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Sample records for methanogenesis primarily drive

  1. Sulfur cycling and methanogenesis primarily drive microbial colonization of the highly sulfidic Urania deep hypersaline basin.

    PubMed

    Borin, Sara; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Mapelli, Francesca; D'Auria, Giuseppe; Brusa, Tullio; Marzorati, Massimo; Rizzi, Aurora; Yakimov, Michail; Marty, Danielle; De Lange, Gert J; Van der Wielen, Paul; Bolhuis, Henk; McGenity, Terry J; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Malinverno, Elisa; Giuliano, Laura; Corselli, Cesare; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2009-06-09

    Urania basin in the deep Mediterranean Sea houses a lake that is >100 m deep, devoid of oxygen, 6 times more saline than seawater, and has very high levels of methane and particularly sulfide (up to 16 mM), making it among the most sulfidic water bodies on Earth. Along the depth profile there are 2 chemoclines, a steep one with the overlying oxic seawater, and another between anoxic brines of different density, where gradients of salinity, electron donors and acceptors occur. To identify and differentiate the microbes and processes contributing to the turnover of organic matter and sulfide along the water column, these chemoclines were sampled at a high resolution. Bacterial cell numbers increased up to a hundredfold in the chemoclines as a consequence of elevated nutrient availability, with higher numbers in the upper interface where redox gradient was steeper. Bacterial and archaeal communities, analyzed by DNA fingerprinting, 16S rRNA gene libraries, activity measurements, and cultivation, were highly stratified and metabolically more active along the chemoclines compared with seawater or the uniformly hypersaline brines. Detailed analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that in both chemoclines delta- and epsilon-Proteobacteria, predominantly sulfate reducers and sulfur oxidizers, respectively, were the dominant bacteria. In the deepest layers of the basin MSBL1, putatively responsible for methanogenesis, dominated among archaea. The data suggest that the complex microbial community is adapted to the basin's extreme chemistry, and the elevated biomass is driven largely by sulfur cycling and methanogenesis.

  2. Methanogenesis-induced pH–Eh shifts drives aqueous metal(loid) mobility in sulfide mineral systems under CO2 enriched conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2016-01-15

    Accounting for microbially-mediated CO2 transformation is pivotal to assessing geochemical implications for elevated CO2 in subsurface environments. A series of batch-reactor experiments were conducted to decipher links between autotrophic methanogenesis, CO2 dynamics and aqueous Fe, As and Pb concentrations in the presence of sulfide minerals. Microbially-mediated solubility-trapping followed by pseudo-first order reduction of HCO3- to CH4 (k’ = 0.28-0.59 d-1) accounted for 95% of the CO2 loss from methanogenic experiments. Bicarbonate-to-methane reduction was pivotal in the mitigation of CO2-induced acidity (~1 pH unit) and enhancement of reducing conditions (Eh change from -0.215 to -0.332V ). Methanogenesis-associated shifts in pH-Eh values showed no significant effect on aqueous Pb but favored, 1) increased aqueous As as a result of microbially-mediated dissolution of arsenopyrite and 2) decreased aqueous Fe due to mineral-trapping of CO2-mobilized Fe as Fe-carbonate. Its order of occurrence (and magnitude), relative to solubility- and mineral-trapping, highlighted the potential for autotrophic methanogenesis to modulate both carbon sequestration and contaminant mobility in CO2-impacted subsurface environments.

  3. Control of rumen methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Van Nevel, C J; Demeyer, D I

    1996-09-01

    During the last decades, considerable research on methane production in the rumen and its inhibition has been carried out. Initially, as methane production represents a significant loss of gross energy in the feed (2-15%), the ultimate goal of such intervention in rumen fermentation was an increase in feed efficiency. A second reason favouring research on methane inhibition is its role in the global warming phenomenon and in the destruction of the ozone layer. In this review, the authors describe briefly several interventions for reducing methane emission by ruminants. The objective can be reached by intervention at the dietary level by ration manipulation (composition, feeding level) or by the use of additives or supplements. Examples of additives are polyhalogenated compounds, ionophores and other antibiotics. Supplementation of the ration with lipids also lowered methanogenesis. More biotechnological interventions, e.g., defaunation, probiotics and introduction of reductive acetogenesis in the rumen, are also mentioned. It can be concluded that drastic inhibition of methane production is not unequivocally successful as a result of several factors, such as: instantaneous inhibition often followed by restoration of methanogenesis due to adaptation of the microbes or degradation of the additive, toxicity for the host animal, negative effects on overall digestion and productive performance. Therefore, methanogenesis and its inhibition cannot be considered as a separate part of rumen fermentation and its consequences on the animal should be taken into account.

  4. Evidence for Methanogenesis in ANME Archaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, K. G.; Kevorkian, R.

    2014-12-01

    Methanogenesis, unlike many higher energy-yielding metabolisms, can be exergonic in the reverse direction at reasonable concentrations of products and reactants. This is because the ΔGf for hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, 4H2 + CO2 → CH4 + H2O, is quite low, and also because hydrogen exerts a fourth-power control on the reaction quotient. This means that common sedimentary metabolisms such as sulfate reduction and metal reduction can draw hydrogen concentrations low enough as a result of their metabolism to make reverse methanogenesis, or anaerobic methane oxidation, exergonic and potentially a useful energy source for life. Previous work has provided evidence for reverse methanogenesis in marine sediments, but an organism capable of both forward and reverse methanogenesis has not been identified. We present evidence in support of the theory that anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME), which are commonly found in methane producing environments, are capable of growth under methanogenic conditions in anoxic incubations of marine sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, NC. Coupled to a large body of literature studying the participation of ANME archaea in methanotrophy (as well as having molecular machinery for methanogenesis), we propose that these difficult-to-culture organisms can also perform methanogenesis when conditions dictate that methanogenesis is exergonic.

  5. Abiogenic methanogenesis in crystalline rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Lollar, B.S.; Frape, S.K. ); Weise, S.M. , Neuherberg ); Fritz, P. ); Macko, S.A. ); Welhan, J.A. )

    1993-12-01

    Isotopically anomalous CH[sub 4]-rich gas deposits are found in mining sites on both the Canadian and Fennoscandian shields. With [delta][sup 13]C[sub CH4] values from -22.4 to -48.5% and [delta]D[sub CH4] values from -133 to -372%, these methane deposits cannot be accounted for by conventional processes for bacterial or thermogenic methanogenesis. Compositionally the gases are similar to other CH[sub 4]-rich gas occurrences found in Canadian and Fennoscandian shield rocks. However, the isotopically anomalous gases of this study are characterized by unexpectedly high concentrations of H[sub 2] gas, ranging from several volume percent up to 30 vol%. The H[sub 2] gases are consistently depleted in the heavy isotope, with [delta]D[sub H[sub 2

  6. Laboratory support for a methanogenesis driven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Montoya, L.; Davis, W.; McKay, C.

    Recent geological evidence strongly suggests that Europa may currently possess a global subsurface water ocean. Since liquid water is a fundamental requirement for life as we know it, there is great speculation on the possibility of life in Europa. For such organisms to survive, there must be an energy source available for metabolism, growth and reproduction. On Earth this energy is principally derived from sunlight through photosynthesis. Due to the expected large ice crust thickness (10 to 100 km) of the satellite, this energy source is unlikely to support a biosphere. Hydrothermal vents have been suggested as a potential environment for chemotrophs. However, for such organisms to obtain energy they depend on oxidants dissolved and transported from the oxygenic Earth's atmosphere to the deep ocean. Without a supply of oxidants from Europa's crust, methanogenesis associated to hydrothermal vents may potentially drive a biosphere in Europa's ocean. Here we explore this possibility experimentally by simulating a hydrothermal vent relevant to Europa and analyzing the resulting gas products by gas chromatography coupled to Fourier transform infrared and mass spectrometries. The chemical composition of the hydrothermal vent gases was derived from a thermochemical model assuming that Europa had a cometary (solar, less H) abundance at a high temperature characteristic of a vent. Specifically the following gas mixture was used: 45% CO2 , 45% CH4 and 10 % N2 . A 500 ml stainless steel reactor was filled with 200 ml triply distilled water and the gas mixture at 1 bar at 25 °C . In some experiments 3 g of pyrite were added into the reaction vessel. The system was heated for 24 hrs at 350 °C . At the completion of the experiment, the reaction was quenched to 25 °C and the gas mixture gas analyzed by GC-FTIR-MS techniques. In the absence of pyrite, methane is oxidized to carbon dioxide with the possible production of hydrogen. In contrast in the presence of pyrite, methane

  7. A New Era of Methanogenesis Research.

    PubMed

    Lever, Mark Alexander

    2016-02-01

    The reductive acetyl-CoA pathway coupled to methanogenesis is likely one of Earth's oldest metabolisms. Yet, until recently this metabolism had only been found in the kingdom Euryarchaeota. A study now suggests that distantly related Bathyarchaeota are also methanogens and that methane metabolism is more phylogenetically widespread than previously thought.

  8. Reverse Methanogenesis and Respiration in Methanotrophic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Koehorst, Jasper J.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is catalyzed by anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) via a reverse and modified methanogenesis pathway. Methanogens can also reverse the methanogenesis pathway to oxidize methane, but only during net methane production (i.e., “trace methane oxidation”). In turn, ANME can produce methane, but only during net methane oxidation (i.e., enzymatic back flux). Net AOM is exergonic when coupled to an external electron acceptor such as sulfate (ANME-1, ANME-2abc, and ANME-3), nitrate (ANME-2d), or metal (oxides). In this review, the reversibility of the methanogenesis pathway and essential differences between ANME and methanogens are described by combining published information with domain based (meta)genome comparison of archaeal methanotrophs and selected archaea. These differences include abundances and special structure of methyl coenzyme M reductase and of multiheme cytochromes and the presence of menaquinones or methanophenazines. ANME-2a and ANME-2d can use electron acceptors other than sulfate or nitrate for AOM, respectively. Environmental studies suggest that ANME-2d are also involved in sulfate-dependent AOM. ANME-1 seem to use a different mechanism for disposal of electrons and possibly are less versatile in electron acceptors use than ANME-2. Future research will shed light on the molecular basis of reversal of the methanogenic pathway and electron transfer in different ANME types. PMID:28154498

  9. C-isotopic fractionation during methylotrophic methanogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Summons, R.E. ); Nichols, P.D.; Franzmann, P.D. )

    1996-01-01

    Methanogenesis from non-competitive substrates such as trimethylamine (TMA) may be quantitatively important in global methane budgets. This is because choline, glycine betaine and related compounds, precursors of TMA, are produced abundantly and ubiquitously by microbes, particularly those from marine and saline lacustrine environments. These substrates may source methane supersaturating oceanic seawater, possibly formed in anaerobic microhabitats (e.g. zooplankton guts and within particulates) and indicated by carbon isotopic analysis of abundant methanogen-derived hydrocarbons (e.g. 2, 6, 10, 15, 19-pentamethyleicosane, PME) found in recent and ancient marine sediments. In order to elaborate on these observations using cultured organisms we measured isotopic fractionation for methane and lipids formed by methanogens using trimethylamine as their carbon source. Methanosarcina barkerii showed fractionation factors ([epsilon]) of 50.2[per thousand] for conversion of TMA to methane and 20.2[per thousand] for TMA-biomass. Moreover PME and phytanyl chains of K barkerii ether lipid were depleted by as much as 18[per thousand] compared to biomass. For the Antarctic methanogen Methanococcoides burtonii we measured even greater e values of 71[per thousand] (TMA-CH[sub 4]), 49.6[per thousand] (TMA- biomass) and 79.9[per thousand] (TMA-phytanyl ether). It should be noted that these E values represent maximum or near maximum values for non-limiting substrate concentrations and are significantly higher than those reported for aceticlastic methanogenesis (approx 21%.) or reduction of carbon dioxide (32 to 46[per thousand]). Methylotrophic methanogenesis may be the source of extremely [sup 13]C-depleted methane in certain gas accumulations.

  10. C-isotopic fractionation during methylotrophic methanogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Summons, R.E.; Nichols, P.D.; Franzmann, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    Methanogenesis from non-competitive substrates such as trimethylamine (TMA) may be quantitatively important in global methane budgets. This is because choline, glycine betaine and related compounds, precursors of TMA, are produced abundantly and ubiquitously by microbes, particularly those from marine and saline lacustrine environments. These substrates may source methane supersaturating oceanic seawater, possibly formed in anaerobic microhabitats (e.g. zooplankton guts and within particulates) and indicated by carbon isotopic analysis of abundant methanogen-derived hydrocarbons (e.g. 2, 6, 10, 15, 19-pentamethyleicosane, PME) found in recent and ancient marine sediments. In order to elaborate on these observations using cultured organisms we measured isotopic fractionation for methane and lipids formed by methanogens using trimethylamine as their carbon source. Methanosarcina barkerii showed fractionation factors ({epsilon}) of 50.2{per_thousand} for conversion of TMA to methane and 20.2{per_thousand} for TMA-biomass. Moreover PME and phytanyl chains of K barkerii ether lipid were depleted by as much as 18{per_thousand} compared to biomass. For the Antarctic methanogen Methanococcoides burtonii we measured even greater e values of 71{per_thousand} (TMA-CH{sub 4}), 49.6{per_thousand} (TMA- biomass) and 79.9{per_thousand} (TMA-phytanyl ether). It should be noted that these E values represent maximum or near maximum values for non-limiting substrate concentrations and are significantly higher than those reported for aceticlastic methanogenesis (approx 21%.) or reduction of carbon dioxide (32 to 46{per_thousand}). Methylotrophic methanogenesis may be the source of extremely {sup 13}C-depleted methane in certain gas accumulations.

  11. Methanogenesis and Methanotrophy in Serpentinizing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shock, E.; Poret-Peterson, A.; Canovas, P. A.; Robinson, K.; Marsala, P.

    2012-12-01

    Serpentinization leads to habitat generation, most obviously through the production of hydrogen and methane. These compounds, on the other hand, can be made by microbes and their production may be facilitated by conditions generated through serpentinization. The Samail ophiolite in northern Oman, hosts a number of hyperalkaline springs (pH>10) with fluids enriched in methane and hydrogen and severely depleted in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), relative to neighboring surface waters. Reaction path modeling of mixing between surface water and serpentinizing fluids, using data from our recent field work in Oman, shows that methanogenesis is promoted when small inputs of surface water (up to 20% of the total mixture) contribute DIC, and that methanotrophy is promoted by higher mixing ratios of surface water to serpentinizing fluids owing to the increasing abundance of dissolved oxygen. Whether methane and hydrogen originate from abiotic serpentinization, microbial metabolism, or a combination of biotic and abiotic processes in these springs remains an open question, which can be addressed in part through analysis of genes for methane and hydrogen metabolism. We amplified genes for methanogenesis (methyl coenzyme M reductase; mcrA), hydrogen metabolism (hydrogenase; hydA), and aerobic methane oxidation (particulate methane monooxygenase; pmoA) from hyperalkaline spring sediments. The genes we retrieved are most similar to sequences already obtained from deep subsurface (mcrA) or alkaline (hydA and pmoA) environments. Biological methanogenesis in hyperalkaline spring sediments is likely mediated by hydrogenotrophic methanogens based on the affiliation of the mcrA genes, and consistent with our reaction path modeling. Hydrogenase genes were most closely related to sequences from cultured organisms belonging to the orders Clostridiales and Bacteroidales and the class Deltaproteobacteria. Aerobic methane oxidation is likely mediated by alphaproteobacterial methanotrophs

  12. Microbial methanogenesis in subsurface oil and coal.

    PubMed

    Meslé, Margaux; Dromart, Gilles; Oger, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    It is now clear that active methanogens are present in the deep-subsurface. This paper reviews microbial population structures and the biodegradation of organic compounds to methane in situ within oil reservoirs and coal deposits. It summarizes our current knowledge of methanogenes and methanogenesis, fermenters, synthrophs and microbial metabolism of complex organic compounds in these two widely occurring organic-rich subsurface environments. This review is not intended to be an exhaustive report of microbial diversity. Rather, it illustrates the similarities and differences between the two environments with specific examples, from the nature of the organic molecules to the methanogenic metabolic pathways and the structure of the microbial populations to demonstrate that widely diverging microbial populations show surprisingly similar metabolic capabilities.

  13. Substrate limitation for methanogenesis in hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Cheryl A; Poole, Jennifer A; Tazaz, Amanda M; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Bebout, Brad M

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by the increasingly abundant evidence for hypersaline environments on Mars and reports of methane in its atmosphere, we examined methanogenesis in hypersaline ponds in Baja California Sur, Mexico, and in northern California, USA. Methane-rich bubbles trapped within or below gypsum/halite crusts have δ¹³C values near -40‰. Methane with these relatively high isotopic values would typically be considered thermogenic; however, incubations of crust samples resulted in the biological production of methane with similar isotopic composition. A series of measurements aimed at understanding the isotopic composition of methane in hypersaline systems was therefore undertaken. Methane production rates, as well as the concentrations and isotopic composition of the particulate organic carbon (POC), were measured. Methane production was highest from microbial communities living within gypsum crusts, whereas POC content at gypsum/halite sites was low, generally less than 1% of the total mass. The isotopic composition of the POC ranged from -26‰ to -10‰. To determine the substrates used by the methanogens, ¹³C-labeled methylamines, methanol, acetate, and bicarbonate were added to individual incubation vials, and the methane produced was monitored for ¹³C content. The main substrates used by the methanogens were the noncompetitive substrates, the methylamines, and methanol. When unlabeled trimethylamine (TMA) was added to incubating gypsum/halite crusts in increasing concentrations, the isotopic composition of the methane produced became progressively lower; the lowest methane δ¹³C values occurred when the most TMA was added (1000 μM final concentration). This decrease in the isotopic composition of the methane produced with increasing TMA concentrations, along with the high in situ methane δ¹³C values, suggests that the methanogens within the crusts are operating at low substrate concentrations. It appears that substrate limitation is decreasing

  14. Methylotrophic methanogenesis discovered in the archaeal phylum Verstraetearchaeota.

    PubMed

    Vanwonterghem, Inka; Evans, Paul N; Parks, Donovan H; Jensen, Paul D; Woodcroft, Ben J; Hugenholtz, Philip; Tyson, Gene W

    2016-10-03

    Methanogenesis is the primary biogenic source of methane in the atmosphere and a key contributor to climate change. The long-standing dogma that methanogenesis originated within the Euryarchaeota was recently challenged by the discovery of putative methane-metabolizing genes in members of the Bathyarchaeota, suggesting that methanogenesis may be more phylogenetically widespread than currently appreciated. Here, we present the discovery of divergent methyl-coenzyme M reductase genes in population genomes recovered from anoxic environments with high methane flux that belong to a new archaeal phylum, the Verstraetearchaeota. These archaea encode the genes required for methylotrophic methanogenesis, and may conserve energy using a mechanism similar to that proposed for the obligate H2-dependent methylotrophic Methanomassiliicoccales and recently described Candidatus 'Methanofastidiosa'. Our findings indicate that we are only beginning to understand methanogen diversity and support an ancient origin for methane metabolism in the Archaea, which is changing our understanding of the global carbon cycle.

  15. Geomicrobiology and Methanogenesis in Accretionary Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, F. S.; Delwiche, M.; Reed, D.; Boyd, S.; Nunoura, T.; Inagaki, F.; Takai, K.

    2003-12-01

    As elsewhere in subsurface environments, microbes are known to colonize the sediments of accretionary margins. In fact, much of the methane present in hydrates along continental margins originates from microbial activity. However, models to predict hydrate distribution or the amount of methane in the sediments lack reliable values for in situ microbial methane production rates. Our studies of hydrate-bearing sediments focus first on the molecular identification of the microbes present and then on estimating realistic methanogenic rates to be used in these models. 16S rDNA extracted from deep marine sediments, then sequenced, and compared to known sequences indicates the presence of diverse bacterial and archaeal lineages. In one example, the Nankai Trough, Archaea (both Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota) and Bacteria (e.g., Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, green non-sulfur) were detected at various depths above, within, and below the hydrate stability zone. Often methanogens cannot be detected using molecular approaches in accretionary sediments, but at least one methanogen (Methanoculleus submarinus) has been isolated from deep sediments that contain hydrates. Although culture-based enrichments for methanogens often yield evidence of methanogenic activity methanogenic rates derived from these studies are likely several orders of magnitude higher than the rates that are possible under in situ conditions. By combining data on methanogen numbers at various depths and realistic methanogenesis rates obtained from starved methanogens we hope to determine the productivity of methanogens on a volumetric basis for the sediments. These data will be used in models that predict hydrate distribution and formation rates in marine sediments.

  16. Biogeochemical metabolic modeling of methanogenesis by Methanosarcina barkeri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensvold, Z. D.; Jin, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Methanogenesis, the biological process of methane production, is the final step of natural organic matter degradation. In studying natural methanogenesis, important questions include how fast methanogenesis proceeds and how methanogens adapt to the environment. To address these questions, we propose a new approach - biogeochemical reaction modeling - by simulating the metabolic networks of methanogens. Biogeochemical reaction modeling combines geochemical reaction modeling and genome-scale metabolic modeling. Geochemical reaction modeling focuses on the speciation of electron donors and acceptors in the environment, and therefore the energy available to methanogens. Genome-scale metabolic modeling predicts microbial rates and metabolic strategies. Specifically, this approach describes methanogenesis using an enzyme network model, and computes enzyme rates by accounting for both the kinetics and thermodynamics. The network model is simulated numerically to predict enzyme abundances and rates of methanogen metabolism. We applied this new approach to Methanosarcina barkeri strain fusaro, a model methanogen that makes methane by reducing carbon dioxide and oxidizing dihydrogen. The simulation results match well with the results of previous laboratory experiments, including the magnitude of proton motive force and the kinetic parameters of Methanosarcina barkeri. The results also predict that in natural environments, the configuration of methanogenesis network, including the concentrations of enzymes and metabolites, differs significantly from that under laboratory settings.

  17. Methanogenesis from wastewater stimulated by addition of elemental manganese

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Sen; Tian, Tian; Qi, Benyu; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a novel procedure for accelerating methanogenesis from wastewater by adding elemental manganese into the anaerobic digestion system. The results indicated that elemental manganese effectively enhanced both the methane yield and the production rate. Compared to the control test without elemental manganese, the total methane yield and production rate with 4 g/L manganese addition increased 3.4-fold (from 0.89 ± 0.03 to 2.99 ± 0.37 M/gVSS within 120 h) and 4.4-fold (from 6.2 ± 0.1 to 27.2 ± 2.2 mM/gVSS/h), respectively. Besides, more acetate consumption and less propionate generation were observed during the methanogenesis with manganese. Further studies demonstrated that the elemental manganese served as electron donors for the methanogenesis from carbon dioxide, and the final proportion of methane in the total generated gas with 4 g/L manganese addition reached 96.9%, which was 2.1-fold than that of the control (46.6%). PMID:26244609

  18. The effect of vinyl acetate in acetoclastic methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Durán, U; Gómez, J; Monroy, O; Ramírez, F

    2011-01-01

    The influence of vinyl acetate (VA) in the methanogenesis was evaluated, by using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor of 1.5L. The reactor was operated at 33.5 g/L volatile suspended solids to 30±2 °C, a hydraulic residence time of 1 day, an organic loading rate of 1 kgCOD/m3/d of two different mixtures of VA and glucose. The VA was methanized to 81% when its proportion was of 10% into reactor loading rate, when VA proportion increased to 25%, the methane production rate decreased to 62% and the acetate production rate increased almost 8 times. These results indicated that VA was only hydrolyzed and glucose was not used as a co-substrate. The effect of glucose on VA methanogenic degradation was evaluated through batch reactors of 60 mL, concluding that the glucose supported the methanogenesis without favoring the VA elimination. On the other hand, the results of the sludge from the reactor in the presence of VA demonstrated that VA caused an irreversibly inhibition of acetoclastic methanogenesis when the anaerobic sludge was exposed to this compound.

  19. Methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in marine sediments: A new model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitterer, Richard M.

    2010-07-01

    A number of studies have shown that methanogens are active in the presence of sulfate under some conditions. This phenomenon is especially exemplified in carbonate sediments of the southern Australian continental margin. Three sites cored during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 182 in the Great Australian Bight have high concentrations of microbially-generated methane and hydrogen sulfide throughout almost 500 m of sediments. In these cores, the sulfate-reducing and methanogenic zones overlap completely; that is, the usual sulfate-methane transition zone is absent. Amino acid racemization data show that the gassy sediments consist of younger carbonates than the low-gas sites. High concentrations of the reduced gases also occur in two ODP sites on the margin of the Bahamas platform, both of which have similar sedimentary conditions to those of the high-gas sites of Leg 182. Co-generation of these reduced gases results from an unusual combination of conditions, including: (1) a thick Quaternary sequence of iron-poor carbonate sediments, (2) a sub-seafloor brine, and (3) moderate amounts of organic carbon. The probable explanation for the co-generation of hydrogen sulfide and methane in all these sites, as well as in other reported environments, is that methanogens are utilizing non-competitive substrates to produce methane within the sulfate-reducing zone. Taken together, these results form the basis of a new model for sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in marine sediments. The biogeochemical end-members of the model are: (1) minimal sulfate reduction, (2) complete sulfate reduction followed by methanogenesis, and (3) overlapping sulfate reduction and methanogenesis with no transition zone.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Methanogenesis at Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosser, D.; Cook, A.; Malinverno, A.; Daigle, H.

    2014-12-01

    Methane migration is a crucial link between locations of methane generation and natural gas hydrate reservoirs, yet migration mechanisms are poorly understood in the natural environment. In this study, we evaluate constraints on methanogenesis and methane diffusion through the development of a 1-dimensional diagenetic model of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Site Walker Ridge 313 in the Gulf of Mexico. High saturation gas hydrate was confirmed at Walker Ridge from borehole logs, which measured both high compressional velocity and high resistivity in hydrate-bearing sand layers. Gas hydrate formation depends largely on organic matter concentration and methanogenesis rates. We will test how much organic matter is required to achieve gas hydrate saturations observed at Walker Ridge. Our model will incorporate methane generation around a sand layer as it is moves down through the sediment column. Variable porosity across the sediment column due to early diagenesis and sediment compaction will also be considered. Since methane solubility is higher in finer grained sediments due to smaller pore spaces, gas hydrate will form in the sand layer from methane transported by the relatively slow process of diffusion from finer grained layers. The results of this model are critical to the development of the basin scale simulation of overall methane flux based on the geometry of WR313. The simulation results will improve scientific characterization of how hydrates form and distribute within continental margin sediments.

  1. Methanogenesis in hypersaline environments -Analogs for Ancient Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, Brad; Chanton, Jeff; Kelley, Cheryl; Tazaz, Amanda; Poole, Jennifer; García Maldonado, José Q.; López Cortés, Alejandro

    values, (ca. -60 to -30 o/oo). The hydrogen isotopic (δ 2 H) composition of the methane ranged from -450 to -350 o/oo. These combinations of carbon and hydrogen isotopic values include many outside of the range of values normally considered to be biogenic. Incubations of evaporitic minerals and sediments confirm, however, that the methane is indeed being produced within these sediments. Substrate limitation of methanogenesis in these environments, and not methane oxidation, can explain the isotopic values of the methane in these environments. Incubations with both isotopically labeled and unlabeled putative substrates for methanogenesis have shown that the substrates most important for methanogenesis in these environments are the so-called non competitive substrates, e.g., methylamines, dimethylsulfide, and methanol. Acetate and bicarbonate appear not to be important substrates for methanogens in these environments. Analysis of partial sequences of the methyl-CoM-reductase A gene (mcrA), involved in methane production, has revealed that the community composition of methanogens is consistent with organisms known to use non-competitive substrates. Our work has shown that hypersaline environments have the potential to both produce and preserve methane for analysis on other planets, e.g., by capable rovers on Mars. These studies expand the range of isotopic values now known to be produced by active methanogenesis, and offer explanations as to how methane with these particular stable isotopic values is produced.

  2. Bacterial methanogenesis in holocene sediments in the Baltic Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Lein, A.Y.; Namsaraev, B.B.; Trotsyuk, V.Y.; Ivanov, M.V.

    1981-01-01

    Soviet biologists have found evidence of viable methanogenic microorganisms in mud samples collected in 1978 from the Baltic Sea by the research ship Academician Kurchatov. Experiments with radioactive carbon and direct measurements of the samples' methane concentrations led to several conclusions: (1) the process of bacterial methanogenesis occurs mainly via carbon dioxide reduction, (2) the methanogenic intensity depends on the depth of the deposited sediment and its distance from land; shallow-water sediments found in gulfs produced more methane than deepwater ones taken from low spots, (3) organic-matter consumption during bacterial methane reduction makes up 0.14-7.9 mg of carbon/kg of wet mud per year; this is over 20 times less than during bacterial sulfate reduction, (4) The bulk of the methane generated migrates from the muds into the water and (5) marine sediments are undersaturated with methane, suggesting that the methane migrates via filtration of pore waters, not by diffusion.

  3. Dietary supplementation with mulberry leaf flavonoids inhibits methanogenesis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tao; Chen, Dan-Dan; Tu, Yan; Zhang, Nai-Feng; Si, Bing-Wen; Diao, Qi-Yu

    2017-01-01

    The effects of flavonoids on methanogenesis and microbial flora in Dorper × thin-tailed Han crossbred ewes were evaluated in two experiments. To investigate the effects of flavonoids on nutrient digestibility and nitrogen balance, 18 ewes (60.0 ± 1.73 kg body weight (BW)) were allotted to two dietary treatments in experiment one, a control diet and the control diet supplemented with flavonoids (2 g/head/day). In experiment two, the effects of supplementary flavonoids on ruminal fermentation and microbial flora were investigated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction with six ewes (67.2 ± 0.79 kg BW) with ruminal cannula assigned to the identical dietary treatments used in experiment one. Supplementary flavonoids improved the apparent digestibility of nitrogen (N, P < 0.001) and neutral detergent fibre (NDF, P = 0.024) and decreased daily CH4 output (P < 0.001). The ruminal pH (P = 0.638) and ammonia (P = 0.690) were not affected by supplementary flavonoids, whereas the total volatile fatty acid (VFA) content increased (P = 0.037). Supplementary flavonoids decreased ruminal populations of protozoans (P = 0.002) and methanogens (P < 0.001) and increased the populations of Fibrobacter succinogenes (P = 0.016). In conclusion, flavonoids improved the digestibility of organic matter and reduced CH4 output by inhibiting the populations of microbes involved in methanogenesis.

  4. Clustered Genes Encoding the Methyltransferases of Methanogenesis from Monomethylamine

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Stephen A.; Lo, Sam L.; Krzycki, Joseph A.

    1998-01-01

    Coenzyme M (CoM) is methylated during methanogenesis from monomethyamine in a reaction catalyzed by three proteins. Using monomethylamine, a 52-kDa polypeptide termed monomethylamine methyltransferase (MMAMT) methylates the corrinoid cofactor bound to a second polypeptide, monomethylamine corrinoid protein (MMCP). Methylated MMCP then serves as a substrate for MT2-A, which methylates CoM. The genes for these proteins are clustered on 6.8 kb of DNA in Methanosarcina barkeri MS. The gene encoding MMCP (mtmC) is located directly upstream of the gene encoding MMAMT (mtmB). The gene encoding MT2-A (mtbA) was found 1.1 kb upstream of mtmC, but no obvious open reading frame was found in the intergenic region between mtbA and mtmC. A single monocistronic transcript was found for mtbA that initiated 76 bp from the translational start. Separate transcripts of 2.4 and 4.7 kb were detected, both of which carried mtmCB. The larger transcript also encoded mtmP, which is homologous to the APC family of cationic amine permeases and may therefore encode a methylamine permease. A single transcriptional start site was found 447 bp upstream of the translational start of mtmC. MtmC possesses the corrinoid binding motif found in corrinoid proteins involved in dimethylsulfide- and methanol-dependent methanogenesis, as well as in methionine synthase. The open reading frame of mtmB was interrupted by a single in-frame, midframe, UAG codon which was also found in mtmB from M. barkeri NIH. A mechanism that circumvents UAG-directed termination of translation must operate during expression of mtmB in this methanogen. PMID:9642198

  5. Clustered genes encoding the methyltransferases of methanogenesis from monomethylamine.

    PubMed

    Burke, S A; Lo, S L; Krzycki, J A

    1998-07-01

    Coenzyme M (CoM) is methylated during methanogenesis from monomethyamine in a reaction catalyzed by three proteins. Using monomethylamine, a 52-kDa polypeptide termed monomethylamine methyltransferase (MMAMT) methylates the corrinoid cofactor bound to a second polypeptide, monomethylamine corrinoid protein (MMCP). Methylated MMCP then serves as a substrate for MT2-A, which methylates CoM. The genes for these proteins are clustered on 6.8 kb of DNA in Methanosarcina barkeri MS. The gene encoding MMCP (mtmC) is located directly upstream of the gene encoding MMAMT (mtmB). The gene encoding MT2-A (mtbA) was found 1.1 kb upstream of mtmC, but no obvious open reading frame was found in the intergenic region between mtbA and mtmC. A single monocistronic transcript was found for mtbA that initiated 76 bp from the translational start. Separate transcripts of 2.4 and 4.7 kb were detected, both of which carried mtmCB. The larger transcript also encoded mtmP, which is homologous to the APC family of cationic amine permeases and may therefore encode a methylamine permease. A single transcriptional start site was found 447 bp upstream of the translational start of mtmC. MtmC possesses the corrinoid binding motif found in corrinoid proteins involved in dimethylsulfide- and methanol-dependent methanogenesis, as well as in methionine synthase. The open reading frame of mtmB was interrupted by a single in-frame, midframe, UAG codon which was also found in mtmB from M. barkeri NIH. A mechanism that circumvents UAG-directed termination of translation must operate during expression of mtmB in this methanogen.

  6. Characterization of an Archaeal Two-Component System That Regulates Methanogenesis in Methanosaeta harundinacea

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaopeng; Qi, Lei; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2014-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) are a major mechanism used by bacteria in response to environmental changes. Although many sequenced archaeal genomes encode TCSs, they remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that a methanogenic archaeon, Methanosaeta harundinacea, encodes FilI, which synthesizes carboxyl-acyl homoserine lactones, to regulate transitions of cellular morphology and carbon metabolic fluxes. Here, we report that filI, the cotranscribed filR2, and the adjacent filR1 constitute an archaeal TCS. FilI possesses a cytoplasmic kinase domain (histidine kinase A and histidine kinase-like ATPase) and its cognate response regulator. FilR1 carries a receiver (REC) domain coupled with an ArsR-related domain with potential DNA-binding ability, while FilR2 carries only a REC domain. In a phosphorelay assay, FilI was autophosphorylated and specifically transferred the phosphoryl group to FilR1 and FilR2, confirming that the three formed a cognate TCS. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation–quantitative polymerase chain reaction (ChIP-qPCR) using an anti-FilR1 antibody, FilR1 was shown to form in vivo associations with its own promoter and the promoter of the filI-filR2 operon, demonstrating a regulatory pattern common among TCSs. ChIP-qPCR also detected FilR1 associations with key genes involved in acetoclastic methanogenesis, acs4 and acs1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed the in vitro tight binding of FilR1 to its own promoter and those of filI-filR2, acs4, and mtrABC. This also proves the DNA-binding ability of the ArsR-related domain, which is found primarily in Archaea. The archaeal promoters of acs4, filI, acs1, and mtrABC also initiated FilR1-modulated expression in an Escherichia coli lux reporter system, suggesting that FilR1 can up-regulate both archaeal and bacterial transcription. In conclusion, this work identifies an archaeal FilI/FilRs TCS that regulates the methanogenesis of M. harundinacea. PMID:24748383

  7. Methanogenesis and sulfate reduction: Competitive and noncompetitive substrates in estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Polcin, Sandra

    1982-01-01

    Sulfate ions did not inhibit methanogenesis in estuarine sediments supplemented with methanol, trimethylamine, or methionine. However, sulfate greatly retarded methanogenesis when hydrogen or acetate was the substrate. Sulfate reduction was stimulated by acetate, hydrogen, and acetate plus hydrogen, but not by methanol or trimethylamine. These results indicate that sulfate-reducing bacteria will outcompete methanogens for hydrogen, acetate, or both, but will not compete with methanogens for compounds like methanol, trimethylamine, or methionine, thereby allowing methanogenesis and sulfate reduction to operate simultaneously within anoxic, sulfate-containing sediments.

  8. Primarily nonlinear effects observed in a driven asymmetrical vibrating wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Roger J.; Macomber, H. Kent; Morrison, Andrew C.; Boucher, Matthew A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the work reported here is to further experimentally explore the wide variety of behaviors exhibited by driven vibrating wires, primarily in the nonlinear regime. When the wire is driven near a resonant frequency, it is found that most such behaviors are significantly affected by the splitting of the resonant frequency and by the existence of a ``characteristic'' axis associated with each split frequency. It is shown that frequency splitting decreases with increasing wire tension and can be altered by twisting. Two methods are described for determining the orientation of characteristic axes. Evidence is provided, with a possible explanation, that each axis has the same orientation everywhere along the wire. Frequency response data exhibiting nonlinear generation of transverse motion perpendicular to the driving direction, hysteresis, linear generation of perpendicular motion (sometimes tubular), and generation of motion at harmonics of the driving frequency are exhibited and discussed. Also reported under seemingly unchanging conditions are abrupt large changes in the harmonic content of the motion that sometimes involve large subharmonics and harmonics thereof. Slow transitions from one stable state of vibration to another and quasiperiodic motions are also exhibited. Possible musical significance is discussed. .

  9. METHANOGENESIS AND SULFATE REDUCTION IN CHEMOSTATS: I. KINETIC STUDIES AND EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six anaerobic chemostats containing mixed microbial cultures were used to investigate the interactions between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis for three substrates: acetic acid, methanol and formic acid. Sulfate reducers outcompeted methanogens in acetate-fed chemostats whil...

  10. Alamethicin Suppresses Methanogenesis and Promotes Acetogenesis in Bioelectrochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiuping; Siegert, Michael; Yates, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) systems with mixed cultures often generate a variety of gaseous and soluble chemicals. Methane is the primary end product in mixed-culture MES because it is the thermodynamically most favorable reduction product of CO2. Here, we show that the peptaibol alamethicin selectively suppressed the growth of methanogens in mixed-culture MES systems, resulting in a shift of the solution and cathode communities to an acetate-producing system dominated by Sporomusa, a known acetogenic genus in MES systems. Archaea in the methane-producing control were dominated by Methanobrevibacter species, but no Archaea were detected in the alamethicin-treated reactors. No methane was detected in the mixed-culture reactors treated with alamethicin over 10 cycles (∼3 days each). Instead, acetate was produced at an average rate of 115 nmol ml−1 day−1, similar to the rate reported previously for pure cultures of Sporomusa ovata on biocathodes. Mixed-culture control reactors without alamethicin generated methane at nearly 100% coulombic recovery, and no acetate was detected. These results show that alamethicin is effective for the suppression of methanogen growth in MES systems and that its use enables the production of industrially relevant organic compounds by the inhibition of methanogenesis. PMID:25819972

  11. Methyl fluoride affects methanogenesis rather than community composition of methanogenic archaea in a rice field soil.

    PubMed

    Daebeler, Anne; Gansen, Martina; Frenzel, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic pathways of methane formation vary with environmental conditions, but whether this can also be linked to changes in the active archaeal community structure remains uncertain. Here, we show that the suppression of aceticlastic methanogenesis by methyl fluoride (CH(3)F) caused surprisingly little differences in community composition of active methanogenic archaea from a rice field soil. By measuring the natural abundances of carbon isotopes we found that the effective dose for a 90% inhibition of aceticlastic methanogenesis in anoxic paddy soil incubations was <0.75% CH(3)F (v/v). The construction of clone libraries as well as t-RFLP analysis revealed that the active community, as indicated by mcrA transcripts (encoding the α subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, a key enzyme for methanogenesis), remained stable over a wide range of CH(3)F concentrations and represented only a subset of the methanogenic community. More precisely, Methanocellaceae were of minor importance, but Methanosarcinaceae dominated the active population, even when CH(3)F inhibition only allowed for aceticlastic methanogenesis. In addition, we detected mcrA gene fragments of a so far unrecognised phylogenetic cluster. Transcription of this phylotype at methyl fluoride concentrations suppressing aceticlastic methanogenesis suggests that the respective organisms perform hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Hence, the application of CH(3)F combined with transcript analysis is not only a useful tool to measure and assign in situ acetate usage, but also to explore substrate usage by as yet uncultivated methanogens.

  12. Impact of formation water geochemistry and crude oil biodegradation on microbial methanogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Warwick, Peter D.; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Shallow wells (393–442 m depth) contained highly biodegraded oils associated with low extent of methanogenesis, while the deepest (> 1208 m) wells contained minimally degraded oils and produced fluids suggesting a low extent of methanogenesis. Mid-depth wells (666–857 m) in the central field had the highest indicators of methanogenesis and contained moderately biodegraded oils. Little correlation existed between extents of crude oil biodegradation and methanogenesis across the whole transect (avg.R2 = 0.13). However, when wells with the greatest extent of crude oil biodegradation were eliminated (3 of 6 oilfields), better correlation between extent of methanogenesis and biodegradation (avg. R2 = 0.53) was observed. The results suggest that oil quality and salinity impact methanogenic crude oil biodegradation. Reservoirs indicating moderate extent of crude oil biodegradation and high extent of methanogenesis, such as the central field, would be good candidates for attempting to enhance methanogenic crude oil biodegradation as a result of the observations from the study.

  13. Solute concentrations influence microbial methanogenesis in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, USA

    DOE PAGES

    Kirk, Matthew F.; Wilson, Brien H.; Marquart, Kyle A.; ...

    2015-11-18

    In this study, microorganisms have contributed significantly to subsurface energy resources by converting organic matter in hydrocarbon reservoirs into methane, the main component of natural gas. In this study, we consider environmental controls on microbial populations in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, an unconventional natural gas resource in southeast Kansas, USA. Pennsylvanian-age strata in the basin contain numerous thin (0.4–1.1 m) coalbeds with marginal thermal maturities (0.5–0.7% Ro) that are interbedded with shale and sandstone. We collected gas, water, and microbe samples from 16 commercial coalbed methane wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The water samples were Na–Cl typemore » with total dissolved solids (TDS) content ranging from 34.9 to 91.3 g L–1. Gas dryness values [C1/(C2 + C3)] averaged 2640 and carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of methane differed from those of carbon dioxide and water, respectively, by an average of 65 and 183‰. These values are thought to be consistent with gas that formed primarily by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Results from cultivation assays and taxonomic analysis of 16S rRNA genes agree with the geochemical results. Cultivable methanogens were present in every sample tested, methanogen sequences dominate the archaeal community in each sample (avg 91%), and few archaeal sequences (avg 4.2%) were classified within Methanosarcinales, an order of methanogens known to contain methylotrophic methanogens. Although hydrogenotrophs appear dominant, geochemical and microbial analyses both indicate that the proportion of methane generated by acetoclastic methanogens increases with the solute content of formation water, a trend that is contrary to existing conceptual models. Consistent with this trend, beta diversity analyses show that archaeal diversity significantly correlates with formation water solute content. In contrast, bacterial diversity more strongly correlates with location

  14. Solute Concentrations Influence Microbial Methanogenesis in Coal-bearing Strata of the Cherokee Basin, USA

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Matthew F.; Wilson, Brien H.; Marquart, Kyle A.; Zeglin, Lydia H.; Vinson, David S.; Flynn, Theodore M.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms have contributed significantly to subsurface energy resources by converting organic matter in hydrocarbon reservoirs into methane, the main component of natural gas. In this study, we consider environmental controls on microbial populations in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, an unconventional natural gas resource in southeast Kansas, USA. Pennsylvanian-age strata in the basin contain numerous thin (0.4–1.1 m) coalbeds with marginal thermal maturities (0.5–0.7% Ro) that are interbedded with shale and sandstone. We collected gas, water, and microbe samples from 16 commercial coalbed methane wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The water samples were Na–Cl type with total dissolved solids (TDS) content ranging from 34.9 to 91.3 g L−1. Gas dryness values [C1/(C2 + C3)] averaged 2640 and carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of methane differed from those of carbon dioxide and water, respectively, by an average of 65 and 183‰. These values are thought to be consistent with gas that formed primarily by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Results from cultivation assays and taxonomic analysis of 16S rRNA genes agree with the geochemical results. Cultivable methanogens were present in every sample tested, methanogen sequences dominate the archaeal community in each sample (avg 91%), and few archaeal sequences (avg 4.2%) were classified within Methanosarcinales, an order of methanogens known to contain methylotrophic methanogens. Although hydrogenotrophs appear dominant, geochemical and microbial analyses both indicate that the proportion of methane generated by acetoclastic methanogens increases with the solute content of formation water, a trend that is contrary to existing conceptual models. Consistent with this trend, beta diversity analyses show that archaeal diversity significantly correlates with formation water solute content. In contrast, bacterial diversity more strongly correlates with location than solute content

  15. Solute Concentrations Influence Microbial Methanogenesis in Coal-bearing Strata of the Cherokee Basin, USA.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Matthew F; Wilson, Brien H; Marquart, Kyle A; Zeglin, Lydia H; Vinson, David S; Flynn, Theodore M

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms have contributed significantly to subsurface energy resources by converting organic matter in hydrocarbon reservoirs into methane, the main component of natural gas. In this study, we consider environmental controls on microbial populations in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, an unconventional natural gas resource in southeast Kansas, USA. Pennsylvanian-age strata in the basin contain numerous thin (0.4-1.1 m) coalbeds with marginal thermal maturities (0.5-0.7% R o ) that are interbedded with shale and sandstone. We collected gas, water, and microbe samples from 16 commercial coalbed methane wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The water samples were Na-Cl type with total dissolved solids (TDS) content ranging from 34.9 to 91.3 g L(-1). Gas dryness values [C1/(C2 + C3)] averaged 2640 and carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of methane differed from those of carbon dioxide and water, respectively, by an average of 65 and 183‰. These values are thought to be consistent with gas that formed primarily by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Results from cultivation assays and taxonomic analysis of 16S rRNA genes agree with the geochemical results. Cultivable methanogens were present in every sample tested, methanogen sequences dominate the archaeal community in each sample (avg 91%), and few archaeal sequences (avg 4.2%) were classified within Methanosarcinales, an order of methanogens known to contain methylotrophic methanogens. Although hydrogenotrophs appear dominant, geochemical and microbial analyses both indicate that the proportion of methane generated by acetoclastic methanogens increases with the solute content of formation water, a trend that is contrary to existing conceptual models. Consistent with this trend, beta diversity analyses show that archaeal diversity significantly correlates with formation water solute content. In contrast, bacterial diversity more strongly correlates with location than solute content

  16. Hydrogen 'leakage' during methanogenesis from methanol and methylamine: implications for anaerobic carbon degradation pathways in aquatic sediments.

    PubMed

    Finke, Niko; Hoehler, Tori Michael; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2007-04-01

    The effect of variations in H2 concentrations on methanogenesis from the non-competitive substrates methanol and methylamine (used by methanogens but not by sulfate reducers) was investigated in methanogenic marine sediments. Imposed variations in sulfate concentration and temperature were used to drive systematic variations in pore water H2 concentrations. Specifically, increasing sulfate concentrations and decreasing temperatures both resulted in decreasing H2 concentrations. The ratio of CO2 and CH4 produced from 14C-labelled methylamine and methanol showed a direct correlation with the H2 concentration, independent of the treatment, with lower H2 concentrations resulting in a shift towards CO2. We conclude that this correlation is driven by production of H2 by methylotrophic methanogens, followed by loss to the environment with a magnitude dependent on the extracellular H2 concentrations maintained by hydrogenotrophic methanogens (in the case of the temperature experiment) or sulfate reducers (in the case of the sulfate experiment). Under sulfate-free conditions, the loss of reducing power as H2 flux out of the cell represents a loss of energy for the methylotrophic methanogens while, in the presence of sulfate, it results in a favourable free energy yield. Thus, hydrogen leakage might conceivably be beneficial for methanogens in marine sediments dominated by sulfate reduction. In low-sulfate systems such as methanogenic marine or freshwater sediments it is clearly detrimental--an adverse consequence of possessing a hydrogenase that is subject to externally imposed control by pore water H2 concentrations. H2 leakage in methanogens may explain the apparent exclusion of acetoclastic methanogenesis in sediments dominated by sulfate reduction.

  17. Crude-oil biodegradation via methanogenesis in subsurface petroleum reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Jones, D M; Head, I M; Gray, N D; Adams, J J; Rowan, A K; Aitken, C M; Bennett, B; Huang, H; Brown, A; Bowler, B F J; Oldenburg, T; Erdmann, M; Larter, S R

    2008-01-10

    Biodegradation of crude oil in subsurface petroleum reservoirs has adversely affected the majority of the world's oil, making recovery and refining of that oil more costly. The prevalent occurrence of biodegradation in shallow subsurface petroleum reservoirs has been attributed to aerobic bacterial hydrocarbon degradation stimulated by surface recharge of oxygen-bearing meteoric waters. This hypothesis is empirically supported by the likelihood of encountering biodegraded oils at higher levels of degradation in reservoirs near the surface. More recent findings, however, suggest that anaerobic degradation processes dominate subsurface sedimentary environments, despite slow reaction kinetics and uncertainty as to the actual degradation pathways occurring in oil reservoirs. Here we use laboratory experiments in microcosms monitoring the hydrocarbon composition of degraded oils and generated gases, together with the carbon isotopic compositions of gas and oil samples taken at wellheads and a Rayleigh isotope fractionation box model, to elucidate the probable mechanisms of hydrocarbon degradation in reservoirs. We find that crude-oil hydrocarbon degradation under methanogenic conditions in the laboratory mimics the characteristic sequential removal of compound classes seen in reservoir-degraded petroleum. The initial preferential removal of n-alkanes generates close to stoichiometric amounts of methane, principally by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Our data imply a common methanogenic biodegradation mechanism in subsurface degraded oil reservoirs, resulting in consistent patterns of hydrocarbon alteration, and the common association of dry gas with severely degraded oils observed worldwide. Energy recovery from oilfields in the form of methane, based on accelerating natural methanogenic biodegradation, may offer a route to economic production of difficult-to-recover energy from oilfields.

  18. Shifts in metabolic hydrogen sinks in the methanogenesis-inhibited ruminal fermentation: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ungerfeld, Emilio M

    2015-01-01

    Maximizing the flow of metabolic hydrogen ([H]) in the rumen away from CH4 and toward volatile fatty acids (VFA) would increase the efficiency of ruminant production and decrease its environmental impact. The objectives of this meta-analysis were: (i) To quantify shifts in metabolic hydrogen sinks when inhibiting ruminal methanogenesis in vitro; and (ii) To understand the variation in shifts of metabolic hydrogen sinks among experiments and between batch and continuous cultures systems when methanogenesis is inhibited. Batch (28 experiments, N = 193) and continuous (16 experiments, N = 79) culture databases of experiments with at least 50% inhibition in CH4 production were compiled. Inhibiting methanogenesis generally resulted in less fermentation and digestion in most batch culture, but not in most continuous culture, experiments. Inhibiting CH4 production in batch cultures resulted in redirection of metabolic hydrogen toward propionate and H2 but not butyrate. In continuous cultures, there was no overall metabolic hydrogen redirection toward propionate or butyrate, and H2 as a proportion of metabolic hydrogen spared from CH4 production was numerically smaller compared to batch cultures. Dihydrogen accumulation was affected by type of substrate and methanogenesis inhibitor, with highly fermentable substrates resulting in greater redirection of metabolic hydrogen toward H2 when inhibiting methanogenesis, and some oils causing small or no H2 accumulation. In both batch and continuous culture, there was a decrease in metabolic hydrogen recovered as the sum of propionate, butyrate, CH4 and H2 when inhibiting methanogenesis, and it is speculated that as CH4 production decreases metabolic hydrogen could be increasingly incorporated into formate, microbial biomass, and perhaps, reductive acetogenesis in continuous cultures. Energetic benefits of inhibiting methanogenesis depended on the inhibitor and its concentration and on the in vitro system.

  19. Shifts in metabolic hydrogen sinks in the methanogenesis-inhibited ruminal fermentation: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ungerfeld, Emilio M.

    2015-01-01

    Maximizing the flow of metabolic hydrogen ([H]) in the rumen away from CH4 and toward volatile fatty acids (VFA) would increase the efficiency of ruminant production and decrease its environmental impact. The objectives of this meta-analysis were: (i) To quantify shifts in metabolic hydrogen sinks when inhibiting ruminal methanogenesis in vitro; and (ii) To understand the variation in shifts of metabolic hydrogen sinks among experiments and between batch and continuous cultures systems when methanogenesis is inhibited. Batch (28 experiments, N = 193) and continuous (16 experiments, N = 79) culture databases of experiments with at least 50% inhibition in CH4 production were compiled. Inhibiting methanogenesis generally resulted in less fermentation and digestion in most batch culture, but not in most continuous culture, experiments. Inhibiting CH4 production in batch cultures resulted in redirection of metabolic hydrogen toward propionate and H2 but not butyrate. In continuous cultures, there was no overall metabolic hydrogen redirection toward propionate or butyrate, and H2 as a proportion of metabolic hydrogen spared from CH4 production was numerically smaller compared to batch cultures. Dihydrogen accumulation was affected by type of substrate and methanogenesis inhibitor, with highly fermentable substrates resulting in greater redirection of metabolic hydrogen toward H2 when inhibiting methanogenesis, and some oils causing small or no H2 accumulation. In both batch and continuous culture, there was a decrease in metabolic hydrogen recovered as the sum of propionate, butyrate, CH4 and H2 when inhibiting methanogenesis, and it is speculated that as CH4 production decreases metabolic hydrogen could be increasingly incorporated into formate, microbial biomass, and perhaps, reductive acetogenesis in continuous cultures. Energetic benefits of inhibiting methanogenesis depended on the inhibitor and its concentration and on the in vitro system. PMID:25699029

  20. Secondary Mineralization of Ferrihydrite Affects Microbial Methanogenesis in Geobacter-Methanosarcina Cocultures

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jia; Ma, Jinlian; Tang, Ziyang; Yu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transformation of ferrihydrite to stable iron oxides over time has important consequences for biogeochemical cycling of many metals and nutrients. The response of methanogenic activity to the presence of iron oxides depends on the type of iron mineral, but the effects of changes in iron mineralogy on methanogenesis have not been characterized. To address these issues, we constructed methanogenic cocultures of Geobacter and Methanosarcina strains with different ferrihydrite mineralization pathways. In this system, secondary mineralization products from ferrihydrite are regulated by the presence or absence of phosphate. In cultures producing magnetite as the secondary mineralization product, the rates of methanogenesis from acetate and ethanol increased by 30.2% and 135.3%, respectively, compared with a control lacking ferrihydrite. Biogenic magnetite was proposed to promote direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter and Methanosarcina in a manner similar to that of c-type cytochrome and thus facilitate methanogenesis. Vivianite biomineralization from ferrihydrite in the presence of phosphate did not significantly influence the methanogenesis processes. The correlation between magnetite occurrence and facilitated methanogenesis was supported by increased rates of methane production from acetate and ethanol with magnetite supplementation in the defined cocultures. Our data provide a new perspective on the important role of iron biomineralization in biogeochemical cycling of carbon in diverse anaerobic environments. IMPORTANCE It has been found that microbial methanogenesis is affected by the presence of iron minerals, and their influences on methanogenesis are associated with the mineralogical properties of the iron minerals. However, how changes in iron mineralogy affect microbial methanogenesis has not been characterized. To address this issue, we constructed methanogenic cocultures of Geobacter and Methanosarcina strains with different

  1. Effect of ferrihydrite biomineralization on methanogenesis in an anaerobic incubation from paddy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Li; Xu, Jielong; Tang, Jia; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-05-01

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) can be one of the major factors controlling methane production from anaerobic sedimentary environments, such as paddy soils and wetlands. Although secondary iron mineralization following Fe(III) reduction is a process that occurs naturally over time, it has not yet been considered in methanogenic systems. This study performed a long-term anaerobic incubation of a paddy soil and ferrihydrite-supplemented soil cultures to investigate methanogenesis during ferrihydrite biomineralization. The results revealed that the long-term effect of ferrihydrite on methanogenesis may be enhancement rather than suppression documented in previous studies. During initial microbial ferrihydrite reduction, methanogenesis was suppressed; however, the secondary minerals of magnetite formation was simultaneous with facilitated methanogenesis in terms of average methane production rate and acetate utilization rate. In the phase of magnetite formation, microbial community analysis revealed a strong stimulation of the bacterial Geobacter, Bacillus, and Sedimentibacter and the archaeal Methanosarcina in the ferrihydrite-supplemented cultures. Direct electric syntrophy between Geobacter and Methanosarcina via conductive magnetite is the plausible mechanism for methanogenesis acceleration along with magnetite formation. Our data suggested that a change in iron mineralogy might affect the conversion of anaerobic organic matter to methane and might provide a fresh perspective on the mitigation of methane emissions from paddy soils by ferric iron fertilization.

  2. Hydrogen as a substrate for methanogenesis and sulphate reduction in anaerobic saltmarsh sediment.

    PubMed

    Abram, J W; Nedwell, D B

    1978-04-27

    Hydrogen gas stimulated sulphate reduction in a saltmarsh sediment and the importance of H2 transferred from organotrophic bacteria to the sulphate-reducers is discussed. beta-fluorolactate inhibited sulphate reduction whether lactate, ethanol or hydrogen was being used as growth substrate. When added to sediment beta-fluorolactate inhibited sulphate reduction with a consequent increase in methane production. Addition of H2 stimulated methanogenesis in sediment and this stimulation was greater if CO2 was also present. Hydrogen availability was the primary limitation of methanogenesis but the low concentration of dissolved CO2 in seawater may limit methane production even if H2 is available. The removal of inhibition of methanogenesis by the use of fluorolactate to suppress sulphate reduction or by the provision of hydrogen indicates competitive inhibition of methanogens by sulphate reducers utilizing transferred hydrogen.

  3. Inhibition of acetoclastic methanogenesis in crude oil- and creosote-contaminated groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warren, E.; Bekins, B.A.; Godsy, E.M.; Smith, V.K.

    2004-01-01

    Results from a series of studies of methanogenic processes in crude oil- and creosote-contaminated aquifers indicated that acetoctastic methanogenesis is inhibited near non-aqueous sources. Acetoclastic methanogenesis was more susceptible to the toxic inhibition of crude oil and creosote than either hydrogen- or formate-utilizing methanogenesis. The effect of this toxic inhibition was apparent in the population of the methanogenic trophic groups near nonaqueous crude oil at the Bemidji, MN, site. At that site, acetoclastic methanogens were < 2/g within or near the oil where hydrogen- and formate-utilizing methanogens were 10-100/g. The geochemical effect of this toxic inhibition was the buildup of low molecular weight volatile acids, particularly acetate. Wastewater reactor studies indicated that this toxicity will result in a decrease in the biodegradation rate of contaminants at sites where toxic compounds are present.

  4. Geospatial Hydrochemical and Microbiological Implications on the Occurrence of Crude Oil Biodegradation and Methanogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, J.; McIntosh, J. C.; Warwick, P.; McCray, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Technologies that serve as a bridge between renewable energy and fossil fuels are needed to meet growing energy demands and to mitigate climate change. Many reservoirs contain difficult to produce residual and/or heavily biodegraded (i.e., geochemically altered) crude oil, which remains a relatively untapped resource. Production of this residual crude oil via unconventional methods, such as enhanced oil recovery (EOR), has offset some of the decline in conventional oil production. EOR is not efficient enough to recover all of the original oil in place, and some methods are not effective for very heavy crude oils. Stimulation of in-situ microorganisms to convert the residual crude oil to natural gas (i.e., microbial methane) is one promising strategy to "extract" residual and /or heavy crude oil. Although the hydrogeochemical conditions necessary for the occurrence of both crude oil biodegradation and microbial methanogenesis in various reservoirs have been studied, there are still gaps in research. Many hydrogeochemical factors have been researched individually (not as part of a multifactor or lithologically similar system) and little work has assessed the microbiological limitations of both processes. Our goal is to determine the hydrogeochemical and microbiological conditions required for maximum crude oil biodegradation and microbial methanogenesis across a lithologically similar unit. Produced water, oil, gas, and microbial biomass samples were collected from wells completed in the Paleocene—Eocene Wilcox Group in central Louisiana. Initial results indicate potential relationships between the amount of crude oil biodegradation, indicators of microbial methanogenesis, and aqueous geochemistry. For example, produced waters with the lowest salinity had the highest crude oil biodegradation, and wells exhibiting the most microbial methane generation produce waters with hydrogeochemical conditions most fit for methanogenesis to occur. In sampled wells displaying

  5. 45 CFR 650.6 - Awards not primarily for research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PATENTS § 650.6 Awards not primarily for research. (a) Awards not primarily intended to support scientific or engineering research need contain no patent provision. Examples of such awards are travel and... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Awards not primarily for research. 650.6...

  6. 45 CFR 650.6 - Awards not primarily for research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PATENTS § 650.6 Awards not primarily for research. (a) Awards not primarily intended to support scientific or engineering research need contain no patent provision. Examples of such awards are travel and... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Awards not primarily for research. 650.6...

  7. Exploring Hydrogenotrophic Methanogenesis: a Genome Scale Metabolic Reconstruction of Methanococcus maripaludis

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Matthew A.; Lie, Thomas J.; Zhang, Juan; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis occurs in multiple environments, ranging from the intestinal tracts of animals to anaerobic sediments and hot springs. Energy conservation in hydrogenotrophic methanogens was long a mystery; only within the last decade was it reported that net energy conservation for growth depends on electron bifurcation. In this work, we focus on Methanococcus maripaludis, a well-studied hydrogenotrophic marine methanogen. To better understand hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and compare it with methylotrophic methanogenesis that utilizes oxidative phosphorylation rather than electron bifurcation, we have built iMR539, a genome scale metabolic reconstruction that accounts for 539 of the 1,722 protein-coding genes of M. maripaludis strain S2. Our reconstructed metabolic network uses recent literature to not only represent the central electron bifurcation reaction but also incorporate vital biosynthesis and assimilation pathways, including unique cofactor and coenzyme syntheses. We show that our model accurately predicts experimental growth and gene knockout data, with 93% accuracy and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.78. Furthermore, we use our metabolic network reconstruction to probe the implications of electron bifurcation by showing its essentiality, as well as investigating the infeasibility of aceticlastic methanogenesis in the network. Additionally, we demonstrate a method of applying thermodynamic constraints to a metabolic model to quickly estimate overall free-energy changes between what comes in and out of the cell. Finally, we describe a novel reconstruction-specific computational toolbox we created to improve usability. Together, our results provide a computational network for exploring hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and confirm the importance of electron bifurcation in this process. IMPORTANCE Understanding and applying hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis is a promising avenue for developing new bioenergy technologies

  8. Control of interspecies electron flow during anaerobic digestion: significance of formate transfer versus hydrogen transfer during syntrophic methanogenesis in flocs. [Methanobacterium formicicum; Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, J.H.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Microbial formate production and consumption during syntrophic conversion of ethanol or lactate to methane was examined in purified flocs and digestor contents obtained from a whey-processing digestor. Formate production by digestor contents or purified digestor flocs was dependent on CO/sub 2/ and either ethanol or lactate but not H/sub 2/ gas as an electron donor. Floc preparations accumulated fourfold-higher levels of formate (40 ..mu..M) than digestor contents, and the free flora was the primary site for formate cleavage to CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/ (90 ..mu..M formate per h). Inhibition of methanogenesis by CHCl/sub 3/ resulted in formate accumulation and suppression of syntrophic ethanol oxidation. H/sub 2/ gas was an insignificant intermediary metabolite of syntrophic ethanol conversion by flocs, and it exogenous addition neither stimulated methanogenes nor inhibited the initial rate of ethanol oxidation. These results demonstrated that >90% of the syntrophic ethanol conversion to methane by mixed cultures containing primarily Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanobacterium formicicum was mediated via interspecies formate transfer and the <10% was mediated via interspecies H/sub 2/ transfer. The results are discussed in relation to biochemical thermodynamics. A model is presented which describes the dynamics of a bicarbonate-formate electron shuttle mechanism for control of carbon and electron flow during syntrophic methanogenesis and provides a novel mechanism for energy conservation by syntrophic acetogens.

  9. Solute concentrations influence microbial methanogenesis in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Matthew F.; Wilson, Brien H.; Marquart, Kyle A.; Zeglin, Lydia H.; Vinson, David S.; Flynn, Theodore M.

    2015-11-18

    In this study, microorganisms have contributed significantly to subsurface energy resources by converting organic matter in hydrocarbon reservoirs into methane, the main component of natural gas. In this study, we consider environmental controls on microbial populations in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, an unconventional natural gas resource in southeast Kansas, USA. Pennsylvanian-age strata in the basin contain numerous thin (0.4–1.1 m) coalbeds with marginal thermal maturities (0.5–0.7% Ro) that are interbedded with shale and sandstone. We collected gas, water, and microbe samples from 16 commercial coalbed methane wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The water samples were Na–Cl type with total dissolved solids (TDS) content ranging from 34.9 to 91.3 g L–1. Gas dryness values [C1/(C2 + C3)] averaged 2640 and carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of methane differed from those of carbon dioxide and water, respectively, by an average of 65 and 183‰. These values are thought to be consistent with gas that formed primarily by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Results from cultivation assays and taxonomic analysis of 16S rRNA genes agree with the geochemical results. Cultivable methanogens were present in every sample tested, methanogen sequences dominate the archaeal community in each sample (avg 91%), and few archaeal sequences (avg 4.2%) were classified within Methanosarcinales, an order of methanogens known to contain methylotrophic methanogens. Although hydrogenotrophs appear dominant, geochemical and microbial analyses both indicate that the proportion of methane generated by acetoclastic methanogens increases with the solute content of formation water, a trend that is contrary to existing conceptual models. Consistent with this trend, beta diversity analyses show that archaeal diversity significantly correlates with formation water solute content. In contrast

  10. Interaction of microbial sulphate reduction and methanogenesis in oil sands tailings ponds.

    PubMed

    Stasik, Sebastian; Wendt-Potthoff, Katrin

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic turnover of organic compounds in oil sands tailings ponds is accomplished by a complex microbial consortium. We examined major electron accepting processes in mature fine tailings (MFT). Beside methanogenesis and sulphate reduction, microbial iron reduction was an important process of anaerobic respiration. Microbial numbers and activity were comparable to those reported for natural lakes. To understand metabolic interactions of indigenous methanogenic and sulphate-reducing communities, we conducted a 6 month microcosm experiment with MFT supplemented with easily available carbon sources and molybdate and/or 2-bromoethane sulphonate (BES) as specific inhibitors for sulphate reduction and methanogenesis. Methanogenesis increased when microcosms were supplemented with extra carbon, but was completely inhibited by the addition of BES. Molybdate not only inhibited sulphate reduction, but also methanogenesis, indicating a positive relation between the two processes. The turnover of extra carbon sources differed between microcosms treated with molybdate and BES. Acetate and propionate were not consumed in microcosms amended with molybdate, indicating that sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were responsible for their metabolisation, and that methane was rather produced by hydrogenotrophic methanogens. In microcosms without molybdate, acetate transiently accumulated, indicating the activity of both incomplete and complete oxidizing SRB. Ethanol and lactate were also consumed in the simultaneous presence of BES and molybdate, demonstrating the occurrence of other anaerobic processes. Biomass increased by the addition of extra carbon, mainly due to a relative increase in the proportion of SRB. The addition of extra carbon lowered the degradation of BTEX compounds.

  11. Evolution of Acetoclastic Methanogenesis in Methanosarcina via Horizontal Gene Transfer from Cellulolytic Clostridia▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Gregory P.; Gogarten, J. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that two genes required for acetoclastic methanogenesis, ackA and pta, were horizontally transferred to the ancestor of Methanosarcina from a derived cellulolytic organism in the class Clostridia. This event likely occurred within the last 475 million years, causing profound changes in planetary methane biogeochemistry. PMID:18055595

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS INFLUENCING METHANOGENESIS IN A SHALLOW ANOXIC AQUIFER: A FIELD AND LABORATORY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental factors influencing methanogenesis in a shallow anoxic aquifer were probed in a combined field and laboratory study. Field data collected over a year revealed that in situ rates of methane production were depressed in winter and elevated in summer. Over the same...

  13. METHANOGENESIS AND SULFATE REDUCTION IN CHEMOSTATS: II. MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND VERIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive dynamic model is presented that simulates methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). This model incorporates the complex chemistry of anaerobic systems. A salient feature of the model is its ability to predict the effluent ...

  14. Improved hydrogen production in the microbial electrolysis cell by inhibiting methanogenesis using ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanping; Luo, Haiping; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Li, Jiayi; Fu, Shiyu

    2014-09-02

    Methanogenesis inhibition is essential for the improvement of hydrogen (H2) yield and energy recovery in the microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). In this study, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was proposed as an efficient method for methanogenesis control in a single chamber MEC. With 30 cycles of operation with UV irradiation in the MEC, high H2 concentrations (>91%) were maintained, while without UV irradiation, CH4 concentrations increased significantly and reached up to 94%. In the MEC, H2 yields ranged from 2.87 ± 0.03 to 3.70 ± 0.11 mol H2/mol acetate with UV irradiation and from 3.78 ± 0.12 to 0.03 ± 0.004 mol H2/mol acetate without UV irradiation. Average energy efficiencies from the UV-irradiated MEC were 1.5 times of those without UV irradiation. Energy production from the MEC without UV irradiation was a negative energy yield process because of large amount of CH4 produced over time, which was mainly attributable to cathodic hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Our results clearly showed that UV irradiation could effectively inhibit methanogenesis and improve MEC performance to produce H2.

  15. Redirection of Metabolic Hydrogen by Inhibiting Methanogenesis in the Rumen Simulation Technique (RUSITEC)

    PubMed Central

    Guyader, Jessie; Ungerfeld, Emilio M.; Beauchemin, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    A decrease in methanogenesis is expected to improve ruminant performance by allocating rumen metabolic hydrogen ([2H]) to more energy-rendering fermentation pathways for the animal. However, decreases in methane (CH4) emissions of up to 30% are not always linked with greater performance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to understand the fate of [2H] when CH4 production in the rumen is inhibited by known methanogenesis inhibitors (nitrate, NIT; 3-nitrooxypropanol, NOP; anthraquinone, AQ) in comparison with a control treatment (CON) with the Rumen Simulation Technique (RUSITEC). Measurements started after 1 week adaptation. Substrate disappearance was not modified by methanogenesis inhibitors. Nitrate mostly seemed to decrease [2H] availability by acting as an electron acceptor competing with methanogenesis. As a consequence, NIT decreased CH4 production (−75%), dissolved dihydrogen (H2) concentration (−30%) and the percentages of reduced volatile fatty acids (butyrate, isobutyrate, valerate, isovalerate, caproate and heptanoate) except propionate, but increased acetate molar percentage, ethanol concentration and the efficiency of microbial nitrogen synthesis (+14%) without affecting gaseous H2. Nitrooxypropanol decreased methanogenesis (−75%) while increasing both gaseous and dissolved H2 concentrations (+81% and +24%, respectively). Moreover, NOP decreased acetate and isovalerate molar percentages and increased butyrate, valerate, caproate and heptanoate molar percentages as well as n-propanol and ammonium concentrations. Methanogenesis inhibition with AQ (−26%) was associated with higher gaseous H2 production (+70%) but lower dissolved H2 concentration (−76%), evidencing a lack of relationship between the two H2 forms. Anthraquinone increased ammonium concentration, caproate and heptanoate molar percentages but decreased acetate and isobutyrate molar percentages, total microbial nitrogen production and efficiency of microbial protein synthesis (

  16. Microbial methanogenesis in the sulfate-reducing zone of surface sediments traversing the Peruvian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltby, J.; Sommer, S.; Dale, A. W.; Treude, T.

    2015-09-01

    We studied the concurrence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in surface sediments (0-25 cm below sea floor, cmbsf) at six stations (70, 145, 253, 407, 770 and 1024 m) along the Peruvian margin (12° S). This oceanographic region is characterized by high carbon export to the seafloor, creating an extensive oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the shelf, both factors that could favor surface methanogenesis. Sediments sampled along the depth transect traversed areas of anoxic and oxic conditions in the bottom-near water. Net methane production (batch incubations) and sulfate reduction (35S-sulfate radiotracer incubation) were determined in the upper 0-25 cmbsf of multicorer cores from all stations, while deep hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (> 30 cmbsf, 14C-bicarbonate radiotracer incubation) was determined in two gravity cores at selected sites (78 and 407 m). Furthermore, stimulation (methanol addition) and inhibition (molybdate addition) experiments were carried out to investigate the relationship between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Highest rates of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in the surface sediments, integrated over 0-25 cmbsf, were observed on the shelf (70-253 m, 0.06-0.1 and 0.5-4.7 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively), while lowest rates were discovered at the deepest site (1024 m, 0.03 and 0.2 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively). The addition of methanol resulted in significantly higher surface methanogenesis activity, suggesting that the process was mostly based on non-competitive substrates, i.e., substrates not used by sulfate reducers. In the deeper sediment horizons, where competition was probably relieved due to the decline of sulfate, the usage of competitive substrates was confirmed by the detection of hydrogenotrophic activity in the sulfate-depleted zone at the shallow shelf station (70 m). Surface methanogenesis appeared to be correlated to the availability of labile organic matter (C / N ratio) and organic carbon degradation (DIC production

  17. Microbial methanogenesis in the sulfate-reducing zone of surface sediments traversing the Peruvian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltby, J.; Sommer, S.; Dale, A. W.; Treude, T.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the concurrence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in surface sediments (0-25 cm below sea floor) at six stations (70, 145, 253, 407, 990 and 1024 m) along the Peruvian margin (12° S). This oceanographic region is characterized by high carbon export to the seafloor creating an extensive oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the shelf, both factors that could favor surface methanogenesis. Sediments sampled along the depth transect traversed areas of anoxic and oxic conditions in the bottom-near water. Net methane production (batch incubations) and sulfate reduction (35S-sulfate radiotracer incubation) were determined in the upper 0-25 cm b.s.f. of multiple cores from all stations, while deep hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (> 30 cm b.s.f., 14C-bicarbonate radiotracer incubation) was determined in two gravity cores at selected sites (78 and 407 m). Furthermore, stimulation (methanol addition) and inhibition (molybdate addition) experiments were carried out to investigate the relationship between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis.

    Highest rates of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in the surface sediments, integrated over 0-25 cm b.s.f., were observed on the shelf (70-253 m, 0.06-0.1 and 0.5-4.7 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively), while lowest rates were discovered at the deepest site (1024 m, 0.03 and 0.2 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively). The addition of methanol resulted in significantly higher surface methanogenesis activity, suggesting that the process was mostly based on non-competitive substrates - i.e., substrates not used by sulfate reducers. In the deeper sediment horizons, where competition was probably relieved due to the decrease of sulfate, the usage of competitive substrates was confirmed by the detection of hydrogenotrophic activity in the sulfate-depleted zone at the shallow shelf station (70 m).

    Surface methanogenesis appeared to be correlated to the availability of labile organic matter (C / N ratio) and organic carbon

  18. The relative importance of methanogenesis in the decomposition of organic matter in northern peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, J. Elizabeth; Tfaily, Malak M.; Burdige, David J.; Glaser, Paul H.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    2015-02-01

    Using an isotope-mass balance approach and assuming the equimolar production of CO2 and CH4 from methanogenesis (e.g., anaerobic decomposition of cellulose), we calculate that the proportion of total CO2 production from methanogenesis varies from 37 to 83% across a variety of northern peatlands. In a relative sense, methanogenesis was a more important pathway for decomposition in bogs (80 ± 13% of CO2 production) than in fens (64 ± 5.7% of CO2 production), but because fens contain more labile substrates they may support higher CH4 production overall. The concentration of CO2 produced from methanogenesis (CO2-meth) can be considered equivalent to CH4 concentration before loss due to ebullition, plant-mediated transport, or diffusion. Bogs produced slightly less CO2-meth than fens (2.9 ± 1.3 and 3.7 ± 1.4 mmol/L, respectively). Comparing the quantity of CH4 present to CO2-meth, fens lost slightly more CH4 than bogs (89 ± 2.8% and 82 ± 5.3%, respectively) likely due to the presence of vascular plant roots. In collapsed permafrost wetlands, bog moats produced half the amount of CO2-meth (0.8 ± 0.2 mmol/L) relative to midbogs (1.6 ± 0.6 mmol/L) and methanogenesis was less important (42 ± 6.6% of total CO2 production relative to 55 ± 8.1%). We hypothesize that the lower methane production potential in collapsed permafrost wetlands occurs because recently thawed organic substrates are being first exposed to the initial phases of anaerobic decomposition following collapse and flooding. Bog moats lost a comparable amount of CH4 as midbogs (63 ± 7.0% and 64 ± 9.3%).

  19. Quantifying the Microbial Utilization of Methanogenesis and Methane Loss from Northern Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, J. E.; Tfaily, M.; Burdige, D.; Glaser, P. H.; Chanton, J.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of methanogenesis and percent of methane loss from the subsurface porewater in various northern wetland sites was quantified with isotope-mass balance equations. With equimolar amounts of CO2 and CH4 produced from methanogenesis, the amount of dissolved CO2 produced from methanogenesis as compared to other decomposition processes can be calculated and is equivalent to the amount of CH4 before loss due to ebullition, plant-mediated transport, and diffusion. This method was applied to porewater samples collected from various locations within permafrost collapse-scar bogs and northern peatlands. From the peatland sites, bogs produced less CO2-meth than fens (2.9 ± 1.3 mM and 3.7 ± 1.4 mM, respectively). Methanogenesis was a more utilized decomposition process in the bogs than the fens. However, greater amounts of CO2-meth found in fen sites was most likely due to the presence of more labile organic substrates resulting in greater overall production. More CH4 was lost in fens (89 ± 2.8%) than bogs (82 ± 5.3%) from plant-mediated transport as fens are dominated by vascular plants (Carex) while bogs are dominated by Sphagnum mosses. In permafrost sites, mid-bogs produced twice the amount of CO2-meth as bog moats (1.6 ± 0.63 mM and 0.82 ± 0.20 mM, respectively). Less methanogenesis was found in bog moats as recently thawed organic matter is exposed to initial decomposition processes and methane production grows over time. A similar amount of CH4 was lost from bog moats as mid bogs (63 ± 7.0% and 64 ± 9.3%, respectively) likely due to the greater density of vascular plants found within a bog moat.

  20. The Relative Importance of Methanogenesis in the Decomposition of Organic Matter in Northern Peatlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, J. Elizabeth; Tfaily, Malak M.; Burdige, David J.; Glaser, Paul H.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    Using an isotope-mass balance approach and assuming the equimolar production of CO2 and CH4 from methanogenesis (e.g., anaerobic decomposition of cellulose), we calculate that the proportion of total CO2 production from methanogenesis varies from 37 to 83% across a variety of northern peatlands. In a relative sense, methanogenesis was a more important pathway for decomposition in bogs (80 +/- 13% of CO2 production) than in fens (64 +/- 5.7% of CO2 production), but because fens contain more labile substrates they may support higher CH4 production overall. The concentration of CO2 produced from methanogenesis (CO2-meth) can be considered equivalent to CH4 concentration before loss due to ebullition, plant-mediated transport, or diffusion. Bogs produced slightly less CO2-meth than fens (2.9 +/- 1.3 and 3.7 +/- 1.4 mmol/L, respectively). Comparing the quantity of CH4 present to CO2-meth, fens lost slightly more CH4 than bogs (89 +/- 2.8% and 82 +/- 5.3%, respectively) likely due to the presence of vascular plant roots. In collapsed permafrost wetlands, bog moats produced half the amount of CO2-meth (0.8 +/- 0.2mmol/L) relative to midbogs (1.6 +/- 0.6 mmol/L) and methanogenesis was less important (42 +/- 6.6% of total CO2 production relative to 55 +/- 8.1%).We hypothesize that the lower methane production potential in collapsed permafrost wetlands occurs because recently thawed organic substrates are being first exposed to the initial phases of anaerobic decomposition following collapse and flooding. Bog moats lost a comparable amount of CH4 as midbogs (63 +/- 7.0% and 64 +/- 9.3%).

  1. Tylosin effect on methanogenesis in an anaerobic biomass from swine wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Liliana; Garzón-Zúñiga, Marco Antonio; Buelna, Gerardo; Estrada-Arriaga, Edson Baltazar

    2016-01-01

    The effect of different concentrations of tylosin on methane production was investigated: first methanogenesis in a biomass without contact with the antibiotic, and later the ability of the sludge to adapt to increasing concentrations of tylosin. Results showed that, for biomass that had no contact with the antibiotic, the presence of tylosin inhibits the generation of methane even at concentrations as small as 0.01 mg L(-1), and samples at concentrations above 0.5 mg L(-1) produced practically no methane, whereas, in the digesters acclimated in the presence of tylosin at a concentration of 0.01 to 0.065 mg L(-1), methanogenesis is not inhibited in the presence of antibiotic and the generation of methane is improved. This behaviour suggests the microorganisms have developed not only resistance to the antibiotic but also an ability to metabolize it.

  2. Rapid restoration of methanogenesis in an acidified UASB reactor treating 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP).

    PubMed

    Díaz-Báez, María Consuelo; Valderrama-Rincon, Juan Daniel

    2017-02-15

    Anaerobic bioreactors are often used for removal of xenobiotic and highly toxic pollutants from wastewater. Most of the time, the pollutant is so toxic that the stability of the reactor becomes compromised. It is well known that methanogens are one of the most sensitive organisms in the anaerobic consortia and hence the stability of the reactors is highly dependant on methanogenesis. Unfortunately few studies have focused on recovering the methanogenic activity once it has been inhibited by highly toxic pollutants. Here we establish a quick recovery strategy for neutralization of an acidified UASB reactor after failure by intoxication with an excess of TCP in the influent. Once the reactor returned to pH values compatible with methanogenesis, biogas production was re-started after one day and the system was re-acclimated to TCP. Successful removal of TCP from synthetic wastewater was shown for concentrations up to 70mg/L after restoration.

  3. Suppression of methanogenesis for hydrogen production in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells using various antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Catal, Tunc; Lesnik, Keaton Larson; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens can utilize the hydrogen produced in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), thereby decreasing the hydrogen generation efficiency. However, various antibiotics have previously been shown to inhibit methanogenesis. In the present study antibiotics, including neomycin sulfate, 2-bromoethane sulfonate, 2-chloroethane sulfonate, 8-aza-hypoxanthine, were examined to determine if hydrogen production could be improved through inhibition of methanogenesis but not hydrogen production in MECs. 1.1mM neomycin sulfate inhibited both methane and hydrogen production while 2-chloroethane sulfonate (20mM), 2-bromoethane sulfonate (20mM), and 8-aza-hypoxanthine (3.6mM) can inhibited methane generation and with concurrent increases in hydrogen production. Our results indicated that adding select antibiotics to the mixed species community in MECs could be a suitable method to enhance hydrogen production efficiency.

  4. iDriving (Intelligent Driving)

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2012-09-17

    iDriving identifies the driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is used with the aim of optimizing a driving style with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels is constructed to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. The optimization framework is used to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving styles in responses to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.

  5. Genomic markers of ancient anaerobic microbial pathways: sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Teske, Andreas; Dhillon, Ashita; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2003-04-01

    Genomic markers for anaerobic microbial processes in marine sediments-sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and anaerobic methane oxidation-reveal the structure of sulfate-reducing, methanogenic, and methane-oxidizing microbial communities (including uncultured members); they allow inferences about the evolution of these ancient microbial pathways; and they open genomic windows into extreme microbial habitats, such as deep subsurface sediments and hydrothermal vents, that are analogs for the early Earth and for extraterrestrial microbiota.

  6. Pathways for methanogenesis and diversity of methanogenic archaea in three boreal peatland ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Galand, P E; Fritze, H; Conrad, R; Yrjälä, K

    2005-04-01

    The main objectives of this study were to uncover the pathways used for methanogenesis in three different boreal peatland ecosystems and to describe the methanogenic populations involved. The mesotrophic fen had the lowest proportion of CH4 produced from H2-CO2. The oligotrophic fen was the most hydrogenotrophic, followed by the ombrotrophic bog. Each site was characterized by a specific group of methanogenic sequences belonging to Methanosaeta spp. (mesotrophic fen), rice cluster-I (oligotrophic fen), and fen cluster (ombrotrophic bog).

  7. Hydrogen isotope systematics of H2-H2O-CH4 during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Kawagucci, S.; Hattori, S.; Yamada, K.; Ueno, Y.; Takai, K.; Yoshida, N.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen and carbon isotopes of CH4 have been utilized to trace microbial processes. The isotope fractionations during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, one of the major processes of environmental CH4, have been studied by several laboratory incubations. For the carbon isotope, H2 concentration is thought to be the major parameter controlling the carbon isotope fractionation by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. For the hydrogen, on the other hand, factors controlling isotope fractionation remain poorly understood, although H2 concentration is suggested to be important. This uncertainty prevents us to utilize δD-CH4 value as the tracer. The most important and principal question is whether all hydrogen atoms in microbially-generated CH4 come from environmental H2O or not. To answer the question, we investigated the D/H systematics of H2-H2O-CH4 during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis by pure culture incubation with softly deuterium-enriched H2 and/or H2O. Our results demonstrate that δD-CH4 value produced by hydrogenotrophic methanogens depends not only on δD-H2O value but also on δD-H2 value. We observed constant correlation between δD-H2 and δD-CH4 values as well as between δD-H2O and δD-CH4 values, which suggests that hydrogen (/deuterium) atom of substrate H2 is also transferred to the product CH4. This implies that the range of δD-CH4 value produced by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis should be re-evaluated considering the distribution of δD-H2 and δD-H2O values in natural environments.

  8. Methanogenesis at extremely haloalkaline conditions in the soda lakes of Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia).

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Abbas, Ben; Geleijnse, Mitchell; Pimenov, Nikolai V; Sukhacheva, Marina V; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2015-04-01

    Microbial methanogenesis at extreme conditions of saline alkaline soda lakes has, so far, been poorly investigated. Despite the obvious domination of sulfidogenesis as the therminal anaerobic process in the hypersaline soda lakes of Kulunda Steppe (Altai, southwestern Siberia), high concentrations of methane were detected in the anaerobic sediments. Potential activity measurements with different substrates gave results significantly deviating from what is commonly found in hypersaline habitats with neutral pH. In particular, not only a non-competitive methylotrophic pathway was active, but also lithotrophic and, in some cases, even acetate-dependent methanogenesis was found to be present in hypersaline soda lake sediments. All three pathways were functioning exclusively within the alkaline pH range between 8 and 10.5, while the salt concentration was the key factor influencing the activity. Methylotrophic and, to a lesser extent, lithotrophic methanogenesis were active up to soda-saturating conditions (4 M total Na(+)). Acetate-dependent methanogenesis was observed at salinities below 3 M total Na(+). Detection of methanogens in sediments using the mcrA gene as a functional marker demonstrated domination of methylotrophic genera Methanolobus and Methanosalsum and lithotrophic Methanocalculus. In a few cases, acetoclastic Methanosaeta was detected, as well as two deep lineage methanogens. Cultivation results corresponded well to the mcrA-based observations. Enrichments for natronophilic methylotrophic methanogens resulted in isolation of Methanolobus strains at moderate salinity, while at salt concentrations above 2 M Na(+) a novel member of the genus Methanosalsum was dominating. Enrichments with H2 or formate invariably resulted in domination of close relatives of Methanocalculus natronophilus. Enrichments with acetate at low salt concentration yielded two acetoclastic alkaliphilic Methanosaeta cultures, while at salinity above 1 M Na(+) syntrophic associations

  9. Methanogenesis from choline by a coculture of Desulfovibrio sp. and Methanosarcina barkeri

    SciTech Connect

    Fiebig, K.; Gottschalk, G.

    1983-01-01

    A sulfate-reducing vibrio was isolated from a methanogenic enrichment with choline as the sole added organic substrate. This oganism was identified as a member of the genus Desulfovibrio and was designated Desulfovibrio strain G1. In a defined medium devoid of sulfate, a pure culture of Desulfovibrio strain G1 fermented choline to trimethylamine, acetate, and ethanol. In the presence of sulfate, more acetate and less ethanol were formed from choline than in the absence of sulfate. When grown in a medium containing sulfate, a coculture of Desulfovibrio strain G1 and Methanosarcina barkeri strain Fusaro degraded chloline almost completely to methane, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide and presumably to carbon dioxide. Methanogenesis occurred in two distinct phases separated by a lag of about 6 days. During the first phase of methanogenesis choline was completely converted to trimethylamine, acetate, hydrogen sulfide, and traces of ethanol by the desulfovibrio.M. barkeri fermented trimethylamine to methane, ammonia, and presumably carbon dioxide via dimethyl- and methylamine as intermediates. Simultaneously, about 60% of the acetate expected was metabolized. In the second phase of methanogenesis, the residual acetate was almost completely catabolized.

  10. The key nickel enzyme of methanogenesis catalyses the anaerobic oxidation of methane.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Silvan; Goenrich, Meike; Boecher, Reinhard; Thauer, Rudolf K; Jaun, Bernhard

    2010-06-03

    Large amounts (estimates range from 70 Tg per year to 300 Tg per year) of the potent greenhouse gas methane are oxidized to carbon dioxide in marine sediments by communities of methanotrophic archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria, and thus are prevented from escaping into the atmosphere. Indirect evidence indicates that the anaerobic oxidation of methane might proceed as the reverse of archaeal methanogenesis from carbon dioxide with the nickel-containing methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) as the methane-activating enzyme. However, experiments showing that MCR can catalyse the endergonic back reaction have been lacking. Here we report that purified MCR from Methanothermobacter marburgensis converts methane into methyl-coenzyme M under equilibrium conditions with apparent V(max) (maximum rate) and K(m) (Michaelis constant) values consistent with the observed in vivo kinetics of the anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulphate. This result supports the hypothesis of 'reverse methanogenesis' and is paramount to understanding the still-unknown mechanism of the last step of methanogenesis. The ability of MCR to cleave the particularly strong C-H bond of methane without the involvement of highly reactive oxygen-derived intermediates is directly relevant to catalytic C-H activation, currently an area of great interest in chemistry.

  11. High-rate, High Temperature Acetotrophic Methanogenesis Governed by a Three Population Consortium in Anaerobic Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Dang; Jensen, Paul; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Beckmann, Sabrina; Manefield, Mike; Batstone, Damien

    2016-01-01

    A combination of acetate oxidation and acetoclastic methanogenesis has been previously identified to enable high-rate methanogenesis at high temperatures (55 to 65°C), but this capability had not been linked to any key organisms. This study combined RNA–stable isotope probing on 13C-labelled acetate and 16S amplicon sequencing to identify the active micro-organisms involved in high-rate methanogenesis. Active biomass was harvested from three bench-scale thermophilic bioreactors treating waste activated sludge at 55, 60 and 65°C, and fed with 13-C labelled and 12C-unlabelled acetate. Acetate uptake and cumulative methane production were determined and kinetic parameters were estimated using model-based analysis. Pyrosequencing performed on 13C- enriched samples indicated that organisms accumulating labelled carbon were Coprothermobacter (all temperatures between 55 and 65°C), acetoclastic Methanosarcina (55 to 60°C) and hydrogenotrophic Methanothermobacter (60 to 65°C). The increased relative abundance of Coprothermobacter with increased temperature corresponding with a shift to syntrophic acetate oxidation identified this as a potentially key oxidiser. Methanosarcina likely acts as both a hydrogen utilising and acetoclastic methanogen at 55°C, and is replaced by Methanothermobacter as a hydrogen utiliser at higher temperatures. PMID:27490246

  12. Inhibition of Acetoclastic Methanogenesis in Crude Oil- and Creosote-Contaminated Groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warren, E.; Bekins, B.A.; Godsy, E.M.; Smith, V.K.

    2003-01-01

    The inhibition of acetoclastic methanogenesis in crude oil- and creosote-contaminated groundwater was studied. The crude oil and water-soluble components of creosote contributed to the inhibition of acetoclastic methanogens. Acetoclastic methanogenesis was much more susceptible to the toxic inhibition of crude oil and creosote than either hydrogen- or formate-utilizing methanogenesis. The effect of this toxic inhibition was apparent in the population of the methanogenic trophic groups near nonaqueous crude oil at the Bemidji, MN, site. At a crude oil-contaminated site, numbers of acetoclastic methanogens found close to crude oil were 100 times fewer than those of hydrogen- and formate-utilizing methanogens. In laboratory toxicity assays, crude oil collected from the site inhibited methane production from acetate but not from formate or hydrogen. Toxicity assays with aqueous creosote extract completely inhibited acetate utilization over the range of tested dilutions but only mildly affected formate and hydrogen utilization. Wastewater reactor studies indicated that this toxicity would result in a decrease in the biodegradation rate of contaminants at sites where toxic compounds are present.

  13. Improving performance of microbial fuel cell while controlling methanogenesis by Chaetoceros pretreatment of anodic inoculum.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P P; Jadhav, D A; Ghangrekar, M M

    2015-03-01

    Loss of substrate due to methanogenesis reduces Coulombic efficiency (CE) of the microbial fuel cell (MFC) significantly. Hexadecatrienoic acid present in the marine algae Chaetoceros inhibits the growth of methanogenic archaea. Influence of Chaetoceros pre-treated mixed anaerobic sludge on the electrogenic activity of MFC was evaluated. A MFC inoculated with Chaetoceros pre-treated mixed anaerobic sludge demonstrated maximum CE of 45.18%, with volumetric power density of 21.43W/m(3) and current density of 93A/m(3). Cyclic voltammetry indicated higher electron discharge on the anode surface due to suppression of methanogenesis. Tafel analysis also showed a higher exchange current density and a lower Tafel slope and charge transfer resistance, indicating advantage of this pre-treatment method in reducing the cell internal losses. A 60% reduction in specific methanogenic activity was observed in anaerobic sludge pre-treated with Chaetoceros; emphasizing significance of this pretreatment for suppressing methanogenesis and its utility for enhancing electricity generation in MFC.

  14. Experimental burial inhibits methanogenesis and anaerobic decomposition in water-saturated peats.

    PubMed

    Blodau, Christian; Siems, Melanie; Beer, Julia

    2011-12-01

    A mechanistic understanding of carbon (C) sequestration and methane (CH(4)) production is of great interest due to the importance of these processes for the global C budget. Here we demonstrate experimentally, by means of column experiments, that burial of water saturated, anoxic bog peat leads to inactivation of anaerobic respiration and methanogenesis. This effect can be related to the slowness of diffusive transport of solutes and evolving energetic constraints on anaerobic respiration. Burial lowered decomposition constants in homogenized peat sand mixtures from about 10(-5) to 10(-7) yr(-1), which is considerably slower than previously assumed, and methanogenesis slowed down in a similar manner. The latter effect could be related to acetoclastic methanogenesis approaching a minimum energy quantum of -25 kJ mol(-1) (CH(4)). Given the robustness of hydraulic properties that locate the oxic-anoxic boundary near the peatland surface and constrain solute transport deeper into the peat, this effect has likely been critical for building the peatland C store and will continue supporting long-term C sequestration in northern peatlands even under moderately changing climatic conditions.

  15. Methanogenesis and the Wood-Ljungdahl Pathway: An Ancient, Versatile, and Fragile Association.

    PubMed

    Borrel, Guillaume; Adam, Panagiotis S; Gribaldo, Simonetta

    2016-06-13

    Methanogenesis coupled to the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway is one of the most ancient metabolisms for energy generation and carbon fixation in the Archaea. Recent results are sensibly changing our view on the diversity of methane-cycling capabilities in this Domain of Life. The availability of genomic sequences from uncharted branches of the archaeal tree has highlighted the existence of novel methanogenic lineages phylogenetically distant to previously known ones, such as the Methanomassiliicoccales. At the same time, phylogenomic analyses have suggested a methanogenic ancestor for all Archaea, implying multiple independent losses of this metabolism during archaeal diversification. This prediction has been strengthened by the report of genes involved in methane cycling in members of the Bathyarchaeota (a lineage belonging to the TACK clade), representing the first indication of the presence of methanogenesis outside of the Euryarchaeota. In light of these new data, we discuss how the association between methanogenesis and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway appears to be much more flexible than previously thought, and might provide information on the processes that led to loss of this metabolism in many archaeal lineages. The combination of environmental microbiology, experimental characterization and phylogenomics opens up exciting avenues of research to unravel the diversity and evolutionary history of fundamental metabolic pathways.

  16. Methanogenesis and the Wood–Ljungdahl Pathway: An Ancient, Versatile, and Fragile Association

    PubMed Central

    Borrel, Guillaume; Adam, Panagiotis S.; Gribaldo, Simonetta

    2016-01-01

    Methanogenesis coupled to the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway is one of the most ancient metabolisms for energy generation and carbon fixation in the Archaea. Recent results are sensibly changing our view on the diversity of methane-cycling capabilities in this Domain of Life. The availability of genomic sequences from uncharted branches of the archaeal tree has highlighted the existence of novel methanogenic lineages phylogenetically distant to previously known ones, such as the Methanomassiliicoccales. At the same time, phylogenomic analyses have suggested a methanogenic ancestor for all Archaea, implying multiple independent losses of this metabolism during archaeal diversification. This prediction has been strengthened by the report of genes involved in methane cycling in members of the Bathyarchaeota (a lineage belonging to the TACK clade), representing the first indication of the presence of methanogenesis outside of the Euryarchaeota. In light of these new data, we discuss how the association between methanogenesis and the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway appears to be much more flexible than previously thought, and might provide information on the processes that led to loss of this metabolism in many archaeal lineages. The combination of environmental microbiology, experimental characterization and phylogenomics opens up exciting avenues of research to unravel the diversity and evolutionary history of fundamental metabolic pathways. PMID:27189979

  17. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... in the past year. Middle Figure: Driving after marijuana use is more common than driving after alcohol ...

  18. Impaired Driving

    MedlinePlus

    Impaired driving is dangerous. It's the cause of more than half of all car crashes. It means operating a ... texting Having a medical condition which affects your driving For your safety and the safety of others, ...

  19. Differential expression of methanogenesis genes of Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus (formerly Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum) in pure culture and in cocultures with fatty acid-oxidizing syntrophs.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Hui; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Hattori, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2002-03-01

    The expression of genes involved in methanogenesis in a thermophilic hydrogen-utilizing methanogen, Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus strain TM, was investigated both in a pure culture sufficiently supplied with H(2) plus CO(2) and in a coculture with an acetate-oxidizing hydrogen-producing bacterium, Thermacetogenium phaeum strain PB, in which hydrogen partial pressure was constantly kept very low (20 to 80 Pa). Northern blot analysis indicated that only the mcr gene, which encodes methyl coenzyme M reductase I (MRI), catalyzing the final step of methanogenesis, was expressed in the coculture, whereas mcr and mrt, which encodes methyl coenzyme M reductase II (MRII), the isofunctional enzyme of MRI, were expressed at the early to late stage of growth in the pure culture. In contrast to these two genes, two isofunctional genes (mtd and mth) for N(5),N(10)-methylene-tetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the fourth step of methanogenesis, and two hydrogenase genes (frh and mvh) were expressed both in a pure culture and in a coculture at the early and late stages of growth. The same expression pattern was observed for Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus strain DeltaH cocultured with a thermophilic butyrate-oxidizing syntroph, Syntrophothermus lipocalidus strain TGB-C1. Two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of whole proteins of M. thermoautotrophicus strain TM obtained from a pure culture and a coculture with the acetate-oxidizing syntroph and subsequent N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis confirmed that MRI and MRII were produced in the pure culture, while only MRI was produced in the coculture. These results indicate that under syntrophic growth conditions, the methanogen preferentially utilizes MRI but not MRII. Considering that hydrogenotrophic methanogens are strictly dependent for growth on hydrogen-producing fermentative microbes in the natural environment and that the hydrogen supply occurs

  20. 45 CFR 650.6 - Awards not primarily for research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Awards not primarily for research. 650.6 Section 650.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION...: Intellectual Property Rights The National Science Foundation claims no rights to any inventions or...

  1. 45 CFR 650.6 - Awards not primarily for research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Awards not primarily for research. 650.6 Section 650.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION...: Intellectual Property Rights The National Science Foundation claims no rights to any inventions or...

  2. 45 CFR 650.6 - Awards not primarily for research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Awards not primarily for research. 650.6 Section 650.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION...: Intellectual Property Rights The National Science Foundation claims no rights to any inventions or...

  3. Careers in virology: teaching at a primarily undergraduate institution.

    PubMed

    Kushner, David B

    2014-10-01

    A faculty position at a primarily undergraduate institution requires working with undergraduates in both the classroom and the research lab. Graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who are interested in such a career should understand that faculty at these institutions need to teach broadly and devise research questions that can be addressed safely and with limited resources compared to a research I university. Aspects of, and ways to prepare for, this career will be reviewed herein.

  4. Careers in Virology: Teaching at a Primarily Undergraduate Institution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A faculty position at a primarily undergraduate institution requires working with undergraduates in both the classroom and the research lab. Graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who are interested in such a career should understand that faculty at these institutions need to teach broadly and devise research questions that can be addressed safely and with limited resources compared to a research I university. Aspects of, and ways to prepare for, this career will be reviewed herein. PMID:25056885

  5. Multiple evidence for methylotrophic methanogenesis as the dominant methanogenic pathway in hypersaline sediments from the Orca Basin, Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Guang-Chao; Elling, Felix J.; Nigro, Lisa M.; Samarkin, Vladimir; Joye, Samantha B.; Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-08-01

    Among the most extreme habitats on Earth, dark, deep, anoxic brines host unique microbial ecosystems that remain largely unexplored. As the terminal step of anaerobic degradation of organic matter, methanogenesis is a potentially significant but poorly constrained process in deep-sea hypersaline environments. We combined biogeochemical and phylogenetic analyses with incubation experiments to unravel the origin of methane in the hypersaline sediments of Orca Basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Substantial concentrations of methane, up to 3.4 mM, coexisted with high concentrations of sulfate from 16 to 43 mM in two sediment cores retrieved from the northern and southern parts of Orca Basin. The strong depletion of 13C in methane (-77‰ to -89‰) points towards a biological source. While low concentrations of competitive substrates limited the significance of hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis, the presence of non-competitive methylated substrates (methanol, trimethylamine, dimethyl sulfide, dimethylsulfoniopropionate) supported the potential for methane generation through methylotrophic methanogenesis. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrated that hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis were unlikely to occur under in situ conditions, while methylotrophic methanogenesis from a variety of substrates was highly favorable. Likewise, carbon isotope relationships between methylated substrates and methane suggested methylotrophic methanogenesis was the major source of methane. Stable and radio-isotope tracer experiments with 13C-labeled bicarbonate, acetate and methanol and 14C-labeled methylamine indicated that methylotrophic methanogenesis was the predominant methanogenic pathway. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, halophilic methylotrophic methanogens related to the genus Methanohalophilus dominated the benthic archaeal community in the northern basin and also occurred in the southern basin. High abundances of methanogen lipid biomarkers such as

  6. Effect of Gynosaponin on Rumen In vitro Methanogenesis under Different Forage-Concentrate Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Manatbay, Bakhetgul; Cheng, Yanfen; Mao, Shengyong; Zhu, Weiyun

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effects of gynosaponin on in vitro methanogenesis under different forage-concentrate ratios (F:C ratios). Experiment was conducted with two kinds of F:C ratios (F:C = 7:3 and F:C = 3:7) and gynosaponin addition (0 mg and 16 mg) in a 2×2 double factorial design. In the presence of gynosaponin, methane production and acetate concentration were significantly decreased, whereas concentration of propionate tended to be increased resulting in a significant reduction (p<0.05) of acetate:propionate ratio (A:P ratio), in high-forage substrate. Gynosaponin treatment increased (p<0.05) the butyrate concentration in both F:C ratios. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis showed there was no apparent shift in the composition of total bacteria, protozoa and methanogens after treated by gynosaponin under both F:C ratios. The real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis indicated that variable F:C ratios significantly affected the abundances of Fibrobacter succinogenes, Rumninococcus flavefaciens, total fungi and counts of protozoa (p<0.05), but did not affect the mcrA gene copies of methanogens and abundance of total bacteria. Counts of protozoa and abundance of F.succinogenes were decreased significantly (p<0.05), whereas mcrA gene copies of methanogens were decreased slightly (p<0.10) in high-forage substrate after treated by gynosaponin. However, gynosaponin treatment under high-concentrate level did not affect the methanogenesis, fermentation characteristics and tested microbes. Accordingly, overall results suggested that gynosaponin supplementation reduced the in vitro methanogenesis and improved rumen fermentation under high-forage condition by changing the abundances of related rumen microbes. PMID:25083102

  7. Populations of Methane-Producing Bacteria and In Vitro Methanogenesis in Salt Marsh and Estuarine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Jones, William J.; Paynter, Malcolm J. B.

    1980-01-01

    Most probable numbers (MPNs) of methanogens in various salt marsh and estuarine sediments were determined with an anaerobic, habitat-simulating culture medium with 80% H2 plus 20% CO2 as substrate. Average MPNs for the short Spartina (SS) marsh sediments of Sapelo Island, Ga., were maximal at the 5- to 7-cm depth (1.2 × 107/g of dry sediment). Populations decreased to approximately 880/g of dry sediment at the 34- to 36-cm depth. There was no significant difference between summer and winter populations. In tall Spartina (TS) marsh sediments, average populations were maximal (1.2 × 106/g of dry sediment) in the upper 0- to 2-cm zone; populations from the 5- to 36-cm zones were similar (average of 9 × 104/g of dry sediment). Methanogenic populations for TS sediments of James Island Creek marsh, Charleston, S.C., were similar (average of 3 × 106/g of dry sediment) for all depths tested (0 to 22 cm), which was comparable to the trend observed for TS sediments at Sapelo Island, Ga. Sediment grab samples collected along a transect of James Island Creek and its adjacent Spartina marsh had MPNs that were approximately 20 times greater for the region of Spartina growth (average of 106/g of dry sediment) compared with the channel (approximately 5 × 104 methanogens per g of dry sediment). A similar trend was found at Pawley's Island marsh, S.C., but populations were approximately one order of magnitude lower. In vitro rates of methanogenesis with SS sediments incubated under 80% H2-20% CO2 showed that the 5- to 7-cm region exhibited maximal activity (51 nmol of CH4 g−1 h−1), which was greater than rates for sediments above and below this depth. SS sediment samples (5 to 7 cm) incubated under 100% N2 and supplemented with formate exhibited rates of methanogenesis similar to those generated by samples under 80% H2-20% CO2. Replacing the N2 atmosphere with H2 resulted in an eightfold decrease in the rate of methanogenesis. In vitro methanogenic activity by TS salt marsh

  8. Pile Driving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Machine-oriented structural engineering firm TERA, Inc. is engaged in a project to evaluate the reliability of offshore pile driving prediction methods to eventually predict the best pile driving technique for each new offshore oil platform. Phase I Pile driving records of 48 offshore platforms including such information as blow counts, soil composition and pertinent construction details were digitized. In Phase II, pile driving records were statistically compared with current methods of prediction. Result was development of modular software, the CRIPS80 Software Design Analyzer System, that companies can use to evaluate other prediction procedures or other data bases.

  9. Distracted driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... the road Your hands on the wheel Your mind on driving Distracted driving occurs when something gets in the way of you doing all 3 things. Examples include: Talking on a cell phone Reading or sending text messages Eating and drinking Grooming ( ...

  10. Phylogenomic Data Support a Seventh Order of Methylotrophic Methanogens and Provide Insights into the Evolution of Methanogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Borrel, Guillaume; O’Toole, Paul W.; Harris, Hugh M.B.; Peyret, Pierre; Brugère, Jean-François; Gribaldo, Simonetta

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence from sequence data from various environments, including the human gut, suggests the existence of a previously unknown putative seventh order of methanogens. The first genomic data from members of this lineage, Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis and “Candidatus Methanomethylophilus alvus,” provide insights into its evolutionary history and metabolic features. Phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal proteins robustly indicates a monophyletic group independent of any previously known methanogenic order, which shares ancestry with the Marine Benthic Group D, the Marine Group II, the DHVE2 group, and the Thermoplasmatales. This phylogenetic position, along with the analysis of enzymes involved in core methanogenesis, strengthens a single ancient origin of methanogenesis in the Euryarchaeota and indicates further multiple independent losses of this metabolism in nonmethanogenic lineages than previously suggested. Genomic analysis revealed an unprecedented loss of the genes coding for the first six steps of methanogenesis from H2/CO2 and the oxidative part of methylotrophic methanogenesis, consistent with the fact that M. luminyensis and “Ca. M. alvus” are obligate H2-dependent methylotrophic methanogens. Genomic data also suggest that these methanogens may use a large panel of methylated compounds. Phylogenetic analysis including homologs retrieved from environmental samples indicates that methylotrophic methanogenesis (regardless of dependency on H2) is not restricted to gut representatives but may be an ancestral characteristic of the whole order, and possibly also of ancient origin in the Euryarchaeota. 16S rRNA and McrA trees show that this new order of methanogens is very diverse and occupies environments highly relevant for methane production, therefore representing a key lineage to fully understand the diversity and evolution of methanogenesis. PMID:23985970

  11. Activation of methanogenesis by cadmium in the marine archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    PubMed

    Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Santiago-Martínez, M Geovanni; Hernández-Juárez, Viridiana; García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Methanosarcina acetivorans was cultured in the presence of CdCl(2) to determine the metal effect on cell growth and biogas production. With methanol as substrate, cell growth and methane synthesis were not altered by cadmium, whereas with acetate, cadmium slightly increased both, growth and methane rate synthesis. In cultures metabolically active, incubations for short-term (minutes) with 10 µM total cadmium increased the methanogenesis rate by 6 and 9 folds in methanol- and acetate-grown cells, respectively. Cobalt and zinc but not copper or iron also activated the methane production rate. Methanogenic carbonic anhydrase and acetate kinase were directly activated by cadmium. Indeed, cells cultured in 100 µM total cadmium removed 41-69% of the heavy metal from the culture and accumulated 231-539 nmol Cd/mg cell protein. This is the first report showing that (i) Cd(2+) has an activating effect on methanogenesis, a biotechnological relevant process in the bio-fuels field; and (ii) a methanogenic archaea is able to remove a heavy metal from aquatic environments.

  12. Activation of Methanogenesis by Cadmium in the Marine Archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans

    PubMed Central

    Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Santiago-Martínez, M. Geovanni; Hernández-Juárez, Viridiana; García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Methanosarcina acetivorans was cultured in the presence of CdCl2 to determine the metal effect on cell growth and biogas production. With methanol as substrate, cell growth and methane synthesis were not altered by cadmium, whereas with acetate, cadmium slightly increased both, growth and methane rate synthesis. In cultures metabolically active, incubations for short-term (minutes) with 10 µM total cadmium increased the methanogenesis rate by 6 and 9 folds in methanol- and acetate-grown cells, respectively. Cobalt and zinc but not copper or iron also activated the methane production rate. Methanogenic carbonic anhydrase and acetate kinase were directly activated by cadmium. Indeed, cells cultured in 100 µM total cadmium removed 41–69% of the heavy metal from the culture and accumulated 231–539 nmol Cd/mg cell protein. This is the first report showing that (i) Cd2+ has an activating effect on methanogenesis, a biotechnological relevant process in the bio-fuels field; and (ii) a methanogenic archaea is able to remove a heavy metal from aquatic environments. PMID:23152802

  13. Pilot-scale two-stage process: a combination of acidogenic hydrogenesis and methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Han, S K; Kim, S H; Kim, H W; Shin, H S

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed to optimize both acidogenic hydrogenesis and methanogenesis, and then to develop a pilot-scale two-stage process producing not only CH4 but also H2. Firstly, acidogenic hydrogenesis of food waste was examined in pilot-scale leaching-bed reactors using dilution rate (D) as a tool to improve the environmental conditions. The maximum efficiency of 71.4% was obtained by adjusting D from 4.5 to 2.5 d(-1) depending on the state of degradation. Secondly, the wastewater from acidogenic hydrogenesis was converted to CH4 in a pilot-scale UASB reactor. The COD removal efficiency exceeded 95% up to the loading rates of 13.1 g COD/Ld, which corresponded to HRT of 0.25 d (6 h). Lastly, a pilot-scale two-stage process was devised based on a combination of acidogenic hydrogenesis and methanogenesis. Over 120 days, the pilot-scale process resulted in large VS reduction of 70.9% at the high loading rate of 12.5 kg VS/m3/d in a short SRT of 8 days.

  14. The toxicity of selected gasoline components to glucose methanogenesis by aquifer microorganisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mormile, Melanie R.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Six model hydrocarbons, representing various classes of chemicals found in gasoline, and methyl ethyl ketone, were assayed for their inhibitory effect on glucose methanogenesis in slurries prepared from aquifer sediments and ground water. Biogas (CH4and CO2) production was monitored with an automated pressure transducer system. Benzene, 1-methyl naphthalene, and methyltert-butyl ether (MTBE) were found to have no inhibitory influence on biogas production rates at concentrations up to 71·7 mg/L. Similarly, octane, cyclohexane, indan, and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) were found to have only marginal negative effects on the rate of biogas production in aquifer slurries, at concentrations ranging from 51·7 to 72·1 mg/L. Thus, gasoline components had low apparent toxicities to microorganisms responsible for glucose methanogenesis in aquifier slurries. As the concentrations of the assayed hydrocarbons are about 100 times those typically reported after an aquifer has been contaminated with gasoline, it is unlikely that individual hydrocarbons will substantially impact anaerobic metabolic processes.

  15. Tetrahydromethanopterin-dependent methanogenesis from non-physiological C1 donors in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum.

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Semerena, J C; Wolfe, R S

    1985-01-01

    Methanogenesis from the non-physiological C1 donors thioproline, thiazolidine, hexamethylenetetramine, formaldehyde (HCHO), and HOCH2-S-coenzyme M (CoM) was catalyzed by cell extracts of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum under a hydrogen atmosphere. Tetrahydromethanopterin (H4MPT) and HS-CoM were required in the reaction mixture. The non-physiological compounds were found to be in chemical equilibrium with HCHO, which has been shown to react spontaneously with H4MPT to form methylene-H4MPT, an intermediate of the methanogenic pathway at the formaldehyde level of oxidation. Highfield (360 MHZ) 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance studies performed on the interaction between HCHO and HS-CoM showed that these compounds are in equilibrium with HOCH2-S-CoM and that the equilibrium is pH dependent. When methanogenesis from the non-physiological donors was followed under a nitrogen atmosphere, the C1 moiety from each compound underwent a disproportionation, forming methenyl-H4MPT+ and methane. The compounds tested served as substrates for the enzymatic synthesis of methenyl-H4MPT+. PMID:3838170

  16. The Effect of Saturated Fatty Acids on Methanogenesis and Cell Viability of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Meile, Leo; Kreuzer, Michael; Zeitz, Johanna O.

    2013-01-01

    Saturated fatty acids (SFAs) are known to suppress ruminal methanogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are not well known. In the present study, inhibition of methane formation, cell membrane permeability (potassium efflux), and survival rate (LIVE/DEAD staining) of pure ruminal Methanobrevibacter ruminantium (DSM 1093) cell suspensions were tested for a number of SFAs. Methane production rate was not influenced by low concentrations of lauric (C12; 1 μg/mL), myristic (C14; 1 and 5 μg/mL), or palmitic (C16; 3 and 5 μg/mL) acids, while higher concentrations were inhibitory. C12 and C14 were most inhibitory. Stearic acid (C18), tested at 10–80 μg/mL and ineffective at 37°C, decreased methane production rate by half or more at 50°C and ≥50 μg/mL. Potassium efflux was triggered by SFAs (C12 = C14 > C16 > C18 = control), corroborating data on methane inhibition. Moreover, the exposure to C12 and C14 decreased cell viability to close to zero, while 40% of control cells remained alive after 24 h. Generally, tested SFAs inhibited methanogenesis, increased cell membrane permeability, and decreased survival of M. ruminantium in a dose- and time-dependent way. These results give new insights into how the methane suppressing effect of SFAs could be mediated in methanogens. PMID:23710130

  17. The effect of saturated fatty acids on methanogenesis and cell viability of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Meile, Leo; Kreuzer, Michael; Zeitz, Johanna O

    2013-01-01

    Saturated fatty acids (SFAs) are known to suppress ruminal methanogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are not well known. In the present study, inhibition of methane formation, cell membrane permeability (potassium efflux), and survival rate (LIVE/DEAD staining) of pure ruminal Methanobrevibacter ruminantium (DSM 1093) cell suspensions were tested for a number of SFAs. Methane production rate was not influenced by low concentrations of lauric (C12; 1 μg/mL), myristic (C14; 1 and 5 μg/mL), or palmitic (C16; 3 and 5 μg/mL) acids, while higher concentrations were inhibitory. C12 and C14 were most inhibitory. Stearic acid (C18), tested at 10-80 μg/mL and ineffective at 37°C, decreased methane production rate by half or more at 50°C and ≥50 μg/mL. Potassium efflux was triggered by SFAs (C12 = C14 > C16 > C18 = control), corroborating data on methane inhibition. Moreover, the exposure to C12 and C14 decreased cell viability to close to zero, while 40% of control cells remained alive after 24 h. Generally, tested SFAs inhibited methanogenesis, increased cell membrane permeability, and decreased survival of M. ruminantium in a dose- and time-dependent way. These results give new insights into how the methane suppressing effect of SFAs could be mediated in methanogens.

  18. Limits to Dihydrogen Incorporation into Electron Sinks Alternative to Methanogenesis in Ruminal Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ungerfeld, Emilio M.

    2015-01-01

    Research is being conducted with the objective of decreasing methane (CH4) production in the rumen, as methane emissions from ruminants are environmentally damaging and a loss of digestible energy to ruminants. Inhibiting ruminal methanogenesis generally results in accumulation of dihydrogen (H2), which is energetically inefficient and can inhibit fermentation. It would be nutritionally beneficial to incorporate accumulated H2 into propionate or butyrate production, or reductive acetogenesis. The objective of this analysis was to examine three possible physicochemical limitations to the incorporation of accumulated H2 into propionate and butyrate production, and reductive acetogenesis, in methanogenesis-inhibited ruminal batch and continuous cultures: (i) Thermodynamics; (ii) Enzyme kinetics; (iii) Substrate kinetics. Batch (N = 109) and continuous (N = 43) culture databases of experiments with at least 50% inhibition in CH4 production were used in this meta-analysis. Incorporation of accumulated H2 into propionate production and reductive acetogenesis seemed to be thermodynamically feasible but quite close to equilibrium, whereas this was less clear for butyrate. With regard to enzyme kinetics, it was speculated that hydrogenases of ruminal microorganisms may have evolved toward high-affinity and low maximal velocity to compete for traces of H2, rather than for high pressure accumulated H2. Responses so far obtained to the addition of propionate production intermediates do not allow distinguishing between thermodynamic and substrate kinetics control. PMID:26635743

  19. Immunization against Rumen Methanogenesis by Vaccination with a New Recombinant Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Litai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Xue, Bai; Peng, Quanhui; Wang, Zhisheng; Yan, Tianhai; Wang, Lizhi

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination through recombinant proteins against rumen methanogenesis provides a mitigation approach to reduce enteric methane (CH4) emissions in ruminants. The objective of present study was to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of a new vaccine candidate protein (EhaF) on methanogenesis and microbial population in the rumen of goats. We amplified the gene mru 1407 encoding protein EhaF using fresh rumen fluid samples of mature goats and successfully expressed recombinant protein (EhaF) in Escherichia coli Rosetta. This product was evaluated using 12 mature goats with half for control and other half injected with 400ug/goat the purified recombinant protein in day 1 and two subsequent booster immunizations in day 35 and 49. All measurements were undertaken from 63 to 68 days after the initial vaccination, with CH4 emissions determined using respiration calorimeter chambers. The results showed that the vaccination caused intensive immune responses in serum and saliva, although it had no significant effect on total enteric CH4 emissions and methanogen population in the rumen, when compared with the control goats. However, the vaccination altered the composition of rumen bacteria, especially the abundance of main phylum Firmicutes and genus Prevotella. The results indicate that protein EhaF might not be an effective vaccine to reduce enteric CH4 emissions but our vaccine have potential to influence the rumen ecosystem of goats. PMID:26445479

  20. Transmethylation reactions during methanogenesis from acetate in Methanosarcina barkeri. [Annual report], August 1, 1991--April 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Krzycki, J.A.

    1993-07-01

    Methanosarcina possesses an abundance corrinoid, which acts as enzyme prosthetic group and functions in methyl transfer reactions. When this work was initiated only two corrinoid proteins had been described from Methanosarcina: methyltransferase I, which catalyses the first step m methanogenesis from methanol; and the corrinoid/iron sulfur protein, which is the primary methyl accepting group in the cleavage of acetyl-CoA during methanogenesis from acetate. Using our technique of in vitro methylation of corrinoid proteins by radioactive methanogenic substrates we have found several novel corrinoid proteins are present in this organism which can function as methytransferases, which are methylated by growth substrate, and are apparently regulated by growth substrate.

  1. Human punishment is not primarily motivated by inequality

    PubMed Central

    Marczyk, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    Previous theorizing about punishment has suggested that humans desire to punish inequality per se. However, the research supporting such an interpretation contains important methodological confounds. The main objective of the current experiment was to remove those confounds in order to test whether generating inequality per se is punished. Participants were recruited from an online market to take part in a wealth-alteration game with an ostensible second player. The participants were given an option to deduct from the other player’s payment as punishment for their behavior during the game. The results suggest that human punishment does not appear to be motivated by inequality per se, as inequality that was generated without inflicting costs on others was not reliably punished. Instead, punishment seems to respond primarily to the infliction of costs, with inequality only becoming relevant as a secondary input for punishment decisions. The theoretical significance of this finding is discussed in the context of its possible adaptive value. PMID:28187166

  2. Human punishment is not primarily motivated by inequality.

    PubMed

    Marczyk, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    Previous theorizing about punishment has suggested that humans desire to punish inequality per se. However, the research supporting such an interpretation contains important methodological confounds. The main objective of the current experiment was to remove those confounds in order to test whether generating inequality per se is punished. Participants were recruited from an online market to take part in a wealth-alteration game with an ostensible second player. The participants were given an option to deduct from the other player's payment as punishment for their behavior during the game. The results suggest that human punishment does not appear to be motivated by inequality per se, as inequality that was generated without inflicting costs on others was not reliably punished. Instead, punishment seems to respond primarily to the infliction of costs, with inequality only becoming relevant as a secondary input for punishment decisions. The theoretical significance of this finding is discussed in the context of its possible adaptive value.

  3. Dementia & Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregiver Resource Center Family Care Navigator Research Registry Support Groups Caregiver Stories Connections e-Newsletter FCA+(plus) Services ... be like if you could no longer drive. Support groups provide a good venue for both the caregivers ...

  4. Thermophilic sulfate reduction and methanogenesis with methanol in a high rate anaerobic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Weijma, J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Pol, L.W.H.; Lettinga, G.

    2000-02-05

    Sulfate reduction outcompeted methanogenesis at 65 C and pH 7.5 in methanol and sulfate-fed expanded granular sludge bed reactors operated at hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 14 and 2.5 h, both under methanol-limiting and methanol-overloading conditions. After 100 and 50 days for the reactors operated at 14 and 3.5 h, respectively, sulfide production accounted for 80% of the methanol-COD consumed by the sludge. The specific methanogenic activity on methanol of the sludge from a reactor operated at HRTs of down to 3.5 h for a period of 4 months gradually decreased from 0.83 gCOD {sm_bullet} gVSS{sup {minus}1} {sm_bullet} day{sup {minus}1} at the start to a value of less than 0.05 gCOD {sm_bullet} gVSS{sup {minus}1} {sm_bullet} day{sup {minus}1}, showing that the relative number of methanogens decreased and eventually became very low. By contrast, the increase of the specific sulfidogenic activity of sludge from 0.22 gCOD {sm_bullet} gVSS{sup {minus}1} {sm_bullet} day{sup {minus}1} to a final value of 1.05 gCOD {sm_bullet} gVSS{sup {minus}1} {sm_bullet} day{sup {minus}1} showed that sulfate reducing bacteria were enriched. Methanol degradation by a methanogenic culture obtained from a reactor by serial dilution of the sludge was inhibited in the presence of vancomycin, indicating that methanogenesis directly from methanogenic culture obtained from a reactor by serial dilution of the sludge was inhibited in the presence of vancomycin, indicating that methanogenesis directly from methanol was not important. H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and formate, but not acetate, were degraded to methane in the presence of vancomycin. These results indicated that methanol degradation to methane occurs via the intermediates H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and formate. The high and low specific methanogenic activity of sludge on H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and formate, respectively, indicated that the former substrate probably acts as the main electron donor for the methanogens during methanol degradation. As

  5. Incorporating H2 Dynamics and Inhibition into a Microbially Based Methanogenesis Model for Restored Wetland Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, David; Jaffe, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Estimates of global CH4 emissions from wetlands indicate that wetlands are the largest natural source of CH4 to the atmosphere. In this paper, we propose that there is a missing component to these models that should be addressed. CH4 is produced in wetland sediments from the microbial degradation of organic carbon through multiple fermentation steps and methanogenesis pathways. There are multiple sources of carbon for methananogenesis; in vegetated wetland sediments, microbial communities consume root exudates as a major source of organic carbon. In many methane models propionate is used as a model carbon molecule. This simple sugar is fermented into acetate and H2, acetate is transformed to methane and CO2, while the H2 and CO2 are used to form an additional CH4 molecule. The hydrogenotrophic pathway involves the equilibrium of two dissolved gases, CH4 and H2. In an effort to limit CH4 emissions from wetlands, there has been growing interest in finding ways to limit plant transport of soil gases through root systems. Changing planted species, or genetically modifying new species of plants may control this transport of soil gases. While this may decrease the direct emissions of methane, there is little understanding about how H2 dynamics may feedback into overall methane production. The results of an incubation study were combined with a new model of propionate degradation for methanogenesis that also examines other natural parameters (i.e. gas transport through plants). This presentation examines how we would expect this model to behave in a natural field setting with changing sulfate and carbon loading schemes. These changes can be controlled through new plant species and other management practices. Next, we compare the behavior of two variations of this model, with or without the incorporation of H2 interactions, with changing sulfate, carbon loading and root volatilization. Results show that while the models behave similarly there may be a discrepancy of nearly

  6. Cryopreservation of primarily isolated porcine hepatocytes with UW solution.

    PubMed

    Kunieda, Takemi; Maruyama, Masanobu; Okitsu, Teru; Shibata, Norikuni; Takesue, Michihiko; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Kosaka, Yoshikazu; Arata, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Ikeda, Hideaki; Oshita, Mizuko; Nakaji, Shuhei; Ohmoto, Kenji; Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Kurabayashi, Yuzuru; Kodama, Makoto; Tanaka, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Naoya

    2003-01-01

    Development of liver-targeted cell therapies, such as hepatocyte transplantation and bioartificial livers, requires a large amount of functional hepatocytes as needed. To achieve this development, establishing an excellent cryopreservation method of hepatocytes is an extremely important issue. Therefore, we performed a comparative review of cryoprotective effects of various cryopreservation solutions using primarily isolated porcine hepatocytes. Porcine hepatocytes were isolated with a four-step dispase and collagenase perfusion method. The obtained hepatocytes with the initial viabilities of 76%, 84%, and 96% were assigned to the following four groups for cryopreservation at -80 degrees C: Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) + 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) + 12% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (group A), University of Wisconsin (UW) solution + 12% DMSO (group B), Cell Banker 1 (group C), and Cell Banker 2 (group D). The hepatocytes in each group were thawed at 3 days, 10 days, and 5 months of cryopreservation and subjected to comparative analyses, including viability, plating efficiency, LDH release, ammonia removal test, and lentiviral gene transfer. These parameters were the most favorable in the hepatocytes cryopreserved with UW solution. Approximately 5% of thawed cryopreserved porcine hepatocytes expressed LacZ activity after lentiviral transduction. Intrasplenic transplantation of UW solution-cryopreserved hepatocytes improved the survival of rats treated with D-galactosamine. UW solution maintained the functions of cryopreserved porcine hepatocytes.

  7. Methanogenesis in the hot and deep: implication for the deep biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, K.; Nakamura, K.; Toki, T.; Tsunogai, U.

    2008-12-01

    Microbial methanogenesis in the deep-sea and deep subseafloor is a key process in the carbon cycle of Earth. Hyperthermophilic methanogens are important primary producers in the deep, hot ecosystem and may represent the most ancient type of life flourishing in the early Earth. Nevertheless, the biogeochemical function and impact of methanogens in deep sea and deep subseafloor are poorly understood, in part because it is difficult to replicate the high temperatures and hydrostatic pressures in the laboratory. We develop a new technique for cultivation of chemolithoautotrophs under high hydrostatic pressures. Using this technique, growth, survival and methane production of a newly isolated, hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanopyrus kandleri strain 116 are characterized under high temperatures and hydrostatic pressures. The results renewed the previous record of upper temperature limit (UTL) for life and the stable carbon isotopic fractionation of the microbiological methane production. These new findings are of great implication for the limits of life and function in the deep biosphere.

  8. HLH Drive System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    M4 1" 4 C. C, 4 10 rYV .104 14144 \\- // S/ / " I 3.025 DPII 36 TEETH 2 n )r lj < ~( NEW ) _ _ _ 7986 RPM Figure 40. Combiner Configuration 6, Reference...based on testing of th le CH- 4 ` -7 •-• ’’• stage p lanet bearing , primarily from fa ilures in the • : , - gram of Reference 19. The test results are...USAAMRDL-TR-77-38 r, . . HLH DRIVE SYSTEM -I Boeing Vertol Company P.O. Box 16858 4 • Philadelphia, Pa. 19142 0 September 1977 4Q Final Report

  9. Pathogenic Leptospira interrogans Exoproteins Are Primarily Involved in Heterotrophic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Azad; Pappalardo, Elisa; Hester, Svenja; Thomas, Benjamin; Pretre, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a life-threatening and emerging zoonotic disease with a worldwide annual occurrence of more than 1 million cases. Leptospirosis is caused by spirochetes belonging to the genus Leptospira. The mechanisms of disease manifestation in the host remain elusive, and the roles of leptospiral exoproteins in these processes have yet to be determined. Our aim in this study was to assess the composition and quantity of exoproteins of pathogenic Leptospira interrogans and to construe how these proteins contribute to disease pathogenesis. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry of proteins obtained from Leptospira spirochetes cultured in vitro under conditions mimicking infection identified 325 exoproteins. The majority of these proteins are conserved in the nonpathogenic species Leptospira biflexa, and proteins involved in metabolism and energy-generating functions were overrepresented and displayed the highest relative abundance in culture supernatants. Conversely, proteins of unknown function, which represent the majority of pathogen-specific proteins (presumably involved in virulence mechanisms), were underrepresented. Characterization of various L. interrogans exoprotein mutants in the animal infection model revealed host mortality rates similar to those of hosts infected with wild-type L. interrogans. Collectively, these results indicate that pathogenic Leptospira exoproteins primarily function in heterotrophic processes (the processes by which organisms utilize organic substances as nutrient sources) to maintain the saprophytic lifestyle rather than the virulence of the bacteria. The underrepresentation of proteins homologous to known virulence factors, such as toxins and effectors in the exoproteome, also suggests that disease manifesting from Leptospira infection is likely caused by a combination of the primary and potentially moonlight functioning of exoproteins. PMID:25987703

  10. Effects of Coconut Materials on In vitro Ruminal Methanogenesis and Fermentation Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, E. T.; Park, C. G.; Lim, D. H.; Kwon, E. G.; Ki, K. S.; Kim, S. B.; Moon, Y. H.; Shin, N. H.; Lee, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effects of coconut materials on ruminal methanogenesis and fermentation characteristics, in particular their effectiveness for mitigating ruminal methanogenesis. Fistulated Holstein cows were used as the donor of rumen fluid. Coconut materials were added to an in vitro fermentation incubated with rumen fluid-buffer mixture and timothy substrate for 24 h incubation. Total gas production, gas profiles, total volatile fatty acids (tVFAs) and the ruminal methanogens diversity were measured. Although gas profiles in added coconut oil and coconut powder were not significantly different, in vitro ruminal methane production was decreased with the level of reduction between 15% and 19% as compared to control, respectively. Coconut oil and coconut powder also inhibited gas production. The tVFAs concentration was increased by coconut materials, but was not affected significantly as compared to control. Acetate concentration was significantly lower (p<0.05), while propionate was significantly higher (p<0.05) by addition of the coconut materials than that of the control. The acetate:propionate ratio was significantly lowered with addition of coconut oil and coconut powder (p<0.05). The methanogens and ciliate-associated methanogens in all added coconut materials were shown to decrease as compared with control. This study showed that ciliate-associated methanogens diversity was reduced by more than 50% in both coconut oil and coconut powder treatments. In conclusion, these results indicate that coconut powder is a potential agent for decreasing in vitro ruminal methane production and as effective as coconut oil. PMID:25358365

  11. High-rate hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis for biogas upgrading: the role of anaerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng; Gong, Shufen; Sun, Yuanzi; Ma, Hailing; Zheng, Mingyue; Wang, Kaijun

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis has been proved to be a feasible biological method for biogas upgrading. To improve its performance, the feasibility of typical anaerobic granules as the inoculum was investigated in both batch and continuous experiments. The results from batch experiments showed that glucose-acclimated granules seemed to perform better than granules acclimated to acidified products (AP, i.e. acetate, propionate and ethanol) in in situ biogas upgrading systems and a slightly higher H2 consumption rate (1.5 mmol H2 g VSS(-1) h(-1)) was obtained for glucose-acclimated granules. For AP-acclimated granules, the inhibition on anaerobic digestion and pH increase (up to 9.55±0.16) took place, and the upgrading performance was adversely affected. In contrast, better performance for AP-acclimated granules was observed in ex situ systems, possibly due to their higher hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activities (HMA). Moreover, when gas-liquid mass transfer limitations were alleviated, the upgrading performance was significantly improved (three-fold) for both glucose-acclimated and AP-acclimated granules. The HMA of anaerobic granules could be further enhanced to improve biogas upgrading performance via continuous cultivation with H2/CO2 as the sole substrate. During the three months' cultivation, secondary granulation and microbial population shift were observed, but anaerobic granules still remained intact and their HMA increased from 0.2 to 0.6 g COD g VSS(-1) d(-1). It indicated that the formation of hydrogenotrophic methanogenic granules, a new type of anaerobic granules specialized for high-rate hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and biogas upgrading, might be possible. Conclusively, anaerobic granules showed great potential for biogas upgrading.

  12. Modeling the Interaction of H2 on Root Exudate Degradation and Methanogenesis in Wetland Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, D. S.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    CH4 is produced in wetland sediments from the microbial degradation of organic carbon through multiple fermentation steps and methanogenesis pathways. There are many potential sources of carbon for methananogenesis; in vegetated wetland sediments, microbial communities consume root exudates as a major source of organic carbon. In many methane models propionate is used as a model carbon molecule. This simple sugar is fermented into acetate and H2, acetate is transformed to methane and CO2 while the H2 and CO2 is synthesized to form an additional CH4 molecule. The hydrogenotrophic pathway involves the equilibrium of two dissolved gases, CH4 and H2. In an effort to limit CH4 emissions from wetlands, there has been growing interest in finding ways to limit plant transport of soil gases through root systems. While this may decrease the direct emissions of methane, there is little understanding about how H2 dynamics may feedback into overall methane production. Since H2 is used in methane production and produced in propionate fermentation, increased subsurface H2 concentrations can simultaneously inhibit propionate fermentation and acetate production and enhance hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. For this study, we incubated soil samples from vegetated wetland sediments with propionate or acetate and four different hydrogen concentrations. The headspaces from these incubations were simultaneously analyzed for H2 and CH4 at multiple time points over two months. The comparison of methane production between different hydrogen concentrations and different carbon sources can indicate which process is most affected by increased hydrogen concentrations. The results from this study were combined with a newly formulated steady-state model of propionate degradation and formation of methane, that also accounts for the venting off both gases via plants. The resulting model indicates how methane production and emissions would be affected by plant volatilization.

  13. Anaerobic mineralization of indigenous organic matters and methanogenesis in tropical wetland soils

    SciTech Connect

    Miyajima, Toshihiro; Wada, Eitaro; Hanba, Yuko T.; Vijarnsorn, P.

    1997-09-01

    Tropical wetlands are one of the largest natural sources in the global methane budget due to high biological activities and the anaerobiosis in soil. We studied mineralization and gas production during the early stage of anaerobic decomposition of indigenous organic matters in soils of Narathiwat, southern Thailand, to clarify the significance of the substrate quality in controlling decomposition and methanogenesis in some different tropical wetland soils. The optimal temperature of decomposition was around 35{degrees}C, while methanogenesis did not proceed at 45{degrees}C. During the first 50 days of anaerobic incubation, 5 {approximately} 63% (carbon basis) of indigeneous plant leaves were mineralized. The mineralization rate was strongly and negatively correlated with the lignin and/or fiber contents, but not the C/N ratio, of the substrate plant materials. Difference in {delta}{sup 13}C between the substrate, indicating that H{sub 2} as opposed to acetate becomes a more important metabolic intermediate in the anaerobic food web when the decomposition rate is limited by substrate recalcitrance. Thus, the CH{sub 4} isotope signature may be used to evaluate the importance of new vs. old organic matter as CH{sub 4} isotope signature may be used to evaluate the importance of new vs. old organic matter as CH{sub 4} source in natural soils. The mineralization rate was higher, and the isotopic difference between the substrate and CH{sub 4} was smaller when plant materials were incubated with sulfate-contaminated soils than with native peat soils. The isotopic difference between the substrate and CH{sub 4} was significantly different between native peat soils. Results of a tracer experiment using {sup 13}C-labeled substrates indicated that these differences could be ascribed to difference in the mode of acetate metabolism between soils. 49 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. The kinetics of process dependent ammonia inhibition of methanogenesis from acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher Allen; Novak, John; Takacs, Imre; Wett, Bernhard; Murthy, Sudhir

    2012-12-01

    Advanced anaerobic digestion processes aimed at improving the methanization of sewage sludge may be potentially impaired by the production of inhibitory compounds (e.g. free ammonia). The result of methanogenic inhibition is relatively high effluent concentrations of acetic acid and other soluble organics, as well as reduced methane yields. An extreme example of such an advanced process is the thermal hydrolytic pretreatment of sludge prior to high solids digestion (THD). Compared to a conventional mesophilic anaerobic digestion process (MAD), THD operates in a state of constant inhibition driven by high free ammonia concentrations, and elevated pH values. As such, previous investigations of the kinetics of methanogenesis from acetic acid under uninhibited conditions do not necessarily apply well to the modeling of extreme processes such as THD. By conducting batch ammonia toxicity assays using biomass from THD and MAD reactors, we compared the response of these communities over a broad range of ammonia inhibition. For both processes, increased inhibitor concentrations resulted in a reduction of biomass growth rate (r(max) = μ(max)∙X) and a resulting decrease in the substrate half saturation coefficient (K(S)). These two parameters exhibited a high degree of correlation, suggesting that for a constant transport limited system, the K(S) was mostly a linear function of the growth rate. After correcting for reactor pH and temperature, we found that the THD and MAD biomass were both able to perform methanogenesis from acetate at high free ammonia concentrations (equivalent to 3-5 g/L total ammonia nitrogen), albeit at less than 30% of their respective maximum rates. The reduction in methane production was slightly less pronounced for the THD biomass than for MAD, suggesting that the long term exposure to ammonia had selected for a methanogenic pathway less dependent on those organisms most sensitive to ammonia inhibition (i.e. aceticlastic methanogens).

  15. Disk Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A new material known as AlBeMet, developed by Brush Wellman for research applications in the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program, is now used for high performance disk drives. AlBeMet is a compression of aluminum, beryllium metal matrix composite. It reduces system weight and its high thermal conductivity can effectively remove heat and increase an electrical system's lifetime. The lighter, stiffer AlBeMet (AlBeMet 160) used in the disk drive means heads can be moved faster, improving disk performance.

  16. Mechanism for stabilizing mRNAs involved in methanol-dependent methanogenesis of cold-adaptive Methanosarcina mazei zm-15.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Li, Jie; Jiang, Na; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2014-02-01

    Methylotrophic methanogenesis predominates at low temperatures in the cold Zoige wetland in Tibet. To elucidate the basis of cold-adapted methanogenesis in these habitats, Methanosarcina mazei zm-15 was isolated, and the molecular basis of its cold activity was studied. For this strain, aceticlastic methanogenesis was reduced 7.7-fold during growth at 15°C versus 30°C. Methanol-derived methanogenesis decreased only 3-fold under the same conditions, suggesting that it is more cold adaptive. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) detected <2-fold difference in the transcript abundances of mtaA1, mtaB1, and mtaC1, the methanol methyltransferase (Mta) genes, in 30°C versus 15°C culture, while ackA and pta mRNAs, encoding acetate kinase (Ack) and phosphotransacetylase (Pta) in aceticlastic methanogenesis, were 4.5- and 6.8-fold higher in 30°C culture than in 15°C culture. The in vivo half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs were similar in 30°C and 15°C cultures. However, the pta-ackA mRNA half-life was significantly reduced in 15°C culture compared to 30°C culture. Using circularized RNA RT-PCR, large 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) (270 nucleotides [nt] and 238 nt) were identified for mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs, while only a 27-nt 5' UTR was present in the pta-ackA transcript. Removal of the 5' UTRs significantly reduced the in vitro half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs. Remarkably, fusion of the mtaA1 or mtaC1B1 5' UTRs to pta-ackA mRNA increased its in vitro half-life at both 30°C and 15°C. These results demonstrate that the large 5' UTRs significantly enhance the stability of the mRNAs involved in methanol-derived methanogenesis in the cold-adaptive M. mazei zm-15.

  17. Mechanism for Stabilizing mRNAs Involved in Methanol-Dependent Methanogenesis of Cold-Adaptive Methanosarcina mazei zm-15

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yi; Li, Jie; Jiang, Na

    2014-01-01

    Methylotrophic methanogenesis predominates at low temperatures in the cold Zoige wetland in Tibet. To elucidate the basis of cold-adapted methanogenesis in these habitats, Methanosarcina mazei zm-15 was isolated, and the molecular basis of its cold activity was studied. For this strain, aceticlastic methanogenesis was reduced 7.7-fold during growth at 15°C versus 30°C. Methanol-derived methanogenesis decreased only 3-fold under the same conditions, suggesting that it is more cold adaptive. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) detected <2-fold difference in the transcript abundances of mtaA1, mtaB1, and mtaC1, the methanol methyltransferase (Mta) genes, in 30°C versus 15°C culture, while ackA and pta mRNAs, encoding acetate kinase (Ack) and phosphotransacetylase (Pta) in aceticlastic methanogenesis, were 4.5- and 6.8-fold higher in 30°C culture than in 15°C culture. The in vivo half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs were similar in 30°C and 15°C cultures. However, the pta-ackA mRNA half-life was significantly reduced in 15°C culture compared to 30°C culture. Using circularized RNA RT-PCR, large 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) (270 nucleotides [nt] and 238 nt) were identified for mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs, while only a 27-nt 5′ UTR was present in the pta-ackA transcript. Removal of the 5′ UTRs significantly reduced the in vitro half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs. Remarkably, fusion of the mtaA1 or mtaC1B1 5′ UTRs to pta-ackA mRNA increased its in vitro half-life at both 30°C and 15°C. These results demonstrate that the large 5′ UTRs significantly enhance the stability of the mRNAs involved in methanol-derived methanogenesis in the cold-adaptive M. mazei zm-15. PMID:24317083

  18. The impacts of drying and rewetting cycles on potential methanogenesis in wetland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannenberg, S.; Ludwig, S.; Nelson, L.; Rich, H.; Spawn, S.; Porterfield, J.; Schade, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Wetlands are currently the world's largest natural emitter of methane, a greenhouse gas that is over 20 times more effective at trapping heat than carbon dioxide. The magnitude of expansion and contraction of wetlands is likely to increase in response to greater severity of precipitation and drought events predicted by climate change models. Increased severity of precipitation and drought events will result in greater variability in size and ephemerality of wetlands. One possible outcome of these size fluctuations is the increase in the anoxic areas preferred by methanogens. Thus, it is becoming increasingly important to discover how production of methane may change as conditions vary. Our objective was to investigate how wetland dynamics, including variability in size and ephemerality, affect methanogenesis and influence the underlying microbial community. We sampled soil from three wetlands of differing ephemerality on the St. Olaf Natural Lands. We measured water and KCl-extractable NO3 and NH4 and used chloroform-fumigation direct-extraction (CFDE) to estimate microbial biomass in each soil sample. Subsamples of each core were incubated in bottles under anoxic conditions in the dark to measure rate of methane production. Bottles were incubated for 9 weeks and headspace samples were collected after 2, 24, and 48 hours and 1 week, and then weekly thereafter. Headspace samples were analyzed for CH4 to calculate rates of methanogenesis. The rate of methane production over the first 48 hours was positively correlated with soil moisture, and negatively correlated with nitrate levels. At the end of the incubation period, methane production was not related to moisture and nitrate, and was positively correlated with soil organic matter. In addition, we observed a lag time before the onset of significant methane flux, followed by a rapid increase in concentration. This lag time was shorter in wet soils than in dry soils. These data suggest that wet, low-nitrate soils

  19. Effect of dietary supplementation with resveratrol on nutrient digestibility, methanogenesis and ruminal microbial flora in sheep.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Chen, D-D; Tu, Y; Zhang, N-F; Si, B-W; Deng, K-D; Diao, Q-Y

    2015-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of resveratrol on methanogenesis and microbial flora in Dorper × thin-tailed Han cross-bred ewes. In experiment 1, ten ewes (67.2 ± 2.24 kg BW) were assigned to two dietary treatments, a basal diet and a basal diet supplemented with resveratrol (0.25 g/head·day), to investigate the effect of resveratrol on nutrient digestibility and nitrogen balance. In experiment 2, six ewes (64.0 ± 1.85 kg BW) with ruminal cannulae were assigned to the identical dietary treatments used in experiment 1 to investigate supplementary resveratrol on ruminal fermentation and microbial flora using qPCR. The results showed that supplementary resveratrol improved the digestibility of organic matter (OM; p < 0.001), nitrogen (N; p = 0.007), neutral detergent fibre (NDF; p < 0.001) and acid detergent fibre (ADF; p < 0.001). The excretion of faecal N was reduced (p = 0.007), whereas that of urinary N increased (p = 0.002), which led to an unchanged N retention (p = 0.157). Both CO2 and CH4 output scaled to digestible dry matter (DM) intake decreased from 602.5 to 518.7 (p = 0.039) and 68.2 to 56.6 (p < 0.001) respectively. Ruminal pH (p = 0.341), ammonia (p = 0.512) and total volatile fatty acid (VFA) (p = 0.249) were unaffected by resveratrol. The molar proportion of propionate increased from 13.1 to 17.5% (p < 0.001) while that of butyrate decreased from 11.0 to 9.55% (p < 0.001). The ratio of acetate to propionate (A/P) decreased from 5.44 to 3.96 (p < 0.001). Supplementary resveratrol increased ruminal population of Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus albus and Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens (p < 0.001) while decreased protozoa and methanogens. In conclusion, dietary resveratrol inhibited methanogenesis without adversely affecting ruminal fermentation.

  20. Rock Magnetic Study in the Methanogenesis Zone, Site U1437, IODP Exp 350, Izu Rear Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kars, M. A. C.; Musgrave, R. J.; Kodama, K.; Jonas, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    In 2014, IODP Expedition 350 drilled a 1806.5 m deep hole at Site U1437 in the Izu Bonin rear arc. The Site presents an unusual deep methanogenesis zone because of a release of sulfate below the sulfate reduction zone (27-83 mbsf) which may buffer methanogenesis by anaerobic methanogens. Methane abundance gradually increases with depth, with significant abundance at ~750-1459 mbsf with a maximum value at 920 mbsf. The rock magnetic study carried out in Hole U1437D from ~775 to ~1000 mbsf shows a drastic change of the magnetic properties at ~850 mbsf coincidently with a stronger release of methane from < 60 ppm at 841 mbsf to ~300 ppm at 854 mbsf. That also corresponds to a depth interval where no core was recovered (~846-854 mbsf). For the sake of clarity, we call hereafter zone A the depth interval above this non-recovered interval (775-846 mbsf) and zone B the interval below (854-1000 mbsf). Both belong to the same lithostratigraphic unit composed of tuffaceous mudstones intercalated with volcanoclastics. In the zone A, NRM, magnetic susceptibility, ARM, SIRM, HIRM display high values. In the zone B, these parameters show much lower values of one order of magnitude less, except for the interval 936-950 mbsf that corresponds to a local maximum (but still lower values than the zone A). Besides, the rock magnetic parameters for grain size and coercivity, such as ARM/χ, S-ratio and Bcr do not show any variations throughout the entire studied interval, although S-ratio displays slightly lower values from ~850 to ~930 mbsf. Grains are low coercivity pseudo-single domain sized. According to the present data, two preliminary hypotheses can be proposed to explain the observations. 1) The non-recovered interval between the zones A and B can be caused by the presence of a sedimentary hiatus and/or a fault, which may be consistent with the observed change in sedimentation rate. 2) No hiatus in the sedimentation. The changes in the magnetic properties can be explained by a

  1. Stoichiometry and temperature sensitivity of methanogenesis and CO2 production from saturated polygonal tundra in Barrow, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Herndon, Elizabeth M; Phelps, Tommy J; Elias, Dwayne A; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Wullschleger, Stan D; Graham, David E

    2015-02-01

    Arctic permafrost ecosystems store ~50% of global belowground carbon (C) that is vulnerable to increased microbial degradation with warmer active layer temperatures and thawing of the near surface permafrost. We used anoxic laboratory incubations to estimate anaerobic CO2 production and methanogenesis in active layer (organic and mineral soil horizons) and permafrost samples from center, ridge and trough positions of water-saturated low-centered polygon in Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow AK, USA. Methane (CH4 ) and CO2 production rates and concentrations were determined at -2, +4, or +8 °C for 60 day incubation period. Temporal dynamics of CO2 production and methanogenesis at -2 °C showed evidence of fundamentally different mechanisms of substrate limitation and inhibited microbial growth at soil water freezing points compared to warmer temperatures. Nonlinear regression better modeled the initial rates and estimates of Q10 values for CO2 that showed higher sensitivity in the organic-rich soils of polygon center and trough than the relatively drier ridge soils. Methanogenesis generally exhibited a lag phase in the mineral soils that was significantly longer at -2 °C in all horizons. Such discontinuity in CH4 production between -2 °C and the elevated temperatures (+4 and +8 °C) indicated the insufficient representation of methanogenesis on the basis of Q10 values estimated from both linear and nonlinear models. Production rates for both CH4 and CO2 were substantially higher in organic horizons (20% to 40% wt. C) at all temperatures relative to mineral horizons (<20% wt. C). Permafrost horizon (~12% wt. C) produced ~5-fold less CO2 than the active layer and negligible CH4 . High concentrations of initial exchangeable Fe(II) and increasing accumulation rates signified the role of iron as terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic C degradation in the mineral horizons.

  2. Lovastatin lactone may improve irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) by inhibiting enzymes in the archaeal methanogenesis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Muskal, Steven M.; Sliman, Joe; Kokai-Kun, John; Pimentel, Mark; Wacher, Vince; Gottlieb, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Methane produced by the methanoarchaeon Methanobrevibacter smithii ( M. smithii) has been linked to constipation, irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C), and obesity. Lovastatin, which demonstrates a cholesterol-lowering effect by the inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase, may also have an anti-methanogenesis effect through direct inhibition of enzymes in the archaeal methanogenesis pathway. We conducted protein-ligand docking experiments to evaluate this possibility. Results are consistent with recent clinical findings. METHODS: F420-dependent methylenetetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase ( mtd), a key methanogenesis enzyme was modeled for two different methanogenic archaea: M. smithii and Methanopyrus kandleri. Once protein models were developed, ligand-binding sites were identified. Multiple ligands and their respective protonation, isomeric and tautomeric representations were docked into each site, including F420-coenzyme (natural ligand), lactone and β-hydroxyacid forms of lovastatin and simvastatin, and other co-complexed ligands found in related crystal structures. RESULTS: 1) Generally, for each modeled site the lactone form of the statins had more favorable site interactions compared to F420; 2) The statin lactone forms generally had the most favorable docking scores, even relative to the native template PDB ligands; and 3) The statin β-hydroxyacid forms had less favorable docking scores, typically scoring in the middle with some of the F420 tautomeric forms. Consistent with these computational results were those from a recent phase II clinical trial ( NCT02495623) with a proprietary, modified-release lovastatin-lactone (SYN-010) in patients with IBS-C, which showed a reduction in symptoms and breath methane levels, compared to placebo. CONCLUSION: The lactone form of lovastatin exhibits preferential binding over the native-F420 coenzyme ligand in silico and thus could inhibit the activity of the key M. smithii methanogenesis enzyme mtd in vivo

  3. Stoichiometry and temperature sensitivity of methanogenesis and CO 2 production from saturated polygonal tundra in Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Graham, David E.

    2014-11-26

    Arctic permafrost ecosystems store ~50% of global belowground carbon (C) that is vulnerable to increased microbial degradation with warmer active layer temperatures and thawing of the near surface permafrost. We used anoxic laboratory incubations to estimate anaerobic CO2 production and methanogenesis in active layer (organic and mineral soil horizons) and permafrost samples from center, ridge and trough positions of water-saturated low-centered polygon in Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow AK, USA. Methane (CH4) and CO2 production rates and concentrations were determined at 2, +4, or +8 C for 60 day incubation period. Temporal dynamics of CO2 production and methanogenesis at 2 C showed evidence of fundamentally different mechanisms of substrate limitation and inhibited microbial growth at soil water freezing points compared to warmer temperatures. Nonlinear regression better modeled the initial rates and estimates of Q10 values for CO2 that showed higher sensitivity in the organic-rich soils of polygon center and trough than the relatively drier ridge soils. Methanogenesis generally exhibited a lag phase in the mineral soils that was significantly longer at 2 C in all horizons. Such discontinuity in CH4 production between 2 C and the elevated temperatures (+4 and +8 C) indicated the insufficient representation of methanogenesis on the basis of Q10 values estimated from both linear and nonlinear models. Production rates for both CH4 and CO2 were substantially higher in organic horizons (20% to 40% wt. C) at all temperatures relative to mineral horizons (<20% wt. C). Permafrost horizon (~12% wt. C) produced ~5-fold less CO2 than the active layer and negligible CH4. High concentrations of initial exchangeable Fe(II) and increasing accumulation rates signified the role of iron as terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic C degradation in the mineral horizons.

  4. Stoichiometry and temperature sensitivity of methanogenesis and CO 2 production from saturated polygonal tundra in Barrow, Alaska

    DOE PAGES

    Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; ...

    2014-11-26

    Arctic permafrost ecosystems store ~50% of global belowground carbon (C) that is vulnerable to increased microbial degradation with warmer active layer temperatures and thawing of the near surface permafrost. We used anoxic laboratory incubations to estimate anaerobic CO2 production and methanogenesis in active layer (organic and mineral soil horizons) and permafrost samples from center, ridge and trough positions of water-saturated low-centered polygon in Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow AK, USA. Methane (CH4) and CO2 production rates and concentrations were determined at 2, +4, or +8 C for 60 day incubation period. Temporal dynamics of CO2 production and methanogenesis at 2 Cmore » showed evidence of fundamentally different mechanisms of substrate limitation and inhibited microbial growth at soil water freezing points compared to warmer temperatures. Nonlinear regression better modeled the initial rates and estimates of Q10 values for CO2 that showed higher sensitivity in the organic-rich soils of polygon center and trough than the relatively drier ridge soils. Methanogenesis generally exhibited a lag phase in the mineral soils that was significantly longer at 2 C in all horizons. Such discontinuity in CH4 production between 2 C and the elevated temperatures (+4 and +8 C) indicated the insufficient representation of methanogenesis on the basis of Q10 values estimated from both linear and nonlinear models. Production rates for both CH4 and CO2 were substantially higher in organic horizons (20% to 40% wt. C) at all temperatures relative to mineral horizons (<20% wt. C). Permafrost horizon (~12% wt. C) produced ~5-fold less CO2 than the active layer and negligible CH4. High concentrations of initial exchangeable Fe(II) and increasing accumulation rates signified the role of iron as terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic C degradation in the mineral horizons.« less

  5. Phosphoproteomic analysis of Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF1T identified the role of protein phosphorylation in methanogenesis and osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wan-Ling; Lai, Shu-Jung; Yang, Jhih-Tian; Chern, Jeffy; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Chou, Chi-Chi; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Lai, Mei-Chin; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Methanogens have gained much attention for their metabolic product, methane, which could be an energy substitute but also contributes to the greenhouse effect. One factor that controls methane emission, reversible protein phosphorylation, is a crucial signaling switch, and phosphoproteomics has become a powerful tool for large-scale surveying. Here, we conducted the first phosphorylation-mediated regulation study in halophilic Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF1T, a model strain for studying stress response mechanisms in osmoadaptation. A shotgun approach and MS-based analysis identified 149 unique phosphoproteins. Among them, 26% participated in methanogenesis and osmolytes biosynthesis pathways. Of note, we uncovered that protein phosphorylation might be a crucial factor to modulate the pyrrolysine (Pyl) incorporation and Pyl-mediated methylotrophic methanogenesis. Furthermore, heterologous expression of glycine sarcosine N-methyltransferase (GSMT) mutant derivatives in the osmosensitive Escherichia coli MKH13 revealed that the nonphosphorylated T68A mutant resulted in increased salt tolerance. In contrast, mimic phosphorylated mutant T68D proved defective in both enzymatic activity and salinity tolerance for growth. Our study provides new insights into phosphorylation modification as a crucial role of both methanogenesis and osmoadaptation in methanoarchaea, promoting biogas production or reducing future methane emission in response to global warming and climate change. PMID:27357474

  6. Effects of Medicinal Herb Extracts on In vitro Ruminal Methanogenesis, Microbe Diversity and Fermentation System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Tae; Hwang, Hee Soon; Lee, Sang Min; Lee, Shin Ja; Lee, Il Dong; Lee, Su Kyoung; Oh, Da Som; Lim, Jung Hwa; Yoon, Ho Baek; Jeong, Ha Yeon; Im, Seok Ki; Lee, Sung Sill

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the in vitro effects of medicinal herb extracts (MHEs) on ruminal fermentation characteristics and the inhibition of protozoa to reduce methane production in the rumen. A fistulated Hanwoo was used as a donor of rumen fluid. The MHEs (T1, Veratrum patulum; T2, Iris ensata var. spontanea; T3, Arisaema ringens; T4, Carduus crispus; T5, Pueraria thunbergiana) were added to the in vitro fermentation bottles containing the rumen fluid and medium. Total volatile fatty acid (tVFA), total gas production, gas profiles, and the ruminal microbe communities were measured. The tVFA concentration was increased or decreased as compared to the control, and there was a significant (p<0.05) difference after 24 h incubation. pH and ruminal disappearance of dry matter did not show significant difference. As the in vitro ruminal fermentation progressed, total gas production in added MHEs was increased, while the methane production was decreased compared to the control. In particular, Arisaema ringens extract led to decrease methane production by more than 43%. In addition, the result of real-time polymerase chain reaction indicted that the protozoa population in all added MHEs decreased more than that of the control. In conclusion, the results of this study indicated that MHEs could have properties that decrease ruminal methanogenesis by inhibiting protozoa species and might be promising feed additives for ruminants. PMID:27004810

  7. Sequential generation of hydrogen and methane from glutamic acid through combined photo-fermentation and methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ao; Cheng, Jun; Lin, Richen; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2013-03-01

    Glutamic acid can hardly produce hydrogen via dark- or photo-fermentation without pretreatment. In this study, a novel process of acidogenic pretreatment with bacteria and zeolite treatment for NH4(+) removal was proposed to use glutamic acid as feedstock in photo-fermentation for efficient hydrogen production. Glutamic acid pretreated with acidogenic bacteria produces soluble metabolite products. After zeolite treatment, the acidulated solution, which mainly contains acetate, butyrate, and NH4(+), shows a decrease in NH4(+) concentration from 36.7mM to 3.2mM (NH4(+) removal efficiency of 91.1%). After NH4(+) removal, the treated solution is incubated with photosynthetic bacteria, exhibiting a maximum hydrogen yield of 292.9mL/g(-glutamic acid) during photo-fermentation. The residual solution from photo-fermentation is reused by methanogenic bacteria to produce a maximum methane yield of 102.7mL/g. The heating value conversion efficiency from glutamic acid to gas fuel significantly increases from 18.9% during photo-fermentation to 40.9% in the combined photo-fermentation and methanogenesis process.

  8. Lovastatin-Enriched Rice Straw Enhances Biomass Quality and Suppresses Ruminal Methanogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Liang, Juan Boo; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Goh, Yong Meng; Shokryazdan, Parisa; Ho, Yin Wan

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that solid state fermentation (SSF) of agro-biomass (using rice straw as model); besides, breaking down its lignocellulose content to improve its nutritive values also produces lovastatin which could be used to suppress methanogenesis in the rumen ecosystem. Fermented rice straw (FRS) containing lovastatin after fermentation with Aspergillus terreus was used as substrate for growth study of rumen microorganisms using in vitro gas production method. In the first experiment, the extract from the FRS (FRSE) which contained lovastatin was evaluated for its efficacy for reduction in methane (CH4) production, microbial population, and activity in the rumen fluid. FRSE reduced total gas and CH4 productions (P < 0.01). It also reduced (P < 0.01) total methanogens population and increased the cellulolytic bacteria including Ruminococcus albus, Fibrobacter succinogenes (P < 0.01), and Ruminococcus flavefaciens (P < 0.05). Similarly, FRS reduced total gas and CH4 productions, methanogens population, but increased in vitro dry mater digestibility compared to the non-fermented rice straw. Lovastatin in the FRSE and the FRS significantly increased the expression of HMG-CoA reductase gene that produces HMG-CoA reductase, a key enzyme for cell membrane production in methanogenic Archaea. PMID:23484116

  9. Thermophilic microbial cellulose decomposition and methanogenesis pathways recharacterized by metatranscriptomic and metagenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yu; Wang, Yubo; Fang, Herbert H P; Jin, Tao; Zhong, Huanzi; Zhang, Tong

    2014-10-21

    The metatranscriptomic recharacterization in the present study captured microbial enzymes at the unprecedented scale of 40,000 active genes belonged to 2,269 KEGG functions were identified. The novel information obtained herein revealed interesting patterns and provides an initial transcriptional insight into the thermophilic cellulose methanization process. Synergistic beta-sugar consumption by Thermotogales is crucial for cellulose hydrolysis in the thermophilic cellulose-degrading consortium because the primary cellulose degraders Clostridiales showed metabolic incompetence in subsequent beta-sugar pathways. Additionally, comparable transcription of putative Sus-like polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs) was observed in an unclassified order of Bacteroidetes suggesting the importance of PULs mechanism for polysaccharides breakdown in thermophilic systems. Despite the abundance of acetate as a fermentation product, the acetate-utilizing Methanosarcinales were less prevalent by 60% than the hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales. Whereas the aceticlastic methanogenesis pathway was markedly more active in terms of transcriptional activities in key genes, indicating that the less dominant Methanosarcinales are more active than their hydrogenotrophic counterparts in methane metabolism. These findings suggest that the minority of aceticlastic methanogens are not necessarily associated with repressed metabolism, in a pattern that was commonly observed in the cellulose-based methanization consortium, and thus challenge the causal likelihood proposed by previous studies.

  10. Eubacteria and Archaea community of simultaneous methanogenesis and denitrification granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujiao; Zuo, Jiane; Chen, Lili; Wang, Yong

    2008-01-01

    Based on the successful performance of a lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor with the capacity of simultaneous methanogenesis and denitrification (SMD), the specific phylogenetic groups and community structure of microbes in the SMD granule in the UASB reactor were investigated by the construction of the Eubacteria and Archaea 16S rDNA clone libraries, fragment length polymorphism, and sequence blast. Real time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (RTQ-PCR) technique was used to quantify the contents of Eubacteria and Archaea in the SMD granule. The contents of some special predominant methanogens were also investigated. The results indicated that the Methanosaeta and Methanobacteria were the predominant methanogens in all Archaea in the SMD granule, with contents of 71.59% and 22.73% in all 88 random Archaea clones, respectively. The diversity of Eubacteria was much more complex than that of Archaea. The low GC positive gram bacteria and epsilon-Protebacteria were the main predominant Eubacteria species in SMD granule, their contents were 49.62% and 12.03% in all 133 random Eubacteria clones respectively. The results of RTQ-PCR indicated that the content of Archaea was less than Eubacteria, the Archaea content in total microorganisms in SMD granule was about 27.6%.

  11. Methanogenesis from volatile fatty acids in downflow stationary fixed-film reactor.

    PubMed

    Bhadra, A; Scharer, J M; Moo-Young, M

    1987-08-05

    Methanogenesis was studied in downflow stationary fixed-film bioreactors. The support materials in this study included ceramic Raschig rings, hardwood chips, and sized charcoal. The performances of these support materials have been compared using both synthetic acid mixture and acid products obtained from paper mill sludge. Woodchips appeared to be the most promising support material: The maximum methane productivity of 3.56 L/L day at a nominal retention time of 0.78 day was obtained using initial total acid concentrations of 9.125 g/L. Higher productivity was achieved at the cost of efficiency of the process in terms of conversion of acids. From nitrogen balances, it was deduced that ammonia supplemented methane generation by supplying hydrogen for there duction of carbon dioxide.An ionic balance was developed to ascertain the relationship between the composition and the pH of the liquid and the mole fraction of carbon dioxide in the gas phase. From these ionic balance equations, it was possible to predict the gas phase composition at various retention times. The maximum error between the computed and the experimental values was less than 13%.

  12. Modeling methanogenesis with a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Methanosarcina barkeri

    SciTech Connect

    Feist, Adam; Scholten, Johannes C.; Palsson, Bernard O.; Brockman, Fred J.; Ideker, Trey

    2006-01-31

    We present a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction for the archaeal methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri. This reconstruction represents the first large-scale, predictive model of a methanogen and an archael species. We characterize this reconstruction and compare it to those from the prokaryotic, eukaryotic, and archael domains. We further apply constraint-based methods to stimulate the metabolic fluxes and resulting phenotypes under different environmental and genetic conditions. These results are validated by comparison to experimental growth measurements and phenotypes of M. barkeri on different substrates. The predicted growth phenotypes for mutants of the methanogenic pathway were found to have a high level of agreement with experimental findings. The active reactions and pathways under selected growth conditions are presented and characterized. We also examined the efficiency of the energy-conserving reactions in the methanogenic pathway, specifically the Ech hydrogenase reaction. This work demonstrates that a reconstructed metabolic network can serve as an in silico analysis platform to predict cellular phenotypes, characterize methanogenic growth, improve the genome annotation, and further uncover the metabolic characteristics of methanogenesis.

  13. Thermophilic microbial cellulose decomposition and methanogenesis pathways recharacterized by metatranscriptomic and metagenomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yu; Wang, Yubo; Fang, Herbert H. P.; Jin, Tao; Zhong, Huanzi; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    The metatranscriptomic recharacterization in the present study captured microbial enzymes at the unprecedented scale of 40,000 active genes belonged to 2,269 KEGG functions were identified. The novel information obtained herein revealed interesting patterns and provides an initial transcriptional insight into the thermophilic cellulose methanization process. Synergistic beta-sugar consumption by Thermotogales is crucial for cellulose hydrolysis in the thermophilic cellulose-degrading consortium because the primary cellulose degraders Clostridiales showed metabolic incompetence in subsequent beta-sugar pathways. Additionally, comparable transcription of putative Sus-like polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs) was observed in an unclassified order of Bacteroidetes suggesting the importance of PULs mechanism for polysaccharides breakdown in thermophilic systems. Despite the abundance of acetate as a fermentation product, the acetate-utilizing Methanosarcinales were less prevalent by 60% than the hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales. Whereas the aceticlastic methanogenesis pathway was markedly more active in terms of transcriptional activities in key genes, indicating that the less dominant Methanosarcinales are more active than their hydrogenotrophic counterparts in methane metabolism. These findings suggest that the minority of aceticlastic methanogens are not necessarily associated with repressed metabolism, in a pattern that was commonly observed in the cellulose-based methanization consortium, and thus challenge the causal likelihood proposed by previous studies. PMID:25330991

  14. Stable carbon isotope discrimination in rice field soil during acetate turnover by syntrophic acetate oxidation or acetoclastic methanogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Ralf; Klose, Melanie

    2011-03-01

    Rice fields are an important source for the greenhouse gas methane. In Italian rice field soil CH 4 is produced either by hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis, or by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and syntrophic acetate oxidation when temperatures are below and above about 40-45 °C, respectively. In order to see whether these acetate consumption pathways differently discriminate the stable carbon isotopes of acetate, we measured the δ 13C of total acetate and acetate-methyl as well as the δ 13C of CO 2 and CH 4 in rice field soil that had been pre-incubated at 45 °C and then shifted to different temperatures between 25 and 50 °C. Acetate transiently accumulated to about 6 mM, which is about one-third of the amount of CH 4 produced, irrespective of the incubation temperature and the CH 4 production pathway involved. However, the patterns of δ 13C of the CH 4 and CO 2 produced were different at low (25, 30, 35 °C) versus high (40, 45, 50 °C) temperatures. These patterns were consistent with CH 4 being exclusively formed by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at high temperatures, and by a combination of acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at low temperatures. The patterns of δ 13C of total acetate and acetate-methyl were also different at high versus low temperatures, indicating the involvement of different pathways of production and consumption of acetate at the two temperature regimes. Isotope fractionation during consumption of the methyl group of acetate was more pronounced at low ( α = 1.010-1.025) than at high ( α = 1.0-1.01) temperatures indicating that acetoclastic methanogenesis exhibits a stronger isotope effect than syntrophic acetate oxidation. Small amounts of propionate also transiently accumulated and were analyzed for δ 13C. The δ 13C values slightly increased (by about 10‰) during production and consumption of propionate, but were not affected by incubation temperature. Collectively, our results showed distinct

  15. Experimental pressure enhancement of the rate of homogenous methanogenesis: implications for abiotic methane yields in terrestrial and planetary environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, C.; Cody, G. D.

    2011-12-01

    Abiotic methane may play a role in the development of a biosphere on an otherwise lifeless planet. Methane concentrations in fluids emanating from serpentinite-hosted submarine springs such as Rainbow and Logatchev are below that required for equilibrium with coexisting CO2 and H2, indicating that the compositions of such fluids may be kinetically-controlled. The presence of transition metal-bearing accessory minerals in serpentinites has led to the hypothesis that heterogeneous catalysis may influence the rate of methanogenesis. We present new experiments that show pressure can also significantly accelerate homogenous methanogenesis, i.e., methane production in the absence of mineral catalysts. A series of cold-seal experiments were performed from 1-3.5 kbar at 300C for two weeks, using dilute isotopically labeled formic acid as a carbon and hydrogen source (70mmol solution). The experiments showed a significant increase in 13CH4 yield with pressure: e.g., the yield at 3.5 kbar was ~20X the yield at 1 kbar. This pressure enhancement is consistent with our previous results on homogeneous and heterogeneous methanogenesis and suggests that mineral catalysts are not necessary for CH4 equilibration in high pressure environments such as Precambrian crystalline basements or regional blueschist-grade metamorphic systems. Furthermore, in hydrothermal systems wherein fluid residence times are too short to permit equilibration, the reaction progress of methanogenesis is expected to increase with pressure. Recently discovered methane plumes above the mid-Cayman trough have been attributed to methanogenesis in deep serpentinites-hosted springs. The current experimental results lead to the prediction that the mid-Cayman springs (>1 kbar) contain higher methane concentrations than their lower pressure analogues at Rainbow and Logatchev (<0.5kbar). Fluids escaping forearc serpentinization in cold, steeply-dipping subduction zones may yield more methane than in warm shallow

  16. Salinity constraints on subsurface archaeal diversity and methanogenesis in sedimentary rock rich in organic matter.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Patricia J; Petsch, Steven T; Martini, Anna M; Nüsslein, Klaus; Nüslein, Klaus

    2007-07-01

    The diversity of microorganisms active within sedimentary rocks provides important controls on the geochemistry of many subsurface environments. In particular, biodegradation of organic matter in sedimentary rocks contributes to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and other elements and strongly impacts the recovery and quality of fossil fuel resources. In this study, archaeal diversity was investigated along a salinity gradient spanning 8 to 3,490 mM Cl(-) in a subsurface shale rich in CH(4) derived from biodegradation of sedimentary hydrocarbons. Shale pore waters collected from wells in the main CH(4)-producing zone lacked electron acceptors such as O(2), NO(3)(-), Fe(3+), or SO(4)(2-). Acetate was detected only in high-salinity waters, suggesting that acetoclastic methanogenesis is inhibited at Cl(-) concentrations above approximately 1,000 mM. Most-probable-number series revealed differences in methanogen substrate utilization (acetate, trimethylamine, or H(2)/CO(2)) associated with chlorinity. The greatest methane production in enrichment cultures was observed for incubations with salinity at or close to the native pore water salinity of the inoculum. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses of archaeal 16S rRNA genes from seven wells indicated that there were links between archaeal communities and pore water salinity. Archaeal clone libraries constructed from sequences from 16S rRNA genes isolated from two wells revealed phylotypes similar to a halophilic methylotrophic Methanohalophilus species and a hydrogenotrophic Methanoplanus species at high salinity and a single phylotype closely related to Methanocorpusculum bavaricum at low salinity. These results show that several distinct communities of methanogens persist in this subsurface, CH(4)-producing environment and that each community is adapted to particular conditions of salinity and preferential substrate use and each community induces distinct geochemical signatures in shale formation waters.

  17. Insights into Methane Formation Temperatures, Biogenic Methanogenesis, and Natural Methane Emissions from Clumped Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, P. M.; Stolper, D. A.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Dallimore, S.; Paull, C. K.; Wik, M.; Crill, P. M.; Winterdahl, M.; Smith, D. A.; Luhmann, A. J.; Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Eiler, J. M.; Ponton, C.; Sessions, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Multiply substituted isotopologues of methane are a valuable new tool for characterizing and understanding the source of methane in different Earth environments. Here we present methane clumped isotope results from natural gas wells, hydrothermal vents, marine and lacustrine methane seeps, and culture experiments. We observe a wide range of formation temperatures for thermogenic methane. Methane samples from low-maturity reservoirs indicate formation temperatures between 102-144° C, high-maturity conventional and shale gasses indicate temperatures between 158-246 °C, and thermogenic coal gases indicate temperatures between 174-267 °C. Methane formation temperatures generally correlate positively with δ13C, and negatively with gas wetness indices. Methane samples from a set of marine hydrothermal vents indicate a formation temperature of 290-350 °C. Methane sampled from subsurface and marine biogenic sources typically indicate temperatures consistent with the formation environment (0-64° C). In contrast, freshwater biogenic methane samples, and cultures of hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens, express low levels of isotopic clumping inconsistent with their formation temperature. These data and complementary models suggest that kinetic isotope effects, likely modulated by rates and pathways of methanogenesis, affect biogenic methane in cultures and freshwater environments. Alternatively, non-equilibrium signatures may result from mixing of methane with widely differing δD and δ13C values. Analyses of biogenic methane emissions from lakes indicate a correlation between methane flux and non-equilibrium clumped isotope fractionations in a given lake. Results from large methane seeps in Alaskan lakes confirm that some seeps emit thermogenic methane, but also indicate that other seeps emit subsurface biogenic methane or variable mixtures of biogenic and thermogenic methane. These results point to diverse sources for large Arctic methane seeps.

  18. Methane production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis methanogenesis cells (MRMCs) using thermolytic solutions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Zhang, Fang; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of bioelectrochemical systems for methane production has attracted increasing attention, but producing methane in these systems requires additional voltage to overcome large cathode overpotentials. To eliminate the need for electrical grid energy, we constructed a microbial reverse-electrodialysis methanogenesis cell (MRMC) by placing a reverse electrodialysis (RED) stack between an anode with exoelectrogenic microorganisms and a methanogenic biocathode. In the MRMC, renewable salinity gradient energy was converted to electrical energy, thus providing the added potential needed for methane evolution from the cathode. The feasibility of the MRMC was examined using three different cathode materials (stainless steel mesh coated with platinum, SS/Pt; carbon cloth coated with carbon black, CC/CB; or a plain graphite fiber brush, GFB) and a thermolytic solution (ammonium bicarbonate) in the RED stack. A maximum methane yield of 0.60 ± 0.01 mol-CH4/mol-acetate was obtained using the SS/Pt biocathode, with a Coulombic recovery of 75 ± 2% and energy efficiency of 7.0 ± 0.3%. The CC/CB biocathode MRMC had a lower methane yield of 0.55 ± 0.02 mol-CH4/mol-acetate, which was twice that of the GFB biocathode MRMC. COD removals (89-91%) and Coulombic efficiencies (74-81%) were similar for all cathode materials. Linear sweep voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests demonstrated that cathodic microorganisms enhanced electron transfer from the cathode compared to abiotic controls. These results show that the MRMC has significant potential for production of nearly pure methane using low-grade waste heat and a source of waste organic matter at the anode.

  19. Nanosilver impact on methanogenesis and biogas production from municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Xu, Meng; Wall, Judy D; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2012-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, nanosilver) released from industrial activities and consumer products may be disposed directly or indirectly in sanitary landfills. To determine the impact of AgNPs on anaerobic digestion of landfill waste, municipal solid waste (MSW) was loaded in identical landfill bioreactors (9L volume each) and exposed to AgNPs (average particle size=21nm) at the final concentrations of 0, 1, and 10mgAg/kg solids. The landfill anaerobic digestion was carried out for more than 250 days, during which time the cumulative biogas production was recorded automatically and the chemical property changes of leachates were analyzed. There were no significant differences in the cumulative biogas volume or gas production rate between the groups of control and 1mgAg/kg. However, landfill solids exposed to AgNPs at 10mg/kg resulted in the reduced biogas production, the accumulation of volatile fatty acids (including acetic acid), and the prolonged period of low leachate pH (between 5 and 6). Quantitative PCR results after day 100 indicated that the total copy numbers of 16S rRNA gene of methanogens in the groups of control and 1mgAgNPs/kg were 1.97±0.21×10(7) and 0.90±0.03×10(7), respectively. These numbers were significantly reduced to 5.79±2.83×10(5)(copies/mL) in the bioreactor treated with 10mgAgNPs/kg. The results suggest that AgNPs at the concentration of 1mg/kg solids have minimal impact on landfill anaerobic digestion, but a concentration at 10mg/kg or higher inhibit methanogenesis and biogas production from MSW.

  20. Mapping the Environmental Boundaries for Methanogenesis in Serpentinizing Systems using a Cell-scale Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alperin, M. J.; Hoehler, T. M.; McCollom, T.

    2011-12-01

    Serpentinizing systems occur where liquid water reacts with ultramafic minerals. The reaction releases heat and produces an alkaline fluid that is rich in H2. The abundant H2 suggests that the energetics of methane production by CO2 reduction is highly favorable (ΔG ~ -102 kJ/mol CH4 for [H2] ~ 10-2 M). Given the possibility of subsurface water and ultramafic minerals on Mars, methanogenesis in serpentinizing systems has been considered as a possible model for photosynthesis-independent, extraterrestrial life. However, the high pH (9 - 11) and possibly elevated temperature have a negative impact on the overall cellular energy balance by increasing the cell's maintenance energy and reducing the concentration of CO2 substrate. We developed a reaction-transport model on the scale of a methanogen cell to investigate how the overall bioenergetics of methane production is influenced by the interplay between pH, temperature, and H2 and CO2 concentration. The model differentiates the cell into three basic structural units (cell wall, cell membrane with gated ion channels, and cytoplasm) and employs both thermodynamic and kinetic controls to estimate an upper-limit energy yield as a function of environmental conditions. The model provides a map of the range of environmental extremes for which the energy balance for microbial methane production is positive. The model also provides a tool for exploring the energetics of different metabolic strategies that methanogens could use to cope with stresses associated with life in an alkaline, low-CO2 environment.

  1. Physicochemical impacts associated with natural gas development on methanogenesis in deep sand aquifers

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Taiki; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Muramoto, Yoshiyuki; Usami, Jun; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sakata, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    The Minami-Kanto gas field, where gases are dissolved in formation water, is a potential analogue for a marine gas hydrate area because both areas are characterized by the accumulation of microbial methane in marine turbidite sand layers interbedded with mud layers. This study examined the physicochemical impacts associated with natural gas production and well drilling on the methanogenic activity and composition in this gas field. Twenty-four gas-associated formation water samples were collected from confined sand aquifers through production wells. The stable isotopic compositions of methane in the gases indicated their origin to be biogenic via the carbonate reduction pathway. Consistent with this classification, methanogenic activity measurements using radiotracers, culturing experiments and molecular analysis of formation water samples indicated the predominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. The cultivation of water samples amended only with methanogenic substrates resulted in significant increases in microbial cells along with high-yield methane production, indicating the restricted availability of substrates in the aquifers. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity increased with increasing natural gas production from the corresponding wells, suggesting that the flux of substrates from organic-rich mudstones to adjacent sand aquifers is enhanced by the decrease in fluid pressure in sand layers associated with natural gas/water production. The transient predominance of methylotrophic methanogens, observed for a few years after well drilling, also suggested the stimulation of the methanogens by the exposure of unutilized organic matter through well drilling. These results provide an insight into the physicochemical impacts on the methanogenic activity in biogenic gas deposits including marine gas hydrates. PMID:25105906

  2. Simultaneous methanogenesis and denitrification of pretreated effluents from a fish canning industry.

    PubMed

    Mosquera-Corral, A; Sánchez, M; Campos, J L; Méndez, R; Lema, J M

    2001-02-01

    A lab-scale hybrid upflow sludge bed-filter (USBF) reactor was employed to carry out methanogenesis and denitrification of the effluent from an anaerobic industrial reactor (EAIR) in a fish canning industry. The reactor was initially inoculated with methanogenic sludge and there were two different operational steps. During the first step (Step I: days 1-61), the methanogenic process was carried out at organic loading rates (OLR) of 1.0-1.25 g COD l-1 d-1 reaching COD removal percentages of 80%. During the second step (Step II: days 62-109) nitrate was added as KNO3 to the industrial effluent and the OLR was varied between 1.0 and 1.25 g COD l-1 d-1. Two different nitrogen loads of 0.10 and 0.22 g NO3(-)-N l-1 d-1 were applied and these led to nitrogen removal percentages of around 100% in both cases and COD removal percentages of around 80%. Carbon to nitrogen ratio (C:N) in the influent was maintained at 2.0 and eventually it was increased to 3.0, by means of glucose addition, to control the denitrification process. From these results it is possible to establish that wastewater produced in a fish canning industry can be used as a carbon source for denitrification and that denitrifying microorganisms were present in the initially methanogenic sludge. Biomass productions of 0.23 and 0.61 g VSS:g TOC fed for Steps I and II, respectively, were calculated from carbon global balances, showing an increase in biomass growth due to denitrification.

  3. Thermodynamic Constraints on Sulfate Reduction and Methanogenesis in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M. F.; Marquart, K. A.; Wilson, B. H.; Flynn, T. M.; Vinson, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    In this study we consider how commercial natural gas production could affect sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in coal-bearing sediments of the Cherokee Basin, Kansas, USA. Controls on the activity of these two groups of microbes are important to understand because their activity and interactions may influence methane formation and retention in unconventional reservoirs. During November 2013, we collected water and gas samples from 16 commercial gas wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. Results indicate that methane in the coalbeds formed biologically and that both methanogens and sulfate reducers are present. Gas samples consisted almost entirely of methane (C1/(C2+C3) = 2638 on avg.) and the δD and δ13C of methane averaged -222‰ VSMOW and -61‰ VPDB, respectively. Archaeal sequences in our samples were nearly all classified within groups of methanogens (avg. 91%) and cultivable methanogens were present in all water samples. On average, 6% of the bacterial sequences from our samples were classified in groups of sulfate reducers and sulfate available to support their activity ranged up to 110 μM in concentration. Any interaction that occurs between these groups may be influenced by the energetics of their metabolic reactions. Thermodynamic calculations show that methanogens hold an energy advantage over sulfate reducers if dissolved methane concentrations are low. Under current conditions, methanogens see between 12 and 16 kJ mol-1 more usable free energy than sulfate reducers, if we assume a minimal methane concentration (1 μM). However, usable energy for methanogens would equal that available to sulfate reducers at methane concentrations ranging between 144 and 831 μM, well below saturation levels. Production activities that hold methane concentration below these levels, therefore, would help maintain an energy advantage for methanogens. In contrast, if production activities cause sulfate concentrations to increase, sulfate reducers would

  4. Salinity Constraints on Subsurface Archaeal Diversity and Methanogenesis in Sedimentary Rock Rich in Organic Matter▿

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Patricia J.; Petsch, Steven T.; Martini, Anna M.; Nüslein, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    The diversity of microorganisms active within sedimentary rocks provides important controls on the geochemistry of many subsurface environments. In particular, biodegradation of organic matter in sedimentary rocks contributes to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and other elements and strongly impacts the recovery and quality of fossil fuel resources. In this study, archaeal diversity was investigated along a salinity gradient spanning 8 to 3,490 mM Cl− in a subsurface shale rich in CH4 derived from biodegradation of sedimentary hydrocarbons. Shale pore waters collected from wells in the main CH4-producing zone lacked electron acceptors such as O2, NO3−, Fe3+, or SO42−. Acetate was detected only in high-salinity waters, suggesting that acetoclastic methanogenesis is inhibited at Cl− concentrations above ∼1,000 mM. Most-probable-number series revealed differences in methanogen substrate utilization (acetate, trimethylamine, or H2/CO2) associated with chlorinity. The greatest methane production in enrichment cultures was observed for incubations with salinity at or close to the native pore water salinity of the inoculum. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses of archaeal 16S rRNA genes from seven wells indicated that there were links between archaeal communities and pore water salinity. Archaeal clone libraries constructed from sequences from 16S rRNA genes isolated from two wells revealed phylotypes similar to a halophilic methylotrophic Methanohalophilus species and a hydrogenotrophic Methanoplanus species at high salinity and a single phylotype closely related to Methanocorpusculum bavaricum at low salinity. These results show that several distinct communities of methanogens persist in this subsurface, CH4-producing environment and that each community is adapted to particular conditions of salinity and preferential substrate use and each community induces distinct geochemical signatures in shale formation waters. PMID:17468287

  5. Physicochemical impacts associated with natural gas development on methanogenesis in deep sand aquifers.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Taiki; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Muramoto, Yoshiyuki; Usami, Jun; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sakata, Susumu

    2015-02-01

    The Minami-Kanto gas field, where gases are dissolved in formation water, is a potential analogue for a marine gas hydrate area because both areas are characterized by the accumulation of microbial methane in marine turbidite sand layers interbedded with mud layers. This study examined the physicochemical impacts associated with natural gas production and well drilling on the methanogenic activity and composition in this gas field. Twenty-four gas-associated formation water samples were collected from confined sand aquifers through production wells. The stable isotopic compositions of methane in the gases indicated their origin to be biogenic via the carbonate reduction pathway. Consistent with this classification, methanogenic activity measurements using radiotracers, culturing experiments and molecular analysis of formation water samples indicated the predominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. The cultivation of water samples amended only with methanogenic substrates resulted in significant increases in microbial cells along with high-yield methane production, indicating the restricted availability of substrates in the aquifers. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity increased with increasing natural gas production from the corresponding wells, suggesting that the flux of substrates from organic-rich mudstones to adjacent sand aquifers is enhanced by the decrease in fluid pressure in sand layers associated with natural gas/water production. The transient predominance of methylotrophic methanogens, observed for a few years after well drilling, also suggested the stimulation of the methanogens by the exposure of unutilized organic matter through well drilling. These results provide an insight into the physicochemical impacts on the methanogenic activity in biogenic gas deposits including marine gas hydrates.

  6. Papaya (Carica papaya) leaf methanolic extract modulates in vitro rumen methanogenesis and rumen biohydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Saeid; Goh, Yong M; Rajion, Mohamed A; Jahromi, Mohammad F; Ahmad, Yusof H; Ebrahimi, Mahdi

    2017-02-01

    Papaya leaf methanolic extract (PLE) at concentrations of 0 (CON), 5 (LLE), 10 (MLE) and 15 (HLE) mg/250 mg dry matter (DM) with 30 mL buffered rumen fluid were incubated for 24 h to identify its effect on in vitro ruminal methanogenesis and ruminal biohydrogenation (BH). Total gas production was not affected (P > 0.05) by addition of PLE compared to the CON at 24 h of incubation. Methane (CH4 ) production (mL/250 mg DM) decreased (P < 0.05) with increasing levels of PLE. Acetate to propionate ratio was lower (P <0.05) in MLE (2.02) and HLE (1.93) compared to the CON (2.28). Supplementation of the diet with PLE significantly (P <0.05) decreased the rate of BH of C18:1n-9 (oleic acid; OA), C18:2n-6 (linoleic acid; LA), C18:3n-3 (linolenic acid; LNA) and C18 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) compared to CON after 24 h incubation, which resulted in higher concentrations of BH intermediates such as C18:1 t11 (vaccenic acid; VA), c9t11 conjugated LA (CLA) (rumenic acid; RA) and t10c12 CLA. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that the total bacteria, total protozoa, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and methanogen population in HLE decreased (P <0.05) compared to CON, but the total bacteria and B. fibrisolvens population were higher (P < 0.05) in CON compared to the PLE treatment groups.

  7. [Medicolegal aspects of driving ability and discussion of study methods].

    PubMed

    Berghaus, G

    2008-06-01

    Medicolegal aspects of driving ability primarily concern patients themselves, because they are responsible when driving in traffic while under drug treatment. Pain patients taking analgesic medication prescribed by a doctor do not commit an offence, insofar as they are able to drive. A doctor's main duty consists of informing the patient about the way a given disease or drug intake affects driving ability. Patients have the duty to inform themselves about the drug they are taking and to assess their driving ability each time before they drive a car.

  8. Effects of coconut and fish oils on ruminal methanogenesis, fermentation, and abundance and diversity of microbial populations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Patra, A K; Yu, Z

    2013-03-01

    Coconut (CO) and fish (FO) oils were previously shown to inhibit rumen methanogenesis and biohydrogenation, which mitigates methane emission and helps improve beneficial fatty acids in meat and milk. This study aimed at investigating the comparative effects of CO and FO on the methanogenesis, fermentation, and microbial abundances and diversity in vitro rumen cultures containing different doses (0, 3.1, and 6.2 mL/L) of each oil and 400mg feed substrate using rumen fluid from lactating dairy cows as inocula. Increasing doses of CO and FO quadratically decreased concentrations of methane, but hydrogen concentrations were only increased quadratically by CO. Both oils linearly decreased dry matter and neutral detergent fiber digestibility of feeds but did not affect the concentration of total volatile fatty acids. However, CO reduced acetate percentage and acetate to propionate ratio and increased the percentages of propionate and butyrate to a greater extent than FO. Ammonia concentration was greater for CO than FO. As determined by quantitative real-time PCR, FO had greater inhibition to methanogens than CO, but the opposite was true for protozoal, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, and Fibrobacter succinogenes. Ruminococcus albus was not affected by either oil. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles revealed that bacterial and archaeal community composition were changed differently by oil type. Based on Pareto-Lorenz evenness curve analysis of the DGGE profiles, CO noticeably changed the functional organization of archaea compared with FO. In conclusion, although both CO and FO decreased methane concentrations to a similar extent, the mode of reduction and the effect on abundances and diversity of archaeal and bacterial populations differed between the oils. Thus, the use of combination of CO and FO at a low dose may additively lower methanogenesis in the rumen while having little adverse effect on rumen fermentation.

  9. Similar evolution in delta 13CH4 and model-predicted relative rate of aceticlastic methanogenesis during mesophilic methanization of municipal solid wastes.

    PubMed

    Vavilin, V A; Qu, X; Qu, X; Mazéas, L; Lemunier, M; Duquennoi, C; Mouchel, J M; He, P; Bouchez, T

    2009-01-01

    Similar evolution was obtained for the stable carbon isotope signatures delta (13)CH(4) and the model-predicted relative rate of aceticlastic methanogenesis during mesophilic methanization of municipal solid wastes. In batch incubations, the importance of aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis changes in time. Initially, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis dominated, but increasing population of Methanosarcina sp. enhances aceticlastic methanogenesis. Later, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis intensified again. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate the relative contribution of hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic pathways of methane generation during mesophilic batch anaerobic biodegradation of the French and the Chinese Municipal Solid Wastes (FMSW and CMSW). Taking into account molecular biology analysis reported earlier three groups of methanogens including strictly hydrogenotrophic methanogens, strictly aceticlastic methanogens (Methanosaeta sp.) and Methanosarcina sp., consuming both acetate and H(2)/H(2)CO(3) were considered in the model. The total organic and inorganic carbon concentrations, methane production volume, methane and carbon dioxide partial pressures values were used for the model calibration and validation. Methane isotopic composition (delta (13)CH(4)) evolution during the incubations was used to independently validate the model results. The model demonstrated that only the putrescible solid waste was totally converted to methane.

  10. Methanogenesis in a Thermophilic (58°C) Anaerobic Digestor: Methanothrix sp. as an Important Aceticlastic Methanogen

    PubMed Central

    Zinder, S. H.; Cardwell, S.C.; Anguish, T.; Lee, M.; Koch, M.

    1984-01-01

    Aceticlastic methanogens and other microbial groups were enumerated in a 58°C laboratory-scale (3 liter) anaerobic digestor which was fed air-classified municipal refuse, a lignocellulosic waste (loading rate = 1.8 to 2.7 g of volatile solids per liter per day; retention time = 10 days). Two weeks after start-up, Methanosarcina sp. was present in high numbers (105 to 106 CFU/ml) and autofluorescent Methanosarcina-like clumps were abundant in sludge examined by using epifluorescence microscopy. After about 4 months of digestor operation, numbers of Methanosarcina sp. dropped 2 to 3 orders of magnitude and large numbers (most probable number = 106 to 107/ml) of a thermophilic aceticlastic methanogen morphologically resembing Methanothrix sp. were found. Methanothrix sp. had apparently displaced Methanosarcina sp. as the dominant aceticlastic methanogen in the digestor. During the period when Methanothrix sp. was apparently dominant, acetate concentrations varied between 0.3 and 1.5 μmol/ml during the daily feeding cycle, and acetate was the precursor of 63 to 66% of the methane produced during peak digestor methanogenesis. The apparent Km value obtained for methanogenesis from acetate, 0.3 μmol/ml, indicated that the aceticlastic methanogens were nearly saturated for substrate during most of the digestor cycle. CO2-reducing methanogens were capable of methanogenesis at rates more than 12 times greater than those usually found in the digestor. Added propionate (4.5 μmol/ml) was metabolized slowly by the digestor populations and slightly inhibited methanogenesis. Added n-butyrate, isobutyrate, or n-valerate (4.5 μmol/ml each) were broken down within 24 h. Isobutyrate was oxidized to acetate, a novel reaction possibly involving isomerization to n-butyrate. The rapid growth rate and versatile metabolism of Methanosarcina sp. make it a likely organism to be involved in start-up, whereas the low Km value of Methanothrix sp. for acetate may cause it to be favored in

  11. Biogas Upgrading via Hydrogenotrophic Methanogenesis in Two-Stage Continuous Stirred Tank Reactors at Mesophilic and Thermophilic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bassani, Ilaria; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Treu, Laura; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-10-20

    This study proposes an innovative setup composed by two stage reactors to achieve biogas upgrading coupling the CO2 in the biogas with external H2 and subsequent conversion into CH4 by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. In this configuration, the biogas produced in the first reactor was transferred to the second one, where H2 was injected. This configuration was tested at both mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. After H2 addition, the produced biogas was upgraded to average CH4 content of 89% in the mesophilic reactor and 85% in the thermophilic. At thermophilic conditions, a higher efficiency of CH4 production and CO2 conversion was recorded. The consequent increase of pH did not inhibit the process indicating adaptation of microorganisms to higher pH levels. The effects of H2 on the microbial community were studied using high-throughput Illumina random sequences and full-length 16S rRNA genes extracted from the total sequences. The relative abundance of archaeal community markedly increased upon H2 addition with Methanoculleus as dominant genus. The increase of hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic Desulfovibrio and the decrease of aceticlastic methanogens indicate a H2-mediated shift toward the hydrogenotrophic pathway enhancing biogas upgrading. Moreover, Thermoanaerobacteraceae were likely involved in syntrophic acetate oxidation with hydrogenotrophic methanogens in absence of aceticlastic methanogenesis.

  12. Role of calcium oxide in sludge granulation and methanogenesis for the treatment of palm oil mill effluent using UASB reactor.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Anwar; Ghufran, Rumana; Abd Wahid, Zularisam

    2011-12-30

    The granulation process in palm oil mill effluent using calcium oxide-cement kiln dust (CaO-CKD) provides an attractive and cost effective treatment option. In this study the efficiency of CaO-CKD at doses of 1.5-20 g/l was tested in batch experiments and found that 10 g of CaO/l caused the greatest degradation of VFA, butyrate and acetate. An upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was operated continuously at 35°C for 150 days to investigate the effect of CaO-CKD on sludge granulation and methanogenesis during start-up. The treatment of POME emphasized the influence of varying organic loading rates (OLR). Up to 94.9% of COD was removed when the reactor was fed with the 15.5-65.5 g-CODg/l at an OLR of 4.5-12.5 kg-COD/m(3)d, suggesting the feasibility of using CaO in an UASB process to treat POME. The ratio of volatile solids/total solids (VS/TS) and volatile fatty acids in the anaerobic sludge in the UASB reactor decreased significantly after long-term operation due to the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the granules. Granulation and methanogenesis decreased with an increase in the influent CaO-CKD concentration.

  13. Linking Microbial Community, Environmental Variables, and Methanogenesis in Anaerobic Biogas Digesters of Chemically Enhanced Primary Treatment Sludge.

    PubMed

    Ju, Feng; Lau, Frankie; Zhang, Tong

    2017-04-04

    Understanding the influences of biotic and abiotic factors on microbial community structure and methanogenesis are important for its engineering and ecological significance. In this study, four biogas digesters were supplied with the same inoculum and feeding sludge but operated at different sludge retention time (7 to 16 days) and organic loading rates for 90 days to determine the relative influence of biotic and environmental factors on the microbial community assembly and methanogenic performance. Despite different operational parameters, all digester communities were dominated by Bacteroidales, Clostridiales, and Thermotogales and followed the same trend of population dynamics over time. Network and multivariate analyses suggest that deterministic factors, including microbial competition (involving Bacteroidales spp.), niche differentiation (e.g., within Clostridiales spp.), and periodic microbial immigration (from feed sludge), are the key drivers of microbial community assembly and dynamics. A yet-to-be-cultured phylotype of Bacteroidales (GenBank ID: GU389558.1 ) is implicated as a strong competitor for carbohydrates. Moreover, biogas-producing rate and methane content were significantly related with the abundances of functional populations rather than any operational or physicochemical parameter, revealing microbiological mediation of methanogenesis. Combined, this study enriches our understandings of biological and environmental drivers of microbial community assembly and performance in anaerobic digesters.

  14. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyl congener concentration and sediment supplementation on rates of methanogenesis and 2,3,6-trichlorobiphenyl dechlorination in an anaerobic enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, A.W.; May, H.D. ); Blake, C.K. ); Price, W.A. )

    1993-09-01

    The release of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) into the environment has caused public concern. PCBs are know known to be susceptible to biodegradation; PCBs in the Hudson river have been shown to be extensively dechlorinated, but the rate of dechlorination in anaerobic environments have been slow, over months or years. This study tested the effects of PCB concentration and sediment supplementation with 2,3,6-trichlorobiphenol, on the rate of PCB dechlorination and methanogenesis. The rates of meta dechlorination in sediment supplemented cultures were measured in the laboratory, including both the rate per bacterial cell and the rate of methanogenesis when dechlorination increases. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Can variable frequency drives reduce irrigation costs for rice producers?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable Frequency Drives (VFD's) allow for variable speed operation of electrical motor drive irrigation pumps and are an emerging technology for agricultural irrigation, primarily for pressurized irrigation systems. They are considered an energy savings device, but less is known about their app...

  16. Coaxial Redundant Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brissette, R.

    1983-01-01

    Harmonic drives allow redundancy and high out put torque in small package. If main drive fails, standby drive takes over and produces torque along same axis as main drive. Uses include power units in robot for internal pipeline inspection, manipulators in deep submersible probes or other applications in which redundancy protects against costly failures.

  17. African Americans' Perceptions of Their Teaching Experiences in Urban Schools Primarily Consisting of Hispanic Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Joffery, III.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined African American teachers' perceptions of their teaching experiences in schools that were once primarily populated with African American students but have experienced shifts in demographics to primarily consisting of Hispanic students. The study focused on three areas. The first area was African American teachers'…

  18. 12 CFR 225.127 - Investment in corporations or projects designed primarily to promote community welfare.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., small businesses, or nonprofit corporations to help achieve community development. (g) For purposes of... primarily to promote community welfare. 225.127 Section 225.127 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM... corporations or projects designed primarily to promote community welfare. (a) Under § 225.25(b)(6)...

  19. 12 CFR 225.127 - Investment in corporations or projects designed primarily to promote community welfare.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., small businesses, or nonprofit corporations to help achieve community development. (g) For purposes of... primarily to promote community welfare. 225.127 Section 225.127 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM... corporations or projects designed primarily to promote community welfare. (a) Under § 225.25(b)(6)...

  20. 12 CFR 225.127 - Investment in corporations or projects designed primarily to promote community welfare.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-income persons, small businesses, or nonprofit corporations to help achieve community development. (g... primarily to promote community welfare. 225.127 Section 225.127 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM... Investment in corporations or projects designed primarily to promote community welfare. (a) Under §...

  1. 12 CFR 225.127 - Investment in corporations or projects designed primarily to promote community welfare.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., small businesses, or nonprofit corporations to help achieve community development. (g) For purposes of... primarily to promote community welfare. 225.127 Section 225.127 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM... corporations or projects designed primarily to promote community welfare. (a) Under § 225.25(b)(6)...

  2. 12 CFR 225.127 - Investment in corporations or projects designed primarily to promote community welfare.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-income persons, small businesses, or nonprofit corporations to help achieve community development. (g... primarily to promote community welfare. 225.127 Section 225.127 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM... Investment in corporations or projects designed primarily to promote community welfare. (a) Under §...

  3. Potentially direct interspecies electron transfer of methanogenesis for syntrophic metabolism under sulfate reducing conditions with stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Zhang, Yaobin; Yang, Yafei; Quan, Xie; Zhao, Zhiqiang

    2017-06-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is an alternative to syntrophic metabolism in natural carbon cycle as well as in anaerobic digesters, but its function in anaerobic treatment of sulfate-containing wastewater have not yet to be described. Here, conductive stainless steel was added into anaerobic digesters for treating sulfate-containing wastewater to investigate the potential role of DIET in the response to the sulfate impact. Results showed that adding the conductive stainless steel made the anaerobic digestion less affected by the sulfate reduction than adding insulative plastic material. With adding stainless steel, methane production of the digesters increased by 7.5%-24.6%. Microbial analysis showed that the dissimilatory Fe (III) reducers like Geobacter species were enriched on the surface of the stainless steel. These results implied that the potential DIET of methanogenesis was established associating with stainless steel to outcompete the sulfate reduction.

  4. Feeding of tropical trees and shrub foliages as a strategy to reduce ruminal methanogenesis: studies conducted in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Denia Caridad; Galindo, Juana; González, Rogelio; González, Niurca; Scull, Idania; Dihigo, Luís; Cairo, Juan; Aldama, Ana Irma; Moreira, Onidia

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this paper was to present the main results obtained in Cuba on the effects of feeding tropical trees and shrubs on rumen methanogenesis in animals fed with low quality fibrous diets. More than 20 tree and shrub foliages were screened for phytochemicals and analyzed for chemical constituents. From these samples, seven promising plants (Samanea saman, Albizia lebbeck, Tithonia diversifolia, Leucaena leucocephala, Trichantera gigantea, Sapindus saponaria, and Morus alba) were evaluated for methane reduction using an in vitro rumen fermentation system. Results indicated that the inclusion levels of 25% of Sapindo, Morus, or Trichantera foliages in the foliages/grass mixtures (grass being Pennisetum purpureum) reduced (P < 0.01) methane production in vitro when compared to Pennisetum alone (17.0, 19.1, and 18.0 versus 26.2 mL CH(4)/g fermented dry matter, respectively). It was demonstrated that S. saman, A. lebbeck, or T. diversifolia accession 23 foliages when mixed at the rate of 30% in Cynodon nlemfuensis grass produced lower methane compared to the grass alone. Inclusion levels of 15% and 25% of a ruminal activator supplement containing 29% of L. leucocehala foliage meal reduced methane by 37% and 42% when compared to the treatment without supplementation. In vivo experiment with sheep showed that inclusion of 27% of L. leucocephala in the diet increased the DM intake but did not show significant difference in methane production compared to control diet without this foliage. The results of these experiments suggest that the feeding of tropical tree and shrub foliages could be an attractive strategy for reduction of ruminal methanogenesis from animals fed with low-quality forage diets and for improving their productivity.

  5. Impact of experimental drought and rewetting on redox transformations and methanogenesis in mesocosms of a northern fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodau, C.; Knorr, K.

    2008-12-01

    The impact of climate change on the greenhouse gas balance of peatlands is debated as they function both as sinks of carbon and significant sources of methane. To study redox transformations influencing methane production, we incubated two intact soil monoliths from a northern temperate fen and compared a permanently wet treatment to a treatment undergoing an experimentally induced drought for 50 days. Net turnover of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), methane (CH4) and electron acceptors in the saturated zone was calculated using a mass balance approach, and sulfate gross reduction rates were determined using a 35S radiotracer. Thermodynamic energy yield of different electron accepting processes was calculated and related to the observed respiration patterns. Permanently wet conditions lead to a depletion of electron acceptors within 50 days and onset of methanogenic conditions. During drought, electron acceptors were renewed and methanogenesis was temporarily suppressed in most of the peat for another 20-50 days after rewetting. Methanogenesis began, however, apparently locally before electron acceptors were fully depleted in the remainder of the peat, and iron and sulfate reduction occurred simultaneously. Anaerobic production of DIC could mostly but not fully be explained by reduction of nitrate, sulfate and ferric iron. Sulfate gross reduction rates of up to ~450 nmol cm- 3 d-1 determined with 35S-SO4 and potentially explained the surplus of 50-60 mmol m-2 of DIC production in one treatment; however, the sulfate pools were too small to sustain such rates beyond some hours to days. Furthermore, anaerobic DIC production proceeded at constant rates after depletion of dissolved inorganic electron acceptors, although not being balanced by methane production. An unknown electron acceptor was thus consumed, and sulfate and potentially other electron acceptors recycled, either by humic substances or by oxygen in the rhizosphere and capillary fringe at low levels of air

  6. Increased fermentation activity and persistent methanogenesis in a model aquifer system following source removal of an ethanol blend release.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Rixey, William G; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-01-01

    The increased probability of groundwater contamination by ethanol-blended fuel calls for improved understanding of how remediation efforts affect the fate and transport of constituents of concern, including the generation and fate of fermentation byproducts. A pilot-scale (8 m³) model aquifer was used to investigate changes in the concentrations of ethanol and its metabolites (methane and volatile fatty acids) after removal of the contamination source. Following the shut-off of a continuous release of a dissolved ethanol blend (10% v:v ethanol, 50 mg/L benzene, and 50 mg/L toluene), fermentation activity was surprisingly stimulated and the concentrations of ethanol metabolites increased. A microcosm experiment showed that this result was due to a decrease in the dissolved ethanol concentration below its toxicity threshold (∼2000 mg/L for this system). Methane generation (>1.5 mg/L of dissolved methane) persisted for more than 100 days after the disappearance of ethanol, despite clean air-saturated water flowing continuously through the tank at a relative high seepage velocity (0.76 m/day). Quantitative real-time PCR showed that functional genes associated with methane metabolism (mcrA for methanogenesis and pmoA for methanotrophy) also persisted in the aquifer material. Persistent methanogenesis was apparently due to the anaerobic degradation of soil-bound organic carbon (e.g., biomass grown on ethanol and other substrates). Overall, this study reflects the complex plume dynamics following source removal, and suggests that monitoring for increases in the concentration of ethanol metabolites that impact groundwater quality should be considered.

  7. Diversity of prokaryotes and methanogenesis in deep subsurface sediments from the Nankai Trough, Ocean Drilling Program Leg 190.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Carole J; Webster, Gordon; Cragg, Barry A; Parkes, R John; Weightman, Andrew J; Fry, John C

    2004-03-01

    Diversity of Bacteria and Archaea was studied in deep marine sediments by PCR amplification and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and methyl co-enzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes. Samples analysed were from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 190 deep subsurface sediments at three sites spanning the Nankai Trough in the Pacific Ocean off Shikoku Island, Japan. DNA was amplified, from three depths at site 1173 (4.15, 98.29 and 193.29 mbsf; metres below the sea floor), and phylogenetic analysis of clone libraries showed a wide variety of uncultured Bacteria and Archaea. Sequences of Bacteria were dominated by an uncultured and deeply branching 'deep sediment group' (53% of sequences). Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were mainly within the uncultured clades of the Crenarchaeota. There was good agreement between sequences obtained independently by cloning and by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. These sequences were similar to others retrieved from marine sediment and other anoxic habitats, and so probably represent important indigenous bacteria. The mcrA gene analysis suggested limited methanogen diversity with only three gene clusters identified within the Methanosarcinales and Methanobacteriales. The cultivated members of the Methanobacteriales and some of the Methanosarcinales can use CO2 and H2 for methanogenesis. These substrates also gave the highest rates in 14C-radiotracer estimates of methanogenic activity, with rates comparable to those from other deep marine sediments. Thus, this research demonstrates the importance of the 'deep sediment group' of uncultured Bacteria and links limited diversity of methanogens to the dominance of CO2/H2 based methanogenesis in deep sub-seafloor sediments.

  8. Methanogenesis produces strong 13C enrichment in stromatolites of Lagoa Salgada, Brazil: a modern analogue for Palaeo-/Neoproterozoic stromatolites?

    PubMed

    Birgel, D; Meister, P; Lundberg, R; Horath, T D; Bontognali, T R R; Bahniuk, A M; de Rezende, C E; Vasconcelos, C; McKenzie, J A

    2015-05-01

    Holocene stromatolites characterized by unusually positive inorganic δ(13) CPDB values (i.e. up to +16‰) are present in Lagoa Salgada, a seasonally brackish to hypersaline lagoon near Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Such positive values cannot be explained by phototrophic fixation of CO2 alone, and they suggest that methanogenesis was a dominating process during the growth of the stromatolites. Indeed, up to 5 mm methane was measured in the porewater. The archaeal membrane lipid archaeol showing δ(13) C values between -15 and 0‰ suggests that archaea are present and producing methane in the modern lagoon sediment. Moreover, (13) C-depleted hopanoids diplopterol and 3β-methylated C32 17β(H),21β(H)-hopanoic acid (both -40‰) are preserved in lagoon sediments and are most likely derived from aerobic methanotrophic bacteria thriving in the methane-enriched water column. Loss of isotopically light methane through the water column would explain the residual (13) C-enriched pool of dissolved inorganic carbon from where the carbonate constituting the stromatolites precipitated. The predominance of methanogenic archaea in the lagoon is most likely a result of sulphate limitation, suppressing the activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria under brackish conditions in a seasonally humid tropical environment. Indeed, sulphate-reduction activity is very low in the modern sediments. In absence of an efficient carbonate-inducing metabolic process, we propose that stromatolite formation in Lagoa Salgada was abiotically induced, while the (13) C-enriched organic and inorganic carbon pools are due to methanogenesis. Unusually, (13) C-enriched stromatolitic deposits also appear in the geological record of prolonged periods in the Palaeo- and Neoproterozoic. Lagoa Salgada represents a possible modern analogue to conditions that may have been widespread in the Proterozoic, at times when low sulphate concentrations in sea water allowed methanogens to prevail over sulphate

  9. Changing Feeding Regimes To Demonstrate Flexible Biogas Production: Effects on Process Performance, Microbial Community Structure, and Methanogenesis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mulat, Daniel Girma; Jacobi, H. Fabian; Feilberg, Anders; Adamsen, Anders Peter S.; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Flexible biogas production that adapts biogas output to energy demand can be regulated by changing feeding regimes. In this study, the effect of changes in feeding intervals on process performance, microbial community structure, and the methanogenesis pathway was investigated. Three different feeding regimes (once daily, every second day, and every 2 h) at the same organic loading rate were studied in continuously stirred tank reactors treating distiller's dried grains with solubles. A larger amount of biogas was produced after feeding in the reactors fed less frequently (once per day and every second day), whereas the amount remained constant in the reactor fed more frequently (every 2 h), indicating the suitability of the former for the flexible production of biogas. Compared to the conventional more frequent feeding regimes, a methane yield that was up to 14% higher and an improved stability of the process against organic overloading were achieved by employing less frequent feeding regimes. The community structures of bacteria and methanogenic archaea were monitored by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA and mcrA genes, respectively. The results showed that the composition of the bacterial community varied under the different feeding regimes, and the observed T-RFLP patterns were best explained by the differences in the total ammonia nitrogen concentrations, H2 levels, and pH values. However, the methanogenic community remained stable under all feeding regimes, with the dominance of the Methanosarcina genus followed by that of the Methanobacterium genus. Stable isotope analysis showed that the average amount of methane produced during each feeding event by acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was not influenced by the three different feeding regimes. PMID:26497462

  10. Power semiconductor controlled drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Gopal K.

    This book presents power semiconductor controlled drives employing dc motors, induction motors, and synchronous motors. The dynamics of motor and load systems are covered. Open-loop and closed-loop drives are considered, and thyristor, power transistor, and GTO converters are discussed. In-depth coverage is given to ac drives, particularly those fed by voltage and current source inverters and cycloconverters. Full coverage is given to brushless and commutatorless dc drives, including load-commuted synchronous motor drives. Rectifier-controlled dc drives are presented in detail.

  11. Ocular disease and driving.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joanne M; Black, Alex A

    2016-09-01

    As the driving population ages, the number of drivers with visual impairment resulting from ocular disease will increase given the age-related prevalence of ocular disease. The increase in visual impairment in the driving population has a number of implications for driving outcomes. This review summarises current research regarding the impact of common ocular diseases on driving ability and safety, with particular focus on cataract, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, hemianopia and diabetic retinopathy. The evidence considered includes self-reported driving outcomes, driving performance (on-road and simulator-based) and various motor vehicle crash indices. Collectively, this review demonstrates that driving ability and safety are negatively affected by ocular disease; however, further research is needed in this area. Older drivers with ocular disease need to be aware of the negative consequences of their ocular condition and in the case where treatment options are available, encouraged to seek these earlier for optimum driving safety and quality of life benefits.

  12. Dementia and driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000028.htm Dementia and driving To use the sharing features on this page, ... their independence is being taken away. Signs That Driving May No Longer be Safe People with signs ...

  13. Safe driving for teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/pubmed/25837240 . Simons-Morton B, Ouimet MC. Parent involvement in novice teen driving: a review of the ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16788109 . Simons-Morton B. Parent involvement in novice teen driving: rationale, evidence of effects, ...

  14. Gear bearing drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  15. Sequential Dependencies in Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doshi, Anup; Tran, Cuong; Wilder, Matthew H.; Mozer, Michael C.; Trivedi, Mohan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of recent experience on current behavior has been studied extensively in simple laboratory tasks. We explore the nature of sequential effects in the more naturalistic setting of automobile driving. Driving is a safety-critical task in which delayed response times may have severe consequences. Using a realistic driving simulator, we find…

  16. Magnetic drive coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Edward L. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The driving and driven members of a magnetic drive are separated by en enlarged gap to provide clearance for a conduit or other member. Flux pins in the gap maintain the torque transmitting capability of the drive. The spacing between two of the flux pins is increased to provide space for the conduit.

  17. Grieving while Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Paul C.

    2004-01-01

    Secondary analysis of data from 84 people in 2 interview studies shows that some bereaved people grieve actively while driving. The grief can be intense, even years after a death. Grief while driving may erupt spontaneously or be set off by a wide range of reminders. Some bereaved people seem to save their grieving for times when they drive,…

  18. Syncope and Driving.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Juan C; Morillo, Carlos A

    2015-08-01

    The occurrence of syncope while driving has obvious implications for personal and public safety. Neurally mediated syncope is the most common type of syncope in general and, thereby, also while driving. The presence of structural heart disease (reduced ejection fraction, previous myocardial infarction, significant congenital heart disease) potentially leads to high risk and should determine driving restrictions pending clarification of underlying heart disease and etiology of syncope. The clinical approach to syncope evaluation and recommendations for driving should not differ, whether or not the syncopal spell occurred while driving.

  19. The Effect of Plant Extracts on In-vitro Ruminal Fermentation, Methanogenesis and Methane-related Microbes in the Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Kim, E. T.; Min, K. -S.; Kim, C. -H.; Moon, Y. H.; Kim, S. C.; Lee, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The effect on methanogens attached to the surface of rumen ciliate protozoa by the addition of plant extracts (pine needles and ginkgo leaves) was studied with particular reference to their effectiveness for decreasing methane emission. The plant extracts (pine needles and ginkgo leaves) were added to an in vitro fermentation incubated with rumen fluid. The microbial population including bacteria, ciliated-associated methanogen, four different groups of methanogens and Fibrobacter succinogenes were quantified by using the real-time PCR. Gas profiles including methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and runinal fermentation characteristics were observed in vitro. The methane emission from samples with an addition of individual juices from pine needles, ginkgo leaves and 70% ethanol extract from ginko leaves was significantly lower (p<0.05, 27.1, 28.1 and 28.1 vs 34.0 ml/g DM) than that of the control, respectively. Total VFAs in samples with an addition of any of the plant extracts were significantly lower than that of the control (p<0.05) as well. The order Methanococcales and the order Methanosarcinales were not detected by using PCR in any incubated mixtures. The ciliate-associated methanogens population decreased from 25% to 49% in the plant extacts as compared to control. We speculate that the supplementation of juice from pine needles and ginkgo leaves extract (70% ethanol extract) decreased the protozoa population resulting in a reduction of methane emission in the rumen and thus inhibiting methanogenesis. The order Methanobacteriales community was affected by addition of all plant extracts and decreased to less than the control, while the order Methanomicrobiales population showed an increase to more than that of the control. The F. succinogenes, the major fibrolytic microorganism, population in all added plant extracts was increased to greater than that of the control. In conclusion, pine needles and ginkgo leaves extracts appear to have properties that

  20. A genomic timescale of prokaryote evolution: insights into the origin of methanogenesis, phototrophy, and the colonization of land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battistuzzi, Fabia U.; Feijao, Andreia; Hedges, S. Blair

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The timescale of prokaryote evolution has been difficult to reconstruct because of a limited fossil record and complexities associated with molecular clocks and deep divergences. However, the relatively large number of genome sequences currently available has provided a better opportunity to control for potential biases such as horizontal gene transfer and rate differences among lineages. We assembled a data set of sequences from 32 proteins (approximately 7600 amino acids) common to 72 species and estimated phylogenetic relationships and divergence times with a local clock method. RESULTS: Our phylogenetic results support most of the currently recognized higher-level groupings of prokaryotes. Of particular interest is a well-supported group of three major lineages of eubacteria (Actinobacteria, Deinococcus, and Cyanobacteria) that we call Terrabacteria and associate with an early colonization of land. Divergence time estimates for the major groups of eubacteria are between 2.5-3.2 billion years ago (Ga) while those for archaebacteria are mostly between 3.1-4.1 Ga. The time estimates suggest a Hadean origin of life (prior to 4.1 Ga), an early origin of methanogenesis (3.8-4.1 Ga), an origin of anaerobic methanotrophy after 3.1 Ga, an origin of phototrophy prior to 3.2 Ga, an early colonization of land 2.8-3.1 Ga, and an origin of aerobic methanotrophy 2.5-2.8 Ga. CONCLUSIONS: Our early time estimates for methanogenesis support the consideration of methane, in addition to carbon dioxide, as a greenhouse gas responsible for the early warming of the Earths' surface. Our divergence times for the origin of anaerobic methanotrophy are compatible with highly depleted carbon isotopic values found in rocks dated 2.8-2.6 Ga. An early origin of phototrophy is consistent with the earliest bacterial mats and structures identified as stromatolites, but a 2.6 Ga origin of cyanobacteria suggests that those Archean structures, if biologically produced, were made by

  1. Drill drive mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Dressel, Michael O.

    1979-01-01

    A drill drive mechanism is especially adapted to provide both rotational drive and axial feed for a drill of substantial diameter such as may be used for drilling holes for roof bolts in mine shafts. The drill shaft is made with a helical pattern of scroll-like projections on its surface for removal of cuttings. The drill drive mechanism includes a plurality of sprockets carrying two chains of drive links which are arranged to interlock around the drill shaft with each drive link having depressions which mate with the scroll-like projections. As the chain links move upwardly or downwardly the surfaces of the depressions in the links mate with the scroll projections to move the shaft axially. Tangs on the drive links mate with notch surfaces between scroll projections to provide a means for rotating the shaft. Projections on the drive links mate together at the center to hold the drive links tightly around the drill shaft. The entire chain drive mechanism is rotated around the drill shaft axis by means of a hydraulic motor and gear drive to cause rotation of the drill shaft. This gear drive also connects with a differential gearset which is interconnected with a second gear. A second motor is connected to the spider shaft of the differential gearset to produce differential movement (speeds) at the output gears of the differential gearset. This differential in speed is utilized to drive said second gear at a speed different from the speed of said gear drive, this speed differential being utilized to drive said sprockets for axial movement of said drill shaft.

  2. Effects and mode of action of chitosan and ivy fruit saponins on the microbiome, fermentation and methanogenesis in the rumen simulation technique.

    PubMed

    Belanche, Alejandro; Pinloche, Eric; Preskett, David; Newbold, C Jamie

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of supplementing a control diet (CON) with chitosan (CHI) or ivy fruit saponins (IVY) as natural feed additives. Both additives had similar abilities to decrease rumen methanogenesis (-42% and -40%, respectively) using different mechanisms: due to its antimicrobial and nutritional properties CHI promoted a shift in the fermentation pattern towards propionate production which explained about two thirds of the decrease in methanogenesis. This shift was achieved by a simplification of the structure in the bacterial community and a substitution of fibrolytic (Firmicutes and Fibrobacteres) by amylolytic bacteria (Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria) which led to greater amylase activity, lactate and microbial protein yield with no detrimental effect on feed digestibility. Contrarily, IVY had negligible nutritional properties promoting minor changes in the fermentation pattern and on the bacterial community. Instead, IVY modified the structure of the methanogen community and decreased its diversity. This specific antimicrobial effect of IVY against methanogens was considered its main antimethanogenic mechanism. IVY had however a negative impact on microbial protein synthesis. Therefore, CHI and IVY should be further investigated in vivo to determine the optimum doses which maintain low methanogenesis but prevent negative effects on the rumen fermentation and animal metabolism.

  3. 29 CFR 780.607 - “Primarily employed” in agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false âPrimarily employedâ in agriculture. 780.607 Section 780... AGRICULTURE, PROCESSING OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, AND RELATED SUBJECTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Employment in Agriculture and Livestock Auction Operations Under the Section 13(b)(13) Exemption...

  4. 29 CFR 780.607 - “Primarily employed” in agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false âPrimarily employedâ in agriculture. 780.607 Section 780... AGRICULTURE, PROCESSING OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, AND RELATED SUBJECTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Employment in Agriculture and Livestock Auction Operations Under the Section 13(b)(13) Exemption...

  5. 29 CFR 780.607 - “Primarily employed” in agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âPrimarily employedâ in agriculture. 780.607 Section 780... AGRICULTURE, PROCESSING OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, AND RELATED SUBJECTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Employment in Agriculture and Livestock Auction Operations Under the Section 13(b)(13) Exemption...

  6. 29 CFR 780.607 - “Primarily employed” in agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false âPrimarily employedâ in agriculture. 780.607 Section 780... AGRICULTURE, PROCESSING OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, AND RELATED SUBJECTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Employment in Agriculture and Livestock Auction Operations Under the Section 13(b)(13) Exemption...

  7. 29 CFR 780.607 - “Primarily employed” in agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false âPrimarily employedâ in agriculture. 780.607 Section 780... AGRICULTURE, PROCESSING OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, AND RELATED SUBJECTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Employment in Agriculture and Livestock Auction Operations Under the Section 13(b)(13) Exemption...

  8. Examining the Effects of Introducing Online Access to ACS Journals at Primarily Undergraduate Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landolt, R. G.

    2007-01-01

    In collaboration with the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS), students and faculty at 24 primarily undergraduate institutions were provided online access to ACS primary research journals for a period of 18 months, and a group of eight schools were granted access to use the archives of ACS journals for a year. Resources…

  9. Identity-Related Influences on the Success of Minority Workers in Primarily Nonminority Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Keith; Khoo, Gillian

    1991-01-01

    Reviews literature at the micro- (individual, interpersonal, and small group) and macro- (organizational, societal, and cultural) levels relating to the experiences and outcomes of minorities in work settings populated primarily by members of the majority. Uses Tajfel and Turner's Social Identity Theory as an organizational and integrative…

  10. Propulsion and control propellers with thruster nozzles primarily for aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pabst, W.

    1986-01-01

    A propulsion and control propeller with thruster nozzles, primarily for aircraft application is described. Adjustability of rotor blades at the hub and pressurized gas expulsion combined with an air propeller increase power. Both characteristics are combined in one simple device, and, furthermore, incorporate overall aircraft control so that mechanisms which govern lateral and horizontal movement become superfluous.

  11. Autism and Developmental Screening in a Public, Primary Care Setting Primarily Serving Hispanics: Challenges and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Gayle C.; Smith, Karen S.; Rosen, Nila; Anderson, Meredith C.; Grether, Judith K.; Coolman, Richard B.; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    We implemented screening of children 16-30 months of age (n = 1,760) from a typically under-served, primarily Hispanic, population, at routine pediatric appointments using the modified checklist for autism in toddlers (M-CHAT) and Ages and Stages Questionnaire. Screen positive rates of 26 and 39%, respectively, were higher than previous reports.…

  12. A contribution of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis to the biogenic coal bed methane reserves of Southern Qinshui Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongguang; Yu, Zhisheng; Thompson, Ian P; Zhang, Hongxun

    2014-11-01

    The activity of methanogens and related bacteria which inhabit the coal beds is essential for stimulating new biogenic coal bed methane (CBM) production from the coal matrix. In this study, the microbial community structure and methanogenesis were investigated in Southern Qinshui Basin in China, and the composition and stable isotopic ratios of CBM were also determined. Although geochemical analysis suggested a mainly thermogenic origin for CBM, the microbial community structure and activities strongly implied the presence of methanogens in situ. 454 pyrosequencing analysis combined with methyl coenzyme-M reductase (mcrA) gene clone library analysis revealed that the archaeal communities in the water samples from both coal seams were similar, with the dominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanobacterium. The activity and potential of these populations to produce methane were confirmed by the observation of methane production in enrichments supplemented with H2 + CO2 and formate, and the only archaea successfully propagated in the tested water samples was from the genus Methanobacterium. 454 pyrosequencing analysis also recovered the diverse bacterial communities in the water samples, which have the potential to play a role in the coal biodegradation fueling methanogens. These results suggest that the biogenic CBM was generated by coal degradation via the hydrogenotrophic methanogens and related bacteria, which also contribute to the huge CBM reserves in Southern Qinshui Basin, China.

  13. Conversion of Cn-Unsaturated into Cn-2-Saturated LCFA Can Occur Uncoupled from Methanogenesis in Anaerobic Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Cavaleiro, Ana J; Pereira, Maria Alcina; Guedes, Ana P; Stams, Alfons J M; Alves, M Madalena; Sousa, Diana Z

    2016-03-15

    Fat, oils, and grease present in complex wastewater can be readily converted to methane, but the energy potential of these compounds is not always recyclable, due to incomplete degradation of long chain fatty acids (LCFA) released during lipids hydrolysis. Oleate (C18:1) is generally the dominant LCFA in lipid-containing wastewater, and its conversion in anaerobic bioreactors results in palmitate (C16:0) accumulation. The reason why oleate is continuously converted to palmitate without further degradation via β-oxidation is still unknown. In this work, the influence of methanogenic activity in the initial conversion steps of unsaturated LCFA was studied in 10 bioreactors continuously operated with saturated or unsaturated C16- and C18-LCFA, in the presence or absence of the methanogenic inhibitor bromoethanesulfonate (BrES). Saturated Cn-2-LCFA accumulated both in the presence and absence of BrES during the degradation of unsaturated Cn-LCFA, and represented more than 50% of total LCFA. In the presence of BrES further conversion of saturated intermediates did not proceed, not even when prolonged batch incubation was applied. As the initial steps of unsaturated LCFA degradation proceed uncoupled from methanogenesis, accumulation of saturated LCFA can be expected. Analysis of the active microbial communities suggests a role for facultative anaerobic bacteria in the initial steps of unsaturated LCFA biodegradation. Understanding this role is now imperative to optimize methane production from LCFA.

  14. Contributions of available substrates and activities of trophic microbial community to methanogenesis in vegetative and reproductive rice rhizospheric soil.

    PubMed

    Chawanakul, Sansanee; Chaiprasert, Pawinee; Towprayoon, Sirintornthep; Tanticharoen, Morakot

    2009-01-01

    Potential of methane production and trophic microbial activities at rhizospheric soil during rice cv. Supanbunri 1 cultivation were determined by laboratory anaerobic diluents vials. The methane production was higher from rhizospheric than non-rhizospheric soil, with the noticeable peaks during reproductive phase (RP) than vegetative phase (VP). Glucose, ethanol and acetate were the dominant available substrates found in rhizospheric soil during methane production at both phases. The predominance activities of trophic microbial consortium in methanogenesis, namely fermentative bacteria (FB), acetogenic bacteria (AGB), acetate utilizing bacteria (AB) and acetoclastic methanogens (AM) were also determined. At RP, these microbial groups were enhanced in the higher of methane production than VP. This correlates with our finding that methane production was greater at the rhizospheric soil with the noticeable peaks during RP (1,150 +/- 60 nmol g dw(-1) d(-1)) compared with VP (510 +/- 30 nmol g dw(-1) d(-1)). The high number of AM showed the abundant (1.1x10(4) cell g dw(-1)) with its high activity at RP, compared to the less activity with AM number at VP (9.8x10(2) cell g dw(-1)). Levels of AM are low in the total microbial population, being less than 1% of AB. These evidences revealed that the microbial consortium of these two phases were different.

  15. Deep subsurface sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in the Iberian Pyrite Belt revealed through geochemistry and molecular biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Puente-Sánchez, F; Moreno-Paz, M; Rivas, L A; Cruz-Gil, P; García-Villadangos, M; Gómez, M J; Postigo, M; Garrido, P; González-Toril, E; Briones, C; Fernández-Remolar, D; Stoker, C; Amils, R; Parro, V

    2014-01-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB, southwest of Spain), the largest known massive sulfide deposit, fuels a rich chemolithotrophic microbial community in the Río Tinto area. However, the geomicrobiology of its deep subsurface is still unexplored. Herein, we report on the geochemistry and prokaryotic diversity in the subsurface (down to a depth of 166 m) of the Iberian Pyritic belt using an array of geochemical and complementary molecular ecology techniques. Using an antibody microarray, we detected polymeric biomarkers (lipoteichoic acids and peptidoglycan) from Gram-positive bacteria throughout the borehole. DNA microarray hybridization confirmed the presence of members of methane oxidizers, sulfate-reducers, metal and sulfur oxidizers, and methanogenic Euryarchaeota. DNA sequences from denitrifying and hydrogenotrophic bacteria were also identified. FISH hybridization revealed live bacterial clusters associated with microniches on mineral surfaces. These results, together with measures of the geochemical parameters in the borehole, allowed us to create a preliminary scheme of the biogeochemical processes that could be operating in the deep subsurface of the Iberian Pyrite Belt, including microbial metabolisms such as sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation.

  16. Effect of antibiotics, 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid and pyromellitic diimide on methanogenesis in rumen ciliate cultures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Váradyová, Z; Kisidayová, S; Zelenák, I; Siroka, P

    2001-01-01

    The effects of penicillin G, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid and pyromellitic diimide on total gas, methane, volatile fatty acid production and food degradability after 24 h of incubation in vitro were investigated in the cultures of two rumen ciliates. The inocula of both rumen ciliates Entodinium caudatum and Epidinium ecaudatum were used at a volume of 34 ml into the 50 ml glass syringes together with the feed and compounds tested. Despite penicillin G--streptomycin treatment methane production in both cultures was significantly decreased by the inhibitors for Epidinium ecaudatum. Methane production of the bacterial fraction of both protozoan species was significantly lower than in the whole cultures. No epifluorescence of methanogens on (or in) the cells of Entodinium caudatum was observed in contrast to Epidinium with which strong epifluorescence of methanogens on the cell surface was detected. Microscopic observation could indicate that the methane production by Entodinium caudatum was probably caused by their intracellular methanogenic activity, while methane production by Epidinium ecaudatum could be related to both the methanogenic bacterial fraction from their external surface and probably also to intracellular activity. Decreased feed degradability and differences in the fermentation end products accompanied the inhibition of methanogenesis in both in vitro cultures. Entodinium caudatum appeared to be more sensitive than Epidinium ecaudatum to the compounds tested.

  17. Closed nutrient recycling via microbial catabolism in an eco-engineered self regenerating mixed anaerobic microbiome for hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Savvas, Savvas; Donnelly, Joanne; Patterson, Tim P; Dinsdale, Richard; Esteves, Sandra R

    2017-03-01

    A novel eco-engineered mixed anaerobic culture was successfully demonstrated for the first time to be capable of continuous regeneration in nutrient limiting conditions. Microbial catabolism has been found to support a closed system of nutrients able to enrich a culture of lithotrophic methanogens and provide microbial cell recycling. After enrichment, the hydrogenotrophic species was the dominating methanogens while a bacterial substratum was responsible for the redistribution of nutrients. q-PCR results indicated that 7% of the total population was responsible for the direct conversion of the gases. The efficiency of H2/CO2 conversion to CH4 reached 100% at a gassing rate of above 60v/v/d. The pH of the culture media was effectively sustained at optimal levels (pH 7-8) through a buffering system created by the dissolved CO2. The novel approach can reduce the process nutrient/metal requirement and enhance the environmental and financial performance of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis for renewable energy storage.

  18. [Hypoglycaemia unawareness: judge driving ability prudently].

    PubMed

    Stork, Alexander D M

    2011-01-01

    Several factors can influence the ability to drive by patients with diabetes mellitus. The most important factor would be hypoglycaemia. It seems logical that hypoglycaemia unawareness would be an important risk factor for accidents. However, in everyday practice, hypoglycaemia-related accidents are rare. Moreover, it seems that only a small subset of people with diabetes is responsible for the overall slightly elevated risk of car accidents. It appears that not hypoglycaemia unawareness itself is a risk factor, but primarily a history of previous hypoglycaemia-related accidents. Although ascertaining hypoglycaemia awareness currently seems the most suitable method for the assessment of driving ability, this may not be fair. In the future, we hope to have better methods of assessing the risk of accidents. Until that time, we should apply current law prudently, and mainly preclude from driving those diabetic patients who have experienced loss of consciousness or have needed outside help due to hypoglycaemia.

  19. Marihuana and driving.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, H

    1985-08-01

    A review was performed of the marihuana and driving literature, both epidemiological and experimental. It was noted that epidemiological studies face considerable difficulties in obtaining estimates of risks involved for drivers utilizing marihuana due to the rapid decline in blood levels of tetrahydrocannabinol. On the other hand, experimental studies examining the relationship between administered marihuana dose and performance have identified many driving-related areas as exhibiting impairment. Areas impaired include coordination, tracking, perception, vigilance and performance in both driving simulators and on the road. Other behavioral areas of lesser importance for driving also exhibited evidence of impairment by marihuana. Areas for further research are suggested.

  20. Hydrogen and carbon isotope systematics in hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis under H2-limited and H2-enriched conditions: implications for the origin of methane and its isotopic diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Tomoyo; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Saito, Yayoi; Matsui, Yohei; Takai, Ken; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen and carbon isotope systematics of H2O-H2-CO2-CH4 in hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and their relation to H2 availability were investigated. Two H2-syntrophic cocultures of fermentatively hydrogenogenic bacteria and hydrogenotrophic methanogens under conditions of <102 Pa-H2 and two pure cultures of hydrogenotrophic methanogens under conditions of 105 Pa-H2 were tested. Carbon isotope fractionation between CH4 and CO2 during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was correlated with pH2, as indicated in previous studies. The hydrogen isotope ratio of CH4 produced during rapid growth of the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermococcus okinawensis under high pH2 conditions ( 105 Pa) was affected by the isotopic composition of H2, as concluded in a previous study of Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus. This " {δ D}_{{H}_2} effect" is a possible cause of the diversity of previously reported values for hydrogen isotope fractionation between CH4 and H2O examined in H2-enriched culture experiments. Hydrogen isotope fractionation between CH4 and H2O, defined by (1000 + {δ D}_{{CH}_4} )/(1000 + {δ D}_{{H}_2O} ), during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis of the H2-syntrophic cocultures was in the range 0.67-0.69. The hydrogen isotope fractionation of our H2-syntrophic dataset overlaps with those obtained not only from low- pH2 experiments reported so far but also from natural samples of "young" methane reservoirs (0.66-0.74). Conversely, such hydrogen isotope fractionation is not consistent with that of "aged" methane in geological samples (≥0.79), which has been regarded as methane produced via hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis from the carbon isotope fractionation. As a possible process inducing the inconsistency in hydrogen isotope signatures between experiments and geological samples, we hypothesize that the hydrogen isotope signature of CH4 imprinted at the time of methanogenesis, as in the experiments and natural young methane, may be altered by diagenetic hydrogen

  1. Primarily chronic progressive and relapsing/remitting multiple sclerosis: two immunogenetically distinct disease entities.

    PubMed Central

    Olerup, O; Hillert, J; Fredrikson, S; Olsson, T; Kam-Hansen, S; Möller, E; Carlsson, B; Wallin, J

    1989-01-01

    HLA class II gene polymorphism was investigated in 100 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS) by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of Taq I-digested DNA using DRB, DQA, and DQB cDNA probes. Twenty-six patients had primarily chronic progressive MS and 74 had relapsing/remitting MS. The latter group included patients with a secondary progressive evolution of symptoms. Both clinical forms of MS were found to be associated with the DRw15,DQw6 haplotype. In addition, primarily chronic progressive MS was positively associated with the DQB1 restriction fragment pattern seen in DR4,DQw8, DR7,DQw9, and DRw8, DQw4 haplotypes, as well as negatively associated with the Taq I DQB1 allelic pattern corresponding to the serological specificity DQw7. Relapsing/remitting MS was positively associated with the DQB1 allelic pattern observed in the DRw17,DQw2 haplotype. These three DQB1 alleles are in strong negative linkage disequilibria with DRw15. The two susceptibility markers of each clinical form of MS act additively in determining the genetic susceptibility, as the relative risks for individuals carrying both markers roughly equal the sum of respective risks. Different alleles of the DQB1 locus defined by restriction fragment length polymorphisms contribute to susceptibility and resistance to primarily chronic progressive MS as well as to susceptibility to relapsing/remitting MS. The observed immunogenetic heterogeneity between the different clinical forms of MS favors the hypothesis that primarily chronic progressive MS and relapsing/remitting MS are two distinct disease entities. Images PMID:2571150

  2. Environmental changes affect the assembly of soil bacterial community primarily by mediating stochastic processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ximei; Johnston, Eric R; Liu, Wei; Li, Linghao; Han, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    Both 'species fitness difference'-based deterministic processes, such as competitive exclusion and environmental filtering, and 'species fitness difference'-independent stochastic processes, such as birth/death and dispersal/colonization, can influence the assembly of soil microbial communities. However, how both types of processes are mediated by anthropogenic environmental changes has rarely been explored. Here we report a novel and general pattern that almost all anthropogenic environmental changes that took place in a grassland ecosystem affected soil bacterial community assembly primarily through promoting or restraining stochastic processes. We performed four experiments mimicking 16 types of environmental changes and separated the compositional variation of soil bacterial communities caused by each environmental change into deterministic and stochastic components, with a recently developed method. Briefly, because the difference between control and treatment communities is primarily caused by deterministic processes, the deterministic change was quantified as (mean compositional variation between treatment and control) - (mean compositional variation within control). The difference among replicate treatment communities is primarily caused by stochastic processes, so the stochastic change was estimated as (mean compositional variation within treatment) - (mean compositional variation within control). The absolute of the stochastic change was greater than that of the deterministic change across almost all environmental changes, which was robust for both taxonomic and functional-based criterion. Although the deterministic change may become more important as environmental changes last longer, our findings showed that changes usually occurred through mediating stochastic processes over 5 years, challenging the traditional determinism-dominated view.

  3. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    DOEpatents

    Treu, C.A. Jr.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes. 7 figs.

  4. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    DOEpatents

    Treu, Jr., Charles A.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes.

  5. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  6. Near-infrared spectroscopy as a tool for driving research.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Pelowski, Matthew; Pang, Changle; Zhou, Yuanji; Cai, Jianfeng

    2016-03-01

    Driving a motor vehicle requires various cognitive functions to process surrounding information, to guide appropriate actions, and especially to respond to or integrate with numerous contextual and perceptual hindrances or risks. It is, thus, imperative to examine driving performance and road safety from a perspective of cognitive neuroscience, which considers both the behaviour and the functioning of the brain. However, because of technical limitations of current brain imaging approaches, studies have primarily adopted driving games or simulators to present participants with simulated driving environments that may have less ecological validity. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a relatively new, non-invasive brain-imaging technique allowing measurement of brain activations in more realistic settings, even within real motor vehicles. This study reviews current NIRS driving research and explores NIRS' potential as a new tool to examine driving behaviour, along with various risk factors in natural situations, promoting our understanding about neural mechanisms of driving safety. Practitioner Summary: Driving a vehicle is dependent on a range of neurocognitive processing abilities. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive brain-imaging technique allowing measurement of brain activation even in on-road studies within real motor vehicles. This study reviews current NIRS driving research and explores the potential of NIRS as a new tool to examine driving behaviour.

  7. Driving and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda; Molnar, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide primary care physicians with an approach to driving safety concerns when older persons present with memory difficulties. Sources of information The approach is based on an accredited memory clinic training program developed by the Centre for Family Medicine Primary Care Collaborative Memory Clinic. Main message One of the most challenging aspects of dementia care is the assessment of driving safety. Drivers with dementia are at higher risk of motor vehicle collisions, yet many drivers with mild dementia might be safely able to continue driving for several years. Because safe driving is dependent on multiple cognitive and functional skills, clinicians should carefully consider many factors when determining if cognitive concerns affect driving safety. Specific findings on corroborated history and office-based cognitive testing might aid in the physician’s decisions to refer for comprehensive on-road driving evaluation and whether to notify transportation authorities in accordance with provincial reporting requirements. Sensitive communication and a person-centred approach are essential. Conclusion Primary care physicians must consider many factors when determining if cognitive concerns might affect driving safety in older drivers. PMID:28115437

  8. 49 CFR 37.107 - Acquisition of passenger rail cars by private entities primarily engaged in the business of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... entities primarily engaged in the business of transporting people. 37.107 Section 37.107 Transportation... entities primarily engaged in the business of transporting people. (a) A private entity which is primarily engaged in the business of transporting people and whose operations affect commerce, which makes...

  9. Drive System Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Glenn Research Center Drive Systems Research will be presented. The primary purpose of this research is to improve performance, reliability, and integrity of aerospace drive systems and space mechanisms. The research is conducted through a combination of in-house, academia, and through contractors. Research is conducted through computer code development and validated through component and system testing. The drive system activity currently has four major thrust areas including: thermal behavior of high speed gearing, health and usage monitoring, advanced components, and space mechanisms.

  10. Vision and Driving

    PubMed Central

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Driving is the primary means of personal travel in many countries and is relies heavily on vision for its successful execution. Research over the past few decades has addressed the role of vision in driver safety (motor vehicle collision involvement) and in driver performance (both on-road and using interactive simulators in the laboratory). Here we critically review what is currently known about the role of various aspects of visual function in driving. We also discuss translational research issues on vision screening for licensure and re-licensure and rehabilitation of visually impaired persons who want to drive. PMID:20580907

  11. The Test Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory shows engineers rehearsing the sol 133 (June 8, 2004) drive into 'Endurance' crater by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. Engineers and scientists have recreated the martian surface and slope the rover will encounter using a combination of bare and thinly sand-coated rocks, simulated martian 'blueberries' and a platform tilted at a 25-degree angle. The results of this test convinced engineers that the rover was capable of driving up and down a straight slope before it attempted the actual drive on Mars.

  12. Fast wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Fast wave current drive is demonstrated in the Princeton ACT-I toroidal device. The fast Alfven wave, in the range of high ion-cyclotron harmonics, produced 40 A of current from 1 kW of rf power coupled into the plasma by fast wave loop antenna. This wave excites a steady current by damping on the energetic tail of the electron distribution function in the same way as lower-hybrid current drive, except that fast wave current drive is appropriate for higher plasma densities.

  13. [Driving and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Roche, Jean

    2005-09-01

    Although most aged people remain safe drivers, a greater risk for crashes due to medical conditions is observed in the elderly. Impairment of important functions for safe driving such as visuospatial skills, attention, memory and judgement are observed in dementia, particularly in Alzheimer's disease. The accident rate increases from 9.4 accidents per million vehicle kilometers traveled for 80 to 85 year-old drivers, but raises to 163.6 for drivers with moderate AD. Patients and their families should be informed that patients with mild dementia related to Alzheimer's disease (stage 1 on the Clinical Dementia Rating, CDR), have a substantially increased rate of traffic accidents and therefore should not drive. But subjects in the pre-dementia phase (stage 0.5 at the CDR, mild cognitive impairment) also pose significant driving safety problems. In most States of the USA, and many European countries, but not in France, law requires regular investigating of driving performance in the elderly.

  14. [Driving and aging].

    PubMed

    Cantón-Cortés, David; Durán Segura, Mercedes; Castro Ramírez, Cándida

    2010-01-01

    The number of older people who continue to drive is constantly increasing. However, whether older people have more traffic accidents than other age groups is unclear. This age group has certain risk factors due to decreased motor, sensory and cognitive functions and also has greater frailty and vulnerability to injury. However, older drivers are aware of their heightened crash risk and employ certain compensatory actions, avoiding traveling under threatening conditions (dense traffic, bad weather or night driving), traveling by well-known routes and driving carefully. In view of these apparent contradictions, the present study attempts to discern the real crash risk and the driving and crash patterns characteristic of this population, which is continually increasing in industrialized countries.

  15. Control rod drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  16. Assessment: A Driving Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakow, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    Asserts that educational assessment drives the curriculum. Thus, assessment is very important in contemplating reform in science education. Assessment should be an integral part of the instructional process, utilizing diagnostic testing, monitoring, and summative evaluations. (PR)

  17. Effects of Adaptation of In vitro Rumen Culture to Garlic Oil, Nitrate, and Saponin and Their Combinations on Methanogenesis, Fermentation, and Abundances and Diversity of Microbial Populations

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Amlan K.; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of garlic oil (0.25 g/L), nitrate (5 mM), and quillaja saponin (0.6 g/L), alone and in binary or ternary combinations, on methanogenesis, rumen fermentation, and abundances of select microbial populations using in vitro rumen cultures. Potential adaptation to these compounds was also examined by repeated transfers of the cultures on alternate days until day 18. All treatments except saponin alone significantly decreased methanogenesis. Ternary combinations of garlic oil, nitrate, and saponin additively/synergistically suppressed methane production by 65% at day 2 and by 40% at day 18. Feed digestion was not adversely affected by any of the treatments at day 2, but was decreased by the combinations (binary and ternary) of garlic oil with the other inhibitors at days 10 and 18. Saponin, alone or in combinations, and garlic oil alone lowered ammonia concentration at day 2, while nitrate increased ammonia concentration at days 10 and 18. Total volatile fatty acid concentration was decreased by garlic oil alone or garlic oil-saponin combination. Molar proportions of acetate and propionate were affected to different extents by the different treatments. The abundances of methanogens were similar among treatments at day 2; however, garlic oil and its combination with saponin and/or nitrate at day 10 and all treatments except saponin at day 18 significantly decreased the abundances of methanogens. All the inhibitors, either alone or in combinations, did not adversely affect the abundances of total bacteria or Ruminococcus flavefaciens. However, at day 18 the abundances of Fibrobacter succinogenes and Ruminococcus albus were lowered in the presence of garlic oil and saponin, respectively. The results suggest that garlic oil-nitrate-saponin combination (at the doses used in this study) can effectively decreases methanogenesis in the rumen, but its efficacy may decrease while inhibition to feed digestion can increase over time. PMID:26733975

  18. Exploring the metabolic potential of microbial communities in ultra-basic, reducing springs at The Cedars, CA, USA: Experimental evidence of microbial methanogenesis and heterotrophic acetogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Lukas; Cumming, Emily; Cox, Alison; Rietze, Amanda; Morrissey, Liam; Lang, Susan Q.; Richter, Andreas; Suzuki, Shino; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Morrill, Penny L.

    2016-04-01

    Present-day serpentinization generates groundwaters with conditions (pH > 11, Eh < -550 mV) favorable for the microbial and abiotic production of organic compounds from inorganic precursors. Elevated concentrations of methane, C2-C6 alkanes, acetate, and formate have been detected at these sites, but the microbial or abiotic origin of these compounds remains unclear. While geochemical data indicate that methane at most sites of present-day serpentinization is abiogenic, the stable carbon, hydrogen, and clumped isotope data as well as the hydrocarbon gas composition from The Cedars, CA, USA, are consistent with a microbial origin for methane. However, there is no direct evidence of methanogenesis at this site of serpentinization. We report on laboratory experiments in which the microbial communities in fluids and sediments from The Cedars were incubated with 13C labeled substrates. Increasing methane concentrations and the incorporation of 13C into methane in live experiments, but not in killed controls, demonstrated that methanogens converted methanol, formate, acetate (methyl group), and bicarbonate to methane. The apparent fractionation between methane and potential substrates (α13CCH4-CO2(g) = 1.059 to 1.105, α13CCH4-acetate = 1.042 to 1.119) indicated that methanogenesis was dominated by the carbonate reduction pathway. Increasing concentrations of volatile organic acid anions indicated microbial acetogenesis. α13CCO2(g)-acetate values (0.999 to 1.000), however, were inconsistent with autotrophic acetogenesis, thus suggesting that acetate was produced through fermentation. This is the first study to show direct evidence of microbial methanogenesis and acetogenesis by the native microbial community at a site of present-day serpentinization.

  19. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.

    1960-05-24

    BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

  20. Common drive unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, R. C.; Fink, R. A.; Moore, E. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Common Drive Unit (CDU) is a high reliability rotary actuator with many versatile applications in mechanism designs. The CDU incorporates a set of redundant motor-brake assemblies driving a single output shaft through differential. Tachometers provide speed information in the AC version. Operation of both motors, as compared to the operation of one motor, will yield the same output torque with twice the output speed.

  1. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  2. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  3. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  4. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  5. Electric Drive Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    Track-Laying Combat Vehicles , and (3) Parametric Study of Electric Drive Component Technologies. The technology survey results are given in a separate...and projections of future electric drive system improvements relative to combat vehicle applications. Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS...273 5.7.2.3.1 DC Homopolar Drum Machine, Design and Performance 5-278 APPENDIX A 19.5 TON AND 40.0 TON VEHICLE SPECIFICATION APPENDIX B ELECTRIC

  6. Self-driving carsickness.

    PubMed

    Diels, Cyriel; Bos, Jelte E

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and productivity. However, we here show that the envisaged scenarios all lead to an increased risk of motion sickness. As such, the benefits this technology is assumed to bring may not be capitalised on, in particular by those already susceptible to motion sickness. This can negatively affect user acceptance and uptake and, in turn, limit the potential socioeconomic benefits that this emerging technology may provide. Following a discussion on the causes of motion sickness in the context of self-driving cars, we present guidelines to steer the design and development of automated vehicle technologies. The aim is to limit or avoid the impact of motion sickness and ultimately promote the uptake of self-driving cars. Attention is also given to less well known consequences of motion sickness, in particular negative aftereffects such as postural instability, and detrimental effects on task performance and how this may impact the use and design of self-driving cars. We conclude that basic perceptual mechanisms need to be considered in the design process whereby self-driving cars cannot simply be thought of as living rooms, offices, or entertainment venues on wheels.

  7. Dementia and driving.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, D; Neubauer, K; Boyle, M; Gerrard, J; Surmon, D; Wilcock, G K

    1992-04-01

    Many European countries test cars, but not their drivers, as they age. There is evidence to suggest that human factors are more important than vehicular factors as causes of motor crashes. The elderly also are involved in more accidents per distance travelled than middle-aged drivers. As the UK relies on self-certification of health by drivers over the age of 70 years, we examined the driving practices of patients with dementia attending a Memory Clinic. Nearly one-fifth of 329 patients with documented dementia continued to drive after the onset of dementia, and impaired driving ability was noted in two-thirds of these. Their families experienced great difficulty in persuading patients to stop driving, and had to invoke outside help in many cases. Neuropsychological tests did not help to identify those who drove badly while activity of daily living scores were related to driving ability. These findings suggest that many patients with dementia drive in an unsafe fashion after the onset of the illness. The present system of self-certification of health by the elderly for driver-licensing purposes needs to be reassessed.

  8. Hydraulic drive system prevents backlash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acord, J. D.

    1965-01-01

    Hydraulic drive system uses a second drive motor operating at reduced torque. This exerts a relative braking action which eliminates the normal gear train backlash that is intolerable when driving certain heavy loads.

  9. A Behavioral Solution to the Drunk Driving Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corey, Michael A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the problem of drunk driving primarily as a failure in the process of operant conditioning, with the inappropriate behavior of the drunk driver resulting from a profound ignorance of the potentially tragic consequences of his behavior. Concludes most effective way to understand consequences is to witness autopsies of drunk driving…

  10. Primarily chronic and cerebrovascular course of Lyme neuroborreliosis: case reports and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, M.; Eiffert, H.; Christen, H.; Hanefeld, F.

    2000-01-01

    As part of an ongoing study aiming to define the clinical spectrum of neuroborreliosis in childhood, we have identified four patients with unusual clinical manifestations. Two patients suffered from a primarily chronic form of neuroborreliosis and displayed only non-specific symptoms. An 11 year old boy presented with long standing symptoms of severe weight loss and chronic headache, while the other patient had pre-existing mental and motor retardation and developed seizures and failure to thrive. Two further children who presented with acute hemiparesis as a result of cerebral ischaemic infarction had a cerebrovascular course of neuroborreliosis. One was a 15 year old girl; the other, a 5 year old boy, is to our knowledge the youngest patient described with this course of illness. Following adequate antibiotic treatment, all patients showed substantial improvement of their respective symptoms. Laboratory and magnetic resonance imaging findings as well as clinical course are discussed and the relevant literature is reviewed.

 PMID:10869004

  11. Direct healthcare costs of selected diseases primarily or partially transmitted by water.

    PubMed

    Collier, S A; Stockman, L J; Hicks, L A; Garrison, L E; Zhou, F J; Beach, M J

    2012-11-01

    Despite US sanitation advancements, millions of waterborne disease cases occur annually, although the precise burden of disease is not well quantified. Estimating the direct healthcare cost of specific infections would be useful in prioritizing waterborne disease prevention activities. Hospitalization and outpatient visit costs per case and total US hospitalization costs for ten waterborne diseases were calculated using large healthcare claims and hospital discharge databases. The five primarily waterborne diseases in this analysis (giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, Legionnaires' disease, otitis externa, and non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection) were responsible for over 40 000 hospitalizations at a cost of $970 million per year, including at least $430 million in hospitalization costs for Medicaid and Medicare patients. An additional 50 000 hospitalizations for campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis, shigellosis, haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and toxoplasmosis cost $860 million annually ($390 million in payments for Medicaid and Medicare patients), a portion of which can be assumed to be due to waterborne transmission.

  12. N170 Changes Show Identifiable Chinese Characters Compete Primarily with Faces Rather than Houses.

    PubMed

    Fan, Cong; He, Weiqi; He, Huamin; Ren, Guofang; Luo, Yuejia; Li, Hong; Luo, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Character processing is a crucial cognitive skill that is highly emphasized and industriously cultivated in contemporary society. In the present study, using a competition paradigm, we examined the electrophysiological correlates of different relationships between Chinese characters and faces and between Chinese characters and houses during early visual processing. We observed that identifiable Chinese characters compete primarily with faces rather than houses at an early visual processing stage, with a significantly reduced N170 for faces but not for houses, when they were viewed concurrently with identifiable characters relative to when they were viewed concurrently with unidentifiable characters. Consistent with our previous study, there was a significant increase in N170 after characters have been learned, indicating a modulatory effect of Chinese character identification level on N170 amplitude. Furthermore, we found an enlarged N170 in response to faces compared to houses, indicating that the neural mechanisms for processing faces and houses are different at an early visual processing stage.

  13. Characterization of the type of calcium channel primarily regulating GABA exocytosis from brain nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Sitges, M; Chiu, L M

    1995-09-01

    In an attempt to further characterize the type of Ca2+ channels primarily regulating GABA exocytosis, the effects of increasing concentrations of omega CTx MVIIC,-omega-Aga IVA and other Ca2+ channel blockers (nitrendipine, Cd2+ and Ni2+), commonly used for pharmacologically discerning among the various types of Ca2+ channels, were tested on the dissected Ca2+ dependent fraction of the depolarization evoked release of GABA from mouse brain synaptosomes. Our results show that omega-CTx MVIIC inhibits GABA exocytosis with a calculated IC50 of 3 microM and omega-Aga IVA with a calculated IC50 of 50 nM. The divalent cation Cd2+ only diminishes GABA exocytosis at 70 microM, but does not modify this response at lower concentrations (i.e. 1 and 10 microM). Neither nitrendipine (10 microM) nor Ni2+ (100 microM and 500 microM) modified GABA exocytosis. The failure of nitrendipine at a high concentration to inhibit GABA exocytosis discards L-type Ca2+ channels as the main regulators of this response; likewise that of Ni2+ discards Ca2+ channels of the N-type, and the failure of nM concentrations of omega-CTx MVIIC or 500 microM Ni2+, also discards alpha 1A/Q-type Ca2+ channels as the main regulators of the GABA response. On the basis of these results and in particular of the higher potency of omega-Aga IVA than omega-CTx MVIIC, it is concluded that the type of Ca2+ channels that primarily determine the exocytosis of GABA belong to a P-like type of Ca2+ channels.

  14. Mental workload and driving

    PubMed Central

    Paxion, Julie; Galy, Edith; Berthelon, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to identify the most representative measures of subjective and objective mental workload in driving, and to understand how the subjective and objective levels of mental workload influence the performance as a function of situation complexity and driving experience, i.e., to verify whether the increase of situation complexity and the lack of experience increase the subjective and physiological levels of mental workload and lead to driving performance impairments. This review will be useful to both researchers designing an experimental study of mental workload and to designers of drivers’ training content. In the first part, we will broach the theoretical approach with two factors of mental workload and performance, i.e., situation complexity and driving experience. Indeed, a low complex situation (e.g., highways), or conversely a high complex situation (e.g., town) can provoke an overload. Additionally, performing the driving tasks implies producing a high effort for novice drivers who have not totally automated the driving activity. In the second part, we will focus on subjective measures of mental workload. A comparison of questionnaires usually used in driving will allow identifying the most appropriate ones as a function of different criteria. Moreover, we will review the empirical studies to verify if the subjective level of mental workload is high in simple and very complex situations, especially for novice drivers compared to the experienced ones. In the third part, we will focus on physiological measures. A comparison of physiological indicators will be realized in order to identify the most correlated to mental workload. An empirical review will also take the effect of situation complexity and experience on these physiological indicators into consideration. Finally, a more nuanced comparison between subjective and physiological measures will be established from the impact on situation complexity and experience. PMID:25520678

  15. Methanogenesis in subglacial sediments.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Skidmore, Mark; Mitchell, Andrew C; Bakermans, Corien; Peters, John W

    2010-10-01

    Methanogenic archaea have a unique role in Earth's global carbon cycle as producers of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4 ). However, despite the fact that ice covers 11% of Earth's continental landmass, evidence for methanogenic activity in subglacial environments has yet to be clearly demonstrated. Here we present genetic, biochemical and geochemical evidence indicative of an active population of methanogens associated with subglacial sediments from Robertson Glacier (RG), Canadian Rockies. Porewater CH4 was quantified in two subglacial sediment cores at concentrations of 16 and 29 ppmv. Coenzyme M (CoM), a metabolic biomarker for methanogens, was detected at a concentration of 1.3 nmol g sediment(-1) corresponding to ∼3 × 10(3) active cells g sediment(-1) . Genetic characterization of communities associated with subglacial sediments indicated the presence of several archaeal 16S rRNA and methyl CoM reductase subunit A (mcrA) gene phylotypes, all of which were affiliated with the euryarchaeal order Methanosarcinales. Further, CH4 was produced at 9-51 fmol g dry weight sediment(-1)  h(-1) in enrichment cultures of RG sediments incubated at 4°C. Collectively, these findings have important implications for the global carbon cycle in light of recent estimates indicating that the Earth's subglacial biome ranges from 10(4) to 10(6)  km(3) sediment.

  16. Children's Theories and the Drive to Explain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwitzgebel, Eric

    Debate has been growing in developmental psychology over how much the cognitive development of children is like theory change in science. Useful debate on this topic requires a clear understanding of what it would be for a child to have a theory. I argue that existing accounts of theories within philosophy of science and developmental psychology either are less precise than is ideal for the task or cannot capture everyday theorizing of the sort that children, if they theorize, must do. I then propose an account of theories that ties theories and explanation very closely together, treating theories primarily as products of a drive to explain. I clarify some of the positions people have taken regarding the theory theory of development, and I conclude by proposing that psychologists interested in the ''theory theory'' look for patterns of affect and arousal in development that would accompany the existence of a drive to explain.

  17. Direct Drive for Low Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John W.

    2005-01-01

    Due to recent studies, NASA has initiated the development of a low power Hall thruster for discovery class missions. The potential advantages of a low power Hall thruster is primarily due to its high efficiency operation at low power and its lower complexity compared to ion engines. Direct drive is another method of reducing the complexity of a Hall thruster system while improving its efficiency. The technical challenges associated with this technology are reported. Additionally, the benefits of this technology are discussed based on parametric studies and mission analysis.

  18. DEDRICK DRIVE, LOOKING NORTH FROM SOUTH END OF DEDRICK DRIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DEDRICK DRIVE, LOOKING NORTH FROM SOUTH END OF DEDRICK DRIVE NEAR BUILDING 80 - Pacific Coast Torpedo Station, Keyport Industrial District, Both sides of Second Street, between Dedrick Drive and Liberty Bay and one building west of Dedrick Drive and south of Second Street, Keyport, Kitsap County, WA

  19. Driving Anger and Driving Behavior in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Tracy L.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Rosen, Lee A.; Barkley, Russell A.; Rodricks, Trisha

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study assesses whether anger in the context of driving is associated with the negative driving outcomes experienced by individuals with ADHD. Method: ADHD adults (n = 56) complete measures of driving anger, driving anger expression, angry thoughts behind the wheel, and aggressive, risky, and crash-related behavior. Results are…

  20. Driving anger in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sullman, Mark J M; Stephens, Amanda N; Yong, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    The present study examined the types of situations that cause Malaysian drivers to become angry. The 33-item version of the driver anger scale (Deffenbacher et al., 1994) was used to investigate driver anger amongst a sample of 339 drivers. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the fit of the original six-factor model (discourtesy, traffic obstructions, hostile gestures, slow driving, illegal driving and police presence), after removing one item and allowing three error pairs to covary, was satisfactory. Female drivers reported more anger, than males, caused by traffic obstruction and hostile gestures. Age was also negatively related to five (discourtesy, traffic obstructions, hostile gestures, slow driving and police presence) of the six factors and also to the total DAS score. Furthermore, although they were not directly related to crash involvement, several of the six forms of driving anger were significantly related to the crash-related conditions of: near misses, loss of concentration, having lost control of a vehicle and being ticketed. Overall the pattern of findings made in the present research were broadly similar to those from Western countries, indicating that the DAS is a valid measure of driving anger even among non-European based cultures.

  1. Efficiency of monolaurin in mitigating ruminal methanogenesis and modifying C-isotope fractionation when incubating diets composed of either C3 or C4 plants in a rumen simulation technique (Rusitec) system.

    PubMed

    Klevenhusen, Fenja; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Bolotin, Jakov; Kunz, Carmen; Soliva, Carla R

    2009-11-01

    Mitigation of methanogenesis in ruminants has been an important goal for several decades. Free lauric acid, known to suppress ruminal methanogenesis, has a low palatability; therefore, in the present study the aim was to evaluate the mitigation efficacy of its esterified form (monolaurin). Further, 13C-isotope abundance (delta13C) and 13C-12C fractionation during methanogenesis and fermentation were determined to evaluate possible microbial C-isotope preferences. Using the rumen simulation technique, four basal diets, characterised either by the C3 plants grass (hay) and wheat (straw and grain), or the C4 plant (13C excess compared with C3 plants) maize (straw and grain), and a mixture of the latter two, were incubated with and without monolaurin (50 g/kg dietary DM). Added to hay, monolaurin did not significantly affect methanogenesis. When added to the other diets (P < 0.05 for the wheat-based diet) methane formation was lowered. Monolaurin decreased fibre disappearance (least effect with the hay diet), acetate:propionate ratio, and protozoal counts. Feed residues and SCFA showed the same delta13C as the diets. Methane was depleted in 13C while CO2 was enriched in 13C compared with the diets. Monolaurin addition resulted in 13C depletion of CO2 and enrichment in CH4 (the latter only in the hay diet). In conclusion, monolaurin proved to effectively decrease methanogenesis in the straw-grain diets although this effect might partly be explained by the concomitantly reduced fibre disappearance. The influence on 13C-isotope abundance and fractionation supports the hypothesis that ruminal microbes seem to differentiate to some extent between C-isotopes during methanogenesis and fermentation.

  2. Use of acetate, propionate and butyrate for reduction of nitrate and sulfate and methanogenesis in microcosms and bioreactors simulating an oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan; Shen, Yin; An, Dongshan; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2017-01-27

    Acetate, propionate and butyrate (volatile fatty acids, VFA) occur in oil field waters and are frequently used for microbial growth of oil field consortia. We determined the kinetics of use of these VFA components (3 mM of each) by an anaerobic oil field consortium in microcosms containing 2 mM sulfate and either 0, 4, 6, 8 or 13 mM of nitrate. Nitrate was reduced first with preference for acetate and propionate. Sulfate reduction then proceeded with propionate (not butyrate) as the electron donor, whereas the fermentation of butyrate (not propionate) was associated with methanogenesis. Microbial community analyses indicated Paracoccus-Thauera, Desulfobulbus and Syntrophomonas-Methanobacterium as the dominant taxa catalyzing these three processes. Most probable number assays showed the presence of up to 10(7)/ml of propionate-oxidizing SRB in waters from the Medicine Hat Glauconitic C field. Bioreactors with the same concentrations of sulfate and VFA responded similarly to increasing concentrations of injected nitrate as observed in the microcosms: sulfide formation was prevented by adding approximately 80% of the nitrate dose needed to completely oxidize VFA to CO2 in both. Thus this work has demonstrated that simple time-dependent observations of the use of acetate, propionate and butyrate for nitrate reduction, sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in microcosms are a good proxy for these processes in bioreactors of which monitoring is more complex.

  3. Formate-Dependent Microbial Conversion of CO2 and the Dominant Pathways of Methanogenesis in Production Water of High-temperature Oil Reservoirs Amended with Bicarbonate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang-Chao; Zhou, Lei; Mbadinga, Serge M.; Liu, Jin-Feng; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    CO2 sequestration in deep-subsurface formations including oil reservoirs is a potential measure to reduce the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. However, the fate of the CO2 and the ecological influences in carbon dioxide capture and storage (CDCS) facilities is not understood clearly. In the current study, the fate of CO2 (in bicarbonate form; 0∼90 mM) with 10 mM of formate as electron donor and carbon source was investigated with high-temperature production water from oilfield in China. The isotope data showed that bicarbonate could be reduced to methane by methanogens and major pathway of methanogenesis could be syntrophic formate oxidation coupled with CO2 reduction and formate methanogenesis under the anaerobic conditions. The bicarbonate addition induced the shift of microbial community. Addition of bicarbonate and formate was associated with a decrease of Methanosarcinales, but promotion of Methanobacteriales in all treatments. Thermodesulfovibrio was the major group in all the samples and Thermacetogenium dominated in the high bicarbonate treatments. The results indicated that CO2 from CDCS could be transformed to methane and the possibility of microbial CO2 conversion for enhanced microbial energy recovery in oil reservoirs. PMID:27047478

  4. Formate-Dependent Microbial Conversion of CO2 and the Dominant Pathways of Methanogenesis in Production Water of High-temperature Oil Reservoirs Amended with Bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang-Chao; Zhou, Lei; Mbadinga, Serge M; Liu, Jin-Feng; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    CO2 sequestration in deep-subsurface formations including oil reservoirs is a potential measure to reduce the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. However, the fate of the CO2 and the ecological influences in carbon dioxide capture and storage (CDCS) facilities is not understood clearly. In the current study, the fate of CO2 (in bicarbonate form; 0∼90 mM) with 10 mM of formate as electron donor and carbon source was investigated with high-temperature production water from oilfield in China. The isotope data showed that bicarbonate could be reduced to methane by methanogens and major pathway of methanogenesis could be syntrophic formate oxidation coupled with CO2 reduction and formate methanogenesis under the anaerobic conditions. The bicarbonate addition induced the shift of microbial community. Addition of bicarbonate and formate was associated with a decrease of Methanosarcinales, but promotion of Methanobacteriales in all treatments. Thermodesulfovibrio was the major group in all the samples and Thermacetogenium dominated in the high bicarbonate treatments. The results indicated that CO2 from CDCS could be transformed to methane and the possibility of microbial CO2 conversion for enhanced microbial energy recovery in oil reservoirs.

  5. Improvement of the energy conversion efficiency of Chlorella pyrenoidosa biomass by a three-stage process comprising dark fermentation, photofermentation, and methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ao; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Lin, Richen; Huang, Rui; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2013-10-01

    The effects of pre-treatment methods on saccharification and hydrogen fermentation of Chlorella pyrenoidosa biomass were investigated. When raw biomass and biomass pre-treated by steam heating, by microwave heating, and by ultrasonication were used as feedstock, the hydrogen yields were only 8.8-12.7 ml/g total volatile solids (TVS) during dark fermentation. When biomass was pre-treated by steam heating with diluted acid and by microwave heating with diluted acid, the dark hydrogen yields significantly increased to 75.6 ml/g TVS and 83.3 ml/g TVS, respectively. Steam heating with diluted acid is the preferred pre-treatment method of C. pyrenoidosa biomass to improve hydrogen yield during dark fermentation and photofermentation, which is followed by methanogenesis to increase energy conversion efficiency (ECE). A total hydrogen yield of 198.3 ml/g TVS and a methane yield of 186.2 ml/g TVS corresponding to an overall ECE of 34.0% were obtained through the three-stage process (dark fermentation, photofermentation, and methanogenesis).

  6. Effect of carbon source and COD/NO₃⁻-N ratio on anaerobic simultaneous denitrification and methanogenesis for high-strength wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Chen, Jinrong; Wang, Rui; Zhou, Qi

    2012-06-01

    The effect of carbon source and COD/NO(3)(-)-N ratio on denitrification and methanogenesis in mixed methanogenic matrix was investigated in this study. Industrial wastewater, anaerobic treated cassava stillage (CS) and glucose synthetic wastewater were used as carbon sources respectively for comparison. Experimental results showed that denitrification was the main nitrate reduction pathway for all COD/NO(3)(-)-N ratios tested in two substrates. Simultaneous denitrification and methanogenesis occurred at COD/NO(3)(-)-N higher than 7 regardless of carbon sources. Incomplete denitrification was observed at COD/NO(3)(-)-N ratio below 7 in both the anaerobic effluent of CS and glucose-fed cultures due to the insufficient available organic carbon. The nature of carbon sources was observed to play a key role in the nitrate and organic carbon utilization rates. COD/NO(3)(-)-N ratio had a strong effect on the organic matter utilization pathways. Methanization consumed more organic matter than denitrification with further increase of COD/NO(3)(-)-N ratio above 7 in two substrates. Results of VFA variation suggested that propionate and butyrate were preferably utilized by the denitrifiers than acetate.

  7. The development and characterization of a primarily mineral calcium phosphate - poly(epsilon-caprolactone) biocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkley, Ian Robert

    Orthopaedic reconstruction often involves the surgical introduction of structural implants that provide for rigid fixation, skeletal stabilization, and bone integration. The high stresses incurred by these implanted devices have historically limited material choices to metallic and select polymeric formulations. While mechanical requirements are achieved, these non-degradable materials do not participate actively in the remodeling of the skeleton and present the possibility of long-term failure or rejection. This is particularly relevant in cervical fusion, an orthopaedic procedure to treat damaged, degenerative or diseased intervertebral discs. A significant improvement on the available synthetic bone replacement/regeneration options for implants to treat these conditions in the cervical spine may be achieved with the development of primarily mineral biocomposites comprised of a bioactive ceramic matrix reinforced with a biodegradable polymer. Such a biocomposite may be engineered to possess the clinically required mechanical properties of a particular application, while maintaining the ability to be remodeled completely by the body. A biocomposite of Si-doped calcium phosphate (Si-CaP) and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) was developed for application as such a synthetic bone material for potential use as a fusion device in the cervical spine. In this thesis, a method by which high mineral content Si-CaP/PCL biocomposites with interpenetrating matrices of mineral and polymer phases may be prepared will be demonstrated, in addition to the effects of the various preparation parameters on the biocomposite density, porosity and mechanical properties. This new technique by which dense, primarily ceramic Si-CaP/PCL biocomposites were prepared, allowed for the incorporation of mineral contents ranging between 45-97vol%. Polymer infiltration, accomplished solely by passive capillary uptake over several days, was found to be capable of fully infiltrating the microporosity

  8. U.S. DRIVE

    SciTech Connect

    2012-03-16

    U.S. DRIVE, which stands for United States Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability, is an expanded government-industry partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies – BP America, Chevron Corporation, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil Corporation, and Shell Oil Products US; two utilities – Southern California Edison and Michigan-based DTE Energy; and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The U.S. DRIVE mission is to accelerate the development of pre-competitive and innovative technologies to enable a full range of affordable and clean advanced light-duty vehicles, as well as related energy infrastructure.

  9. Ceramic vane drive joint

    DOEpatents

    Smale, Charles H.

    1981-01-01

    A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

  10. Empathic concern drives costly altruism

    PubMed Central

    FeldmanHall, Oriel; Dalgleish, Tim; Evans, Davy; Mobbs, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Why do we self-sacrifice to help others in distress? Two competing theories have emerged, one suggesting that prosocial behavior is primarily motivated by feelings of empathic other-oriented concern, the other that we help mainly because we are egoistically focused on reducing our own discomfort. Here we explore the relationship between costly altruism and these two sub-processes of empathy, specifically drawing on the caregiving model to test the theory that trait empathic concern (e.g. general tendency to have sympathy for another) and trait personal distress (e.g. predisposition to experiencing aversive arousal states) may differentially drive altruistic behavior. We find that trait empathic concern – and not trait personal distress – motivates costly altruism, and this relationship is supported by activity in the ventral tegmental area, caudate and subgenual anterior cingulate, key regions for promoting social attachment and caregiving. Together, this data helps identify the behavioral and neural mechanisms motivating costly altruism, while demonstrating that individual differences in empathic concern-related brain responses can predict real prosocial choice. PMID:25462694

  11. Floral biology of two Vanilloideae (Orchidaceae) primarily adapted to pollination by euglossine bees.

    PubMed

    Pansarin, E R; Pansarin, L M

    2014-11-01

    Vanilloideae comprises 15 genera distributed worldwide, among which are Vanilla and Epistephium (tribe Vanilleae). Based on field and laboratory investigations, the pollination biology of V. dubia and E. sclerophyllum was analysed. The former was surveyed in a semi-deciduous mesophytic forest at the biological reserve of Serra do Japi and in a marshy forest at the city of Pradópolis, southeastern Brazil. The latter was examined in rocky outcrop vegetation in the Chapada Diamantina, northeastern Brazil. In the studied populations, the tubular flowers of V. dubia and E. sclerophyllum were pollinated by bees. Pollen was deposited on either their scutellum (V. dubia) or scutum (E. sclerophyllum). The mentum region of V. dubia is dry, whereas that of E. sclerophyllum presents a small quantity of dilute nectar. Flowers of E. sclerophyllum are scentless, while those of V. dubia are odoriferous. Although V. dubia is self-compatible, it needs a pollinator to produce fruit. In contrast, E. sclerophyllum sets fruit through spontaneous self-pollination, but biotic pollination also occurs. Both species are primarily adapted to pollination by euglossine bees. Pollination by Euglossina seems to have occurred at least twice during the evolution of Vanilleae. Furthermore, shifts between rewarding and reward-free flowers and between autogamous and allogamous species have been reported among vanillas.

  12. Local field potentials primarily reflect inhibitory neuron activity in human and monkey cortex

    PubMed Central

    Teleńczuk, Bartosz; Dehghani, Nima; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Cash, Sydney S.; Halgren, Eric; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.; Destexhe, Alain

    2017-01-01

    The local field potential (LFP) is generated by large populations of neurons, but unitary contribution of spiking neurons to LFP is not well characterised. We investigated this contribution in multi-electrode array recordings from human and monkey neocortex by examining the spike-triggered LFP average (st-LFP). The resulting st-LFPs were dominated by broad spatio-temporal components due to ongoing activity, synaptic inputs and recurrent connectivity. To reduce the spatial reach of the st-LFP and observe the local field related to a single spike we applied a spatial filter, whose weights were adapted to the covariance of ongoing LFP. The filtered st-LFPs were limited to the perimeter of 800 μm around the neuron, and propagated at axonal speed, which is consistent with their unitary nature. In addition, we discriminated between putative inhibitory and excitatory neurons and found that the inhibitory st-LFP peaked at shorter latencies, consistently with previous findings in hippocampal slices. Thus, in human and monkey neocortex, the LFP reflects primarily inhibitory neuron activity. PMID:28074856

  13. Habitat-specific environmental conditions primarily control the microbiomes of the coral Seriatopora hystrix

    PubMed Central

    Pantos, Olga; Bongaerts, Pim; Dennis, Paul G; Tyson, Gene W; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Reef-building corals form complex relationships with a range of microorganisms including bacteria, archaea, fungi and the unicellular microalgae of the genus Symbiodinium, which together form the coral holobiont. These symbionts are known to have both beneficial and deleterious effects on their coral host, but little is known about what the governing factors of these relationships are, or the interactions that exist between the different members of the holobiont and their environment. Here we used 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing to investigate how archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the widespread scleractinian coral Seriatopora hystrix are influenced by extrinsic (reef habitat and geographic location) and intrinsic (host genotype and Symbiodinium subclade) factors. Bacteria dominate the microbiome of S. hystrix, with members of the Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteriodetes being the most predominant in all samples. The richness and evenness of these communities varied between reef habitats, but there was no significant difference between distinct coral host lineages or corals hosting distinct Symbiodinium subclades. The coral microbiomes correlated to reef habitat (depth) and geographic location, with a negative correlation between Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, driven by the key members of both groups (Rhodobacteraceae and Hahellaceae, respectively), which showed significant differences between location and depth. This study suggests that the control of microbial communities associated with the scleractinian coral S. hystrix is driven primarily by external environmental conditions rather than by those directly associated with the coral holobiont. PMID:25668159

  14. Habitat-specific environmental conditions primarily control the microbiomes of the coral Seriatopora hystrix.

    PubMed

    Pantos, Olga; Bongaerts, Pim; Dennis, Paul G; Tyson, Gene W; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2015-09-01

    Reef-building corals form complex relationships with a range of microorganisms including bacteria, archaea, fungi and the unicellular microalgae of the genus Symbiodinium, which together form the coral holobiont. These symbionts are known to have both beneficial and deleterious effects on their coral host, but little is known about what the governing factors of these relationships are, or the interactions that exist between the different members of the holobiont and their environment. Here we used 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing to investigate how archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the widespread scleractinian coral Seriatopora hystrix are influenced by extrinsic (reef habitat and geographic location) and intrinsic (host genotype and Symbiodinium subclade) factors. Bacteria dominate the microbiome of S. hystrix, with members of the Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteriodetes being the most predominant in all samples. The richness and evenness of these communities varied between reef habitats, but there was no significant difference between distinct coral host lineages or corals hosting distinct Symbiodinium subclades. The coral microbiomes correlated to reef habitat (depth) and geographic location, with a negative correlation between Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, driven by the key members of both groups (Rhodobacteraceae and Hahellaceae, respectively), which showed significant differences between location and depth. This study suggests that the control of microbial communities associated with the scleractinian coral S. hystrix is driven primarily by external environmental conditions rather than by those directly associated with the coral holobiont.

  15. Dehaloperoxidase-Hemoglobin from Amphitrite ornata Is Primarily a Monomer in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    M Thompson; S Franzen; M Davis; R Oliver; j Krueger; J Tredup; C Chang; J Khan; E Baldwin

    2011-12-31

    The crystal structures of the dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin from A. ornata (DHP A) each report a crystallographic dimer in the unit cell. Yet, the largest dimer interface observed is 450 {angstrom}{sup 2}, an area significantly smaller than the typical value of 1200-2000 {angstrom}{sup 2} and in contrast to the extensive interface region of other known dimeric hemoglobins. To examine the oligomerization state of DHP A in solution, we used gel permeation by fast protein liquid chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Gel permeation experiments demonstrate that DHP A elutes as a monomer (15.5 kDa) and can be separated from green fluorescent protein, which has a molar mass of 27 kDa, near the 31 kDa expected for the DHP A dimer. By SAXS, we found that DHP A is primarily monomeric in solution, but with a detectable level of dimer (10%), under all conditions studied up to a protein concentration of 3.0 mM. These concentrations are likely 10-100-fold lower than the K{sub d} for dimer formation. Additionally, there was no significant effect either on the overall conformation of DHP A or its monomer-dimer equilibrium upon addition of the DHP A inhibitor, 4-iodophenol.

  16. Asthma prevalence and risk factor assessment of an underserved and primarily Latino child population in Colorado.

    PubMed

    Clark, Maggie L; Reynolds, Stephen J; Hendrikson, Edward; Peel, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a substantialpublic health burden among children. Disease and risk-factor discrepancies have been identified among racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. At a rural health clinic (Salud Family Health Center) with primarily underserved and Latino patients in Colorado, the authors evaluated 250 medical records and administered 57 parental surveys to describe this population with respect to asthma diagnosis, asthma-like symptoms, and environmental/occupational risk factors among children. Wheeze and asthma were indicated in 9.7% and 8.9% of medical records, respectively. Twenty parents (35.7%) reported in a questionnaire that their child had experienced wheezing or whistling in the chest. Parents reported that children play in farming fields (21.8%) and feed livestock/animals (10.9%). Additionally, 13.2% and 9.4% of children have a household member who works around livestock or around grain, feed, or dust, respectively. Information from the Salud population can be used to develop larger-scale research and public health initiatives to eliminate health and risk factor disparities among underserved children.

  17. Tribolium castaneum defensins are primarily active against Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tonk, Miray; Knorr, Eileen; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Valdés, James J; Kollewe, Christian; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum is a destructive insect pest of stored food and feed products, and a model organism for development, evolutionary biology and immunity. The insect innate immune system includes antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. Defensins are an evolutionarily-conserved class of AMPs and a potential new source of antimicrobial agents. In this context, we report the antimicrobial activity, phylogenetic and structural properties of three T. castaneum defensins (Def1, Def2 and Def3) and their relevance in the immunity of T. castaneum against bacterial pathogens. All three recombinant defensins showed bactericidal activity against Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus thuringiensis serovar tolworthi, but only Def1 and Def2 showed a bacteriostatic effect against Staphylococcus epidermidis. None of the defensins showed activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas entomophila or against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. All three defensins were transcriptionally upregulated following a bacterial challenge, suggesting a key role in the immunity of T. castaneum against bacterial pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis showed that defensins from T. castaneum, mealworms, Udo longhorn beetle and houseflies cluster within a well-defined clade of insect defensins. We conclude that T. castaneum defensins are primarily active against Gram-positive bacteria and that other AMPs may play a more prominent role against Gram-negative species.

  18. Identification of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is primarily expressed in Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Nemazanyy, Ivan . E-mail: nemazanyy@imbg.org.ua; Panasyuk, Ganna; Breus, Oksana; Zhyvoloup, Alexander; Filonenko, Valeriy; Gout, Ivan T. . E-mail: i.gout@ucl.ac.uk

    2006-03-24

    CoA and its derivatives Acetyl-CoA and Acyl-CoA are important players in cellular metabolism and signal transduction. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme which mediates the final stages of CoA biosynthesis. In previous studies, we have reported molecular cloning, biochemical characterization, and subcellular localization of CoA synthase (CoASy). Here, we describe the existence of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is the product of alternative splicing and possesses a 29aa extension at the N-terminus. We termed it CoASy {beta} and originally identified CoA synthase, CoASy {alpha}. The transcript specific for CoASy {beta} was identified by electronic screening and by RT-PCR analysis of various rat tissues. The existence of this novel isoform was further confirmed by immunoblot analysis with antibodies directed to the N-terminal peptide of CoASy {beta}. In contrast to CoASy {alpha}, which shows ubiquitous expression, CoASy {beta} is primarily expressed in Brain. Using confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that both isoforms are localized on mitochondria. The N-terminal extension does not affect the activity of CoA synthase, but possesses a proline-rich sequence which can bring the enzyme into complexes with signalling proteins containing SH3 or WW domains. The role of this novel isoform in CoA biosynthesis, especially in Brain, requires further elucidation.

  19. Microlinear piezo drive experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azin, A. V.; Bogdanov, E. P.; Rikkonen, S. V.; Ponomarev, S. V.; Khramtsov, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    The article embraces the experimental description of the micro linear piezo drive intended for the peripheral cord tensioner in the reflecting surface shape regulator system for large-sized transformable spacecraft antenna reflectors. The research target is the experimental investigation of the micro linear piezo drive to determine the stable oscillatory system operating modes which would include improved energy conversion parameters. The following points are briefly presented: test stand construction-design of the peripheral cord tensioner; the determined frequency characteristics and the identified resonant and actual frequencies of an oscillatory system under inertia load. A series of experiments has been conducted for both different preliminary voltages and inertia mass values.

  20. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

    1961-06-27

    Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

  1. Recent Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion primarily driven by black carbon and tropospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Allen, Robert J; Sherwood, Steven C; Norris, Joel R; Zender, Charles S

    2012-05-16

    Observational analyses have shown the width of the tropical belt increasing in recent decades as the world has warmed. This expansion is important because it is associated with shifts in large-scale atmospheric circulation and major climate zones. Although recent studies have attributed tropical expansion in the Southern Hemisphere to ozone depletion, the drivers of Northern Hemisphere expansion are not well known and the expansion has not so far been reproduced by climate models. Here we use a climate model with detailed aerosol physics to show that increases in heterogeneous warming agents--including black carbon aerosols and tropospheric ozone--are noticeably better than greenhouse gases at driving expansion, and can account for the observed summertime maximum in tropical expansion. Mechanistically, atmospheric heating from black carbon and tropospheric ozone has occurred at the mid-latitudes, generating a poleward shift of the tropospheric jet, thereby relocating the main division between tropical and temperate air masses. Although we still underestimate tropical expansion, the true aerosol forcing is poorly known and could also be underestimated. Thus, although the insensitivity of models needs further investigation, black carbon and tropospheric ozone, both of which are strongly influenced by human activities, are the most likely causes of observed Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion.

  2. Teachers with Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coggins, Celine; Diffenbaugh, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    For students in U.S. classrooms today, the odds of being assigned to an inexperienced teacher are higher than they have ever been because so many teachers, some in the top 20 percent of effectiveness are leaving the classroom in their first five years. Coggins and Diffenbaugh turn to Daniel Pink's work on drive to determine how to motivate…

  3. DrivePy

    SciTech Connect

    King, Ryan; Guo, Yi

    2014-08-30

    DrivePy is physics-based drivetrain model that sizes drivetrain components based on aerodynamic and operational loads for use in a systems engineering model. It also calculates costs based on empirical data collected by NREL's National Wind Technology Center.

  4. Magnetized drive fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensweig, R.E.; Zahn, M.

    1986-04-01

    A process is described for recovering a first fluid from a porous subterranean formation which comprises injecting a displacement fluid in an effective amount to displace the first fluid, injecting a ferrofluid, applying a magnetic field containing a gradient of field intensity within the formation, driving the displacement fluid through the formation with the ferrofluid and recovering first fluid.

  5. Drive-Through Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how the early childhood field's approach to staff training reflects the drive-through, fast-food culture. Year after year directors send their teachers to workshops to get some quick refresher techniques. The author suggests that rather than focusing professional development on topics, focus on observing…

  6. Flywheel sickle drive mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, R.K.

    1989-03-21

    A releasable, eccentric drive mechanism is described, comprising: a first shaft extending along a central axis and presenting a generally cylindrical portion; a second shaft extending along a reference axis substantially parallel to the central axis in offset relation to the latter and having a generally cylindrical portion; a drive member having structure defining an opening including a first, generally cylindrical region receiving over one half of the circumference of the first shaft portion and a second, generally cylindrical region receiving over one half of the circumference of the second shaft portion, the second region being in side-by-side relationship to the first region and in open communication with the latter, the first shaft portion and the second shaft portion each including a substantially flat wall section extending in a plane substantially perpendicular to a reference plane passing through the central axis and the reference axis, each of the wall sections being inclined relative to the central axis in complemental, flat engagement with each other; and means coupled to one of the drive member and the second shaft for urging the first shaft in a longitudinal direction generally toward the second shaft in order to bring the wall section of the first shaft into a position of flat, wedging contact with the wall section of the second shaft and in contact with the structure defining the opening in order to securely interconnect the first shaft, the second shaft and the drive member.

  7. Driving While Intoxicated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brick, John

    Alcohol intoxication increases the risk of highway accidents, the relative risk of crash probability increasing as a function of blood alcohol content (BAC). Because alcohol use is more prevalent than use of other drugs, more is known about the relationship between alcohol use and driving. Most states presume a BAC of .10% to be evidence of drunk…

  8. The Drive to Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Diego

    2017-01-01

    At the heart of the educational vocation is a drive to influence, to meaningfully affect the learning and development of others. For adult educators working in higher education, daily activities--from teaching classes to supervising student research to attending faculty meetings to sitting on advisory boards--are full of opportunities to…

  9. CSI: Hard Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Acting on information from students who reported seeing a classmate looking at inappropriate material on a school computer, school officials used forensics software to plunge the depths of the PC's hard drive, searching for evidence of improper activity. Images were found in a deleted Internet Explorer cache as well as deleted file space.…

  10. Species sorting and seasonal dynamics primarily shape bacterial communities in the Upper Mississippi River.

    PubMed

    Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J; Wang, Ping; Phillips, Jane; Cotner, James B; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial community structure (BCS) in freshwater ecosystems varies seasonally and due to physicochemical gradients, but metacommunity structure of a major river remains understudied. Here we characterize the BCS along the Mississippi River and contributing rivers in Minnesota over three years using Illumina next-generation sequencing, to determine how changes in environmental conditions as well as inputs from surrounding land and confluences impacted community structure. Contributions of sediment to water microbial diversity were also evaluated. Long-term variation in community membership was observed, and significant shifts in relative abundances of major freshwater taxa, including α-Proteobacteria, Burkholderiales, and Actinomycetales, were observed due to temporal and spatial variations. Environmental parameters (e.g. temperature, rainfall, and nutrient concentrations) primarily contributed to differences in phyla abundances (88% of variance), with minimal influence from spatial distance alone (<1% of variance). Furthermore, an annually-recurrent BCS was observed in late summer, further suggesting that seasonal dynamics strongly influence community composition. Sediment communities differed from those in the water, but contributed up to 50% to community composition in the water column. Among water sampling sites, 34% showed significant variability in BCS of replicate samples indicating variability among riverine communities due to heterogeneity in the water column. Results of this study highlight the need for a better understanding of spatial and temporal variations in riverine bacterial diversity associated with physicochemical gradients and reveal how communities in sediments, and potentially other environmental reservoirs, impact waterborne BCS. Techniques used in this study may prove useful to determine sources of microbes from sediments and soils to waterways, which will facilitate best management practices and total maximum daily load determinations.

  11. Brainstem structures are primarily affected in an experimental model of severe scorpion envenomation.

    PubMed

    Guidine, Patrícia Alves Maia; Cash, Diana; Drumond, Luciana Estefani; de Souza E Rezende, Gustavo Henrique; Massensini, André Ricardo; Williams, Steve Charles Rees; Moraes-Santos, Tasso; Moraes, Márcio Flávio Dutra; Mesquita, Michel Bernanos Soares

    2014-01-01

    Severe scorpion envenoming (SSE) is more frequent in children and is characterized by systemic dysfunctions with a mortality rate of up to 9%. Recent evidence shows that the central nervous system (CNS) plays a key role in triggering the cascade of symptoms present in SSE. The age-dependent role of the CNS in SSE lethality may be summarized in 3 hypotheses: (1) the shown increased blood brain barrier permeability of infants to the toxins would especially and primarily compromise neurovegetative control areas, (2) the neurons within these areas have high affinity to the toxins, and (3) the neurovascular interaction is such that SSE metabolically compromises proper function of toxin-targeted areas. A pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging paradigm was used to evaluate localized hemodynamic changes in relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) for 30 min after the injection of TsTX, the most lethal toxin from the venom of the Tityus serrulatus scorpion. The brainstem showed significant rCBV reduction 1 min after TsTX administration, whereas rostral brain areas had delayed increase in rCBV (confirmed by laser Doppler measurements of cortical cerebral blood flow). Moreover, metabolic activity by 14C-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography showed the highest relative increase at the brainstem. To test whether TsTX has high affinity to brainstem neurons, the lateral ventricle was injected with Alexa Fluor 568 TsTX. Although some neurons showed intense fluorescence, the labeling pattern suggests that specific neurons were targeted. Altogether, these results suggest that brainstem areas involved in neurovegetative control are most likely within the primary structures triggering the cascade of symptoms present in SSE.

  12. Bleomycin, unlike other male-mouse mutagens, is most effective in spermatogonia, inducing primarily deletions.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B; Hunsicker, P R; Kerley, M K; Johnson, D K; Shelby, M D

    2000-08-21

    Dominant-lethal tests [P.D. Sudman, J.C. Rutledge, J.B. Bishop, W.M. Generoso, Bleomycin: female-specific dominant lethal effects in mice, Mutat. Res. 296 (1992) 205-217] had suggested that Bleomycin sulfate (Blenoxane), BLM, might be a female-specific mutagen. While confirming that BLM is indeed a powerful inducer of dominant-lethal mutations in females that fails to induce such mutations in postspermatogonial stages of males, we have shown in a specific-locus test that BLM is, in fact, mutagenic in males. This mutagenicity, however, is restricted to spermatogonia (stem-cell and differentiating stages), for which the specific-locus mutation rate differed significantly (P<0.008) from the historical control rate. In treated groups, dominant mutations, also, originated only in spermatogonia. With regard to mutation frequencies, this germ-cell-stage pattern is different from that for radiation and for any other chemical studied to date, except ethylnitrosourea (ENU). However, the nature of the spermatogonial specific-locus mutations differentiates BLM from ENU as well, because BLM induced primarily (or, perhaps, exclusively) multilocus deletions. Heretofore, no chemical that induced specific-locus mutations in spermatogonia did not also induce specific-locus as well as dominant-lethal mutations in postspermatogonial stages, making the dominant lethal test, up till now, predictive of male mutagenicity in general. The BLM results now demonstrate that there are chemicals that can induce specific-locus mutations in spermatogonia without testing positive in postspermatogonial stages. Thus, BLM, while not female-specific, is unique, (a) in its germ-cell-stage specificity in males, and (b) in inducing a type of mutation (deletions) that is atypical for the responding germ-cell stages (spermatogonia).

  13. Glutamate Synaptic Inputs to Ventral Tegmental Area Neurons in the Rat Derive Primarily from Subcortical Sources

    PubMed Central

    Omelchenko, Natalia; Sesack, Susan R.

    2007-01-01

    cortical sources of excitation expressing VGlut1 and are more likely to drive the behaviorally-linked bursts in dopamine cells that signal future expectancy or attentional shifting. PMID:17391856

  14. 49 CFR 37.171 - Equivalency requirement for demand responsive service operated by private entities not primarily...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... service operated by private entities not primarily engaged in the business of transporting people. 37.171... INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Provision of Service § 37.171 Equivalency requirement for demand responsive service operated by private entities not primarily engaged in the business of transporting...

  15. 49 CFR 178.337 - Specification MC 331; cargo tank motor vehicle primarily for transportation of compressed gases...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specification MC 331; cargo tank motor vehicle primarily for transportation of compressed gases as defined in subpart G of part 173 of this subchapter. 178... MC 331; cargo tank motor vehicle primarily for transportation of compressed gases as defined...

  16. Subduction Drive of Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, W. B.

    2003-12-01

    shrinking oceans, forcing rapid Pacific spreading. Slabs suck forward overriding arcs and continental lithosphere, plus most subjacent mantle above the transition zone. Changes in sizes of oceans result primarily from transfer of oceanic lithosphere, so backarcs and expanding oceans spread only slowly. Lithosphere parked in, or displaced from, the transition zone, or mixed into mid-upper mantle, is ultimately recycled, and regional variations in age of that submerged lithosphere may account for some regional contrasts in MORB. Plate motions make no kinematic sense in either the "hotspot" reference frame (HS; the notion of fixed plumes is easily disproved) or the no-net-rotation frame (NNR) In both, for example, many hinges roll forward, impossible with gravity drive. Subduction-drive predictions are fulfilled, and paleomagnetic data are satisfied (as they are not in HS and NNR), in the alternative framework of propulsionless Antarctica fixed relative to sluggish lower mantle. Passive ridges migrate away from Antarctica on all sides, and migration of these and other ridges permits tapping fresh asthenosphere. (HS and NNR tend to fix ridges). Ridge migration and spreading rates accord with subduction drive. All trenches roll back when allowance is made for back-arc spreading and intracontinental deformation. Africa rotates slowly toward subduction systems in the NE, instead of moving rapidly E as in HS and NNR. Stable NW Eurasia is nearly stationary, instead of also moving rapidly, and S and E Eurasian deformation relates to subduction and rollback. The Americas move Pacificward at almost the full spreading rates of passive ridges behind them. Lithosphere has a slow net westward drift. Reference: W.B. Hamilton, An alternative Earth, GSA Today, in press.

  17. Autonomous driving in urban environments: approaches, lessons and challenges.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Mark; Egerstedt, Magnus; How, Jonathan P; Murray, Richard M

    2010-10-13

    The development of autonomous vehicles for urban driving has seen rapid progress in the past 30 years. This paper provides a summary of the current state of the art in autonomous driving in urban environments, based primarily on the experiences of the authors in the 2007 DARPA Urban Challenge (DUC). The paper briefly summarizes the approaches that different teams used in the DUC, with the goal of describing some of the challenges that the teams faced in driving in urban environments. The paper also highlights the long-term research challenges that must be overcome in order to enable autonomous driving and points to opportunities for new technologies to be applied in improving vehicle safety, exploiting intelligent road infrastructure and enabling robotic vehicles operating in human environments.

  18. Blast exposure in rats with body shielding is characterized primarily by diffuse axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Garman, Robert H; Jenkins, Larry W; Switzer, Robert C; Bauman, Richard A; Tong, Lawrence C; Swauger, Peter V; Parks, Steven A; Ritzel, David V; Dixon, C Edward; Clark, Robert S B; Bayir, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian; Jackson, Edwin K; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2011-06-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the signature insult in combat casualty care. Survival with neurological damage from otherwise lethal blast exposures has become possible with body armor use. We characterized the neuropathologic alterations produced by a single blast exposure in rats using a helium-driven shock tube to generate a nominal exposure of 35 pounds per square inch (PSI) (positive phase duration ∼ 4 msec). Using an IACUC-approved protocol, isoflurane-anesthetized rats were placed in a steel wedge (to shield the body) 7 feet inside the end of the tube. The left side faced the blast wave (with head-only exposure); the wedge apex focused a Mach stem onto the rat's head. The insult produced ∼ 25% mortality (due to impact apnea). Surviving and sham rats were perfusion-fixed at 24 h, 72 h, or 2 weeks post-blast. Neuropathologic evaluations were performed utilizing hematoxylin and eosin, amino cupric silver, and a variety of immunohistochemical stains for amyloid precursor protein (APP), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1), ED1, and rat IgG. Multifocal axonal degeneration, as evidenced by staining with amino cupric silver, was present in all blast-exposed rats at all time points. Deep cerebellar and brainstem white matter tracts were most heavily stained with amino cupric silver, with the morphologic staining patterns suggesting a process of diffuse axonal injury. Silver-stained sections revealed mild multifocal neuronal death at 24 h and 72 h. GFAP, ED1, and Iba1 staining were not prominently increased, although small numbers of reactive microglia were seen within areas of neuronal death. Increased blood-brain barrier permeability (as measured by IgG staining) was seen at 24 h and primarily affected the contralateral cortex. Axonal injury was the most prominent feature during the initial 2 weeks following blast exposure, although degeneration of other neuronal processes was also present

  19. Passerine exposure to primarily PCDFs and PCDDs in the river floodplains near Midland, Michigan, USA.

    PubMed

    Fredricks, Timothy B; Zwiernik, Matthew J; Seston, Rita M; Coefield, Sarah J; Plautz, Stephanie C; Tazelaar, Dustin L; Shotwell, Melissa S; Bradley, Patrick W; Kay, Denise P; Giesy, John P

    2010-05-01

    House wren (Troglodytes aedon), tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), and eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) tissues collected in study areas (SAs) downstream of Midland, Michigan (USA) contained concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) greater than in upstream reference areas (RAs) in the region. The sum of concentrations of PCDD/DFs (SigmaPCDD/DFs) in eggs of house wrens and eastern bluebirds from SAs were 4- to 22-fold greater compared to those from RAs, whereas concentrations in tree swallow eggs were similar among areas. Mean concentrations of SigmaPCDD/DFs and sum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (SigmaTEQs(WHO-Avian)), based on 1998 WHO avian toxic equivalency factors, in house wren and eastern bluebird eggs ranged from 860 (430) to 1500 (910) ng/kg wet weight (ww) and 470 (150) to 1100 (510) ng/kg ww, respectively, at the most contaminated study areas along the Tittabawassee River, whereas mean concentrations in tree swallow eggs ranged from 280 (100) to 760 (280) ng/kg ww among all locations. Concentrations of SigmaPCDD/DFs in nestlings of all studied species at SAs were 3- to 50-fold greater compared to RAs. Mean house wren, tree swallow, and eastern bluebird nestling concentrations of SigmaPCDD/DFs and SigmaTEQs(WHO-Avian) ranged from 350 (140) to 610 (300) ng/kg ww, 360 (240) to 1100 (860) ng/kg ww, and 330 (100) to 1200 (690) ng/kg ww, respectively, at SAs along the Tittabawassee River. Concentrations of SigmaTEQs(WHO-Avian) were positively correlated with SigmaPCDD/DF concentrations in both eggs and nestlings of all species studied. Profiles of relative concentrations of individual congeners were dominated by furan congeners (69-84%), primarily 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran and 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran, for all species at SAs on the Tittabawassee and Saginaw rivers but were dominated by dioxin congeners at upstream RAs.

  20. Young children's hand contact activities: an observational study via videotaping in primarily outdoor residential settings.

    PubMed

    Auyeung, Willa; Canales, Robert A; Beamer, Paloma; Ferguson, Alesia C; Leckie, James O

    2006-09-01

    Microlevel activity time series (MLATS) data were gathered on hand contact activities of 38 children (1-6 years old) by videotaping in primarily outdoor residential environments. The videotape recordings were then translated into text files using a specialized software called VirtualTimingDevicetrade mark. Contact frequency (contacts/h), duration per contact (s/contact), and hourly contact duration (min/h) were summarized for outdoor hand contacts with 15 distinct object/surface categories ("Animal", "Body", "Clothes/Towels", "Fabric", "Floor", "Food", "Footwear", "Metal", "Non-dietary Water", "Paper/Wrapper", "Plastic", "Rock/Brick", "Toys", "Vegetation/Grass", and "Wood") and two aggregate object/surface categories ("Non-dietary objects/surfaces" and "Total objects/surfaces"). For outdoor both hand contacts with "Total objects/surfaces", contact frequencies ranged from 229.9 to 1517.7 contacts/h, median durations/contact ranged from < 1 to 5 s, and hourly contact durations ranged from 42.6 to 102.2 m/h. The data were analyzed for significant differences in hand contact activities as a function of (1) age, (2) location, (3) gender, and (4) hand. Significant differences (P < or = 0.05) were found for all four factors analyzed. Hourly contact durations with "Non-dietary objects/surfaces" and "Total objects/surfaces" increased with age (P = 0.01, rs = 0.42 and P = 0.005, rs = 0.46, respectively), while contact frequencies and hourly contact durations with "Wood" decreased with age (P = 0.02, rs = -0.38 and P = 0.05, rs = -0.32, respectively). Location was found to affect contact frequencies and hourly contact durations with certain objects/surfaces. For example, contact frequencies and hourly contact durations with "Fabric" were higher indoors (P = 0.02 for both), while contact frequencies and hourly contact durations with "Vegetation/Grass" were higher outdoors (P = 0.02 and P = 0.04, respectively). Girls had longer hourly contact durations with "Footwear" (P = 0

  1. Passerine Exposure to Primarily PCDFs and PCDDs in the River Floodplains Near Midland, Michigan, USA

    PubMed Central

    Zwiernik, Matthew J.; Seston, Rita M.; Coefield, Sarah J.; Plautz, Stephanie C.; Tazelaar, Dustin L.; Shotwell, Melissa S.; Bradley, Patrick W.; Kay, Denise P.; Giesy, John P.

    2009-01-01

    House wren (Troglodytes aedon), tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), and eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) tissues collected in study areas (SAs) downstream of Midland, Michigan (USA) contained concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) greater than in upstream reference areas (RAs) in the region. The sum of concentrations of PCDD/DFs (ΣPCDD/DFs) in eggs of house wrens and eastern bluebirds from SAs were 4- to 22-fold greater compared to those from RAs, whereas concentrations in tree swallow eggs were similar among areas. Mean concentrations of ΣPCDD/DFs and sum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (ΣTEQsWHO-Avian), based on 1998 WHO avian toxic equivalency factors, in house wren and eastern bluebird eggs ranged from 860 (430) to 1500 (910) ng/kg wet weight (ww) and 470 (150) to 1100 (510) ng/kg ww, respectively, at the most contaminated study areas along the Tittabawassee River, whereas mean concentrations in tree swallow eggs ranged from 280 (100) to 760 (280) ng/kg ww among all locations. Concentrations of ΣPCDD/DFs in nestlings of all studied species at SAs were 3- to 50-fold greater compared to RAs. Mean house wren, tree swallow, and eastern bluebird nestling concentrations of ΣPCDD/DFs and ΣTEQsWHO-Avian ranged from 350 (140) to 610 (300) ng/kg ww, 360 (240) to 1100 (860) ng/kg ww, and 330 (100) to 1200 (690) ng/kg ww, respectively, at SAs along the Tittabawassee River. Concentrations of ΣTEQsWHO-Avian were positively correlated with ΣPCDD/DF concentrations in both eggs and nestlings of all species studied. Profiles of relative concentrations of individual congeners were dominated by furan congeners (69–84%), primarily 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran and 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran, for all species at SAs on the Tittabawassee and Saginaw rivers but were dominated by dioxin congeners at upstream RAs. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10

  2. Comparison of fluid geochemistry and microbiology of multiple organic-rich reservoirs in the Illinois Basin, USA: Evidence for controls on methanogenesis and microbial transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Melissa E.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Bates, Brittney L.; Kirk, Matthew F.; Martini, Anna M.

    2011-04-01

    Microbial methane in sedimentary basins comprises approximately 20% of global natural gas resources, yet little is known about the environmental requirements and metabolic rates of these subsurface microbial communities. The Illinois Basin, located in the midcontinent of the United States, is an ideal location to investigate hydrogeochemical factors controlling methanogenesis as microbial methane accumulations occur: (1) in three organic-rich reservoirs of different geologic ages and organic matter types - Upper Devonian New Albany Shale (up to 900 m depth), Pennsylvanian coals (up to 600 m depth), and Quaternary glacial sediments (shallow aquifers); (2) across steep salinity gradients; and (3) with variable concentrations of SO42-. For all three organic-rich reservoirs aqueous geochemical conditions are favorable for microbial methanogenesis, with near neutral pH, SO42- concentrations <2 mM, and Cl - concentrations <3 M. Also, carbon isotopic fractionation of CH 4, CO 2, and DIC is consistent with microbial methanogenesis, and increased carbon isotopic fractionation with average reservoir depth corresponds to a decrease of groundwater flushing rates with average depth of reservoir. Plots of stable isotopes of water and Cl - show mixing between a brine endmember and freshwater, suggesting that meteoric groundwater recharge has affected all microbial methanogenic systems. Additionally, similar methanogenic communities are present in all three reservoirs with comparable cell counts (8.69E3-2.58E6 cells/mL). TRFLP results show low numbers of archaea species with only two dominant groups of base pairs in coals, shale, and limestone aquifers. These results compare favorably with other methanogen-containing deep subsurface environments. Individual hydrogeochemical parameters that have a Spearman correlation coefficient greater than 0.3 to variations in methanogenic species include stable isotopes of water (δ 18O and δD), type of substrate (i.e. coals versus shale), p

  3. Methanogenesis produces strong 13C-enrichment in stromatolites of Lagoa Salgada, Brazil: A modern analogue for Palaeo-/Neoproterozoic stromatolites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick; Birgel, Daniel; Lundberg, Rebecca; Horat, Thomas; Bontognali, Tomaso; Bahniuk Rumbelsperger, Anelize; Rezende, Carlos; Vásconcelos, Crisógono; McKenzie, Judith A.

    2015-04-01

    Holocene stromatolites characterized by unusually positive inorganic carbon isotope values (δ13C up to +16 ‰ relative to the Vienna Peedee Belemnite Standard; VPDB) are present in Lagoa Salgada, a seasonally brackish to hypersaline lagoon near Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Such positive values cannot be explained by phototrophic fixation of CO2 alone. Instead, strong carbon isotope fractionation is commonly observed during methanogenesis, where isotopically light C is preferentially incorporated into methane and the residual inorganic carbon is 13C-enriched. We suggest that methanogenesis was the dominating process of organic carbon mineralization during the growth of the stromatolites. Indeed, the presence of dissolved methane in porewater (up to 5 mM) and the archaeal membrane lipid archaeol showing relatively high δ13C values (-15 to 0 ‰ VPDB) indicates that methanogenic archaea are present and active in the modern lagoon sediment. Moreover, 13C-depleted hopanoids diplopterol and 3-methylated bishomohopanoic acid (both -40‰ VPDB) are preserved in lagoon sediments and are most likely derived from aerobic methanotrophic bacteria thriving in the methane-enriched water column. Loss of isotopically light methane through the water column to the atmosphere would explain the residual 13C-enriched pool of dissolved inorganic carbon from where the carbonate constituting the stromatolites precipitated. The predominance of methanogenic archaea in the lagoon is most likely a result of sulphate limitation suppressing the activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria under brackish conditions in a seasonally humid tropical and arid environment. Also in the modern sediments, sulphate reduction activity is very low. Under dominating methanogenic conditions and in absence of an efficient carbonate-inducing metabolic process, we propose that stromatolite formation in Lagoa Salgada was abiotically induced while the 13C-enriched organic and inorganic carbon pools are due to

  4. [Driving ability with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Küst, J; Dettmers, C

    2014-07-01

    Driving is an important issue for young patients, especially for those whose walking capacity is impaired. Driving might support the patient's social and vocational participation. The question as to whether a patient with multiple sclerosis (MS) is restricted in the ability to drive a car depends on neurological and neuropsychological deficits, self-awareness, insight into deficits and ability to compensate for loss of function. Because of the enormous variability of symptoms in MS the question is highly individualized. A practical driving test under supervision of a driving instructor (possibly accompanied by a neuropsychologist) might be helpful in providing both patient and relatives adequate feedback on driving abilities.

  5. Sex Chromosome Drive

    PubMed Central

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R.; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in two clades, Rodentia and Diptera. Although very little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of drive, epigenetic processes such as chromatin regulation could be involved in many instances. Yet, its evolutionary consequences are far-reaching, from the evolution of mating systems and sex determination to the emergence of new species. PMID:25524548

  6. [Cannabis affects driving skills].

    PubMed

    Khiabani, Hassan Z; Christophersen, Asbjørg S; Mørland, Jørg

    2007-03-01

    Delta (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the most important psychoactive substance in cannabis, is frequently detected in blood from apprehended drivers suspected for drugged driving. Both experimental and epidemiological studies have demonstrated the negative effects of THC upon cognitive functions and psychomotor skills. These effects could last longer than a measurable concentration of THC in blood. Culpability studies have recently demonstrated an increased risk of becoming responsible in fatal or injurious traffic accidents, even with low blood concentrations of THC. It has also been demonstrated that there is a correlation between the degree of impairment, the drug dose and the THC blood concentration. It is very important to focus on the negative effect of cannabis on fitness to drive in order to prevent injuries and loss of human life and to avoid large economic consequences to the society.

  7. Magnetostrictive direct drive motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1990-01-01

    Developing magnetostrictive direct drive research motors to power robot joints is discussed. These type motors are expected to produce extraordinary torque density, to be able to perform microradian incremental steps and to be self-braking and safe with the power off. Several types of motor designs have been attempted using magnetostrictive materials. One of the candidate approaches (the magnetostrictive roller drive) is described. The method in which the design will function is described as is the reason why this approach is inherently superior to the other approaches. Following this, the design will be modelled and its expected performance predicted. This particular candidate design is currently undergoing detailed engineering with prototype construction and testing scheduled for mid 1991.

  8. Advanced Motor Drives Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehsani, M.; Tchamdjou, A.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of advanced motor drive systems as a replacement for the hydrazine fueled APU units. The replacement technology must meet several requirements which are particular to the space applications and the Orbiter in general. Some of these requirements are high efficiency, small size, high power density. In the first part of the study several motors are compared, based on their characteristics and in light of the Orbiter requirements. The best candidate, the brushless DC is chosen because of its particularly good performance with regards to efficiency. Several power electronics drive technologies including the conventional three-phase hard switched and several soft-switched inverters are then presented. In the last part of the study, a soft-switched inverter is analyzed and compared to its conventional hard-switched counterpart. Optimal efficiency is a basic requirement for space applications and the soft-switched technology represents an unavoidable trend for the future.

  9. Driving on the Descartes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 16 mission commander, drives the 'Rover', Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) to its final parking place near the end of the third extravehicular activity (EVA-3) at the Descartes landing site. Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., Lunar Module pilot, took this photograph looking southward. The flank of Stone Mountain can be seen on the horizon at left. The shadow of the Lunar Module 'Orion' is visible in the foreground.

  10. Gear Drive Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Philadelphia Gear Corporation used two COSMIC computer programs; one dealing with shrink fit analysis and the other with rotor dynamics problems in computerized design and test work. The programs were used to verify existing in-house programs to insure design accuracy by checking its company-developed computer methods against procedures developed by other organizations. Its specialty is in custom units for unique applications, such as Coast Guard ice breaking ships, steel mill drives, coal crusher, sewage treatment equipment and electricity.

  11. Variable reluctance drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Lipo, T.A.; Liang, F.

    1995-10-17

    A variable reluctance drive system including a motor and corresponding converter for improved current commutation is described. The motor incorporates a salient pole rotor and a salient pole stator having one or more full pitch windings which operate by mutual inductance to transfer the current from the active short pitch winding following phase alignment. This increases output torque and/or speed and permits a number of simple and economical converter circuits. 17 figs.

  12. Butalbital and driving impairment.

    PubMed

    Yeakel, Jillian K; Logan, Barry K

    2013-07-01

    Butalbital (Fiorinal(®)), used in the treatment of migraines and muscle pain, is the most commonly encountered barbiturate in impaired driving cases. It has central nervous system (CNS) depressant properties, including sedation, drowsiness, and feelings of intoxication, which can contribute to driving impairment. Twenty-six driving under the influence cases are reviewed including results from field sobriety tests and toxicology testing. Blood samples were screened using enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique immunoassay, and the presence of butalbital was confirmed and quantified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, gas chromatography with flame ionization detection, or gas chromatography nitrogen/phosphorus detection. Butalbital concentrations ranged from 1.0 to 30.2 mg/L, with a mean and median of 16.0 mg/L. General impairment indicators in these cases included horizontal and vertical nystagmus, lack of convergence, poor motor coordination, and balance and speech problems, which are common to CNS depressant intoxication, similar to that associated with alcohol. These findings indicate the importance of toxicological testing for butalbital in cases where CNS depressants are indicated.

  13. [Automobile driving capacity in dementia].

    PubMed

    Seeger, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Dementia influences at an early stage the driving aptitude of motor vehicle steering persons. Every year in Switzerland, around 16'000 driving permit holders suffer newly from dementia; therefore the driving aptitude is questioned, especially because of possibly limited executive functions. Individuals with early-stage dementia often may show a dangerous driving stile. However, a mild dementia does not a priori exclude the driving aptitude, and less than half of these drivers can continue driving for another 1 - 3 years. In contrast, there is no further driving aptitude in presence of moderate dementia. In the assessment of driving aptitude, the underlying cause of dementia is always taken into account. Cognitive short tests such as the Mini-Mental Status Exam, Clock Drawing Test and Trail-Making Test are not suitable to make reliable statements about the aptitude to drive, but these tests are very important for the initial diagnosis of dementia in primary care practice and can lead the way for further examination concerning driving aptitude. The legally prescribed regular check-up for motorists aged over 70 years in Switzerland provides an ideal opportunity for early detection of incipient dementia. The practical procedure for the assessment of aptitude to drive in the primary care practice is presented. The physician-guided on-road driving test represents a meaningful, practical and relatively cost-effective tool for the evaluation of driving aptitude in cases of doubt.

  14. In vitro study and comparison of caecal methanogenesis and fermentation pattern in the brown hare (Lepus europaeus) and domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Miśta, Dorota; Króliczewska, Bożena; Marounek, Milan; Pecka, Ewa; Zawadzki, Wojciech; Nicpoń, Józef

    2015-01-01

    The brown hare and the domestic rabbit are mid-sized herbivorous mammals and hindgut fermenters, though their digestive physiologies differ in some traits. The objective of this study was to estimate and compare the caecal microbial activity in hares and rabbits via an analysis of the following end-products of in vitro caecal fermentation: methane, total gas production, short chain fatty acids and ammonia concentration. Hare caecal methanogenesis occurred at a much lower level (0.25 mmol/kg for samples incubated without substrate and 0.22 mmol/kg for samples incubated with substrate) than that of the rabbit (15.49 and 11.73 mmol/kg, respectively) (P<0.001). The impact of the substrate's presence on caecal methanogenesis was not significant, though its presence increased the total gas production during fermentation (P<0.001). Hare caecal microflora produced a lower short chain fatty acids concentration than did rabbit microorganisms (P<0.05). In unincubated hare samples, the short chain fatty acids concentration was 28.4 mmol/kg, whereas in unincubated rabbit samples, the short chain fatty acids concentration was 51.8 mmol/kg. The caecal fermentation pattern of the hare was characterised by higher propionate and isobutyrate molar proportions compared with those observed in rabbit caecum (P<0.01). No significant changes in the ammonia concentration in either rabbit or hare caecum were found. The results obtained indicate some differences in the activity of the microbial populations colonising the hare and rabbit caecum, particularly in regards to methanogenic Archaea.

  15. Do we really need to use our smartphones while driving?

    PubMed

    Musicant, Oren; Lotan, Tsippy; Albert, Gila

    2015-12-01

    Smartphone usage while driving, a prominent type of driver distraction, has become a major concern in the area of road safety. Answers to an internet survey by 757 Israeli drivers who own smartphones were analyzed with focus on two main purposes: (1) to gain insights regarding patterns of smartphone usage while driving and its motivation, (2) to probe drivers' views on the perceived risk and the need to use smartphones while driving, as well as their willingness to use blocking apps that limit such usages. Phone calls and texting were found to be the most common usages while driving, hence, both were chosen to be further analyzed. 73% (N=551) of the respondents make phone calls while driving and almost half of them may be considered frequent callers as they admit to do it intensively while driving. As for texting, 35% of the respondents (N=256) text while driving and a quarter of them do so frequently. While phone calls were perceived to compromise safety by 34% of the users, texting was perceived to compromise safety by 84% of the users. However, we found that drivers place limitations on themselves as more than 70% avoid texting when they think they need to devote attention to driving. A logistic regression model indicates that perceived need and perceived safety are significant factors associated with being a frequent smartphone phone calls user, but only perceived need significantly predicts being a frequent texting user. Approximately half of all the respondents are willing to try an app which blocks smartphone usage while driving. The willingness to use such technology was found to be related primarily to perceived need. Less significant factors are work-related usage and perceived safety. Frequency of usage was not found to affect this willingness, indicating that it should not be a factor in designing and implementing interventions to limit smartphone usage while driving.

  16. Abundant carbon substrates drive extremely high sulfate reduction rates and methane fluxes in Prairie Pothole Wetlands.

    PubMed

    Dalcin Martins, Paula; Hoyt, David W; Bansal, Sheel; Mills, Christopher T; Tfaily, Malak; Tangen, Brian A; Finocchiaro, Raymond G; Johnston, Michael D; McAdams, Brandon C; Solensky, Matthew J; Smith, Garrett J; Chin, Yu-Ping; Wilkins, Michael J

    2017-01-24

    Inland waters are increasingly recognized as critical sites of methane emissions to the atmosphere, but the biogeochemical reactions driving such fluxes are less well understood. The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America is one of the largest wetland complexes in the world, containing millions of small, shallow wetlands. The sediment pore waters of PPR wetlands contain some of the highest concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and sulfur species ever recorded in terrestrial aquatic environments. Using a suite of geochemical and microbiological analyses, we measured the impact of sedimentary carbon and sulfur transformations in these wetlands on methane fluxes to the atmosphere. This research represents the first study of coupled geochemistry and microbiology within the PPR and demonstrates how the conversion of abundant labile DOC pools into methane results in some of the highest fluxes of this greenhouse gas to the atmosphere ever reported. Abundant DOC and sulfate additionally supported some of the highest sulfate reduction rates ever measured in terrestrial aquatic environments, which we infer to account for a large fraction of carbon mineralization in this system. Methane accumulations in zones of active sulfate reduction may be due to either the transport of free methane gas from deeper locations or the co-occurrence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. If both respiratory processes are concurrent, any competitive inhibition of methanogenesis by sulfate-reducing bacteria may be lessened by the presence of large labile DOC pools that yield noncompetitive substrates such as methanol. Our results reveal some of the underlying mechanisms that make PPR wetlands biogeochemical hotspots, which ultimately leads to their critical, but poorly recognized role in regional greenhouse gas emissions.

  17. Drive Diagnostic Filter Wheel Control

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlich, D.

    2007-07-17

    DrD Filter Wheel Control is National Instrument's Labview software that drives a Drive Diagnostic filter wheel. The software can drive the filter wheel between each end limit, detect the positive and negative limit and each home position and post the stepper motot values to an Excel spreadsheet. The software can also be used to cycle the assembly between the end limits.

  18. Drive alignment pays maintenance dividends

    SciTech Connect

    Fedder, R.

    2008-12-15

    Proper alignment of the motor and gear drive on conveying and processing equipment will result in longer bearing and coupling life, along with lower maintenance costs. Selecting an alignment free drive package instead of a traditional foot mounted drive and motor is a major advancement toward these goals. 4 photos.

  19. Offset Compound Gear Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Mark A.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The Offset Compound Gear Drive is an in-line, discrete, two-speed device utilizing a special offset compound gear that has both an internal tooth configuration on the input end and external tooth configuration on the output end, thus allowing it to mesh in series, simultaneously, with both a smaller external tooth input gear and a larger internal tooth output gear. This unique geometry and offset axis permits the compound gear to mesh with the smaller diameter input gear and the larger diameter output gear, both of which are on the same central, or primary, centerline. This configuration results in a compact in-line reduction gear set consisting of fewer gears and bearings than a conventional planetary gear train. Switching between the two output ratios is accomplished through a main control clutch and sprag. Power flow to the above is transmitted through concentric power paths. Low-speed operation is accomplished in two meshes. For the purpose of illustrating the low-speed output operation, the following example pitch diameters are given. A 5.0 pitch diameter (PD) input gear to 7.50 PD (internal tooth) intermediate gear (0.667 reduction mesh), and a 7.50 PD (external tooth) intermediate gear to a 10.00 PD output gear (0.750 reduction mesh). Note that it is not required that the intermediate gears on the offset axis be of the same diameter. For this example, the resultant low-speed ratio is 2:1 (output speed = 0.500; product of stage one 0.667 reduction and stage two 0.750 stage reduction). The design is not restricted to the example pitch diameters, or output ratio. From the output gear, power is transmitted through a hollow drive shaft, which, in turn, drives a sprag during which time the main clutch is disengaged.

  20. Base drive circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lange, Arnold C.

    1995-01-01

    An improved base drive circuit (10) having a level shifter (24) for providing bistable input signals to a pair of non-linear delays (30, 32). The non-linear delays (30, 32) provide gate control to a corresponding pair of field effect transistors (100, 106) through a corresponding pair of buffer components (88, 94). The non-linear delays (30, 32) provide delayed turn-on for each of the field effect transistors (100, 106) while an associated pair of transistors (72, 80) shunt the non-linear delays (30, 32) during turn-off of the associated field effect transistor (100, 106).

  1. Generative design drives manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Frank A.

    1989-04-01

    This paper reviews the collaboration that is being forced on Engineering and Manufacturing as they move from the manual translation of Engineering drawings toward automatic decoding of Product Data Definitions (PDDs), a pre-requisite to integrated manufacture. Based on case studies and implementation experience gained over the last decade, it defines the step-by-step evolution of a generative design capability that will drive manufacturing logic. It reviews the changing relationship of Engineering to Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering and the challenge this presents to manufacturing management in its struggle to remain competitive in both domestic and international markets.

  2. Engine valve driving apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, S.; Uesugi, T.; Oda, H.

    1989-01-03

    An engine valve driving apparatus for an internal combustion engine having a cam driven engine valve is described. It consists of a camshaft rotatable in synchronism with rotation of a crankshaft of an engine and a movable cam member supported by the camshaft for axial movement and prevented from turning relative to the camshaft. The movable cam member can be axially shifted between an operative position wherein the cam member is cooperative with a member of the engine valve so as to cause an operation of the engine valve and an inoperative position wherein the cam member is out of cooperation with the member.

  3. Modular droplet actuator drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  4. Base drive circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lange, A.C.

    1995-04-04

    An improved base drive circuit having a level shifter for providing bistable input signals to a pair of non-linear delays. The non-linear delays provide gate control to a corresponding pair of field effect transistors through a corresponding pair of buffer components. The non-linear delays provide delayed turn-on for each of the field effect transistors while an associated pair of transistors shunt the non-linear delays during turn-off of the associated field effect transistor. 2 figures.

  5. Effect of cognitive status on self-regulatory driving behavior in older adults: an assessment of naturalistic driving using in-car video recordings.

    PubMed

    Festa, Elena K; Ott, Brian R; Manning, Kevin J; Davis, Jennifer D; Heindel, William C

    2013-03-01

    Previous findings that older drivers engage in strategic self-regulatory behaviors to minimize perceived safety risks are primarily based on survey reports rather than actual behavior. This study analyzed in-car video recording of naturalistic driving of 18 patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and 20 age-matched controls in order to (1) characterize self-regulatory behaviors engaged by older drivers and (2) assess how behaviors change with cognitive impairment. Only participants who were rated "safe" on a prior standardized road test were selected for this study. Both groups drove primarily in environments that minimized the demands on driving skill and that incurred the least risk for involvement in major crashes. Patients with AD displayed further restrictions of driving behavior beyond those of healthy elderly individuals, suggesting additional regulation on the basis of cognitive status. These data provide critical empirical support for findings from previous survey studies indicating an overall reduction in driving mobility among older drivers with cognitive impairment.

  6. Advances in traction drive technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Anderson, N. E.; Rohn, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Traction drives are traced from early uses as main transmissions in automobiles at the turn of the century to modern, high-powered traction drives capable of transmitting hundreds of horsepower. Recent advances in technology are described which enable today's traction drive to be a serious candidate for off-highway vehicles and helicopter applications. Improvements in materials, traction fluids, design techniques, power loss and life prediction methods will be highlighted. Performance characteristics of the Nasvytis fixed-ratio drive are given. Promising future drive applications, such as helicopter main transmissions and servo-control positioning mechanisms are also addressed.

  7. Fast wave current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Experiments on the fast wave in the range of high ion cyclotron harmonics in the ACT-1 device show that current drive is possible with the fast wave just as it is for the lower hybrid wave, except that it is suitable for higher plasma densities. A 140° loop antenna launched the high ion cyclotron harmonic fast wave [ω/Ω=O(10)] into a He+ plasma with ne≂4×1012 cm-3 and B=4.5 kG. Probe and magnetic loop diagnostics and FIR laser scattering confirmed the presence of the fast wave, and the Rogowski loop indicated that the circulating plasma current increased by up to 40A with 1 kW of coupled power, which is comparable to lower hybrid current drive in the same device with the same unidirectional fast electron beam used as the target for the rf. A phased antenna array would be used for FWCD in a tokamak without the E-beam.

  8. Glaucoma and Driving: On-Road Driving Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Joanne M.; Black, Alex A.; Mallon, Kerry; Thomas, Ravi; Owsley, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To comprehensively investigate the types of driving errors and locations that are most problematic for older drivers with glaucoma compared to those without glaucoma using a standardized on-road assessment. Methods Participants included 75 drivers with glaucoma (mean = 73.2±6.0 years) with mild to moderate field loss (better-eye MD = -1.21 dB; worse-eye MD = -7.75 dB) and 70 age-matched controls without glaucoma (mean = 72.6 ± 5.0 years). On-road driving performance was assessed in a dual-brake vehicle by an occupational therapist using a standardized scoring system which assessed the types of driving errors and the locations where they were made and the number of critical errors that required an instructor intervention. Driving safety was rated on a 10-point scale. Self-reported driving ability and difficulties were recorded using the Driving Habits Questionnaire. Results Drivers with glaucoma were rated as significantly less safe, made more driving errors, and had almost double the rate of critical errors than those without glaucoma. Driving errors involved lane positioning and planning/approach, and were significantly more likely to occur at traffic lights and yield/give-way intersections. There were few between group differences in self-reported driving ability. Conclusions Older drivers with glaucoma with even mild to moderate field loss exhibit impairments in driving ability, particularly during complex driving situations that involve tactical problems with lane-position, planning ahead and observation. These results, together with the fact that these drivers self-report their driving to be relatively good, reinforce the need for evidence-based on-road assessments for evaluating driving fitness. PMID:27472221

  9. Landscape heritage objects' effect on driving: a combined driving simulator and questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Antonson, Hans; Ahlström, Christer; Mårdh, Selina; Blomqvist, Göran; Wiklund, Mats

    2014-01-01

    According to the literature, landscape (panoramas, heritage objects e.g. landmarks) affects people in various ways. Data are primarily developed by asking people (interviews, photo sessions, focus groups) about their preferences, but to a lesser degree by measuring how the body reacts to such objects. Personal experience while driving a car through a landscape is even more rare. In this paper we study how different types of objects in the landscape affect drivers during their drive. A high-fidelity moving-base driving simulator was used to measure choice of speed and lateral position in combination with stress (heart rate measure) and eye tracking. The data were supplemented with questionnaires. Eighteen test drivers (8 men and 10 women) with a mean age of 37 were recruited. The test drivers were exposed to different new and old types of landscape objects such as 19th century church, wind turbine, 17th century milestone and bus stop, placed at different distances from the road driven. The findings are in some respect contradictory, but it was concluded that that 33% of the test drivers felt stressed during the drive. All test drivers said that they had felt calm at times during the drive but the reason for this was only to a minor degree connected with old and modern objects. The open landscape was experienced as conducive to acceleration. Most objects were, to a small degree, experienced (subjective data) as having a speed-reducing effect, much in line with the simulator data (objective data). Objects close to the road affected the drivers' choice of' lateral position. No significant differences could be observed concerning the test drivers' gaze between old or modern objects, but a significant difference was observed between the test drivers' gaze between road stretches with faraway objects and stretches without objects. No meaningful, significant differences were found for the drivers' stress levels as measured by heart rate.

  10. [Car driving and psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Jonas, Carol

    2015-10-01

    Among the specialties involved in the order of 31 August 2010, psychiatry is in Chapter IV alongside addictive behavior and drug use may impair the ability of the driver. As well as for personal vehicles for professional vehicles the incompatibility of health with driving exists when clinical factors can interfere with the skills required of the driver. There would simply absolute incompatibility for psychoses in active phase. In the other phases of psychosis is at the discretion of specialist as for illiteracy or social maladjustment. The role of the authorized psychiatrist is therefore always subjective. This article also makes room for attention-deficit disorder with hyperactivity (ADHD), not listed, but the subject of numerous articles in the English literature.

  11. Rotary drive mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Kenderdine, Eugene W.

    1991-01-01

    A rotary drive mechanism includes a rotary solenoid having a stator and multi-poled rotor. A moving member rotates with the rotor and is biased by a biasing device. The biasing device causes a further rotational movement after rotation by the rotary solenoid. Thus, energization of the rotary solenoid moves the member in one direction to one position and biases the biasing device against the member. Subsequently, de-energization of the rotary solenoid causes the biasing device to move the member in the same direction to another position from where the moving member is again movable by energization and de-energization of the rotary solenoid. Preferably, the moving member is a multi-lobed cam having the same number of lobes as the rotor has poles. An anti-overdrive device is also preferably provided for preventing overdrive in the forward direction or a reverse rotation of the moving member and for precisely aligning the moving member.

  12. Magnetostrictive direct drive motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    A new rare earth alloy, Terfenol-D, combines low frequency operation and extremely high energy density with high magnetostriction. Its material properties make it suitable as a drive element for actuators requiring high output torque. The high strains, the high forces and the high controllability of Terfenol alloys provide a powerful and challenging basis for new ways to generate motion in actuators. Two prototypes of motors using Terfenol-D rods were developed at NASA Goddard. The basic principles of operation are provided of the motor along with other relevant details. A conceptual design of a torque limiting safety clutch/brake under development is illustrated. Also, preliminary design drawings of a linear actuator using Terfenol-D is shown.

  13. What Drives Blend Miscibility?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ronald; Lipson, Jane

    2014-03-01

    With no mixture data available, can one predict phase behavior in polymeric systems based on pure component information only? Due to the very weak entropic drive for large molecules to mix, predicting and understanding miscibility behavior is indeed very difficult. However, while not perfect, some a priori insight is attainable when pure component properties are analyzed within the framework of a theoretical model. A theory provides a platform, allowing one to define quantities and other measures that may not always be directly measurable, but, are physically appealing and insightful none-the-less. Are there properties that can explain for example, why a polymer like polyisobutylene (PIB) exhibits such different phase behavior compared to other polyolefins? Applying our simple lattice-based equation of state, we have recently analyzed a large number of different polymers. In this talk we will present insights from trends and patterns we have observed. Work supported by the National Science Foundation.

  14. QUICK RELEASABLE DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Dickson, J.J.

    1958-07-01

    A quick releasable mechanical drive system suitable for use in a nuclear reactor is described. A small reversible motor positions a control rod by means of a worm and gear speed reducer, a magnetic torque clutch, and a bell crank. As the control rod is raised to the operating position, a heavy coil spring is compressed. In the event of an emergency indicated by either a''scram'' signal or a power failure, the current to the magnetic clutch is cut off, thereby freeing the coil spring and the bell crank positioner from the motor and speed reduction gearing. The coil spring will immediately act upon the bell crank to cause the insertion of the control rod. This arrangement will allow the slow, accurate positioning of the control rod during reactor operation, while providing an independent force to rapidly insert the rod in the event of an emergency.

  15. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  16. Methane-bearing fluids in subduction zones: an experimental study of abiotic methanogenesis during serpentinization at 12 kbar and 300°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, C.; Manning, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    Serpentinization within subduction zones may generate reduced fluids that contain higher concentrations of abiotic methane than near-surface ultramafic environments. We present preliminary experimental data suggesting that the kinetics of abiotic methanogenesis are enhanced at high pressures. Thermodynamic calculations of C-O-H fluid speciations at the low oxygen fugacities attained during early serpentinization suggest complete conversion of oxidized carbon to methane, yet previous field and experimental investigations have reported fluid compositions with CH4/CO2 far below equilibrium (McCollom and Seewald, 2007). Much experimental work, therefore, has focused on CH4 production rates and the kinetic effects of temperature and mineral catalysis (Horita and Berdt, 1999; Foustoukos and Seyfried, 2004). Methane has been shown experimentally to form at very high pressures (Scott et al, 2004), but the quantitative effect of pressure on methanogenesis kinetics is unknown. We present preliminary results of a comparison of methane production rates at 0.35 and 12 kbar, 300°C, using experiments performed in piston cylinder and cold seal hydrothermal apparatus. Carbon was introduced as a roughly 70 mmol solution of isotopically-labeled formic acid, H13COOH, known to decompose to 13CO2 and H2 at run conditions. Roughly 15 mL of this solution, along with 1.9 mg of natural awaruite (Ni3Fe), was loaded into a gold capsule and then sealed via DC spot welding. Awaruite, a known methane catalyst (Horita and Berndt, 1999), was added to increase the overall rates of all experiments in order to boost the concentration for analysis and as an fO2 buffer appropriate for serpentinization. The experiments were held at T and P for approximately 160 hours. After each run, the capsule was placed in a gas vial and punctured with a needle. The contents of the vial were extracted via gas syringe and injected into gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GC-MS). CH4 concentration in the 12 kbar run

  17. Methanogenesis from methanol and methylamines and acetogenesis from hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the sediments of a eutrophic lake

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, D.R.; Klug, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    /sup 14/C-tracer techniques were used to examine the metabolism of methanol and methylamines and acetogenesis from hydrogen and carbon dioxide in sediments from the profundal and littoral zones of eutrophic Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. Methanogens were primarily responsible for the metabolism of methanol, mono-methylammine, and trimethylamine and maintained the pool size of these substrates below 10 ..mu..M in both sediment types. Methanol and methylamines were the precursors for less than 5 and 1%, respectively, of the total methane produced. Methanol and methylamines continued to be metabolized to methane when the sulfate concentration in the sediment was increased to 20 mM. Less than 2% of the total acetate production was derived from carbon dioxide reduction. Hydrogen consumption by hydrogen-oxidizing acetogens was 5% or less of the total hydrogen uptake by acetogens and methanogens. These results, in conjunction with previous studies, emphasize that acetate and hydrogen are the major methane precursors and that methanogens are the predominant hydrogen consumers in the sediments of this eutrophic lake.

  18. Sequenced drive for rotary valves

    DOEpatents

    Mittell, Larry C.

    1981-01-01

    A sequenced drive for rotary valves which provides the benefits of applying rotary and linear motions to the movable sealing element of the valve. The sequenced drive provides a close approximation of linear motion while engaging or disengaging the movable element with the seat minimizing wear and damage due to scrubbing action. The rotary motion of the drive swings the movable element out of the flowpath thus eliminating obstruction to flow through the valve.

  19. Driving anger in Ukraine: Appraisals, not trait driving anger, predict anger intensity while driving.

    PubMed

    Stephens, A N; Hill, T; Sullman, M J M

    2016-03-01

    Trait driving anger is often, but not always, found to predict both the intensity of anger while driving and subsequent crash-related behaviours. However, a number of studies have not found support for a direct relationship between one's tendency to become angry and anger reported while driving, suggesting that other factors may mediate this relationship. The present self-report study investigated whether, in anger provoking driving situations, the appraisals made by drivers influence the relationship between trait and state anger. A sample of 339 drivers from Ukraine completed the 33-item version of the Driver Anger Scale (DAS; Deffenbacher et al., 1994) and eight questions about their most recent experience of driving anger. A structural equation model found that the intensity of anger experienced was predicted by the negative evaluations of the situation, which was in turn predicted by trait driving anger. However, trait driving anger itself did not predict anger intensity; supporting the hypothesis that evaluations of the driving situation mediate the relationship between trait and state anger. Further, the unique structure of the DAS required to fit the data from the Ukrainian sample, may indicate that the anger inducing situations in Ukraine are different to those of a more developed country. Future research is needed to investigate driving anger in Ukraine in a broader sample and also to confirm the role of the appraisal process in the development of driving anger in both developed and undeveloped countries.

  20. The drive-wise project: driving simulator training increases real driving performance in healthy older drivers

    PubMed Central

    Casutt, Gianclaudio; Theill, Nathan; Martin, Mike; Keller, Martin; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Age-related cognitive decline is often associated with unsafe driving behavior. We hypothesized that 10 active training sessions in a driving simulator increase cognitive and on-road driving performance. In addition, driving simulator training should outperform cognitive training. Methods: Ninety-one healthy active drivers (62–87 years) were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) a driving simulator training group, (2) an attention training group (vigilance and selective attention), or (3) a control group. The main outcome variables were on-road driving and cognitive performance. Seventy-seven participants (85%) completed the training and were included in the analyses. Training gains were analyzed using a multiple regression analysis with planned orthogonal comparisons. Results: The driving simulator-training group showed an improvement in on-road driving performance compared to the attention-training group. In addition, both training groups increased cognitive performance compared to the control group. Conclusion: Driving simulator training offers the potential to enhance driving skills in older drivers. Compared to the attention training, the simulator training seems to be a more powerful program for increasing older drivers' safety on the road. PMID:24860497

  1. Utilization of subsurface microbial electrochemical systems to elucidate the mechanisms of competition between methanogenesis and microbial iron(III)/humic acid reduction in Arctic peat soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E. S.; Miller, K.; Lipson, D.; Angenent, L. T.

    2012-12-01

    High-latitude peat soils are a major carbon reservoir, and there is growing concern that previously dormant carbon from this reservoir could be released to the atmosphere as a result of continued climate change. Microbial processes, such as methanogenesis and carbon dioxide production via iron(III) or humic acid reduction, are at the heart of the carbon cycle in Arctic peat soils [1]. A deeper understanding of the factors governing microbial dominance in these soils is crucial for predicting the effects of continued climate change. In previous years, we have demonstrated the viability of a potentiostatically-controlled subsurface microbial electrochemical system-based biosensor that measures microbial respiration via exocellular electron transfer [2]. This system utilizes a graphite working electrode poised at 0.1 V NHE to mimic ferric iron and humic acid compounds. Microbes that would normally utilize these compounds as electron acceptors donate electrons to the electrode instead. The resulting current is a measure of microbial respiration with the electrode and is recorded with respect to time. Here, we examine the mechanistic relationship between methanogenesis and iron(III)- or humic acid-reduction by using these same microbial-three electrode systems to provide an inexhaustible source of alternate electron acceptor to microbes in these soils. Chamber-based carbon dioxide and methane fluxes were measured from soil collars with and without microbial three-electrode systems over a period of four weeks. In addition, in some collars we simulated increased fermentation by applying acetate treatments to understand possible effects of continued climate change on microbial processes in these carbon-rich soils. The results from this work aim to increase our fundamental understanding of competition between electron acceptors, and will provide valuable data for climate modeling scenarios. 1. Lipson, D.A., et al., Reduction of iron (III) and humic substances plays a major

  2. 49 CFR 37.107 - Acquisition of passenger rail cars by private entities primarily engaged in the business of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... transporting people and whose operations affect commerce, which remanufactures a rail passenger car to be used... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acquisition of passenger rail cars by private entities primarily engaged in the business of transporting people. 37.107 Section 37.107...

  3. Transformative Undergraduate Science Courses for Non-Majors at a Historically Black Institution and at a Primarily White Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; McGinnis, J. Randy; Pease, Rebecca; Dai, Amy; Benson, Spencer; Dantley, Scott Jackson

    2010-01-01

    We investigated curricular and pedagogical innovations in undergraduate science courses for non-science majors at a Historically Black Institution (HBI) and a Primarily White Institution (PWI). The aims were to improve students' understanding of science, increase their enthusiasm towards science by connecting their prior experience and interest to…

  4. 49 CFR 37.101 - Purchase or lease of vehicles by private entities not primarily engaged in the business of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Purchase or lease of vehicles by private entities not primarily engaged in the business of transporting people. 37.101 Section 37.101 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES...

  5. 49 CFR 37.101 - Purchase or lease of vehicles by private entities not primarily engaged in the business of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Purchase or lease of vehicles by private entities not primarily engaged in the business of transporting people. 37.101 Section 37.101 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES...

  6. 49 CFR 37.107 - Acquisition of passenger rail cars by private entities primarily engaged in the business of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Acquisition of passenger rail cars by private entities primarily engaged in the business of transporting people. 37.107 Section 37.107 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES...

  7. 49 CFR 37.107 - Acquisition of passenger rail cars by private entities primarily engaged in the business of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acquisition of passenger rail cars by private entities primarily engaged in the business of transporting people. 37.107 Section 37.107 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES...

  8. 49 CFR 37.101 - Purchase or lease of vehicles by private entities not primarily engaged in the business of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purchase or lease of vehicles by private entities not primarily engaged in the business of transporting people. 37.101 Section 37.101 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES...

  9. Noninductive current drive in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    Various current drive mechanisms may be grouped into four classes: (1) injection of energetic particle beams; (2) launching of rf waves; (3) hybrid schemes, which are combinations of various rf schemes (rf plus beams, rf and/or beam plus ohmic heating, etc.); and (4) other schemes, some of which are specific to reactor plasma conditions requiring the presence of alpha particle or intense synchrotron radiation. Particle injection schemes include current drive by neutral beams and relativistic electron beams. The rf schemes include current drive by the lower hybrid (LH) waves, the electron waves, the waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies, etc. Only a few of these approaches, however, have been tested experimentally, with the broadest data base available for LH waves. Included in this report are (1) efficiency criteria for current drive, (2) current drive by neutral beam injection, (3) LH current drive, (4) electron cyclotron current drive, (5) current drive by ion cyclotron waves - minority species heating, and (6) current drive by other schemes (such as hybrids and low frequency waves).

  10. 26. CAN CONVEYOR DRIVE MECHANISM Empty can conveyor driving mechanism, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. CAN CONVEYOR DRIVE MECHANISM Empty can conveyor driving mechanism, second floor above canning area. The belt has been removed from the conveyor, but sections of can conveyor tracks are visible on the floor. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  11. Driving for All Seasons and Reasons. Book Four. Project Drive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zook, Doris; And Others

    This Project Drive booklet titled Driving for All Seasons and Reasons is one of eight booklets designed for intermediate-level English-as-a-second-language students and low-level adult basic education/basic reading students. The goal of the booklet is to aid the student in developing the oral and sight vocabulary necessary for a basic driver…

  12. VIEW OF BEND IN CEDAR DRIVE WITH 603 CEDAR DRIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BEND IN CEDAR DRIVE WITH 603 CEDAR DRIVE ON RIGHT. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. The "genetics" of driving behavior: parents' driving style predicts their children's driving style.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Alessandra; Summala, Heikki

    2004-07-01

    It can be hypothesized that children inherit their parents' driving habits both through genetic disposition and model learning. A few studies have shown indeed that parents' and their children's traffic convictions and accidents correlate which, however, may be due to life style and other exposure factors. This study aimed at investigating the relationships between parents' and their children's self-reported driving behavior. The subjects were 174 parent-child pairs who independently completed a questionnaire. Driving behavior-driving style-was evaluated by means of Manchester driver behavior questionnaire (DBQ), while data about driving exposure, life style, accidents, and traffic tickets were also collected. A series of regression models indicated that parents' self-reported driving behavior explains their children's respective self-reported behavior, even when exposure and demographic and life-style factors are controlled.

  14. Drive-By Pharming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Sid; Ramzan, Zulfikar; Jakobsson, Markus

    This paper describes an attack concept termed Drive-by Pharming where an attacker sets up a web page that, when simply viewed by the victim (on a JavaScript-enabled browser), attempts to change the DNS server settings on the victim's home broadband router. As a result, future DNS queries are resolved by a DNS server of the attacker's choice. The attacker can direct the victim's Internet traffic and point the victim to the attacker's own web sites regardless of what domain the victim thinks he is actually going to, potentially leading to the compromise of the victim's credentials. The same attack methodology can be used to make other changes to the router, like replacing its firmware. Routers could then host malicious web pages or engage in click fraud. Since the attack is mounted through viewing a web page, it does not require the attacker to have any physical proximity to the victim nor does it require the explicit download of traditional malicious software. The attack works under the reasonable assumption that the victim has not changed the default management password on their broadband router.

  15. On the methane paradox: Transport from shallow water zones rather than in situ methanogenesis is the major source of CH4 in the open surface water of lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encinas Fernández, Jorge; Peeters, Frank; Hofmann, Hilmar

    2016-10-01

    Estimates of global methane (CH4) emissions from lakes and the contributions of different pathways are currently under debate. In situ methanogenesis linked to algae growth was recently suggested to be the major source of CH4 fluxes from aquatic systems. However, based on our very large data set on CH4 distributions within lakes, we demonstrate here that methane-enriched water from shallow water zones is the most likely source of the basin-wide mean CH4 concentrations in the surface water of lakes. Consistently, the mean surface CH4 concentrations are significantly correlated with the ratio between the surface area of the shallow water zone and the entire lake, fA,s/t, but not with the total surface area. The categorization of CH4 fluxes according to fA,s/t may therefore improve global estimates of CH4 emissions from lakes. Furthermore, CH4 concentrations increase substantially with water temperature, indicating that seasonally resolved data are required to accurately estimate annual CH4 emissions.

  16. Advanced treatment of landfill leachate using anaerobic-aerobic process: organic removal by simultaneous denitritation and methanogenesis and nitrogen removal via nitrite.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongwei; Peng, Yongzhen; Shi, Xiaoning

    2015-02-01

    A novel biological system coupling an UASB and a SBR was established to treat landfill leachate. In order to enhance organics and nitrogen removal, simultaneous denitritation and methanogenesis (SDM) was performed in the UASB. Free ammonia (FA) inhibition on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and process control was used to achieve nitrite pathway in the SBR. Results over 623 days showed that the maximum organic removal rate in the UASB and the maximum ammonium oxidization rate in the SBR was 12.7 kgCOD/m(3) d and 0.96 kgN/m(3) d, respectively. The system achieved COD, TN, and NH4(+)-N removal efficiencies of 93.5%, 99.5%, and 99.1%, respectively. By using FA inhibition coupled with process control, the nitrite pathway was started-up in the SBR at low temperatures (14.0-18.2°C) and was maintained for 142 days at temperatures below 15°C (the lowest level was 9.0°C). The predominant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) explains essentially stable nitritation obtained.

  17. Effect of 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid and Peptostreptococcus productus ATCC 35244 addition on stimulation of reductive acetogenesis in the ruminal ecosystem by selective inhibition of methanogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Nollet, L; Demeyer, D; Verstraete, W

    1997-01-01

    Evidence is provided that reductive acetogenesis can be stimulated in ruminal samples during short-term (24-h) incubations when methanogenesis is inhibited selectively. While addition of the reductive acetogen Peptostreptococcus productus ATCC 35244 alone had no significant influence on CH4 and volatile fatty acid (VFA) production in ruminal samples, the addition of this strain together with 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES) (final concentration, 0.01 or 0.03 mM) resulted in stimulation of acetic acid production and H2 consumption. Since acetate production exceeded amounts that could be attributed to reductive acetogenesis, as measured by H2 consumption, it was found that P. productus also fermented C6 units (glucose and fructose) heterotrophically to mainly acetate (> 99% of the total VFA). Using 14CH3COOH, we concluded that addition of BES and BES plus P. productus did not alter the consumption of acetate in ruminal samples. The addition of P. productus to BES-treated ruminal samples caused supplemental inhibition of CH4 production and stimulation of VFA production, representing a possible energy gain of about 13 to 15%. PMID:8979351

  18. Handbook for Driving Knowledge Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, William T.; McDole, Thomas L.

    Materials intended for driving knowledge test development for use by operational licensing and education agencies are presented. A pool of 1,313 multiple choice test items is included, consisting of sets of specially developed and tested items covering principles of safe driving, legal regulations, and traffic control device knowledge pertinent to…

  19. Bidirectional drive and brake mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, Scott A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A space transport vehicle is disclosed as including a body which is arranged to be movably mounted on an elongated guide member disposed in outer space and driven therealong. A drive wheel is mounted on a drive shaft and arranged to be positioned in rolling engagement with the elongated guide carrying the vehicle. A brake member is arranged on the drive shaft for movement into and out of engagement with an adjacent surface of the drive wheel. An actuator is mounted on the body to be manually moved back and forth between spaced positions in an arc of movement. A ratchet-and-pawl mechanism is arranged to operate upon movements of the actuator in one direction between first and second positions for coupling the actuator to the drive wheel to incrementally rotate the wheel in one rotational direction and to operate upon movements of the actuator in the opposite direction for uncoupling the actuator from the wheel. The brake member is threadedly coupled to the drive shaft in order that the brake member will be operated only when the actuator is moved on beyond its first and second positions for shifting the brake member along the drive shaft and into frictional engagement with the adjacent surface on the drive wheel.

  20. Quantum gates by periodic driving

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Z. C.; Wang, W.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Topological quantum computation has been extensively studied in the past decades due to its robustness against decoherence. One way to realize the topological quantum computation is by adiabatic evolutions—it requires relatively long time to complete a gate, so the speed of quantum computation slows down. In this work, we present a method to realize single qubit quantum gates by periodic driving. Compared to adiabatic evolution, the single qubit gates can be realized at a fixed time much shorter than that by adiabatic evolution. The driving fields can be sinusoidal or square-well field. With the sinusoidal driving field, we derive an expression for the total operation time in the high-frequency limit, and an exact analytical expression for the evolution operator without any approximations is given for the square well driving. This study suggests that the period driving could provide us with a new direction in regulations of the operation time in topological quantum computation. PMID:26911900

  1. Driving the Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    Technological modification of the earth's surface (e.g., agriculture, urbanization) is an old story in human history, but what about the future? The future of landscape in an accelerating technological world, beyond a relatively short time horizon, lies hidden behind an impenetrable veil of complexity. Sufficiently complex dynamics generates not only the trajectory of a variable of interest (e.g., vegetation cover) but also the environment in which that variable evolves (e.g., background climate). There is no way to anticipate what variables will define that environment—the dynamics creates its own variables. We are always open to surprise by a change of conditions we thought or assumed were fixed or by the appearance of new phenomena of whose possible existence we had been unaware or thought unlikely. This is especially true under the influence of technology, where novelty is the rule. Lack of direct long-term predictability of landscape change does not, however, mean we cannot say anything about its future. The presence of persistence (finite time scales) in a system means that prediction by a calibrated numerical model should be good for a limited period of time barring bad luck or faulty implementation. Short-term prediction, despite its limitations, provides an option for dealing with the longer-term future. If a computer-controlled car tries to drive itself from New York to Los Angeles, no conceivable (or possible) stand-alone software can be constructed to predict a priori the space-time trajectory of the vehicle. Yet the drive is normally completed easily by most drivers. The trip is successfully completed because each in a series of very short (linear) steps can be "corrected" on the fly by the driver, who takes her cues from the environment to keep the car on the road and headed toward its destination. This metaphor differs in a fundamental way from the usual notion of predicting geomorphic change, because it involves a goal—to reach a desired

  2. Electric vehicle drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleyard, M.

    1992-01-01

    New legislation in the State of California requires that 2% of vehicles sold there from 1998 will be 'zero-emitting'. This provides a unique market opportunity for developers of electric vehicles but substantial improvements in the technology are probably required if it is to be successfully exploited. There are around a dozen types of battery that are potentially relevant to road vehicles but, at the present, lead/acid and sodium—sulphur come closest to combining acceptable performance, life and cost. To develop an efficient, lightweight electric motor system requires up-to-date techniques of magnetics design, and the latest power-electronic and microprocessor control methods. Brushless machines, coupled with solid-state inverters, offer the most economical solution for mass production, even though their development costs are higher than for direct-current commutator machines. Fitted to a small car, even the highest energy-density batteries will only provide around 200 km average range before recharging. Therefore, some form of supplementary on-board power generation will probably be needed to secure widespread acceptance by the driving public. Engine-driven generators of quite low power can achieve useful increases in urban range but will fail to qualify as 'zero-emitting'. On the other hand, if the same function could be economically performed by a small fuel-cell using hydrogen derived from a methanol reformer, then most of the flexibility provided by conventional vehicles would be retained. The market prospects for electric cars would then be greatly enhanced and their dependence on very advanced battery technology would be reduced.

  3. An altered form of pp60/sup c-src/ is expressed primarily in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Le Beau, J.M.; Wiestler, O.D.; Walter, G.

    1987-11-01

    The expression of two forms of pp60/sup c-scr/, pp60 and pp60/sup +/, was measured in the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system. Both forms were expressed in the CNS, whereas only pp60 was primarily detected in the peripheral nervous system. Our findings suggest that pp60/sup +/ may play a role in events important to the CNS.

  4. Prognostic Cell Biological Markers in Cervical Cancer Patients Primarily Treated With (Chemo)radiation: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Noordhuis, Maartje G.; Eijsink, Jasper J.H.; Roossink, Frank; Graeff, Pauline de; Pras, Elisabeth; Schuuring, Ed; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Zee, Ate G.J. van der

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the prognostic and predictive significance of cell biological markers in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation. A PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane literature search was performed. Studies describing a relation between a cell biological marker and survival in {>=}50 cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation were selected. Study quality was assessed, and studies with a quality score of 4 or lower were excluded. Cell biological markers were clustered on biological function, and the prognostic and predictive significance of these markers was described. In total, 42 studies concerning 82 cell biological markers were included in this systematic review. In addition to cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-ag) levels, markers associated with poor prognosis were involved in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling (EGFR and C-erbB-2) and in angiogenesis and hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase 9 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}). Epidermal growth factor receptor and C-erbB-2 were also associated with poor response to (chemo)radiation. In conclusion, EGFR signaling is associated with poor prognosis and response to therapy in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation, whereas markers involved in angiogenesis and hypoxia, COX-2, and serum SCC-ag levels are associated with a poor prognosis. Therefore, targeting these pathways in combination with chemoradiation may improve survival in advanced-stage cervical cancer patients.

  5. Linear Back-Drive Differentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Linear back-drive differentials have been proposed as alternatives to conventional gear differentials for applications in which there is only limited rotational motion (e.g., oscillation). The finite nature of the rotation makes it possible to optimize a linear back-drive differential in ways that would not be possible for gear differentials or other differentials that are required to be capable of unlimited rotation. As a result, relative to gear differentials, linear back-drive differentials could be more compact and less massive, could contain fewer complex parts, and could be less sensitive to variations in the viscosities of lubricants. Linear back-drive differentials would operate according to established principles of power ball screws and linear-motion drives, but would utilize these principles in an innovative way. One major characteristic of such mechanisms that would be exploited in linear back-drive differentials is the possibility of designing them to drive or back-drive with similar efficiency and energy input: in other words, such a mechanism can be designed so that a rotating screw can drive a nut linearly or the linear motion of the nut can cause the screw to rotate. A linear back-drive differential (see figure) would include two collinear shafts connected to two parts that are intended to engage in limited opposing rotations. The linear back-drive differential would also include a nut that would be free to translate along its axis but not to rotate. The inner surface of the nut would be right-hand threaded at one end and left-hand threaded at the opposite end to engage corresponding right- and left-handed threads on the shafts. A rotation and torque introduced into the system via one shaft would drive the nut in linear motion. The nut, in turn, would back-drive the other shaft, creating a reaction torque. Balls would reduce friction, making it possible for the shaft/nut coupling on each side to operate with 90 percent efficiency.

  6. Driving Performance Under Alcohol in Simulated Representative Driving Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Kenntner-Mabiala, Ramona; Kaussner, Yvonne; Jagiellowicz-Kaufmann, Monika; Hoffmann, Sonja; Krüger, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Comparing drug-induced driving impairments with the effects of benchmark blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) is an approved approach to determine the clinical relevance of findings for traffic safety. The present study aimed to collect alcohol calibration data to validate findings of clinical trials that were derived from a representative test course in a dynamic driving simulator. The driving performance of 24 healthy volunteers under placebo and with 0.05% and 0.08% BACs was measured in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Trained investigators assessed the subjects’ driving performance and registered their driving errors. Various driving parameters that were recorded during the simulation were also analyzed. Generally, the participants performed worse on the test course (P < 0.05 for the investigators’ assessment) under the influence of alcohol. Consistent with the relevant literature, lane-keeping performance parameters were sensitive to the investigated BACs. There were significant differences between the alcohol and placebo conditions in most of the parameters analyzed. However, the total number of errors was the only parameter discriminating significantly between all three BAC conditions. In conclusion, data show that the present experimental setup is suitable for future psychopharmacological research. Thereby, for each drug to be investigated, we recommend to assess a profile of various parameters that address different levels of driving. On the basis of this performance profile, the total number of driving errors is recommended as the primary endpoint. However, this overall endpoint should be completed by a specifically sensitive parameter that is chosen depending on the effect known to be induced by the tested drug. PMID:25689289

  7. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.; Birx, Dan; Cook, Edward G.

    1993-01-01

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 Kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 Kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  8. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, D.G.; Birx, D.; Cook, E.G.

    1993-01-05

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  9. How to maintain chain drives

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.L. )

    1992-06-18

    Properly selected and maintained chain drives can be expected to give thousands of hours of reliable service. Selection is usually done just once. This paper reports on good maintenance which must be done regularly to keep the drive operating. An effective maintenance program for roller chain should include correct type and adequate amounts of lubrication, replacement of worn chains and sprockets, and elimination of drive interferences. It is important to set u a lubrication and inspection/correction schedule to ensure that all required maintenance is carried out.

  10. Phoning while driving II: a review of driving conditions influence.

    PubMed

    Collet, C; Guillot, A; Petit, C

    2010-05-01

    The first paper examined how the variables related to driving performance were impacted by the management of holding a phone conversation. However, the conditions under which this dual task is carried out are dependent upon a set of factors that may particularly influence the risk of crash. These conditions are defined by several independent variables, classified into five main categories: i) legislation; ii) phone type (hands-free or hand-held); iii) drivers' features regarding age, gender, personal individual profile and driving experience; iv) conversation content (casual or professional) and its context (held with passengers or with a cell (mobile) phone); v) driving conditions (actual or simulated driving, road type, traffic density and weather). These independent variables determine the general conditions. The way in which these factors are combined and interact one with another thus determines the risk that drivers undergo when a cell phone is used while driving. Finally, this review defined the general conditions of driving for which managing a phone conversation is likely to elicit a high risk of car crash or, conversely, may provide a situation of lower risk, with sufficient acceptance to ensure safety.

  11. Apparatus for forming drive belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topits, A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An apparatus for manufacturing belts, such as seamless belts, is provided, the apparatus has relatively movable rollers that are mounted in an oven. A belt blank, for example, of a thin polyester film, is rotated on the rollers as heat is applied. Four rollers, each mounted on a separate roller assembly, are movable along appropriate tracks while a fifth centrally located roller is stationary. A pair of dc motors are operatively connected to a speed reduction gear assembly to provide a pair of rotating drive shafts that extend into the oven. One rotating shaft drives all of the rollers through a rotational gear assembly while the other drive shaft is capable of positioning the movable rollers through respective rotating threaded shafts. Control devices are provided for controlling the motors while measuring devices are operatively connected to the positional drive shaft to indicate the position of the rollers.

  12. Dangers of Texting While Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Privacy Policy Proceedings & Actions Proceedings and Actions Overview Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS) Commission Documents (EDOCS) Most ... 000 drivers are using cell phones or manipulating electronic devices while driving, a number that has held ...

  13. Driving Speed vs Fuel Efficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vest, Floyd

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical treatment of the relationship between driving speed and fuel efficiency is presented. The material involves applications of exponentials, logarithms, and elementary calculus, and is intended to be enrichment material for secondary and lower college mathematics classes. (MP)

  14. Quantum effects in warp drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finazzi, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    Warp drives are interesting configurations that, at least theoretically, provide a way to travel at superluminal speed. Unfortunately, several issues seem to forbid their realization. First, a huge amount of exotic matter is required to build them. Second, the presence of quantum fields propagating in superluminal warp-drive geometries makes them semiclassically unstable. Indeed, a Hawking-like high-temperature flux of particles is generated inside the warp-drive bubble, which causes an exponential growth of the energy density measured at the front wall of the bubble by freely falling observers. Moreover, superluminal warp drives remain unstable even if the Lorentz symmetry is broken by the introduction of regulating higher order terms in the Lagrangian of the quantum field. If the dispersion relation of the quantum field is subluminal, a black-hole laser phenomenon yields an exponential amplification of the emitted flux. If it is superluminal, infrared effects cause a linear growth of this flux.

  15. Power requirements for current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    1988-03-01

    General formulas for the efficiency of current drive in toroidal plasmas are derived using entropy arguments. The highest possible efficiency for current drive in which a high-energy electron tail is formed is shown to be p=Erj, with p and j the power and current densities and Er≊0.09n14 V/m with n14 the electron density in units of 1014/cm.3 The electric field required to maintain the current in a runaway discharge is also shown to equal Er. If the plasma current is carried by near-Maxwellian electrons, waves that have a low phase velocity, compared to the energy of the electrons with which they interact, can drive a current with Ohmic efficiency, p=ηj2. Such waves were first discussed in the context of current drive by Fisch [Rev. Mod. Phys. 59, 175 (1987)].

  16. Outbreak of Serogroup C Meningococcal Disease Primarily Affecting Men Who Have Sex with Men - Southern California, 2016.

    PubMed

    Nanduri, Srinivas; Foo, Chelsea; Ngo, Van; Jarashow, Claire; Civen, Rachel; Schwartz, Ben; Holguin, John; Shearer, Eric; Zahn, Matt; Harriman, Kathleen; Winter, Kathleen; Kretz, Cecilia; Chang, How Yi; Meyer, Sarah; MacNeil, Jessica

    2016-09-09

    During March 4-August 11, 2016, 25 outbreak-associated cases of meningococcal disease, including two deaths (8% case-fatality ratio), were reported in Southern California. Twenty-four of the cases were caused by serogroup C Neisseria meningitidis (NmC) and one by N. meningitidis with an undetermined serogroup (Figure). On June 24, 2016, in response to this increase in NmC cases, primarily among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Los Angeles County, the city of Long Beach, and Orange County, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) issued a press release and health advisory, declaring an outbreak of NmC in Southern California (1).

  17. Mechanical drive for blood pump

    DOEpatents

    Bifano, N.J.; Pouchot, W.D.

    1975-07-29

    This patent relates to a highly efficient blood pump to be used as a replacement for a ventricle of the human heart to restore people disabled by heart disease. The mechanical drive of the present invention is designed to operate in conjunction with a thermoelectric converter power source. The mechanical drive system essentially converts the output of a rotary power into pulsatile motion so that the power demand from the thermoelectric converter remains essentially constant while the blood pump output is pulsed. (auth)

  18. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  19. [Vision and car driving ability].

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Helmut

    2011-05-01

    Visual functions relevant for car driving are: Visual acuity, contrast and twilight vision, visual field, ocular motility and alignment and colour vision. Generally accepted and standardized tests are available for visual acuity and visual field. Maximum permissible values have been defined arbitrarily and are hardly supported by studies. European standards have been published comprising also contrast and twilight vision. When examining driving ability progressive and treatable ocular disorders such as cataract and glaucoma have to be considered.

  20. Direct drive field actuator motors

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  1. Water deficit in field-grown Gossypium hirsutum primarily limits net photosynthesis by decreasing stomatal conductance, increasing photorespiration, and increasing the ratio of dark respiration to gross photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chastain, Daryl R; Snider, John L; Collins, Guy D; Perry, Calvin D; Whitaker, Jared; Byrd, Seth A

    2014-11-01

    Much effort has been expended to improve irrigation efficiency and drought tolerance of agronomic crops; however, a clear understanding of the physiological mechanisms that interact to decrease source strength and drive yield loss has not been attained. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms contributing to inhibition of net carbon assimilation under drought stress, three cultivars of Gossypium hirsutum were grown in the field under contrasting irrigation regimes during the 2012 and 2013 growing season near Camilla, Georgia, USA. Physiological measurements were conducted on three sample dates during each growing season (providing a broad range of plant water status) and included, predawn and midday leaf water potential (ΨPD and ΨMD), gross and net photosynthesis, dark respiration, photorespiration, and chlorophyll a fluorescence. End-of-season lint yield was also determined. ΨPD ranged from -0.31 to -0.95MPa, and ΨMD ranged from -1.02 to -2.67MPa, depending upon irrigation regime and sample date. G. hirsutum responded to water deficit by decreasing stomatal conductance, increasing photorespiration, and increasing the ratio of dark respiration to gross photosynthesis, thereby limiting PN and decreasing lint yield (lint yield declines observed during the 2012 growing season only). Conversely, even extreme water deficit, causing a 54% decline in PN, did not negatively affect actual quantum yield, maximum quantum yield, or photosynthetic electron transport. It is concluded that PN is primarily limited in drought-stressed G. hirsutum by decreased stomatal conductance, along with increases in respiratory and photorespiratory carbon losses, not inhibition or down-regulation of electron transport through photosystem II. It is further concluded that ΨPD is a reliable indicator of drought stress and the need for irrigation in field-grown cotton.

  2. Little-known truths, quirky anecdotes, seething scandals, and even some science in the history of (primarily achievement) motivation.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Bernard

    2013-08-01

    This article presents a history of the study of motivation from approximately 1900-1975, focusing on achievement strivings and containing little-known and often surprising facts about the main contributors to this field. Four theorists are highlighted: David McClelland, Kurt Lewin, John Atkinson, and Fritz Heider, each associated with a different theoretical approach (respectively and in order of historical emergence: trait, Gestalt, expectancy/value, and attribution theory). A fifth conception, drive theory, is also represented. In addition, a number of individuals who influenced these theorists and others who followed them are discussed. The article emphasizes the interrelations between the theorists and the interaction between personal and scientific life.

  3. Effect of select nitrocompounds on ruminal fermentation; an initial look at their potential to reduce economic and environmental costs associated with ruminal methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robin C; Callaway, Todd R; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S; Jung, Yong Soo; Edrington, Thomas S; Nisbet, David J

    2003-10-01

    Methane production by ruminal microbes during the digestion of feedstuffs is an inefficient process resulting in losses of 2-12% of the gross energy consumed by ruminants. Presently, we report the effect of three inhibitors on ruminal methane production in vitro. Mixed populations of ruminal microbes collected from cannulated cows maintained on an alfalfa hay:corn diet (50:50) were incubated at 39 degrees C for 24 h under a 100% carbon dioxide gas phase in closed tubes with 72 mM added sodium formate. Cultures were supplemented with 12 mM 2-nitropropanol, nitroethane or nitroethanol (experiment 1) or with 2, 12 or 24 mM nitroethane or a combination of 12 mM nitroethane and 4 mM nitroethanol (experiment 2). Control cultures containing no added nitrocompound were incubated simultaneously with treated incubations. Methane concentrations were reduced (P<0.05) from those measured in control incubations (27.6 +/- 2.1 and 17.7 +/- 0.8 micromol/ml; mean +/- SD for experiments 1 and 2, respectively) by at least 57% and as much as 94% in the nitrocompound supplemented incubations. By comparison, the widely fed methane inhibitor, monensin, typically reduces ruminal methane production by about 33%. Concentrations of volatile fatty acids and ammonia that accumulated in the nitrocompound supplemented incubations were not markedly affected compared to those produced by control cultures despite the reductions in methane produced. Hydrogen accumulated only slightly in cultures supplemented with the nitrocompounds. These results demonstrate that 2-nitropropanol, nitroethane and nitroethanol inhibit ruminal methane production. Further research is warranted to determine the mechanisms responsible for this inhibition and to see if these inhibitors can be used in practical application to reduce economic and environmental costs associated with ruminal methanogenesis.

  4. Stable isotope probing of acetate fed anaerobic batch incubations shows a partial resistance of acetoclastic methanogenesis catalyzed by Methanosarcina to sudden increase of ammonia level.

    PubMed

    Hao, Liping; Lü, Fan; Mazéas, Laurent; Desmond-Le Quéméner, Elie; Madigou, Céline; Guenne, Angéline; Shao, Liming; Bouchez, Théodore; He, Pinjing

    2015-02-01

    Ammonia inhibition represents a major operational issue for anaerobic digestion. In order to refine our understanding of the terminal catabolic steps in thermophilic anaerobic digestion under ammonia stress, we studied batch thermophilic acetate fed experiments at low (0.26 g L(-1)) and high (7.00 g L(-1)) Total Ammonia Nitrogen concentrations (TAN). Although methane production started immediately for all incubations and resulted in methane yields close to stoichiometric expectations, a 62-72% decrease of methanogenic rate was observed throughout the incubation at 7.00 g L(-1) of TAN compared to 0.26 g L(-1). Stable Isotope Probing analysis of active microbial communities in (13)C-acetate fed experiments coupled to automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and 16S rDNA pyrotag sequencing confirmed that microbial communities were similar for both TAN conditions. At both TAN levels, the (13)C-labeled bacterial community was mainly affiliated to Clostridia-relatives, with OPB54 bacteria being the most abundant sequence in the heavy DNA 16S rDNA pyrotag library. Sequences closely related to Methanosarcina thermophila were also abundantly retrieved in the heavy DNA fractions, showing that this methanogen was still actively assimilating labeled carbon from acetate at free ammonia nitrogen concentrations up to 916 mg L(-1). Stable isotopic signature analysis of biogas, measured in unlabeled acetate fed experiments that were conducted in parallel, confirmed that acetoclastic methanogenic pathway was dominant at both ammonia concentrations. Our work demonstrates that, besides the syntrophic acetate oxidation pathway, acetoclastic methanogenesis catalyzed by Methanosarcina can also play a major role in methane production at high ammonia levels.

  5. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1994-10-25

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw. 10 figs.

  6. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1994-01-01

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw.

  7. FADD Expression as a Prognosticator in Early-Stage Glottic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx Treated Primarily With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schrijvers, Michiel L.; Pattje, Wouter J.; Slagter-Menkema, Lorian; Mastik, Mirjam F.; Gibcus, Johan H.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wal, Jacqueline E. van der; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. vn der

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: We recently reported on the identification of the Fas-associated death domain (FADD) as a possible driver of the chromosome 11q13 amplicon and the association between increased FADD expression and disease-specific survival in advanced-stage laryngeal carcinoma. The aim of this study was to examine whether expression of FADD and its Ser194-phosphorylated isoform (pFADD) predicts local control in patients with early-stage glottic carcinoma primarily treated with radiotherapy only. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemical staining for FADD and pFADD was performed on pretreatment biopsy specimens of 92 patients with T1-T2 glottic squamous cell carcinoma primarily treated with radiotherapy between 1996 and 2005. Cox regression analysis was used to correlate expression levels with local control. Results: High levels of pFADD were associated with significantly better local control (hazard ratio, 2.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-5.55; p = 0.040). FADD overexpression showed a trend toward better local control (hazard ratio, 3.656; 95% confidence interval, 0.853-15.663; p = 0.081). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that high pFADD expression was the best predictor of local control after radiotherapy. Conclusions: This study showed that expression of phosphorylated FADD is a new prognostic biomarker for better local control after radiotherapy in patients with early-stage glottic carcinomas.

  8. Mating-type orthologous genes in the primarily homothallic Moniliophthora perniciosa, the causal agent of Witches' Broom Disease in cacao.

    PubMed

    Kües, Ursula; Navarro-González, Mónica

    2010-10-01

    The cacao-pathogenic Moniliophthora perniciosa C-biotype is a primarily homothallic Agaricomycete of which the genome has recently become available. Searching of the genome sequence with mating type proteins from other basidiomycetes detected one or possibly two potential genes for HD1 homeodomain transcription factors, 7 or possibly 8 genes for potential pheromone receptors and five genes for putative pheromone precursors. Apparently, the fungus possesses gene functions encoded in the tetrapolar basidiomycetes in the A and B mating loci, respectively. In the tetrapolar species, the A and B mating type genes govern formation of clamp cells at hyphal septa of the dikaryon and their fusion with sub-apical cells as well as mushroom production. The C-biotype forms fused clamp cells and also basidiocarps on mycelia germinated from basidiospores and their development might be controlled by the detected genes. It represents the first example of a primarily homothallic basidiomycete where A - and B -mating-type-like genes were found. Various strategies are discussed as how self-compatibility in presence of such genes can evolve. An A -mating-type like gene for an HD2 homeodomain transcription factor is, however, not included in the available sequence representing estimated 69% coverage of the haploid genome but there are non-mating genes for other homeodomain transcription factors of currently unknown function that are conserved in basidiomycetes and also various ascomycetes.

  9. China Continues to Drive Foreign-Student Growth in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurtrie, Beth

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the results of the latest "Open Doors" report from the Institute of International Education. The report states that thousands of mainland Chinese students in pursuit of an American education helped drive up international enrollments at colleges across the United States. Double-digit growth from China, primarily at…

  10. Efficient Driving of Piezoelectric Transducers Using a Biaxial Driving Technique.

    PubMed

    Pichardo, Samuel; Silva, Rafael R C; Rubel, Oleg; Curiel, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Efficient driving of piezoelectric materials is desirable when operating transducers for biomedical applications such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or ultrasound imaging. More efficient operation reduces the electric power required to produce the desired bioeffect or contrast. Our preliminary work [Cole et al. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. 2014;26(13):135901.] suggested that driving transducers by applying orthogonal electric fields can significantly reduce the coercivity that opposes ferroelectric switching. We present here the experimental validation of this biaxial driving technique using piezoelectric ceramics typically used in HIFU. A set of narrow-band transducers was fabricated with two sets of electrodes placed in an orthogonal configuration (following the propagation and the lateral mode). The geometry of the ceramic was chosen to have a resonance frequency similar for the propagation and the lateral mode. The average (± s.d.) resonance frequency of the samples was 465.1 (± 1.5) kHz. Experiments were conducted in which each pair of electrodes was driven independently and measurements of effective acoustic power were obtained using the radiation force method. The efficiency (acoustic/electric power) of the biaxial driving method was compared to the results obtained when driving the ceramic using electrodes placed only in the pole direction. Our results indicate that the biaxial method increases efficiency from 50% to 125% relative to the using a single electric field.

  11. Efficient Driving of Piezoelectric Transducers Using a Biaxial Driving Technique

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Efficient driving of piezoelectric materials is desirable when operating transducers for biomedical applications such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or ultrasound imaging. More efficient operation reduces the electric power required to produce the desired bioeffect or contrast. Our preliminary work [Cole et al. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. 2014;26(13):135901.] suggested that driving transducers by applying orthogonal electric fields can significantly reduce the coercivity that opposes ferroelectric switching. We present here the experimental validation of this biaxial driving technique using piezoelectric ceramics typically used in HIFU. A set of narrow-band transducers was fabricated with two sets of electrodes placed in an orthogonal configuration (following the propagation and the lateral mode). The geometry of the ceramic was chosen to have a resonance frequency similar for the propagation and the lateral mode. The average (± s.d.) resonance frequency of the samples was 465.1 (± 1.5) kHz. Experiments were conducted in which each pair of electrodes was driven independently and measurements of effective acoustic power were obtained using the radiation force method. The efficiency (acoustic/electric power) of the biaxial driving method was compared to the results obtained when driving the ceramic using electrodes placed only in the pole direction. Our results indicate that the biaxial method increases efficiency from 50% to 125% relative to the using a single electric field. PMID:26418550

  12. Driving performance and driver discomfort in an elevated and standard driving position during a driving simulation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jordan; Mansfield, Neil; Gyi, Diane; Pagett, Mark; Bateman, Bob

    2015-07-01

    The primary purposes of a vehicle driver's seat, is to allow them to complete the driving task comfortably and safely. Within each class of vehicle (e.g. passenger, commercial, industrial, agricultural), there is an expected driving position to which a vehicle cabin is designed. This paper reports a study that compares two driving positions, in relation to Light Commercial Vehicles (LCVs), in terms of driver performance and driver discomfort. In the 'elevated' driving position, the seat is higher than usually used in road vehicles; this is compared to a standard driving position replicating the layout for a commercially available vehicle. It is shown that for a sample of 12 drivers, the elevated position did not, in general, show more discomfort than the standard position over a 60 min driving simulation, although discomfort increased with duration. There were no adverse effects shown for emergency stop reaction time or for driver headway for the elevated posture compared to the standard posture. The only body part that showed greater discomfort for the elevated posture compared to the standard posture was the right ankle. A second experiment confirmed that for 12 subjects, a higher pedal stiffness eliminated the ankle discomfort problem.

  13. Dynamically correlated mutations drive human Influenza A evolution.

    PubMed

    Tria, F; Pompei, S; Loreto, V

    2013-01-01

    Human Influenza A virus undergoes recurrent changes in the hemagglutinin (HA) surface protein, primarily involved in the human antibody recognition. Relevant antigenic changes, enabling the virus to evade host immune response, have been recognized to occur in parallel to multiple mutations at antigenic sites in HA. Yet, the role of correlated mutations (epistasis) in driving the molecular evolution of the virus still represents a challenging puzzle. Further, though circulation at a global geographic level is key for the survival of Influenza A, its role in shaping the viral phylodynamics remains largely unexplored. Here we show, through a sequence based epidemiological model, that epistatic effects between amino acids substitutions, coupled with a reservoir that mimics worldwide circulating viruses, are key determinants that drive human Influenza A evolution. Our approach explains all the up-to-date observations characterizing the evolution of H3N2 subtype, including phylogenetic properties, nucleotide fixation patterns, and composition of antigenic clusters.

  14. Relationships between driving simulator performance and driving test results.

    PubMed

    de Winter, J C F; de Groot, S; Mulder, M; Wieringa, P A; Dankelman, J; Mulder, J A

    2009-02-01

    This article is considered relevant because: 1) car driving is an everyday and safety-critical task; 2) simulators are used to an increasing extent for driver training (related topics: training, virtual reality, human-machine interaction); 3) the article addresses relationships between performance in the simulator and driving test results--a relevant topic for those involved in driver training and the virtual reality industries; 4) this article provides new insights about individual differences in young drivers' behaviour. Simulators are being used to an increasing extent for driver training, allowing for the possibility of collecting objective data on driver proficiency under standardised conditions. However, relatively little is known about how learner drivers' simulator measures relate to on-road driving. This study proposes a theoretical framework that quantifies driver proficiency in terms of speed of task execution, violations and errors. This study investigated the relationships between these three measures of learner drivers' (n=804) proficiency during initial simulation-based training and the result of the driving test on the road, occurring an average of 6 months later. A higher chance of passing the driving test the first time was associated with making fewer steering errors on the simulator and could be predicted in regression analysis with a correlation of 0.18. Additionally, in accordance with the theoretical framework, a shorter duration of on-road training corresponded with faster task execution, fewer violations and fewer steering errors (predictive correlation 0.45). It is recommended that researchers conduct more large-scale studies into the reliability and validity of simulator measures and on-road driving tests.

  15. FRONTOTEMPORAL AND DOPAMINERGIC CONTROL OF IDEA GENERATION AND CREATIVE DRIVE

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Alice W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a three-factor anatomical model of human idea generation and creative drive, focusing on interactions between the temporal lobes, frontal lobes, and limbic system. Evidence is drawn from functional imaging, drug studies, and lesion analysis. Temporal lobe changes, as in hypergraphia, often increase idea generation, sometimes at the expense of quality. Frontal lobe deficits may decrease idea generation, in part because of rigid judgments about an idea's worth. These phenomena are clearest in verbal creativity, and roughly parallel the pressured communication of temporal lobe epilepsy, mania, and Wernicke's aphasia--compared to the sparse speech and cognitive inflexibility of depression, Broca's aphasia, and other frontal lobe lesions. The phenomena also shape non-linguistic creativity, as in that of frontotemporal dementia. The appropriate balance between frontal and temporal activity is mediated by mutually inhibitory corticocortical interactions. Mesolimbic dopamine influences novelty seeking and creative drive. Dopamine agonists and antagonists have opposite effects on goal-directed behavior and hallucinations. Creative drive is not identical to skill—the latter depends more on neocortical association areas. However, drive correlates better with successful creative output than skill does. Traditional neuroscientific models of creativity, such as the left brain – right brain hemispheric model, emphasize skills primarily, and stress art and musical skill at the expense of language and mathematics. The three-factor model proposed here predicts findings in a broad range of normal and pathological states, and can be tested in many experimental paradigms. PMID:16254989

  16. The mec-7 beta-tubulin gene of Caenorhabditis elegans is expressed primarily in the touch receptor neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Hamelin, M; Scott, I M; Way, J C; Culotti, J G

    1992-01-01

    Mutants of the mec-7 beta-tubulin gene of Caenorhabditis elegans lack the large diameter 15-protofilament microtubules normally found only in the set of six touch receptor neurons. Both a mec-7-lacZ reporter gene and affinity-purified anti-mec-7 antibodies were used to show that mec-7 is expressed primarily in the touch neurons. These data are consistent with a possible instructive role for the mec-7 tubulin in determining microtubule protofilament number. The antibodies and the mec-7-lacZ transgene were also used to examine mec-7 expression in mutants affecting the generation, differentiation or maintenance of the touch neurons. Decreased expression was observed in mutants of unc-86 and mec-3, genes that encode transcription factors essential for touch receptor neuron generation and differentiation, respectively. Images PMID:1639062

  17. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arising primarily at the stoma after bladder reconstruction using ileal conduit.

    PubMed

    Muta, Tsuyoshi; Nakaike, Takashi; Fujisaki, Tomoaki; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Ohshima, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    A 76-year-old man suffered from swelling stoma for several weeks. A biopsy sample revealed the diffuse infiltration of large lymphoid cells which were positive for CD20, bcl-6, and MUM1. The patient was diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, with a non-germinal center B-cell pattern. A whole-body PET-CT scan revealed that the lymphoma was restricted to the stomal site. Bladder reconstruction was undertaken using the ileal conduit: this is the first reported case of lymphoma that developed primarily at the stoma. During the long-term maintenance after bladder reconstruction, clinicians should consider the possibility of lymphoma at the stomal site.

  18. Development and Sensitivity Analysis of a Frost Risk model based primarily on freely distributed Earth Observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louka, Panagiota; Petropoulos, George; Papanikolaou, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    The ability to map the spatiotemporal distribution of extreme climatic conditions, such as frost, is a significant tool in successful agricultural management and decision making. Nowadays, with the development of Earth Observation (EO) technology, it is possible to obtain accurately, timely and in a cost-effective way information on the spatiotemporal distribution of frost conditions, particularly over large and otherwise inaccessible areas. The present study aimed at developing and evaluating a frost risk prediction model, exploiting primarily EO data from MODIS and ASTER sensors and ancillary ground observation data. For the evaluation of our model, a region in north-western Greece was selected as test site and a detailed sensitivity analysis was implemented. The agreement between the model predictions and the observed (remotely sensed) frost frequency obtained by MODIS sensor was evaluated thoroughly. Also, detailed comparisons of the model predictions were performed against reference frost ground observations acquired from the Greek Agricultural Insurance Organization (ELGA) over a period of 10-years (2000-2010). Overall, results evidenced the ability of the model to produce reasonably well the frost conditions, following largely explainable patterns in respect to the study site and local weather conditions characteristics. Implementation of our proposed frost risk model is based primarily on satellite imagery analysis provided nowadays globally at no cost. It is also straightforward and computationally inexpensive, requiring much less effort in comparison for example to field surveying. Finally, the method is adjustable to be potentially integrated with other high resolution data available from both commercial and non-commercial vendors. Keywords: Sensitivity analysis, frost risk mapping, GIS, remote sensing, MODIS, Greece

  19. Drive: Theory and Construct Validation

    PubMed Central

    Petrides, K. V.

    2016-01-01

    This article explicates the theory of drive and describes the development and validation of two measures. A representative set of drive facets was derived from an extensive corpus of human attributes (Study 1). Operationalised using an International Personality Item Pool version (the Drive:IPIP), a three-factor model was extracted from the facets in two samples and confirmed on a third sample (Study 2). The multi-item IPIP measure showed congruence with a short form, based on single-item ratings of the facets, and both demonstrated cross-informant reliability. Evidence also supported the measures’ convergent, discriminant, concurrent, and incremental validity (Study 3). Based on very promising findings, the authors hope to initiate a stream of research in what is argued to be a rather neglected niche of individual differences and non-cognitive assessment. PMID:27409773

  20. MULTIPLE DIFFERENTIAL ROTARY MECHANICAL DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Smits, R.G.

    1964-01-28

    This patent relates to a mechanism suitable for such applications as driving two spaced-apart spools which carry a roll film strip under conditions where the film movement must be rapidly started, stopped, and reversed while maintaining a constant tension on the film. The basic drive is provided by a variable speed, reversible rnotor coupled to both spools through a first differential mechanism and driving both spools in the same direction. A second motor, providing a constant torque, is connected to the two spools through a second differential mechanism and is coupled to impart torque to one spool in a first direction anid to the other spool in the reverse direction thus applying a constant tension to the film passing over the two spools irrespective of the speed or direction of rotation thereof. (AEC)

  1. Multi-propeller drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenger, Robert V.

    1995-05-01

    A multipropeller drive system having a single input shaft for connection to an engine system, a differential gear assembly for dividing the driving force from the input drive shaft between a pair of output shafts, and a pair of laterally spaced propellers driven by the output shafts of the differential gear assembly is disclosed. The differential gear assembly operates in a manner wherein one output shaft, if required, is permitted to revolve at a different rate than the other output shaft. A pair of brake mechanisms acting on the output shafts of the differential gear assembly enable an operator to control the rotational speed of the respective propellers without modifying the engine speed or transmission settings.

  2. Future hard disk drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Roger

    2009-03-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evolution of today's hard disk drive with the additional intention of orienting the reader to the overall mechanical and electrical architecture. The modern hard disk drive is a miracle of storage capacity and function together with remarkable economy of design. This paper presents a personal view of future customer requirements and the anticipated design evolution of the components. There are critical decisions and great challenges ahead for the key technologies of heads, media, head-disk interface, mechanics, and electronics.

  3. 32 CFR 634.43 - Driving records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Records and the Traffic Point System § 634.43 Driving... intoxicating liquor (0.08% or greater on DOD installations; violation of civil law off post). C. Driving a... the same as the date of civil conviction, or the date that State or host-nation driving privileges...

  4. 32 CFR 634.43 - Driving records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Driving records. 634.43 Section 634.43 National... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Records and the Traffic Point System § 634.43 Driving... suspension or revocation actions. Table 5-1 of Part 634 Suspension/Revocation of Driving Privileges...

  5. 32 CFR 634.43 - Driving records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Driving records. 634.43 Section 634.43 National... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Records and the Traffic Point System § 634.43 Driving... suspension or revocation actions. Table 5-1 of Part 634 Suspension/Revocation of Driving Privileges...

  6. 32 CFR 634.43 - Driving records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Driving records. 634.43 Section 634.43 National... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Records and the Traffic Point System § 634.43 Driving... suspension or revocation actions. Table 5-1 of Part 634 Suspension/Revocation of Driving Privileges...

  7. 32 CFR 634.43 - Driving records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Driving records. 634.43 Section 634.43 National... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Records and the Traffic Point System § 634.43 Driving... suspension or revocation actions. Table 5-1 of Part 634 Suspension/Revocation of Driving Privileges...

  8. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  9. Basic principles of variable speed drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.

    1973-01-01

    An understanding of the principles which govern variable speed drive operation is discussed for successful drive application. The fundamental factors of torque, speed ratio, and power as they relate to drive selection are discussed. The basic types of variable speed drives, their operating characteristics and their applications are also presented.

  10. Electronic 4-wheel drive control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayato, S.; Takanori, S.; Shigeru, H.; Tatsunori, S.

    1984-01-01

    The internal rotation torque generated during operation of a 4-wheel drive vehicle is reduced using a control device whose clutch is attached to one part of the rear-wheel drive shaft. One torque sensor senses the drive torque associated with the rear wheel drive shaft. A second sensor senses the drive torque associated with the front wheel drive shaft. Revolution count sensors sense the revolutions of each drive shaft. By means of a microcomputer, the engagement of the clutch is changed to insure that the ratio of the torque sensors remains constant.

  11. Roller/Gear Drives For Robotic Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William J.; Shipitalo, William

    1995-01-01

    Pitch/yaw roller/gear drive and wrist-roll roller/gear drive designed to incorporate several features desirable in robotic-joint actuators. Includes zero backlash, high efficiency, smooth motion (little ripple in torque and in speed ratio), and high degree of back-drivability. Pitch/yaw drive is novel two-axis drive containing combination of gears, rollers, and springs acting together eliminating backlash and cogging. Wrist-roll drive more-conventional single-axis drive offering advantages like those of pitch/yaw drive.

  12. Drive reconfiguration mechanism for tracked robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Willis, W. David

    2000-01-01

    Drive reconfiguration apparatus for changing the configuration of a drive unit with respect to a vehicle body may comprise a guide system associated with the vehicle body and the drive unit which allows the drive unit to rotate about a center of rotation that is located at about a point where the drive unit contacts the surface being traversed. An actuator mounted to the vehicle body and connected to the drive unit rotates the drive unit about the center of rotation between a first position and a second position.

  13. The chemical biology of methanogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, James G.

    2010-12-01

    Two distinct pathways account for most of the CH 4 produced in the majority of the diverse and vast anaerobic environments of Earth's biosphere by microbes that are classified in the Archaea domain of life: conversion of the methyl group of acetate to CH 4 in the aceticlastic pathway and reduction of CO 2 with electrons derived from H 2, formate or CO in the CO 2 reduction pathway. Minor, albeit ecologically important, amounts of CH 4 are produced by conversion of methylotrophic substrates methanol, methylamines and methyl sulfides. Although all pathways have terminal steps in common, they deviate in the initial steps leading to CH 4 and mechanisms for synthesizing ATP for growth. Hydrogen gas is the major reductant for CO 2-reducing methanogens in the deep subsurface, although H 2 is also utilized by CO 2-reducing microbes from the Bacteria domain that produce acetate for the aceticlastic methanogens. This review presents fundamentals of the two major CH 4-producing pathways with a focus on understanding the potential for biologically-produced CH 4 on Mars.

  14. Biogeochemistry: Hexadecane decay by methanogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Robert T.; Lovely, Derek R.

    2000-01-01

    The potential for the biological conversion of long-chain saturated hydrocarbons to methane under anaerobic conditions has been demonstrated by using an enrichment culture of bacteria to degrade pure-phase hexadecane1. The formation of methane in hydrocarbon-rich subsurface zones could be explained if a similar conversion of long-chain alkanes to methane were to take place in subsurface environments. If this process could be stimulated in the subsurface, it could be used to enhance hydrocarbon recovery from petroleum reserves1, 2. Parkes2, however, questions the environmental significance of the enrichment-culture results1 on the grounds that alkane conversion to methane is very slow and because sulphate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might both be necessary for even this slow process to occur, restricting the conversion to specialized, unusual zones in sediments. Here we show that, on the contrary, subsurface bacteria can adapt to convert hexadecane to methane rapidly and in the absence of sulphate-reducing bacteria.

  15. Virtual Rewards for Driving Green

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Josh

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide from automobiles is a major contributor to global climate change. In "Virtual Rewards for Driving Green," Josh Pritchard proposes a computer application that will enable fuel-efficient drivers to earn "green" dollars with which to buy digital merchandise on the Web. Can getting items that exist only in cyberspace actually change a…

  16. Test-Driving Their Passions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Noah

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how the Watson fellowships give recipients an opportunity to test-drive their passions and see if they could lead to a career path. Over the last 40 years, the Thomas J. Watson Foundation has awarded $29 million in fellowships to seniors graduating from 50 mostly top-tier colleges with fewer than 3,000 students. In 2007, 50…

  17. Driving and working with syncope.

    PubMed

    Barbic, Franca; Casazza, Giovanni; Zamunér, Antonio Roberto; Costantino, Giorgio; Orlandi, Mauro; Dipaola, Franca; Capitanio, Chiara; Achenza, Sara; Sheldon, Robert; Furlan, Raffaello

    2014-09-01

    Syncope is usually addressed in the Emergency Department (ED) by the doctor in charge of the clinical picture, i.e. the patient's risk is stratified, a diagnostic work-up is done and a prognosis is set. Patients are ultimately admitted to hospital or discharged. However, other aspects related to syncope may deeply affect their daily lives. These include how and when to return to work and to driving, the feelings about a recent loss of consciousness, and the potential relapse of syncope. This is particularly significant if the work setting is intrinsically hazardous. These patients need adequate clinical and psychological support. For patients with syncope, two main parameters should be considered regarding returning to work and to driving. The first is to evaluate the risk of syncope recurrence and the second is to consider the expected harm if syncope does indeed occur during these activities. In the present paper we detail the problem of driving (including professional driving) and work after syncope. We propose a new quantitative model that will guide the physician in stratifying the risk for patients who have had a previous syncope event. The new model considers the syncope recurrence risk, the job task duration, and features that facilitate a syncope during work. On the basis of these variables, the global risk index for a worker is calculated. Following appropriate validation, this method might help ED and occupational physicians in their decision-making process with the goal of safely readmitting syncope patients to the workplace.

  18. Hydromechanical transmission with hydrodynamic drive

    DOEpatents

    Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias; Weseloh, William E.

    1979-01-01

    This transmission has a first planetary gear assembly having first input means connected to an input shaft, first output means, and first reaction means, and a second planetary gear assembly having second input means connected to the first input means, second output means, and second reaction means connected directly to the first reaction means by a reaction shaft. First clutch means, when engaged, connect the first output means to an output shaft in a high driving range. A hydrodynamic drive is used; for example, a torque converter, which may or may not have a stationary case, has a pump connected to the second output means, a stator grounded by an overrunning clutch to the case, and a turbine connected to an output member, and may be used in a starting phase. Alternatively, a fluid coupling or other type of hydrodynamic drive may be used. Second clutch means, when engaged, for connecting the output member to the output shaft in a low driving range. A variable-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the input shaft, and a fixed-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the reaction shaft. The hydraulic units are hydraulically connected together so that when one operates as a pump the other acts as a motor, and vice versa. Both clutch means are connected to the output shaft through a forward-reverse shift arrangement. It is possible to lock out the torque converter after the starting phase is over.

  19. Promising Electric Aircraft Drive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    An overview of electric aircraft propulsion technology performance thresholds for key power system components is presented. A weight comparison of electric drive systems with equivalent total delivered energy is made to help identify component performance requirements, and promising research and development opportunities.

  20. Torque-Splitting Gear Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kish, J.

    1991-01-01

    Geared drive train transmits torque from input shaft in equal parts along two paths in parallel, then combines torques in single output shaft. Scheme reduces load on teeth of meshing gears while furnishing redundancy to protect against failures. Such splitting and recombination of torques common in design of turbine engines.

  1. Mechanical planetary compensating drive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiger, R. J.; Gerdts, J. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Drive enables two concentric output shafts to be controlled independently or rotated as a unit. Possible uses are pointing and tracking devices, rotary camera shutters with variable light control, gimbal systems with yaw and pitch movement, spectrometer mirror scanning devices, etc.

  2. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  3. Adolescent Pornography Use and Dating Violence among a Sample of Primarily Black and Hispanic, Urban-Residing, Underage Youth.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Emily F; Adhia, Avanti

    2015-12-23

    This cross-sectional study was designed to characterize the pornography viewing preferences of a sample of U.S.-based, urban-residing, economically disadvantaged, primarily Black and Hispanic youth (n = 72), and to assess whether pornography use was associated with experiences of adolescent dating abuse (ADA) victimization. The sample was recruited from a large, urban, safety net hospital, and participants were 53% female, 59% Black, 19% Hispanic, 14% Other race, 6% White, and 1% Native American. All were 16-17 years old. More than half (51%) had been asked to watch pornography together by a dating or sexual partner, and 44% had been asked to do something sexual that a partner saw in pornography. Adolescent dating abuse (ADA) victimization was associated with more frequent pornography use, viewing pornography in the company of others, being asked to perform a sexual act that a partner first saw in pornography, and watching pornography during or after marijuana use. Approximately 50% of ADA victims and 32% of non-victims reported that they had been asked to do a sexual act that their partner saw in pornography (p = 0.15), and 58% did not feel happy to have been asked. Results suggest that weekly pornography use among underage, urban-residing youth may be common, and may be associated with ADA victimization.

  4. Bimanual cross-talk during reaching movements is primarily related to response selection, not the specification of motor parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazeltine, Eliot; Diedrichsen, Joern; Kennerley, Steven W.; Ivry, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    Simultaneous reaching movements made with the two hands can show a considerable increase in reaction time (RT) when they differ in terms of direction or extent, compared to when the movements involve the same direction and extent. This cost has been attributed to cross-talk in the specification of the motor parameters for the two hands. However, a recent study [Diedrichsen, Hazeltine, Kennerley, & Ivry, (2001). Psychological Science, 12, 493-498] indicates that when reaching movements are cued by the onset of the target endpoint, no compatibility effects are observed. To determine why directly cued movements are immune from interference, we varied the stimulus onset asynchrony for the two movements and used different combinations of directly cued and symbolically cued movements. In two experiments, compatibility effects were only observed when both movements were symbolically cued. No difference was found between compatible and incompatible movements when both movements were directly cued or when one was directly cued and the other was symbolically cued. These results indicate that interference is not related to the specification of movement parameters but instead emerges from processes associated with response selection. Moreover, the data suggest that cross-talk, when present, primarily shortens the RT of the second movement on compatible trials rather than lengthening this RT on incompatible trials.

  5. Human land uses enhance sediment denitrification and N2O production in Yangtze lakes primarily by influencing lake water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Yao, L.; Wang, Z.; Xiong, Z.; Liu, G.

    2015-10-01

    Sediment denitrification in lakes alleviates the effects of eutrophication through the removal of nitrogen to the atmosphere as N2O and N2. However, N2O contributes notably to the greenhouse effect and global warming. Human land uses (e.g. agricultural and urban areas) strongly affect lake water quality and sediment characteristics, which, in turn, may regulate lake sediment denitrification and N2O production. In this study, we investigated sediment denitrification and N2O production and their relationships to within-lake variables and watershed land uses in 20 lakes from the Yangtze River basin in China. The results indicated that both lake water quality and sediment characteristics were significantly influenced by watershed land uses. N2O production rates increased with increasing background denitrification rates. Background denitrification and N2O production rates were positively related to water nitrogen concentrations but were not significantly correlated with sediment characteristics and plant community structure. A significant positive relationship was observed between background denitrification rate and percentage of human-dominated land uses (HDL) in watersheds. Structural equation modelling revealed that the indirect effects of HDL on sediment denitrification and N2O production in Yangtze lakes were mediated primarily through lake water quality. Our findings also suggest that although sediments in Yangtze lakes can remove large quantities of nitrogen through denitrification, they may also be an important source of N2O, especially in lakes with high nitrogen content.

  6. Inverted Papilloma Originating Primarily from the Nasolacrimal Duct: A Case Report and Review of the Pertinent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Walijee, Hussein Z.; Berry, Sandeep; Quine, Stuart; Lane, Carol; Morris, Daniel S.; Bowman, Benedict

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Inverted papilloma (IP) is an uncommon, benign yet aggressive neoplasm characterised by high recurrence rates and tendency towards malignant transformation. The majority of IP cases originate in the ethmoid region, lateral wall of the nasal fossa, and maxillary sinus. The authors report a case of an IP originating primarily from the nasolacrimal duct (NLD). Case. A 69-year-old Caucasian gentleman presented with a lump in his right medial canthal region, epiphora, and discharge bilaterally. Radiological investigation revealed a well-defined, heterogeneous mass within the proximal NLD eroding the bony canal, protruding into the middle meatus and into the right orbit. The tumour was excised en bloc utilizing a combined external and endoscopic approach based on its location. Histology revealed hyperplastic ribbons of basement membrane-enclosed epithelium growing endophytically into the underlying stroma with no evidence of invasive malignancy. The patient made an uneventful recovery with unchanged visual acuity and normal extraocular movements. Conclusion. The case demonstrates variability within the sinonasal tract that IP can develop and the individuality of each case necessitating tailored operative techniques for complete excision whilst minimising recurrence rates. We also present a combined endoscopic approach for the en bloc resection of a NLD IP with no clinical recurrence at 15-month follow-up. PMID:26649215

  7. Inverted Papilloma Originating Primarily from the Nasolacrimal Duct: A Case Report and Review of the Pertinent Literature.

    PubMed

    Walijee, Hussein Z; Berry, Sandeep; Quine, Stuart; Lane, Carol; Morris, Daniel S; Bowman, Benedict

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Inverted papilloma (IP) is an uncommon, benign yet aggressive neoplasm characterised by high recurrence rates and tendency towards malignant transformation. The majority of IP cases originate in the ethmoid region, lateral wall of the nasal fossa, and maxillary sinus. The authors report a case of an IP originating primarily from the nasolacrimal duct (NLD). Case. A 69-year-old Caucasian gentleman presented with a lump in his right medial canthal region, epiphora, and discharge bilaterally. Radiological investigation revealed a well-defined, heterogeneous mass within the proximal NLD eroding the bony canal, protruding into the middle meatus and into the right orbit. The tumour was excised en bloc utilizing a combined external and endoscopic approach based on its location. Histology revealed hyperplastic ribbons of basement membrane-enclosed epithelium growing endophytically into the underlying stroma with no evidence of invasive malignancy. The patient made an uneventful recovery with unchanged visual acuity and normal extraocular movements. Conclusion. The case demonstrates variability within the sinonasal tract that IP can develop and the individuality of each case necessitating tailored operative techniques for complete excision whilst minimising recurrence rates. We also present a combined endoscopic approach for the en bloc resection of a NLD IP with no clinical recurrence at 15-month follow-up.

  8. Predictors of moderated drinking in a primarily alcohol dependent sample of men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Kuerbis, Alexis; Morgenstern, Jon; Hail, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Understanding for whom moderated drinking is a viable, achievable, and sustainable goal among those with a range of alcohol use disorders (AUD) remains an important public health question. Despite common acceptance as severe risk factors, there is little empirical evidence to conclude whether co-occurring mental health disorders or drug dependence contribute to an individual’s inability to successfully moderate his drinking. Utilizing secondary data analysis, the purpose of this study was to identify predictors of moderation among both treatment seeking and non-treatment seeking, primarily alcohol dependent, problem drinking men who have sex with men (MSM), with an emphasis on the high risk factors psychiatric comorbidity and drug dependence. Problem drinkers (N=187) were assessed, provided feedback about their drinking, given the option to receive brief AUD treatment or change their drinking on their own, and then followed for 15 months. Findings revealed that neither psychiatric comorbidity or drug dependence predicted ability to achieve moderation when controlling for alcohol dependence severity. Those who were younger, more highly educated, and had more mild alcohol dependence were more likely to achieve moderated drinking. Impact of treatment on predictors is explored. Limitations of this study and arenas for future research are discussed. PMID:22201219

  9. Adolescent Pornography Use and Dating Violence among a Sample of Primarily Black and Hispanic, Urban-Residing, Underage Youth

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Emily F.; Adhia, Avanti

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to characterize the pornography viewing preferences of a sample of U.S.-based, urban-residing, economically disadvantaged, primarily Black and Hispanic youth (n = 72), and to assess whether pornography use was associated with experiences of adolescent dating abuse (ADA) victimization. The sample was recruited from a large, urban, safety net hospital, and participants were 53% female, 59% Black, 19% Hispanic, 14% Other race, 6% White, and 1% Native American. All were 16–17 years old. More than half (51%) had been asked to watch pornography together by a dating or sexual partner, and 44% had been asked to do something sexual that a partner saw in pornography. Adolescent dating abuse (ADA) victimization was associated with more frequent pornography use, viewing pornography in the company of others, being asked to perform a sexual act that a partner first saw in pornography, and watching pornography during or after marijuana use. Approximately 50% of ADA victims and 32% of non-victims reported that they had been asked to do a sexual act that their partner saw in pornography (p = 0.15), and 58% did not feel happy to have been asked. Results suggest that weekly pornography use among underage, urban-residing youth may be common, and may be associated with ADA victimization. PMID:26703744

  10. Patient-Provider Engagement and Chronic Pain in Drug-Using, Primarily African American Persons Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mary M; Nguyen, Trang Q; Maragh-Bass, Allysha C; Isenberg, Sarina R; Beach, Mary Catherine; Knowlton, Amy R

    2016-10-27

    Among disadvantaged persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV), patient-provider engagement, which has been defined as patient-provider relationships that promote the use of health care services and are characterized by active listening and supportive decision making, has been associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) maintenance and viral suppression. However, chronic pain, depression, and substance use, all of which are prevalent in this population, can reduce the quality of patient-provider engagement. We hypothesized a model in which chronic pain, depression, and substance use would be associated with poorer patient-provider engagement, which would be positively associated with adherence, with the latter associated positively with viral suppression. We analyzed data from the BEACON study, which included surveys from 383 PLHIV who were primarily African American, on ART, and had histories of drug use. Due to six missing cases on the chronic pain variable, we used data from 377 respondents in a structural equation model. Chronic pain and depressive symptoms were significantly associated with poorer patient-provider engagement, while substance use was associated with better engagement. Patient-provider engagement in turn was associated with better ART adherence, which was associated with higher viral suppression. Results suggest the role of chronic pain in poor patient-physician engagement in this population, which has potential implications for quality of HIV patient care and health outcomes. Findings suggest the need for attention to patient-provider engagement in PLHIV.

  11. Half-century evidence from western Canada shows forest dynamics are primarily driven by competition followed by climate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Huang, Shongming; He, Fangliang

    2015-03-31

    Tree mortality, growth, and recruitment are essential components of forest dynamics and resiliency, for which there is great concern as climate change progresses at high latitudes. Tree mortality has been observed to increase over the past decades in many regions, but the causes of this increase are not well understood, and we know even less about long-term changes in growth and recruitment rates. Using a dataset of long-term (1958-2009) observations on 1,680 permanent sample plots from undisturbed natural forests in western Canada, we found that tree demographic rates have changed markedly over the last five decades. We observed a widespread, significant increase in tree mortality, a significant decrease in tree growth, and a similar but weaker trend of decreasing recruitment. However, these changes varied widely across tree size, forest age, ecozones, and species. We found that competition was the primary factor causing the long-term changes in tree mortality, growth, and recruitment. Regional climate had a weaker yet still significant effect on tree mortality, but little effect on tree growth and recruitment. This finding suggests that internal community-level processes-more so than external climatic factors-are driving forest dynamics.

  12. Cannabis Effects on Driving Skills

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Rebecca L.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cannabis is the most prevalent illicit drug identified in impaired drivers. The effects of cannabis on driving continue to be debated, making prosecution and legislation difficult. Historically, delays in sample collection, evaluating the inactive Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC, and polydrug use have complicated epidemiologic evaluations of driver impairment after cannabis use. CONTENT We review and evaluate the current literature on cannabis’ effects on driving, highlighting the epidemiologic and experimental data. Epidemiologic data show that the risk of involvement in a motor vehicle accident (MVA) increases approximately 2-fold after cannabis smoking. The adjusted risk of driver culpability also increases substantially, particularly with increased blood THC concentrations. Studies that have used urine as the biological matrix have not shown an association between cannabis and crash risk. Experimental data show that drivers attempt to compensate by driving more slowly after smoking cannabis, but control deteriorates with increasing task complexity. Cannabis smoking increases lane weaving and impaired cognitive function. Critical-tracking tests, reaction times, divided-attention tasks, and lane-position variability all show cannabis-induced impairment. Despite purported tolerance in frequent smokers, complex tasks still show impairment. Combining cannabis with alcohol enhances impairment, especially lane weaving. SUMMARY Differences in study designs frequently account for inconsistencies in results between studies. Participant-selection bias and confounding factors attenuate ostensible cannabis effects, but the association with MVA often retains significance. Evidence suggests recent smoking and/or blood THC concentrations 2–5 ng/mL are associated with substantial driving impairment, particularly in occasional smokers. Future cannabis-and-driving research should emphasize challenging tasks, such as divided attention

  13. Configuring the National Ignition Facility for direct-drive experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Eimerl, D.

    1995-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a project whose primary mission is to provide an above-ground experimental capability for maintaining nuclear competence and weapons effects simulation, and to pursue the achievement of fusion ignition utilizing solid state lasers as the energy driver. In this facility a large number of laser beams are focused onto a small target located at the center of a spherical target chamber. The laser energy is delivered in a few billionths of a second, raising the temperature and density of the nuclear materials in the target to levels where significant thermonuclear energy is released. The thermonuclear reaction proceeds very rapidly, so that the target materials remain confined by their own inertia during the thermonuclear reaction. This type of approach is called inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The proposed project is described in a conceptual design report (CDR) that was released in May 1994. Early in FY95, a collaboration between the University of Rochester and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established to study reconfiguring the NIF to accommodate direct-drive experiments. The present paper is a report to the scientific community, primarily the scientists and engineers working on the design of the NIF. It represents results from work in progress, specifically work completed by the end of the second quarter FY95. This report has two main sections. The first describes the target requirements on the laser drive, and the second part describes how the NIF laser can be configured to accommodate both indirect and direct drive. The report includes a description of the scientific basis for these conclusions. Though a complete picture does not exist, the present understanding is sufficient to conclude that the primary target requirements and laser functional requirements for indirect and direct drive are quite compatible. It is evidently straightforward to reconfigure the NIF to accommodate direct and indirect drive.

  14. Effects of pH and hydraulic retention time on hydrogen production versus methanogenesis during anaerobic fermentation of organic household solid waste under extreme-thermophilic temperature (70 degrees C).

    PubMed

    Liu, Dawei; Zeng, Raymond J; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-08-15

    Two continuously stirred tank reactors were operated with household solid waste at 70 degrees C, for hydrogen and methane production. The individual effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT as 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 days) at pH 7 or pH (5, 5.5, 6, 6.5, 7) at 3-day HRT was investigated on the hydrogen production versus methanogenesis. It was found that at pH 7, the maximum hydrogen yield was 107 mL-H(2)/g VS(added) (volatile solid added) but no stable hydrogen production was obtained as after some time methanogenesis was initiated at all tested HRTs. This demonstrated that sludge retention time alone was not enough for washing out the methanogens at pH 7 under extreme-thermophilic conditions. Oppositely, we showed that keeping the pH level at 5.5 was enough to inhibit methane and produce hydrogen stably at 3-day HRT. However, the maximum stable hydrogen yield was low at 21 mL-H(2)/g VS(added).

  15. Both cell substratum regulation and hormonal regulation of milk protein gene expression are exerted primarily at the posttranscriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, R.S.; Rosen, J.M.

    1988-08-01

    The mechanism by which individual peptide and steroid hormones and cell-substratum interactions regulate milk protein gene expression has been studied in the COMMA-D mammary epithelial cell line. In the presence of insulin, hydrocortisone, and prolactin, growth of COMMA-D cells on floating collagen gels in comparison with that on a plastic substratum resulted in a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in the relative rate of ..beta..-casein gene transcription but a 37-fold increase in ..beta..-casein mRNA accumulation. In contrast, whey acidic protein gene transcription was constitutive in COMMA-D cells grown on either substratum, but its mRNA was unstable and little intact mature mRNA was detected. Culturing COMMA-D cells on collagen also promoted increased expression of other genes expressed in differentiated mammary epithelial cells, including those encoding ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-casein, transferrin, malic enzyme, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase but decreased the expression of actin and histone genes. Using COMMA-D cells, the authors defined further the role of individual hormones in influencing ..beta..-casein gene transcription. With insulin alone, a basal level of ..beta..-casein gene transcription was detected in COMMA-D cells grown on floating collagen gels. Addition of prolactin but not hydrocortisone resulted in a 2.5- to 3.0-fold increase in ..beta..-casein gene transcription, but both hormones were required to elicit the maximal 73-fold induction in mRNA accumulation. The posttranscriptional effect of hormones on casein mRNA accummulation preceded any detectable changes in the relative rate of transcription. Thus, regulation by both hormones and cell substratum of casein gene expression is exerted primarily at the post transcriptional level.

  16. Mutant alleles of small effect are primarily responsible for the loss of fitness with slow inbreeding in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Latter, B D

    1998-03-01

    Multilocus simulation is used to identify genetic models that can account for the observed rates of inbreeding and fitness decline in laboratory populations of Drosophila melanogaster. The experimental populations were maintained under crowded conditions for approximately 200 generations at a harmonic mean population size of Nh approximately 65-70. With a simulated population size of N = 50, and a mean selective disadvantage of homozygotes at individual loci approximately 1-2% or less, it is demonstrated that the mean effective population size over a 200-generation period may be considerably greater than N, with a ratio matching the experimental estimate of Ne/Nh approximately 1.4. The buildup of associative overdominance at electrophoretic marker loci is largely responsible for the stability of gene frequencies and the observed reduction in the rate of inbreeding, with apparent selection coefficients in favor of the heterozygote at neutral marker loci increasing rapidly over the first N generations of inbreeding to values approximately 5-10%. The observed decline in fitness under competitive conditions in populations of size approximately 50 in D. melanogaster therefore primarily results from mutant alleles with mean effects on fitness as homozygotes of sm < or = 0.02. Models with deleterious recessive mutants at the background loci require that the mean selection coefficient against heterozygotes is at most hsm approximately 0.002, with a minimum mutation rate for a single Drosophila autosome 100 cM in length estimated to be in the range 0.05-0.25, assuming an exponential distribution of s. A typical chromosome would be expected to carry at least 100-200 such mutant alleles contributing to the decline in competitive fitness with slow inbreeding.

  17. Predator effects on a detritus-based food web are primarily mediated by non-trophic interactions.

    PubMed

    Majdi, Nabil; Boiché, Anatole; Traunspurger, Walter; Lecerf, Antoine

    2014-07-01

    Predator effects on ecosystems can extend far beyond their prey and are often not solely lethally transmitted. Change in prey traits in response to predation risk can have important repercussions on community assembly and key ecosystem processes (i.e. trait-mediated indirect effects). In addition, some predators themselves alter habitat structure or nutrient cycling through ecological engineering effects. Tracking these non-trophic pathways is thus an important, yet challenging task to gain a better grasp of the functional role of predators. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that, in detritus-based food webs, non-trophic interactions may prevail over purely trophic interactions in determining predator effects on plant litter decomposition. This hypothesis was tested in a headwater stream by modulating the density of a flatworm predator (Polycelis felina) in enclosures containing oak (Quercus robur) leaf litter exposed to natural colonization by small invertebrates and microbial decomposers. Causal path modelling was used to infer how predator effects propagated through the food web. Flatworms accelerated litter decomposition through positive effects on microbial decomposers. The biomass of prey and non-prey invertebrates was not negatively affected by flatworms, suggesting that net predator effect on litter decomposition was primarily determined by non-trophic interactions. Flatworms enhanced the deposition and retention of fine sediments on leaf surface, thereby improving leaf colonization by invertebrates - most of which having strong affinities with interstitial habitats. This predator-induced improvement of habitat availability was attributed to the sticky nature of the mucus that flatworms secrete in copious amount while foraging. Results of path analyses further indicated that this bottom-up ecological engineering effect was as powerful as the top-down effect on invertebrate prey. Our findings suggest that predators have the potential to affect substantially

  18. Y-Chromosomal Diversity in Europe Is Clinal and Influenced Primarily by Geography, Rather than by Language

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, Zoë H.; Zerjal, Tatiana; Hurles, Matthew E.; Adojaan, Maarja; Alavantic, Dragan; Amorim, António; Amos, William; Armenteros, Manuel; Arroyo, Eduardo; Barbujani, Guido; Beckman, Gunhild; Beckman, Lars; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Bosch, Elena; Bradley, Daniel G.; Brede, Gaute; Cooper, Gillian; Côrte-Real, Helena B. S. M.; de Knijff, Peter; Decorte, Ronny; Dubrova, Yuri E.; Evgrafov, Oleg; Gilissen, Anja; Glisic, Sanja; Gölge, Mukaddes; Hill, Emmeline W.; Jeziorowska, Anna; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Kayser, Manfred; Kivisild, Toomas; Kravchenko, Sergey A.; Krumina, Astrida; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Lavinha, João; Livshits, Ludmila A.; Malaspina, Patrizia; Maria, Syrrou; McElreavey, Ken; Meitinger, Thomas A.; Mikelsaar, Aavo-Valdur; Mitchell, R. John; Nafa, Khedoudja; Nicholson, Jayne; Nørby, Søren; Pandya, Arpita; Parik, Jüri; Patsalis, Philippos C.; Pereira, Luísa; Peterlin, Borut; Pielberg, Gerli; Prata, Maria João; Previderé, Carlo; Roewer, Lutz; Rootsi, Siiri; Rubinsztein, D. C.; Saillard, Juliette; Santos, Fabrício R.; Stefanescu, Gheorghe; Sykes, Bryan C.; Tolun, Aslihan; Villems, Richard; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    Clinal patterns of autosomal genetic diversity within Europe have been interpreted in previous studies in terms of a Neolithic demic diffusion model for the spread of agriculture; in contrast, studies using mtDNA have traced many founding lineages to the Paleolithic and have not shown strongly clinal variation. We have used 11 human Y-chromosomal biallelic polymorphisms, defining 10 haplogroups, to analyze a sample of 3,616 Y chromosomes belonging to 47 European and circum-European populations. Patterns of geographic differentiation are highly nonrandom, and, when they are assessed using spatial autocorrelation analysis, they show significant clines for five of six haplogroups analyzed. Clines for two haplogroups, representing 45% of the chromosomes, are continentwide and consistent with the demic diffusion hypothesis. Clines for three other haplogroups each have different foci and are more regionally restricted and are likely to reflect distinct population movements, including one from north of the Black Sea. Principal-components analysis suggests that populations are related primarily on the basis of geography, rather than on the basis of linguistic affinity. This is confirmed in Mantel tests, which show a strong and highly significant partial correlation between genetics and geography but a low, nonsignificant partial correlation between genetics and language. Genetic-barrier analysis also indicates the primacy of geography in the shaping of patterns of variation. These patterns retain a strong signal of expansion from the Near East but also suggest that the demographic history of Europe has been complex and influenced by other major population movements, as well as by linguistic and geographic heterogeneities and the effects of drift. PMID:11078479

  19. Mouse lysine catabolism to aminoadipate occurs primarily through the saccharopine pathway; implications for pyridoxine dependent epilepsy (PDE).

    PubMed

    Pena, Izabella Agostinho; Marques, Lygia Azevedo; Laranjeira, Ângelo B A; Yunes, José A; Eberlin, Marcos N; MacKenzie, Alex; Arruda, Paulo

    2017-01-01

    Lysine is catabolized in mammals through the saccharopine and pipecolate pathways - the former is mainly hepatic and renal, and the latter is believed to play a role in the cerebral lysine oxidation. Both pathways lead to the formation of aminoadipic semialdehyde (AASA) that is then oxidized to aminoadipate (AAA) by antiquitin (ALDH7A1). Mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene result in the accumulation of AASA and its cyclic form, piperideine-6-carboxylate (P6C), which causes pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE). P6C reacts with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) causing its inactivation. Here, we used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to investigate lysine catabolism in mice injected with lysine labelled at either its nitrogen epsilon (ε-(15)N) or nitrogen alpha (α-(15)N). Analysis of ε-(15)N and α-(15)N lysine catabolites in plasma, liver and brain suggested the saccharopine as the main pathway for AAA biosynthesis. Although there was evidence for upstream cerebral pipecolate pathway activity, the resulting pipecolate does not appear to be further oxidized into AASA/P6C/AAA. By far the bulk of lysine degradation and therefore, the primary source of lysine catabolites are hepatic and renal. The results indicate that the saccharopine pathway is primarily responsible for body's production of AASA/P6C. The centrality of the saccharopine pathway in whole body lysine catabolism opens new possibilities of therapeutic targets for PDE. We suggest that inhibition of this pathway upstream of AASA/P6C synthesis may be used to prevent its accumulation benefiting PDE patients. Inhibition of the enzyme aminoadipic semialdehyde synthase, for example, could constitute a new strategy to treat PDE and other inherited diseases of lysine catabolism.

  20. Transient activation of microglia following acute alcohol exposure in developing mouse neocortex is primarily driven by BAX-dependent neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, Katelin E; Karaçay, Bahri; Fuller, Leah; Bonthius, Daniel J; Dailey, Michael E

    2015-10-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure is the most common known cause of preventable mental retardation, yet we know little about how microglia respond to, or are affected by, alcohol in the developing brain in vivo. Using an acute (single day) model of moderate (3 g/kg) to severe (5 g/kg) alcohol exposure in postnatal day (P) 7 or P8 mice, we found that alcohol-induced neuroapoptosis in the neocortex is closely correlated in space and time with the appearance of activated microglia near dead cells. The timing and molecular pattern of microglial activation varied with the level of cell death. Although microglia rapidly mobilized to contact and engulf late-stage apoptotic neurons, apoptotic bodies temporarily accumulated in neocortex, suggesting that in severe cases of alcohol toxicity the neurodegeneration rate exceeds the clearance capacity of endogenous microglia. Nevertheless, most dead cells were cleared and microglia began to deactivate within 1-2 days of the initial insult. Coincident with microglial activation and deactivation, there was a transient increase in expression of pro-inflammatory factors, TNFα and IL-1β, after severe (5 g/kg) but not moderate (3 g/kg) EtOH levels. Alcohol-induced microglial activation and pro-inflammatory factor expression were largely abolished in BAX null mice lacking neuroapoptosis, indicating that microglial activation is primarily triggered by apoptosis rather than the alcohol. Therefore, acute alcohol exposure in the developing neocortex causes transient microglial activation and mobilization, promoting clearance of dead cells and tissue recovery. Moreover, cortical microglia show a remarkable capacity to rapidly deactivate following even severe neurodegenerative insults in the developing brain.

  1. Initial Molecular-Level Response to Artificial Selection for Increased Aerobic Metabolism Occurs Primarily through Changes in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Konczal, Mateusz; Babik, Wiesław; Radwan, Jacek; Sadowska, Edyta T; Koteja, Paweł

    2015-06-01

    Experimental evolution combined with genome or transcriptome resequencing (Evolve and Resequence) represents a promising approach for advancing our understanding of the genetic basis of adaptation. Here, we applied this strategy to investigate the effect of selection on a complex trait in lines derived from a natural population of a small mammal. We analyzed the liver and heart transcriptomes of bank voles (Myodes [=Clethrionomys] glareolus) that had been selected for increased aerobic metabolism. The organs were sampled from 13th generation voles; at that point, the voles from four replicate selected lines had 48% higher maximum rates of oxygen consumption than those from four control lines. At the molecular level, the response to selection was primarily observed in gene expression: Over 300 genes were found to be differentially expressed between the selected and control lines and the transcriptome-wide pattern of expression distinguished selected lines from controls. No evidence for selection-driven changes of allele frequencies at coding sites was found: No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) changed frequency more than expected under drift alone and frequency changes aggregated over all SNPs did not separate selected and control lines. Nevertheless, among genes which showed highest differentiation in allele frequencies between selected and control lines we identified, using information about gene functions and the biology of the selected phenotype, plausible targets of selection; these genes, together with those identified in expression analysis, have been prioritized for further studies. Because our selection lines were derived from a natural population, the amount and the spectrum of variation available for selection probably closely approximated that typically found in populations of small mammals. Therefore, our results are relevant to the understanding of the molecular basis of complex adaptations occurring in natural vertebrate populations.

  2. Stability and skill in driving.

    PubMed

    Treffner, Paul; Barrett, Rod; Petersen, Andrew

    2002-12-01

    Two experiments addressed the relation between postural stability, perceptual sensitivity, and stability of driving performance. A vehicle was fitted with differential GPS for measuring position and speed, position sensors for measuring brake and accelerator depression, force transducers for measuring door, console and footrest bracing forces, and an accelerometer for measuring the 3D accelerations of the vehicle. In Experiment 1, we investigated whether the initiation of deceleration and the control of braking might be due to sensitivity to the perceptual variable tau, which specifies time-to-contact (TTC), and in particular, whether its first derivative, tau-dot, is used to maintain a constant deceleration profile. Using both untrained experienced drivers (EDs) and trained driving instructors from the Holden Performance Driving Centre (HPDC), results confirmed that, regardless of skill level, tau-dot was maintained at a value close to 0.5 and, as predicted by Lee [Perception 5 (1976) 437], braking was initiated when TTC approximately 5 s. In Experiment 2, we wished to quantify the purported differences in driving behaviour between EDs and HPDC instructors during a variety of everyday manoeuvres. Results indicated that instructors utilised a different cornering trajectory, a different emergency braking strategy, and were able to perform a high-speed swerve and recovery task more effectively than the EDs. In general, the instructors applied greater bracing forces using the door and console compared with EDs. The instructors also applied greater footrest forces during emergency braking than did the EDs. The greater use of bracing by instructor drivers to resist g-forces represents a strategy of active stabilisation that enhances both postural stability, as well as overall stability and consistency of driving performance. Results are discussed with regard to the dynamics of perceptual-motor coordination, and how increased stability might improve sensitivity to

  3. 49 CFR 37.103 - Purchase or lease of new non-rail vehicles by private entities primarily engaged in the business...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-rail vehicles by private entities primarily engaged in the business of transporting people. Link to an... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Purchase or lease of new non-rail vehicles by private entities primarily engaged in the business of transporting people. 37.103 Section...

  4. 49 CFR 37.103 - Purchase or lease of new non-rail vehicles by private entities primarily engaged in the business...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-rail vehicles by private entities primarily engaged in the business of transporting people. (a... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purchase or lease of new non-rail vehicles by private entities primarily engaged in the business of transporting people. 37.103 Section...

  5. 49 CFR 37.195 - Purchase or lease of OTRBs by private entities not primarily in the business of transporting people.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Buses (OTRBs) § 37.195 Purchase or lease of OTRBs by private entities not primarily in the business of... are not primarily engaged in the business of transporting people, with respect to buses delivered to... required to purchase or lease an accessible bus except as needed to meet the requirements of § 37.189....

  6. 49 CFR 37.195 - Purchase or lease of OTRBs by private entities not primarily in the business of transporting people.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Buses (OTRBs) § 37.195 Purchase or lease of OTRBs by private entities not primarily in the business of... are not primarily engaged in the business of transporting people, with respect to buses delivered to... required to purchase or lease an accessible bus except as needed to meet the requirements of § 37.189....

  7. 49 CFR 37.195 - Purchase or lease of OTRBs by private entities not primarily in the business of transporting people.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Buses (OTRBs) § 37.195 Purchase or lease of OTRBs by private entities not primarily in the business of... are not primarily engaged in the business of transporting people, with respect to buses delivered to... required to purchase or lease an accessible bus except as needed to meet the requirements of § 37.189....

  8. 49 CFR 37.195 - Purchase or lease of OTRBs by private entities not primarily in the business of transporting people.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Buses (OTRBs) § 37.195 Purchase or lease of OTRBs by private entities not primarily in the business of... are not primarily engaged in the business of transporting people, with respect to buses delivered to... required to purchase or lease an accessible bus except as needed to meet the requirements of § 37.189....

  9. Among High School Seniors, Driving After Marijuana Use Surpasses Drunk Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drunk Driving Among High School Seniors, Driving After Marijuana Use Surpasses Drunk Driving Email Facebook Twitter July ... in a vehicle whose driver had been using marijuana or another illicit drug, or had drunk 5 ...

  10. Sensory drive in cichlid speciation.

    PubMed

    Maan, Martine E; Hofker, Kees D; van Alphen, Jacques J M; Seehausen, Ole

    2006-06-01

    The role of selection in speciation is a central yet poorly understood problem in evolutionary biology. The rapid radiations of extremely colorful cichlid fish in African lakes have fueled the hypothesis that sexual selection can drive species divergence without geographical isolation. Here we present experimental evidence for a mechanism by which sexual selection becomes divergent: in two sibling species from Lake Victoria, female mating preferences for red and blue male nuptial coloration coincide with their context-independent sensitivities to red and blue light, which in turn correspond to a difference in ambient light in the natural habitat of the species. These results suggest that natural selection on visual performance, favoring different visual properties in different spectral environments, may lead to divergent sexual selection on male nuptial coloration. This interplay of ecological and sexual selection along a light gradient may provide a mechanism of rapid speciation through divergent sensory drive.

  11. Electric Drive Study. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-21

    necessary and identify by block number) FIELD j GROUP SUB-GROUP IElectric Drives, Motors, Homopolar Motors, Induction Motof’s, I-u I ’Propulsion Systems...E-I APPENDIX F. VEHICLE AND PROPULSION SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS ..... .F-I APPENDIX G. HOMOPOLAR MACHINE DESCRIPTION ..... ............ G-1 APPENDIX H...System (19.5 Ton) ............... .. 62 5-22. Homopolar (DC) System (19.5 Ton).... . .. . 64 5-23. HF Induction AC System (19.5 Ton) (Split Power’Pack

  12. Electric vehicle drive train components

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, F.

    1994-12-31

    Power Control Systems has developed a family of electric vehicle drive systems that range from 65 horsepower through 300 horse power. These propulsion systems support vehicle applications ranging from light cars and pickups to buses and trucks weighing as much as 40,000 lbs (18,400 kg). These robust systems are designed specifically for automotive applications including safety, electromagnetic emissions, and environment ruggedness. Dolphin Drive Systems are very flexible. Their inverter controllers are programmable and can be provided as stand alone components matched to customer specified motors. A selection of pre-calibrated systems including motor and inverter/controller can be provided. Accessory tools are also available for customer self programming. Dolphin Drive Systems provide precision control of AC induction motors providing excellent torque-speed performance usually eliminating the need for multistage transmissions. In addition, they are very efficient over a wide speed/torque range. This provides for excellent power management over a variety of continuous speed and stop and go applications.

  13. TRPA1 is functionally expressed primarily by IB4-binding, non-peptidergic mouse and rat sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Barabas, Marie E; Kossyreva, Elena A; Stucky, Cheryl L

    2012-01-01

    expressed primarily in the IB4-positive, CGRP-negative subpopulation of small lumbar DRG neurons from rodents. Thus, IB4 binding is a better indicator than neuropeptides for TRPA1 expression.

  14. Embedded sensor node deployment to monitor telescope drive system components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart G.; Stull, Christopher J.; Wren, James; Raby, Eric Y.; Farrar, Charles R.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the deployment of an embedded active sensing platform for real-time condition monitoring of telescopes in the RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response (RAPTOR) observatory network. The RAPTOR network consists of several ground-based autonomous astronomical observatories primarily designed to search for astrophysical transients such as gamma-ray bursts. In order to capture astrophysical transients of interest, the telescopes must remain in peak operating condition to move swiftly from one potential transient to the next throughout the night. However, certain components of these telescopes have until recently been maintained in an ad hoc manner, often being permitted to run to failure, resulting in the inability to drive the telescope. In a recent study, a damage classifier was developed using the statistical pattern recognition paradigm of structural health monitoring (SHM) to identify the onset of damage in critical telescope drive components. In this work, a prototype embedded active sensing platform is deployed to the telescope structure in order to record data for use in detecting the onset of telescope drive component damage and alert system administrators prior to system failure.

  15. Perceived risk, resources, and perceptions concerning driving and epilepsy: a patient perspective.

    PubMed

    Elliott, John O; Long, Lucretia

    2008-08-01

    Previous research on driving and epilepsy has focused primarily on determining predictors of who will continue to drive when told not to. An analysis of health behavior attitudes and beliefs in persons with epilepsy may provide insight into effective patient counseling. A three-page, 46-item questionnaire was adapted and completed by 213 respondents with epilepsy. Nineteen percent indicated that in order to drive, they were not completely honest about their seizure frequency. Twenty-six percent reported having had a car accident because of a seizure. On Safety Concern, Attitudes toward Driving, Perceived Severity/Susceptibility, Perceived Barriers, Helping Relationships, and Self-Efficacy, there were no significant differences with respect to gender or place of residence. Respondents indicated that being in good health and taking precautions were important to them. Predictors of driving behavior included race/ethnicity, employment status, dishonesty about seizure frequency with the doctor, Attitudes toward Driving, Perceived Severity/Susceptibility, Perceived Barriers to changing driving behavior, and Self-Efficacy. Recommendations for communication strategies are discussed.

  16. Behavioral Impact of Graduated Driver Licensing on Teenage Driving Risk and Exposure1

    PubMed Central

    Karaca-Mandic, Pinar; Ridgeway, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) is a critical policy tool for potentially improving teenage driving while reducing teen accident exposure. While previous studies demonstrated that GDL reduces teenage involvement in fatal crashes, much remains unanswered. We explore the mechanisms through which GDL influences accident rates as well as its long term effectiveness on teen driving. In particular, we investigate; 1) whether GDL policies improve teenage driving behavior, or simply reduce teenage prevalence on the roads; 2) whether GDL exposed teens become better drivers in later years. We employ a unique data source, the State Data System, which contains all police reported accidents (fatal and non-fatal) during 1990–2005 for twelve states. We estimate a structural model that separately identifies GDL s effect on relative teenage prevalence and relative teenage riskiness. Identification of the model is driven by the relative numbers of crashes between two teenagers, two adults, or a teenager and an adult. We find that the GDL policies reduce the number of 15–17 year-old accidents by limiting the amount of teenage driving rather than by improving teenage driving. This prevalence reduction primarily occurs at night and stricter GDL policies, especially those with nighttime driving restrictions, are the most effective. Finally, we find that teen driving quality does not improve ex-post GDL exposure. PMID:19942310

  17. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the machines are provided with mechanical shifters. (b) Belt dressing shall not be applied while belts are...

  18. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the machines are provided with mechanical shifters. (b) Belt dressing shall not be applied while belts are...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not...

  20. 25 CFR 11.445 - Driving violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Driving violations. 11.445 Section 11.445 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.445 Driving violations. (a) A person who shall operate any vehicle in a manner dangerous to the public safety is guilty of reckless driving, a petty misdemeanor,...

  1. 25 CFR 11.445 - Driving violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Driving violations. 11.445 Section 11.445 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.445 Driving violations. (a) A person who shall operate any vehicle in a manner dangerous to the public safety is guilty of reckless driving, a petty misdemeanor,...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not...

  3. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not...

  4. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drive belts. 77.406 Section 77.406 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless...

  5. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drive belts. 77.406 Section 77.406 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless...

  6. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drive belts. 77.406 Section 77.406 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless...

  7. 25 CFR 11.445 - Driving violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Driving violations. 11.445 Section 11.445 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.445 Driving violations. (a) A person who shall operate any vehicle in a manner dangerous to the public safety is guilty of reckless driving, a petty misdemeanor,...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not...

  9. 25 CFR 11.445 - Driving violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Driving violations. 11.445 Section 11.445 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.445 Driving violations. (a) A person who shall operate any vehicle in a manner dangerous to the public safety is guilty of reckless driving, a petty misdemeanor,...

  10. 25 CFR 11.445 - Driving violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Driving violations. 11.445 Section 11.445 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.445 Driving violations. (a) A person who shall operate any vehicle in a manner dangerous to the public safety is guilty of reckless driving, a petty misdemeanor,...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not...

  12. Driving When You Have Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Driving When You Have Parkinson’s Disease DRIVEWELL You have been a safe driver for years. For you, driving means freedom and control. As you get older, ... it can interfere with your daily activities, including driving safely. Early symptoms vary from person to person, ...

  13. Measuring the Propensity to Drink and Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertelli, Anthony M.; Richardson, Lilliard E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Laws such as 0.08 blood alcohol content, open container, and license revocation provide a policy framework for reducing drinking and driving. Drinking and driving behavior is difficult to assess; unlike property and violent crimes, where incidence statistics can approximate behavior, most drink-driving trips go undetected. The authors develop a…

  14. Mindfulness predicts less texting while driving among young adults: Examining attention- and emotion-regulation motives as potential mediators

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Greg; Greeson, Jeff; Renna, Megan; Robbins-Monteith, Kendra

    2011-01-01

    Many young adult drivers read and send text messages while driving despite clear safety risks. Understanding predictors of texting-while-driving may help to indentify relevant targets for interventions to reduce this dangerous behavior. The present study examined whether individual differences in mindfulness is associated with texting-while-driving in a sample of young-adult drivers. Using path analysis, we tested whether this relationship would be mediated by the degree to which individuals use text-messaging as a means of reducing unpleasant emotions (emotion-regulation motives) and the degree to which individuals limit texting in order to focus on present-moment experiences (attention-regulation motives). Individuals lower in mindfulness reported more frequent texting-while-driving and this relationship appeared to be mediated primarily by emotion-regulation motives. Results may help inform the development of mindfulness-based interventions to prevent texting-while-driving. PMID:22031789

  15. Mindfulness predicts less texting while driving among young adults: Examining attention- and emotion-regulation motives as potential mediators.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Greg; Greeson, Jeff; Renna, Megan; Robbins-Monteith, Kendra

    2011-11-01

    Many young adult drivers read and send text messages while driving despite clear safety risks. Understanding predictors of texting-while-driving may help to indentify relevant targets for interventions to reduce this dangerous behavior. The present study examined whether individual differences in mindfulness is associated with texting-while-driving in a sample of young-adult drivers. Using path analysis, we tested whether this relationship would be mediated by the degree to which individuals use text-messaging as a means of reducing unpleasant emotions (emotion-regulation motives) and the degree to which individuals limit texting in order to focus on present-moment experiences (attention-regulation motives). Individuals lower in mindfulness reported more frequent texting-while-driving and this relationship appeared to be mediated primarily by emotion-regulation motives. Results may help inform the development of mindfulness-based interventions to prevent texting-while-driving.

  16. Fluid cooled vehicle drive module

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-11-15

    An electric vehicle drive includes a support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EM/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  17. Driving trajectories in chaotic scattering.

    PubMed

    Macau, Elbert E N; Caldas, Iberê L

    2002-02-01

    In this work we introduce a general approach for targeting in chaotic scattering that can be used to find a transfer trajectory between any two points located inside the scattering region. We show that this method can be used in association with a control of chaos strategy to drive around and keep a particle inside the scattering region. As an illustration of how powerful this approach is, we use it in a case of practical interest in celestial mechanics in which it is desired to control the evolution of two satellites that evolve around a large central body.

  18. Computer-Aided Remote Driving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.

    1994-01-01

    System for remote control of robotic land vehicle requires only small radio-communication bandwidth. Twin video cameras on vehicle create stereoscopic images. Operator views cross-polarized images on two cathode-ray tubes through correspondingly polarized spectacles. By use of cursor on frozen image, remote operator designates path. Vehicle proceeds to follow path, by use of limited degree of autonomous control to cope with unexpected conditions. System concept, called "computer-aided remote driving" (CARD), potentially useful in exploration of other planets, military surveillance, firefighting, and clean-up of hazardous materials.

  19. Efficient alternatives for electric drives

    SciTech Connect

    Comnes, G.A.; Barnes, R.W.

    1987-11-01

    This analysis of industrial electric motors describes the current motor stock, its energy use and operating characteristics, and innovations that could change current use patterns. It provides calculations characterizing the economic attractiveness of several existing and potential options. One attractive option given particular attention is the adjustable-speed drive which can replace throttles or valves for many pumping operations. A major conclusion is that, throughout industry, options that are both energy-saving and economically attractive appear to penetrate markets more slowly than would be socially optimal. The final section examines characteristics of industry that may contribute to slow market penetration. 29 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs.

  20. Evidence for meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A.M.; Barnetson, R.A.; Phillips, M.F.

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), an autosomal dominant disorder, is the most common form of adult muscular dystrophy, affecting at least 1 in 8000 of the population. It is a multisystemic disorder, primarily characterized by myotonia, muscle wasting and cataract. The molecular basis of DM is an expanded CTG repeat located within the 3{prime} untranslated region of a putative serine-threonine protein kinase on chromosome 19q13.3. DM exhibits anticipation, that is, with successive generations there is increasing disease severity and earlier age of onset. This mechanism and the fact that the origin of the disease has been attributed to one or a small number of founder chromosomes suggests that, in time, DM should die out. Meiotic drive has been described as a way in which certain alleles are transmitted to succeeding generations in preference to others: preferential transmission of large CTG alleles may account for their continued existence in the gene pool. There is evidence that a CTG allele with > 19 repeats may gradually increase in repeat number over many generations until it is sufficiently large to give a DM phenotype. We report a study of 495 transmissions from individuals heterozygous for the CTG repeat and with repeat numbers within the normal range (5-30). Alleles were simply classified as large or small relative to the other allele in an individual. Of 242 male meioses, 126 transmissions from parent to child were of the larger allele to their offspring (57.7%, p=0.014). This shows that there is strong evidence for meiotic drive favoring the transmission of the larger DM allele in unaffected individuals. Contrary to a previous report of meiotic drive in the male, we have shown that females preferentially transmit the larger DM allele. Taken together, the data suggest the occurrence of meiotic drive in both males and females in this locus.

  1. Engine starter and accessory drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, T.R.

    1986-10-07

    An engine starter and accessory drive system is described which consists of: an accessory drive means; a planetary gearset having a sun gear driveably connected to the accessory drive means, a ring gear, a carrier and planet pinions rotatably mounted on the carrier, fixed to the engine crankshaft, meshing with the sun gear and with the ring gear; means for holding the ring gear against rotation; and a starter motor and first clutch means for providing a one-way driving connection between the motor and the accessory drive means.

  2. Voight variable speed drive. [for windpowered generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkin, J.

    1973-01-01

    The variable speed drive transmission is mounted within the gondola and connected with the wind turbine blades and the hub. This unit is designed for the production of ac power. The turbine turns by means of the variable speed drive and a set of synchronous three phase generators. This motion is controlled automatically by two wind rosettes in such a way that the wind turbine always opposes the wind direction. The Voight variable speed drive is a mechanical variable positive drive gear transmission. It has an unlimited power and torque transmission, a constant ratio with high degree of accuracy, a speed variation over a wide range, and a nonslip drive.

  3. 32 CFR 634.14 - Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving. 634.14 Section 634.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued... SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.14 Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of...

  4. 32 CFR 634.14 - Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving. 634.14 Section 634.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued... SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.14 Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of...

  5. 32 CFR 634.14 - Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving. 634.14 Section 634.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued... SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.14 Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of...

  6. 32 CFR 634.14 - Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving. 634.14 Section 634.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued... SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.14 Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of...

  7. 32 CFR 634.14 - Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of intoxicated driving. 634.14 Section 634.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued... SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.14 Restoration of driving privileges upon acquittal of...

  8. Can Active Navigation Be as Good as Driving? A Comparison of Spatial Memory in Drivers and Backseat Drivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Stulpnagel, Rul; Steffens, Melanie C.

    2012-01-01

    When driving a vehicle, either the driver or a passenger (henceforth: backseat driver) may be responsible for navigation. Research on active navigation, primarily addressed in virtual environments, suggests that controlling navigation is more central for spatial learning than controlling movement. To test this assumption in a real-world scenario,…

  9. Asymmetric relationship between driving and safety skills.

    PubMed

    Sümer, Nebi; Ozkan, Türker; Lajunen, Timo

    2006-07-01

    We hypothesized that the combination of self reported high ratings of driving skills and low ratings of safety skills creates a serious risk for road accident involvement. This study was aimed at investigating the asymmetric interplay between driving and safety skills among Turkish drivers (N=785) using the Driving Skills Inventory [Lajunen, T., Summala, H., 1995. Driver experience, personality, and skill and safety motive dimensions in drivers' self-assessments. Pers. Indiv. Differ. 19, 307-318]. The assumed asymmetric interactions were tested on a number of outcome variables representing risky driving using moderated regression analyses. The results revealed that driving skills moderated the effects of safety skills on six out of the eight outcome variables including the number of accidents, tickets, overtaking tendencies, speed on motorways, and aggressive driving style. Results suggested that high levels of safety skills buffer the negative effect of overconfidence resulting from exaggerated ratings of self-reported driving skills.

  10. Driving Extreme Efficiency to Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbesi, Karina

    2014-03-01

    The rapid development of extremely energy efficient appliances and equipment is essential to curtail catastrophic climate disruption. This will require the on-going development of products that apply all best-practices and that take advantage of the synergies of hybridization and building integration. Beyond that, it requires the development of new disruptive technologies and concepts. To facilitate these goals, in 2011 the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy launched the Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition for Ultra-Low-Energy-Use Appliances and Equipment. Now in its third year, the competition supports faculty-lead student design teams at U.S. universities to develop and test new technology prototypes. This talk describes what the competition and the Max Tech Program are doing to drive such rapid technology progress and to facilitate the entry to the market of successful Max Tech prototypes. The talk also initiates a discussion of physicists' unique role in driving that technology progress faster and farther. Emerging Technologies, Building Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Four-wheel drive car

    SciTech Connect

    Ashikawa, N.

    1986-03-25

    A drive train in a four-wheel drive vehicle is described having an engine mounted on one end with a crankshaft oriented transverse to the direction of vehicle travel which consists of: a transmission having an output gear driven by the crankshaft and rotatable around an axis parallel to the axis of the crankshaft; a reduction gear operatively engaged with the output gear; a first differential gear having a gear and being concentrically engaged with the reduction gear to transmit the output of the reduction gear in a divided manner; a second differential gear transmitting power from one output of the differential gear to left and right wheels of the one end of the vehicle; a transmission gear meshing with the gear of the first differential gear for transmitting power from another output of the first differential gear in a direction generally perpendicular to the crankshaft through a propeller shaft to the other end of the vehicle, opposite the one end; a third differential gear receiving power from the propeller shaft for transmitting power to left and right wheels on the other end; and wherein a mesh portion where the transmission gear meshes with the gear of the first differential gear is closer to the crankshaft axis of engine than is the axis of the reduction gear.

  12. Circuit for Driving Piezoelectric Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, David P.; Chapsky, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts an oscillator circuit for driving a piezoelectric transducer to excite vibrations in a mechanical structure. The circuit was designed and built to satisfy application-specific requirements to drive a selected one of 16 such transducers at a regulated amplitude and frequency chosen to optimize the amount of work performed by the transducer and to compensate for both (1) temporal variations of the resonance frequency and damping time of each transducer and (2) initially unknown differences among the resonance frequencies and damping times of different transducers. In other words, the circuit is designed to adjust itself to optimize the performance of whichever transducer is selected at any given time. The basic design concept may be adaptable to other applications that involve the use of piezoelectric transducers in ultrasonic cleaners and other apparatuses in which high-frequency mechanical drives are utilized. This circuit includes three resistor-capacitor networks that, together with the selected piezoelectric transducer, constitute a band-pass filter having a peak response at a frequency of about 2 kHz, which is approximately the resonance frequency of the piezoelectric transducers. Gain for generating oscillations is provided by a power hybrid operational amplifier (U1). A junction field-effect transistor (Q1) in combination with a resistor (R4) is used as a voltage-variable resistor to control the magnitude of the oscillation. The voltage-variable resistor is part of a feedback control loop: Part of the output of the oscillator is rectified and filtered for use as a slow negative feedback to the gate of Q1 to keep the output amplitude constant. The response of this control loop is much slower than 2 kHz and, therefore, does not introduce significant distortion of the oscillator output, which is a fairly clean sine wave. The positive AC feedback needed to sustain oscillations is derived from sampling the current through the

  13. Optimizing digital 8mm drive performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schadegg, Gerry

    1993-01-01

    The experience of attaching over 350,000 digital 8mm drives to 85-plus system platforms has uncovered many factors which can reduce cartridge capacity or drive throughput, reduce reliability, affect cartridge archivability and actually shorten drive life. Some are unique to an installation. Others result from how the system is set up to talk to the drive. Many stem from how applications use the drive, the work load that's present, the kind of media used and, very important, the kind of cleaning program in place. Digital 8mm drives record data at densities that rival those of disk technology. Even with technology this advanced, they are extremely robust and, given proper usage, care and media, should reward the user with a long productive life. The 8mm drive will give its best performance using high-quality 'data grade' media. Even though it costs more, good 'data grade' media can sustain the reliability and rigorous needs of a data storage environment and, with proper care, give users an archival life of 30 years or more. Various factors, taken individually, may not necessarily produce performance or reliability problems. Taken in combination, their effects can compound, resulting in rapid reductions in a drive's serviceable life, cartridge capacity, or drive performance. The key to managing media is determining the importance one places upon their recorded data and, subsequently, setting media usage guidelines that can deliver data reliability. Various options one can implement to optimize digital 8mm drive performance are explored.

  14. Driving, brain injury and assistive technology.

    PubMed

    Lane, Amy K; Benoit, Dana

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with brain injury often present with cognitive, physical and emotional impairments which impact their ability to resume independence in activities of daily living. Of those activities, the resumption of driving privileges is cited as one of the greatest concerns by survivors of brain injury. The integration of driving fundamentals within the hierarchical model proposed by Keskinen represents the complexity of skills and behaviors necessary for driving. This paper provides a brief review of specific considerations concerning the driver with TBI and highlights current vehicle technology which has been developed by the automotive industry and by manufacturers of adaptive driving equipment that may facilitate the driving task. Adaptive equipment technology allows for compensation of a variety of operational deficits, whereas technological advances within the automotive industry provide drivers with improved safety and information systems. However, research has not yet supported the use of such intelligent transportation systems or advanced driving systems for drivers with brain injury. Although technologies are intended to improve the safety of drivers within the general population, the potential of negative consequences for drivers with brain injury must be considered. Ultimately, a comprehensive driving evaluation and training by a driving rehabilitation specialist is recommended for individuals with brain injury. An understanding of the potential impact of TBI on driving-related skills and knowledge of current adaptive equipment and technology is imperative to determine whether return-to-driving is a realistic and achievable goal for the individual with TBI.

  15. Driving and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Fuermaier, Anselm B M; Tucha, Lara; Evans, Ben Lewis; Koerts, Janneke; de Waard, Dick; Brookhuis, Karel; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Thome, Johannes; Lange, Klaus W; Tucha, Oliver

    2017-02-01

    Adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) suffer from various impairments of cognitive, emotional and social functioning, which can have considerable consequences for many areas of daily living. One of those areas is driving a vehicle. Driving is an important activity of everyday life and requires an efficient interplay between multiple cognitive, perceptual, and motor skills. In the present study, a selective review of the literature on driving-related difficulties associated with ADHD is performed, seeking to answer whether individuals with ADHD show increased levels of unsafe driving behaviours, which cognitive (dys)functions of individuals with ADHD are related to driving difficulty, and whether pharmacological treatment significantly improves the driving behaviour of individuals with ADHD. The available research provides convincing evidence that individuals with ADHD have different and more adverse driving outcomes than individuals without the condition. However, it appears that not all individuals with ADHD are affected uniformly. Despite various cognitive functions being related with driving difficulties, these functions do not appear helpful in detecting high risk drivers with ADHD, nor in predicting driving outcomes in individuals with ADHD, since impairments in these functions are defining criteria for the diagnoses of ADHD (e.g., inattention and impulsivity). Pharmacological treatment of ADHD, in particular stimulant drug treatment, appears to be beneficial to the driving difficulties experienced by individuals with ADHD. However, additional research is needed, in particular further studies that address the numerous methodological weaknesses of many of the previous studies.

  16. Night driving assistance system based on spatial perspective approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poh, Chung-Kiak; Poh, Chung-How

    2004-10-01

    In this paper we put forward and evaluate a near real-time night driving assistance system intended for use in land vehicles (cars in particular) to help with T-junctions crossing at night. The onboard system of the host vehicle computes the remaining distance between itself and the nearest approaching vehicle using spatial perspective method. The algorithm evaluates the interspacing of the incoming vehicle's headlights. This allows the distance-to-contact to be determined or estimated. This work emphasises techniques to obtain the required image quality for distance sensing. The image quality was achieved when work was focused primarily at the hardware levels. With polaroids in place, the acquired images show that the headlight signals are clearly distinguishable from other ambient lights. This significantly simplifies image processing. Road-testing shows rather promising results. The system can be generalised to intersection settings, prevent rear-front collisions and may be extended for daytime applications with the introduction of virtual references.

  17. Current Drive in Recombining Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2012-05-15

    The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

  18. Driving Task: How Older Drivers' On-Road Driving Performance Relates to Abilities, Perceptions, and Restrictions.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Sjaan; Charlton, Judith L; Langford, Jim; Di Stefano, Marilyn; MacDonald, Wendy; Vlahodimitrakou, Zafiroula; Mazer, Barbara L; Gelinas, Isabelle; Vrkljan, Brenda; Eliasz, Kinga; Myers, Anita; Tuokko, Holly A; Marshall, Shawn C

    2016-06-01

    This study examined a cohort of 227 older drivers and investigated the relationship between performance on the electronic Driver Observation Schedule (eDOS) driving task and: (1) driver characteristics; (2) functional abilities; (3) perceptions of driving comfort and abilities; and (4) self-reported driving restrictions. Participants (male: 70%; age: M = 81.53 years, SD = 3.37 years) completed a series of functional ability measures and scales on perceived driving comfort, abilities, and driving restrictions from the Year 2 Candrive/Ozcandrive assessment protocol, along with an eDOS driving task. Observations of participants' driving behaviours during the driving task were recorded for intersection negotiation, lane-changing, merging, low-speed maneuvers, and maneuver-free driving. eDOS driving task scores were high (M = 94.74; SD = 5.70) and significantly related to participants' perceived driving abilities, reported frequency of driving in challenging situations, and number of driving restrictions. Future analyses will explore potential changes in driving task scores over time.

  19. Personal and situational influences on drink driving and sober driving among a cohort of young adults

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, L; Begg, D; Langley, J

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To compare personal and situational influences on incidents involving drink driving with those involving sober driving. Methods: Information on a range of road safety practices was sought in face to face interviews conducted with 969 members of the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort at age 26 years. A total of 750 study members reported an incident that involved the opportunity to consume alcohol and also travel by motor vehicle. Of these, 87 were classified as "drink drive incidents" and 663 as "sober drive incidents". Results: Study members who were male, of lower socioeconomic status, had no school qualifications, or were dependent on alcohol or marijuana at age 21 were significantly more likely to report a drink drive incident at age 26. Compared with the sober drive incidents, the drink drive incidents were more commonly associated with driving alone, drinking at bars, and no advanced planning. For drink drive incidents the amount of alcohol consumed was influenced by the conviviality of the occasion, whereas for sober drive incidents it was the need to drive. One quarter of those reporting drink drive incidents stated they had used marijuana and/or LSD at the event at which they drank. Conclusions: Drink drive and sober drive incidents differed, particularly with regard to decisions made before the event. Prevention efforts could usefully be targeted toward these decisions. PMID:12120828

  20. Traction Drives for Zero Stick-Slip Robots, and Reaction Free, Momentum Balanced Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William J.; Shipitalo, William; Newman, Wyatt

    1995-01-01

    Balanced (Grounded Ring) Drive performed as expected kinematically. Reduction r-atios to the two counterrotating outputs (design nominal=24:1) were measured to be 23.98:1 and 24.12:1 at zero load.. At 25ONm (2200 in-lbf) output torque the ratio changed 2% due to roller creep. This drive was the smoothest of all three as determined from linearity and cogging tests, and maximum measured efficiency (ratio of power out to power in) was 95%. The disadvantages of full preloading as comvared to variable preload were apparent in this drive as in the Differential Roller Drive. Efficiencies at part load were low, but improved dramatically with increases in torque. These were consistent with friction measurements which indicated losses primarily from Coulomb friction. The initial preload level setting was low so roller slip was encountered at higher torques during testing.

  1. Application of traction drives as servo mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Rohn, D. A.; Steinetz, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    The suitability of traction drives for a wide class of aerospace control mechanisms is examined. Potential applications include antenna or solar array drive positioners, robotic joints, control moment gyro (CMG) actuators and propeller pitch change mechanisms. In these and similar applications the zero backlash, high torsional stiffness, low hysteresis and torque ripple characteristics of traction drives are of particular interest, as is the ability to run without liquid lubrication in certain cases. Wear and fatigue considerations for wet and dry operation are examined along with the tribological performance of several promising self lubricating polymers for traction contracts. The speed regulation capabilities of variable ratio traction drives are reviewed. A torsional stiffness analysis described suggests that traction contacts are relatively stiff compared to gears and are significantly stiffer than the other structural elements in the prototype CMG traction drive analyzed. Discussion is also given of an advanced turboprop propeller pitch change mechanism that incorporates a traction drive.

  2. Parkinson's disease and issues related to driving.

    PubMed

    Uitti, Ryan J

    2009-12-01

    Driving a motor vehicle represents an important activity associated with personal independence and freedom. Being told that one can no longer drive is itself associated with loss of independence, depression, low self-esteem and reduced activities [1,2]. Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), therefore, understandably wish to continue to be able to maintain their ability to drive automobiles, motorcycles, airplanes, and boats, etc. The ability to determine if and when a PD patient is no longer fit to drive a motor vehicle is important for maintaining safety for the PD patient and the public. There are numerous requirements for being able to drive a motor vehicle safely. When any of these capacities deteriorate, the ability to drive safely may be lost. This review will concentrate upon common issues that would be peculiar to patients with PD.

  3. Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, C.E.; Benson, R.A.

    1994-11-29

    A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the traction battery and the power drive circuit, a voltage detector across contacts of the main contactor, and a controller for controlling the main contactor to prevent movement of its contacts to the closed position when the voltage across the contacts exceeds a predetermined threshold, to thereby protect the contacts of the contactor. The power drive circuit includes an electric traction motor and a DC-to-AC inverter with a capacitive input filter. The controller also inhibits the power drive circuit from driving the motor and thereby discharging the input capacitor if the contacts are inadvertently opened during motoring. A precharging contactor is controlled to charge the input filter capacitor prior to closing the main contactor to further protect the contacts of the main contactor. 3 figures.

  4. Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Charles E.; Benson, Ralph A.

    1994-01-01

    A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the traction battery and the power drive circuit, a voltage detector across contacts of the main contactor, and a controller for controlling the main contactor to prevent movement of its contacts to the closed position when the voltage across the contacts exceeds a predetermined threshold, to thereby protect the contacts of the contactor. The power drive circuit includes an electric traction motor and a DC-to-AC inverter with a capacitive input filter. The controller also inhibits the power drive circuit from driving the motor and thereby discharging the input capacitor if the contacts are inadvertently opened during motoring. A precharging contactor is controlled to charge the input filter capacitor prior to closing the main contactor to further protect the contacts of the main contactor.

  5. Life Analysis of Multiroller Planetary Traction Drive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    Nasvytis eUltirollcr Traction Drive. The analysis was based on the Lundberg- Palmgren method for rolling- element bearing life prediction. Life...a steel rail. There are dozens bearing life. The effect of stress, stressed volume, of traction drive designs, distinguished by the and depth to the...clene¶,t bearing materials, lubrication and traction drive concept. Cleaner steels (vacuum design were considered as well as the potentially induction

  6. Optimal Sector Sampling for Drive Triage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    known files, which we call target data, that could help identify a drive holding evidence such as child pornography or malware. Triage is needed to sift...we call target data, that could help identify a drive holding evidence such as child pornography or malware. Triage is needed to sift through drives...situations where the user is looking for known data.1 One example is a law enforcement officer searching for evidence of child pornography from a large num

  7. A new driving circuit for IGBT devices

    SciTech Connect

    Licitra, C.; Musumeci, S.; Raciti, A.; Galluzzo, A.U.; Letor, R.; Melito, M.

    1995-05-01

    IGBT devices are increasingly used in power electronic equipment due to their high power handling capability. This paper deals with the problems that concern the turn-on, turn-off, and short-circuit of these devices. An optimal new driving circuit is proposed which gives excellent device output performances. Experimental oscillogram traces of transient condition tests are given, which demonstrate the advantages of using the new driving circuit. The suitability of the driving circuit for integration is analyzed.

  8. Get the message: distracted driving and teens.

    PubMed

    Adeola, Ruth; Gibbons, Mallory

    2013-01-01

    Distracted driving is a growing problem in the United States. With the integration of wireless devices into everyday life, cell phone use behind the wheel is a distraction requiring increasing concern. Teen drivers are most susceptible to the dangers of distracted driving as made evident in the overrepresentation of teens in distraction-related motor vehicle crashes. This article describes the causes, consequences, and statistics related to distracted driving in teenagers and an injury prevention program for teenagers.

  9. Driving Retirement in Older Adults with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Croston, Jami; Meuser, Thomas M.; Berg-Weger, Marla; Grant, Elizabeth A.; Carr, David B.

    2010-01-01

    In order to characterize the driving and mobility status of older adults with dementia, a questionnaire was mailed to 527 informants; 119 were returned. The majority of patients were diagnosed with Dementia of the Alzheimer’s Type. Only 28% were actively driving at the time of survey. Informants rated 53% of current or recently retired drivers as potentially unsafe. Few informants reported using community/educational resources. Individuals with progressive dementia retire from driving for differing reasons, many subsequent to family recognition of impaired driving performance. Opportunities for education and supportive assistance exist but are underutilized. PMID:20161565

  10. Women drive better if not stereotyped.

    PubMed

    Moè, Angelica; Cadinu, Mara; Maass, Anne

    2015-12-01

    A commonly held stereotype is that women are poor drivers. This stereotype is recognized and endorsed by women and girls very early on, long before taking their driving licence, nevertheless they are less involved in accidents and drive safer and less fast than men. In line with the stereotype threat theory, the present study tests the hypothesis that making the driving stereotype salient will lead women to underperform in a driving simulation task. In Experiment 1women in the stereotype threat condition were told that the aim of the study was to detect gender differences in driving whereas in a control condition no study aim was provided. In Experiment 2, two conditions were compared: stereotype threat (same instructions as in Experiment 1), and stereotype boost (the alleged goal was to compare driving ability of young vs. old people). As predicted, the results of both experiments showed that women under stereotype threat, as compared to either control or stereotype boost participants, doubled the number of mistakes. Nevertheless, they overall expected/self-reported to drive/have driven poorly. Importantly, their level of expectation was a significant predictor of their actual driving performance only in the stereotype threat condition. Implications of these effects of stereotype threat on women's driving performance and self-assessment are discussed.

  11. Camshaft driving device for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ebesu, H.

    1988-06-14

    A camshaft driving device for use in a double overhead cam type internal combustion engine having a cylinder block, an upper deck formed at an upper portion of the cylinder block, a cylinder head disposed on the cylinder block, a driving shaft rotatably mounted at a lower portion of the cylinder block, and a pair of camshafts rotatably mounted at an upper portion of the cylinder head, is described comprising: driving force transmitting endless chain members engaging in the reduction gear means for transmitting a driving force from the driving shaft to the pair of camshaft through the reduction gear means. The camshaft driving device further including chain tensioners for tightening the chain, a nozzle means for supplying a lubricating oil to the driving force chain members on the side of the drive shaft and an oil guide wall formed immediately above the sprocket of the transmitting portion of the reduction gear means at a lower end portion of the journal boss and lapping thereover both in the radial direction and in the axial direction of the driving shaft. A mounting boss for mounting the reduction gear means thereon is formed on the upper deck of the cylinder block.

  12. Risky driving and lifestyles in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Bina, Manuela; Graziano, Federica; Bonino, Silvia

    2006-05-01

    Several studies have shown that risky driving is especially prevalent among young drivers and recent research has pointed out that driving in adolescence should be investigated in the more general context of adolescent development. The first aim of this contribution was to analyze involvement in risky driving in a normative sample of 645 Italian adolescents, boys and girls, aged 14-17, through a self-report questionnaire. A second aim was to evaluate the association between risky driving and lifestyle, defined as involvement in other health risk behaviors and leisure activities. The main results showed that many adolescents drove cars and motorcycles without the required driving license and the most frequent offences were speeding and failure to maintain a safe braking distance. Gender and age differences were also investigated. Results concerning the association between risky driving and lifestyle showed that risky driving was not an isolated behavior. Boys who displayed risky driving practices were more likely to adopt a lifestyle characterized by high involvement in antisocial behaviors, tobacco smoking, comfort eating and time spent in non-organized activities with friends. Girls involved in risky driving were more likely to be involved in other risk-taking behaviors, antisocial behaviors and drug use.

  13. Metal band drives in spacecraft mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maus, Daryl

    1993-01-01

    Transmitting and changing the characteristics of force and stroke is a requirement in nearly all mechanisms. Examples include changing linear to rotary motion, providing a 90 deg change in direction, and amplifying stroke or force. Requirements for size, weight, efficiency and reliability create unique problems in spacecraft mechanisms. Flexible metal band and cam drive systems provide powerful solutions to these problems. Band drives, rack and pinion gears, and bell cranks are compared for effectiveness. Band drive issues are discussed including materials, bend radius, fabrication, attachment and reliability. Numerous mechanisms are shown which illustrate practical applications of band drives.

  14. Environmental characteristics drive variation in Amazonian understorey bird assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, William E.; Anderson, Marti J.; Schlegel, Martin; Pe’er, Guy; Henle, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Tropical bird assemblages display patterns of high alpha and beta diversity and, as tropical birds exhibit strong habitat specificity, their spatial distributions are generally assumed to be driven primarily by environmental heterogeneity and interspecific interactions. However, spatial distributions of some Amazonian forest birds are also often restricted by large rivers and other large-scale topographic features, suggesting that dispersal limitation may also play a role in driving species’ turnover. In this study, we evaluated the effects of environmental characteristics, topographic and spatial variables on variation in local assemblage structure and diversity of birds in an old-growth forest in central Amazonia. Birds were mist-netted in 72 plots distributed systematically across a 10,000 ha reserve in each of three years. Alpha diversity remained stable through time, but species composition changed. Spatial variation in bird-assemblage structure was significantly related to environmental and topographic variables but not strongly related to spatial variables. At a broad scale, we found bird assemblages to be significantly distinct between two watersheds that are divided by a central ridgeline. We did not detect an effect of the ridgeline per se in driving these patterns, indicating that most birds are able to fly across it, and that differences in assemblage structure between watersheds may be due to unmeasured environmental variables or unique combinations of measured variables. Our study indicates that complex geography and landscape features can act together with environmental variables to drive changes in the diversity and composition of tropical bird assemblages at local scales, but highlights that we still know very little about what makes different parts of tropical forest suitable for different species. PMID:28225774

  15. Environmental characteristics drive variation in Amazonian understorey bird assemblages.

    PubMed

    Menger, Juliana; Magnusson, William E; Anderson, Marti J; Schlegel, Martin; Pe'er, Guy; Henle, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Tropical bird assemblages display patterns of high alpha and beta diversity and, as tropical birds exhibit strong habitat specificity, their spatial distributions are generally assumed to be driven primarily by environmental heterogeneity and interspecific interactions. However, spatial distributions of some Amazonian forest birds are also often restricted by large rivers and other large-scale topographic features, suggesting that dispersal limitation may also play a role in driving species' turnover. In this study, we evaluated the effects of environmental characteristics, topographic and spatial variables on variation in local assemblage structure and diversity of birds in an old-growth forest in central Amazonia. Birds were mist-netted in 72 plots distributed systematically across a 10,000 ha reserve in each of three years. Alpha diversity remained stable through time, but species composition changed. Spatial variation in bird-assemblage structure was significantly related to environmental and topographic variables but not strongly related to spatial variables. At a broad scale, we found bird assemblages to be significantly distinct between two watersheds that are divided by a central ridgeline. We did not detect an effect of the ridgeline per se in driving these patterns, indicating that most birds are able to fly across it, and that differences in assemblage structure between watersheds may be due to unmeasured environmental variables or unique combinations of measured variables. Our study indicates that complex geography and landscape features can act together with environmental variables to drive changes in the diversity and composition of tropical bird assemblages at local scales, but highlights that we still know very little about what makes different parts of tropical forest suitable for different species.

  16. Analysis of cache for streaming tape drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinnaswamy, V.

    1993-01-01

    A tape subsystem consists of a controller and a tape drive. Tapes are used for backup, data interchange, and software distribution. The backup operation is addressed. During a backup operation, data is read from disk, processed in CPU, and then sent to tape. The processing speeds of a disk subsystem, CPU, and a tape subsystem are likely to be different. A powerful CPU can read data from a fast disk, process it, and supply the data to the tape subsystem at a faster rate than the tape subsystem can handle. On the other hand, a slow disk drive and a slow CPU may not be able to supply data fast enough to keep a tape drive busy all the time. The backup process may supply data to tape drive in bursts. Each burst may be followed by an idle period. Depending on the nature of the file distribution in the disk, the input stream to the tape subsystem may vary significantly during backup. To compensate for these differences and optimize the utilization of a tape subsystem, a cache or buffer is introduced in the tape controller. Most of the tape drives today are streaming tape drives. A streaming tape drive goes into reposition when there is no data from the controller. Once the drive goes into reposition, the controller can receive data, but it cannot supply data to the tape drive until the drive completes its reposition. A controller can also receive data from the host and send data to the tape drive at the same time. The relationship of cache size, host transfer rate, drive transfer rate, reposition, and ramp up times for optimal performance of the tape subsystem are investigated. Formulas developed will also show the advantages of cache watermarks to increase the streaming time of the tape drive, maximum loss due to insufficient cache, tradeoffs between cache and reposition times and the effectiveness of cache on a streaming tape drive due to idle times or interruptions due in host transfers. Several mathematical formulas are developed to predict the performance of the tape

  17. Variable frequency drive applications guide

    SciTech Connect

    Laloudakis, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Traditionally, fans and pumps have been designed to be capable of handling the maximum demand of the system in which they are installed. However, quite often the actual demand can vary and it can be much lower than the original design capacity. These situations have been corrected in the past through additions of outlet dampers to fans or throttling valves to pumps. While these can be effective and simple controls they severely affect the efficiency of the system. Variable frequency (speed) is the most efficient means of capacity control. The most cost effective method of achieving variable speed capacity control is using AC adjustable frequency drives. AC adjustable frequency controls convert any fixed speed AC motor into an adjustable speed device. Adjusting the speed of a motor, by controlling the frequency of the AC power to that motor, reduces its horsepower requirements. According to pump and fan laws, capacity is proportional to speed while horsepower is proportional to the cube of the speed. Therefore, by reducing the speed of an AC motor by 20 percent the horsepower requirement is reduced by nearly 50 percent. Reduced speed through variable frequency control allows for flexibility of meeting changing weather and comfort requirements without operating costly equipment at full capacity.

  18. Drive Electric Vermont Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Fred; Roberts, Dave; Francfort, Jim; White, Sera

    2016-03-01

    Currently in the United States, the heavy majority of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) sales have been in highly conducive, selected, metropolitan areas; opposed to more broad distribution across the country. The U.S. Department of Energy’s EV Everywhere Grand Challenge is looking carefully at the barriers and opportunities that exist to enable small and midsize communities to partake in the PEV market and benefit from the economic and environmental advantages of PEVs. In order to gain insight into these challenges and barriers, DOE selected a success story (i.e., Drive Electric Vermont) as the subject of this case study, as the state of Vermont is tied with Detroit, Michigan in having the highest percentage of 2014 (most recent complete data) PEV registrations for cold weather U.S. cities and has seen more than a sixfold increase in charging stations over the last three years. The overall objective of this case study was to use the lessons learned from Drive Electric Vermont to determine what activities are most effective at encouraging acquisitions of PEVs and deployment of charging infrastructure in small to midsize communities, prioritizing and sequencing their implementation, identifying robust means for extrapolation, and applying this understanding to other small to midsize communities across the nation. The Drive Electric Vermont Program was formed in 2012 with a goal of increasing the use of electrified transportation in Vermont through policy development, education and outreach, and infrastructure development. The Drive Electric Vermont Program can be broadly broken into four components: (1) strategic planning/leadership, (2) stakeholder/partnership development, (3) education and outreach, and (4) incentives. The early phases of the program focused heavily on strategic planning, and stakeholder and partnership development, followed by a transition to education and outreach activities, charging infrastructure development, and grant and incentive programs

  19. The Thermodynamics of Drunk Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert Q.

    1997-05-01

    Chemical and instrumental tests for driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI) measure the concentration of ethanol in the breath (BrAC), while state DUI laws are described in terms of blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Consequently, accurate and fair conversion from BrAC to BAC is crucial to the judicial process. Theoretical treatment of the water-air-ethanol equilibrium system and the related blood-breath-ethanol system, based on principles from general chemistry and biology, yields an equation relating the ratio of BAC to BrAC to the absolute temperature of the breath, the fraction of water in the blood, and the enthalpy and entropy of vaporization of ethanol from aqueous solution. The model equation predicts an average value for the ratio of 2350+100, not significantly different from reported experimental values. An exponential temperature dependence is predicted and has been confirmed experimentally as well. Biological, chemical, and instrumental variables are described along with their contributions to the overall uncertainty in the value of BrAC/BAC. While the forensic science community uses, and debates, a fixed ratio of 2100, the theoretical model suggests that a value of 1880 should be used to reduce the fraction of false positives to <1%.

  20. Redundant arrays of IDE drives

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Sanders et al.

    2002-01-02

    The authors report tests of redundant arrays of IDE disk drives for use in offline high energy physics data analysis. Parts costs of total systems using commodity EIDE disks are now at the $4000 per Terabyte level. Disk storage prices have now decreased to the point where they equal the cost per Terabyte of Storage Technology tape silos. The disks, however, offer far better granularity; even small institutions can afford to deploy systems. The tests include reports on software RAID-5 systems running under Linux 2.4 using Promise Ultra 100{trademark} disk controllers. RAID-5 protects data in case of a single disk failure by providing parity bits. Tape backup is not required. Journaling file systems are used to allow rapid recovery from crashes. The data analysis strategy is to encapsulate data and CPU processing power. Analysis for a particular part of a data set takes place on the PC where the data resides. The network is only used to put results together. They explore three methods of moving data between sites; internet transfers, not pluggable IDE disks in FireWire cases, and DVD-R disks.