea by 17OD was time- and concentration-dependent. The effects of 17OD were specific for ammonia-oxidizing activity, and de novo protein synthesis was required to reestablish this activity after cells were exposed to 17OD. Cells were reacted with Alexa Fluor 647 azide using a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) (click) reaction, solubilized, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and infrared (IR) scanning. A fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was observed for cells previously exposed to 17OD but not for cells treated with either allylthiourea or acetylene prior to exposure to 17OD or for cells not previously exposed to 17OD. The fluorescent polypeptide was membrane associated and aggregated when heated with β-mercaptoethanol and SDS. The fluorescent polypeptide was also detected in cells pretreated with other diynes, but not in cells pretreated with structural homologs containing a single ethynyl functional group. The membrane fraction from 17OD-treated cells was conjugated with biotin-azide and solubilized in SDS. Streptavidin affinity-purified polypeptides were on-bead trypsin-digested, and amino acid sequences of the peptide fragments were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Peptide fragments from AmoA were the predominant peptides detected in 17OD-treated samples. In-gel digestion and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–tandem time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) analyses also confirmed that the fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was AmoA. PMID:26826234

  8. Analyzing Activities of Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases by Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Westereng, Bjørge; Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Agger, Jane Wittrup; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Eijsink, Vincent G H

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases perform oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds in various polysaccharides. The majority of LMPOs studied so far possess activity on either cellulose or chitin and analysis of these activities is therefore the main focus of this review. Notably, however, the number of LPMOs that are active on other polysaccharides is increasing. The products generated by LPMOs from cellulose are either oxidized in the downstream end (at C1) or upstream end (at C4), or at both ends. These modifications only result in small structural changes, which makes both chromatographic separation and product identification by mass spectrometry challenging. The changes in physicochemical properties that are associated with oxidation need to be considered when choosing analytical approaches. C1 oxidation leads to a sugar that is no longer reducing but instead has an acidic functionality, whereas C4 oxidation leads to products that are inherently labile at high and low pH and that exist in a keto-gemdiol equilibrium that is strongly shifted toward the gemdiol in aqueous solutions. Partial degradation of C4-oxidized products leads to the formation of native products, which could explain why some authors claim to have observed glycoside hydrolase activity for LPMOs. Notably, apparent glycoside hydrolase activity may also be due to small amounts of contaminating glycoside hydrolases since these normally have much higher catalytic rates than LPMOs. The low catalytic turnover rates of LPMOs necessitate the use of sensitive product detection methods, which limits the analytical possibilities considerably. Modern liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry have become essential tools for evaluating LPMO activity, and this chapter provides an overview of available methods together with a few novel tools. The methods described constitute a suite of techniques for analyzing oxidized carbohydrate products, which can be applied to LPMOs as well as other carbohydrate

  9. Ascorbate depletion as a consequence of product recycling during dopamine. beta. -monooxygenase catalyzed selenoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    May, S.W.; Herman, H.H.; Roberts, S.F.; Ciccarello, M.C.

    1987-03-24

    The competence of dopamine ..beta..-monooxygenase (DBM) to process selenide substrates was investigated, in anticipation that the expected selenoxide products would exhibit unique reactivity and redox properties. The prototypical selenide phenyl 2-aminoethyl selenide (PAESe) was synthesized and shown to be a substrate for DBM with the characteristic e/O/sub 2/ ratio of 2:1 for monooxygenation. The kinetic parameters for oxygenation of PAESe were found to be similar to those for the DBM-catalyzed sulfoxidation of the cognate sulfide phenyl 2-aminoethyl sulfide, and selenoxidation was stimulated by fumarate in a manner similar to other well-characterized DBM monooxygenation reactions. Identification of phenyl 2-aminoethyl selenoxide (PAESeO) as the enzymatic product was accomplished by the demonstration of coincident elution of authentic PAESeO with the enzymatic product in three significantly different HPLC systems. PAESeO was found to oxidize ascorbic acid with the concomitant and stoichiometric reduction of PAESeO back to the selenide, PAESe. As a consequence of this nonenzymatic reaction, ascorbate-supported DBM turnover was prematurely terminated under standard assay conditions due to depletion of reduced ascorbate. The kinetics of the redox reaction between PAESeO and ascorbate were investigated with a spectrophotometric assay of ascorbate at 300 nm, and a second-order rate constant of 3.4 M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ was determined at pH 5.0, 25/sup 0/C. Spectrophotometric assay of cytochrome c (cyt c) reduction at 550 nm during the oxidation of ascorbate by PAESeO demonstrated that no cyt c trappable semidehydroascorbate was produced in this nonenzymatic reaction.

  10. Intermediate P* from Soluble Methane Monooxygenase Contains a Diferrous Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Rahul; Meier, Katlyn K.; Münck, Eckard; Lipscomb, John D.

    2013-01-01

    During a single turnover of the hydroxylase component (MMOH) of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, several discrete intermediates are formed. The diiron cluster of MMOH is first reduced to the FeIIFeII state (Hred). O2 binds rapidly at a site away from the cluster to form the FeIIFeII intermediate O, which converts to an FeIIIFeIII-peroxo intermediate P and finally to the FeIVFeIV intermediate Q. Q binds and reacts with methane to yield methanol and water. The rate constants for these steps are increased by a regulatory protein, MMOB. Previously reported transient kinetic studies have suggested that an intermediate P* forms between O and P in which the g = 16 EPR signal characteristic of the reduced diiron cluster of Hred and O is lost. This was interpreted as signaling oxidation of the cluster, but low accumulation of P* prevented further characterization. In this study, three methods to directly detect and trap P* are applied together to allow its spectroscopic and kinetic characterization. First, the MMOB mutant His33Ala is used to specifically slow the decay of P* without affecting its formation rate, leading to its nearly quantitative accumulation. Second, spectra-kinetic data collection is used to provide a sensitive measure of the formation and decay rate constants of intermediates as well as their optical spectra. Finally, the substrate furan is included to react with Q and quench its strong chromophore. The optical spectrum of P* closely mimics those of Hred and O, but it is distinctly different from that of P. The reaction cycle rate constants allowed prediction of the times for maximal accumulation of the intermediates. Mössbauer spectra of rapid freeze quench samples at these times show that the intermediates are formed at almost exactly the predicted levels. The Mössbauer spectra show that the diiron cluster of P*, quite unexpectedly, is in the FeIIFeII state. Thus, the loss of the g = 16 EPR results from a change of

  11. Intermediate P* from soluble methane monooxygenase contains a diferrous cluster.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rahul; Meier, Katlyn K; Münck, Eckard; Lipscomb, John D

    2013-06-25

    During a single turnover of the hydroxylase component (MMOH) of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, several discrete intermediates are formed. The diiron cluster of MMOH is first reduced to the Fe(II)Fe(II) state (H(red)). O₂ binds rapidly at a site away from the cluster to form the Fe(II)Fe(II) intermediate O, which converts to an Fe(III)Fe(III)-peroxo intermediate P and finally to the Fe(IV)Fe(IV) intermediate Q. Q binds and reacts with methane to yield methanol and water. The rate constants for these steps are increased by a regulatory protein, MMOB. Previously reported transient kinetic studies have suggested that an intermediate P* forms between O and P in which the g = 16 EPR signal characteristic of the reduced diiron cluster of H(red) and O is lost. This was interpreted as signaling oxidation of the cluster, but a low level of accumulation of P* prevented further characterization. In this study, three methods for directly detecting and trapping P* are applied together to allow its spectroscopic and kinetic characterization. First, the MMOB mutant His33Ala is used to specifically slow the decay of P* without affecting its formation rate, leading to its nearly quantitative accumulation. Second, spectra-kinetic data collection is used to provide a sensitive measure of the formation and decay rate constants of intermediates as well as their optical spectra. Finally, the substrate furan is included to react with Q and quench its strong chromophore. The optical spectrum of P* closely mimics those of H(red) and O, but it is distinctly different from that of P. The reaction cycle rate constants allowed prediction of the times for maximal accumulation of the intermediates. Mössbauer spectra of rapid freeze-quench samples at these times show that the intermediates are formed at almost exactly the predicted levels. The Mössbauer spectra show that the diiron cluster of P*, quite unexpectedly, is in the Fe(II)Fe(II) state. Thus, the

  12. Dual role of the carboxyl-terminal region of pig liver L-kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: mitochondrial-targeting signal and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Kumiko; Kuroyanagi, Hidehito; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Hirabayashi-Takahashi, Kanako; Saito, Kuniaki; Haga, Seiich; Uemura, Tomihiko; Izumi, Susumu

    2010-12-01

    l-kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an NAD(P)H-dependent flavin monooxygenase that catalyses the hydroxylation of l-kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine, and is localized as an oligomer in the mitochondrial outer membrane. In the human brain, KMO may play an important role in the formation of two neurotoxins, 3-hydroxykynurenine and quinolinic acid, both of which provoke severe neurodegenerative diseases. In mosquitos, it plays a role in the formation both of eye pigment and of an exflagellation-inducing factor (xanthurenic acid). Here, we present evidence that the C-terminal region of pig liver KMO plays a dual role. First, it is required for the enzymatic activity. Second, it functions as a mitochondrial targeting signal as seen in monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) or outer membrane cytochrome b(5). The first role was shown by the comparison of the enzymatic activity of two mutants (C-terminally FLAG-tagged KMO and carboxyl-terminal truncation form, KMOΔC50) with that of the wild-type enzyme expressed in COS-7 cells. The second role was demonstrated with fluorescence microscopy by the comparison of the intracellular localization of the wild-type, three carboxyl-terminal truncated forms (ΔC20, ΔC30 and ΔC50), C-terminally FLAG-tagged wild-type and a mutant KMO, where two arginine residues, Arg461-Arg462, were replaced with Ser residues.

  13. Synthesis, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activity of novel silver(I) tris(pyrazolyl)methanesulfonate and 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphadamantane complexes.

    PubMed

    Pettinari, Claudio; Marchetti, Fabio; Lupidi, Giulio; Quassinti, Luana; Bramucci, Massimo; Petrelli, Dezemona; Vitali, Luca A; da Silva, M Fátima C Guedes; Martins, Luísa M D R S; Smoleński, Piotr; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2011-11-07

    Five new silver(I) complexes of formulas [Ag(Tpms)] (1), [Ag(Tpms)(PPh(3))] (2), [Ag(Tpms)(PCy(3))] (3), [Ag(PTA)][BF(4)] (4), and [Ag(Tpms)(PTA)] (5) {Tpms = tris(pyrazol-1-yl)methanesulfonate, PPh(3) = triphenylphosphane, PCy(3) = tricyclohexylphosphane, PTA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane} have been synthesized and fully characterized by elemental analyses, (1)H, (13)C, and (31)P NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and IR spectroscopic techniques. The single crystal X-ray diffraction study of 3 shows the Tpms ligand acting in the N(3)-facially coordinating mode, while in 2 and 5 a N(2)O-coordination is found, with the SO(3) group bonded to silver and a pendant free pyrazolyl ring. Features of the tilting in the coordinated pyrazolyl rings in these cases suggest that this inequivalence is related with the cone angles of the phosphanes. A detailed study of antimycobacterial and antiproliferative properties of all compounds has been carried out. They were screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activities against the standard strains Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29922), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Streptococcus pneumoniae (ATCC 49619), Streptococcus pyogenes (SF37), Streptococcus sanguinis (SK36), Streptococcus mutans (UA159), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), and the fungus Candida albicans (ATCC 24443). Complexes 1-5 have been found to display effective antimicrobial activity against the series of bacteria and fungi, and some of them are potential candidates for antiseptic or disinfectant drugs. Interaction of Ag complexes with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has been studied by fluorescence spectroscopic techniques, using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescence probe of DNA. The decrease in the fluorescence of DNA-EB system on addition of Ag complexes shows that the fluorescence quenching of DNA-EB complex occurs and compound 3 is particularly active. Complexes 1-5 exhibit pronounced antiproliferative activity against human malignant

  14. Functional Analysis of the Small Component of the 4-Hydroxyphenylacetate 3-Monooxygenase of Escherichia coli W: a Prototype of a New Flavin:NAD(P)H Reductase Subfamily

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Beatriz; Díaz, Eduardo; Prieto, María A.; García, José L.

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli W uses the aromatic compound 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (4-HPA) as a sole source of carbon and energy for growth. The monooxygenase which converts 4-HPA into 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate, the first intermediate of the pathway, consists of two components, HpaB (58.7 kDa) and HpaC (18.6 kDa), encoded by the hpaB and hpaC genes, respectively, that form a single transcription unit. Overproduction of the small HpaC component in E. coli K-12 cells has facilitated the purification of the protein, which was revealed to be a homodimer that catalyzes the reduction of free flavins by NADH in preference to NADPH. Subsequently, the reduced flavins diffuse to the large HpaB component or to other electron acceptors such as cytochrome c and ferric ion. Amino acid sequence comparisons revealed that the HpaC reductase could be considered the prototype of a new subfamily of flavin:NAD(P)H reductases. The construction of a fusion protein between the large HpaB oxygenase component and the choline-binding domain of the major autolysin of Streptococcus pneumoniae allowed us to develop a rapid method to efficiently purify this highly unstable enzyme as a chimeric CH-HpaB protein, which exhibited a 4-HPA hydroxylating activity only when it was supplemented with the HpaC reductase. These results suggest the 4-HPA 3-monooxygenase of E. coli W as a representative member of a novel two-component flavin-diffusible monooxygenase (TC-FDM) family. Relevant features on the evolution and structure-function relationships of these TC-FDM proteins are discussed. PMID:10633095

  15. An electrophoretic study of the thermal- and reductant-dependent aggregation of the 27 kDa component of ammonia monooxygenase from Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Hyman, M R; Arp, D J

    1993-07-01

    Standard protocols for sample preparation for sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) typically involve the combined use of heat and a reductant to fully disrupt protein-protein interactions and allow for constant ratios of SDS-binding to individual polypeptides. However, 14C-labeled forms of the membrane-bound, active-site-containing 27 kDa polypeptide of ammonia monooxygenase from Nitrosomonas europaea undergo an aggregation reaction when cells or membranes are heated in the presence of SDS-PAGE sample buffer. The aggregate produced after heating at 100 degrees C is a soluble complex which fails to enter the stacking gel in discontinuous SDS-PAGE gels. The extent of the aggregation reaction is dependent on the temperature of sample preparation, and the reaction exhibits first-order kinetics at 65 degrees C and 100 degrees C (rates constants = 0.07 and 0.35 min-1, respectively). The rate of the aggregation reaction is further dependent on the concentration of reductant used in the sample buffer. However, the concentration of SDS does not significantly affect the rate of aggregation. The aggregated form of the 27 kDA polypeptide can be isolated by gel-permeation chromatography in the presence of SDS. The aggregated protein can also be returned to the monomeric state by incubation at high pH in the presence of SDS. The aggregation reaction also occurs with 14C2H2-labeled polypeptides in other species of autotrophic nitrifiers and a methanotrophic bacterium which expresses the particulate form of methane monooxygenase. We conclude that strongly hydrophobic amino acid sequences present in ammonia monooxygenase are responsible for the aggregation phenomenon.

  16. Biocatalytic conversion of ethylene to ethylene oxide using an engineered toluene monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, DA; Bertolani, SJ; Siegel, JB

    2015-01-01

    Mutants of toluene o-xylene monooxygenase are demonstrated to oxidize ethylene to ethylene oxide in vivo at yields of >99%. The best mutant increases ethylene oxidation activity by >5500-fold relative to the native enzyme. This is the first report of a recombinant enzyme capable of carrying out this industrially significant chemical conversion.

  17. TCE degradation by toluene/benzene monooxygenase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa JI104 and Escherichia coli recombinant

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Junichi; Kitayama, Atsushi

    1995-12-31

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa JI104 incorporates more than three degradation pathways for aromatic compounds such as benzene, toluene, and xylene. A dioxygenase and two monooxygenases were cloned in Escherichia coli XL1-Blue. The dioxygenase yielding cis-toluene dihydrodiol and one of the monooxygenases producing o-cresol from toluene did not exhibit conspicuous activity in trichloroethylene (TCE) oxygenation, although DNA sequencing proved that the former enzyme was an isozyme of toluene dioxygenase of the known TCE decomposer P.putida F1. The other toluene/benzene monooxygenase that could generate o-, m-, and p-cresol simultaneously from toluene showed TCE oxygenation activity resulting in TCE decomposition in E. coli. The activity was inhibited competitively by toluene, ethylbenzene, and o- and m-xylene: their inhibition constants were greater than those of propylbenzene and p-xylene. When the E. coli recombinant harboring the monooxygenase was induced by isopropyl {beta}-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) and incubated in the absence of toluene, TCE degradation activity decreased during incubation, compared to that with toluene. Toluene probably controlled the lifetime of the enzyme.

  18. Flavoprotein monooxygenases for oxidative biocatalysis: recombinant expression in microbial hosts and applications

    PubMed Central

    Ceccoli, Romina D.; Bianchi, Dario A.; Rial, Daniela V.

    2014-01-01

    External flavoprotein monooxygenases comprise a group of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases that catalyze the insertion of one atom of molecular oxygen into an organic substrate and the second atom is reduced to water. These enzymes are involved in a great number of metabolic pathways both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Flavoprotein monooxygenases have attracted the attention of researchers for several decades and the advent of recombinant DNA technology caused a great progress in the field. These enzymes are subjected to detailed biochemical and structural characterization and some of them are also regarded as appealing oxidative biocatalysts for the production of fine chemicals and valuable intermediates toward active pharmaceutical ingredients due to their high chemo-, stereo-, and regioselectivity. Here, we review the most representative reactions catalyzed both in vivo and in vitro by prototype flavoprotein monooxygenases, highlighting the strategies employed to produce them recombinantly, to enhance the yield of soluble proteins, and to improve cofactor regeneration in order to obtain versatile biocatalysts. Although we describe the most outstanding features of flavoprotein monooxygenases, we mainly focus on enzymes that were cloned, expressed and used for biocatalysis during the last years. PMID:24567729

  19. Flavoprotein monooxygenases for oxidative biocatalysis: recombinant expression in microbial hosts and applications.

    PubMed

    Ceccoli, Romina D; Bianchi, Dario A; Rial, Daniela V

    2014-01-01

    External flavoprotein monooxygenases comprise a group of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases that catalyze the insertion of one atom of molecular oxygen into an organic substrate and the second atom is reduced to water. These enzymes are involved in a great number of metabolic pathways both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Flavoprotein monooxygenases have attracted the attention of researchers for several decades and the advent of recombinant DNA technology caused a great progress in the field. These enzymes are subjected to detailed biochemical and structural characterization and some of them are also regarded as appealing oxidative biocatalysts for the production of fine chemicals and valuable intermediates toward active pharmaceutical ingredients due to their high chemo-, stereo-, and regioselectivity. Here, we review the most representative reactions catalyzed both in vivo and in vitro by prototype flavoprotein monooxygenases, highlighting the strategies employed to produce them recombinantly, to enhance the yield of soluble proteins, and to improve cofactor regeneration in order to obtain versatile biocatalysts. Although we describe the most outstanding features of flavoprotein monooxygenases, we mainly focus on enzymes that were cloned, expressed and used for biocatalysis during the last years.

  20. The discovery of potent and selective kynurenine 3-monooxygenase inhibitors for the treatment of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Liddle, John; Beaufils, Benjamin; Binnie, Margaret; Bouillot, Anne; Denis, Alexis A; Hann, Michael M; Haslam, Carl P; Holmes, Duncan S; Hutchinson, Jon P; Kranz, Michael; McBride, Andrew; Mirguet, Olivier; Mole, Damian J; Mowat, Christopher G; Pal, Sandeep; Rowland, Paul; Trottet, Lionel; Uings, Iain J; Walker, Ann L; Webster, Scott P

    2017-05-01

    A series of potent, competitive and highly selective kynurenine monooxygenase inhibitors have been discovered via a substrate-based approach for the treatment of acute pancreatitis. The lead compound demonstrated good cellular potency and clear pharmacodynamic activity in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biocatalytic conversion of ethylene to ethylene oxide using an engineered toluene monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Carlin, D A; Bertolani, S J; Siegel, J B

    2015-02-11

    Mutants of toluene o-xylene monooxygenase are demonstrated to oxidize ethylene to ethylene oxide in vivo at yields of >99%. The best mutant increases ethylene oxidation activity by >5500-fold relative to the native enzyme. This is the first report of a recombinant enzyme capable of carrying out this industrially significant chemical conversion.

  2. Profiles of gene expression changes in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells treated with methyl methanesulfonate and sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Shawn D; Sparrow, Barney R; Kan, H Lynn; Stott, William T; Schisler, Melissa R; Linscombe, V Ann; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar

    2004-05-01

    Treatment of cells with genotoxic chemicals is expected to set into motion a series of events including gene expression changes to cope with the damage. We have investigated gene expression changes in L5178Y TK(+/-) mouse lymphoma cells in culture following treatment with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), a direct acting genotoxin, and sodium chloride (NaCl), which induces mutations in these cells through indirect mechanisms at high concentrations. The mouse lymphoma cells were treated for 4 or 24 h and the cells were harvested for RNA isolation at the end of the treatment. Analysis of the transcriptome was performed using Clontech Mouse 1.2K cDNA microarrays (1185 genes) and hybridized using 32P-labeled cDNA. The microwell methodology was used to quantify the mutagenic response. Of the genes examined, MMS altered the expression (1.5-fold or more) of only five (four at 4 h and one after 24 h treatment). NaCl altered two genes after 4 h treatment, but after 24 h it altered 19 genes (13 down- and six up-regulated). Both compounds altered the expression of several genes associated with apoptosis and NaCl altered genes involved in DNA damage/response and GTP-related proteins. This, along with other data, indicates that the widely used L5178Y TK(+/-) mouse lymphoma cells in culture are relatively recalcitrant in terms of modulating gene expression to deal with genotoxic insult.

  3. Production and loss of methanesulfonate and non-sea salt sulfate in the equatorial Pacific marine boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Huebert, B.J.; Wylie, D.J.; Zhuang, L.; Heath, J.A.

    1996-04-01

    The authors measured the concentrations of aerosol methanesulfonate (MSA) and non-sea salt sulfate (NSS) in the remote pacific marine boundary layer (MBL) at Christmas Island (157{degrees}W, 2{degrees}N) in July and August of 1994. The project-average MSA displayed a distinct diurnal variation, decreasing to 8.6 ppt at sunrise and increasing to 12.1 ppt by sunset. The average NSS diurnal variation ranged from 196 ppt at sunrise to 235 ppt at sunset. Large-particle dry deposition may account for 10-20% of the observed nighttime decrease, with entrainment of cleaner free tropospheric air responsible for the rest. The entrainment velocity inferred from the nighttime decrease averaged 0.5 {+-} 0.2 cm/s. A simple model suggests that NSS and MSA were produced at rates of about 74 and 6 ppt per day, respectively. Between 30 and 40% of the daily dimethylsulfide (DMS) flux forms NSS and 3% forms MSA. 11 refs., 3 fig.

  4. Induction and disappearance of DNA strand breaks in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and fibroblasts treated with methyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Boerrigter, M.E.T.I.; Mullaart, E.; Vijg, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The induction and disappearance of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and fibroblasts exposed to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) were investigated by using the alkaline filter elution assay. In the two cell types, identical amounts of SSB were induced during a 45-minute treatment with a given dose of MMS. In quiescent PBL only 9{plus minus}4% (mean {plus minus} SD) of the induced SSB had disappeared at 1 hour after exposure, whereas in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated PBL, 23 {plus minus} 12% disappeared within the same repair period. The accumulation of SSB in PBL, but not in fibroblasts, during MMS exposure in the presence of the excision-repair inhibitor 1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine indicated the utilization of different repair pathways in these two cell types. The generally lower rate of disappearance of MMS-induced SSB in PBL as compared to fibroblasts correlated with an increased loss of cell viability, measured by determining the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine.

  5. Roles of PCNA ubiquitination and TLS polymerases κ and η in the bypass of methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Wit, Niek; Buoninfante, Olimpia Alessandra; van den Berk, Paul C.M.; Jansen, Jacob G.; Hogenbirk, Marc A.; de Wind, Niels; Jacobs, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) provides a highly conserved mechanism that enables DNA synthesis on a damaged template. TLS is performed by specialized DNA polymerases of which polymerase (Pol) κ is important for the cellular response to DNA damage induced by benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), ultraviolet (UV) light and the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). As TLS polymerases are intrinsically error-prone, tight regulation of their activity is required. One level of control is provided by ubiquitination of the homotrimeric DNA clamp PCNA at lysine residue 164 (PCNA-Ub). We here show that Polκ can function independently of PCNA modification and that Polη can function as a backup during TLS of MMS-induced lesions. Compared to cell lines deficient for PCNA modification (PcnaK164R) or Polκ, double mutant cell lines display hypersensitivity to MMS but not to BPDE or UV-C. Double mutant cells also displayed delayed post-replicative TLS, accumulate higher levels of replication stress and delayed S-phase progression. Furthermore, we show that Polη and Polκ are redundant in the DNA damage bypass of MMS-induced DNA damage. Taken together, we provide evidence for PCNA-Ub-independent activation of Polκ and establish Polη as an important backup polymerase in the absence of Polκ in response to MMS-induced DNA damage. PMID:25505145

  6. Scanning the effects of ethyl methanesulfonate on the whole genome of Lotus japonicus using second-generation sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Yusoff, Nur Fatihah; Ruperao, Pradeep; Tomoyoshi, Nurain Emylia; Edwards, David; Gresshoff, Peter M; Biswas, Bandana; Batley, Jacqueline

    2015-02-06

    Genetic structure can be altered by chemical mutagenesis, which is a common method applied in molecular biology and genetics. Second-generation sequencing provides a platform to reveal base alterations occurring in the whole genome due to mutagenesis. A model legume, Lotus japonicus ecotype Miyakojima, was chemically mutated with alkylating ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) for the scanning of DNA lesions throughout the genome. Using second-generation sequencing, two individually mutated third-generation progeny (M3, named AM and AS) were sequenced and analyzed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms and reveal the effects of EMS on nucleotide sequences in these mutant genomes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found in every 208 kb (AS) and 202 kb (AM) with a bias mutation of G/C-to-A/T changes at low percentage. Most mutations were intergenic. The mutation spectrum of the genomes was comparable in their individual chromosomes; however, each mutated genome has unique alterations, which are useful to identify causal mutations for their phenotypic changes. The data obtained demonstrate that whole genomic sequencing is applicable as a high-throughput tool to investigate genomic changes due to mutagenesis. The identification of these single-point mutations will facilitate the identification of phenotypically causative mutations in EMS-mutated germplasm.

  7. Effects of Using Tricaine Methanesulfonate and Metomidate before Euthanasia on the Contractile Properties of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jordan C; Syme, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Because many anesthetics work through depressing cell excitability, unanesthetized euthanasia has become common for research involving excitable tissues (for example muscle and nerve) to avoid these depressive effects. However, anesthetic use during euthanasia may be indicated for studies involving isolated tissues if the potential depressive effects of brief anesthetic exposure dissipate after subsequent tissue isolation, washout, and saline perfusion. We explore this here by measuring whether, when applied prior to euthanasia, standard immersion doses of 2 fish anesthetics, tricaine methanesulfonate (TMS; 100 mg/L, n = 6) and methyl 1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (metomidate, 10 mg/L, n = 6), have residual effects on the contractile properties (force and work output) of isolated and saline-perfused ventricular compact myocardium from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Results suggest that direct exposure of muscle to immersion doses of TMS—but not metomidate—impairs muscle contractile performance. However, brief exposure (2 to 3 min) to either anesthetic during euthanasia only—providing that the agent is washed out prior to tissue experimentation—does not have an effect on the contractile properties of the myocardium. Therefore, the use of TMS, metomidate, and perhaps other anesthetics that depress cell excitability during euthanasia may be indicated when conducting research on isolated and rinsed tissues. PMID:27657711

  8. Self-assembly behaviour of colistin and its prodrug colistin methanesulfonate: implications for solution stability and solubilization

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Stephanie J.; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L.; Prankerd, Richard J.; Velkov, Tony; Boyd, Ben J.

    2010-01-01

    Colistin is an amphiphilic antibiotic that has re-emerged into clinical use due to the increasing prevalence of difficult-to-treat Gram-negative infections. The existence of self-assembling colloids in solutions of colistin and its derivative prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) was investigated. Colistin and CMS reduced the air-water interfacial tension, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies showed the existence of 2.07 ± 0.3 nm aggregates above 1.5 mM for colistin, and of 1.98 ± 0.36 nm aggregates for CMS above 3.5 mM (mean ± SD). Above the respective critical micelle concentrations (CMC) the solubility of azithromycin, a hydrophobic antibiotic, increased approximately linearly with increasing surfactant concentration (5:1 mol ratio colistin:azithromycin), suggestive of hydrophobic domains within the micellar cores. Rapid conversion of CMS to colistin occurred below the CMC (60 % over 48 hr), while conversion above the CMC was less than 1 %. The formation of colistin and CMS micelles demonstrated in this study is the proposed mechanism for solubilization of azithromycin and the concentration-dependent stability of CMS. PMID:20302384

  9. Characterization of Pph3-mediated dephosphorylation of Rad53 during methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage repair in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guangyin; Wan, Junhua; Liu, Qizheng; Mu, Chunhua; Wang, Yue; Sang, Jianli

    2017-02-09

    Genotoxic stress causes DNA damage or stalled DNA replication and filamentous growth in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans The DNA checkpoint kinase Rad53 critically regulates by phosphorylation effectors that execute the stress response. Rad53 itself is activated by phosphorylation and inactivated by dephosphorylation. Previous studies have suggested that the phosphatase Pph3 dephosphorylates Rad53. Here, we used mass spectrometry and mutagenesis to identify Pph3 dephosphorylation sites on Rad53 in C. albicans We found that serine residues 351, 461, and 477, which were dephosphorylated in wild-type cells during the recovery from DNA damage caused by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), remained phosphorylated in pph3Δ/Δ cells. Phosphomimetic mutation of the three residues ( rad53-3D ) impaired Rad53 dephosphorylation, exit from cell cycle arrest, dephosphorylation of two Rad53 effectors Dun1 and Dbf4, and the filament-to-yeast growth transition during the recovery from MMS-induced DNA damage. The phenotypes observed in the rad53-3D mutant also occurred in the pph3Δ/Δ mutant. Together, our findings reveal a molecular mechanism by which Pph3 controls DNA damage response in C. albicans.

  10. Inducible protective processes in animal systems: adaptive response to a low dose of methyl methanesulfonate in mouse bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, R; Vasudev, V; Harish, S K; Guruprasad, K P

    1996-06-01

    To investigate the induction of adaptive response (inducible protective processes) in mitotic cells of Swiss albino mouse, a monofunctional alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) was employed. When the animals treated with a low dose of 50 mg/kg body weight were challenged with a subsequent high (challenging) dose of 150 mg/kg body weight, after different time lags (2,5,8 or 10 hr), the yield of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells was found to be significantly reduced compared to the additive effects of both conditioning and challenging doses. It seems, therefore, that the low dose of MMS employed has made the cells less sensitive against further clastogenic effect of challenge dose of MMS. The data clearly suggest that the phenomenon of adaptive response to methylating agents can be encountered in in vivo mammalian cells. Furthermore, it is also observed that ethylating agent EMS is a poor inducer of adaptive response than its corresponding methylating agent MMS in the bone marrow cells of mouse.

  11. Variations in the methanesulfonate to sulfate molar ratio in submicrometer marine aerosol particles over the south Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Timothy S.; Calhoun, Julie A.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    1992-01-01

    Seawater concentrations of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and atmospheric concentrations of DMS, sulfur dioxide, methanesulfonate (MSA), and non-sea-salt (nss) sulfate were measured over the eastern Pacific Ocean between 105 deg and 110 deg W from 20 deg N to 60 deg S during February and March 1989. Although the samples collected in the Southern Hemisphere appear to be of marine origin, no significant correlation was found between the latitudinal distributions of DMS, SO2, MSA, and nss SO4(2-). However, an inverse correlation was found between atmospheric temperature and the MSA to nss SO4(2-) molar ratio in submicrometer aerosol particles with a decrease in temperature corresponding to an increase in the molar ratio. Although this trend is consistent with laboratory results indicating the favored production of MSA at lower temperatures, it is contrary to Southern Hemisphere baseline station data. This suggests either a decrease in the supply of DMS relative to nonmarine sources of nss SO4(2-) at the baseline stations in winter or additional mechanisms that affect the relative production of MSA and nss SO4(2-).

  12. Variations in the methanesulfonate to sulfate molar ratio in submicrometer marine aerosol particles over the south Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Timothy S.; Calhoun, Julie A.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    1992-01-01

    Seawater concentrations of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and atmospheric concentrations of DMS, sulfur dioxide, methanesulfonate (MSA), and non-sea-salt (nss) sulfate were measured over the eastern Pacific Ocean between 105 deg and 110 deg W from 20 deg N to 60 deg S during February and March 1989. Although the samples collected in the Southern Hemisphere appear to be of marine origin, no significant correlation was found between the latitudinal distributions of DMS, SO2, MSA, and nss SO4(2-). However, an inverse correlation was found between atmospheric temperature and the MSA to nss SO4(2-) molar ratio in submicrometer aerosol particles with a decrease in temperature corresponding to an increase in the molar ratio. Although this trend is consistent with laboratory results indicating the favored production of MSA at lower temperatures, it is contrary to Southern Hemisphere baseline station data. This suggests either a decrease in the supply of DMS relative to nonmarine sources of nss SO4(2-) at the baseline stations in winter or additional mechanisms that affect the relative production of MSA and nss SO4(2-).

  13. Protective effect of vitamin E on methyl methanesulfonate-induced teratozoospermia in adult Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhian; Ding, Weiliang; Wang, Lun; Jiang, Wenchu; Zhang, Quanxiang; Chen, Hong; Zou, Hongnan; Dong, Yongkang; Shao, Jianwei; Ma, Tieliang

    2015-09-01

    The protective effect of vitamin E (VE, α-tocopherol) on methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced teratozoospermia was investigated in adult rats. Rats (n=6 per group) were divided into three groups: i) Control group, treated with distilled water from days 1 to 5; ii) the MMS group, treated with MMS at a dose of 40 mg·kg(-1) from days 1‑5; or iii) the VE+MMS group, treated with MMS at a dose of 40 mg·kg(-1) from days 1‑5, followed by VE at a dose of 150 mg·kg(-1) from day 6 for 6 weeks. Sperm count, motility and morphology were examined following treatment with VE. The serum testosterone level and antioxidant enzyme activity were measured, and the localization of Vasa, promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (Plzf) and synaptonemal complex protein 3 (Scp3) were also examined. MMS treatment decreased sperm count and motility, and the levels of immunoreactive serum testosterone and endogenous antioxidants. In addition, MMS increased the percentage of abnormal sperm and the levels of free radicals. After MMS and VE treatment, sperm count and motility were significantly higher in rats from the VE+MMS group than in the MMS group. In addition, the serum testosterone concentration, as well as the levels of Vasa and free radicals and the percentage of abnormal sperm, decreased. The results indicated that VE has protective effects against MMS-induced teratozoospermia in adult rats.

  14. Differential action on cancer and normal tissue by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate and cytochrome C combined with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsugawa, S. ); Sugahara, T. )

    1994-06-15

    The possibility that radioprotective effects on potent natural killer (NK) cells by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate (AMM) + cytochrome C during radiotherapy (RT) for lung cancer might result in the radiosensitization of human lung cancer cells in vivo is examined. Human lung cancer xenografts in the right hind legs of KSN mice (10 weeks old) were locally irradiated with 20 Gy of X ray. AMM (10 mg/kg/day) and/or cytochrome C (CCC) (5 mg/kg/day) were given intraperitoneally immediately before or after RT, followed by daily administration for 4 days. Natural killer activities of host splenocytes were also tested with the standard [sup 51]Cr releasing assay with YAC-1 cells as target cells. In a clinical study, 65 patients with lung cancer were treated with more than 50 Gy of RT with or without combination with AMM + CCC, OK-432 or AMM + CCC + OK-432. Before and after RT, lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood were examined with dichromatic analysis using an Ortho Spectrum IIIFCM system and fluorescent MABs. In this study, the change in the absolute number of each subset was investigated. AMM + cytochrome C augumented NK activity in KSN nude mice, protected potent NK cells in patients with lung cancer against RT and sensitized the human lung cancer xenografts to RT. AMM + cytochrome C may have potential as a differential modulator of radiosensitivity of normal tissues and of tumors. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Alternative splicing governs sulfation of tyrosine or oligosaccharide on peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Yun, H Y; Keutmann, H T; Eipper, B A

    1994-04-08

    Peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) catalyzes the COOH-terminal alpha-amidation of neuro-endocrine peptides through the sequential action of monooxygenase and lyase domains contained within this bifunctional protein. Alternative splicing leads to the expression of soluble and integral membrane bifunctional PAM proteins as well as a soluble monofunctional monooxygenase. In order to determine how alternative splicing affects post-translational modification of PAM proteins, we investigated the sulfation of PAM proteins expressed in stably transfected hEK-293 cells. Metabolic labeling with [35S]SO4(2-) or [35S]methionine and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that [35S]SO4(2-) was efficiently incorporated into PAM proteins that have the noncatalytic exon A region following the monooxygenase domain (PAM-1 and PAM-4) and into a soluble bifunctional PAM protein (PAM-3). Alkaline hydrolysis, radiosequencing, and deglycosylation experiments demonstrated the presence of a sulfated tyrosine (Tyr965) in the COOH-terminal domain of PAM-3 and multiple sulfated O-glycans in the exon A region of PAM-1 and PAM-4. A mutant PAM-3 protein in which Tyr965 was changed to Ala965 (PAM-3/Y965A) was not sulfated and exhibited monooxygenase and lyase activities similar to those of wild type PAM-3. Pulse-chase and temperature block experiments showed that the PAM-3/Y965A protein exits the trans-Golgi network faster than wild type PAM-3. Thus inclusion of exon A results in the sulfation of O-glycans, while elimination of the transmembrane domain results in the sulfation of Tyr965.

  16. Monooxygenase Levels and Knockdown Resistance (kdr) Allele Frequencies in Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles arabiensis in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Githeko, Andrew K; Githure, John I; Mutunga, James; Zhou, Guofa; Yan, Guiyun

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid-treated bed nets and indoor spray are important components of malaria control strategies in Kenya. Information on resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in Anopheles gambiae and An. arabiensis populations is essential to the selection of appropriate insecticides and the management of insecticide resistance. Monooxygenase activity and knockdown resistance (kdr) allele frequency are biochemical and molecular indicators of mosquito resistance to pyrethroids. This study determined baseline information on monooxygenase activity and kdr allele frequency in anopheline mosquitoes in the western region, the Great Rift Valley-central province region, and the coastal region of Kenya. A total of 1990 field-collected individuals, representing 12 An. gambiae and 22 An. arabiensis populations was analyzed. We found significant among-population variation in monooxygenase activity in An. gambiae and An. arabiensis and substantial variability among individuals within populations. Nine out of 12 An. gambiae populations exhibited significantly higher average monooxygenase activity than the susceptible Kisumu reference strain. The kdr alleles (L1014S) were detected in three An. gambiae populations, and one An. arabiensis population in western Kenya, but not in the Rift Valley-central region and the coastal Kenya region. All genotypes with the kdr alleles were heterozygous, and the conservative estimation of kdr allele frequency was below 1% in these four populations. Information on monooxygenase activity and kdr allele frequency reported in this study provided baseline data for monitoring insecticide resistance changes in Kenya during the era when large-scale insecticide-treated bednet and indoor residual spray campaigns were being implemented. PMID:18402140

  17. Cometabolic degradation of chlorinated alkenes by alkene monooxygenase in a propylene-grown Xanthobacter strain.

    PubMed Central

    Ensign, S A; Hyman, M R; Arp, D J

    1992-01-01

    Propylene-grown Xanthobacter cells (strain Py2) degraded several chlorinated alkenes of environmental concern, including trichloroethylene, 1-chloroethylene (vinyl chloride), cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,3-dichloropropylene, and 2,3-dichloropropylene. 1,1-Dichloroethylene was not degraded efficiently, while tetrachloroethylene was not degraded. The role of alkene monooxygenase in catalyzing chlorinated alkene degradations was established by demonstrating that glucose-grown cells which lack alkene monooxygenase and propylene-grown cells in which alkene monooxygenase was selectively inactivated by propyne were unable to degrade the compounds. C2 and C3 chlorinated alkanes were not oxidized by alkene monooxygenase, but a number of these compounds were inhibitors of propylene and ethylene oxidation, suggesting that they compete for binding to the enzyme. A number of metabolites enhanced the rate of degradation of chlorinated alkenes, including propylene oxide, propionaldehyde, and glucose. Propylene stimulated chlorinated alkene oxidation slightly when present at a low concentration but became inhibitory at higher concentrations. Toxic effects associated with chlorinated alkene oxidations were determined by measuring the propylene oxidation and propylene oxide-dependent O2 uptake rates of cells previously incubated with chlorinated alkenes. Compounds which were substrates for alkene monooxygenase exhibited various levels of toxicity, with 1,1-dichloroethylene and trichloroethylene being the most potent inactivators of propylene oxidation and 1,3- and 2,3-dichloropropylene being the most potent inactivators of propylene oxide-dependent O2 uptake. No toxic effects were seen when cells were incubated with chlorinated alkenes anaerobically, indicating that the product(s) of chlorinated alkene oxidation mediates toxicity. PMID:1444418

  18. Molecular Dynamics Analysis Reveals Structural Insights into Mechanism of Nicotine N-Demethylation Catalyzed by Tobacco Cytochrome P450 Mono-Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Yang, Shuo; An, Baiyi; Wang, Shichen; Yin, Yuejia; Lu, Yang; Xu, Ying; Hao, Dongyun

    2011-01-01

    CYP82E4, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, has nicotine N-demethylase (NND) activity, which mediates the bioconversion of nicotine into nornicotine in senescing tobacco leaves. Nornicotine is a precursor of the carcinogen, tobacco-specific nitrosamine. CYP82E3 is an ortholog of CYP82E4 with 95% sequence identity, but it lacks NND activity. A recent site-directed mutagenesis study revealed that a single amino acid substitution, i.e., cysteine to tryptophan at the 330 position in the middle of protein, restores the NND activity of CYP82E3 entirely. However, the same amino acid change caused the loss of the NND activity of CYP82E4. To determine the mechanism of the functional turnover of the two molecules, four 3D structures, i.e., the two molecules and their corresponding cys–trp mutants were modeled. The resulting structures exhibited that the mutation site is far from the active site, which suggests that no direct interaction occurs between the two sites. Simulation studies in different biological scenarios revealed that the mutation introduces a conformation drift with the largest change at the F-G loop. The dynamics trajectories analysis using principal component analysis and covariance analysis suggests that the single amino acid change causes the opening and closing of the transfer channels of the substrates, products, and water by altering the motion of the F-G and B-C loops. The motion of helix I is also correlated with the motion of both the F-G loop and the B-C loop and; the single amino acid mutation resulted in the curvature of helix I. These results suggest that the single amino acid mutation outside the active site region may have indirectly mediated the flexibility of the F-G and B-C loops through helix I, causing a functional turnover of the P450 monooxygenase. PMID:21858078

  19. Structural and Catalytic Differences between Two FADH2-Dependent Monooxygenases: 2,4,5-TCP 4-Monooxygenase (TftD) from Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 and 2,4,6-TCP 4-Monooxygenase (TcpA) from Cupriavidus necator JMP134

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Robert P.; Webb, Brian N.; Subramanian, Arun Kumar; Nissen, Mark; Popchock, Andrew; Xun, Luying; Kang, ChulHee

    2012-01-01

    2,4,5-TCP 4-monooxygenase (TftD) and 2,4,6-TCP 4-monooxygenase (TcpA) have been discovered in the biodegradation of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP). TcpA and TftD belong to the reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2)-dependent monooxygenases and both use 2,4,6-TCP as a substrate; however, the two enzymes produce different end products. TftD catalyzes a typical monooxygenase reaction, while TcpA catalyzes a typical monooxygenase reaction followed by a hydrolytic dechlorination. We have previously reported the 3D structure of TftD and confirmed the catalytic residue, His289. Here we have determined the crystal structure of TcpA and investigated the apparent differences in specificity and catalysis between these two closely related monooxygenases through structural comparison. Our computational docking results suggest that Ala293 in TcpA (Ile292 in TftD) is possibly responsible for the differences in substrate specificity between the two monooxygenases. We have also identified that Arg101 in TcpA could provide inductive effects/charge stabilization during hydrolytic dechlorination. The collective information provides a fundamental understanding of the catalytic reaction mechanism and the parameters for substrate specificity. The information may provide guidance for designing bioremediation strategies for polychlorophenols, a major group of environmental pollutants. PMID:22949829

  20. A novel flavin-containing monooxygenase from Methylophaga sp strain SK1 and its indigo synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hack Sun; Kim, Jin Kwon; Cho, Eun Hee; Kim, Yong Chul; Kim, Jae Il; Kim, Si Wouk

    2003-07-11

    We cloned a gene from Methylophaga sp. strain SK1. This gene was responsible for producing, the blue pigment, indigo. The complete open reading frame was 1371 bp long, which encodes a protein of 456 amino acids. The molecular mass of the encoded protein was 105 kDa, consisting of homodimer of 54 kDa with an isoelectric point of 5.14. The deduced amino acid sequence from the gene showed approximately 30% identities with flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) of human (FMO1-FMO5), Arabidopsis, and yeast. It contained three characteristic sequence motifs of FMOs: FAD binding domain, FMO-identifying sequence motif, and NADPH binding domain. In addition, the biochemical properties such as substrate specificities and absorption spectra were similar to the eukaryotic FMO families. Thus, we assigned the enzyme to be a bacterial FMO. The recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the bacterial FMO produced up to 160 mg of indigo per liter in the tryptophan medium after 12h cultivation. This suggests that the recombinant strain has a potential to be applied in microbial indigo production.

  1. Suitability of recombinant Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida strains for selective biotransformation of m-nitrotoluene by xylene monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Daniel; Witholt, Bernard; Schmid, Andreas

    2005-11-01

    Escherichia coli JM101(pSPZ3), containing xylene monooxygenase (XMO) from Pseudomonas putida mt-2, catalyzes specific oxidations and reductions of m-nitrotoluene and derivatives thereof. In addition to reactions catalyzed by XMO, we focused on biotransformations by native enzymes of the E. coli host and their effect on overall biocatalyst performance. While m-nitrotoluene was consecutively oxygenated to m-nitrobenzyl alcohol, m-nitrobenzaldehyde, and m-nitrobenzoic acid by XMO, the oxidation was counteracted by an alcohol dehydrogenase(s) from the E. coli host, which reduced m-nitrobenzaldehyde to m-nitrobenzyl alcohol. Furthermore, the enzymatic background of the host reduced the nitro groups of the reactants resulting in the formation of aromatic amines, which were shown to effectively inhibit XMO in a reversible fashion. Host-intrinsic oxidoreductases and their reaction products had a major effect on the activity of XMO during biocatalysis of m-nitrotoluene. P. putida DOT-T1E and P. putida PpS81 were compared to E. coli JM101 as alternative hosts for XMO. These promising strains contained an additional dehydrogenase that oxidized m-nitrobenzaldehyde to the corresponding acid but catalyzed the formation of XMO-inhibiting aromatic amines at a significantly lower level than E. coli JM101.

  2. The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of FAD-dependent monooxygenase PhzS, a phenazine-modifying enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gohain, Neelakshi; Thomashow, Linda S.; Mavrodi, Dmitri V.; Blankenfeldt, Wulf

    2006-10-01

    PhzS, an FAD-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes a reaction involved in the biosynthesis of the virulence factor pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa, was cloned, overexpressed and crystallized. Data collection from native and seleno-l-methionine-labelled crystals is reported. The blue chloroform-soluble bacterial metabolite pyocyanin (1-hydroxy-5-methyl-phenazine) contributes to the survival and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen of humans and animals. Little is known about the two enzymes, designated PhzM and PhzS, that function in the synthesis of pyocyanin from phenazine-1-carboxylic acid. In this study, the FAD-dependent monooxygenase PhzS was purified and crystallized from lithium sulfate/ammonium sulfate/sodium citrate pH 5.5. Native crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 144.2, b = 96.2, c = 71.7 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 110.5°. They contain two monomers of PhzS in the asymmetric unit and diffract to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Seleno-l-methionine-labelled PhzS also crystallizes in space group C2, but the unit-cell parameters change to a = 70.6, b = 76.2, c = 80.2 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 110.5° and the diffraction limit is 2.7 Å.

  3. Purification and characterization of a Baeyer-Villiger mono-oxygenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 involved in three different monocyclic monoterpene degradation pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Werf, M J

    2000-01-01

    A Baeyer-Villiger mono-oxygenase (BVMO), catalysing the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent oxidation of the monocyclic monoterpene ketones 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, dihydrocarvone and menthone, was purified to homogeneity from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14. Monocyclic monoterpene ketone mono-oxygenase (MMKMO) is a monomeric enzyme of molecular mass 60 kDa. It contains 1 mol of FAD/monomer as the prosthetic group. The N-terminal amino acid sequence showed homology with many other NADPH-dependent and FAD-containing (Type 1) BVMOs. Maximal enzyme activity was measured at pH 9 and 35 degrees C. MMKMO has a broad substrate specificity, catalysing the lactonization of a large number of monocyclic monoterpene ketones and substituted cyclohexanones. The natural substrates 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, dihydrocarvone and menthone were converted stoichiometrically into 3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate (the spontaneous rearrangement product of the lactone formed by MMKMO), 4-isopropenyl-7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone and 7-isopropyl-4-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone respectively. The MMKMO-catalysed conversion of iso-dihydrocarvone showed an opposite regioselectivity to that of dihydrocarvone; in this case, 6-isopropenyl-3-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone was formed as the product. MMKMO converted all enantiomers of the natural substrates with almost equal efficiency. MMKMO is involved in the conversion of the monocyclic monoterpene ketone intermediates formed in the degradation pathways of all stereoisomers of three different monocyclic monoterpenes, i.e. limonene, (dihydro)carveol and menthol. PMID:10769172

  4. Comparative analysis of the conventional and novel pmo (particulate methane monooxygenase) operons from methylocystis strain SC2.

    PubMed

    Ricke, Peter; Erkel, Christoph; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Liesack, Werner

    2004-05-01

    In addition to the conventional pmoA gene (pmoA1) encoding the active site polypeptide of particulate methane monooxygenase, a novel pmoA gene copy (pmoA2) is widely distributed among type II methanotrophs (methane-oxidizing bacteria [MOB]) (M. Tchawa Yimga, P. F. Dunfield, P. Ricke, J. Heyer, and W. Liesack, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69:5593-5602, 2003). Here we report that the pmoA1 and pmoA2 gene copies in the type II MOB Methylocystis strain SC2 are each part of a complete pmoCAB gene cluster (pmoCAB1, pmoCAB2). A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of strain SC2 genomic DNA was constructed, and BAC clones carrying either pmoCAB1 or pmoCAB2 were identified. Comparative sequence analysis showed that these two gene clusters exhibit low levels of identity at both the DNA level (67.4 to 70.9%) and the derived protein level (59.3 to 65.6%). In contrast, the secondary structures predicted for PmoCAB1 and PmoCAB2, as well as the derived transmembrane-spanning regions, are nearly identical. This suggests that PmoCAB2 is, like PmoCAB1, a highly hydrophobic, membrane-associated protein. A total of 190 of the 203 amino acid residues representing a highly conserved consensus sequence of the currently known PmoCAB1 and AmoCAB sequence types could be identified in PmoCAB2. The amoCAB gene cluster encodes ammonia monooxygenase and is evolutionarily related to pmoCAB. Analysis of a set of amino acid residues that allowed differentiation between conventional PmoA and AmoA provided further support for the hypothesis that pmoCAB2 encodes a functional equivalent of PmoCAB1. In experiments in which we used 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends we identified transcriptional start sites 320 and 177 bp upstream of pmoC1 and pmoC2, respectively. Immediately upstream of the transcriptional start sites of both pmoCAB1 and pmoCAB2, sequence motifs similar to Escherichia coli sigma(70) promoters were identified.

  5. Comparative Analysis of the Conventional and Novel pmo (Particulate Methane Monooxygenase) Operons from Methylocystis Strain SC2

    PubMed Central

    Ricke, Peter; Erkel, Christoph; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Liesack, Werner

    2004-01-01

    In addition to the conventional pmoA gene (pmoA1) encoding the active site polypeptide of particulate methane monooxygenase, a novel pmoA gene copy (pmoA2) is widely distributed among type II methanotrophs (methane-oxidizing bacteria [MOB]) (M. Tchawa Yimga, P. F. Dunfield, P. Ricke, J. Heyer, and W. Liesack, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69:5593-5602, 2003). Here we report that the pmoA1 and pmoA2 gene copies in the type II MOB Methylocystis strain SC2 are each part of a complete pmoCAB gene cluster (pmoCAB1, pmoCAB2). A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of strain SC2 genomic DNA was constructed, and BAC clones carrying either pmoCAB1 or pmoCAB2 were identified. Comparative sequence analysis showed that these two gene clusters exhibit low levels of identity at both the DNA level (67.4 to 70.9%) and the derived protein level (59.3 to 65.6%). In contrast, the secondary structures predicted for PmoCAB1 and PmoCAB2, as well as the derived transmembrane-spanning regions, are nearly identical. This suggests that PmoCAB2 is, like PmoCAB1, a highly hydrophobic, membrane-associated protein. A total of 190 of the 203 amino acid residues representing a highly conserved consensus sequence of the currently known PmoCAB1 and AmoCAB sequence types could be identified in PmoCAB2. The amoCAB gene cluster encodes ammonia monooxygenase and is evolutionarily related to pmoCAB. Analysis of a set of amino acid residues that allowed differentiation between conventional PmoA and AmoA provided further support for the hypothesis that pmoCAB2 encodes a functional equivalent of PmoCAB1. In experiments in which we used 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends we identified transcriptional start sites 320 and 177 bp upstream of pmoC1 and pmoC2, respectively. Immediately upstream of the transcriptional start sites of both pmoCAB1 and pmoCAB2, sequence motifs similar to Escherichia coli σ70 promoters were identified. PMID:15128567

  6. Improved NADPH Regeneration for Fungal Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase by Co-Expressing Bacterial Glucose Dehydrogenase in Resting-Cell Biotransformation of Recombinant Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyunwoo; Durairaj, Pradeepraj; Lee, Dowoo; Ahsan, Md Murshidul; Yun, Hyungdon

    2016-12-28

    Fungal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes catalyze versatile monooxygenase reactions and play a major role in fungal adaptations owing to their essential roles in the production avoid metabolites critical for pathogenesis, detoxification of xenobiotics, and exploitation avoid substrates. Although fungal CYP-dependent biotransformation for the selective oxidation avoid organic compounds in yeast system is advantageous, it often suffers from a shortage avoid intracellular NADPH. In this study, we aimed to investigate the use of bacterial glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) for the intracellular electron regeneration of fungal CYP monooxygenase in a yeast reconstituted system. The benzoate hydroxylase FoCYP53A19 and its homologous redox partner FoCPR from Fusarium oxysporum were co-expressed with the BsGDH from Bacillus subtilis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for heterologous expression and biotransformations. We attempted to optimize several bottlenecks concerning the efficiency of fungal CYP-mediated whole-cell-biotransformation to enhance the conversion. The catalytic performance of the intracellular NADPH regeneration system facilitated the hydroxylation of benzoic acid to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid with high conversion in the resting-cell reaction. The FoCYP53A19+FoCPR+BsGDH reconstituted system produced 0.47 mM 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (94% conversion) in the resting-cell biotransformations performed in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) containing 0.5 mM benzoic acid and 0.25% glucose for 24 h at 30°C. The "coupled-enzyme" system can certainly improve the overall performance of NADPH-dependent whole-cell biotransformations in a yeast system.

  7. Population Pharmacokinetics of Colistin Methanesulfonate and Colistin in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Renal Failure Requiring Intermittent Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, M.; Grégoire, N.; Mégarbane, B.; Gobin, P.; Balayn, D.; Marchand, S.; Mimoz, O.

    2016-01-01

    Colistin is increasingly used as a last option for the treatment of severe infections due to Gram-negative bacteria in critically ill patients requiring intermittent hemodialysis (HD) for acute renal failure. Our objective was to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of colistin and its prodrug colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) in this population and to suggest dosing regimen recommendations. Eight intensive care unit (ICU) patients who were under intermittent HD and who were treated by CMS (Colimycine) were included. Blood samples were collected between two consecutive HD sessions. CMS and colistin concentrations were measured by a specific chromatographic assay and were analyzed using a PK population approach (Monolix software). Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to predict the probability of target attainment (PTA). CMS nonrenal clearance was increased in ICU-HD patients. Compared with that of ICU patients included in the same clinical trial but with preserved renal function, colistin exposure was increased by 3-fold in ICU-HD patients. This is probably because a greater fraction of the CMS converted into colistin. To maintain colistin plasma concentrations high enough (>3 mg/liter) for high PTA values (area under the concentration-time curve for the free, unbound fraction of a drug [fAUC]/MIC of >10 and fAUC/MIC of >50 for systemic and lung infections, respectively), at least for MICs lower than 1.5 mg/liter (nonpulmonary infection) or 0.5 mg/liter (pulmonary infection), the dosing regimen of CMS should be 1.5 million international units (MIU) twice daily on non-HD days. HD should be conducted at the end of a dosing interval, and a supplemental dose of 1.5 MIU should be administered after the HD session (i.e., total of 4.5 MIU for HD days). This study has confirmed and complemented previously published data and suggests an a priori clear and easy to follow dosing strategy for CMS in ICU-HD patients. PMID:26729492

  8. Validation of a colistin plasma concentration breakpoint as a predictor of nephrotoxicity in patients treated with colistin methanesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Horcajada, Juan P; Sorlí, Luisa; Luque, Sonia; Benito, Natividad; Segura, Concepción; Campillo, Nuria; Montero, Milagro; Esteve, Erika; Mirelis, Beatriz; Pomar, Virginia; Cuquet, Jordi; Martí, Carmina; Garro, Pau; Grau, Santiago

    2016-12-01

    Nephrotoxicity limits the effective use of colistin for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) infections. We previously defined a steady-state colistin plasma concentration (Css) of 2.42 mg/L that predicted nephrotoxicity at end of treatment (EOT). The objective of this study was to validate this breakpoint in a prospective cohort. This was a multicentre, prospective, observational study conducted at three hospitals with a cohort of patients treated for MDR-GNB infection with colistin methanesulfonate from September 2011 until January 2015. Nephrotoxicity was evaluated at Day 7 and at EOT using the RIFLE criteria. Css values were measured and analysed using HPLC. Taking the previously defined breakpoint for colistin concentration as a criterion, patients were divided into two groups (Css, ≤2.42 mg/L vs. >2.42 mg/L). Sixty-four patients were included. Seven patients (10.9%) had a Css > 2.42 mg/L and were compared with the remaining patients. Bivariate analysis showed that patients with a Css > 2.42 mg/L were older and had a significantly higher incidence of nephrotoxicity at Day 7 and EOT. Although not statistically significant, nephrotoxicity occurred earlier in these patients (6.2 days vs. 9.2 days in patients with lower Css; P = 0.091). Multivariate analysis of nephrotoxicity showed that Css > 2.42 mg/L was the only predictive factor. Nephrotoxicity was more frequent and occurred earlier in patients with colistin plasma concentrations higher than the previously defined breakpoint (2.42 mg/L). Colistin therapeutic drug monitoring should be routinely considered to avoid reaching this toxicity threshold and potential clinical consequences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of aerosolized colistin methanesulfonate therapy for extensively-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii complex pneumonia and airway colonization.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tai-Chin; Chen, Fu-Lun; Ou, Tsong-Yih; Jean, Shio-Shin; Lee, Wen-Sen

    2016-08-01

    Aerosolized colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) has been used for the treatment of extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB) pneumonia and eradication of XDRAB colonization in the respiratory tract. The aims of this study were to compare the efficacy, adverse effects, clinical outcomes, and microbiological eradication of the cases of XDRAB pneumonia or colonization. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who received aerosolized CMS for the treatment of pneumonia and airway colonization due to XDRAB. Clinical data from 118 patients were studied. The mean age of 57 patients in the pneumonia group was 79.4 years, and that of 61 patients in the colonization group was 80.0 years. Patients with XDRAB pneumonia were more likely to be ventilator-dependent than colonized patients (46.5% vs. 21.3%; p = 0.005), receive steroid therapy (49.1% vs. 31.1%; p = 0.046), and be admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) at the time of aerosolized CMS treatment (56.1% vs. 32.8%; p = 0.011). The in-hospital mortality rate was higher in the pneumonia group than the colonization group (50.9% vs. 33.3%; p = 0.05). Microbiological eradication of XDRAB in airway samples was achieved in 75% (89 of 118) patients. In pneumonia patients, XDRAB eradication was associated with resolution or improvement of presenting symptoms and signs of infection by the end of treatment relative to the noneradicated group (57.8% vs. 25%; p = 0.044), but had no influence on 30-day mortality. In colonized patients, no difference in clinical outcomes was noted between the eradicated and noneradicated groups. Aerosolized CMS therapy has acceptable efficacy for XDRAB pneumonia, but no proven efficacy for XDRAB airway colonization. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Colistin Methanesulfonate and Formed Colistin in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Receiving Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Koomanachai, Pornpan; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B.; Chen, Gong; Lee, Hee Ji; Jitmuang, Anupop; Wasuwattakul, Somkiat; Sritippayawan, Suchai; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Colistin, administered intravenously as its inactive prodrug colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), is increasingly used as last-line therapy to combat multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. CMS dosing needs to be adjusted for renal function. The impact of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) on the pharmacokinetics of both CMS and colistin has not been studied. No CMS dosing recommendations are available for patients receiving CAPD. Eight CAPD patients received a single intravenous CMS dose (150 mg colistin base activity [CBA]) over 30 min. Serial blood and dialysate samples, and cumulative urine where applicable, were collected over 25 h. CMS and colistin concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Population pharmacokinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulations were conducted. The total body clearance of CMS (excluding CAPD clearance) was 1.77 liters/h (44%) [population mean (between-subject variability)], while CAPD clearance was 0.088 liter/h (64%). The population mean terminal half-life of CMS was 8.4 h. For colistin, the total clearance/fraction of CMS metabolized to colistin (fm) (excluding CAPD clearance) was 2.74 liters/h (50%), the CAPD clearance was 0.101 liter/h (34%), and the mean terminal half-life was 13.2 h. Monte Carlo simulations suggested a loading dose of 300 mg CBA on day 1 and a maintenance dose of either 150 mg or 200 mg CBA daily to achieve a target average steady-state plasma colistin concentration of 2.5 mg/liter. Clearance by CAPD was low for both CMS and formed colistin. Therefore, CMS doses should not be increased during CAPD. Modeling and simulation enabled us to propose the first evidence-based CMS dosage regimen for CAPD patients. PMID:24189256

  11. Characterization of a starch-hydrolyzing α-amylase produced by Aspergillus niger WLB42 mutated by ethyl methanesulfonate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shihui; Lin, Chaoyang; Liu, Yun; Shen, Zhicheng; Jeyaseelan, Jenasia; Qin, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus niger is the most commonly used fungus for commercial amylase production, the increase of amylase activity will be beneficial to the amylase industry. Herein we report a high α-amylase producing (HAP) A. niger WLB42 mutated from A. niger A4 by ethyl methanesulfonate treatment. The fermentation conditions for the amylase production were optimized. The results showed that both the amylase activity and total protein content reached highest after 48-h incubation in liquid medium using starch as the sole carbon source. The enzyme production reached maximum at temperature of 30°C, pH 7, with 40 g/L starch in the medium inoculated with 1.4% v/v spore. When 0.3% w/v urea was added to the liquid medium as a nitrogen source, the amylase activity was elevated by 20%. Nine monosaccharides and derivatives were tested for α-amylase induction, glucose was the best inducer. Furthermore, the enzymology characterization of amylase was conducted. The molecular weight of amylase was determined to be 50 kD by SDS-PAGE. The amylase had maximum activity at 45°C and pH 7. The activity could be dramatically triggered by adding 1 mM Co2+, increased to 250%. The activity was inhibited by detergents SDS and Triton X-100. Six different brands of starch were tested for amylase activity, the results demonstrated that the more soluble of the starch, the higher hydrolyzability of the substrate by amylase. PMID:27335681

  12. Effect of O6-methylguanine on DNA interstrand cross-link formation by chloroethylnitrosoureas and 2-chloroethyl(methylsulfonyl)methanesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Dolan, M E; Pegg, A E; Hora, N K; Erickson, L C

    1988-07-01

    Exposure of HT29 cells in culture to O6-methylguanine is known to result in a reduction in O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) activity and an enhancement of sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of chloroethylating agents. Since cytotoxicity of these agents may be mediated by the formation of interstrand cross-links, alkaline elution analysis was performed on HT29 cells treated with 1-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea, 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea, and Clomesone [2-chloroethyl(methylsulfonyl)methanesulfonate] in the presence or absence of O6-methylguanine pretreatment to determine if the enhanced toxicity was due to an increase in the number of cross-links formed. Interstrand cross-linking by 1-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea or 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea was increased by pretreatment with 0.4 mM O6-methylguanine for 24 h. Cross-linking by Clomesone was observed only in cells exposed to 0.4 mM O6-methylguanine for 24 h prior to administration of the drug and for 12 h after administration, suggesting that the resynthesis of the AGT may prevent the cross-linking by Clomesone. Complete recovery of AGT activity after reduction to 20 to 30% of the basal level upon treatment with 0.4 mM O6-methylguanine required between 8 h and 15 h in both HT29 cells and in Raji cells which were also sensitized to 1-(2-chloro-ethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea by exposure to O6-methylguanine. These data suggest that the enhancement of chloroethylnitrosourea toxicity after treatment with O6-methylguanine may be related to an increase in the number of DNA cross-links and that the relatively rapid rate of AGT recovery plays a role in prevention of cross-links resulting from Clomesone.

  13. Stability of Colistin and Colistin Methanesulfonate in Aqueous Media and Plasma as Determined by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Milne, Robert W.; Nation, Roger L.; Turnidge, John D.; Coulthard, Kingsley

    2003-01-01

    The stabilities of colistin and colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) in different aqueous media were studied by specific high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods. Colistin was stable in water at 4 and 37°C for up to 60 days and 120 h, respectively. However, degradation was observed when colistin was stored in isotonic phosphate buffer (0.067 M, pH 7.4) and human plasma at 37°C. The stability of CMS from three different sources in water was explored by strong-anion-exchange (SAX) HPLC for CMS and by measuring the concentrations of colistin formed from the hydrolysis of CMS. The peaks of CMS in SAX HPLC disappeared almost completely after 12 h at 37°C, but appeared to remain intact for up to 2 days at 4°C. Over the same period, there was no formation of colistin at 4°C. In water, phosphate buffer, and plasma, there was rapid formation of colistin within 24 to 48 h at 37°C from the three sources of CMS. The hydrolysis products were assumed to be a complex mixture of many different sulfomethyl derivatives, including colistin. The stability of a fourth source of CMS in Mueller-Hinton broth examined during 30 min at 37°C revealed no formation of colistin. Along with previous microbiological studies, this suggested that different sulfomethyl CMSs possess intrinsic antibacterial activity. These results will be helpful for understanding the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of colistin and CMS in humans and animals. PMID:12654671

  14. Population Pharmacokinetics of Colistin Methanesulfonate in Rats: Achieving Sustained Lung Concentrations of Colistin for Targeting Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    W. S. Yapa, Shalini; Li, Jian; Porter, Christopher J. H.; Nation, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), the inactive prodrug of colistin, is administered by inhalation for the management of respiratory infections. However, limited pharmacokinetic data are available for CMS and colistin following pulmonary delivery. This study investigates the pharmacokinetics of CMS and colistin following intravenous (i.v.) and intratracheal (i.t.) administration in rats and determines the targeting advantage after direct delivery into the lungs. In addition to plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected to quantify drug concentrations in lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF). The resulting data were analyzed using a population modeling approach in S-ADAPT. A three-compartment model described the disposition of both compounds in plasma following i.v. administration. The estimated mean clearance from the central compartment was 0.122 liters/h for CMS and 0.0657 liters/h for colistin. Conversion of CMS to colistin from all three compartments was required to fit the plasma data. The fraction of the i.v. dose converted to colistin in the systemic circulation was 0.0255. Two BAL fluid compartments were required to reflect drug kinetics in the ELF after i.t. dosing. A slow conversion of CMS (mean conversion time [MCTCMS] = 3.48 h) in the lungs contributed to high and sustained concentrations of colistin in ELF. The fraction of the CMS dose converted to colistin in ELF (fm,ELF = 0.226) was higher than the corresponding fractional conversion in plasma after i.v. administration. In conclusion, pulmonary administration of CMS achieves high and sustained exposures of colistin in lungs for targeting respiratory infections. PMID:23917323

  15. Pulmonary and Systemic Pharmacokinetics of Inhaled and Intravenous Colistin Methanesulfonate in Cystic Fibrosis Patients: Targeting Advantage of Inhalational Administration

    PubMed Central

    W. S. Yapa, Shalini; Li, Jian; Patel, Kashyap; Wilson, John W.; Dooley, Michael J.; George, Johnson; Clark, Denise; Poole, Susan; Williams, Elyssa; Porter, Christopher J. H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the pulmonary and systemic pharmacokinetics of colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) and formed colistin following intravenous (i.v.) and inhaled administration in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Six CF subjects were administered nebulized CMS doses of 2 and 4 million IU and an i.v. CMS infusion of 150 mg of colistin base activity. Blood plasma, sputum, and urine samples were collected for 12 to 24 h postdose. To assess the tolerability of the drug, lung function tests, blood serum creatinine concentrations, and adverse effect reports were recorded. All doses were well tolerated in the subjects. The pharmacokinetic parameters for CMS following i.v. delivery were consistent with previously reported values. Sputum concentrations of formed colistin were maintained at <1.0 mg/liter for 12 h postdose. Nebulization of CMS resulted in relatively high sputum concentrations of CMS and formed colistin compared to those resulting from i.v. administration. The systemic availability of CMS was low following nebulization of 2 and 4 million IU (7.93% ± 4.26% and 5.37% ± 1.36%, respectively), and the plasma colistin concentrations were below the limit of quantification. Less than 2 to 3% of the nebulized CMS dose was recovered in the urine samples in 24 h. The therapeutic availability and drug targeting index for CMS and colistin following inhalation compared to i.v. delivery were significantly greater than 1. Inhalation of CMS is an effective means of targeting CMS and formed colistin for delivery to the lungs, as high lung exposure and minimal systemic exposure were achieved in CF subjects. PMID:24550334

  16. Impact of Pharmacists' audit on improving the quality of prescription of dabigatran etexilate methanesulfonate: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Teppei; Momose, Yoshio; Ogawa, Ryuichi; Takahashi, Masahiro; Echizen, Hirotoshi

    2017-01-01

    Appropriate prescription of dabigatran etexilate methanesulfonate (JAN) is more complicated than assumed, because there are totally 10 items of contraindications and instructions for dosage reduction depending on patients' characteristics. We aimed to study whether the routine audit of first-time prescriptions of dabigatran performed by pharmacists is effective in improving the quality of prescription. A retrospective re-audit was performed on all the prescriptions of dabigatran issued at Kitahara International Hospital, Tokyo between March 2011 and February 2014, by evaluating the prescriptions rigorously against the approved prescribing information of the drug. The original routine audit of the prescriptions for inpatients was performed by hospital pharmacists using electronic medical records (EMR), whereas the audit for ambulant patients receiving external prescriptions was performed by community pharmacists using information obtained mainly by questioning patients. The frequencies of inappropriate prescriptions detected by the re-audit in the two groups were compared. Two hundred and twenty-eight patients (131 ambulant patients and 97 inpatients) were prescribed dabigatran for the first time during the study period. All patients met the approved indications. While 33% of the prescriptions for ambulant patients showed at least one violation of the approved usage, only 11% of the prescriptions for inpatients showed violations (p < 0.001). Two ambulant patients with creatinine clearance < 30 mL/min were dispensed dabigatran, whereas no such case was found among inpatients. A significantly greater proportion of ambulant patients aged ≥70 years showed violation of the instruction for dosage reduction compared to inpatients of the same age group (18 and 4%, respectively). The present study suggests that pharmacists may achieve better performance in auditing prescriptions of dabigatran when medical records are fully available than when information is

  17. Efficacy of tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) as an anesthetic agent for blocking sensory-motor responses in Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Ramlochansingh, Carlana; Branoner, Francisco; Chagnaud, Boris P; Straka, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Anesthetics are drugs that reversibly relieve pain, decrease body movements and suppress neuronal activity. Most drugs only cover one of these effects; for instance, analgesics relieve pain but fail to block primary fiber responses to noxious stimuli. Alternately, paralytic drugs block synaptic transmission at neuromuscular junctions, thereby effectively paralyzing skeletal muscles. Thus, both analgesics and paralytics each accomplish one effect, but fail to singularly account for all three. Tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) is structurally similar to benzocaine, a typical anesthetic for anamniote vertebrates, but contains a sulfate moiety rendering this drug more hydrophilic. MS-222 is used as anesthetic in poikilothermic animals such as fish and amphibians. However, it is often argued that MS-222 is only a hypnotic drug and its ability to block neural activity has been questioned. This prompted us to evaluate the potency and dynamics of MS-222-induced effects on neuronal firing of sensory and motor nerves alongside a defined motor behavior in semi-intact in vitro preparations of Xenopus laevis tadpoles. Electrophysiological recordings of extraocular motor discharge and both spontaneous and evoked mechanosensory nerve activity were measured before, during and after administration of MS-222, then compared to benzocaine and a known paralytic, pancuronium. Both MS-222 and benzocaine, but not pancuronium caused a dose-dependent, reversible blockade of extraocular motor and sensory nerve activity. These results indicate that MS-222 as benzocaine blocks the activity of both sensory and motor nerves compatible with the mechanistic action of effective anesthetics, indicating that both caine-derivates are effective as single-drug anesthetics for surgical interventions in anamniotes.

  18. Characterization of an Escherichia coli mutant (radB101) sensitive to. gamma. and uv radiation, and methyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Sargentini, N.J.; Smith, K.C.

    1983-03-01

    After N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis of Escherichia coli K-12 (xthA14), an X-ray-sensitive mutant was isolated. This sensitivity is due to a mutation, radB101, which is located at 56.5 min on the E.coli K-12 linkage map. The radB101 mutation sensitized wild-type cells to ..gamma.. and uv radiation, and to methyl methanesulfonate. When known DNA repair-deficient mutants were ranked for their ..gamma..-radiation sensitivity relative to their uv-radiation sensitivity, their order was (starting with the most selectively ..gamma..-radiation-sensitive strain): recB21, radB101, wild type, polA1, recF143, lexA101, recA56, uvrD3, and uvrA6. The radB mutant was normal for ..gamma..- and uv-radiation mutagenesis, it showed only a slight enhancement of ..gamma..- and uv-radiation-induced DNA degradation, and it was approx. 60% deficient in recombination ability. The radB gene is suggested to play a role in the recA gene-dependent (Type III) repair of DNA single-strand breaks after ..gamma.. irradiation and in postreplication repair after uv irradiation for the following reasons: the radB strain was normal for the host-cell reactivation of ..gamma..- and uv-irradiated bacteriophage lambda; the radB mutation did not sensitize a recA strain, but did sensitize a polA strain to ..gamma.. and uv radiation; the radB mutation sensitized a uvrB strain to uv radiation.

  19. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Ammonia Monooxygenase in Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Kristen; Sadler, Natalie C; Wright, Aaron T; Yeager, Chris; Hyman, Michael R

    2016-04-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic nitrifying bacterium that oxidizes ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2 (-)) through the sequential activities of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (HAO). Many alkynes are mechanism-based inactivators of AMO, and here we describe an activity-based protein profiling method for this enzyme using 1,7-octadiyne (17OD) as a probe. Inactivation of NH4 (+)-dependent O2 uptake by N. europaea by 17OD was time- and concentration-dependent. The effects of 17OD were specific for ammonia-oxidizing activity, andde novoprotein synthesis was required to reestablish this activity after cells were exposed to 17OD. Cells were reacted with Alexa Fluor 647 azide using a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) (click) reaction, solubilized, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and infrared (IR) scanning. A fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was observed for cells previously exposed to 17OD but not for cells treated with either allylthiourea or acetylene prior to exposure to 17OD or for cells not previously exposed to 17OD. The fluorescent polypeptide was membrane associated and aggregated when heated with β-mercaptoethanol and SDS. The fluorescent polypeptide was also detected in cells pretreated with other diynes, but not in cells pretreated with structural homologs containing a single ethynyl functional group. The membrane fraction from 17OD-treated cells was conjugated with biotin-azide and solubilized in SDS. Streptavidin affinity-purified polypeptides were on-bead trypsin-digested, and amino acid sequences of the peptide fragments were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Peptide fragments from AmoA were the predominant peptides detected in 17OD-treated samples. In-gel digestion and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-tandem time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) analyses also confirmed that the fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was AmoA. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All

  20. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Ammonia Monooxygenase in Nitrosomonas europaea

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Kristen; Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.; Yeager, Chris; Hyman, Michael R.; Löffler, F. E.

    2016-01-29

    Nitrosomonas europaeais an aerobic nitrifying bacterium that oxidizes ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2) through the sequential activities of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (HAO). Many alkynes are mechanism-based inactivators of AMO, and here we describe an activity-based protein profiling method for this enzyme using 1,7-octadiyne (17OD) as a probe. Inactivation of NH4+-dependent O2uptake byN. europaeaby 17OD was time- and concentration-dependent. The effects of 17OD were specific for ammonia-oxidizing activity, andde novoprotein synthesis was required to reestablish this activity after cells were exposed to 17OD. Cells were reacted with Alexa Fluor 647 azide using a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) (click) reaction, solubilized, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and infrared (IR) scanning. A fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was observed for cells previously exposed to 17OD but not for cells treated with either allylthiourea or acetylene prior to exposure to 17OD or for cells not previously exposed to 17OD. The fluorescent polypeptide was membrane associated and aggregated when heated with β-mercaptoethanol and SDS. The fluorescent polypeptide was also detected in cells pretreated with other diynes, but not in cells pretreated with structural homologs containing a single ethynyl functional group. The membrane fraction from 17OD-treated cells was conjugated with biotin-azide and solubilized in SDS. Streptavidin affinity-purified polypeptides were on-bead trypsin-digested, and amino acid sequences of the peptide fragments were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Peptide fragments from AmoA were the predominant peptides detected in 17OD-treated samples. In-gel digestion and matrix

  1. Differential Reactivity between Two Copper Sites in Peptidylglycine r-Hydroxylating Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    E Chufan; S Prigge; X Siebert; B Eipper; R Mains; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    Peptidylglycine {alpha}-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) catalyzes the stereospecific hydroxylation of the C{alpha} of C-terminal glycine-extended peptides and proteins, the first step in the activation of many peptide hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters. The crystal structure of the enzyme revealed two nonequivalent Cu sites (Cu{sub M} and Cu{sub H}) separated by {approx}11 {angstrom}. In the resting state of the enzyme, Cu{sub M} is coordinated in a distorted tetrahedral geometry by one methionine, two histidines, and a water molecule. The coordination site of the water molecule is the position where external ligands bind. The Cu{sub H} has a planar T-shaped geometry with three histidines residues and a vacant position that could potentially be occupied by a fourth ligand. Although the catalytic mechanism of PHM and the role of the metals are still being debated, Cu{sub M} is identified as the metal involved in catalysis, while Cu{sub H} is associated with electron transfer. To further probe the role of the metals, we studied how small molecules such as nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}), azide (N{sub 3}{sup -}), and carbon monoxide (CO) interact with the PHM copper ions. The crystal structure of an oxidized nitrite-soaked PHMcc, obtained by soaking for 20 h in mother liquor supplemented with 300 mM NaNO{sub 2}, shows that nitrite anion coordinates Cu{sub M} in an asymmetric bidentate fashion. Surprisingly, nitrite does not bind Cu{sub H}, despite the high concentration used in the experiments (nitrite/protein > 1000). Similarly, azide and carbon monoxide coordinate Cu{sub M} but not Cu{sub H} in the PHMcc crystal structures obtained by cocrystallization with 40 mM NaN{sub 3} and by soaking CO under 3 atm of pressure for 30 min. This lack of reactivity at the Cu{sub H} is also observed in the reduced form of the enzyme: CO binds Cu{sub M} but not Cu{sub H} in the structure of PHMcc obtained by exposure of a crystal to 3 atm CO for 15 min in the presence of 5

  2. Methane monooxygenase component B mutants alter the kinetics of steps throughout the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Wallar, B J; Lipscomb, J D

    2001-02-20

    Component interactions play important roles in the regulation of catalysis by methane monooxygenase (MMO). The binding of component B (MMOB) to the hydroxylase component (MMOH) has been shown in previous studies to cause structural changes in MMOH that result in altered thermodynamic and kinetic properties during the reduction and oxygen binding steps of the catalytic cycle. Here, specific amino acid residues of MMOB that play important roles in the interconversion of several intermediates of the MMO cycle have been identified. Both of the histidine residues in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b MMOB (H5 and H33) were chemically modified by diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC). Although the DEPC--MMOB species exhibited only minor changes relative to unmodified MMOB in steady-state MMO turnover, large decreases in the formation rate constants of the reaction cycle intermediates, compound P and compound Q, were observed. The site specific mutants H5A, H33A, and H5A/H33A were made and characterized. H5A and wild type MMOB elicited similar steady-state and transient kinetics, although the mutant caused a slightly lower rate constant for Q formation. Conversely, H33A exhibited a >50-fold decrease in the P formation rate constant, which resulted in slower formation of Q. The kinetics of the double mutant (H5A/H33A) were similar to those of H33A, suggesting that the highly conserved residue, H33, has the most significant effect on the efficient progress of the cycle. Ongoing NMR investigations of residues perturbed by formation of the MMOH-MMOB complex suggested construction of the MMOB N107G/S109A/S110A/T111A quadruple mutant. This mutant was found to elicit a nearly 2-fold increase in specific activity for steady-state MMO turnover of large substrates such as furan and nitrobenzene but caused no similar increase for the physiological substrate, methane. While the quadruple mutant did not have a significant effect on P and Q formation, it caused an almost 3-fold increase in the

  3. Evolution of substrate specificity in bacterial AA10 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Book, Adam J; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M; Takasuka, Taichi E; Currie, Cameron R; Phillips, George N; Fox, Brian G

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the diversity of lignocellulose-degrading enzymes in nature will provide insights for the improvement of cellulolytic enzyme cocktails used in the biofuels industry. Two families of enzymes, fungal AA9 and bacterial AA10, have recently been characterized as crystalline cellulose or chitin-cleaving lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs). Here we analyze the sequences, structures, and evolution of LPMOs to understand the factors that may influence substrate specificity both within and between these enzyme families. Comparative analysis of sequences, solved structures, and homology models from AA9 and AA10 LPMO families demonstrated that, although these two LPMO families are highly conserved, structurally they have minimal sequence similarity outside the active site residues. Phylogenetic analysis of the AA10 family identified clades with putative chitinolytic and cellulolytic activities. Estimation of the rate of synonymous versus non-synonymous substitutions (dN/dS) within two major AA10 subclades showed distinct selective pressures between putative cellulolytic genes (subclade A) and CBP21-like chitinolytic genes (subclade D). Estimation of site-specific selection demonstrated that changes in the active sites were strongly negatively selected in all subclades. Furthermore, all codons in the subclade D had dN/dS values of less than 0.7, whereas codons in the cellulolytic subclade had dN/dS values of greater than 1.5. Positively selected codons were enriched at sites localized on the surface of the protein adjacent to the active site. The structural similarity but absence of significant sequence similarity between AA9 and AA10 families suggests that these enzyme families share an ancient ancestral protein. Combined analysis of amino acid sites under Darwinian selection and structural homology modeling identified a subclade of AA10 with diversifying selection at different surfaces, potentially used for cellulose-binding and protein

  4. The metabolomics of (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide in the mouse and its formation by human flavin-containing monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Giri, Sarbani; Krausz, Kristopher W; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2007-02-15

    The alkaloid arecoline is a main constituent of areca nuts that are chewed by approximately 600 million persons worldwide. A principal metabolite of arecoline is arecoline 1-oxide whose metabolism has been poorly studied. To redress this, synthetic (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide was administered to mice (20mg/kg p.o.) and a metabolomic study performed on 0-12h urine using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-coupled time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOFMS) with multivariate data analysis. A total of 16 mass/retention time pairs yielded 13 metabolites of (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide, most of them novel. Identity of metabolites was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry. The principal pathways of metabolism of (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide were mercapturic acid formation, with catabolism to mercaptan and methylmercaptan metabolites, apparent CC double-bond reduction, carboxylic acid reduction to the aldehyde (a novel pathway in mammals), N-oxide reduction, and de-esterification. Relative percentages of metabolites were determined directly from the metabolomic data. Approximately, 50% of the urinary metabolites corresponded to unchanged (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide, 25% to other N-oxide metabolites, while approximately, 30% corresponded to mercapturic acids or their metabolites. Many metabolites, principally mercapturic acids and their derivatives, were excreted as diastereomers that could be resolved by UPLC-TOFMS. Arecoline was converted to arecoline 1-oxide in vitro by human flavin-containing monooxygenases FMO1 (K(M): 13.6+/-4.9muM; V(MAX): 0.114+/-0.01nmolmin(-1)microg(-1) protein) and FMO3 (K(M): 44.5+/-8.0microM; V(MAX): 0.014+/-0.001nmolmin(-1)microg(-1) protein), but not by FMO5 or any of 11 human cytochromes P450. This report underscores the power of metabolomics in drug metabolite mining.

  5. Properties of soluble and membrane bound dopamine-beta-monooxygenase from bovine adrenal medulla cross-linked with dimethyl suberimidate.

    PubMed

    Miras-Portugal, M T; Millaruelo, A; Vara, F

    1980-12-10

    Bovine dopamine-beta-monooxygenase from chromaffin granules in its soluble and membrane-bound forms was cross-linked with the bifunctional reagent dimethyl suberimidate, and its structural and kinetic properties were studied. 1. The cross-linking reaction does not affect the activity of soluble dopamine-beta-monooxygenase; it produces a ten percent inactivation in the membrane-bound enzyme, possibly because the linkage to other membrane proteins hinders its activity. 2. The soluble dopamine-beta-monooxygenase reaction mixture was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis, showing appreciable amounts of dimer and tetramer, but only small amounts of trimer. In membrane-bound dopamine-beta-monooxygenase, subjected to the same treatment, appreciable amounts of dimer and higher aggregates were found. 3. The kinetic properties of soluble dopamine-beta-monooxygenase after the crosslinking reaction are the same as those of the native enzyme, with a ping-pong kinetic mechanism and the same real Michaelis constants for tyramine and ascorbate: KmT = 0.36 mM and KmA = 0.32 mM. Membrane-bound dopamine-beta-monooxygenase does not present a ping-pong mechanism before or after cross-linking; its real Michaelis constants are slightly modified by the cross-linking reaction: KmT = 0.4 mM and KMA = 0.4 mM.

  6. [A substrate-type induction of liver microsomal monooxygenases by phenobarbital].

    PubMed

    Tsyrlov, I B; Gromova, O A; Rivkind, N B; Vakulin, G M; Liakhovich, V V

    1977-07-01

    A possibility of step-wise induction of microsomal monooxygenases after injection of phenobarbital in the presence of 3-methylcholanthrene-caused induction was studied. It was found that the ratio of the high- and low-spin types of cytochrome, rather than the position of the CO-peak of its reduced form is a criterion for functional specificity of hemoprotein. Induction by phenobarbital appears possible under conditions when the inductor binding to microsomal hemoprotein is lacking, since cytochrome P-488 has no binding sites for phenobarbital. It is assumed that under microsomal monooxygenases induction by phenobarbital activation of genome and subsequent protein synthesis are operated by the substrate rather than by products of its primary metabolism in microsomes.

  7. Discovery, application and protein engineering of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases for organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Balke, Kathleen; Kadow, Maria; Mallin, Hendrik; Sass, Stefan; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2012-08-21

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are useful enzymes for organic synthesis as they enable the direct and highly regio- and stereoselective oxidation of ketones to esters or lactones simply with molecular oxygen. This contribution covers novel concepts such as searching in protein sequence databases using distinct motifs to discover new Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases as well as high-throughput assays to facilitate protein engineering in order to improve BVMOs with respect to substrate range, enantioselectivity, thermostability and other properties. Recent examples for the application of BVMOs in synthetic organic synthesis illustrate the broad potential of these biocatalysts. Furthermore, methods to facilitate the more efficient use of BVMOs in organic synthesis by applying e.g. improved cofactor regeneration, substrate feed and in situ product removal or immobilization are covered in this perspective.

  8. tRNA-modifying MiaE protein from Salmonella typhimurium is a nonheme diiron monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Mathevon, Carole; Pierrel, Fabien; Oddou, Jean-Louis; Garcia-Serres, Ricardo; Blondin, Geneviève; Latour, Jean-Marc; Ménage, Stéphane; Gambarelli, Serge; Fontecave, Marc; Atta, Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    MiaE catalyzes the posttranscriptional allylic hydroxylation of 2-methylthio-N-6-isopentenyl adenosine in tRNAs. The Salmonella typhimurium enzyme was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme is a monomer with two iron atoms and displays activity in in vitro assays. The type and properties of the iron center were investigated by using a combination of UV-visible absorption, EPR, HYSCORE, and Mössbauer spectroscopies which demonstrated that the MiaE enzyme contains a nonheme dinuclear iron cluster, similar to that found in the hydroxylase component of methane monooxygenase. This is the first example of an enzyme from this important class of diiron monooxygenases to be involved in the hydroxylation of a biological macromolecule and the second example of a redox metalloenzyme participating in tRNA modification. PMID:17679698

  9. Manipulation of neuropeptide biosynthesis through the expression of antisense RNA for peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Mains, R E; Bloomquist, B T; Eipper, B A

    1991-02-01

    Stable cell lines with significantly elevated or diminished levels of a key neuropeptide processing enzyme, peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), were generated by transfection of a mouse pituitary cell line with expression vectors containing PAM cDNA in the sense or antisense orientation. By evaluating the ability of these cell lines to alpha-amidate endogenous neuropeptides, a rate-limiting role for PAM in neuropeptide alpha-amidation was demonstrated. Overexpression of either the full-length PAM precursor with its trans-membrane domain or a soluble protein containing only the monooxygenase domain of PAM led to increased alpha-amidation of endogenous neuropeptides. Overexpression of the full-length PAM led to an unexpected decrease in the endoproteolytic processing of endogenous prohormone; conversely, underexpression of PAM led to significantly enhanced endoproteolytic processing of endogenous prohormone. These data suggest that PAM may have additional functions in peptide processing.

  10. Oxygen Activation at the Active Site of a Fungal Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, William B; Agarwal, Pratul K; Meilleur, Flora

    2017-01-16

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases have attracted vast attention owing to their abilities to disrupt glycosidic bonds via oxidation instead of hydrolysis and to enhance enzymatic digestion of recalcitrant substrates including chitin and cellulose. We have determined high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of an enzyme from Neurospora crassa in the resting state and of a copper(II) dioxo intermediate complex formed in the absence of substrate. X-ray crystal structures also revealed "pre-bound" molecular oxygen adjacent to the active site. An examination of protonation states enabled by neutron crystallography and density functional theory calculations identified a role for a conserved histidine in promoting oxygen activation. These results provide a new structural description of oxygen activation by substrate free lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases and provide insights that can be extended to reactivity in the enzyme-substrate complex. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Improved homology model of cyclohexanone monooxygenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus based on multiple templates.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Eduardo; Ventura, Oscar N; Eriksson, Leif A; Saenz-Méndez, Patricia

    2014-04-01

    A new homology model of cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus is derived based on multiple templates, and in particular the crystal structure of CHMO from Rhodococcus sp. The derived model was fully evaluated, showing that the quality of the new structure was improved over previous models. Critically, the nicotinamide cofactor is included in the model for the first time. Analysis of several molecular dynamics snapshots of intermediates in the enzymatic mechanism led to a description of key residues for cofactor binding and intermediate stabilization during the reaction, in particular Arg327 and the well known conserved motif (FxGxxxHxxxW) in Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases, in excellent agreement with known experimental and computational data.

  12. Biological methane oxidation: regulation, biochemistry, and active site structure of particulate methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Raquel L; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2004-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a three-subunit integral membrane enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of methane to methanol. Although pMMO is the predominant methane oxidation catalyst in nature, it has proved difficult to isolate, and most questions regarding its molecular structure, active site composition, chemical mechanism, and genetic regulation remain unanswered. Copper ions are believed to play a key role in both pMMO regulation and catalysis, and there is some evidence that the enzyme contains iron as well. A number of research groups have solubilized and purified or partially purified pMMO. These preparations have been characterized by biochemical and biophysical methods. In addition, aspects of methane monooxygenase gene regulation and copper accumulation in methanotrophs have been studied. This review summarizes for the first time the often controversial pMMO literature, focusing on recent progress and highlighting unresolved issues.

  13. The mechanism of methane and dioxygen activation in the catalytic cycle of methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Shteinman, A A

    1995-03-27

    The binuclear structure of the active center of methane monooxygenase plays a determining role in dioxygen activation and in selectivity and specificity of alkane oxidation with this enzyme. A new mechanism is suggested for binding and activation of O2, which involves side-on binding of O2-(2) to iron atoms followed by its conversion to the bis-mu-oxo complex considered as an alternative of ferryl in CH4 activation. This mechanism results in the sequence of the cleavage of the O-O bond of peroxide O/O2-instead of the opposite sequence O2-/O, which takes place in the case of heme monooxygenase cytochrome P-450. Therefore, in this case there is no necessity of the charge relay system [N.B. Gerber and S.G. Sligar, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 114 (1992) 8742] for the transformation of O2 to an active intermediate. The experiment for checking this hypothesis is suggested.

  14. tRNA-modifying MiaE protein from Salmonella typhimurium is a nonheme diiron monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Mathevon, Carole; Pierrel, Fabien; Oddou, Jean-Louis; Garcia-Serres, Ricardo; Blondin, Geneviève; Latour, Jean-Marc; Ménage, Stéphane; Gambarelli, Serge; Fontecave, Marc; Atta, Mohamed

    2007-08-14

    MiaE catalyzes the posttranscriptional allylic hydroxylation of 2-methylthio-N-6-isopentenyl adenosine in tRNAs. The Salmonella typhimurium enzyme was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme is a monomer with two iron atoms and displays activity in in vitro assays. The type and properties of the iron center were investigated by using a combination of UV-visible absorption, EPR, HYSCORE, and Mössbauer spectroscopies which demonstrated that the MiaE enzyme contains a nonheme dinuclear iron cluster, similar to that found in the hydroxylase component of methane monooxygenase. This is the first example of an enzyme from this important class of diiron monooxygenases to be involved in the hydroxylation of a biological macromolecule and the second example of a redox metalloenzyme participating in tRNA modification.

  15. The multifunctional peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase gene: exon/intron organization of catalytic, processing, and routing domains.

    PubMed

    Ouafik, L H; Stoffers, D A; Campbell, T A; Johnson, R C; Bloomquist, B T; Mains, R E; Eipper, B A

    1992-10-01

    Peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM; EC 1.14.17.3) is a multifunctional protein containing two enzymes that act sequentially to catalyze the alpha-amidation of neuroendocrine peptides. Peptidylglycine alpha-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) catalyzes the first step of the reaction and is dependent on copper, ascorbate, and molecular oxygen. Peptidyl-alpha-hydroxyglycine alpha-amidating lyase (PAL) catalyzes the second step of the reaction. Previous studies demonstrated that alternative splicing results in the production of bifunctional PAM proteins that are integral membrane or soluble proteins as well as soluble monofunctional PHM proteins. Rat PAM is encoded by a complex single copy gene that consists of 27 exons and encompasses more than 160 kilobases (kb) of genomic DNA. The 12 exons comprising PHM are distributed over at least 76 kb genomic DNA and range in size from 49-185 base pairs; four of the introns within the PHM domain are over 10 kb in length. Alternative splicing in the PHM region can result in a truncated, inactive PHM protein (rPAM-5), or a soluble, monofunctional PHM protein (rPAM-4) instead of a bifunctional protein. The eight exons comprising PAL are distributed over at least 19 kb genomic DNA. The exons encoding PAL range in size from 54-209 base pairs and have not been found to undergo alternative splicing. The PHM and PAL domains are separated by a single alternatively spliced exon surrounded by lengthy introns; inclusion of this exon results in the production of a form of PAM (rPAM-1) in which endoproteolytic cleavage at a paired basic site can separate the two catalytic domains. The exon following the PAL domain encodes the trans-membrane domain of PAM; alternative splicing at this site produces integral membrane or soluble PAM proteins. The COOH-terminal domain of PAM is comprised of a short exon subject to alternative splicing and a long exon encoding the final 68 amino acids present in all bifunctional PAM proteins along

  16. Contribution of ethyl methanesulfonate vapors to the yield of mutations detected in Drosophila melanogaster when the adult feeding technique is used

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) is an alkylating agent widely used in mutation research. In experiments with adult Drosophila melanogaster, EMS is either injected or fed to the flies using different feeding methods that essentially consist of placing the flies in bottles or vials with a piece of tissue paper moistened with a sucrose solution containing the desired concentration of EMS. To determine the extent to which vapors contribute to the mutagenic effect detected in Drosophila when the feeding technique is used, 7-day-old wild-type Samarkand males were fed EMS or were exposed only to its vapors.

  17. Factors limiting aliphatic chlorocarbon degradation by Nitrosomonas europaea: Cometabolic inactivation of ammonia monooxygenase and substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Rasche, M.E.; Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J. )

    1991-10-01

    The soil nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea is capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) and other halogenated hydrocarbons. TCE cometabolism by N. europaea resulted in an irreversible loss of TCE biodegradative capacity, ammonia-oxidizing activity, and ammonia-dependent O{sub 2} uptake by the cells. Inactivation was not observed in the presence of allylthiourea, a specific inhibitor of enzyme ammonia monooxygenase, or under anaerobic conditions, indicating that the TCE-mediated inactivation required ammonia monooxygenase activity. When N. europaea cells were incubated with ({sup 14}C)TCE under conditions which allowed turnover of ammonia monooxygenase, a number of cellular proteins were covalently labeled with {sup 14}C. Treatment of cells with allylthiourea or acetylene prior to incubation with ({sup 14}C)TCE prevented incorporation of {sup 14}C into proteins. The ammonia-oxidizing activity of cells inactivated in the presence of TCE could be recovered through a process requiring de novo protein synthesis. In addition to TCE, a series of chlorinated methanes, ethanes, and other ethylenes were screened as substrates for ammonia monooxygenase and for their ability to inactivate the ammonia-oxidizing system of N. europaea. The chlorocarbons would be divided into three classes depending on their biodegradability and inactivating potential: (1) compounds which were not biodegradable by N. europaea and which had no toxic effect on the cells (2) compounds which were cooxidized by N. europaea and had little or no toxic effect on the cells; and (3) compounds which were cooxidized and produced a turnover-dependent inactivation of ammonia oxidation by N. europaea.

  18. Induction of cytochrome P450 1A1 and monooxygenase activity in Tilapia by sediment extract

    SciTech Connect

    Ueng, Y.F.; Ueng, T.H.; Liu, T.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450)-dependent monooxygenases of fishes are inducible by a variety of environmental pollutants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Induction of fish monoxygenases may serve as a biological monitor for PAH- and PCB-types of environmental chemicals. Many studies have demonstrated environmental induction of fish monooxygenases using various experimental approaches. However, relatively few studies have been conducted using fish treated with contaminated river sediment extracts. Damsui River is the largest river in the north of Taiwan. The lower section of the river in the Taipei Metropolitan area is heavily polluted by industrial and municipal wastes. Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) is one of the few species of fish that occur in the polluted river. Previous field studies showed that the levels of P450 1A1, benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activities in tilapia collected at Fu-Ho Bridge, a polluted section of Damsui River, were higher than respective levels in fish collected from an unpolluted section. These results suggested that tilapia caught at the polluted site were exposed to substances similar in action to PAHs and PCBs, because these chemical pollutants are potent inducers of P450 1A1. PAHs and PCBs are persistent compounds that can accumulate in sediment. Tilapia are occasionally associated with the bottom and could ingest chemically contaminated sediment. In the present study, we determined the induction properties of monooxygenases using tilapia treated with extract of sediment collected from a polluted section of Damsui River. The present study demonstrates that Damsui River sediment extract has the ability to induce hepatic P450 1A1 and dependent monooxygenase activities in tilapia. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. The Cercospora nicotianae gene encoding dual O-methyltransferase and FAD-dependent monooxygenase domains mediates cercosporin toxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Katherine L; You, Bang-Jau; Gowda, Vivek S; Liao, Hui-Ling; Lee, Miin-Huey; Bau, Huey-Jiunn; Ueng, Peter P; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2007-05-01

    Cercosporin, a photo-activated, non-host-selective phytotoxin produced by many species of the plant pathogenic fungus Cercospora, causes peroxidation of plant cell membranes by generating reactive oxygen species and is an important virulence determinant. Here we report a new gene, CTB3 that is involved in cercosporin biosynthesis in Cercospora nicotianae. CTB3 is adjacent to a previously identified CTB1 encoding a polyketide synthase which is also required for cercosporin production. CTB3 contains a putative O-methyltransferase domain in the N-terminus and a putative flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent monooxygenase domain in the C-terminus. The N-terminal amino acid sequence also is similar to that of the transcription enhancer AFLS (formerly AFLJ) involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. Expression of CTB3 was differentially regulated by light, medium, nitrogen and carbon sources and pH. Disruption of the N- or C-terminus of CTB3 yielded mutants that failed to accumulate the CTB3 transcript and cercosporin. The Deltactb3 disruptants produced a yellow pigment that is not toxic to tobacco suspension cells. Production of cercosporin in a Deltactb3 null mutant was fully restored when transformed with a functional CTB3 clone or when paired with a Deltactb1-null mutant (defective in polyketide synthase) by cross feeding of the biosynthetic intermediates. Pathogenicity assays using detached tobacco leaves revealed that the Deltactb3 disruptants drastically reduced lesion formation.

  20. Molecular evolutionary dynamics of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases across kingdoms: Special focus on mycobacterial P450s

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Mohammad; Qhanya, Lehlohonolo Benedict; Mthakathi, Ntsane Trevor; Kgosiemang, Ipeleng Kopano Rosinah; Bamal, Hans Denis; Pagadala, Nataraj Sekhar; Xie, Ting; Yang, Haoran; Chen, Hengye; Theron, Chrispian William; Monyaki, Richie; Raselemane, Seiso Caiphus; Salewe, Vuyani; Mongale, Bogadi Lorato; Matowane, Retshedisitswe Godfrey; Abdalla, Sara Mohamed Hasaan; Booi, Wool Isaac; van Wyk, Mari; Olivier, Dedré; Boucher, Charlotte E.; Nelson, David R.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Blackburn, Jonathan Michael; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Mashele, Samson Sitheni; Chen, Wanping; Syed, Khajamohiddin

    2016-01-01

    Since the initial identification of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs/P450s), great progress has been made in understanding their structure-function relationship, diversity and application in producing compounds beneficial to humans. However, the molecular evolution of P450s in terms of their dynamics both at protein and DNA levels and functional conservation across kingdoms still needs investigation. In this study, we analyzed 17 598 P450s belonging to 113 P450 families (bacteria −42; fungi −19; plant −28; animal −22; plant and animal −1 and common P450 family −1) and found highly conserved and rapidly evolving P450 families. Results suggested that bacterial P450s, particularly P450s belonging to mycobacteria, are highly conserved both at protein and DNA levels. Mycobacteria possess the highest P450 diversity percentage compared to other microbes and have a high coverage of P450s (≥1%) in their genomes, as found in fungi and plants. Phylogenetic and functional analyses revealed the functional conservation of P450s despite belonging to different biological kingdoms, suggesting the adherence of P450s to their innate function such as their involvement in either generation or oxidation of steroids and structurally related molecules, fatty acids and terpenoids. This study’s results offer new understanding of the dynamic structural nature of P450s. PMID:27616185

  1. Isolation of Homogeneous Polysaccharide Monooxygenases from Fungal Sources and Investigation of Their Synergism with Cellulases when Acting on Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Bulakhov, A G; Gusakov, A V; Chekushina, A V; Satrutdinov, A D; Koshelev, A V; Matys, V Yu; Sinitsyn, A P

    2016-05-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO) discovered several years ago are enzymes classified as oxidoreductases. In nature, they participate in microbial degradation of cellulose together with cellulases that belong to the hydrolytic type of enzymes (class of hydrolases). Three PMO from ascomycetes - Thielavia terrestris, Trichoderma reesei, and Myceliophthora thermophila - were isolated and purified to homogeneous state using various types of chromatography. The first two enzymes are recombinant proteins heterologously expressed by the Penicillium verruculosum fungus, while the third is a native PMO secreted by M. thermophila. When acting on microcrystalline cellulose, all these PMOs displayed synergism with the cellulase complex of the P. verruculosum fungus. Replacing 10% of cellulases (by protein concentration) with PMO in the presence of 6.25 mM gallic acid or 2.5 µM of cellobiose dehydrogenase from M. thermophila, used as electron donors for PMO, resulted in the 17-31% increase in the yield of reducing sugars after 24-48 h of the enzymatic reaction.

  2. The Regulatory Domain of Squalene Monooxygenase Contains a Re-entrant Loop and Senses Cholesterol via a Conformational Change*

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Vicky; Chua, Ngee Kiat; Stevenson, Julian; Brown, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Squalene monooxygenase (SM) is an important control point in cholesterol synthesis beyond 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. Although it is known to associate with the endoplasmic reticulum, its topology has not been determined. We have elucidated the membrane topology of the sterol-responsive domain of SM comprising the first 100 amino acids fused to GFP (SM N100-GFP) by determining the accessibility of 16 introduced cysteines to the cysteine-reactive, membrane-impermeable reagent PEG-maleimide. We have identified a region integrally associated with the endoplasmic reticulum membrane that is likely to interact with cholesterol or respond to cholesterol-induced membrane effects. By comparing cysteine accessibility with and without cholesterol treatment, we further present evidence to suggest that cholesterol induces a conformational change in SM N100-GFP. This change is likely to lead to its targeted degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system because degradation is blunted by treatment with the chemical chaperone glycerol, which retains SM N100-GFP in its native conformation. Furthermore, degradation can be disrupted by insertion of two N-terminal myc tags, implicating the N terminus in this process. Together, this information provides new molecular insights into the regulation of this critical control point in cholesterol synthesis. PMID:26434806

  3. Crystal Structure and Computational Characterization of the Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase GH61D from the Basidiomycota Fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miao; Beckham, Gregg T.; Larsson, Anna M.; Ishida, Takuya; Kim, Seonah; Payne, Christina M.; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.; Horn, Svein J.; Westereng, Bjørge; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Sandgren, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate structures are modified and degraded in the biosphere by a myriad of mostly hydrolytic enzymes. Recently, lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMOs) were discovered as a new class of enzymes for cleavage of recalcitrant polysaccharides that instead employ an oxidative mechanism. LPMOs employ copper as the catalytic metal and are dependent on oxygen and reducing agents for activity. LPMOs are found in many fungi and bacteria, but to date no basidiomycete LPMO has been structurally characterized. Here we present the three-dimensional crystal structure of the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium GH61D LPMO, and, for the first time, measure the product distribution of LPMO action on a lignocellulosic substrate. The structure reveals a copper-bound active site common to LPMOs, a collection of aromatic and polar residues near the binding surface that may be responsible for regio-selectivity, and substantial differences in loop structures near the binding face compared with other LPMO structures. The activity assays indicate that this LPMO primarily produces aldonic acids. Last, molecular simulations reveal conformational changes, including the binding of several regions to the cellulose surface, leading to alignment of three tyrosine residues on the binding face of the enzyme with individual cellulose chains, similar to what has been observed for family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules. A calculated potential energy surface for surface translation indicates that P. chrysosporium GH61D exhibits energy wells whose spacing seems adapted to the spacing of cellobiose units along a cellulose chain. PMID:23525113

  4. Identification of structural determinants of NAD(P)H selectivity and lysine binding in lysine N(6)-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Heba; Robinson, Reeder; Rodriguez, Pedro; Adly, Camelia; El-Sohaimy, Sohby; Sobrado, Pablo

    2016-09-15

    l-lysine (l-Lys) N(6)-monooxygenase (NbtG), from Nocardia farcinica, is a flavin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of l-Lys in the presence of oxygen and NAD(P)H in the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophore nocobactin. NbtG displays only a 3-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, different from well-characterized related enzymes, which are highly selective for NADPH. The structure of NbtG with bound NAD(P)(+) or l-Lys is currently not available. Herein, we present a mutagenesis study targeting M239, R301, and E216. These amino acids are conserved and located in either the NAD(P)H binding domain or the l-Lys binding pocket. M239R resulted in high production of hydrogen peroxide and little hydroxylation with no change in coenzyme selectivity. R301A caused a 300-fold decrease on kcat/Km value with NADPH but no change with NADH. E216Q increased the Km value for l-Lys by 30-fold with very little change on the kcat value or in the binding of NAD(P)H. These results suggest that R301 plays a major role in NADPH selectivity by interacting with the 2'-phosphate of the adenine-ribose moiety of NADPH, while E216 plays a role in l-Lys binding.

  5. Marmoset Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 in the Liver Is a Major Benzydamine and Sulindac Sulfide Oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shotaro; Shimizu, Makiko; Uno, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Takashi; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2017-05-01

    Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) are potentially primate models for preclinical drug metabolism studies because there are similarities in the molecular characteristics of cytochrome P450 enzymes between this species and humans. However, characterization of non-cytochrome P450 enzymes has not been clarified in marmosets. Here, we report characterization of flavin-containing monooxygenases FMO1-FMO5 identified in marmoset tissues. Marmoset FMO forms shared high amino acid sequence identities (93%-95%) and phylogenetic closeness with human homologous FMO forms. FMO1 and FMO3 mRNA were abundantly expressed in the liver and kidneys among five marmoset tissues examined, where FMO3 protein was detected by immunoblotting. FMO inhibition assays using preheated tissue microsomes indicated that benzydamine N-oxygenation and sulindac sulfide S-oxygenation in the marmoset liver was mainly catalyzed by FMO3, the major hepatic FMO. Marmoset FMO3 protein heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli effectively catalyzed benzydamine N-oxygenation and sulindac sulfide S-oxygenation comparable to marmoset liver microsomes. These results indicate that the FMO3 enzyme expressed in marmoset livers mainly metabolizes benzydamine and sulindac sulfide (typical human FMO substrates), suggesting its importance for FMO-dependent drug metabolism in marmosets. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  6. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F.; Lau, Peter C.; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-10-31

    The first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase reveals a different ring orientation of its FMN cofactor compared with other related bacterial luciferase-family enzymes. The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily.

  7. Cloning and characterization of the Type I Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase from Leptospira biflexa.

    PubMed

    Ceccoli, Romina D; Bianchi, Dario A; Fink, Michael J; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Rial, Daniela V

    2017-12-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases are recognized by their ability and high selectivity as oxidative biocatalysts for the generation of esters or lactones using ketones as starting materials. These enzymes represent valuable tools for biooxidative syntheses since they can catalyze reactions that otherwise involve strong oxidative reagents. In this work, we present a novel enzyme, the Type I Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase from Leptospira biflexa. This protein is phylogenetically distant from other well-characterized BVMOs. In order to study this new enzyme, we cloned its gene, expressed it in Escherichia coli and characterized the substrate scope of the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase from L. biflexa as a whole-cell biocatalyst. For this purpose, we performed the screening of a collection of ketones with variable structures and sizes, namely acyclic ketones, aromatic ketones, cyclic ketones, and fused ketones. As a result, we observed that this biocatalyst readily oxidized linear- and branched- medium-chain ketones, alkyl levulinates and linear ketones with aromatic substituents with excellent regioselectivity. In addition, this enzyme catalyzed the oxidation of 2-substituted cycloketone derivatives but showed an unusual selection against substituents in positions 3 or 4 of the ring.

  8. Direct inhibitions of the activities of steroidogenic cytochrome P-450 mono-oxygenase systems by anticonvulsants.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, T; Ichikawa, Y

    1997-01-01

    The effects of anticonvulsants on the activities of cytochromes P-450(17alpha,lyase) (CYP17), P-450arom (CYP19), P-450C21 (CYP21), P-450SCC (CYP11A1), and P-450(11beta) (CYP11B1) mono-oxygenase systems were studied using rat testicular microsomes, human placental microsomes, bovine adrenocortical microsomes, bovine adrenocortical mitochondria and purified cytochrome P-450(11beta). Phenytoin, clonazepam and carbamazepine inhibited the steroidogenesis catalysed by these cytochrome P-450 mono-oxygenase systems and the Ki values for each anticonvulsant were determined. Neither hydantoin nor sodium valproate inhibited the activities of steroidogenic cytochromes P-450. When the activities of cytochromes P-450arom and P-450C21 were measured in the presence of anticonvulsants, the Ki values (0.15 mM) for phenytoin were close to the plasma concentration of phenytoin under therapeutic conditions. Phenytoin, clonazepam and carbamazepine directly inhibited the monooxygenase activities of cytochromes P-450, because they did not affect the activities of NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase, NADPH-adrenoferredoxin reductase and adrenoferredoxin.

  9. Crystallization and initial crystallographic characterization of the Corynebacterium glutamicum nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase component A

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Sujin; Lee, Sujin; Kang, Beom Sik; Lee, Heung-Soo; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Kim, Myung Hee

    2006-11-01

    The Corynebacterium glutamicum NTA monooxygenase component A protein, which plays the central role in NTA biodegradation, was crystallized. The initial X-ray crystallographic characterization is reported. Safety and environmental concerns have recently dictated the proper disposal of nitrilotriacetate (NTA). Biodegradation of NTA is initiated by NTA monooxygenase, which is composed of two proteins: component A and component B. The NTA monooxygenase component A protein from Corynebacterium glutamicum was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.5 Å on a synchrotron beamline. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.04, b = 98.51, c = 171.61 Å, β = 101.94°. The asymmetric unit consists of four molecules, corresponding to a packing density of 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. The structure was solved by molecular replacement. Structure refinement is in progress.

  10. Prospecting Biotechnologically-Relevant Monooxygenases from Cold Sediment Metagenomes: An In Silico Approach.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Matías A; Lozada, Mariana; Rial, Daniela V; Mac Cormack, Walter P; Jansson, Janet K; Sjöling, Sara; Carroll, JoLynn; Dionisi, Hebe M

    2017-04-09

    The goal of this work was to identify sequences encoding monooxygenase biocatalysts with novel features by in silico mining an assembled metagenomic dataset of polar and subpolar marine sediments. The targeted enzyme sequences were Baeyer-Villiger and bacterial cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP153). These enzymes have wide-ranging applications, from the synthesis of steroids, antibiotics, mycotoxins and pheromones to the synthesis of monomers for polymerization and anticancer precursors, due to their extraordinary enantio-, regio-, and chemo- selectivity that are valuable features for organic synthesis. Phylogenetic analyses were used to select the most divergent sequences affiliated to these enzyme families among the 264 putative monooxygenases recovered from the ~14 million protein-coding sequences in the assembled metagenome dataset. Three-dimensional structure modeling and docking analysis suggested features useful in biotechnological applications in five metagenomic sequences, such as wide substrate range, novel substrate specificity or regioselectivity. Further analysis revealed structural features associated with psychrophilic enzymes, such as broader substrate accessibility, larger catalytic pockets or low domain interactions, suggesting that they could be applied in biooxidations at room or low temperatures, saving costs inherent to energy consumption. This work allowed the identification of putative enzyme candidates with promising features from metagenomes, providing a suitable starting point for further developments.

  11. A novel chimera: the "truncated hemoglobin-antibiotic monooxygenase" from Streptomyces avermitilis.

    PubMed

    Bonamore, Alessandra; Attili, Andrea; Arenghi, Fabio; Catacchio, Bruno; Chiancone, Emilia; Morea, Veronica; Boffi, Alberto

    2007-08-15

    Novel chimeric proteins made of a globin domain fused with a "cofactor free" monooxygenase domain have been identified within the Streptomyces avermitilis and Frankia sp. genomes by means of bioinformatics methods. Structure based sequence alignments show that the globin domains of both proteins can be unambiguously assigned to the truncated hemoglobin family, in view of the striking similarity to the truncated hemoglobins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Thermobifida fusca and Bacillus subtilis. In turn, the non-heme domains belong to a family of small (about 100 aminoacids) homodimeric proteins annotated as antibiotic biosynthesis monooxygenases, despite the lack of a cofactor (e.g., a metal, a flavin or a heme) necessary for oxygen activation. The chimeric protein from S. avermitilis has been cloned, expressed and characterized. The protein is a stable dimer in solution based on analytical ultracentrifugation experiments. The heme ligand binding properties with oxygen and carbonmonoxide resemble those of other Group II truncated hemoglobins. In addition, an oxygen dependent redox activity has been demonstrated towards easily oxidizable substrates such as menadiol and p-aminophenol. These findings suggest novel functional roles of truncated hemoglobins, which might represent a vast class of multipurpose oxygen activating/scavenging proteins whose catalytic action is mediated by the interaction with cofactor free monooxygenases.

  12. Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases: structure/function, genetic polymorphisms and role in drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) oxygenates drugs and xenobiotics containing a “soft-nucleophile”, usually nitrogen or sulfur. FMO, like cytochrome P450 (CYP), is a monooxygenase, utilizing the reducing equivalents of NADPH to reduce 1 atom of molecular oxygen to water, while the other atom is used to oxidize the substrate. FMO and CYP also exhibit similar tissue and cellular location, molecular weight, substrate specificity, and exist as multiple enzymes under developmental control. The human FMO functional gene family is much smaller (5 families each with a single member) than CYP. FMO does not require a reductase to transfer electrons from NADPH and the catalytic cycle of the 2 monooxygenases is strikingly different. Another distinction is the lack of induction of FMOs by xenobiotics. In general, CYP is the major contributor to oxidative xenobiotic metabolism. However, FMO activity may be of significance in a number of cases and should not be overlooked. FMO and CYP have overlapping substrate specificities, but often yield distinct metabolites with potentially significant toxicological/pharmacological consequences. The physiological function(s) of FMO are poorly understood. Three of the 5 expressed human FMO genes, FMO1, FMO2 and FMO3, exhibit genetic polymorphisms. The most studied of these is FMO3 (adult human liver) in which mutant alleles contribute to the disease known as trimethylaminuria. The consequences of these FMO genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism and human health are areas of research requiring further exploration. PMID:15922018

  13. Alternative mRNA splicing generates multiple forms of peptidyl-glycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase in rat atrium.

    PubMed Central

    Stoffers, D A; Green, C B; Eipper, B A

    1989-01-01

    Peptidyl-glycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM; EC 1.14.17.3) catalyzes the conversion of a variety of glycine-extended peptides into biologically active alpha-amidated product peptides in a reaction dependent on copper, ascorbate, and molecular oxygen. We have isolated and sequenced cDNAs representing the two major classes of PAM mRNA in the adult rat heart atrium. The two types of cDNA, rPAM-1 and rPAM-2, are identical except for the deletion of a 315-base-pair segment within the protein coding region in rPAM-2, suggesting that rPAM-1 and rPAM-2 arise by alternative splicing. Northern analysis using a cDNA probe derived from within the 315-base-pair region deleted in rPAM-2 visualized the larger of the PAM mRNAs in adult rat atrium and not the smaller, indicating that the presence or absence of this 315-nucleotide segment is a major feature distinguishing the two size forms of PAM mRNA. The 105 amino acid segment that distinguishes the two forms of atrial PAM contains a consensus N-glycosylation site and a paired basic amino acid site of potential importance in endoproteolytic processing. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of rat, frog, and bovine PAM cDNAs reveals an extremely well conserved segment in the 3' untranslated region. The high degree of conservation in amino acid sequence throughout the catalytic, intragranular, and cytoplasmic domains of rat atrium, bovine pituitary, and frog skin PAM suggests that both the catalytic and noncatalytic domains of the protein subserve important functions. Images PMID:2911604

  14. Does the detoxification of penicillin side-chain precursors depend on microsomal monooxygenase and glutathione S-transferase in Penicillium chrysogenum?

    PubMed

    Emri, Tamás; Oláh, Brigitta; Sámi, László; Pócsi, István

    2003-01-01

    The glutathione (GSH) S-conjugation of 1,2-epoxy-3-(4'-nitrophenoxy)propane was catalysed predominantly by microsomal glutathione S-transferase (mGST) in Penicillium chrysogenum. The specific mGST activity unlike the cytosolic GST (cGST) activity increased substantially when the penicillin side-chain precursor phenoxyacetic acid (POA) was included in the culture medium. Therefore, a microsomal monooxygenase (causing possible release of epoxide intermediates) and mGST-dependent detoxification pathway may exist for the side-chain precursors as an alternative to microsomal activation to acyl-CoA and subsequent transfer to beta-lactam molecules. The P. chrysogenum pahA and Aspergillus nidulans phacA gene products, which are cytochrome p450 monooxygenases and are able to hydroxylate phenylacetic acid (PA) at position 2 on the aromatic ring, are unlikely to release toxic epoxide intermediates but epoxidation of PA and POA due to the action of other microsomal monooxygenases cannot be excluded. The GSH-dependent detoxification of POA was provoked by a well-controlled transient lowering of pH (down to 5.0) at the beginning of the production phase in a fed-batch fermentation system. Both the specific GST and gammaGT activities were increased but the intracellular GSH concentrations remained unaltered unless the pH of the feed was transiently lowered below 5.0. At pH 4.6, the GSH pool was depleted rapidly but no antibiotic production was observed. Although sucrose was taken up effectively by the cells, cell death and autolysis were progressing. Therefore, the industrial exploitation of the GSH-dependent detoxification of penicillin side-chain precursors to reduce intracellular GSH-levels in order to avoid the GSH inhibition of the beta-lactam biosynthetic enzymes seems to be rather unlikely. P. chrysogenum mGST and cGST were separated using GSH-Sepharose 6B affinity chromatography. The purified cGST possessed a homodimer (alpha(2)) tertiary structure with M(r) (, alpha

  15. Colistin Population Pharmacokinetics after Application of a Loading Dose of 9 MU Colistin Methanesulfonate in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Lena E.; Pontikis, Konstantinos; Ioannidis, Konstantinos; Tsagkari, Vasiliki; Galani, Lamprini; Kostakou, Eirini; Baziaka, Fotini; Paskalis, Charalambos; Koutsoukou, Antonia; Giamarellou, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Colistin has been revived, in the era of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Gram-negative infections, as the last-resort treatment in critically ill patients. Recent studies focusing on the optimal dosing strategy of colistin have demonstrated the necessity of a loading dose at treatment initiation (D. Plachouras, M. Karvanen, L. E. Friberg, E. Papadomichelakis, A. Antoniadou, I. Tsangaris, I. Karaiskos, G. Poulakou, F. Kontopidou, A. Armaganidis, O. Cars, and H. Giamarellou, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 53:3430–3436, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01361-08; A. F. Mohamed, I. Karaiskos, D. Plachouras, M. Karvanen, K. Pontikis, B. Jansson, E. Papadomichelakis, A. Antoniadou, H. Giamarellou, A. Armaganidis, O. Cars, and L. E. Friberg, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 56:4241– 4249, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.06426-11; S. M. Garonzik, J. Li, V. Thamlikitkul, D. L. Paterson, S. Shoham, J. Jacob, F. P. Silveira, A. Forrest, and R. L. Nation, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 55:3284–3294, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01733-10). In 19 critically ill patients with suspected or microbiologically documented infections caused by XDR Gram-negative strains, a loading dose of 9 MU colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) (∼270 mg colistin base activity) was administered with a maintenance dose of 4.5 MU every 12 h, commenced after 24 h. Patients on renal replacement were excluded. CMS infusion was given over 30 min or 1 h. Repeated blood sampling was performed after the loading dose and after the 5th or 6th dose. Colistin concentrations and measured CMS, determined after hydrolization to colistin and including the partially sulfomethylated derivatives, were determined with a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted in NONMEM with the new data combined with data from previous studies. Measured colistimethate concentrations were described by 4 compartments for distribution and removal of sulfomethyl groups

  16. Colistin Population Pharmacokinetics after Application of a Loading Dose of 9 MU Colistin Methanesulfonate in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Karaiskos, Ilias; Friberg, Lena E; Pontikis, Konstantinos; Ioannidis, Konstantinos; Tsagkari, Vasiliki; Galani, Lamprini; Kostakou, Eirini; Baziaka, Fotini; Paskalis, Charalambos; Koutsoukou, Antonia; Giamarellou, Helen

    2015-12-01

    Colistin has been revived, in the era of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Gram-negative infections, as the last-resort treatment in critically ill patients. Recent studies focusing on the optimal dosing strategy of colistin have demonstrated the necessity of a loading dose at treatment initiation (D. Plachouras, M. Karvanen, L. E. Friberg, E. Papadomichelakis, A. Antoniadou, I. Tsangaris, I. Karaiskos, G. Poulakou, F. Kontopidou, A. Armaganidis, O. Cars, and H. Giamarellou, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 53:3430-3436, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01361-08; A. F. Mohamed, I. Karaiskos, D. Plachouras, M. Karvanen, K. Pontikis, B. Jansson, E. Papadomichelakis, A. Antoniadou, H. Giamarellou, A. Armaganidis, O. Cars, and L. E. Friberg, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 56:4241- 4249, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.06426-11; S. M. Garonzik, J. Li, V. Thamlikitkul, D. L. Paterson, S. Shoham, J. Jacob, F. P. Silveira, A. Forrest, and R. L. Nation, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 55:3284-3294, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01733-10). In 19 critically ill patients with suspected or microbiologically documented infections caused by XDR Gram-negative strains, a loading dose of 9 MU colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) (∼ 270 mg colistin base activity) was administered with a maintenance dose of 4.5 MU every 12 h, commenced after 24 h. Patients on renal replacement were excluded. CMS infusion was given over 30 min or 1 h. Repeated blood sampling was performed after the loading dose and after the 5th or 6th dose. Colistin concentrations and measured CMS, determined after hydrolization to colistin and including the partially sulfomethylated derivatives, were determined with a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted in NONMEM with the new data combined with data from previous studies. Measured colistimethate concentrations were described by 4 compartments for distribution and removal of sulfomethyl groups, while

  17. Nontumorigenic squamous cell carcinoma line converted to tumorigenicity with methyl methanesulfonate without activation of HRAS or MYC.

    PubMed

    Milo, G E; Shuler, C; Kurian, P; French, B T; Mannix, D G; Noyes, I; Hollering, J; Sital, N; Schuller, D; Trewyn, R W

    1990-02-01

    Plasticity of human tumor populations could account for the reason why many tumorigenic human cell lines lose this feature when grown in culture. Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) was used to convert premalignant squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell line SCC-83-01-82 to a malignant phenotype. The MMS-treated SCC-83-01-82 cells (MMS-SCC-83-01-82) produced progressively growing tumors in 5 of 11 splenectomized BALB/c nude mice within 3-5 months. A cell line, designated SCC-83-01-82 CA, was established in vitro from one of the mouse tumors and was repassaged successively. This SCC-83-01-82 CA cell line was aggressively tumorigenic. A tumor greater than or equal to 2.0 cm in size was present within a month, as opposed to the 3-5 months required for the tumors produced by the MMS-SCC-83-01-82 cells. Examination of frozen cross sections by in situ hybridization revealed that focal areas of the tumor produced by the MMS-SCC-83-01-82 cells expressed MYC and HRAS mRNA. However, by the third passage in vivo, the levels of expression of the corresponding genes in the mouse tumors were undetectable. Blot-hybridization analysis of the RNA from the MMS-SCC-83-01-82 cells and the subsequently derived tumors and cells did not indicate any consistent overexpression of MYC, HRAS, or KRAS. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of both MYC and HRAS genes revealed neither rearrangement nor amplification of MYC nor point mutation in the 11th or 12th codon of HRAS. The data suggest that alterations in MYC and HRAS were not directly involved in either the initial transformation or MMS-induced tumorigenic conversion of the SCC-83-01-82 cell line. Persistence of tumorigenicity after reisolation of the MMS-converted premalignant SCC-83-01-82 cells did not disappear immediately following the treatment with MMS.

  18. Assessing Methanesulfonate as a Proxy for Sea Ice Concentration Using Firn Cores from the Disko Bay Region of Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thadhani, E.; Fernandopulle, G. C.; Rhodes, C. T.; Galls, D.; Bingham, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Jakobshavn Glacier, responsible for draining upwards of 7% of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) into Disko Bay, has experienced terminal retreat in recent decades. High sea ice concentrations have been heavily implicated in the blocking of glacier calving, thereby reducing glacial retreat. However, the satellite imagery used to evaluate levels of sea ice only spans the past few decades, thus establishing the necessity for a valid proxy to generate records father into the past. Methanesulfonate (MSA) is an oxidation product of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a chemical released by phytoplankton. As phytoplankton population increases with decreased sea ice concentration, MSA concentrations should shift directly with the phytoplankton population and inversely with sea ice concentration.The objective of this study was to evaluate MSA as a natural proxy for sea ice variability.Two meters of firn core were drilled from an ice cap on the Nuussuaq Peninsula, near Disko Bay in April 2014. The core was processed into 3 cm resolution samples for measurement of oxygen isotope ratios by cavity ring down spectroscopy and MSA concentrations by ion chromatography. Sea Ice concentrations at three locations around Disko Bay were calculated using IDRISI software (a GIS) and satellite imagery. Peaks in the oxygen isotope ratio, which has stable seasonal variation with maximum levels in warmer months, were correlated with the likewise seasonal peaks in the percent of the grid uncovered by sea ice (Figure 1). With these corresponding peaks, Taylor series approximation allowed each sample depth to be dated. We subsequently compared MSA concentrations to sea ice concentrations at known dates for three different potential source areas around Disko Bay within 25km by 25km grids. In the grid below Disko Island, peaks in MSA and the inverse of sea ice concentration occurred simultaneously (Figure 2, r=0.4). The parallel peaks in MSA, oxygen isotope and inverse sea ice concentration indicate the

  19. Relationship between methanesulfonate (MS-) in atmospheric particulate and remotely sensed phytoplankton activity in oligo-mesotrophic central Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becagli, S.; Lazzara, L.; Fani, F.; Marchese, C.; Traversi, R.; Severi, M.; di Sarra, A.; Sferlazzo, D.; Piacentino, S.; Bommarito, C.; Dayan, U.; Udisti, R.

    2013-11-01

    The coupling between oceanic and atmospheric sulfur cycles is fundamental for the understanding of the role of sulfate particles as potential climate regulators. We discuss existing relationships among methanesulfonate (MS- - one of the end products of oxidation of biogenic dimethylsulfide - DMS) in the atmospheric particulate, phytoplankton biomass, and remotely-sensed activity in the central Mediterranean. The MS- concentration in the aerosol particles is based on PM10 sampling (from 2005 to 2008) of atmospheric aerosols at the island of Lampedusa (35.5°N, 12.6°E) in the central Mediterranean Sea. The marine primary production in the sea sector surrounding the sampling site is obtained by using Ocean Color remote sensed data (SeaWiFS, MODIS-Aqua). In particular, primary production is calculated using a bio-optical model of sea reflectance and a Wavelength-Depth-Resolved Model (WDRM), fed by elaborated satellite data (chlorophyll concentration in the euphotic layer - Chl, sea surface temperature) and daily solar surface irradiance measurements. The multi-year evolution of MS- atmospheric concentration shows a well-defined seasonal cycle with a summer maximum, corresponding to the annual peak of solar radiation and a minimum of phytoplankton biomass (expressed as Chl). Statistically significant linear relationships between monthly means of atmospheric MS- and both the phytoplankton productivity index PB (r2 = 0.84, p < 0.001) and the solar radiation dose (SRD; r2 = 0.87, p < 0.001) in the upper mixed layer of the sea around Lampedusa are found. These correlations are mainly driven by the common seasonal pattern and suggest that DMS production in the marine surface layer is mainly related to the phytoplankton physiology. High values of PB are also the expression of stressed cells. The main stress factors in Mediterranean Sea during summer are high irradiance and shallow depth of the upper mixed layer, which lead to enhanced DMS emissions and higher MS- amounts in

  20. Allium cepa anaphase-telophase root tip chromosome aberration assay on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, maleic hydrazide, sodium azide, and ethyl methanesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Rank, J; Nielsen, M H

    1997-04-24

    The Allium anaphase-telophase assay was used to show genotoxicity of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), maleic hydrazide (MH), sodium azide (NaN3) and ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). All agents induced chromosome aberrations at statistically significant levels. The rank of the lowest doses with positive effect was as follows: NaN3 0.3 mg/l < MH 1 mg/l < MNU 41 mg/l < EMS 100 mg/l. The results were compared with results from other plant assays (Arabidopsis, Vicia, Tradescantia) and for MH and MNU the values were found to be within the same range, whereas the results in the Allium test for NaN3 and EMS were in a lower range than that found for the other plant assays. EMS and MMS (methyl methanesulfonate), two chemicals used as positive controls in mutagenicity testing, were compared in the Allium test, and MMS was found to be about ten times more potent in inducing chromosome aberrations than EMS. Recording of micronuclei in interphase cells showed that this endpoint does not give more information of clastogenicity than recording of chromosome aberrations in anaphase-telophase cells.

  1. StyA1 and StyA2B from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP: a Multifunctional Styrene Monooxygenase System▿

    PubMed Central

    Tischler, Dirk; Kermer, René; Gröning, Janosch A. D.; Kaschabek, Stefan R.; van Berkel, Willem J. H.; Schlömann, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Two-component flavoprotein monooxygenases are emerging biocatalysts that generally consist of a monooxygenase and a reductase component. Here we show that Rhodococcus opacus 1CP encodes a multifunctional enantioselective flavoprotein monooxygenase system composed of a single styrene monooxygenase (SMO) (StyA1) and another styrene monooxygenase fused to an NADH-flavin oxidoreductase (StyA2B). StyA1 and StyA2B convert styrene and chemical analogues to the corresponding epoxides at the expense of FADH2 provided from StyA2B. The StyA1/StyA2B system presents the highest monooxygenase activity in an equimolar ratio of StyA1 and StyA2B, indicating (transient) protein complex formation. StyA1 is also active when FADH2 is supplied by StyB from Pseudomonas sp. VLB120 or PheA2 from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP. However, in both cases the reductase produces an excess of FADH2, resulting in a high waste of NADH. The epoxidation rate of StyA1 heavily depends on the type of reductase. This supports that the FADH2-induced activation of StyA1 requires interprotein communication. We conclude that the StyA1/StyA2B system represents a novel type of multifunctional flavoprotein monooxygenase. Its unique mechanism of cofactor utilization provides new opportunities for biotechnological applications and is highly relevant from a structural and evolutionary point of view. PMID:20675468

  2. 4-Toluene sulfonate methyl-monooxygenase from Comamonas testosteroni T-2: purification and some properties of the oxygenase component.

    PubMed Central

    Locher, H H; Leisinger, T; Cook, A M

    1991-01-01

    Comamonas testosteroni T-2 synthesizes an inducible enzyme system that oxygenates 4-toluene sulfontate (TS) to 4-sulfobenzyl alcohol when grown in TS-salts medium. We purified this TS methyl-monooxygenase system (TSMOS) and found it to consist of two components. A monomeric, iron-sulfur flavoprotein (component B), which has been shown to act as a reductase in the 4-sulfobenzoate dioxygenase system of this organism (H. H. Locher, T. Leisinger, and A. M. Cook, Biochem. J. 274:833-842, 1991), carried electrons from NADH to component M, an oxygenase. This oxygenase had the UV-visible spectral characteristics of an iron-sulfur protein. Mrs of about 152,000 for the native oxygenase and of 43,000 under denaturing conditions indicated a homotri- or homotetrameric enzyme, whose N-terminal amino acids and amino acid composition were determined. The activity of the purified enzyme was enhanced about fivefold by the addition of Fe2+. In the presence of O2 and NADH, components B and M together catalyzed the stoichiometric transformation of TS or p-toluate to the corresponding alcohol. The reaction was confirmed as oxygenation of the methyl group by observation of an oxygen atom from 18O2 in carboxybenzyl alcohol. The substrate range of TSMOS included carboxylated analogs of TS (p- and m-toluates and 4-ethylbenzoate), whereas p-xylene, toluene, and p-cresol were not substrates. TSMOS also catalyzed demethylation; 4-methoxybenzoate was transformed to 4-hydroxybenzoate and formaldehyde. Images PMID:2050632

  3. Genetic Variant in Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Alters Lipid Metabolism in Laying Hens in a Diet-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Long, Cheng; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Yanan; Wang, Hao; Yue, Hongyuan; Wang, Xiaocui; Wu, Shugeng; Qi, Guanghai

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variant T329S in flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) impairs trimethylamine (TMA) metabolism in birds. The TMA metabolism that under complex genetic and dietary regulation, closely linked to cardiovascular disease risk. We determined whether the genetic defects in TMA metabolism may change other metabolic traits in birds, determined whether the genetic effects depend on diets, and to identify genes or gene pathways that underlie the metabolic alteration induced by genetic and diet factors. We used hens genotyped as FMO3 c.984 A>T as well as those with the homozygous normal genotype. For each genotype, hens were provided with either a corn-soybean meal basal diets (SM), which contains lower levels of TMA precursor, or the basal diets supplemented with 21% of rapeseed meal (RM), which contains higher levels of TMA precursor. An integrative analysis of metabolomic and transcriptomic was used to explore the metabolic patterns of FMO3 genetic variant in hens that were fed the two defined diets. In birds that consumed SM diets, the T329S mutation increased levels of plasma TMA and lipids, FMO3 mRNA levels, and the expression of genes involved in long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis. In birds that consumed RM diets, the T329S mutation induced fishy odor syndrome, a repression in LXR pathway and a reciprocal change in lipid metabolism. Variations in TMA and lipid metabolism were linked to the genetic variant in FMO3 in a diet-specific manner, which suggest FMO3 functions in TMA metabolism and lipid homeostasis. LXR pathway and polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism are two possible mechanisms of FMO3 action in response to dietary TMA precursor. PMID:27877090

  4. Expression and purification of the recombinant subunits of toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase and reconstitution of the active complex.

    PubMed

    Cafaro, Valeria; Scognamiglio, Roberta; Viggiani, Ambra; Izzo, Viviana; Passaro, Irene; Notomista, Eugenio; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Amoresano, Angela; Casbarra, Annarita; Pucci, Piero; Di Donato, Alberto

    2002-11-01

    This paper describes the cloning of the genes coding for each component of the complex of toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1, their expression, purification and characterization. Moreover, the reconstitution of the active complex from the recombinant subunits has been obtained, and the functional role of each component in the electron transfer from the electron donor to molecular oxygen has been determined. The coexpression of subunits B, E and A leads to the formation of a subcomplex, named H, with a quaternary structure (BEA)2, endowed with hydroxylase activity. Tomo F component is an NADH oxidoreductase. The purified enzyme contains about 1 mol of FAD, 2 mol of iron, and 2 mol of acid labile sulfide per mol of protein, as expected for the presence of one [2Fe-2S] cluster, and exhibits a typical flavodoxin absorption spectrum. Interestingly, the sequence of the protein does not correspond to that previously predicted on the basis of DNA sequence. We have shown that this depends on minor errors in the gene sequence that we have corrected. C component is a Rieske-type ferredoxin, whose iron and acid labile sulfide content is in agreement with the presence of one [2Fe-2S] cluster. The cluster is very sensitive to oxygen damage. Mixtures of the subcomplex H and of the subunits F, C and D are able to oxidize p-cresol into 4-methylcathecol, thus demonstrating the full functionality of the recombinant subunits as purified. Finally, experimental evidence is reported which strongly support a model for the electron transfer. Subunit F is the first member of an electron transport chain which transfers electrons from NADH to C, which tunnels them to H subcomplex, and eventually to molecular oxygen.

  5. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F.; Lau, Peter C.; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily. PMID:26527149

  6. Oxorhenium complexes bearing the water-soluble tris(pyrazol-1-yl)methanesulfonate, 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane, or related ligands, as catalysts for Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of ketones.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luísa M D R S; Alegria, Elisabete C B A; Smoleński, Piotr; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2013-04-15

    New rhenium(VII or III) complexes [ReO3(PTA)2][ReO4] (1) (PTA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane), [ReO3(mPTA)][ReO4]I (2) (mPTA = N-methyl-1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane cation), [ReO3(HMT)2][ReO4] (3) (HMT = hexamethylenetetramine), [ReO3(η(2)-Tpm)(PTA)][ReO4] (4) [Tpm = hydrotris(pyrazol-1-yl)methane, HC(pz)3, pz = pyrazolyl], [ReO3(Hpz)(HMT)][ReO4] (5) (Hpz = pyrazole), [ReO(Tpms)(HMT)] (6) [Tpms = tris(pyrazol-1-yl)methanesulfonate, O3SC(pz)3(-)] and [ReCl2{N2C(O)Ph}(PTA)3] (7) have been prepared from the Re(VII) oxide Re2O7 (1-6) or, in the case of 7, by ligand exchange from the benzoyldiazenido complex [ReCl2{N2C(O)Ph}(Hpz)(PPh3)2], and characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopies, elemental analysis and electrochemical properties. Theoretical calculations at the density functional theory (DFT) level of theory indicated that the coordination of PTA to both Re(III) and Re(VII) centers by the P atom is preferable compared to the coordination by the N atom. This is interpreted in terms of the Re-PTA bond energy and hard-soft acid-base theory. The oxo-rhenium complexes 1-6 act as selective catalysts for the Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of cyclic and linear ketones (e.g., 2-methylcyclohexanone, 2-methylcyclopentanone, cyclohexanone, cyclopentanone, cyclobutanone, and 3,3-dimethyl-2-butanone or pinacolone) to the corresponding lactones or esters, in the presence of aqueous H2O2. The effects of a variety of factors are studied toward the optimization of the process.

  7. mRNA differential display in a microbial enrichment culture: simultaneous identification of three cyclohexanone monooxygenases from three species.

    PubMed

    Brzostowicz, Patricia C; Walters, Dana M; Thomas, Stuart M; Nagarajan, Vasantha; Rouvière, Pierre E

    2003-01-01

    mRNA differential display has been used to identify cyclohexanone oxidation genes in a mixed microbial community derived from a wastewater bioreactor. Thirteen DNA fragments randomly amplified from the total RNA of an enrichment subculture exposed to cyclohexanone corresponded to genes predicted to be involved in the degradation of cyclohexanone. Nine of these DNA fragments are part of genes encoding three distinct Baeyer-Villiger cyclohexanone monooxygenases from three different bacterial species present in the enrichment culture. In Arthrobacter sp. strain BP2 and Rhodococcus sp. strain Phi2, the monooxygenase is part of a gene cluster that includes all the genes required for the degradation of cyclohexanone, while in Rhodococcus sp. strain Phi1 the genes surrounding the monooxygenase are not predicted to be involved in this degradation pathway but rather seem to belong to a biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, in the case of Arthrobacter strain BP2, three other genes flanking the monooxygenase were identified by differential display, demonstrating that the repeated sampling of bacterial operons shown earlier for a pure culture (D. M. Walters, R. Russ, H. Knackmuss, and P. E. Rouvière, Gene 273:305-315, 2001) is also possible for microbial communities. The activity of the three cyclohexanone monooxygenases was confirmed and characterized following their expression in Escherichia coli.

  8. mRNA Differential Display in a Microbial Enrichment Culture: Simultaneous Identification of Three Cyclohexanone Monooxygenases from Three Species

    PubMed Central

    Brzostowicz, Patricia C.; Walters, Dana M.; Thomas, Stuart M.; Nagarajan, Vasantha; Rouvière, Pierre E.

    2003-01-01

    mRNA differential display has been used to identify cyclohexanone oxidation genes in a mixed microbial community derived from a wastewater bioreactor. Thirteen DNA fragments randomly amplified from the total RNA of an enrichment subculture exposed to cyclohexanone corresponded to genes predicted to be involved in the degradation of cyclohexanone. Nine of these DNA fragments are part of genes encoding three distinct Baeyer-Villiger cyclohexanone monooxygenases from three different bacterial species present in the enrichment culture. In Arthrobacter sp. strain BP2 and Rhodococcus sp. strain Phi2, the monooxygenase is part of a gene cluster that includes all the genes required for the degradation of cyclohexanone, while in Rhodococcus sp. strain Phi1 the genes surrounding the monooxygenase are not predicted to be involved in this degradation pathway but rather seem to belong to a biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, in the case of Arthrobacter strain BP2, three other genes flanking the monooxygenase were identified by differential display, demonstrating that the repeated sampling of bacterial operons shown earlier for a pure culture (D. M. Walters, R. Russ, H. Knackmuss, and P. E. Rouvière, Gene 273:305-315, 2001) is also possible for microbial communities. The activity of the three cyclohexanone monooxygenases was confirmed and characterized following their expression in Escherichia coli. PMID:12514013

  9. Flavin-Dependent Redox Transfers by the Two-Component Diketocamphane Monooxygenases of Camphor-Grown Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 10007

    PubMed Central

    Willetts, Andrew; Kelly, David

    2016-01-01

    The progressive titres of key monooxygenases and their requisite native donors of reducing power were used to assess the relative contribution of various camphor plasmid (CAM plasmid)- and chromosome-coded activities to biodegradation of (rac)-camphor at successive stages throughout growth of Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 10007 on the bicylic monoterpenoid. A number of different flavin reductases (FRs) have the potential to supply reduced flavin mononucleotide to both 2,5- and 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase, the key isoenzymic two-component monooxygenases that delineate respectively the (+)- and (−)-camphor branches of the convergent degradation pathway. Two different constitutive chromosome-coded ferric reductases able to act as FRs can serve such as role throughout all stages of camphor-dependent growth, whereas Fred, a chromosome-coded inducible FR can only play a potentially significant role in the relatively late stages. Putidaredoxin reductase, an inducible CAM plasmid-coded flavoprotein that serves an established role as a redox intermediate for plasmid-coded cytochrome P450 monooxygenase also has the potential to serve as an important FR for both diketocamphane monooxygenases (DKCMOs) throughout most stages of camphor-dependent growth. PMID:27754389

  10. Antifungal activity of biogenic tellurium nanoparticles against Candida albicans and its effects on squalene monooxygenase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zare, Bijan; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Soltany-Rezaee-Rad, Mohammad; Rezaie, Sassan; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the antifungal activity of biogenic tellurium nanoparticles (Te NPs) against Candida albicans (ATCC14053). In addition, the effect of these biogenic NPs on squalene monooxygenase activity and the squalene monooxygenase gene (ERG1) expression level was evaluated. Squalene monooxygenase is an important enzyme involved in the synthesis of ergosterol, cholesterol, and phytosterols. Because of the importance of the noted compound, the squalene monooxygenase gene could be considered a good antifungal target. Results showed that biogenic Te NPs had antifungal effect against C. albicans. The minimal fungicidal concentration-minimal inhibitory concentration ratios of the biogenic Te NPs revealed that these NPs exhibited fungicidal effects against the test strain. The results of an enzyme assay using quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography showed squalene accumulation in C. albicans cells because of enzyme inhibition. Real-time PCR analysis showed an increase in the expression of the ERG1 gene in C. albicans cells, which were treated with Te NPs (0.2 mg/mL). It is conclution that Te NPs can inhibit the squalene monooxygenase enzyme, and, as a result, this inhibition phenomenon can cause an increase in the expression level of the ERG1 gene. This is the first report of the anti-Candida effect of biogenic Te NPs and its possible mechanisms.

  11. Rational Reprogramming of the R2 Subunit of Escherichia coli Ribonucleotide Reductase into a Self-Hydroxylating Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, J.; Voegtli, W.C.; Khidekel, N.; Moënne-Loccoz, P.; Krebs, C.; Ley, B.A.; Huynh, B.H.; Loehr, T.M.; Rosenzweig, A.C.; Bollinger, Jr., J.M.

    2010-03-05

    The outcome of O{sub 2} activation at the diiron(II) cluster in the R2 subunit of Escherichia coli (class I) ribonucleotide reductase has been rationally altered from the normal tyrosyl radical (Y122) production to self-hydroxylation of a phenylalanine side-chain by two amino acid substitutions that leave intact the (histidine){sub 2}-(carboxylate){sub 4} ligand set characteristic of the diiron-carboxylate family. Iron ligand Asp (D) 84 was replaced with Glu (E), the amino acid found in the cognate position of the structurally similar diiron-carboxylate protein, methane monooxygenase hydroxylase (MMOH). We previously showed that this substitution allows accumulation of a {mu}-1,2-peroxodiiron(III) intermediate, which does not accumulate in the wild-type (wt) protein and is probably a structural homologue of intermediate P (H{sub peroxo}) in O{sub 2} activation by MMOH. In addition, the near-surface residue Trp (W) 48 was replaced with Phe (F), blocking transfer of the 'extra' electron that occurs in wt R2 during formation of the formally Fe(III)Fe(IV) cluster X. Decay of the {mu}-1,2-peroxodiiron(III) complex in R2-W48F/D84E gives an initial brown product, which contains very little Y122 and which converts very slowly (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 7 h) upon incubation at 0 C to an intensely purple final product. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the purple product indicates that F208 has undergone {epsilon}-hydroxylation and the resulting phenol has shifted significantly to become a ligand to Fe2 of the diiron cluster. Resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the purple product generated with {sup 16}O{sub 2} or {sub 18}O{sub 2} show appropriate isotopic sensitivity in bands assigned to O-phenyl and Fe-O-phenyl vibrational modes, confirming that the oxygen of the Fe(III)-phenolate species is derived from O{sub 2}. Chemical analysis, experiments involving interception of the hydroxylating intermediate with exogenous reductant, and Moessbauer and EXAFS characterization of the brown

  12. Cloning, Baeyer-Villiger Biooxidations, and Structures of the Camphor Pathway 2-Oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-Trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-Coenzyme A Monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453

    PubMed Central

    Leisch, Hannes; Shi, Rong; Grosse, Stephan; Morley, Krista; Bergeron, Hélène; Cygler, Miroslaw; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie

    2012-01-01

    A dimeric Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) catalyzing the lactonization of 2-oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-coenzyme A (CoA), a key intermediate in the metabolism of camphor by Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453, had been initially characterized in 1983 by Ougham and coworkers (H. J. Ougham, D. G. Taylor, and P. W. Trudgill, J. Bacteriol. 153:140–152, 1983). Here we cloned and overexpressed the 2-oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-CoA monooxygenase (OTEMO) in Escherichia coli and determined its three-dimensional structure with bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) at a 1.95-Å resolution as well as with bound FAD and NADP+ at a 2.0-Å resolution. OTEMO represents the first homodimeric type 1 BVMO structure bound to FAD/NADP+. A comparison of several crystal forms of OTEMO bound to FAD and NADP+ revealed a conformational plasticity of several loop regions, some of which have been implicated in contributing to the substrate specificity profile of structurally related BVMOs. Substrate specificity studies confirmed that the 2-oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid coenzyme A ester is preferred over the free acid. However, the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) favors 2-n-hexyl cyclopentanone (4.3 × 105 M−1 s−1) as a substrate, although its affinity (Km = 32 μM) was lower than that of the CoA-activated substrate (Km = 18 μM). In whole-cell biotransformation experiments, OTEMO showed a unique enantiocomplementarity to the action of the prototypical cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) and appeared to be particularly useful for the oxidation of 4-substituted cyclohexanones. Overall, this work extends our understanding of the molecular structure and mechanistic complexity of the type 1 family of BVMOs and expands the catalytic repertoire of one of its original members. PMID:22267661

  13. Peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase heterozygosity alters brain copper handling with region specificity.

    PubMed

    Gaier, Eric D; Miller, Megan B; Ralle, Martina; Aryal, Dipendra; Wetsel, William C; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2013-12-01

    Copper (Cu), an essential trace element present throughout the mammalian nervous system, is crucial for normal synaptic function. Neuronal handling of Cu is poorly understood. We studied the localization and expression of Atp7a, the major intracellular Cu transporter in the brain, and its relation to peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), an essential cuproenzyme and regulator of Cu homeostasis in neuroendocrine cells. Based on biochemical fractionation and immunostaining of dissociated neurons, Atp7a was enriched in post-synaptic vesicular fractions. Cu followed a similar pattern, with ~ 20% of total Cu in synaptosomes. A mouse model heterozygous for the Pam gene (PAM+/−) was selectively Cu deficient in the amygdala. As in cortex and hippocampus, Atp7a and PAM expression overlap in the amygdala, with highest expression in interneurons. Messenger RNA levels of Atox-1 and Atp7a, which deliver Cu to the secretory pathway, were reduced in the amygdala but not in the hippocampus in PAM+/− mice, GABAB receptor mRNA levels were similarly affected. Consistent with Cu deficiency, dopamine β-monooxygenase function was impaired as evidenced by elevated dopamine metabolites in the amygdala, but not in the hippocampus, of PAM+/− mice. These alterations in Cu delivery to the secretory pathway in the PAM+/− amygdala may contribute to the physiological and behavioral deficits observed. Atp7a, a Cu-transporting P-type ATPase, is localized to the trans-Golgi network and to vesicles distributed throughout the dendritic arbor. Tissue-specific alterations in Atp7a expression were found in mice heterozygous for peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), an essential neuropeptide-synthesizing cuproenzyme. Atp7a and PAM are highly expressed in amygdalar interneurons. Reduced amygdalar expression of Atox-1 and Atp7a in PAM heterozygous mice may lead to reduced synaptic Cu levels, contributing to the behavioral and neurochemical alterations seen in these mice.

  14. Preferential inhibition of mouse hepatic coumarin 7-hydroxylase by inhibitors of steroid metabolizing monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Kojo, A; Honkakoski, P; Järvinen, P; Pelkonen, O; Lang, M

    1989-08-01

    Etomidate, metomidate and metyrapone, all potent inhibitors of steroid metabolizing monooxygenases, inhibit preferentially coumarin 7-hydroxylase (COH) amongst several liver microsomal monooxygenase activities from control and pyrazole-treated D2 mice in vitro. SKF-525A, an inhibitor of phenobarbital-inducible monooxygenase activities has a much weaker effect on COH than the other three drugs, even though COH is a phenobarbital-inducible enzyme. Treatment of mice with eto- and metomidate decreases the microsomal COH also in vivo while the other activities remained unchanged (with the exception of 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECDE) in case of metomidate). Despite of the decrease in COH no parallel decrease in the amount of microsomal P450Coh (P450 isoenzyme highly active in the 7-hydroxylation of coumarin) could be found in dot immuno-binding analysis. These data suggest that among several liver microsomal P450 isoenzymes, metyrapone, eto- and metomidate interact preferentially with the P450Coh and that eto- and metomidate may alter selectively the catalytic properties of P450Coh leading to decreased enzyme activity. Two different Ks-values could be found for all three drug in their binding to microsomal cytochrome(s) P450. Based on substrate binding spectra, potassium ferricyanide treatment does not dissociate the complex between reduced P450 and metomidate and does it only partly for etomidate. Furthermore potassium ferricyanide treatment of microsomes does not increase COH after in vivo treatment of mice with eto- and metomidate. These data further suggest that the complex between P450Coh and eto- and metomidate may be particularly strong and independent from the redox state of the haem iron.

  15. Structural and Catalytic Characterization of a Fungal Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Ferroni, Felix Martin; Tolmie, Carmien; Smit, Martha Sophia; Opperman, Diederik Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are biocatalysts that convert ketones to esters. Due to their high regio-, stereo- and enantioselectivity and ability to catalyse these reactions under mild conditions, they have gained interest as alternatives to chemical Baeyer-Villiger catalysts. Despite their widespread occurrence within the fungal kingdom, most of the currently characterized BVMOs are from bacterial origin. Here we report the catalytic and structural characterization of BVMOAFL838 from Aspergillus flavus. BVMOAFL838 converts linear and aryl ketones with high regioselectivity. Steady-state kinetics revealed BVMOAFL838 to show significant substrate inhibition with phenylacetone, which was more pronounced at low pH, enzyme and buffer concentrations. Para substitutions on the phenyl group significantly improved substrate affinity and increased turnover frequencies. Steady-state kinetics revealed BVMOAFL838 to preferentially oxidize aliphatic ketones and aryl ketones when the phenyl group are separated by at least two carbons from the carbonyl group. The X-ray crystal structure, the first of a fungal BVMO, was determined at 1.9 Å and revealed the typical overall fold seen in type I bacterial BVMOs. The active site Arg and Asp are conserved, with the Arg found in the “in” position. Similar to phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO), a two residue insert relative to cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) forms a bulge within the active site. Approximately half of the “variable” loop is folded into a short α-helix and covers part of the active site entry channel in the non-NADPH bound structure. This study adds to the current efforts to rationalize the substrate scope of BVMOs through comparative catalytic and structural investigation of different BVMOs. PMID:27472055

  16. Interaction of the mechanism-based inactivator acetylene with ammonia monooxygenase of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Gilch, Stefan; Vogel, Manja; Lorenz, Matthias W; Meyer, Ortwin; Schmidt, Ingo

    2009-01-01

    The ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) of Nitrosomonas europaea is a metalloenzyme that catalyses the oxidation of ammonia to hydroxylamine. We have identified histidine 191 of AmoA as the binding site for the oxidized mechanism-based inactivator acetylene. Binding of acetylene changed the molecular mass of His-191 from 155.15 to 197.2 Da (+42.05), providing evidence that acetylene was oxidized to ketene (CH2CO; 42.04 Da) which binds specifically to His-191. It must be assumed that His-191 is part of the acetylene-activating site in AMO or at least directly neighbours this site.

  17. Kinetic characterization of the soluble butane monooxygenase from Thauera butanivorans, formerly 'Pseudomonas butanovora'.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Richard B; Dubbels, Bradley L; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A; Bottomley, Peter J; Arp, Daniel J

    2009-06-01

    Soluble butane monooxygenase (sBMO), a three-component di-iron monooxygenase complex expressed by the C(2)-C(9) alkane-utilizing bacterium Thauera butanivorans, was kinetically characterized by measuring substrate specificities for C(1)-C(5) alkanes and product inhibition profiles. sBMO has high sequence homology with soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and shares a similar substrate range, including gaseous and liquid alkanes, aromatics, alkenes and halogenated xenobiotics. Results indicated that butane was the preferred substrate (defined by k(cat) : K(m) ratios). Relative rates of oxidation for C(1)-C(5) alkanes differed minimally, implying that substrate specificity is heavily influenced by differences in substrate K(m) values. The low micromolar K(m) for linear C(2)-C(5) alkanes and the millimolar K(m) for methane demonstrate that sBMO is two to three orders of magnitude more specific for physiologically relevant substrates of T. butanivorans. Methanol, the product of methane oxidation and also a substrate itself, was found to have similar K(m) and k(cat) values to those of methane. This inability to kinetically discriminate between the C(1) alkane and C(1) alcohol is observed as a steady-state concentration of methanol during the two-step oxidation of methane to formaldehyde by sBMO. Unlike methanol, alcohols with chain length C(2)-C(5) do not compete effectively with their respective alkane substrates. Results from product inhibition experiments suggest that the geometry of the active site is optimized for linear molecules four to five carbons in length and is influenced by the regulatory protein component B (butane monooxygenase regulatory component; BMOB). The data suggest that alkane oxidation by sBMO is highly specialized for the turnover of C(3)-C(5) alkanes and the release of their respective alcohol products. Additionally, sBMO is particularly efficient at preventing methane oxidation during growth on linear alkanes > or =C(2,) despite its high

  18. Kinetic characterization of the soluble butane monooxygenase from Thauera butanivorans, formerly ‘Pseudomonas butanovora’

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Richard B.; Dubbels, Bradley L.; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Arp, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Soluble butane monooxygenase (sBMO), a three-component di-iron monooxygenase complex expressed by the C2–C9 alkane-utilizing bacterium Thauera butanivorans, was kinetically characterized by measuring substrate specificities for C1–C5 alkanes and product inhibition profiles. sBMO has high sequence homology with soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and shares a similar substrate range, including gaseous and liquid alkanes, aromatics, alkenes and halogenated xenobiotics. Results indicated that butane was the preferred substrate (defined by kcat : Km ratios). Relative rates of oxidation for C1–C5 alkanes differed minimally, implying that substrate specificity is heavily influenced by differences in substrate Km values. The low micromolar Km for linear C2–C5 alkanes and the millimolar Km for methane demonstrate that sBMO is two to three orders of magnitude more specific for physiologically relevant substrates of T. butanivorans. Methanol, the product of methane oxidation and also a substrate itself, was found to have similar Km and kcat values to those of methane. This inability to kinetically discriminate between the C1 alkane and C1 alcohol is observed as a steady-state concentration of methanol during the two-step oxidation of methane to formaldehyde by sBMO. Unlike methanol, alcohols with chain length C2–C5 do not compete effectively with their respective alkane substrates. Results from product inhibition experiments suggest that the geometry of the active site is optimized for linear molecules four to five carbons in length and is influenced by the regulatory protein component B (butane monooxygenase regulatory component; BMOB). The data suggest that alkane oxidation by sBMO is highly specialized for the turnover of C3–C5 alkanes and the release of their respective alcohol products. Additionally, sBMO is particularly efficient at preventing methane oxidation during growth on linear alkanes ≥C2, despite its high sequence homology with sMMO. These

  19. Terbinafine resistance conferred by multiple copies of the salicylate 1-monooxygenase gene in Trichophyton rubrum.

    PubMed

    Santos, Hemelin L; Lang, Elza A S; Segato, Fernando; Rossi, Antonio; Martinez-Rossi, Nilce M

    2017-06-02

    Resistance to antifungals is a leading concern in the treatment of human mycoses. We demonstrate that the salA gene, encoding salicylate 1-monooxygenase, is involved in resistance of the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum to terbinafine, one of the most effective antifungal drugs against dermatophytes. A strain with multiple copies of salA was constructed and exhibited elevated expression of salA and increased terbinafine resistance. This reflects a mechanism not yet reported in a pathogenic fungus. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Fungal secretomics to probe the biological functions of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Berrin, Jean-Guy; Rosso, Marie-Noëlle; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2017-08-07

    Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass is of growing interest for the development of a sustainable bio-based industry. Filamentous fungi, which degrade complex and recalcitrant plant polymers, are proficient secretors of enzymes acting on the lignocellulose composite of plant cell walls in addition to starch, the main carbon storage reservoir. In this review, we focus on the identification of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) and their redox partners in fungal secretomes to highlight the biological functions of these remarkable enzyme systems and we discuss future trends related to LPMO-potentiated bioconversion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Oxidation of chlorinated olefins by Escherichia coli transformed with dimethyl sulfide monooxygenase genes or cumene dioxygenase genes.

    PubMed

    Takami, Wako; Yoshida, Takako; Nojiri, Hideaki; Yamane, Hisakazu; Omori, Toshio

    1999-04-01

    In the present work, it was shown that the dimethyl sulfide (DMS) monooxygenase and the cumene dioxygenase catalyzed oxidation of various chlorinated ethenes, propenes, and butenes. The specific activities of these oxygenases were determined for C(2) to C(4) chlorinated olefins, and the oxidation rates ranged from 0.19 to 4.18 nmol.min(-1).mg(-1) of dry cells by the DMS monooxygenase and from 0.19 to 1.29 nmol.min(-1).mg(-1) of dry cells by the cumene dioxygenase. The oxidation products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Most chlorinated olefins were monooxygenated by the DMS monooxygenase to yield chlorinated epoxides. In the case of the cumene dioxygenase, the substrates lacking any chlorine atom on double-bond carbon atoms were dioxygenated, and those with chlorine atoms attaching to double-bond carbon atoms were monooxygenated to yield allyl alcohols.

  2. CYP63A2, a catalytically versatile fungal P450 monooxygenase capable of oxidizing higher-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, and alkanes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are known to oxidize hydrocarbons albeit with limited substrate specificity across classes of these compounds. Here we report a P450 monooxygenase (CYP63A2) from the model ligninolytic white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium that was fo...

  3. CYP63A2, a catalytically versatile fungal P450 monooxygenase capable of oxidizing higher-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, and alkanes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are known to oxidize hydrocarbons albeit with limited substrate specificity across classes of these compounds. Here we report a P450 monooxygenase (CYP63A2) from the model ligninolytic white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium that was fo...

  4. Crystal structure of a Baeyer-Villiger flavin-containing monooxygenase from Staphylococcus aureus MRSA strain MU50.

    PubMed

    Hwang, William C; Xu, Qingping; Wu, Bainan; Godzik, Adam

    2014-08-05

    Flavin-containing Monooxygenase (FMO) catalyzed the oxygenation of broad spectrum of substrates. FMO can also serve as biocatalysts in the Baeyer-Villiger reaction in organic synthesis. Here, we report the high-resolution crystal structure of a Baeyer-Villiger Flavin-containing Monooxygenase (BVFMO) from methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain MU50. The structure of S. aureus FMO should facilitate further development of BVFMO as biocatalysts. A possible role of S. aureus FMO in methicillin and vancomycin resistance is discussed. Proteins 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Structural characterization by EXAFS spectroscopy of the binuclear iron center in protein A of methane monooxygenase from methylococcus capsulatus (bath)

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, A.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Green, J.; Dalton, H.; Bentsen, J.G.; Beer, R.H.; Lippard, S.J.

    1988-03-30

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) activates dioxygen for incorporation into a remarkable variety of substrates including methane, which is required for bacterial growth (eq 1). MMO is a three component CH/sub 4/ + NADH + H/sup +/ + O/sub 2/ /sup MMO/ ..-->.. CH/sub 3/OH + NAD/sup +/ + H/sub 2/O (1) enzyme. Protein A (M/sub r/ 210,000), believed to be the oxygenase component, contains two iron atoms. Protein B (M/sub r/ 15,700) serves a regulatory function and lacks prosthetic groups, while protein C, the reductase component of the enzyme, is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein (M/sub r/ 42,000) responsible for electron transfer from NADH to protein A. Recently, a binuclear iron center was postulated to occur in protein A based on the finding that one-electron reduction gives rise to electron spin resonance (ESR) signals (g 1.95, 1.88, 1.78) very similar to those observed for the binuclear mixed-valence Fe/sub 2/(III,II) centers in semimet hemerythrin (Hr) and purple acid phosphatase (PAP). In conjunction with model studies, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful method for identifying bridged binuclear iron centers in Hr, ribonucleotide reductase (RR), and PAP. Here the authors report iron K-edge EXAFS results on semireduced protein A of MMO which support the occurrence of a binuclear iron center (Fe-Fe distance, 3.41 A), with no short ..mu..-oxo bridge.

  6. The detection and phylogenetic analysis of the alkane 1-monooxygenase gene of members of the genus Rhodococcus.

    PubMed

    Táncsics, András; Benedek, Tibor; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Veres, Péter G; Farkas, Milán; Máthé, István; Márialigeti, Károly; Kukolya, József; Lányi, Szabolcs; Kriszt, Balázs

    2015-02-01

    Naturally occurring and anthropogenic petroleum hydrocarbons are potential carbon sources for many bacteria. The AlkB-related alkane hydroxylases, which are integral membrane non-heme iron enzymes, play a key role in the microbial degradation of many of these hydrocarbons. Several members of the genus Rhodococcus are well-known alkane degraders and are known to harbor multiple alkB genes encoding for different alkane 1-monooxygenases. In the present study, 48 Rhodococcus strains, representing 35 species of the genus, were investigated to find out whether there was a dominant type of alkB gene widespread among species of the genus that could be used as a phylogenetic marker. Phylogenetic analysis of rhodococcal alkB gene sequences indicated that a certain type of alkB gene was present in almost every member of the genus Rhodococcus. These alkB genes were common in a unique nucleotide sequence stretch absent from other types of rhodococcal alkB genes that encoded a conserved amino acid motif: WLG(I/V/L)D(G/D)GL. The sequence identity of the targeted alkB gene in Rhodococcus ranged from 78.5 to 99.2% and showed higher nucleotide sequence variation at the inter-species level compared to the 16S rRNA gene (93.9-99.8%). The results indicated that the alkB gene type investigated might be applicable for: (i) differentiating closely related Rhodococcus species, (ii) properly assigning environmental isolates to existing Rhodococcus species, and finally (iii) assessing whether a new Rhodococcus isolate represents a novel species of the genus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Haploinsufficiency in peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase leads to altered synaptic transmission in the amygdala and impaired emotional responses

    PubMed Central

    Gaier, ED; Rodriguiz, RM; Ma, XM; Sivaramakrishnan, S; Bousquet-Moore, D; Wetsel, WC; Eipper, BA

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian amygdala expresses various neuropeptides whose signaling has been implicated in emotionality. Many neuropeptides require amidation for full activation by peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), a transmembrane vesicular cuproenzyme and regulator of the secretory pathway. Mice heterozygous for the Pam gene (PAM+/−) exhibit physiological and behavioral abnormalities related to specific peptidergic pathways. In the present study, we evaluated emotionality and examined molecular and cellular responses that characterize neurophysiological differences in the PAM+/− amygdala. PAM+/− mice presented with anxiety-like behaviors in the zero maze that were alleviated by diazepam. PAM+/− animals were deficient in short- and long-term contextual and cued fear conditioning and required higher shock intensities to establish fear-potentiated startle than their wildtype littermates. Immunohistochemical analysis of the amygdala revealed PAM expression in pyramidal neurons and local interneurons that synthesize γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). We performed whole-cell recordings of pyramidal neurons in the PAM+/− amygdala to elucidate neurophysiological correlates of the fear behavioral phenotypes. Consistent with these observations, thalamic afferent synapses in the PAM+/− lateral nucleus were deficient in long-term potentiation. This deficit was apparent in the absence and presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin and was abolished when both GABAA and GABAB receptors were blocked. Both evoked and spontaneous excitatory signals were enhanced in the PAM+/− lateral nucleus. Phasic GABAergic signaling was also augmented in the PAM+/− amygdala, and this difference was comprised of activity-independent and activity-dependent components. These physiological findings represent perturbations in the PAM+/− amygdala that may underlie the aberrant emotional responses in the intact animal. PMID:20943906

  8. Biochemical evidence for the tyrosine involvement in cationic intermediate stabilization in mouse β-carotene 15, 15'-monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (BCMO1) catalyzes the crucial first step in vitamin A biosynthesis in animals. We wished to explore the possibility that a carbocation intermediate is formed during the cleavage reaction of BCMO1, as is seen for many isoprenoid biosynthesis enzymes, and to determine which residues in the substrate binding cleft are necessary for catalytic and substrate binding activity. To test this hypothesis, we replaced substrate cleft aromatic and acidic residues by site-directed mutagenesis. Enzymatic activity was measured in vitro using His-tag purified proteins and in vivo in a β-carotene-accumulating E. coli system. Results Our assays show that mutation of either Y235 or Y326 to leucine (no cation-π stabilization) significantly impairs the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Moreover, mutation of Y326 to glutamine (predicted to destabilize a putative carbocation) almost eliminates activity (9.3% of wt activity). However, replacement of these same tyrosines with phenylalanine or tryptophan does not significantly impair activity, indicating that aromaticity at these residues is crucial. Mutations of two other aromatic residues in the binding cleft of BCMO1, F51 and W454, to either another aromatic residue or to leucine do not influence the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Our ab initio model of BCMO1 with β-carotene mounted supports a mechanism involving cation-π stabilization by Y235 and Y326. Conclusions Our data are consistent with the formation of a substrate carbocation intermediate and cation-π stabilization of this intermediate by two aromatic residues in the substrate-binding cleft of BCMO1. PMID:20003456

  9. CYP709B3, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase gene involved in salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Within the Arabidopsis genome, there are 272 cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) genes. However, the biological functions of the majority of these P450s remain unknown. The CYP709B family of P450s includes three gene members, CYP709B1, CYP709B2 and CYP709B3, which have high amino acid sequence similarity and lack reports elucidating biological functions. Results We identified T-DNA insertion-based null mutants of the CYP709B subfamily of genes. No obvious morphological phenotypes were exhibited under normal growth conditions. When the responses to ABA and salt stress were studied in these mutants, only the cyp709b3 mutant showed sensitivity to ABA and salt during germination. Under moderate salt treatment (150 mM NaCl), cyp709b3 showed a higher percentage of damaged seedlings, indicating a lower tolerance to salt stress. CYP709B3 was highly expressed in all analyzed tissues and especially high in seedlings and leaves. In contrast, CYP709B1 and CYP709B2 were highly expressed in siliques, but were at very low levels in other tissues. Under salt stress condition, CYP709B3 gene expression was induced after 24 hr and remained at high expression level. Expression of the wild type CYP709B3 gene in the cyp709b3 mutant fully complemented the salt intolerant phenotype. Furthermore, metabolite profiling analysis revealed some differences between wild type and cyp709b3 mutant plants, supporting the salt intolerance phenotype of the cyp709b3 mutant. Conclusions These results suggest that CYP709B3 plays a role in ABA and salt stress response and provides evidence to support the functions of cytochrome P450 enzymes in plant stress response. PMID:24164720

  10. Soluble Methane Monooxygenase Production and Trichloroethylene Degradation by a Type I Methanotroph, Methylomonas methanica 68-1

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sung-Cheol; Bowman, John P.; Sayler, Gary S.

    1993-01-01

    A methanotroph (strain 68-1), originally isolated from a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated aquifer, was identified as the type I methanotroph Methylomonas methanica on the basis of intracytoplasmic membrane ultrastructure, phospholipid fatty acid profile, and 16S rRNA signature probe hybridization. Strain 68-1 was found to oxidize naphthalene and TCE via a soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and thus becomes the first type I methanotroph known to be able to produce this enzyme. The specific whole-cell sMMO activity of 68-1, as measured by the naphthalene oxidation assay and by TCE biodegradation, was comparatively higher than sMMO activity levels in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b grown in the same copper-free conditions. The maximal naphthalene oxidation rates of Methylomonas methanica 68-1 and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b were 551 ± 27 and 321 ± 16 nmol h-1 mg of protein -1, respectively. The maximal TCE degradation rates of Methylomonas methanica 68-1 and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b were 2,325 ± 260 and 995 ± 160 nmol h-1 mg of protein-1, respectively. The substrate affinity of 68-1 sMMO to naphthalene (Km, 70 ± 4 μM) and TCE (Km, 225 ± 13 μM), however, was comparatively lower than that of the sMMO of OB3b, which had affinities of 40 ± 3 and 126 ± 8 μM, respectively. Genomic DNA slot and Southern blot analyses with an sMMO gene probe from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b showed that the sMMO genes of 68-1 have little genetic homology to those of OB3b. This result may indicate the evolutionary diversification of the sMMOs. Images PMID:16348920

  11. Microspore Induced Doubled Haploids Production from Ethyl Methanesulfonate (EMS) Soaked Flower Buds Is an Efficient Strategy for Mutagenesis in Chinese Cabbage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yin; Dai, Shuangyan; Gu, Aixia; Liu, Mengyang; Wang, Yanhua; Luo, Shuangxia; Zhao, Yujing; Wang, Shan; Xuan, Shuxin; Chen, Xueping; Li, Xiaofeng; Bonnema, Guusje; Zhao, Jianjun; Shen, Shuxing

    2016-01-01

    Chinese cabbage buds were soaked with Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) to induce mutagenesis. The influence of different EMS concentrations and treatment durations on microspore development, embryo production rate and seedling rate were evaluated in five Chinese cabbage genotypes. Mutations in four color-related genes were identified using high resolution melting (HRM) curves of their PCR products. The greatest embryo production and seedling rates were observed when buds were treated with 0.03 to 0.1% EMS for 5 to 10 min, while EMS concentrations greater than 0.1% were lethal to the microspores. In total, 142 mutants with distinct variations in leaf shape, leaf color, corolla size, flower color, bolting time and downy mildew resistance were identified from 475 microspore culture derived Doubled Haploids. Our results demonstrate that microspore derived Doubled Haploids from EMS soaked buds represents an efficient approach to rapidly generate homozygous Chinese cabbage mutants. PMID:28018368

  12. DNA repair in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum group A fibroblasts following treatment with various methanesulfonates and the demonstration of a long-patch repair component

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, R.D.; Regan, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Excision repair of DNA in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A fibroblasts were examined following treatment with methyl-, ethyl-, and isopropyl methanesulfonate. Studies utilizing repair synthesis methods and inhibition with arabinofuranosyl cytosine revealed two distinct phases of repair; one commencing and terminating within the first 3-5 h after the treatment, and a second much longer phase extending from 9-35 h post-treatment. Both phases of repair have a long-patch component, which establishes for the first time the existence of this mode of repair in response to alkane sulfonate damage. While xeroderma cells display somewhat fewer alkaline labile sites in their DNA following alkylation treatment than do their normal counterparts, researchers are unable to demonstrate a deficiency of these cells in either of the two phases of repair.

  13. Single-strand breaks in DNA of various organs of mice induced by methyl methanesulfonate and dimethylsulfoxide determined by the alkaline unwinding technique

    SciTech Connect

    Solveig Walles, S.A.; Erixon, K.

    1984-03-01

    The method for determination of single-strand breaks (SSB) in DNA by the technique of alkaline unwinding and hydroxylapatite chromatography has been applied for cell nuclei from organs of mice. Male mice were given methyl methane-sulfonate (MMS) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) by i.p. administration. Cell nuclei were prepared from various organs and then lysed in alkali. The amount of DNA was determined by fluorometry using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole.2HCl. The relative level of SSB in DNA was determined in various organs (liver, kidney, lung, spleen, testis and brain) 1-24 h after administration of the agent. After MMS-treatment the number of SSB in DNA increased to about the same extent in all organs 1 h post-treatment but then decreased by time. The SSB persisted for the longest time in brain- and lung-DNA. DMSO induced SSB only in DNA of kidney.

  14. Microspore Induced Doubled Haploids Production from Ethyl Methanesulfonate (EMS) Soaked Flower Buds Is an Efficient Strategy for Mutagenesis in Chinese Cabbage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin; Dai, Shuangyan; Gu, Aixia; Liu, Mengyang; Wang, Yanhua; Luo, Shuangxia; Zhao, Yujing; Wang, Shan; Xuan, Shuxin; Chen, Xueping; Li, Xiaofeng; Bonnema, Guusje; Zhao, Jianjun; Shen, Shuxing

    2016-01-01

    Chinese cabbage buds were soaked with Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) to induce mutagenesis. The influence of different EMS concentrations and treatment durations on microspore development, embryo production rate and seedling rate were evaluated in five Chinese cabbage genotypes. Mutations in four color-related genes were identified using high resolution melting (HRM) curves of their PCR products. The greatest embryo production and seedling rates were observed when buds were treated with 0.03 to 0.1% EMS for 5 to 10 min, while EMS concentrations greater than 0.1% were lethal to the microspores. In total, 142 mutants with distinct variations in leaf shape, leaf color, corolla size, flower color, bolting time and downy mildew resistance were identified from 475 microspore culture derived Doubled Haploids. Our results demonstrate that microspore derived Doubled Haploids from EMS soaked buds represents an efficient approach to rapidly generate homozygous Chinese cabbage mutants.

  15. P450monooxygenases (P450ome) of the model white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Khajamohiddin; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2012-01-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium, the model white rot fungus, has been the focus of research for the past about four decades for understanding the mechanisms and processes of biodegradation of the natural aromatic polymer lignin and a broad range of environmental toxic chemicals. The ability to degrade this vast array of xenobiotic compounds was originally attributed to its lignin-degrading enzyme system (LDS), mainly the extracellular peroxidases. However, subsequent physiological, biochemical, and/or genetic studies by us and others identified the involvement of a peroxidase-independent oxidoreductase system, the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system. The whole genome sequence revealed an extraordinarily large P450 contingent (P450ome) with an estimated 149 P450s in this organism. This review focuses on the current status of understanding on the P450 monooxygenase system of P. chrysosporium in terms of pre-genomic and post-genomic identification, structural and evolutionary analysis, transcriptional regulation, redox partners, and functional characterization for its biodegradative potential. Future research on this catalytically diverse oxidoreductase enzyme system and its major role as a newly emerged player in xenobiotic metabolism/degradation is discussed. PMID:22624627

  16. Biooxidation of n-butane to 1-butanol by engineered P450 monooxygenase under increased pressure.

    PubMed

    Nebel, Bernd A; Scheps, Daniel; Honda Malca, Sumire; Nestl, Bettina M; Breuer, Michael; Wagner, Hans-Günter; Breitscheidel, Boris; Kratz, Detlef; Hauer, Bernhard

    2014-12-10

    In addition to the traditional 1-butanol production by hydroformylation of gaseous propene and by fermentation of biomass, the cytochrome P450-catalyzed direct terminal oxidation of n-butane into the primary alcohol 1-butanol constitutes an alternative route to provide the high demand of this basic chemical. Moreover the use of n-butane offers an unexploited ubiquitous feed stock available in large quantities. Based on protein engineering of CYP153A from Polaromonas sp. JS666 and the improvement of the native redox system, a highly ω-regioselective (>96%) fusion protein variant (CYP153AP.sp.(G254A)-CPRBM3) for the conversion of n-butane into 1-butanol was developed. Maximum yield of 3.12g/L butanol, of which 2.99g/L comprise for 1-butanol, has been obtained after 20h reaction time. Due to the poor solubility of n-butane in an aqueous system, a high pressure reaction assembly was applied to increase the conversion. After optimization a maximum product content of 4.35g/L 1-butanol from a total amount of 4.53g/L butanol catalyzed by the self-sufficient fusion monooxygenase has been obtained at 15bar pressure. In comparison to the CYP153A wild type the 1-butanol concentration was enhanced fivefold using the engineered monooxygenase whole cell system by using the high-pressure reaction assembly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Stabilization of cyclohexanone monooxygenase by a computationally designed disulfide bond spanning only one residue

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Hugo L.; Wijma, Hein J.; Fromont, Lucie; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important parameter in biocatalytic applications, and there is a strong need for efficient methods to generate robust enzymes. We investigated whether stabilizing disulfide bonds can be computationally designed based on a model structure. In our approach, unlike in previous disulfide engineering studies, short bonds spanning only a few residues were included. We used cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO), a Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) from Acinetobacter sp. NCIMB9871 as the target enzyme. This enzyme has been the prototype BVMO for many biocatalytic studies even though it is notoriously labile. After creating a small library of mutant enzymes with introduced cysteine pairs and subsequent screening for improved thermostability, three stabilizing disulfide bonds were identified. The introduced disulfide bonds are all within 12 Å of each other, suggesting this particular region is critical for unfolding. This study shows that stabilizing disulfide bonds do not have to span many residues, as the most stabilizing disulfide bond, L323C–A325C, spans only one residue while it stabilizes the enzyme, as shown by a 6 °C increase in its apparent melting temperature. PMID:24649397

  18. Induced allostery in the directed evolution of an enantioselective Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng; Acevedo, Juan Pablo; Reetz, Manfred T.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular basis of allosteric effects, known to be caused by an effector docking to an enzyme at a site distal from the binding pocket, has been studied recently by applying directed evolution. Here, we utilize laboratory evolution in a different way, namely to induce allostery by introducing appropriate distal mutations that cause domain movements with concomitant reshaping of the binding pocket in the absence of an effector. To test this concept, the thermostable Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase, phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO), was chosen as the enzyme to be employed in asymmetric Baeyer–Villiger reactions of substrates that are not accepted by the wild type. By using the known X-ray structure of PAMO, a decision was made regarding an appropriate site at which saturation mutagenesis is most likely to generate mutants capable of inducing allostery without any effector compound being present. After screening only 400 transformants, a double mutant was discovered that catalyzes the asymmetric oxidative kinetic resolution of a set of structurally different 2-substituted cyclohexanone derivatives as well as the desymmetrization of three different 4-substituted cyclohexanones, all with high enantioselectivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and covariance maps unveiled the origin of increased substrate scope as being due to allostery. Large domain movements occur that expose and reshape the binding pocket. This type of focused library production, aimed at inducing significant allosteric effects, is a viable alternative to traditional approaches to “designed” directed evolution that address the binding site directly. PMID:20133612

  19. The hydrogen peroxide reactivity of peptidylglycine monooxygenase supports a Cu(II)-superoxo catalytic intermediate.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Andrew T; Yukl, Erik T; Alkevich, Katsiaryna; McCormack, Ashley L; Blackburn, Ninian J

    2006-02-17

    We have investigated the reaction of peptidylglycine monooxygenase with hydrogen peroxide to determine whether Cu(II)-peroxo is a likely intermediate. When the oxidized enzyme was reacted with the dansyl-YVG substrate and H(2)O(2), the alpha-hydroxyglycine product was formed. The reaction was catalytic and did not require the presence of additional reductant. When (18)O-labeled H(2)O(2) was reacted with peptidylglycine monooxygenase and substrate anaerobically, oxygen in the product was labeled with (18)O and must therefore be derived from H(2)O(2). However, when the reaction was carried out with H (16)(2)O(2) in the presence of (18)O(2), 60% of the product contained the (18)O label. Therefore, the reaction must proceed via an intermediate that can react directly with dioxygen and thus scramble the label. Under strictly anaerobic conditions (in the presence of glucose and glucose oxidase, where no oxygen was released into the medium from nonenzymatic peroxide decomposition), product formation and peroxide consumption were tightly coupled, and the rate of product formation was identical to that measured under aerobic conditions. Peroxide reactivity was eliminated by a mutation at the Cu(H) center, which should not be involved in the peroxide shunt. Our data lend support to recent proposals that Cu(II)-superoxide is the active species.

  20. Lactone-bound structures of cyclohexanone monooxygenase provide insight into the stereochemistry of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yachnin, Brahm J; McEvoy, Michelle B; MacCuish, Roderick J D; Morley, Krista L; Lau, Peter C K; Berghuis, Albert M

    2014-12-19

    The Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are microbial enzymes that catalyze the synthetically useful Baeyer-Villiger oxidation reaction. The available BVMO crystal structures all lack a substrate or product bound in a position that would determine the substrate specificity and stereospecificity of the enzyme. Here, we report two crystal structures of cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) with its product, ε-caprolactone, bound: the CHMO(Tight) and CHMO(Loose) structures. The CHMO(Tight) structure represents the enzyme state in which substrate acceptance and stereospecificity is determined, providing a foundation for engineering BVMOs with altered substrate spectra and/or stereospecificity. The CHMO(Loose) structure is the first structure where the product is solvent accessible. This structure represents the enzyme state upon binding and release of the substrate and product. In addition, the role of the invariant Arg329 in chaperoning the substrate/product during the catalytic cycle is highlighted. Overall, these data provide a structural framework for the engineering of BVMOs with altered substrate spectra and/or stereospecificity.

  1. Stabilization of cyclohexanone monooxygenase by a computationally designed disulfide bond spanning only one residue.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Hugo L; Wijma, Hein J; Fromont, Lucie; Janssen, Dick B; Fraaije, Marco W

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important parameter in biocatalytic applications, and there is a strong need for efficient methods to generate robust enzymes. We investigated whether stabilizing disulfide bonds can be computationally designed based on a model structure. In our approach, unlike in previous disulfide engineering studies, short bonds spanning only a few residues were included. We used cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO), a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) from Acinetobacter sp. NCIMB9871 as the target enzyme. This enzyme has been the prototype BVMO for many biocatalytic studies even though it is notoriously labile. After creating a small library of mutant enzymes with introduced cysteine pairs and subsequent screening for improved thermostability, three stabilizing disulfide bonds were identified. The introduced disulfide bonds are all within 12 Å of each other, suggesting this particular region is critical for unfolding. This study shows that stabilizing disulfide bonds do not have to span many residues, as the most stabilizing disulfide bond, L323C-A325C, spans only one residue while it stabilizes the enzyme, as shown by a 6 °C increase in its apparent melting temperature.

  2. Effects of nutrition and alcohol on the microsomal monooxygenase system (MMS) of rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Ronis, M.; Huang, J.; Ingelman-Sundberg, M.; Badger, T.M. Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Center, Little Rock )

    1991-03-15

    Ethanol is a known inducer of the hepatic cytochrome P450 dependent microsomal monooxygenase system (MMS). As a consequence, ethanol intake affects the clearance and metabolism of many drugs and other xenobiotics including acetaminophen, enflurane, carbon tetrachloride and ethanol itself. The major ethanol inducible cytochrome P450 isozyme in the rat liver, CYP 2E1, has been well characterized. Much less is known concerning extrahepatic effects of ethanol on the monooxygenase system. In the current study, the effects of diet and alcohol were examined on MMS activities and cytochrome P450 expression in the kidneys of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Three diets containing no ethanol and two diets containing ethanol at 35% of total calories were studied. Renal MMS activities were measured using enzyme specific substrates and isozyme apoprotein levels were determined by Western blot analysis using antibodies directed against rat hepatic cytochrome P450s CYP 2E1, CYP 2A1 and CYP 3A2. Several diet and alcohol induced effects were observed, including a 5-fold diet-independent ethanol induction of CYP 2E1 cross reactive protein. No diet or ethanol effects were observed in levels of CYP 2A1 or CYP 3A2 cross reactive proteins.

  3. Investigation of the enzymology and pharmacology of novel substrates and inhibitors of dopamine beta-monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.F.

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine beta-monooxygenase (DBM) was shown to catalyze the selenoxidation of 2-(phenylseleno)ethylamines, selenium-containing analogues of dopamine, by the normal monooxygenase pathway. The compounds 2-(phenylseleno)-ethylamine (PAESe), 2-(4'-hydroxyphenylseleno)ethylamine (pOH PAESe), and 1-(phenylseleno)-2-propylamine (Me PAESe) were synthesized and fully characterized as DBM substrates. Two other classes of compounds were investigated as potential alternate substrates for DBM. The possibility of stereoselective sulfonylation of 2-(phenylsulfenyl)- ethylamine (PAESO) was considered. A unique class of compounds, 2-(phenylthio)ethanols were designed and synthesized as DBM substrates but were found to be a novel class of potent competitive inhibitors of DBM with respect to tyramine. Preliminary experiments were also performed in an effort to demonstrate that the potent antihypertensive and indirect-acting sympathomimetic activity of 2-(phenylthio)ethylamine (PAES) was a result of DBM-oxygenation of this compound in vivo. The specific reserpine-sensitive uptake of (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine into rat brain synaptosomes was demonstrated as was the synaptosomal conversion of (/sup 3/H)-dopamine to (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine.

  4. Mechanism of O2 activation and substrate hydroxylation in noncoupled binuclear copper monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Ryan E.; Tian, Li; Solomon, Edward I.

    2016-01-01

    Peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) and dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM) are copper-dependent enzymes that are vital for neurotransmitter regulation and hormone biosynthesis. These enzymes feature a unique active site consisting of two spatially separated (by 11 Å in PHM) and magnetically noncoupled copper centers that enables 1e– activation of O2 for hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) of substrate C–H bonds and subsequent hydroxylation. Although the structures of the resting enzymes are known, details of the hydroxylation mechanism and timing of long-range electron transfer (ET) are not clear. This study presents density-functional calculations of the full reaction coordinate, which demonstrate: (i) the importance of the end-on coordination of superoxide to Cu for HAA along the triplet spin surface; (ii) substrate radical rebound to a CuII hydroperoxide favors the proximal, nonprotonated oxygen; and (iii) long-range ET can only occur at a late step with a large driving force, which serves to inhibit deleterious Fenton chemistry. The large inner-sphere reorganization energy at the ET site is used as a control mechanism to arrest premature ET and dictate the correct timing of ET. PMID:27790986

  5. Increased monooxygenase activity associated with resistance to permethrin in Pediculus humanus capitis (Anoplura: Pediculidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    González Audino, P; Barrios, S; Vassena, C; Mougabure Cueto, G; Zerba, E; Picollo, M I

    2005-05-01

    We studied the profile of permethrin resistance in populations of head lice infesting children 6-12 yr old in schools and their homes in and around Buenos Aires, Argentina. Five permethrin-resistant populations with different levels of resistance were collected: Hogar Loyola (HL), Republica de Turquia (RT), Hogar Mitre (HM), Guardia de Honor (GH), and Ricardo Guiraldes (RG). One susceptible population, Bandera Argentina (BA), also was collected. Their level of resistance was evaluated, and results showed resistance ratios of 13 for HL, 16 for RT, 22 for HM, 61 for GH, and 69 for RG. To elucidate the possible involvement of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system in conferring permethrin resistance, ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase (ECOD) activity was measured in abdomens of individual third instars and adults by using a fluorometric assay. The ECOD activity was lower in the susceptible BA population (4.7 ng per louse) than in the resistant ones (13.7 ng per louse for RG, 12.3 ng per louse for GH, 8.6 ng per louse for RT, and 8.2 ng per louse for HL). ECOD activity was significantly correlated with the level of resistance in the field populations (r = 0.97, P = 0.0009), suggesting a role for cytochrome monooxygenase P450 system in permethrin resistance by head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer.

  6. Untangling the multiple monooxygenases of Mycobacterium chubuense strain NBB4, a versatile hydrocarbon degrader.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Nicholas V; Yau, Sheree; Wilson, Neil L; Nolan, Laura M; Migocki, Margaret D; Ly, Mai-Anh; Crossett, Ben; Holmes, Andrew J

    2011-06-01

    Mycobacterium strain NBB4 was isolated on ethene as part of a bioprospecting study searching for novel monooxygenase (MO) enzymes of interest to biocatalysis and bioremediation. Previous work indicated that strain NBB4 contained an unprecedented diversity of MO genes, and we hypothesized that each MO type would support growth on a distinct hydrocarbon substrate. Here, we attempted to untangle the relationships between MO types and hydrocarbon substrates. Strain NBB4 was shown to grow on C2 -C4 alkenes and C2 -C16 alkanes. Complete gene clusters encoding six different monooxygenases were recovered from a fosmid library, including homologues of ethene MO (etnABCD), propene MO (pmoABCD), propane MO (smoABCD), butane MO (smoXYB1C1Z), cytochrome P450 (CYP153; fdx-cyp-fdr) and alkB (alkB-rubA1-rubA2). Catabolic enzymes involved in ethene assimilation (EtnA, EtnC, EtnD, EtnE) and alkane assimilation (alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases) were identified by proteomics, and we showed for the first time that stress response proteins (catalase/peroxidase, chaperonins) were induced by growth on C2 -C5 alkanes and ethene. Surprisingly, none of the identified MO genes could be specifically associated with oxidation of small alkanes, and thus the nature of the gaseous alkane MO in NBB4 remains mysterious.

  7. Sulfur and Hydrogen Isotope Anomalies in Meteorite Sulfonic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George W.; Thiemens, Mark H.; Jackson, Teresa L.; Chang, Sherwood

    1997-01-01

    Intramolecular carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur isotope ratios were measured on a homologous series of organic sulfonic acids discovered in the Murchison meteorite. Mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations were observed along with high deuterium/hydrogen ratios. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low-temperature environment that is consistent with that of interstellar clouds. Sulfur-33 enrichments observed in methanesulfonic acid could have resulted from gas-phase ultraviolet irradiation of a precursor, carbon disulfide. The source of the sulfonic acid precursors may have been the reactive interstellar molecule carbon monosulfide.

  8. Metabolic pathway involved in 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline degradation by Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 and cloning of the novel flavin-dependent monooxygenase system meaBA.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiliang; Chen, Qiongzhen; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Zhuang, Kai; Huang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Zhengguang; Huang, Yan; Wang, Fei; Cui, Zhongli

    2015-12-01

    2-Methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA) is the main microbial degradation intermediate of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor. Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 can utilize MEA and various alkyl-substituted aniline and phenol compounds as sole carbon and energy sources for growth. We isolated the mutant strain MEA3-1Mut, which converts MEA only to 2-methyl-6-ethyl-hydroquinone (MEHQ) and 2-methyl-6-ethyl-benzoquinone (MEBQ). MEA may be oxidized by the P450 monooxygenase system to 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (4-OH-MEA), which can be hydrolytically spontaneously deaminated to MEBQ or MEHQ. The MEA microbial metabolic pathway was reconstituted based on the substrate spectra and identification of the intermediate metabolites in both the wild-type and mutant strains. Plasmidome sequencing indicated that both strains harbored 7 plasmids with sizes ranging from 6,108 bp to 287,745 bp. Among the 7 plasmids, 6 were identical, and pMEA02' in strain MEA3-1Mut lost a 37,000-bp fragment compared to pMEA02 in strain MEA3-1. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein mass fingerprinting (PMF) showed that MEA3-1Mut lost the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase (TC-FDM) MeaBA, which was encoded by a gene in the lost fragment of pMEA02. MeaA shared 22% to 25% amino acid sequence identity with oxygenase components of some TC-FDMs, whereas MeaB showed no sequence identity with the reductase components of those TC-FDMs. Complementation with meaBA in MEA3-1Mut and heterologous expression in Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 resulted in the production of an active MEHQ monooxygenase.

  9. Metabolic Pathway Involved in 2-Methyl-6-Ethylaniline Degradation by Sphingobium sp. Strain MEA3-1 and Cloning of the Novel Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenase System meaBA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Weiliang; Chen, Qiongzhen; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Zhuang, Kai; Huang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Zhengguang; Huang, Yan; Wang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    2-Methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA) is the main microbial degradation intermediate of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor. Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 can utilize MEA and various alkyl-substituted aniline and phenol compounds as sole carbon and energy sources for growth. We isolated the mutant strain MEA3-1Mut, which converts MEA only to 2-methyl-6-ethyl-hydroquinone (MEHQ) and 2-methyl-6-ethyl-benzoquinone (MEBQ). MEA may be oxidized by the P450 monooxygenase system to 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (4-OH-MEA), which can be hydrolytically spontaneously deaminated to MEBQ or MEHQ. The MEA microbial metabolic pathway was reconstituted based on the substrate spectra and identification of the intermediate metabolites in both the wild-type and mutant strains. Plasmidome sequencing indicated that both strains harbored 7 plasmids with sizes ranging from 6,108 bp to 287,745 bp. Among the 7 plasmids, 6 were identical, and pMEA02′ in strain MEA3-1Mut lost a 37,000-bp fragment compared to pMEA02 in strain MEA3-1. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein mass fingerprinting (PMF) showed that MEA3-1Mut lost the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase (TC-FDM) MeaBA, which was encoded by a gene in the lost fragment of pMEA02. MeaA shared 22% to 25% amino acid sequence identity with oxygenase components of some TC-FDMs, whereas MeaB showed no sequence identity with the reductase components of those TC-FDMs. Complementation with meaBA in MEA3-1Mut and heterologous expression in Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 resulted in the production of an active MEHQ monooxygenase. PMID:26386060

  10. Whole genome co-expression analysis of soybean cytochrome P450 genes identifies nodulation-specific P450 monooxygenases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) catalyze oxidation of various substrates using oxygen and NAD(P)H. Plant P450s are involved in the biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites performing diverse biological functions. The recent availability of soybean genome sequence allows us to ident...

  11. Controlling the regiospecific oxidation of aromatics via active site engineering of toluene para-monooxygenase of Ralstonia pickettii PKO1.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ayelet; Tao, Ying; Rui, Lingyun; Wood, Thomas K

    2005-01-07

    A primary goal of protein engineering is to control catalytic activity. Here we show that through mutagenesis of three active site residues, the catalytic activity of a multicomponent monooxygenase is altered so that it hydroxylates all three positions of toluene as well as both positions of naphthalene. Hence, for the first time, an enzyme has been engineered so that its regiospecific oxidation of a substrate can be controlled. Through the A107G mutation in the alpha-subunit of toluene para-monooxygenase, a variant was formed that hydroxylated toluene primarily at the ortho-position while converting naphthalene to 1-naphthol. Conversely, the A107T variant produced >98% p-cresol and p-nitrophenol from toluene and nitrobenzene, respectively, as well as produced 2-naphthol from naphthalene. The mutation I100S/G103S produced a toluene para-monooxygenase variant that formed 75% m-cresol from toluene and 100% m-nitrophenol from nitrobenzene; thus, for the first time a true meta-hydroxylating toluene monooxygenase was created.

  12. Purification and characterization of toluene 2-monooxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia G4.

    PubMed

    Newman, L M; Wackett, L P

    1995-10-31

    Recent in vivo studies indicate that ring monooxygenation is a widespread mechanism by which bacteria metabolize aromatic hydrocarbons and obtain carbon and energy. In this study, toluene 2-monooxygenase from Burkholderia (formerly Pseudomonas) cepacia G4 was purified to homogeneity and found to be a three-component enzyme system. The reconstituted enzyme system oxidized toluene to o-cresol and o-cresol to 3-methylcatechol, an important intermediate for growth of the bacterium on toluene. Steady-state kinetic parameters measured for the water-soluble substrate o-cresol were a Km of 0.8 microM and a Vmax of 131 nmol min-1 (mg of hydroxylase protein)-1. The three protein components were (1) a 40 kDa polypeptide containing one FAD and a [2Fe2S] cluster, (2) a 10.4 kDa polypeptide that contained no identifiable metals or organic cofactors, and (3) a 211 kDa alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2 component containing five to six iron atoms. The 40 kDa flavo-iron-sulfur protein oxidized NADH and transferred electrons to cytochrome c, dyes, and the alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2 component. It is analogous to other NADH oxidoreductase components found in a wide range of bacterial mono- and dioxygenases. The 10.4 kDa component, added to the other two components and NADH, increased toluene oxidation rates 10-fold. The alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2 component was indicated to contain the site for toluene binding and hydroxylation by the following observations: (1) tight binding to a toluene affinity column; (2) oxidation of toluene after reduction of the protein with dithionite and adding O2; (3) H2O2-dependent toluene oxidation and catalase activity; and (4) spectroscopic studies of the iron atoms in the component. The alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2 component had no significant absorbance in the visible region. EPR spectroscopy yielded a signal at g = 16 upon addition of > 2 equiv of electrons per 2 Fe atoms. Taken with the quantitation of five to six iron atoms, the data suggest that the alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2

  13. Status of Resistance of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to Neonicotinoids in Iran and Detoxification by Cytochrome P450-Dependent Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Basij, M; Talebi, K; Ghadamyari, M; Hosseininaveh, V; Salami, S A

    2017-02-01

    Nine Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) populations were collected from different regions of Iran. In all nine populations, only one biotype (B biotype) was detected. Susceptibilities of these populations to imidacloprid and acetamiprid were assayed. The lethal concentration 50 values (LC50) for different populations showed a significant discrepancy in the susceptibility of B. tabaci to imidacloprid (3.76 to 772.06 mg l(-1)) and acetamiprid (4.96 to 865 mg l(-1)). The resistance ratio of the populations ranged from 9.72 to 205.20 for imidacloprid and 6.38 to 174.57 for acetamiprid. The synergistic effects of piperonylbutoxide (PBO) and S,S,S-tributylphosphorotrithioate (DEF) were evaluated for the susceptible (RF) and resistant (JR) populations for the determination of the involvement of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase and carboxylesterase, respectively, in their resistance mechanisms. The results showed that PBO overcame the resistance of the JR population to both imidacloprid and acetamiprid, with synergistic ratios of 72.7 and 106.9, respectively. Carboxylesterase, glutathione S-transferase and cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase were studied biochemically, for the purpose of measuring the activity of the metabolizing enzymes in order to determine which enzymes are directly involved in neonicotinoid resistance. There was an increase in the activity of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase up to 17-fold in the resistant JR population (RR = 205.20). The most plausible activity of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase correlated with the resistances of imidacloprid and acetamiprid, and this suggests that cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase is the only enzyme system responsible for neonicotinoid resistance in the nine populations of B. tabaci.

  14. Alkyl Formate Ester Synthesis by a Fungal Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Felix Martin; Tolmie, Carmien; Smit, Martha Sophia; Opperman, Diederik Johannes

    2017-03-16

    We investigated Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO)-mediated synthesis of alkyl formate esters, which are important flavor and fragrance products. A recombinant fungal BVMO from Aspergillus flavus was found to transform a selection of aliphatic aldehydes into alkyl formates with high regioselectivity. Near complete conversion of 10 mm octanal was achieved within 8 h with a regiomeric excess of ∼80 %. Substrate concentration was found to affect specific activity and regioselectivity of the BVMO, as well as the rate of product autohydrolysis to the primary alcohol. More than 80 % conversion of 50 mm octanal was reached after 72 h (TTN nearly 20 000). Biotransformation on a 200 mL scale under unoptimized conditions gave a space-time yield (STY) of 4.2 g L(-1)  d(-1) (3.4 g L(-1)  d(-1) extracted product).

  15. Distribution and Diversity of Archaeal Ammonia Monooxygenase Genes Associated with Corals▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Beman, J.Michael; Roberts, Kathryn J.; Wegley, Linda; Rohwer, Forest; Francis, Christopher A.

    2007-01-01

    Corals are known to harbor diverse microbial communities of Bacteria and Archaea, yet the ecological role of these microorganisms remains largely unknown. Here we report putative ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) genes of archaeal origin associated with corals. Multiple DNA samples drawn from nine coral species and four different reef locations were PCR screened for archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and archaeal amoA gene sequences were obtained from five different species of coral collected in Bocas del Toro, Panama. The 210 coral-associated archaeal amoA sequences recovered in this study were broadly distributed phylogenetically, with most only distantly related to previously reported sequences from coastal/estuarine sediments and oceanic water columns. In contrast, the bacterial amoA gene could not be amplified from any of these samples. These results offer further evidence for the widespread presence of the archaeal amoA gene in marine ecosystems, including coral reefs. PMID:17586663

  16. Dynamics of Alkane Hydroxylation at the Non-Heme Diiron Center in Methane Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Guallar, Victor; Gherman, Benjamin F.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Friesner, Richard A.

    2002-03-12

    Semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations have been combined with quantum chemistry calculations to provide detailed modeling of the methane and ethane hydroxylation reactions catalyzed by the hydroxylase enzymes of the soluble methane monooxygenase system. The experimental distribution of enantiomeric alcohols in the reaction of ethanes made chiral by the use of hydrogen isotopes is quantitatively reproduced and explained. The reaction dynamics involve a mixture of concerted and bound radical trajectories, and we characterize each of these reactive channels in detail. Diffusion of the bound radical intermediate at the active site core determines the global rate constant. The results also provide a qualitative rationale for the lack of ring-opened products derived from certain radical clock substrate probes and for the relative rate constants and kinetic isotope effects exhibited by a variety of substrates.

  17. Xenon and halogenated alkanes track putative substrate binding cavities in the soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Whittington, D A; Rosenzweig, A C; Frederick, C A; Lippard, S J

    2001-03-27

    To investigate the role of protein cavities in facilitating movement of the substrates, methane and dioxygen, in the soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylase (MMOH), we determined the X-ray structures of MMOH from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) cocrystallized with dibromomethane or iodoethane, or by using crystals pressurized with xenon gas. The halogenated alkanes bind in two cavities within the alpha-subunit that extend from one surface of the protein to the buried dinuclear iron active site. Two additional binding sites were located in the beta-subunit. Pressurization of two crystal forms of MMOH with xenon resulted in the identification of six binding sites located exclusively in the alpha-subunit. These results indicate that hydrophobic species bind preferentially in preexisting cavities in MMOH and support the hypothesis that such cavities may play a functional role in sequestering and enhancing the availability of the physiological substrates for reaction at the active site.

  18. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases involved in anthracene metabolism by the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Chigu, Nomathemba Loice; Hirosue, Sinji; Nakamura, Chie; Teramoto, Hiroshi; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) involved in anthracene metabolism by the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium were identified by comprehensive screening of both catalytic potentials and transcriptomic profiling. Functional screening of P. chrysosporium P450s (PcCYPs) revealed that 14 PcCYP species catalyze stepwise conversion of anthracene to anthraquinone via intermediate formation of anthrone. Moreover, transcriptomic profiling explored using a complementary DNA microarray system demonstrated that 12 PcCYPs are up-regulated in response to exogenous addition of anthracene. Among the up-regulated PcCYPs, five species showed catalytic activity against anthracene. Based upon both catalytic and transcriptional properties, these five species are most likely to play major roles in anthracene metabolic processes in vivo. Thus, the combination of functional screening and a microarray system may provide a novel strategy for obtaining a thorough understanding of the catalytic functions and biological impacts of PcCYPs.

  19. Toluene 4-Monooxygenase and its Complex with Effector Protein T4moD

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Lucas J.; Fox, Brian G.

    2012-10-16

    Toluene 4-monooxygenase (T4MO) is a multiprotein diiron enzyme complex that catalyzes the regiospecific oxidation of toluene to p-cresol. Catalytic function requires the presence of a small protein, called the effector protein. Effector protein exerts substantial control on the diiron hydroxylase catalytic cycle through protein-protein interactions. High-resolution crystal structures of the stoichometric hydroxylase and effector protein complex described here reveal how protein-protein interactions and reduction of the diiron center produce an active site configuration poised for reaction with O{sub 2}. Further information from crystal structures of mutated isoforms of the hydroxylase and a peroxo adduct is combined with catalytic results to give a fuller picture of the geometry of the enzyme-substrate complex used for the high fidelity oxidation of hydrocarbon substrates.

  20. Supramolecular control of monooxygenase reactivity in a copper(ii) cryptate.

    PubMed

    Chaloner, L; Khomutovskaya, A; Thomas, F; Ottenwaelder, X

    2016-07-05

    We report a detailed investigation of the formation and self-decomposition of Cu(ii)-hydroperoxo intermediates under the influence of second-coordination-sphere features provided by a cryptand. In solution, an equilibrium between two copper complexes with square-planar and square-pyramidal geometries was identified. Upon addition of H2O2/Et3N, two copper(ii)-hydroperoxo intermediates formed at different rates. Their decomposition via self-oxidation was probed by deuterating select positions on the cryptand. This led to a small kinetic isotope effect of 1.5. Mass spectrometry analysis of the demetallated organic products is consistent with a direct oxygen-atom transfer to a tertiary amine on the cryptand, forming an N-oxide, unlike other models of copper mononuclear monooxygenase enzymes.

  1. Structural and mechanistic basis of differentiated inhibitors of the acute pancreatitis target kynurenine-3-monooxygenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Jonathan P.; Rowland, Paul; Taylor, Mark R. D.; Christodoulou, Erica M.; Haslam, Carl; Hobbs, Clare I.; Holmes, Duncan S.; Homes, Paul; Liddle, John; Mole, Damian J.; Uings, Iain; Walker, Ann L.; Webster, Scott P.; Mowat, Christopher G.; Chung, Chun-Wa

    2017-06-01

    Kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a key FAD-dependent enzyme of tryptophan metabolism. In animal models, KMO inhibition has shown benefit in neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's. Most recently it has been identified as a target for acute pancreatitis multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (AP-MODS); a devastating inflammatory condition with a mortality rate in excess of 20%. Here we report and dissect the molecular mechanism of action of three classes of KMO inhibitors with differentiated binding modes and kinetics. Two novel inhibitor classes trap the catalytic flavin in a previously unobserved tilting conformation. This correlates with picomolar affinities, increased residence times and an absence of the peroxide production seen with previous substrate site inhibitors. These structural and mechanistic insights culminated in GSK065(C1) and GSK366(C2), molecules suitable for preclinical evaluation. Moreover, revising the repertoire of flavin dynamics in this enzyme class offers exciting new opportunities for inhibitor design.

  2. Single-domain flavoenzymes trigger lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases for oxidative degradation of cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Garajova, Sona; Mathieu, Yann; Beccia, Maria Rosa; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Biaso, Frédéric; Fanuel, Mathieu; Ropartz, David; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Record, Eric; Rogniaux, Hélène; Henrissat, Bernard; Berrin, Jean-Guy

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic conversion of plant biomass has been recently revolutionized by the discovery of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) that carry out oxidative cleavage of polysaccharides. These very powerful enzymes are abundant in fungal saprotrophs. LPMOs require activation by electrons that can be provided by cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs), but as some fungi lack CDH-encoding genes, other recycling enzymes must exist. We investigated the ability of AA3_2 flavoenzymes secreted under lignocellulolytic conditions to trigger oxidative cellulose degradation by AA9 LPMOs. Among the flavoenzymes tested, we show that glucose dehydrogenase and aryl-alcohol quinone oxidoreductases are catalytically efficient electron donors for LPMOs. These single-domain flavoenzymes display redox potentials compatible with electron transfer between partners. Our findings extend the array of enzymes which regulate the oxidative degradation of cellulose by lignocellulolytic fungi. PMID:27312718

  3. Hepatic microsomal monooxygenase activity in black-crowned night herons (BCNHS) from the Chesapeake basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melancon, M.J.; Rattner, B.A.; Rice, C.P.; Hines, R.K.; Eisemann, J.

    1992-01-01

    In a continuation of our studies on the use of hepatic cytochromes P450 as a biomarker for contaminant exposure, BCNH eggs were collected from Baltimore Harbor (BH) (n = 20), Washington National Zoo (WNZ) (n = 13) and Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR) (reference location) (n = 20). Eggs were artificially incubated and sacrificed at pipping. Livers were snap frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at -80?C until assay. Hepatic microsomes were prepared by differential centrifugation of homogenates and assayed for protein, benzyloxy-resorufin-O-dealkylase, (BROD) ethoxyresorufinO-dealkylase (EROD) and pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (PROD). Monooxygenase assays were run in triplicate using a computer-coupled fluorometric microwell plate scanner. Values for EROD and BROD, but not PROD, from BH and WNZ were significantly greater (approximately double) than those from CNWR. Organochlorine pesticide residues were much higher in carcasses from BH and WNZ as compared to CNWR. Carcasses are presently being analyzed for PCB congeners.

  4. The Contribution of Non-catalytic Carbohydrate Binding Modules to the Activity of Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases*

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Lucy I.; Labourel, Aurore; Walton, Paul H.; Davies, Gideon J.; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable industrial substrate. Copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) contribute to the degradation of lignocellulose and increase the efficiency of biofuel production. LPMOs can contain non-catalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), but their role in the activity of these enzymes is poorly understood. Here we explored the importance of CBMs in LPMO function. The family 2a CBMs of two monooxygenases, CfLPMO10 and TbLPMO10 from Cellulomonas fimi and Thermobispora bispora, respectively, were deleted and/or replaced with CBMs from other proteins. The data showed that the CBMs could potentiate and, surprisingly, inhibit LPMO activity, and that these effects were both enzyme-specific and substrate-specific. Removing the natural CBM or introducing CtCBM3a, from the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome scaffoldin CipA, almost abolished the catalytic activity of the LPMOs against the cellulosic substrates. The deleterious effect of CBM removal likely reflects the importance of prolonged presentation of the enzyme on the surface of the substrate for efficient catalytic activity, as only LPMOs appended to CBMs bound tightly to cellulose. The negative impact of CtCBM3a is in sharp contrast with the capacity of this binding module to potentiate the activity of a range of glycoside hydrolases including cellulases. The deletion of the endogenous CBM from CfLPMO10 or the introduction of a family 10 CBM from Cellvibrio japonicus LPMO10B into TbLPMO10 influenced the quantity of non-oxidized products generated, demonstrating that CBMs can modulate the mode of action of LPMOs. This study demonstrates that engineered LPMO-CBM hybrids can display enhanced industrially relevant oxygenations. PMID:26801613

  5. Identification of a flavin-containing S-oxygenating monooxygenase involved in alliin biosynthesis in garlic.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Naoko; Onuma, Misato; Mizuno, Shinya; Sugino, Yuka; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Imai, Shinsuke; Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Sumi, Shin-ichiro; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-09-01

    S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides are cysteine-derived secondary metabolites highly accumulated in the genus Allium. Despite pharmaceutical importance, the enzymes that contribute to the biosynthesis of S-alk-(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides in Allium plants remain largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of a flavin-containing monooxygenase, AsFMO1, in garlic (Allium sativum), which is responsible for the S-oxygenation reaction in the biosynthesis of S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide (alliin). Recombinant AsFMO1 protein catalyzed the stereoselective S-oxygenation of S-allyl-l-cysteine to nearly exclusively yield (RC SS )-S-allylcysteine sulfoxide, which has identical stereochemistry to the major natural form of alliin in garlic. The S-oxygenation reaction catalyzed by AsFMO1 was dependent on the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), consistent with other known flavin-containing monooxygenases. AsFMO1 preferred S-allyl-l-cysteine to γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine as the S-oxygenation substrate, suggesting that in garlic, the S-oxygenation of alliin biosynthetic intermediates primarily occurs after deglutamylation. The transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins indicated that AsFMO1 is localized in the cytosol. AsFMO1 mRNA was accumulated in storage leaves of pre-emergent nearly sprouting bulbs, and in various tissues of sprouted bulbs with green foliage leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that AsFMO1 functions as an S-allyl-l-cysteine S-oxygenase, and contributes to the production of alliin both through the conversion of stored γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine to alliin in storage leaves during sprouting and through the de novo biosynthesis of alliin in green foliage leaves.

  6. The Toluene o-Xylene Monooxygenase Enzymatic Activity for the Biosynthesis of Aromatic Antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Donadio, Giuliana; Sarcinelli, Carmen; Pizzo, Elio; Notomista, Eugenio; Pezzella, Alessandro; Di Cristo, Carlo; De Lise, Federica; Di Donato, Alberto; Izzo, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Monocyclic phenols and catechols are important antioxidant compounds for the food and pharmaceutic industries; their production through biotransformation of low-added value starting compounds is of major biotechnological interest. The toluene o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas sp. OX1 is a bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) that is able to hydroxylate a wide array of aromatic compounds and has already proven to be a versatile biochemical tool to produce mono- and dihydroxylated derivatives of aromatic compounds. The molecular determinants of its regioselectivity and substrate specificity have been thoroughly investigated, and a computational strategy has been developed which allows designing mutants able to hydroxylate non-natural substrates of this enzyme to obtain high-added value compounds of commercial interest. In this work, we have investigated the use of recombinant ToMO, expressed in cells of Escherichia coli strain JM109, for the biotransformation of non-natural substrates of this enzyme such as 2-phenoxyethanol, phthalan and 2-indanol to produce six hydroxylated derivatives. The hydroxylated products obtained were identified, isolated and their antioxidant potential was assessed both in vitro, using the DPPH assay, and on the rat cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2. Incubation of H9c2 cells with the hydroxylated compounds obtained from ToMO-catalyzed biotransformation induced a differential protective effect towards a mild oxidative stress induced by the presence of sodium arsenite. The results obtained confirm once again the versatility of the ToMO system for oxyfunctionalization reactions of biotechnological importance. Moreover, the hydroxylated derivatives obtained possess an interesting antioxidant potential that encourages the use of the enzyme for further functionalization reactions and their possible use as scaffolds to design novel bioactive molecules.

  7. Crystal Structure of Albaflavenone Monooxygenase Containing a Moonlighting Terpene Synthase Active Site*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bin; Lei, Li; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.; Lin, Xin; Cane, David E.; Kelly, Steven L.; Yuan, Hang; Lamb, David C.; Waterman, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Albaflavenone synthase (CYP170A1) is a monooxygenase catalyzing the final two steps in the biosynthesis of this antibiotic in the soil bacterium, Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Interestingly, CYP170A1 shows no stereo selection forming equal amounts of two albaflavenol epimers, each of which is oxidized in turn to albaflavenone. To explore the structural basis of the reaction mechanism, we have studied the crystal structures of both ligand-free CYP170A1 (2.6 Å) and complex of endogenous substrate (epi-isozizaene) with CYP170A1 (3.3 Å). The structure of the complex suggests that the proximal epi-isozizaene molecules may bind to the heme iron in two orientations. In addition, much to our surprise, we have found that albaflavenone synthase also has a second, completely distinct catalytic activity corresponding to the synthesis of farnesene isomers from farnesyl diphosphate. Within the cytochrome P450 α-helical domain both the primary sequence and x-ray structure indicate the presence of a novel terpene synthase active site that is moonlighting on the P450 structure. This includes signature sequences for divalent cation binding and an α-helical barrel. This barrel is unusual because it consists of only four helices rather than six found in all other terpene synthases. Mutagenesis establishes that this barrel is essential for the terpene synthase activity of CYP170A1 but not for the monooxygenase activity. This is the first bifunctional P450 discovered to have another active site moonlighting on it and the first time a terpene synthase active site is found moonlighting on another protein. PMID:19858213

  8. Kinetic Mechanism of the Dechlorinating Flavin-dependent Monooxygenase HadA.

    PubMed

    Pimviriyakul, Panu; Thotsaporn, Kittisak; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2017-03-24

    The accumulation of chlorophenols (CPs) in the environment, due to their wide use as agrochemicals, has become a serious environmental problem. These organic halides can be degraded by aerobic microorganisms, where the initial steps of various biodegradation pathways include an oxidative dechlorinating process in which chloride is replaced by a hydroxyl substituent. Harnessing these dechlorinating processes could provide an opportunity for environmental remediation, but detailed catalytic mechanisms for these enzymes are not yet known. To close this gap, we now report transient kinetics and product analysis of the dechlorinating flavin-dependent monooxygenase, HadA, from the aerobic organism Ralstonia pickettii DTP0602, identifying several mechanistic properties that differ from other enzymes in the same class. We first overexpressed and purified HadA to homogeneity. Analyses of the products from single and multiple turnover reactions demonstrated that HadA prefers 4-CP and 2-CP over CPs with multiple substituents. Stopped-flow and rapid-quench flow experiments of HadA with 4-CP show the involvement of specific intermediates (C4a-hydroperoxy-FAD and C4a-hydroxy-FAD) in the reaction, define rate constants and the order of substrate binding, and demonstrate that the hydroxylation step occurs prior to chloride elimination. The data also identify the non-productive and productive paths of the HadA reactions and demonstrate that product formation is the rate-limiting step. This is the first elucidation of the kinetic mechanism of a two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase that can catalyze oxidative dechlorination of various CPs, and as such it will serve as the basis for future investigation of enzyme variants that will be useful for applications in detoxifying chemicals hazardous to human health.

  9. The Biochemical Mechanism of Auxin Biosynthesis by an Arabidopsis YUCCA Flavin-containing Monooxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xinhua; Mashiguchi, Kiyoshi; Chen, Qingguo; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Kamiya, Yuji; Ojha, Sunil; DuBois, Jennifer; Ballou, David; Zhao, Yunde

    2013-01-01

    Auxin regulates every aspect of plant growth and development. Previous genetic studies demonstrated that YUCCA (YUC) flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) catalyze a rate-limiting step in auxin biosynthesis and that YUCs are essential for many developmental processes. We proposed that YUCs convert indole-3-pyruvate (IPA) to indole-3-acetate (IAA). However, the exact biochemical mechanism of YUCs has remained elusive. Here we present the biochemical characterization of recombinant Arabidopsis YUC6. Expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli, YUC6 contains FAD as a cofactor, which has peaks at 448 nm and 376 nm in the UV-visible spectrum. We show that YUC6 uses NADPH and oxygen to convert IPA to IAA. The first step of the YUC6-catalyzed reaction is the reduction of the FAD cofactor to FADH− by NADPH. Subsequently, FADH− reacts with oxygen to form a flavin-C4a-(hydro)peroxy intermediate, which we show has a maximum absorbance at 381 nm in its UV-visible spectrum. The final chemical step is the reaction of the C4a-intermediate with IPA to produce IAA. Although the sequences of the YUC enzymes are related to those of the mammalian FMOs, which oxygenate nucleophilic substrates, YUC6 oxygenates an electrophilic substrate (IPA). Nevertheless, both classes of enzymes form quasi-stable C4a-(hydro)peroxyl FAD intermediates. The YUC6 intermediate has a half-life of ∼20 s whereas that of some FMOs is >30 min. This work reveals the catalytic mechanism of the first known plant flavin monooxygenase and provides a foundation for further investigating how YUC activities are regulated in plants. PMID:23188833

  10. Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenases as a Detoxification Mechanism in Insects: New Insights from the Arctiids (Lepidoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Langel, Dorothee; Heckel, David G.; Mohagheghi, Hoda; Petschenka, Georg; Ober, Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    Insects experience a wide array of chemical pressures from plant allelochemicals and pesticides and have developed several effective counterstrategies to cope with such toxins. Among these, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are crucial in plant-insect interactions. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) seem not to play a central role in xenobiotic detoxification in insects, in contrast to mammals. However, the previously identified senecionine N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Tyria jacobaeae (Lepidoptera) indicates that FMOs have been recruited during the adaptation of this insect to plants that accumulate toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Identification of related FMO-like sequences of various arctiids and other Lepidoptera and their combination with expressed sequence tag (EST) data and sequences emerging from the Bombyx mori genome project show that FMOs in Lepidoptera form a gene family with three members (FMO1 to FMO3). Phylogenetic analyses suggest that FMO3 is only distantly related to lepidopteran FMO1 and FMO2 that originated from a more recent gene duplication event. Within the FMO1 gene cluster, an additional gene duplication early in the arctiid lineage provided the basis for the evolution of the highly specific biochemical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations of these butterflies to pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-producing plants. The genes encoding pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-N-oxygenizing enzymes (PNOs) are transcribed in the fat body and the head of the larvae. An N-terminal signal peptide mediates the transport of the soluble proteins into the hemolymph where PNOs efficiently convert pro-toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids into their non-toxic N-oxide derivatives. Heterologous expression of a PNO of the generalist arctiid Grammia geneura produced an N-oxygenizing enzyme that shows noticeably expanded substrate specificity compared with the related enzyme of the specialist Tyria jacobaeae. The data about the evolution of FMOs within lepidopteran insects and the

  11. The Toluene o-Xylene Monooxygenase Enzymatic Activity for the Biosynthesis of Aromatic Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Pizzo, Elio; Notomista, Eugenio; Pezzella, Alessandro; Di Cristo, Carlo; De Lise, Federica; Di Donato, Alberto; Izzo, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Monocyclic phenols and catechols are important antioxidant compounds for the food and pharmaceutic industries; their production through biotransformation of low-added value starting compounds is of major biotechnological interest. The toluene o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas sp. OX1 is a bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) that is able to hydroxylate a wide array of aromatic compounds and has already proven to be a versatile biochemical tool to produce mono- and dihydroxylated derivatives of aromatic compounds. The molecular determinants of its regioselectivity and substrate specificity have been thoroughly investigated, and a computational strategy has been developed which allows designing mutants able to hydroxylate non-natural substrates of this enzyme to obtain high-added value compounds of commercial interest. In this work, we have investigated the use of recombinant ToMO, expressed in cells of Escherichia coli strain JM109, for the biotransformation of non-natural substrates of this enzyme such as 2-phenoxyethanol, phthalan and 2-indanol to produce six hydroxylated derivatives. The hydroxylated products obtained were identified, isolated and their antioxidant potential was assessed both in vitro, using the DPPH assay, and on the rat cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2. Incubation of H9c2 cells with the hydroxylated compounds obtained from ToMO-catalyzed biotransformation induced a differential protective effect towards a mild oxidative stress induced by the presence of sodium arsenite. The results obtained confirm once again the versatility of the ToMO system for oxyfunctionalization reactions of biotechnological importance. Moreover, the hydroxylated derivatives obtained possess an interesting antioxidant potential that encourages the use of the enzyme for further functionalization reactions and their possible use as scaffolds to design novel bioactive molecules. PMID:25915063

  12. Soluble expression and purification of the oxidoreductase component of toluene 4-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Lucas J; Elsen, Nathaniel L; Pierce, Brad S; Fox, Brian G

    2008-01-01

    Toluene 4-monooxygenase (T4MO) is a member of the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases, an enzyme family that utilizes a soluble diiron hydroxylase to oxidize a variety of hydrocarbons as the initial step in their metabolism. The hydroxylases obtain reducing equivalents from NAD(P)H via an electron transfer chain that is initiated by an oxidoreductase containing an N-terminal ferredoxin domain and C-terminal flavin- and NAD-binding domains. T4moF, the NADH oxidoreductase of T4MO, was expressed as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) from the pUC-derived expression vector pRS205. This vector contains a lac promoter instead of a T7 promoter. A three step purification from the soluble cell lysate yielded approximately 1 mg of T4moF per gram of wet cell paste with greater than 90% purity. The purified protein contained 1 mol of FAD and 2 mol of Fe per mol of T4moF; quantitative EPR spectroscopy showed approximately 1 mol of the S=1/2 signal from the reduced [2Fe-2S] cluster per mol of T4moF. Steady state kinetic analysis of p-cresol formation activity treating T4moF as the variable substrate while all other proteins and substrates were held constant gave apparent K(M-) and apparent k(cat)-values of 0.15 microM and 3.0 s(-1), respectively. This expression system and purification allows for the recovery of the soluble oxidoreductase in yields that facilitate further biochemical and structural characterizations.

  13. Crystal Structure of Albaflavenone Monooxygenase Containing a Moonlighting Terpene Synthase Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bin; Lei, Li; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.; Lin, Xin; Cane, David E.; Kelly, Steven L.; Yuan, Hang; Lamb, David C.; Waterman, Michael R.

    2010-01-08

    Albaflavenone synthase (CYP170A1) is a monooxygenase catalyzing the final two steps in the biosynthesis of this antibiotic in the soil bacterium, Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Interestingly, CYP170A1 shows no stereo selection forming equal amounts of two albaflavenol epimers, each of which is oxidized in turn to albaflavenone. To explore the structural basis of the reaction mechanism, we have studied the crystal structures of both ligand-free CYP170A1 (2.6 {angstrom}) and complex of endogenous substrate (epi-isozizaene) with CYP170A1 (3.3 {angstrom}). The structure of the complex suggests that the proximal epi-isozizaene molecules may bind to the heme iron in two orientations. In addition, much to our surprise, we have found that albaflavenone synthase also has a second, completely distinct catalytic activity corresponding to the synthesis of farnesene isomers from farnesyl diphosphate. Within the cytochrome P450 {alpha}-helical domain both the primary sequence and x-ray structure indicate the presence of a novel terpene synthase active site that is moonlighting on the P450 structure. This includes signature sequences for divalent cation binding and an {alpha}-helical barrel. This barrel is unusual because it consists of only four helices rather than six found in all other terpene synthases. Mutagenesis establishes that this barrel is essential for the terpene synthase activity of CYP170A1 but not for the monooxygenase activity. This is the first bifunctional P450 discovered to have another active site moonlighting on it and the first time a terpene synthase active site is found moonlighting on another protein.

  14. Inactivation of Toluene 2-Monooxygenase in Burkholderia cepacia G4 by Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Chris M.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Arp, Daniel J.; Hyman, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    High concentrations of acetylene (10 to 50% [vol/vol] gas phase) were required to inhibit the growth of Burkholderia cepacia G4 on toluene, while 1% (vol/vol) (gas phase) propyne or 1-butyne completely inhibited growth. Low concentrations of longer-chain alkynes (C5 to C10) were also effective inhibitors of toluene-dependent growth, and 2- and 3-alkynes were more potent inhibitors than their 1-alkyne counterparts. Exposure of toluene-grown B. cepacia G4 to alkynes resulted in the irreversible loss of toluene- and o-cresol-dependent O2 uptake activities, while acetate- and 3-methylcatechol-dependent O2 uptake activities were unaffected. Toluene-dependent O2 uptake decreased upon the addition of 1-butyne in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The loss of activity followed first-order kinetics, with apparent rate constants ranging from 0.25 min−1 to 2.45 min−1. Increasing concentrations of toluene afforded protection from the inhibitory effects of 1-butyne. Furthermore, oxygen, supplied as H2O2, was required for inhibition by 1-butyne. These results suggest that alkynes are specific, mechanism-based inactivators of toluene 2-monooxygenase in B. cepacia G4, although the simplest alkyne, acetylene, was relatively ineffective compared to longer alkynes. Alkene analogs of acetylene and propyne—ethylene and propylene—were not inactivators of toluene 2-monooxygenase activity in B. cepacia G4 but were oxidized to their respective epoxides, with apparent Ks and Vmax values of 39.7 μM and 112.3 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 for ethylene and 32.3 μM and 89.2 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 for propylene. PMID:9925593

  15. Structure and Ligand Binding Properties of the Epoxidase Component of Styrene Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ukaegbu, Uchechi E.; Kantz, Auric; Beaton, Michelle; Gassner, George T.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-07-23

    Styrene monooxygenase (SMO) is a two-component flavoprotein monooxygenase that transforms styrene to styrene oxide in the first step of the styrene catabolic and detoxification pathway of Pseudomonas putida S12. The crystal structure of the N-terminally histidine-tagged epoxidase component of this system, NSMOA, determined to 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, indicates the enzyme exists as a homodimer in which each monomer forms two distinct domains. The overall architecture is most similar to that of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH), although there are some significant differences in secondary structure. Structural comparisons suggest that a large cavity open to the surface forms the FAD binding site. At the base of this pocket is another cavity that likely represents the styrene binding site. Flavin binding and redox equilibria are tightly coupled such that reduced FAD binds apo NSMOA {approx}8000 times more tightly than the oxidized coenzyme. Equilibrium fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry data using benzene as a substrate analogue indicate that the oxidized flavin and substrate analogue binding equilibria of NSMOA are linked such that the binding affinity of each is increased by 60-fold when the enzyme is saturated with the other. A much weaker {approx}2-fold positive cooperative interaction is observed for the linked binding equilibria of benzene and reduced FAD. The low affinity of the substrate analogue for the reduced FAD complex of NSMOA is consistent with a preferred reaction order in which flavin reduction and reaction with oxygen precede the binding of styrene, identifying the apoenzyme structure as the key catalytic resting state of NSMOA poised to bind reduced FAD and initiate the oxygen reaction.

  16. Methane monooxygenase gene expression mediated by methanobactin in the presence of mineral copper sources

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Charles W.; Fowle, David A.; Kulczycki, Ezra; Roberts, Jennifer A.; Graham, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Methane is a major greenhouse gas linked to global warming; however, patterns of in situ methane oxidation by methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs), nature's main biological mechanism for methane suppression, are often inconsistent with laboratory predictions. For example, one would expect a strong relationship between methanotroph ecology and Cu level because methanotrophs require Cu to sustain particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), the most efficient enzyme for methane oxidation. However, no correlation has been observed in nature, which is surprising because methane monooxygenase (MMO) gene expression has been unequivocally linked to Cu availability. Here we provide a fundamental explanation for this lack of correlation. We propose that MMO expression in nature is largely controlled by solid-phase Cu geochemistry and the relative ability of Cu acquisition systems in methanotrophs, such as methanobactins (mb), to obtain Cu from mineral sources. To test this hypothesis, RT-PCR expression assays were developed for Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b (which produces mb) to quantify pMMO, soluble MMO (the alternate MMO expressed when Cu is “unavailable”), and 16S-rRNA gene expression under progressively more stringent Cu supply conditions. When Cu was provided as CuCl2, pMMO transcript levels increased significantly consistent with laboratory work. However, when Cu was provided as Cu-doped iron oxide, pMMO transcript levels increased only when mb was also present. Finally, when Cu was provided as Cu-doped borosilicate glass, pMMO transcription patterns varied depending on the ambient mb:Cu supply ratio. Cu geochemistry clearly influences MMO expression in terrestrial systems, and, as such, local Cu mineralogy might provide an explanation for methane oxidation patterns in the natural environment. PMID:17615240

  17. Eukaryotic formylglycine-generating enzyme catalyses a monooxygenase type of reaction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jianhe; Alam, Sarfaraz; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Rudolph, Markus Georg; May, Caroline; Dierks, Thomas; von Figura, Kurt; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    C α-formylglycine (FGly) is the catalytic residue of sulfatases in eukaryotes. It is generated by a unique post-translational modification catalysed by the FGly-generating enzyme (FGE) in the endoplasmic reticulum. FGE oxidizes a cysteine residue within the conserved CxPxR sequence motif of nascent sulfatase polypeptides to FGly. Here we show that this oxidation is strictly dependent on molecular oxygen (O2) and consumes 1 mol O2 per mol FGly formed. For maximal activity FGE requires an O2 concentration of 9% (105 μM). Sustained FGE activity further requires the presence of a thiol-based reductant such as DTT. FGly is also formed in the absence of DTT, but its formation ceases rapidly. Thus inactivated FGE accumulates in which the cysteine pair Cys336/Cys341 in the catalytic site is oxidized to form disulfide bridges between either Cys336 and Cys341 or Cys341 and the CxPxR cysteine of the sulfatase. These results strongly suggest that the Cys336/Cys341 pair is directly involved in the O2 -dependent conversion of the CxPxR cysteine to FGly. The available data characterize eukaryotic FGE as a monooxygenase, in which Cys336/Cys341 disulfide bridge formation donates the electrons required to reduce one oxygen atom of O2 to water while the other oxygen atom oxidizes the CxPxR cysteine to FGly. Regeneration of a reduced Cys336/Cys341 pair is accomplished in vivo by a yet unknown reductant of the endoplasmic reticulum or in vitro by DTT. Remarkably, this monooxygenase reaction utilizes O2 without involvement of any activating cofactor.

  18. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases as a detoxification mechanism in insects: new insights from the arctiids (lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Sehlmeyer, Sven; Wang, Linzhu; Langel, Dorothee; Heckel, David G; Mohagheghi, Hoda; Petschenka, Georg; Ober, Dietrich

    2010-05-03

    Insects experience a wide array of chemical pressures from plant allelochemicals and pesticides and have developed several effective counterstrategies to cope with such toxins. Among these, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are crucial in plant-insect interactions. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) seem not to play a central role in xenobiotic detoxification in insects, in contrast to mammals. However, the previously identified senecionine N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Tyria jacobaeae (Lepidoptera) indicates that FMOs have been recruited during the adaptation of this insect to plants that accumulate toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Identification of related FMO-like sequences of various arctiids and other Lepidoptera and their combination with expressed sequence tag (EST) data and sequences emerging from the Bombyx mori genome project show that FMOs in Lepidoptera form a gene family with three members (FMO1 to FMO3). Phylogenetic analyses suggest that FMO3 is only distantly related to lepidopteran FMO1 and FMO2 that originated from a more recent gene duplication event. Within the FMO1 gene cluster, an additional gene duplication early in the arctiid lineage provided the basis for the evolution of the highly specific biochemical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations of these butterflies to pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-producing plants. The genes encoding pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-N-oxygenizing enzymes (PNOs) are transcribed in the fat body and the head of the larvae. An N-terminal signal peptide mediates the transport of the soluble proteins into the hemolymph where PNOs efficiently convert pro-toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids into their non-toxic N-oxide derivatives. Heterologous expression of a PNO of the generalist arctiid Grammia geneura produced an N-oxygenizing enzyme that shows noticeably expanded substrate specificity compared with the related enzyme of the specialist Tyria jacobaeae. The data about the evolution of FMOs within lepidopteran insects and the

  19. Effects of Dichloroethene Isomers on the Induction and Activity of Butane Monooxygenase in the Alkane-Oxidizing Bacterium “Pseudomonas butanovora”

    PubMed Central

    Doughty, D. M.; Sayavedra-Soto, L. A.; Arp, D. J.; Bottomley, P. J.

    2005-01-01

    We examined cooxidation of three different dichloroethenes (1,1-DCE, 1,2-trans DCE, and 1,2-cis DCE) by butane monooxygenase (BMO) in the butane-utilizing bacterium “Pseudomonas butanovora.” Different organic acids were tested as exogenous reductant sources for this process. In addition, we determined if DCEs could serve as surrogate inducers of BMO gene expression. Lactic acid supported greater rates of oxidation of the three DCEs than the other organic acids tested. The impacts of lactic acid-supported DCE oxidation on BMO activity differed among the isomers. In intact cells, 50% of BMO activity was irreversibly lost after consumption of ∼20 nmol mg protein−1 of 1,1-DCE and 1,2-trans DCE in 0.5 and 5 min, respectively. In contrast, a comparable loss of activity required the oxidation of 120 nmol 1,2-cis DCE mg protein−1. Oxidation of similar amounts of each DCE isomer (∼20 nmol mg protein−1) produced different negative effects on lactic acid-dependent respiration. Despite 1,1-DCE being consumed 10 times faster than 1,2,-trans DCE, respiration declined at similar rates, suggesting that the product(s) of oxidation of 1,2-trans DCE was more toxic to respiration than 1,1-DCE. Lactate-grown “P. butanovora” did not express BMO activity but gained activity after exposure to butane, ethene, 1,2-cis DCE, or 1,2-trans DCE. The products of BMO activity, ethene oxide and 1-butanol, induced lacZ in a reporter strain containing lacZ fused to the BMO promoter, whereas butane, ethene, and 1,2-cis DCE did not. 1,2-trans DCE was unique among the BMO substrates tested in its ability to induce lacZ expression. PMID:16204521

  20. Cadmium inhibits repair of UV-, methyl methanesulfonate- and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced DNA damage in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Fatur, Tanja; Lah, Tamara T; Filipic, Metka

    2003-08-28

    The co-genotoxic effects of cadmium are well recognized and it is assumed that most of these effects are due to the inhibition of DNA repair. We used the comet assay to analyze the effect of low, non-toxic concentrations of CdCl2 on DNA damage and repair-induced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by UV-radiation, by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU). The UV-induced DNA lesions revealed by the comet assay are single-strand breaks which are the intermediates formed during nucleotide excision repair (NER). In cells exposed to UV-irradiation alone the formation of DNA strand breaks was rapid, followed by a fast rejoining phase during the first 60 min after irradiation. In UV-irradiated cells pre-exposed to CdCl2, the formation of DNA strand breaks was significantly slower, indicating that cadmium inhibited DNA damage recognition and/or excision. Methyl methanesulfonate and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea directly alkylate nitrogen and oxygen atoms of DNA bases. The lesions revealed by the comet assay are mainly breaks at apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and breaks formed as intermediates during base excision repair (BER). In MMS treated cells the initial level of DNA strand breaks did not change during the first hour of recovery; thereafter repair was detected. In cells pre-exposed to CdCl2 the MMS-induced DNA strand breaks accumulated during the first 2h of recovery, indicating that AP sites and/or DNA strand breaks were formed but that further steps of BER were blocked. In MNU treated cells the maximal level of DNA strand breaks was detected immediately after the treatment and the breaks were repaired rapidly. In CdCl2 pre-treated cells the formation of MNU-induced DNA single-strand breaks was not affected, while the repair was slower, indicating inhibition of polymerization and/or the ligation step of BER. Cadmium thus affects the repair of UV-, MMS- and MNU-induced DNA damage, providing further evidence, that inhibition of DNA repair is an

  1. Enzymatic formation of apo-carotenoids from the xanthophyll carotenoids lutein, zeaxanthin and b-cryptoxanthin by ferret carotene-9, 10-monooxygenase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Xanthophyll carotenoids, such as lutein, zeaxanthin and b-cryptoxanthin, may provide potential health benefits against chronic and degenerative diseases. Investigating pathways of xanthophyll metabolism are important to understanding their biological functions. Carotene-15,150-monooxygenase (CMO1) h...

  2. Characterization of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes (P450ome) from the carotenogenic yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    PubMed

    Córdova, Pamela; Gonzalez, Ana-María; Nelson, David R; Gutiérrez, María-Soledad; Baeza, Marcelo; Cifuentes, Víctor; Alcaíno, Jennifer

    2017-07-19

    The cytochromes P450 (P450s) are a large superfamily of heme-containing monooxygenases involved in the oxidative metabolism of an enormous diversity of substrates. These enzymes require electrons for their activity, and the electrons are supplied by NAD(P)H through a P450 electron donor system, which is generally a cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). The yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous has evolved an exclusive P450-CPR system that specializes in the synthesis of astaxanthin, a carotenoid with commercial potential. For this reason, the aim of this work was to identify and characterize other potential P450 genes in the genome of this yeast using a bioinformatic approach. Thirteen potential P450-encoding genes were identified, and the analysis of their deduced proteins allowed them to be classified in ten different families: CYP51, CYP61, CYP5139 (with three members), CYP549A, CYP5491, CYP5492 (with two members), CYP5493, CYP53, CYP5494 and CYP5495. Structural analyses of the X. dendrorhous P450 proteins showed that all of them have a predicted transmembrane region at their N-terminus and have the conserved domains characteristic of the P450s, including the heme-binding region (FxxGxRxCxG); the PER domain, with the characteristic signature for fungi (PxRW); the ExxR motif in the K-helix region and the oxygen-binding domain (OBD) (AGxDTT); also, the characteristic secondary structure elements of all the P450 proteins were identified. The possible functions of these P450s include primary, secondary and xenobiotic metabolism reactions such as sterol biosynthesis, carotenoid synthesis and aromatic compound degradation. The carotenogenic yeast X. dendrorhous has thirteen P450-encoding genes having potential functions in primary, secondary and xenobiotic metabolism reactions, including some genes of great interest for fatty acid hydroxylation and aromatic compound degradation. These findings established a basis for future studies about the role of P450s in the

  3. Diversity of flavin-binding monooxygenase genes (almA) in marine bacteria capable of degradation long-chain alkanes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2012-06-01

    Many bacteria have been reported as degraders of long-chain (LC) n-alkanes, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Flavin-binding monooxygenase (AlmA) was recently found to be involved in LC-alkane degradation in bacteria of the Acinetobacter and Alcanivorax genera. However, the diversity of this gene and the role it plays in other bacteria remains unclear. In this study, we surveyed the diversity of almA in marine bacteria and in bacteria found in oil-enrichment communities. To identify the presence of this gene, a pair of degenerate PCR primers were was designed based on conserved motifs of the almA gene sequences in public databases. Using this approach, we identified diverse almA genes in the hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and in bacterial communities from the surface seawater of the Xiamen coastal area, the South China Sea, the Indian Ocean, and the Atlantic Ocean. As a result, almA was positively detected in 35 isolates belonging to four genera, and a total of 39 different almA sequences were obtained. Five isolates were confirmed to harbor two to three almA genes. From the Xiamen coastal area and the Atlantic Ocean oil-enrichment communities, a total of 60 different almA sequences were obtained. These sequences mainly formed two clusters in the phylogenetic tree, named Class I and Class II, and these shared 45-56% identity at the amino acid level. Class I contained 11 sequences from bacteria represented by the Salinisphaera and Parvibaculum genera. Class II was larger and more diverse, and it was composed of 88 sequences from Proteobacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and the enriched bacterial communities. These communities were represented by the Alcanivorax and Marinobacter genera, which are the two most popular genera hosting the almA gene. AlmA was also detected across a wide geographical range, as determined by the origin of the bacterial host. Our results demonstrate the diversity of almA and confirm its high rate of occurrence in hydrocarbon

  4. A comparison of the substrate and electron-donor specificities of the methane mono-oxygenases from three strains of methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, D I; Colby, J; Dalton, H

    1979-01-01

    1. Methane mono-oxygenase from Methylosinus trichosporium has the same broad substrate specificity as the analogous enzyme from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath); the enzyme from Methylomonas methanica is more specific. 2. Contrary to previous reports, NAD(P)H and not ascorbate is the required electron donor for the enzyme from Methylosinus trichosporium. 3. It is concluded that these three bacteria contain similar methane mono-oxygenases. PMID:106847

  5. Comparison of Intrapulmonary and Systemic Pharmacokinetics of Colistin Methanesulfonate (CMS) and Colistin after Aerosol Delivery and Intravenous Administration of CMS in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boisson, Matthieu; Jacobs, Matthieu; Grégoire, Nicolas; Gobin, Patrice; Marchand, Sandrine; Mimoz, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic that has recently gained a considerable renewal of interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Nebulization seems to be a promising form of administration, but colistin is administered as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS); however, differences between the intrapulmonary concentrations of the active moiety as a function of the route of administration in critically ill patients have not been precisely documented. In this study, CMS and colistin concentrations were measured on two separate occasions within the plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of critically ill patients (n = 12) who had received 2 million international units (MIU) of CMS by aerosol delivery and then intravenous administration. The pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a population approach and completed by pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and simulations. The ELF colistin concentrations varied considerably (9.53 to 1,137 mg/liter), but they were much higher than those in plasma (0.15 to 0.73 mg/liter) after aerosol delivery but not after intravenous administration of CMS. Following CMS aerosol delivery, typically, 9% of the CMS dose reached the ELF, and only 1.4% was presystemically converted into colistin. PK-PD analysis concluded that there was much higher antimicrobial efficacy after CMS aerosol delivery than after intravenous administration. These new data seem to support the use of aerosol delivery of CMS for the treatment of pulmonary infections in critical care patients. PMID:25267660

  6. The Preference for Error-Free or Error-Prone Postreplication Repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Exposed to Low-Dose Methyl Methanesulfonate Is Cell Cycle Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dongqing; Piening, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Cells employ error-free or error-prone postreplication repair (PRR) processes to tolerate DNA damage. Here, we present a genome-wide screen for sensitivity to 0.001% methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). This relatively low dose is of particular interest because wild-type cells exhibit no discernible phenotypes in response to treatment, yet PRR mutants are unique among repair mutants in their exquisite sensitivity to 0.001% MMS; thus, low-dose MMS treatment provides a distinctive opportunity to study postreplication repair processes. We show that upon exposure to low-dose MMS, a PRR-defective rad18Δ mutant stalls into a lengthy G2 arrest associated with the accumulation of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) gaps. Consistent with previous results following UV-induced damage, reactivation of Rad18, even after prolonged G2 arrest, restores viability and genome integrity. We further show that PRR pathway preference in 0.001% MMS depends on timing and context; cells preferentially employ the error-free pathway in S phase and do not require MEC1-dependent checkpoint activation for survival. However, when PRR is restricted to the G2 phase, cells utilize REV3-dependent translesion synthesis, which requires a MEC1-dependent delay and results in significant hypermutability. PMID:23382077

  7. Ambident nitrogen and oxygen ligands of the type tris(pyrazolyl)methanesulfonate: An “IR criterion” for the assignment of the coordination mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenskaya, T. B.; Berghahn, M.; Kunz, P. C.; Frank, W.; Kläui, W.

    2007-03-01

    The IR spectra of a series of metal complexes with the ambident nitrogen and oxygen ligand tris(3- tert-butylpyrazolyl)methanesulfonate, Tpms tBu , were measured in the range 4000-50 cm -1. The solid-state structure of Li(Tpms)·{1}/{2}CH has been determined by X-ray analysis. MTpms tBu (M = Li, K, Tl), [Tpms tBu NiX] (X = Cl, Br), [Tpms tBu ZnX] (X = Cl, Br, I, Et), [(Tpms tBu )Co(Hpz tBu )X] (X = Cl, Br), [(Tpms tBu )Zn(μ-OAc)(μ-OH)Zn(Tpms tBu )] and [(Tpms tBu )CuL] (L = CO, PPh 3, CH 3CN) were investigated in solid state (KBr pellet) and in solution (CH 2Cl 2) and a band assignment is proposed. It could be shown that the assignment of the coordination mode to either N, N, N, N, N, O or N, O is possible by using an "IR criterion" specifying the binding mode. A dynamic equilibrium between the N, N, N and N, N, O coordination mode is observed in CH 2Cl 2 solutions of all investigated cobalt, nickel, copper and zinc complexes.

  8. Comparison of intrapulmonary and systemic pharmacokinetics of colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) and colistin after aerosol delivery and intravenous administration of CMS in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Boisson, Matthieu; Jacobs, Matthieu; Grégoire, Nicolas; Gobin, Patrice; Marchand, Sandrine; Couet, William; Mimoz, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic that has recently gained a considerable renewal of interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Nebulization seems to be a promising form of administration, but colistin is administered as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS); however, differences between the intrapulmonary concentrations of the active moiety as a function of the route of administration in critically ill patients have not been precisely documented. In this study, CMS and colistin concentrations were measured on two separate occasions within the plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of critically ill patients (n = 12) who had received 2 million international units (MIU) of CMS by aerosol delivery and then intravenous administration. The pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a population approach and completed by pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and simulations. The ELF colistin concentrations varied considerably (9.53 to 1,137 mg/liter), but they were much higher than those in plasma (0.15 to 0.73 mg/liter) after aerosol delivery but not after intravenous administration of CMS. Following CMS aerosol delivery, typically, 9% of the CMS dose reached the ELF, and only 1.4% was presystemically converted into colistin. PK-PD analysis concluded that there was much higher antimicrobial efficacy after CMS aerosol delivery than after intravenous administration. These new data seem to support the use of aerosol delivery of CMS for the treatment of pulmonary infections in critical care patients.

  9. Methyl methanesulfonate induces apoptosis in p53-deficient H1299 and Hep3B cells through a caspase 2- and mitochondria-associated pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Yun; Sun, Li; Zhang, Guang-Lin; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope; Zhu, Xin-Qiang; Yang, Jun

    2012-11-01

    Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) has been shown to induce apoptosis in various cell types through p53-dependent pathways. Nevertheless, pharmacological and genetic blockade of p53 functions results in similar or delayed sensitivity to MMS treatment, suggesting the presence of p53-independent apoptotic mechanisms. To understand the p53-independent mechanisms that are engaged during MMS-induced apoptosis, we established MMS-induced apoptotic cell models using p53-deficient H1299 and Hep3B cells. Our results demonstrated that MMS at concentrations of 50, 100, 200, 400 and 800 μM induced the formation of gammaH2AX foci, and that at higher concentrations, 400 and 800 μM, MMS treatment led to apoptosis in the two cell lines. This apoptotic cell death was concurrent with the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, nuclear-cytosolic translocation of active caspase 2, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, and the cleavage of caspase 9, caspase 3 and PARP. However, MMS-induced DNA damage failed to stabilize the p53 family members TAp73 and DNp73. These results demonstrated a p53- and p73-independent mechanism for MMS-induced apoptosis that involves the nuclear-cytosolic translocation of active caspase 2 as well as the mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  10. Differential effect of manool--a diterpene from Salvia officinalis, on genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate in V79 and HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Nicolella, Heloiza Diniz; de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Munari, Carla Carolina; Costa, Gizela Faleiros Dias; Moreira, Monique Rodrigues; Veneziani, Rodrigo Cassio Sola; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2014-10-01

    Salvia officinalis (sage) is a perennial woody subshrub native to the Mediterranean region that is commonly used as a condiment and as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antimicrobial agent due to its biological activities. Manool is the most abundant micro-metabolite found in Salvia officinalis essential oils and extracts. We therefore decided to evaluate the cytotoxic, genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of manool in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79) and human hepatoma cells (HepG2). Cytotoxicity was assessed by the colony-forming assay in V79 cells and toxic effects were observed at concentrations of up to 8.0 μg/mL. The micronucleus test was used to evaluate the genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity of manool in V79 and HepG2 cells at concentrations of 0.5-6.0 μg/mL and 0.5-8.0 μg/mL, respectively. For evaluation of antigenotoxicity, the concentrations of manool were combined with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, 44 μg/mL). The results showed a significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei in cultures of both cell lines treated with the highest concentration tested, demonstrating a genotoxic effect. On the other hand, manool exhibited a protective effect against chromosome damage induced by MMS in HepG2 cells, but not in V79 cells. These data suggest that some manool metabolite may be responsible for the antigenotoxic effect observed in HepG2 cells.

  11. Transcriptional regulation of the grape cytochrome P450 monooxygenase gene CYP736B expression in response to Xylella fastidiosa infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP) mediate synthesis and metabolism of many physiologically important primary and secondary compounds that are related to plant defense against a range of pathogenic microbes and insects. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in defense response to Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) infection, we investigated expression and regulatory mechanisms of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP736B gene in both disease resistant and susceptible grapevines. Results Cloning of genomic DNA and cDNA revealed that the CYP736B gene was composed of two exons and one intron with GT as a donor site and AG as an acceptor site. CYP736B transcript was up-regulated in PD-resistant plants and down-regulated in PD-susceptible plants 6 weeks after Xf inoculation. However, CYP736B expression was very low in stem tissues at all evaluated time points. 5'RACE and 3'RACE sequence analyses revealed that there were three candidate transcription start sites (TSS) in the upstream region and three candidate polyadenylation (PolyA) sites in the downstream region of CYP736B. Usage frequencies of each transcription initiation site and each polyadenylation site varied depending on plant genotype, developmental stage, tissue, and treatment. These results demonstrate that expression of CYP736B is regulated developmentally and in response to Xf infection at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Multiple transcription start and polyadenylation sites contribute to regulation of CYP736B expression. Conclusions This report provides evidence that the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP736B gene is involved in defense response at a specific stage of Xf infection in grapevines; multiple transcription initiation and polyadenylation sites exist for CYP736B in grapevine; and coordinative and selective use of transcription initiation and polyadenylation sites play an important role in regulation of CYP736B expression during growth

  12. Peptide amidation in an invertebrate: purification, characterization, and inhibition of peptidylglycine alpha-hydroxylating monooxygenase from the heads of honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Zabriskie, T M; Klinge, M; Szymanski, C M; Cheng, H; Vederas, J C

    1994-01-01

    Peptidylglycine alpha-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), an enzyme involved in formation of neuropeptides with a C-terminal amide functionality in mammals and amphibians, was isolated from the head of an invertebrate, the honeybee, Apis mellifera, and purified 220-fold in 1% overall yield. The bee PHM has a molecular weight of 71,000, is membrane associated but can be solubilized with a detergent (n-octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside), and cross-reacts with rabbit antibodies generated toward bacterially expressed rat PHM. In the presence of copper, oxygen, and ascorbic acid, the enzyme hydroxylates model tripeptides such as dansyl-L-Phe-L-Phe-Gly on the methylene carbon of the glycine residue with retention of configuration. Using this tripeptide as substrate, the Km is 1.7 microM and the Vmax is 2.3 nmol.micrograms-1.h-1. Treatment of the insect PHM with D-Phe-L-Phe-D-vinylglycine, a substrate analogue and mechanism-based inactivator of PHM from pig pituitary, results in irreversible loss of activity. The diastereomeric analogue, D-Phe-L-Phe-L-vinylglycine, is only a competitive inhibitor (IC50 = 320 microM).

  13. Gene structure and spatiotemporal expression profile of tomato genes encoding YUCCA-like flavin monooxygenases: the ToFZY gene family.

    PubMed

    Expósito-Rodríguez, Marino; Borges, Andrés A; Borges-Pérez, Andrés; Pérez, José A

    2011-07-01

    The flavin monooxygenases (FMO) encoded by plant YUCCA genes are thought to catalyze a rate-limiting step in the tryptamine pathway for indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis. Recent experiments with different plant models have indicate that YUCCA genes play essential roles in growth and development through their contribution to the local pool of free auxin. In this study we have characterized five new genes that encode YUCCA-like FMOs in the tomato genome (ToFZY2 to ToFZY6), including gene structure, conserved motifs and phylogenetic analyses. As a first step towards clarifying the individual functions of ToFZY genes, we have used quantitative real-time RT-PCR to conduct a systematic comparison of the steady-state mRNA levels of 6 ToFZY genes, in 33 samples representing major organs and the entire tomato life cycle. We followed an absolute quantification strategy which allowed us to cross-compare transcript levels among different ToFZY genes in a given spatiotemporal coordinate. Our results indicate that expression of ToFZY genes is temporally and spatially regulated, and that the distinctive expression pattern of each ToFZY gene partially overlaps with other members of the multigenic family. We compare our data with previous results in other plant species and make some predictions about the role of tryptamine pathway in tomato growth and development.

  14. Structures of the Apo and FAD-Bound Forms of 2-Hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA) Locate Activity Hotspots Identified by Using Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Chantel N; Mielke, Tamara; Farrugia, Joseph E; Frank, Annika; Man, Henry; Hart, Sam; Turkenburg, Johan P; Grogan, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    The FAD-dependent monooxygenase HbpA from Pseudomonas azelaica HBP1 catalyses the hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2HBP) to 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl (23DHBP). HbpA has been used extensively as a model for studying flavoprotein hydroxylases under process conditions, and has also been subjected to directed-evolution experiments that altered its catalytic properties. The structure of HbpA has been determined in its apo and FAD-complex forms to resolutions of 2.76 and 2.03 Å, respectively. Comparisons of the HbpA structure with those of homologues, in conjunction with a model of the reaction product in the active site, reveal His48 as the most likely acid/base residue to be involved in the hydroxylation mechanism. Mutation of His48 to Ala resulted in an inactive enzyme. The structures of HbpA also provide evidence that mutants achieved by directed evolution that altered activity are comparatively remote from the substrate-binding site. PMID:25737306

  15. Expression levels of chaperones influence biotransformation activity of recombinant Escherichia coli expressing Micrococcus luteus alcohol dehydrogenase and Pseudomonas putida Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Baek, A-Hyong; Jeon, Eun-Yeong; Lee, Sun-Mee; Park, Jin-Byung

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrated for the first time that the archaeal chaperones (i.e., γ-prefoldin and thermosome) can stabilize enzyme activity in vivo. Ricinoleic acid biotransformation activity of recombinant Escherichia coli expressing Micrococcus luteus alcohol dehydrogenase and the Pseudomonas putida KT2440 Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase improved significantly with co-expression of γ-prefoldin or recombinant themosome originating from the deep-sea hyperthermophile archaea Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. Furthermore, the degree of enhanced activity was dependent on the expression levels of the chaperones. For example, whole-cell biotransformation activity was highest at 12 µmol/g dry cells/min when γ-prefoldin expression level was approximately 46% of the theoretical maximum. This value was approximately two-fold greater than that in E. coli, where the γ-prefoldin expression level was zero or set to the theoretical maximum. Therefore, it was assumed that the expression levels of chaperones must be optimized to achieve maximum biotransformation activity in whole-cell biocatalysts. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Characterization of the second prosthetic group of the flavoenzyme NADH-acceptor reductase (component C) of the methane mono-oxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed Central

    Colby, J; Dalton, H

    1979-01-01

    1. A new two-step purification is described that routinely yields 100mg quantities of component C for biochemical studies. 2. Chemical analyses show component C purified by this procedure to contain 2 g-atoms of iron, 2 mol of acid-labile sulphide (S) and 1 mol of FAD per mol of protein. 3. The Fe-S core of component C was extruded by treating the protein with p-methoxybenzenethiol in hexamethyl phosphoramide/50mM-Tris/HCl buffer, pH 8.5 (4:1, v/v), under anaerobic conditions. The spectral properties of the extruded core suggest that component C contains 1 mol of [2Fe-2S(S-Cys)4] centre per mol of protein. 4. E.p.r. spectroscopy confirms the presence of a Fe-S centre in component C. 5. Component C catalyses the reduction by NADH of ferricyanide, 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol or horse heart cytochrome c, with specific activities of 50--230 units/mg of protein. 6. The optimum pH for the NADH-acceptor reductase activity is 8.5--9.0, and the apparent Km values for NADH and NADPH are 0.05mM and 15.5mM respectively. 7. Unlike methane mono-oxygenase activity, NADH-acceptor reductase activity of component C is not inhibited by 8-hydroxyquinoline or by acetylene. PMID:220953

  17. Characterization of the second prosthetic group of the flavoenzyme NADH-acceptor reductase (component C) of the methane mono-oxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Colby, J; Dalton, H

    1979-03-01

    1. A new two-step purification is described that routinely yields 100mg quantities of component C for biochemical studies. 2. Chemical analyses show component C purified by this procedure to contain 2 g-atoms of iron, 2 mol of acid-labile sulphide (S) and 1 mol of FAD per mol of protein. 3. The Fe-S core of component C was extruded by treating the protein with p-methoxybenzenethiol in hexamethyl phosphoramide/50mM-Tris/HCl buffer, pH 8.5 (4:1, v/v), under anaerobic conditions. The spectral properties of the extruded core suggest that component C contains 1 mol of [2Fe-2S(S-Cys)4] centre per mol of protein. 4. E.p.r. spectroscopy confirms the presence of a Fe-S centre in component C. 5. Component C catalyses the reduction by NADH of ferricyanide, 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol or horse heart cytochrome c, with specific activities of 50--230 units/mg of protein. 6. The optimum pH for the NADH-acceptor reductase activity is 8.5--9.0, and the apparent Km values for NADH and NADPH are 0.05mM and 15.5mM respectively. 7. Unlike methane mono-oxygenase activity, NADH-acceptor reductase activity of component C is not inhibited by 8-hydroxyquinoline or by acetylene.

  18. Interaction of Auxin and ERECTA in Elaborating Arabidopsis Inflorescence Architecture Revealed by the Activation Tagging of a New Member of the YUCCA Family Putative Flavin Monooxygenases1

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Claire; Bemis, Shannon M.; Hill, Emi J.; Sawa, Shinichiro; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Torii, Keiko U.

    2005-01-01

    The aboveground body of higher plants has a modular structure of repeating units, or phytomers. As such, the position, size, and shape of the individual phytomer dictate the plant architecture. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ERECTA (ER) gene regulates the inflorescence architecture by affecting elongation of the internode and pedicels, as well as the shape of lateral organs. A large-scale activation-tagging genetic screen was conducted in Arabidopsis to identify novel genes and pathways that interact with the ER locus. A dominant mutant, super1-D, was isolated as a nearly complete suppressor of a partial loss-of-function allele er-103. We found that SUPER1 encodes YUCCA5, a novel member of the YUCCA family of flavin monooxygenases. The activation tagging of YUCCA5 conferred increased levels of free indole acetic acid, increased auxin response, and mild phenotypic characteristics of auxin overproducers, such as elongated hypocotyls, epinastic cotyledons, and narrow leaves. Both genetic and cellular analyses indicate that auxin and the ER pathway regulate cell division and cell expansion in a largely independent but overlapping manner during elaboration of inflorescence architecture. PMID:16126863

  19. Role of hepatic monooxygenases in generating estrogenic metabolites from methoxychlor and from its identified contaminants.

    PubMed

    Bulger, W H; Feil, V J; Kupfer, D

    1985-01-01

    Previous investigations demonstrated that methoxychlor [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane] contains estrogenic contaminants and that methoxychlor per se is not an estrogen but is a proestrogen being metabolized in vivo into estrogenic products. The present study examined structurally identified methoxychlor contaminants as to their estrogenic or proestrogenic properties. Also, the estrogenic activity of demethylated metabolites of methoxychlor and of one contaminant was determined. To examine these properties, we utilized an assay developed by us that monitors whether a given compound, incubated with isolated rat uteri, can diminish the uterine cytosolic estrogen receptor and elevate the nuclear estrogen receptor and whether metabolic intervention by hepatic microsomal monooxygenase(s) is required by the respective compound for this cellular redistribution of the receptor. Of the 15 compounds examined which constitute with methoxychlor 99.5% of total technical grade methoxychlor, two compounds, 1,1-dichloro-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethene (mono-OH-MDDE) and 1,1,1-trichloro-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane (mono-OH-methoxychlor), were active per se and two compounds, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethene (MDDE) and methoxychlor, required metabolic transformation for estrogenic activity to be manifested. Subsequently, it was shown that the mono- and bis-OH metabolites of MDDE and of methoxychlor were active estrogens and that the order of activity, either by the above procedure or in terms of relative binding affinity to rat uterine cytosolic receptor, was as follows: bis-OH-MDDE much greater than bis-OH-methoxychlor greater than mono-OH-MDDE greater than mono-OH-methoxychlor. Following the in vitro observations, the activity of MDDE and bis-OH-MDDE was determined in vivo in immature rats. It appears that both compounds are estrogenic, yielding marked elevation in ornithine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.17) levels and moderate

  20. Identification and treatment of heme depletion attributed to overexpression of a lineage of evolved P450 monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Michener, Joshua K; Nielsen, Jens; Smolke, Christina D

    2012-11-20

    Recent advances in metabolic engineering have demonstrated that microbial biosynthesis can provide a viable alternative to chemical synthesis for the production of bulk and fine chemicals. Introduction of a new biosynthetic pathway typically requires the expression of multiple heterologous enzymes in the production host, which can impose stress on the host cell and, thereby, limit performance of the pathway. Unfortunately, analysis and treatment of the host stress response can be difficult, because there are many sources of stress that may interact in complex ways. We use a systems biological approach to analyze the stress imposed by expressing different enzyme variants from a lineage of soluble P450 monooxygenases, previously evolved for heterologous activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our analysis identifies patterns of stress imposed on the host by heterologous enzyme overexpression that are consistent across the evolutionary lineage, ultimately implicating heme depletion as the major stress. We show that the monooxygenase evolution, starting from conditions of either high or low stress, caused the cellular stress to converge to a common level. Overexpression of rate-limiting enzymes in the endogenous heme biosynthetic pathway alleviates the stress imposed by expression of the P450 monooxygenases and increases the enzymatic activity of the final evolved P450 by an additional 2.3-fold. Heme overexpression also increases the total activity of an endogenous cytosolic heme-containing catalase but not a heterologous P450 that is membrane-associated. This work demonstrates the utility of combining systems and synthetic biology to analyze and optimize heterologous enzyme expression.

  1. Total degradation of pentachloroethane by an engineered Alcaligenes strain expressing a modified camphor monooxygenase and a hybrid dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Ryo; Yoshihira, Kunichika; Ngadiman; Futagami, Taiki; Goto, Masatoshi; Furukawa, Kensuke

    2004-06-01

    We engineered biphenyl-degrading Alcaligenes sp. strain KF711 for total degradation of pentachloroethane (PCA), which expresses a modified camphor monooxygenase and a hybrid dioxygenase consisting of TodC1 (a large subunit of toluene dioxygenase of Pseudomonas putida F1) and BphA2-BphA3-pbhA4 (a small subunit, ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase of biphenyl dioxygenase, respectively, in strain KF707). Modified camphor monooxygenase genes (camCAB) were supplied as a plasmid and the todC1 gene was integrated within the chromosomal bph gene cluster by a single crossover recombination. The resultant strain KF711S-3cam dechlorinated PCA to trichloroethene by the action of the modified camphor monooxygenase under anaerobic conditions. The same strain subsequently degraded trichloroethene formed oxidatively by the action of the Tol-Bph hybrid dioxygenase under aerobic conditions. Thus sequential anaerobic and aerobic treatments of the KF711S-3cam resting cells resulted in efficient and total degradation of PCA.

  2. Phenylalanine monooxygenase and the sulfur oxygenation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine in mice.

    PubMed

    Vandenbossche, Evita; Lucas, Christopher; Mistry, Lata; Garfield, Emma; Mitchell, Stephen C; Steventon, Glyn B

    2016-01-01

    1. The extent of sulfoxidation of the drug, S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine, has been shown to vary between individuals, with this phenomenon being mooted as a biomarker for certain disease states and susceptibilities. Studies in vitro have indicated that the enzyme responsible for this reaction was phenylalanine monooxygenase but to date no in vivo evidence exists to support this assumption. Using the mouse models of mild hyperphenylalaninamia (enu1 PAH variant) and classical phenylketonuria (enu2 PAH variant), the sulfur oxygenation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine has been investigated. 2. Compared to the wild type (wt/wt) mice, both the heterozygous dominant (wt/enu1 and wt/enu2) mice and the homozygous recessive (enu1/enu1 and enu2/enu2) mice were shown to have significantly increased Cmax, AUC(0-180 min) and AUC(0-∞ min) values (15 - to 20-fold higher). These results were primarily attributable to the significantly reduced clearance of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine (13 - to 22-fold lower). 3. Only the wild type mice produced measurable quantities of the parent S-oxide metabolites. Those mice possessing one or more allelic variant showed no evidence of blood SCMC (R/S) S-oxides. These observations support the proposition that differences in phenylalanine hydroxylase activity underlie the variation in S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine sulfoxidation and that no other enzyme is able to undertake this reaction.

  3. Isolation and functional expression of human pancreatic peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, K; Arakawa, F; Misumi, Y; Treston, A M; Vos, M; Matsuoka, Y

    1994-11-30

    Pancreastatin (PST) is processed from chromogranin A and the C-terminal amide of the peptide is an absolute requirement for biological activities. Human pancreatic carcinoma cells QGP-1 which produce both chromogranin A and PST were used to isolate cDNAs encoding two forms of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM). The two forms are a full length bifunctional enzyme and a variant lacking the transmembrane domain-coding region. When the cDNAs of these two forms were expressed in COS-7 cells, cells transfected with the predicted soluble form released into the culture medium a very much higher amidating activity which converts human chromogranin A-(273-302) to PST-29. The optimal pH for amidating activity was 5.4 and Cu2+, ascorbate and catalase were required as cofactors for the both forms of PAM. Km values for the membrane-bound and the soluble forms of PAM were 15.7 +/- 3.1 microM and 12.4 +/- 1.6 microM, respectively. These results demonstrate that both forms of PAM can function in the posttranslational processing of chromogranin A to PST in the environment of a secretory vesicle.

  4. C. elegans flavin-containing monooxygenase-4 is essential for osmoregulation in hypotonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Hirani, Nisha; Westenberg, Marcel; Seed, Paul T.; Petalcorin, Mark I. R.; Dolphin, Colin T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed osmoregulatory systems engaged when worms experience hypertonic conditions, but less is known about measures employed when faced with hypotonic stress. Inactivation of fmo-4, which encodes flavin-containing monooxygenase-4, results in dramatic hypoosmotic hypersensitivity; worms are unable to prevent overwhelming water influx and swell rapidly, finally rupturing due to high internal hydrostatic pressure. fmo-4 is expressed prominently in hypodermis, duct and pore cells but is excluded from the excretory cell. Thus, FMO-4 plays a crucial osmoregulatory role by promoting clearance of excess water that enters during hypotonicity, perhaps by synthesizing an osmolyte that acts to establish an osmotic gradient from excretory cell to duct and pore cells. C. elegans FMO-4 contains a C-terminal extension conserved in all nematode FMO-4s. The coincidently numbered human FMO4 also contains an extended C-terminus with features similar to those of FMO-4. Although these shared sequence characteristics suggest potential orthology, human FMO4 was unable to rescue the fmo-4 osmoregulatory defect. Intriguingly, however, mammalian FMO4 is expressed predominantly in the kidney – an appropriate site if it too is, or once was, involved in osmoregulation. PMID:27010030

  5. Flavin-containing monooxygenase, a new clue of pathological proteins in the rotenone model of parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Li, Boyu; Yuan, Yuhe; Zhang, Wanqing; He, Wenbin; Hu, Jinfeng; Chen, Naihong

    2014-04-30

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a major age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra par compacta (SNpc) and accumulation of aggregated alpha-synuclein in brain areas. Rotenone is a neurotoxin that is routinely used to model PD, thus to help us understand the mechanisms of neural death. Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO), usually known as an important hepatic microsomal enzyme like cytochrome P450, was found to play a role in the brain recent years. In our study we aimed to find out the role that FMO might play in PD pathology. Thus we successfully generated rotenone model in primary midbrain dopaminergic neurons and identified the apoptosis of neurons caused by rotenone. We found that in rotenone model of Parkinsonism, the expression/protein level of parkin and FMO1 were decreased accompanied by the activation of caspase 3. Blocking FMO activity by FMO inhibitor methimazole directly caused activation of caspase 3, meanwhile parkin protein level was decreased. Our data indicated that FMO, whose dysfunction could be a reason for the apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons in rotenone model, might be a new clue of pathological proteins in rotenone model of parkinsonism. Meanwhile, it was suggested that parkin function was compromised in neuro-pathological states, thereby further adding to the cellular survival stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reconstitution of {beta}-carotene hydroxylase activity of thermostable CYP175A1 monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Momoi, Kyoko; Hofmann, Ute; Schmid, Rolf D.; Urlacher, Vlada B. . E-mail: itbvkha@po.uni-stuttgart.de

    2006-01-06

    CYP175A1 is a thermostable P450 Monooxygenase from Thermus thermophilus HB27, demonstrating in vivo activity towards {beta}-carotene. Activity of CYP175A1 was reconstituted in vitro using artificial electron transport proteins. First results were obtained in the mixture with a crude Escherichia coli cell extract at 37 {sup o}C. In this system, {beta}-carotene was hydroxylated to {beta}-cryptoxanthin. The result indicated the presence of electron transport enzymes among the E. coli proteins, which are suitable for CYP175A1. However, upon in vitro reconstitution of CYP175A1 activity with purified recombinant flavodoxin and flavodoxin reductase from E. coli, only very low {beta}-cryptoxanthin production was observed. Remarkably, with another artificial electron transport system, putidaredoxin and putidaredoxin reductase from Pseudomonas putida, purified CYP175A1 enzyme hydroxylated {beta}-carotene at 3- and also 3'-positions, resulting in {beta}-cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin. Under the optimal reaction conditions, the turnover rate of the enzyme reached 0.23 nmol {beta}-cryptoxanthin produced per nmol P450 per min.

  7. Kynurenine-3-monooxygenase inhibition prevents multiple organ failure in rodent models of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mole, Damian J; Webster, Scott P; Uings, Iain; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Wilson, Kris; Hutchinson, Jonathan P; Mirguet, Olivier; Walker, Ann; Beaufils, Benjamin; Ancellin, Nicolas; Trottet, Lionel; Bénéton, Véronique; Mowat, Christopher G; Wilkinson, Martin; Rowland, Paul; Haslam, Carl; McBride, Andrew; Homer, Natalie Z M; Baily, James E; Sharp, Matthew G F; Garden, O James; Hughes, Jeremy; Howie, Sarah E M; Holmes, Duncan S; Liddle, John; Iredale, John P

    2016-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating inflammatory condition of the pancreas that is considered to be a paradigm of sterile inflammation leading to systemic multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death. Acute mortality from AP-MODS exceeds 20% (ref. 3), and the lifespans of those who survive the initial episode are typically shorter than those of the general population. There are no specific therapies available to protect individuals from AP-MODS. Here we show that kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO), a key enzyme of tryptophan metabolism, is central to the pathogenesis of AP-MODS. We created a mouse strain that is deficient for Kmo (encoding KMO) and that has a robust biochemical phenotype that protects against extrapancreatic tissue injury to the lung, kidney and liver in experimental AP-MODS. A medicinal chemistry strategy based on modifications of the kynurenine substrate led to the discovery of the oxazolidinone GSK180 as a potent and specific inhibitor of KMO. The binding mode of the inhibitor in the active site was confirmed by X-ray co-crystallography at 3.2 Å resolution. Treatment with GSK180 resulted in rapid changes in the levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites in vivo, and it afforded therapeutic protection against MODS in a rat model of AP. Our findings establish KMO inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of AP-MODS, and they open up a new area for drug discovery in critical illness.

  8. Kynurenine–3–monooxygenase inhibition prevents multiple organ failure in rodent models of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Damian J; Webster, Scott P; Uings, Iain; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Wilson, Kris; Hutchinson, Jonathan P; Mirguet, Olivier; Walker, Ann; Beaufils, Benjamin; Ancellin, Nicolas; Trottet, Lionel; Bénéton, Véronique; Mowat, Christopher G; Wilkinson, Martin; Rowland, Paul; Haslam, Carl; McBride, Andrew; Homer, Natalie ZM; Baily, James E; Sharp, Matthew GF; Garden, O James; Hughes, Jeremy; Howie, Sarah EM; Holmes, Duncan S; Liddle, John; Iredale, John P

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating inflammatory condition of the pancreas that is considered to be a paradigm of sterile inflammation leading to systemic multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death1,2 Acute mortality from AP-MODS exceeds 20%3 and for those who survive the initial episode, their lifespan is typically shorter than the general population4. There are no specific therapies available that protect individuals against AP-MODS. Here, we show that kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO), a key enzyme of tryptophan metabolism5, is central to the pathogenesis of AP-MODS. We created a mouse strain deficient for Kmo with a robust biochemical phenotype that protected against extrapancreatic tissue injury to lung, kidney and liver in experimental AP-MODS. A medicinal chemistry strategy based on modifications of the kynurenine substrate led to the discovery of GSK180 as a potent and specific inhibitor of KMO. The binding mode of the inhibitor in the active site was confirmed by X-ray co-crystallography at 3.2 Å resolution. Treatment with GSK180 resulted in rapid changes in levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites in vivo and afforded therapeutic protection against AP-MODS in a rat model of AP. Our findings establish KMO inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of AP-MODS and open up a new area for drug discovery in critical illness. PMID:26752518

  9. Production of four Neurospora crassa lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in Pichia pastoris monitored by a fluorimetric assay.

    PubMed

    Kittl, Roman; Kracher, Daniel; Burgstaller, Daniel; Haltrich, Dietmar; Ludwig, Roland

    2012-10-26

    Recent studies demonstrate that enzymes from the glycosyl hydrolase family 61 (GH61) show lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (PMO) activity. Together with cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) an enzymatic system capable of oxidative cellulose cleavage is formed, which increases the efficiency of cellulases and put PMOs at focus of biofuel research. Large amounts of purified PMOs, which are difficult to obtain from the native fungal producers, are needed to study their reaction kinetics, structure and industrial application. In addition, a fast and robust enzymatic assay is necessary to monitor enzyme production and purification. Four pmo genes from Neurospora crassa were expressed in P. pastoris under control of the AOX1 promoter. High yields were obtained for the glycosylated gene products PMO-01867, PMO-02916 and PMO-08760 (>300 mg L-1), whereas the yield of non-glycosylated PMO-03328 was moderate (~45 mg L-1). The production and purification of all four enzymes was specifically followed by a newly developed, fast assay based on a side reaction of PMO: the production of H2O2 in the presence of reductants. While ascorbate is a suitable reductant for homogeneous PMO preparations, fermentation samples require the specific electron donor CDH. P. pastoris is a high performing expression host for N. crassa PMOs. The pmo genes under control of the native signal sequence are correctly processed and active. The novel CDH-based enzyme assay allows fast determination of PMO activity in fermentation samples and is robust against interfering matrix components.

  10. Localization of genes encoding three distinct flavin-containing monooxygenases to human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, E.A.; Fox, M.F.; Povey, S. ); Dolphin, C.T.; Phillips, I.R.; Smith, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to map the gene encoding human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) form II (N. Lomri, Q. Gu, and J. R. Cashman, 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89: 1685--1689) to chromosome 1. They propose the designation FMO3 for this gene as it is the third FMO gene to be mapped. The two other human FMO genes identified to date, FMO1 and FMO2, are also located on chromosome 1 (C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. Povey, C. N. A. Palmer, D. M. Ziegler, R. Ayesh, R. L. Smith, and 1. R. Phillips, 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266: 12379--12385; C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. F. Povey, R. L. Smith, and I. R. Phillips, 1992, Biochem. J. 286: 261--267). The localization of FMO1, FMO2, and FMO3 has been refined to the long arm of chromosome 1. Analysis of human metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization confirmed the mapping of FMO1 and localized this gene more precisely to 1 q23-q25. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Crystal Structures of Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase Reveal Complex Domain Movements and a Sliding Cofactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza, I.; Yachnin, B; Wang, S; Grosse, S; Bergeron, H; Imura, A; Iwaki, H; Hasegawa, Y; Lau, P; Berghuis, A

    2009-01-01

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) is a flavoprotein that carries out the archetypical Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of a variety of cyclic ketones into lactones. Using NADPH and O{sub 2} as cosubstrates, the enzyme inserts one atom of oxygen into the substrate in a complex catalytic mechanism that involves the formation of a flavin-peroxide and Criegee intermediate. We present here the atomic structures of CHMO from an environmental Rhodococcus strain bound with FAD and NADP+ in two distinct states, to resolutions of 2.3 and 2.2 {angstrom}. The two conformations reveal domain shifts around multiple linkers and loop movements, involving conserved arginine 329 and tryptophan 492, which effect a translation of the nicotinamide resulting in a sliding cofactor. Consequently, the cofactor is ideally situated and subsequently repositioned during the catalytic cycle to first reduce the flavin and later stabilize formation of the Criegee intermediate. Concurrent movements of a loop adjacent to the active site demonstrate how this protein can effect large changes in the size and shape of the substrate binding pocket to accommodate a diverse range of substrates. Finally, the previously identified BVMO signature sequence is highlighted for its role in coordinating domain movements. Taken together, these structures provide mechanistic insights into CHMO-catalyzed Baeyer-Villiger oxidation.

  12. Lead discovery for human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase by high-throughput RapidFire mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Denise M; Gee, Michelle; Haslam, Carl; Leavens, Bill; Christodoulou, Erica; Hissey, Paul; Hardwicke, Philip; Argyrou, Argyrides; Webster, Scott P; Mole, Damian J; Wilson, Kris; Binnie, Margaret; Yard, Beverley A; Dean, Tony; Liddle, John; Uings, Iain; Hutchinson, Jonathan P

    2014-04-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a therapeutically important target on the eukaryotic tryptophan catabolic pathway, where it converts L-kynurenine (Kyn) to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK). We have cloned and expressed the human form of this membrane protein as a full-length GST-fusion in a recombinant baculovirus expression system. An enriched membrane preparation was used for a directed screen of approximately 78,000 compounds using a RapidFire mass spectrometry (RF-MS) assay. The RapidFire platform provides an automated solid-phase extraction system that gives a throughput of approximately 7 s per well to the mass spectrometer, where direct measurement of both the substrate and product allowed substrate conversion to be determined. The RF-MS methodology is insensitive to assay interference, other than where compounds have the same nominal mass as Kyn or 3-HK and produce the same mass transition on fragmentation. These instances could be identified by comparison with the product-only data. The screen ran with excellent performance (average Z' value 0.8) and provided several tractable hit series for further investigation.

  13. Trichloroethylene degradation using recombinant bacteria expressing the soluble methane monooxygenase from methylosinus trichosporium OB3b

    SciTech Connect

    Jahng, D.; Kim, C.; Wood, T.K.

    1995-12-01

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from M. trichosporium OB3b has the ability to degrade many halogenated aliphatic compounds that are found in contaminated soil and groundwater. For efficient trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation in a foreign host, efforts are being made to improve inconsistent and low sMMO activity of the recombinant strain constructed previously (Pseudomonas putida F1/pSMMO20). Additional smmo-containing recombinant strains have been constructed including various Pseudomonas, Agrobacterium, and Rhizobium strains. Recombinant facultative methylotrophs containing the smmo locus were also constructed through electroporation and tri-parental mating using a new plasmid pSMMO50. TCE degradation by these recombinant strains was examined. The effect of metal ions on in vitro sMMO activity was also discerned to optimize the expression medium. Among the metal ions examined, Cu(I), Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) inhibited sMMO purified from trichosporium OB3b, and the effect of the metal ions on each of the components of sMMO will also be discussed. In addition, the post-segregational killing locus (hok/sok) from E. coli plasmid R1 was inserted downstream of the smmo locus to stabilize the recombinant plasmid in these host cells, and chemostat cultures were used to optimize expression of active sMMO by varying the growth rate.

  14. Emerging Roles of Flavin Monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) in Cholesterol Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schugar, Rebecca C.; Brown, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Atherosclerosis and associated cardiovascular disease (CVD) still remain the largest cause of mortality worldwide. Several recent studies have discovered that metabolism of common nutrients by gut microbes can produce a proatherogenic metabolite called trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). The goal of this review is to discuss emerging evidence that the hepatic enzyme that generates TMAO, flavin monooxygenase 3 (FMO3), plays a regulatory role in maintaining whole body cholesterol balance and atherosclerosis development. Recent Findings Several independent studies have recently uncovered a link between either FMO3 itself or its enzymatic product TMAO with atherosclerosis and hepatic insulin resistance. These recent studies show that inhibition of FMO3 stimulates macrophage reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and protects against atherosclerosis in mice. Summary A growing body of work demonstrates that nutrients present in high fat foods (phosphatidylcholine, choline, and L-carnitine) can be metabolized by the gut microbial enzymes to generate trimethylamine (TMA), which is then further metabolized by the host enzyme FMO3 to produce proatherogenic TMAO. Here we discuss emerging evidence that the TMAO producing enzyme FMO3 is centrally involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by regulating cholesterol metabolism and insulin resistance, and how these new insights provide exciting new avenues for CVD therapies. PMID:26218418

  15. Flavin containing monooxygenase 3 exerts broad effects on glucose and lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Diana M.; Wang, Zeneng; Lee, Richard; Meng, Yonghong; Che, Nam; Charugundla, Sarada; Qi, Hannah; Wu, Judy; Pan, Calvin; Brown, J. Mark; Vallim, Thomas; Bennett, Brian J.; Graham, Mark; Hazen, Stanley L.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    We performed silencing and overexpression studies of flavin containing monooxygenase (FMO) 3 in hyperlipidemic mouse models to examine its effects on trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) levels and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of hepatic FMO3 in LDL receptor knockout mice using an antisense oligonucleotide resulted in decreased circulating TMAO levels and atherosclerosis. Surprisingly, we also observed significant decreases in hepatic lipids and in levels of plasma lipids, ketone bodies, glucose, and insulin. FMO3 overexpression in transgenic mice, on the other hand, increased hepatic and plasma lipids. Global gene expression analyses suggested that these effects of FMO3 on lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis may be mediated through the PPARα and Kruppel-like factor 15 pathways. In vivo and in vitro results were consistent with the concept that the effects were mediated directly by FMO3 rather than trimethylamine/TMAO; in particular, overexpression of FMO3 in the human hepatoma cell line, Hep3B, resulted in significantly increased glucose secretion and lipogenesis. Our results indicate a major role for FMO3 in modulating glucose and lipid homeostasis in vivo, and they suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of FMO3 to reduce TMAO levels would be confounded by metabolic interactions. PMID:25378658

  16. Characterization of maize cytochrome P450 monooxygenases induced in response to safeners and bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Persans, M W; Wang, J; Schuler, M A

    2001-02-01

    Plants use a diverse array of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in their biosynthetic and detoxification pathways. To determine the extent to which various maize P450s are induced in response to chemical inducers, such as naphthalic anhydride (NA), triasulfuron (T), phenobarbital, and bacterial pathogens (Erwinia stuartii, Acidovorax avenae), we have analyzed the response patterns of seven P450 transcripts after treatment of seedlings with these inducers. Each of these P450 transcripts has distinct developmental, tissue-specific, and chemical cues regulating their expression even when they encode P450s within the same biosynthetic pathway. Most notably, the CYP71C1 and CYP71C3 transcripts, encoding P450s in the DIMBOA biosynthetic pathway, are induced to the same level in response to wounding and NA treatment of younger seedlings and differentially in response to NA/T treatment of younger seedlings and NA and NA/T treatment of older seedlings. NA and T induce expression of both CYP92A1 and CYP72A5 transcripts in older seedling shoots, whereas phenobarbital induces CYP92A1 expression in older seedling shoots and highly induces CYP72A5 expression in young and older seedling roots. Expressed sequence tag (EST) 6c06b11 transcripts, encoding an undefined P450 activity, are highly induced in seedling shoots infected with bacterial pathogens.

  17. Characterization of Maize Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases Induced in Response to Safeners and Bacterial Pathogens1

    PubMed Central

    Persans, Michael W.; Wang, Jian; Schuler, Mary A.

    2001-01-01

    Plants use a diverse array of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in their biosynthetic and detoxification pathways. To determine the extent to which various maize P450s are induced in response to chemical inducers, such as naphthalic anhydride (NA), triasulfuron (T), phenobarbital, and bacterial pathogens (Erwinia stuartii, Acidovorax avenae), we have analyzed the response patterns of seven P450 transcripts after treatment of seedlings with these inducers. Each of these P450 transcripts has distinct developmental, tissue-specific, and chemical cues regulating their expression even when they encode P450s within the same biosynthetic pathway. Most notably, the CYP71C1 and CYP71C3 transcripts, encoding P450s in the DIMBOA biosynthetic pathway, are induced to the same level in response to wounding and NA treatment of younger seedlings and differentially in response to NA/T treatment of younger seedlings and NA and NA/T treatment of older seedlings. NA and T induce expression of both CYP92A1 and CYP72A5 transcripts in older seedling shoots, whereas phenobarbital induces CYP92A1 expression in older seedling shoots and highly induces CYP72A5 expression in young and older seedling roots. Expressed sequence tag (EST) 6c06b11 transcripts, encoding an undefined P450 activity, are highly induced in seedling shoots infected with bacterial pathogens. PMID:11161067

  18. Electron transfer reactions in the alkene mono-oxygenase complex from Nocardia corallina B-276.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, S C; Cammack, R; Dalton, H

    1999-01-01

    Nocardia corallina B-276 possesses a multi-component enzyme, alkene mono-oxygenase (AMO), that catalyses the stereoselective epoxygenation of alkenes. The reductase component of this system has been shown by EPR and fluorescence spectroscopy to contain two prosthetic groups, an FAD centre and a [2Fe-2S] cluster. The role of these centres in the epoxygenation reaction was determined by midpoint potential measurements and electron transfer kinetics. The order of potentials of the prosthetic groups of the reductase were FAD/FAD.=-216 mV, [2Fe-2S]/[2Fe-2S].=-160 mV and FAD./FAD.=-134 mV. Combined, these data implied that the reductase component supplied the energy required for the epoxygenation reaction and allowed a prediction of the mechanism of electron transfer within the AMO complex. The FAD moiety was reduced by bound NADH in a two-electron reaction. The electrons were then transported to the [2Fe-2S] centre one at a time, which in turn reduced the di-iron centre of the epoxygenase. Reduction of the di-iron centre is required for oxygen binding and substrate oxidation. PMID:10085230

  19. Soluble methane monooxygenase component B gene probe for identification of methanotrophs that rapidly degrade trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Tsien, H C; Hanson, R S

    1992-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphisms, Western blot (immunoblot) analysis, and fluorescence-labelled signature probes were used for the characterization of methanotrophic bacteria as well as for the identification of methanotrophs which contained the soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) gene and were able to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE). The gene encoding a soluble MMO component B protein from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was cloned. It contained a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment. With this cloned component B gene as probe, methanotroph types I, II, and X and environmental and bioreactor samples were screened for the presence of the gene encoding soluble MMO. Fragments produced by digestion of DNA with rare cutting restriction endonucleases were separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and transferred to Zeta-Probe membrane (Bio-Rad) for Southern blot analysis. Samples were also analyzed for the presence of soluble MMO by Western blot analysis and the ability to degrade TCE. The physiological groups of methanotrophs in each sample were determined by hybridizing cells with fluorescence-labelled signature probes. Among twelve pure or mixed cultures, DNA fragments of seven methanotrophs hybridized with the soluble MMO B gene probe. When grown in media with limited copper, all of these bacteria degraded TCE. All of them are type II methanotrophs. The soluble MMO component B gene of the type X methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath, did not hybridize to the M. trichosporium OB3b soluble MMO component B gene probe, although M. capsulatus Bath also produces a soluble MMO. Images PMID:1349468

  20. Menkes protein contributes to the function of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Steveson, Tami C; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D; Ma, Xin-Ming; Mueller, Gregory P; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2003-01-01

    Menkes protein (ATP7A) is a P-type ATPase involved in copper uptake and homeostasis. Disturbed copper homeostasis occurs in patients with Menkes disease, an X-linked disorder characterized by mental retardation, neurodegeneration, connective tissue disorders, and early childhood death. Mutations in ATP7A result in malfunction of copper-requiring enzymes, such as tyrosinase and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase. The first step of the two-step amidation reaction carried out by peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) also requires copper. We used tissue from wild-type rats and mice and an ATP7A-specific antibody to determine that ATP7A is expressed at high levels in tissues expressing high levels of PAM. ATP7A is largely localized to the trans Golgi network in pituitary endocrine cells. The Atp7a mouse, bearing a mutation in the Atp7a gene, is an excellent model system for examining the consequences of ATP7A malfunction. Despite normal levels of PAM protein, levels of several amidated peptides were reduced in pituitary and brain extracts of Atp7a mice, demonstrating that PAM function is compromised when ATP7A is inactive. Based on these results, we conclude that a reduction in the ability of PAM to produce bioactive end-products involved in neuronal growth and development could contribute to many of the biological effects associated with Menkes disease.

  1. Prediction and analysis of the modular structure of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) form a vast and diverse family of highly variable sequences. They catalyze a wide variety of oxidative reactions and are therefore of great relevance in drug development and biotechnological applications. Despite their differences in sequence and substrate specificity, the structures of CYPs are highly similar. Although being in research focus for years, factors mediating selectivity and activity remain vague. Description This systematic comparison of CYPs based on the Cytochrome P450 Engineering Database (CYPED) involved sequence and structure analysis of more than 8000 sequences. 31 structures have been applied to generate a reliable structure-based HMM profile in order to predict structurally conserved regions. Therefore, it was possible to automatically transfer these modules on CYP sequences without any secondary structure information, to analyze substrate interacting residues and to compare interaction sites with redox partners. Conclusions Functionally relevant structural sites of CYPs were predicted. Regions involved in substrate binding were analyzed in all sequences among the CYPED. For all CYPs that require a reductase, two reductase interaction sites were identified and classified according to their length. The newly gained insights promise an improvement of engineered enzyme properties for potential biotechnological application. The annotated sequences are accessible on the current version of the CYPED. The prediction tool can be applied to any CYP sequence via the web interface at http://www.cyped.uni-stuttgart.de/cgi-bin/strpred/dosecpred.pl. PMID:20950472

  2. Catalase improves saccharification of lignocellulose by reducing lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase-associated enzyme inactivation.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brian R; Huang, Hong Zhi; Frickman, Jesper; Halvorsen, Rune; Johansen, Katja S

    2016-03-01

    Efficient enzymatic saccharification of plant cell wall material is key to industrial processing of agricultural and forestry waste such as straw and wood chips into fuels and chemicals. Saccharification assays were performed on steam-pretreated wheat straw under ambient and O2-deprived environments and in the absence and presence of a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) and catalase. A kinetic model was used to calculate catalytic rate and first-order inactivation rate constants of the cellulases from reaction progress curves. The addition of a LPMO significantly (P < 0.01, Student's T test) enhanced the rate of glucose release from 2.8 to 6.9 h(-1) under ambient O2 conditions. However, this also significantly (P < 0.01, Student's T test) increased the rate of inactivation of the enzyme mixture, thereby reducing the performance half-life from 65 to 35 h. Decreasing O2 levels or, strikingly, the addition of catalase significantly reduced (P < 0.01, Student's T test) enzyme inactivation and, as a consequence, higher efficiency of the cellulolytic enzyme cocktail was achieved. Oxidative inactivation of commercial cellulase mixtures is a significant factor influencing the overall saccharification efficiency and the addition of catalase can be used to protect these mixtures from inactivation.

  3. Signaling mediated by the cytosolic domain of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Alam, M R; Steveson, T C; Johnson, R C; Bäck, N; Abraham, B; Mains, R E; Eipper, B A

    2001-03-01

    The luminal domains of membrane peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) are essential for peptide alpha-amidation, and the cytosolic domain (CD) is essential for trafficking. Overexpression of membrane PAM in corticotrope tumor cells reorganizes the actin cytoskeleton, shifts endogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from mature granules localized at the tips of processes to the TGN region, and blocks regulated secretion. PAM-CD interactor proteins include a protein kinase that phosphorylates PAM (P-CIP2) and Kalirin, a Rho family GDP/GTP exchange factor. We engineered a PAM protein unable to interact with either P-CIP2 or Kalirin (PAM-1/K919R), along with PAM proteins able to interact with Kalirin but not with P-CIP2. AtT-20 cells expressing PAM-1/K919R produce fully active membrane enzyme but still exhibit regulated secretion, with ACTH-containing granules localized to process tips. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrates accumulation of PAM and ACTH in tubular structures at the trans side of the Golgi in AtT-20 cells expressing PAM-1 but not in AtT-20 cells expressing PAM-1/K919R. The ability of PAM to interact with P-CIP2 is critical to its ability to block exit from the Golgi and affect regulated secretion. Consistent with this, mutation of its P-CIP2 phosphorylation site alters the ability of PAM to affect regulated secretion.

  4. Signaling Mediated by the Cytosolic Domain of Peptidylglycine α-Amidating Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Alam, M. Rashidul; Steveson, Tami C.; Johnson, Richard C.; Bäck, Nils; Abraham, Benjamin; Mains, Richard E.; Eipper, Betty A.

    2001-01-01

    The luminal domains of membrane peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) are essential for peptide α-amidation, and the cytosolic domain (CD) is essential for trafficking. Overexpression of membrane PAM in corticotrope tumor cells reorganizes the actin cytoskeleton, shifts endogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from mature granules localized at the tips of processes to the TGN region, and blocks regulated secretion. PAM-CD interactor proteins include a protein kinase that phosphorylates PAM (P-CIP2) and Kalirin, a Rho family GDP/GTP exchange factor. We engineered a PAM protein unable to interact with either P-CIP2 or Kalirin (PAM-1/K919R), along with PAM proteins able to interact with Kalirin but not with P-CIP2. AtT-20 cells expressing PAM-1/K919R produce fully active membrane enzyme but still exhibit regulated secretion, with ACTH-containing granules localized to process tips. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrates accumulation of PAM and ACTH in tubular structures at the trans side of the Golgi in AtT-20 cells expressing PAM-1 but not in AtT-20 cells expressing PAM-1/K919R. The ability of PAM to interact with P-CIP2 is critical to its ability to block exit from the Golgi and affect regulated secretion. Consistent with this, mutation of its P-CIP2 phosphorylation site alters the ability of PAM to affect regulated secretion. PMID:11251076

  5. Localization of integral membrane peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase in neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Milgram, S L; Kho, S T; Martin, G V; Mains, R E; Eipper, B A

    1997-03-01

    Peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) catalyzes the amidation of glycine-extended peptides in neuroendocrine cells. At steady state, membrane PAM is accumulated in a perinuclear compartment. We examined the distribution of membrane PAM in stably transfected AtT-20 cells and compared its localization to markers for the trans-Golgi network (TGN), endosomes, and lysosomes. At the light microscopic level, the distribution of membrane PAM does not overlap extensively with lysosomal markers but does overlap with TGN38 and with SCAMP, a component of post-Golgi membranes involved in recycling pathways. By immunoelectron microscopy, membrane PAM is present in tubulovesicular structures which constitute the TGN; some of these PAM-containing tubulovesicular structures are more distal to the Golgi stacks and do not contain TGN38. While some POMC-derived peptides are present in tubulovesicular structures like those that contain membrane PAM, the majority of the POMC-derived peptides are present in secretory granules. There is little overlap between the steady state distribution of membrane PAM and internalized FITC-transferrin in the early endosomes. Few of the perinuclear PAM-containing structures are labeled with HRP or WGA-HRP even following long incubations. Therefore, membrane PAM is localized to perinuclear tubulovesicular structures which are partially devoid of TGN38 and are not all endosomal in origin.

  6. Reaction Mechanism of the Bicopper Enzyme Peptidylglycine α-Hydroxylating Monooxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Enrique; Rommel, Judith B.; Kästner, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase is a noninteracting bicopper enzyme that stereospecifically hydroxylates the terminal glycine of small peptides for its later amidation. Neuroendocrine messengers, such as oxytocin, rely on the biological activity of this enzyme. Each catalytic turnover requires one oxygen molecule, two protons from the solvent, and two electrons. Despite this enzyme having been widely studied, a consensus on the reaction mechanism has not yet been found. Experiments and theoretical studies favor a pro-S abstraction of a hydrogen atom followed by the rebinding of an OH group. However, several hydrogen-abstracting species have been postulated; because two protons are consumed during the reaction, several protonation states are available. An electron transfer between the copper atoms could play a crucial role for the catalysis as well. This leads to six possible abstracting species. In this study, we compare them on equal footing. We perform quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations, considering the glycine hydrogen abstraction. Our results suggest that the most likely mechanism is a protonation of the abstracting species before the hydrogen abstraction and another protonation as well as a reduction before OH rebinding. PMID:24668808

  7. Suppressed expression of choline monooxygenase in sugar beet on the accumulation of glycine betaine.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Nana; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kitou, Kunihide; Sahashi, Kosuke; Tamagake, Hideto; Tanaka, Yoshito; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-11-01

    Glycine betaine (GB) is an important osmoprotectant and synthesized by two-step oxidation of choline. Choline monooxygenase (CMO) catalyzes the first step of the pathway and is believed to be a rate limiting step for GB synthesis. Recent studies have shown the importance of choline-precursor supply for GB synthesis. In order to investigate the role of CMO for GB accumulation in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), transgenic plants carrying the antisense BvCMO gene were developed. The antisense BvCMO plants showed the decreased activity of GB synthesis from choline compared to wild-type (WT) plants which is well related to the suppressed level of BvCMO protein. However, GB contents were similar between transgenic and WT plants with the exception of young leaves and storage roots. Transgenic plants showed enhanced susceptibility to salt stress than WT plants. These results suggest the importance of choline-precursor-supply for GB accumulation, and young leaves and storage root are sensitive sites for GB accumulation.

  8. Cellulose surface degradation by a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase and its effect on cellulase hydrolytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Eibinger, Manuel; Ganner, Thomas; Bubner, Patricia; Rošker, Stephanie; Kracher, Daniel; Haltrich, Dietmar; Ludwig, Roland; Plank, Harald; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2014-12-26

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) represents a unique principle of oxidative degradation of recalcitrant insoluble polysaccharides. Used in combination with hydrolytic enzymes, LPMO appears to constitute a significant factor of the efficiency of enzymatic biomass depolymerization. LPMO activity on different cellulose substrates has been shown from the slow release of oxidized oligosaccharides into solution, but an immediate and direct demonstration of the enzyme action on the cellulose surface is lacking. Specificity of LPMO for degrading ordered crystalline and unordered amorphous cellulose material of the substrate surface is also unknown. We show by fluorescence dye adsorption analyzed with confocal laser scanning microscopy that a LPMO (from Neurospora crassa) introduces carboxyl groups primarily in surface-exposed crystalline areas of the cellulosic substrate. Using time-resolved in situ atomic force microscopy we further demonstrate that cellulose nano-fibrils exposed on the surface are degraded into shorter and thinner insoluble fragments. Also using atomic force microscopy, we show that prior action of LPMO enables cellulases to attack otherwise highly resistant crystalline substrate areas and that it promotes an overall faster and more complete surface degradation. Overall, this study reveals key characteristics of LPMO action on the cellulose surface and suggests the effects of substrate morphology on the synergy between LPMO and hydrolytic enzymes in cellulose depolymerization. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Membrane-associated forms of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase activity in rat pituitary. Tissue specificity.

    PubMed

    May, V; Cullen, E I; Braas, K M; Eipper, B A

    1988-06-05

    Membrane-associated peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) activity was investigated in rat anterior and neurointermediate pituitary tissues and in pituitary AtT-20/D-16v and GH3 cell lines. A substantial fraction of total pituitary PAM activity was found to be membrane-associated. Triton X-100, N-octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside, and Zwittergent were effective in solubilizing PAM activity from crude pituitary membranes. The distribution of enzyme activity between soluble and membrane-associated forms was tissue-specific. In the anterior pituitary lobe and pituitary cell lines, 40-60% of total PAM activity was membrane-associated while only 10% of the alpha-amidating activity in the neurointermediate lobe was membrane-associated. Soluble and membrane-associated forms of PAM shared nearly identical characteristics with respect to copper and ascorbate requirements, pH optima, and Km values. Upon subcellular fractionation of anterior and neurointermediate pituitary lobe homogenates on Percoll gradients, 12-18% of total PAM activity was found in the rough endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi fractions and 42-60% was localized to secretory granule fractions. For both tissues, membrane-associated PAM activity was enriched in the rough endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi pool, whereas most of the secretory granule-associated enzyme activity was soluble.

  10. Crystal structures of cyclohexanone monooxygenase reveal complex domain movements and a sliding cofactor.

    PubMed

    Mirza, I Ahmad; Yachnin, Brahm J; Wang, Shaozhao; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Imura, Akihiro; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Lau, Peter C K; Berghuis, Albert M

    2009-07-01

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) is a flavoprotein that carries out the archetypical Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of a variety of cyclic ketones into lactones. Using NADPH and O(2) as cosubstrates, the enzyme inserts one atom of oxygen into the substrate in a complex catalytic mechanism that involves the formation of a flavin-peroxide and Criegee intermediate. We present here the atomic structures of CHMO from an environmental Rhodococcus strain bound with FAD and NADP(+) in two distinct states, to resolutions of 2.3 and 2.2 A. The two conformations reveal domain shifts around multiple linkers and loop movements, involving conserved arginine 329 and tryptophan 492, which effect a translation of the nicotinamide resulting in a sliding cofactor. Consequently, the cofactor is ideally situated and subsequently repositioned during the catalytic cycle to first reduce the flavin and later stabilize formation of the Criegee intermediate. Concurrent movements of a loop adjacent to the active site demonstrate how this protein can effect large changes in the size and shape of the substrate binding pocket to accommodate a diverse range of substrates. Finally, the previously identified BVMO signature sequence is highlighted for its role in coordinating domain movements. Taken together, these structures provide mechanistic insights into CHMO-catalyzed Baeyer-Villiger oxidation.

  11. Switching the Regioselectivity of a Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase toward (+)-trans-Dihydrocarvone by Rational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Balke, Kathleen; Schmidt, Sandy; Genz, Maika; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2016-01-15

    The regioselectivity of the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase-catalyzed oxidation is governed mostly by electronic effects leading to the migration of the higher substituted residue. However, in some cases, substrate binding occurs in a way that the less substituted residue lies in an antiperiplanar orientation to the peroxy bond in the Criegee intermediate yielding in the formation of the "abnormal" lactone product. We are the first to demonstrate a complete switch in the regioselectivity of the BVMO from Arthrobacter sp. (CHMOArthro) as exemplified for (+)-trans-dihydrocarvone by redesigning the active site of the enzyme. In the designed triple mutant, the substrate binds in an inverted orientation leading to a ratio of 99:1 in favor of the normal lactone instead of exclusive formation of the abnormal lactone in case of the wild type enzyme. In order to validate our computational study, the beneficial mutations were successfully transferred to the CHMO from Acinetobacter sp. (CHMOAcineto), again yielding in a complete switch of regioselectivity.

  12. Absence of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase reduces mortality of acute viral myocarditis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Hisako; Hoshi, Masato; Mouri, Akihiro; Tashita, Chieko; Yamamoto, Yasuko; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Saito, Kuniaki

    2017-01-01

    Infection of the encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) in mice is an established model for viral myocarditis. Previously, we have demonstrated that indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an L-tryptophan - kynurenine pathway (KP) enzyme, affects acute viral myocarditis. However, the roles of KP metabolites in EMCV infection remain unclear. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is one of the key regulatory enzymes, which metabolizes kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine in the KP. Therefore, we examined the role of KMO in acute viral infection by comparing between KMO(-/-) mice and KMO(+/+) mice. KMO deficiency resulted in suppressed mortality after EMCV infection. The number of infiltrating cells and F4/80(+) cells in KMO(-/-) mice was suppressed compared with those in KMO(+/+) mice. KMO(-/-) mice showed significantly increased levels of serum KP metabolites, and induction of KMO expression upon EMCV infection was involved in its effect on mortality through EMCV suppression. Furthermore, KMO(-/-) mice showed significantly suppression of CCL2, CCL3 and CCL4 on day 2 and CXCL1 on day 4 after infection. These results suggest that increased KP metabolites reduced chemokine production, resulting in suppressed mortality upon KMO knockdown in EMCV infection. KP metabolites may thus provide an effective strategy for treating acute viral myocarditis. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Microsomal monooxygenase as a multienzyme system: the role of P450-P450 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Davydov, Dmitri R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction There is increasing evidence of physical interactions (association) among cytochromes P450 in the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. Functional consequences of these interactions are often underestimated. Areas covered This article provides a comprehensive overview of available experimental material regarding P450-P450 interactions. Special emphasis is given to the interactions between different P450 species and to the functional consequences of homo- and heterooligomerization. Expert opinion Recent advances provide conclusive evidence for a substantial degree of P450 oligomerization in membranes. Interactions between different P450 species resulting in the formation of mixed oligomers with altered activity and substrate specificity have been demonstrated clearly. There are important indications that oligomerization of cytochromes P450 impedes electron flow to a fraction of the P450 population, which render some P450 species non-functional. Functional consequences of P450-P450 interactions make the integrated properties of the microsomal monooxygenase remarkably different from a simple summation of the properties of the individual P450 species. This complexity compromises the predictive power of the current in vitro models of drug metabolism and warrants an urgent need for development of new model systems that consider the interactions of multiple P450 species. PMID:21395496

  14. Collaborative contribution of six cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes to fenpropathrin resistance in Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval).

    PubMed

    Shi, L; Zhang, J; Shen, G; Xu, Z; Xu, Q; He, L

    2016-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), as an important family of detoxification enzymes, participate in the metabolism of agrochemicals in almost all agricultural pests and play important roles in the development of insecticide resistance. Two P450 genes (CYP389B1 and CYP392A26) were identified and their expression patterns were investigated in our previous study. In this study, four more P450 gene sequences (CYP391A1, CYP384A1, CYP392D11 and CYP392A28) from the Clan 2, Clan 3 and Clan 4 families were identified and characterized. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that these four P450 genes were highly expressed in a fenpropathrin-resistant (FeR) strain of Tetranychus cinnabarinus. In addition, their expressions were much more sensitive to fenpropathrin induction in the FeR strain than the susceptible strain. Gene-silencing experiments via double-stranded RNA feeding were carried out. The results showed that mRNA levels of these six P450 genes were reduced in the FeR strain and the activities of P450s were decreased. Consequently mite susceptibilities to fenpropathrin were increased. Interestingly, silencing all six P450 genes simultaneously had an even greater effect on resistance than silencing them individually. This study increases our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of insecticide detoxification, suggesting that the overexpression of these six P450 genes might play important roles in fenpropathrin resistance in T. cinnabarinus collaboratively. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  15. Identification of selectivity determinants in CYP monooxygenases by modelling and systematic analysis of sequence and structure.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Alexander; Pleiss, Jurgen

    2012-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) form a large, ubiquitous enzyme family and are of great interest in red and white biotechnology. To investigate the effect of protein structure on selectivity, the binding of substrate molecules near to the active site was modelled by molecular dynamics simulations. From a comprehensive and systematic comparison of more than 6300 CYP sequences and 31 structures using the Cytochrome P450 Engineering Database (CYPED), residues were identified which are predicted to point close to the heme centre and thus restrict accessibility for substrates. As a result, sequence-structure-function relationships are described that can be used to predict selectivity-determining positions from CYP sequences and structures. Based on this analysis, a minimal library consisting of bacterial CYP102A1 (P450(BM3)) and 24 variants was constructed. All variants were functionally expressed in E. coli, and the library was screened with four terpene substrates. Only 3 variants showed no activity towards all 4 terpenes, while 11 variants demonstrated either a strong shift or improved regio- or stereoselectivity during oxidation of at least one substrate as compared to CYP102A1 wild type. The minimal library also contains variants that show interesting side products which are not generated by the wild type enzyme. By two additional rounds of molecular modelling, diversification, and screening, the selectivity of one of these variants for a new product was optimised with a minimal screening effort. We propose this as a generic approach for other CYP substrates.

  16. Cellulose Surface Degradation by a Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase and Its Effect on Cellulase Hydrolytic Efficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Eibinger, Manuel; Ganner, Thomas; Bubner, Patricia; Rošker, Stephanie; Kracher, Daniel; Haltrich, Dietmar; Ludwig, Roland; Plank, Harald; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) represents a unique principle of oxidative degradation of recalcitrant insoluble polysaccharides. Used in combination with hydrolytic enzymes, LPMO appears to constitute a significant factor of the efficiency of enzymatic biomass depolymerization. LPMO activity on different cellulose substrates has been shown from the slow release of oxidized oligosaccharides into solution, but an immediate and direct demonstration of the enzyme action on the cellulose surface is lacking. Specificity of LPMO for degrading ordered crystalline and unordered amorphous cellulose material of the substrate surface is also unknown. We show by fluorescence dye adsorption analyzed with confocal laser scanning microscopy that a LPMO (from Neurospora crassa) introduces carboxyl groups primarily in surface-exposed crystalline areas of the cellulosic substrate. Using time-resolved in situ atomic force microscopy we further demonstrate that cellulose nano-fibrils exposed on the surface are degraded into shorter and thinner insoluble fragments. Also using atomic force microscopy, we show that prior action of LPMO enables cellulases to attack otherwise highly resistant crystalline substrate areas and that it promotes an overall faster and more complete surface degradation. Overall, this study reveals key characteristics of LPMO action on the cellulose surface and suggests the effects of substrate morphology on the synergy between LPMO and hydrolytic enzymes in cellulose depolymerization. PMID:25361767

  17. Carbon Isotope Fractionations Associated with Methanotrophic Growth with the Soluble and Particulate Methane Monooxygenases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Summons, Roger E.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Growth experiments with the RuMP-type methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), have demonstrated that biomass and lipid biomarkers are significantly depleted in C-13 compared to the substrate methane and that the extent of fractionation is dependent on whether cells express the soluble (s) or particulate (p) methane monooxygenase (MMO). The presence or absence of the characteristic sMMO subunits was monitored using SDS-polyacrylamide gels. In M. capsulatus grown with no Cu supplementation, the characteristic sMMO subunits were observed in the soluble fraction throughout the entire growth period and biomass was depleted in C-13 by approximately 14,700 relative to substrate methane. In cells grown with 5uM Cu, no sMMO bands were observed and a greater fractionation of approximately 27,700 in resultant biomass was obtained. Methanol growth experiments with M. capsulatus and with a RuMP methylotroph, Methylophilus methylotrophus, in which biomass measurements yielded depletions in C-13 of 9 and 5%(sub o), respectively, suggest that oxidation of methane is the major fractionation step. Growth of M. capsulatus at a low level of oxygen, approximately 0.5%, had no significant effect on carbon isotope fractionation by either sMMO or pMMO. These observations are significant for identification of molecular biomarkers; and methanotrophic contributions to carbon isotope composition in natural environments.

  18. Oxidation of ultrafast radical clock substrate probes by the soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Valentine, A M; LeTadic-Biadatti, M H; Toy, P H; Newcomb, M; Lippard, S J

    1999-04-16

    Radical clock substrate probes were used to assess the viability of a discrete substrate radical species in the mechanism of hydrocarbon oxidation by the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). New substituted cyclopropane probes were used with very fast ring-opening rate constants and other desirable attributes, such as the ability to discriminate between radical and cationic intermediates. Oxidation of these substrates by a reconstituted sMMO system resulted in no rearranged products, allowing an upper limit of 150 fs to be placed on the lifetime of a putative radical species. This limit strongly suggests that there is no such substrate radical intermediate. The two enantiomers of trans-1-methyl-2-phenyl-cyclopropane were prepared, and the regioselectivity of their oxidation to the corresponding cyclopropylmethanol and cyclopropylphenol products was determined. The results are consistent with selective orientation of the two enantiomeric substrates in the hydrophobic cavity at the active site of sMMO, specific models for which were examined by molecular modeling.

  19. Modulation of MICAL Monooxygenase Activity by its Calponin Homology Domain: Structural and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Alqassim, Saif S.; Urquiza, Mauricio; Borgnia, Eitan; Nagib, Marc; Amzel, L. Mario; Bianchet, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    MICALs (Molecule Interacting with CasL) are conserved multidomain enzymes essential for cytoskeletal reorganization in nerve development, endocytosis, and apoptosis. In these enzymes, a type-2 calponin homology (CH) domain always follows an N-terminal monooxygenase (MO) domain. Although the CH domain is required for MICAL-1 cellular localization and actin-associated function, its contribution to the modulation of MICAL activity towards actin remains unclear. Here, we present the structure of a fragment of MICAL-1 containing the MO and the CH domains—determined by X-ray crystallography and small angle scattering—as well as kinetics experiments designed to probe the contribution of the CH domain to the actin-modification activity. Our results suggest that the CH domain, which is loosely connected to the MO domain by a flexible linker and is far away from the catalytic site, couples F-actin to the enhancement of redox activity of MICALMO-CH by a cooperative mechanism involving a trans interaction between adjacently bound molecules. Binding cooperativity is also observed in other proteins regulating actin assembly/disassembly dynamics, such as ADF/Cofilins. PMID:26935886

  20. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase with Broad Substrate Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Borisova, Anna S.; Isaksen, Trine; Dimarogona, Maria; Kognole, Abhishek A.; Mathiesen, Geir; Várnai, Anikó; Røhr, Åsmund K.; Payne, Christina M.; Sørlie, Morten; Sandgren, Mats; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.

    2015-01-01

    The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) carry out oxidative cleavage of polysaccharides and are of major importance for efficient processing of biomass. NcLPMO9C from Neurospora crassa acts both on cellulose and on non-cellulose β-glucans, including cellodextrins and xyloglucan. The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of NcLPMO9C revealed an extended, highly polar substrate-binding surface well suited to interact with a variety of sugar substrates. The ability of NcLPMO9C to act on soluble substrates was exploited to study enzyme-substrate interactions. EPR studies demonstrated that the Cu2+ center environment is altered upon substrate binding, whereas isothermal titration calorimetry studies revealed binding affinities in the low micromolar range for polymeric substrates that are due in part to the presence of a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM1). Importantly, the novel structure of NcLPMO9C enabled a comparative study, revealing that the oxidative regioselectivity of LPMO9s (C1, C4, or both) correlates with distinct structural features of the copper coordination sphere. In strictly C1-oxidizing LPMO9s, access to the solvent-facing axial coordination position is restricted by a conserved tyrosine residue, whereas