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Sample records for methanol reformate gas

  1. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  2. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  3. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  4. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  5. PdZnAl Catalysts for the Reactions of Water-Gas-Shift, Methanol Steam Reforming, and Reverse-Water-Gas-Shift

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, Robert A.; Platon, Alexandru; Datye, Abhaya K.; Vohs, John M.; Wang, Yong; Palo, Daniel R.

    2008-03-07

    Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts were studied for water-gas-shift (WGS), methanol steam reforming, and reverse-water-gas-shift (RWGS) reactions. WGS activity was found to be dependent on the Pd:Zn ratio with a maximum activity obtained at approximately 0.50, which was comparable to that of a commercial Pt-based catalyst. The catalyst stability was demonstrated for 100 hours time-on-stream at a temperature of 3600C without evidence of metal sintering. WGS reaction rates were approximately 1st order with respect to CO concentration, and kinetic parameters were determined to be Ea = 58.3 kJ mol-1 and k0 = 6.1x107 min-1. During methanol steam reforming, the CO selectivities were observed to be lower than the calculated equilibrium values over a range of temperatures and steam/carbon ratios studied while the reaction rate constants were approximately of the same magnitude for both WGS and methanol steam reforming. These results indicate that although Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 are active WGS catalysts, WGS is not involved in methanol steam reforming. RWGS rate constants are on the order of about 20 times lower than that of methanol steam reforming, suggesting that RWGS reaction could be one of the sources for small amount of CO formation in methanol steam reforming.

  6. Bioinduced Room-Temperature Methanol Reforming.

    PubMed

    Heim, Leo E; Thiel, Daniel; Gedig, Christian; Deska, Jan; Prechtl, Martin H G

    2015-08-24

    Imitating nature's approach in nucleophile-activated formaldehyde dehydrogenation, air-stable ruthenium complexes proved to be exquisite catalysts for the dehydrogenation of formaldehyde hydrate as well as for the transfer hydrogenation to unsaturated organic substrates at loadings as low as 0.5 mol %. Concatenation of the chemical hydrogen-fixation route with an oxidase-mediated activation of methanol gives an artificial methylotrophic in vitro metabolism providing methanol-derived reduction equivalents for synthetic hydrogenation purposes. Moreover, for the first time methanol reforming at room temperature was achieved on the basis of this bioinduced dehydrogenation path delivering hydrogen gas from aqueous methanol.

  7. Development of a selective oxidation CO removal reactor for methanol reformate gas

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Shunji; Takatani, Yoshiaki; Terada, Seijo; Ohtani, Shinichi

    1996-12-31

    This report forms part of a joint study on a PEFC propulsion system for surface ships, summarized in a presentation to this Seminar, entitled {open_quotes}Study on a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) Propulsion System for Surface Ships{close_quotes}, and which envisages application to a 1,500 DWT cargo vessel. The aspect treated here concerns laboratory-scale tests aimed at reducing by selective oxidation to a level below 10 ppm the carbon monoxide (CO) contained to a concentration of around 1% in reformate gas.

  8. Method of steam reforming methanol to hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Beshty, Bahjat S.

    1990-01-01

    The production of hydrogen by the catalyzed steam reforming of methanol is accomplished using a reformer of greatly reduced size and cost wherein a mixture of water and methanol is superheated to the gaseous state at temperatures of about 800.degree. to about 1,100.degree. F. and then fed to a reformer in direct contact with the catalyst bed contained therein, whereby the heat for the endothermic steam reforming reaction is derived directly from the superheated steam/methanol mixture.

  9. Methanol Steam Reforming for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Palo, Daniel R.; Dagle, Robert A.; Holladay, Jamie D.

    2007-09-11

    Review article covering developments in methanol steam reforming in the context of PEM fuel cell power systems. Subjects covered include methanol background, use, and production, comparison to other fuels, power system considerations, militrary requirements, competing technologies, catalyst development, and reactor and system development and demonstration.

  10. Methanol Steam Reformer on a Silicon Wafer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Malen, J; Piggott, T; Morse, J; Sopchak, D; Greif, R; Grigoropoulos, C; Havstad, M; Upadhye, R

    2004-04-15

    A study of the reforming rates, heat transfer and flow through a methanol reforming catalytic microreactor fabricated on a silicon wafer are presented. Comparison of computed and measured conversion efficiencies are shown to be favorable. Concepts for insulating the reactor while maintaining small overall size and starting operation from ambient temperature are analyzed.

  11. Single Step Bi-reforming and Oxidative Bi-reforming of Methane (Natural Gas) with Steam and Carbon Dioxide to Metgas (CO-2H2) for Methanol Synthesis: Self-Sufficient Effective and Exclusive Oxygenation of Methane to Methanol with Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Olah, George A; Goeppert, Alain; Czaun, Miklos; Mathew, Thomas; May, Robert B; Prakash, G K Surya

    2015-07-15

    Catalysts based on suitable metal oxide supports, such as NiO/MgO and CoO/MgO, were shown to be active for single step bi-reforming, the combined steam and dry reforming of methane or natural gas with H2O and CO2 exclusively to metgas (CO-2H2) for efficient methanol synthesis. Reactions were carried out in a tubular flow reactor under pressures up to 42 bar at 830-910 °C. Using a CH4 to steam to CO2 ratio of ∼3:2:1 in the gas feed, the H2/CO ratio of 2:1 was achieved, which is desired for subsequent methanol synthesis. The needed 2/1 steam/CO2 feed ratio together with the reaction heat for the endothermic bi-reforming can be conveniently obtained by the complete combustion of a quarter part of the overall used methane (natural gas) with oxygen of the air (oxidative bi-reforming). Complete combustion of a part of methane followed by bi-reforming leads to the production of metgas (H2/CO in 2:1 mol ratio) for self-sufficient exclusive methanol synthesis. The long sought after but elusive efficient and selective oxygenation of methane to methanol is thus achieved in an effective and economic way without any oxidation byproduct formation according to CH4 + 1/2O2 → CH3OH.

  12. Single Step Bi-reforming and Oxidative Bi-reforming of Methane (Natural Gas) with Steam and Carbon Dioxide to Metgas (CO-2H2) for Methanol Synthesis: Self-Sufficient Effective and Exclusive Oxygenation of Methane to Methanol with Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Olah, George A; Goeppert, Alain; Czaun, Miklos; Mathew, Thomas; May, Robert B; Prakash, G K Surya

    2015-07-15

    Catalysts based on suitable metal oxide supports, such as NiO/MgO and CoO/MgO, were shown to be active for single step bi-reforming, the combined steam and dry reforming of methane or natural gas with H2O and CO2 exclusively to metgas (CO-2H2) for efficient methanol synthesis. Reactions were carried out in a tubular flow reactor under pressures up to 42 bar at 830-910 °C. Using a CH4 to steam to CO2 ratio of ∼3:2:1 in the gas feed, the H2/CO ratio of 2:1 was achieved, which is desired for subsequent methanol synthesis. The needed 2/1 steam/CO2 feed ratio together with the reaction heat for the endothermic bi-reforming can be conveniently obtained by the complete combustion of a quarter part of the overall used methane (natural gas) with oxygen of the air (oxidative bi-reforming). Complete combustion of a part of methane followed by bi-reforming leads to the production of metgas (H2/CO in 2:1 mol ratio) for self-sufficient exclusive methanol synthesis. The long sought after but elusive efficient and selective oxygenation of methane to methanol is thus achieved in an effective and economic way without any oxidation byproduct formation according to CH4 + 1/2O2 → CH3OH. PMID:26086090

  13. Thermally integrated staged methanol reformer and method

    DOEpatents

    Skala, Glenn William; Hart-Predmore, David James; Pettit, William Henry; Borup, Rodney Lynn

    2001-01-01

    A thermally integrated two-stage methanol reformer including a heat exchanger and first and second reactors colocated in a common housing in which a gaseous heat transfer medium circulates to carry heat from the heat exchanger into the reactors. The heat transfer medium comprises principally hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methanol vapor and water vapor formed in a first stage reforming reaction. A small portion of the circulating heat transfer medium is drawn off and reacted in a second stage reforming reaction which substantially completes the reaction of the methanol and water remaining in the drawn-off portion. Preferably, a PrOx reactor will be included in the housing upstream of the heat exchanger to supplement the heat provided by the heat exchanger.

  14. Methanol simplifies gas processing

    SciTech Connect

    Minkkinen, A.; Jonchere, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    Recent development of a simple single solvent technology goes far to meet the complete gas processing needs. The use of methanol, as practiced in the IPFEXOL process, where it is used not only as a hydrate inhibitor and antifreeze agent but as an acid gas extraction solvent makes the complete gas processing scheme simple and probably the most cost effective as well. This paper presents several gas processing applications where water, hydrocarbon liquids and acid gases are removed from natural wellhead production gases. Water and hydrocarbon liquids removal is achieved to the extent necessary to make a pipeline transportable gas or meet downstream cryogenic processing demands. These are illustrated with recent applications of the IFPEX-1 process successfully operating today in North America and the Far East. A recent North Sea offshore project is highlighted showing the particular advantages in offshore applications. For the removal of water and hydrocarbon liquids together with a substantial quantity of not only CO{sub 2} but H{sub 2}S, the most complete methanol use scheme is presented. This is illustrated with the development of an advanced version of the IFPEX-2 process containing some innovative but simple equipment concepts which yields high pressure dry acid gases for reinjection or a high quality acid gas destined to Claus type sulfur recovery.

  15. Testing of a small combustion turbine burning reformed methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Karpuk, M E; Schell, D J

    1984-02-01

    As part of ongoing research into high-efficiency alcohol fuels utilization at the Solar Energy Research Institute, as gas combustion turbine was modified for use with reformed methanol and tested. The reforming process for this application uses waste engine heat to convert methanol and steam in the presence of a catalyst into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. We modified the standard combustor of a Garrett Model GTCP85-397 combustion turbine to burn the hydrogen and carbon dioxide mixture. Heat exchangers to boil and reform a methanol and water mixture were sized, purchased, and connected to the turbine exhaust. Instrumentation was added to monitor turbine temperatures, pressures, and exhaust emissions. Turbine performance and emissions were measured at various loads with a distillate fuel and compared with performance on reformed methanol. Reformed alcohol yields a significant improvement in efficiency because waste heat is reclaimed as chemical energy in the fuel. The larger mass flowrate of fuel to the combustor increases power output, and emissions are substantially reduced. 5 references, 6 figures, 4 tables.

  16. Hydrogen from methanol for fuel cells in mobile systems: development of a compact reformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhlein, B.; Boe, M.; Bøgild-Hansen, J.; Bröckerhoff, P.; Colsman, G.; Emonts, B.; Menzer, R.; Riedel, E.

    On-board generation of hydrogen from methanol with a reformer in connection with the use of a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is an attractive option for a passenger car drive. Special considerations are required to obtain low weight and volume. Furthermore, the PEMFC of today cannot tolerate more than 10 ppm of carbon monoxide in the fuel. Therefore a gas conditioning step is needed after the methanol reformer. Our main research activities focus on the conceptual design of a drive system for a passenger car with methanol reformer and PEMFC: engineering studies with regard to different aspects of this design including reformer, catalytic burner, gas conditioning, balances of the fuel cycles and basic design of a compact methanol reformer. The work described here was carried out within the framework of a JOULE II project of the European Union (1993-1995). Extensive experimental studies have been carried out at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH (KFA) in Germany and at Haldor Topsøe A/S in Denmark.

  17. Kinetics, simulation and optimization of methanol steam reformer for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongtaek; Stenger, Harvey G.

    To evaluate reaction rates for making hydrogen from methanol, kinetic studies of methanol decomposition, methanol steam reforming, the water gas shift reaction, and CO selective oxidation have been performed. These reactions were studied in a microreactor testing unit using a commercial Cu-ZnO/Al 2O 3 catalyst for the first three reactions and Pt-Fe/γ-alumina catalyst for the last reaction. The activity tests were performed between 120 and 325 °C at atmospheric pressure with a range of feed rates and compositions. For methanol decomposition, a simplified reaction network of five elementary reactions was proposed and parameters for all five rate expressions were obtained using non-linear least squares optimization, numerical integration of a one-dimensional PFR model, and extensive experimental data. Similar numerical analysis was carried out to obtain the rate expressions for methanol steam reaction, the water gas shift reaction, and CO selective oxidation. Combining the three reactors with several heat exchange options, an integrated methanol reformer system was designed and simulated using MATLAB. Using this simulation, the product distribution, the effects of reactor volume and temperature, and the options of water and air injection rates were studied. Also, a series of optimization tests were conducted to give maximum hydrogen yield and/or maximum economic profit.

  18. Evaluation of dissociated and steam-reformed methanol as automotive engine fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalk, T. R.; Mccall, D. M.; Mccanlies, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Dissociated and steam reformed methanol were evaluated as automotive engine fuels. Advantages and disadvantages in using methanol in the reformed rather than liquid state were discussed. Engine dynamometer tests were conducted with a four cylinder, 2.3 liter, spark ignition automotive engine to determine performance and emission characteristics operating on simulated dissociated and steam reformed methanol (2H2 + CO and 3H2 + CO2 respectively), and liquid methanol. Results are presented for engine performance and emissions as functions of equivalence ratio, at various throttle settings and engine speeds. Operation on dissociated and steam reformed methanol was characterized by flashback (violent propagation of a flame into the intake manifold) which limited operation to lower power output than was obtainable using liquid methanol. It was concluded that: an automobile could not be operated solely on dissociated or steam reformed methanol over the entire required power range - a supplementary fuel system or power source would be necessary to attain higher powers; the use of reformed mechanol, compared to liquid methanol, may result in a small improvement in thermal efficiency in the low power range; dissociated methanol is a better fuel than steam reformed methanol for use in a spark ignition engine; and use of dissociated or steam reformed methanol may result in lower exhaust emissions compared to liquid methanol.

  19. Raman study on methanol partial oxidation and oxidative steam reforming over copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudelski, Andrzej; Pettinger, Bruno

    2004-09-01

    In situ Raman spectra of copper surfaces during the catalytic partial oxidation of methanol and methanol oxidative steam reforming have been measured and analysed. Raman measurements reveal that if methanol is present in the surrounding gas phase the ratio of quantities of CuO and Cu 2O at the surface of the catalysts decreases at lower temperature. From changes in relative intensity of the band at about 220 cm -1, which is symmetry forbidden and is interpreted as an indicator of poor crystallinity and non-stoichiometry of Cu 2O, we noticed that the defect density in crystal lattices of Cu 2O at the surfaces of catalysts is significantly different for various reaction conditions. Methoxy species were detected as intermediates via characteristic ν(C-O) Raman band at 1070 cm -1.

  20. Kinetics of methanol-steam reformation in an internal reforming fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samms, S. R.; Savinell, R. F.

    A study of the kinetics of the methanol-steam reformation reaction within an idealized tube reactor and within a non-ideal internal reforming fuel cell (IRFC) was performed. Kinetic expressions were calculated from the reaction rate data obtained from the tube reactor by least squares fitting to general power law model, as well as to a mechanism-based model put forth by Peppley et al. [Appl. Catal. A 179 (1999) 21; Appl. Catal. A 179 (1999) 31] assuming isothermal plug flow behavior. Reaction rate data obtained from an IRFC with and without an H 3PO 4 containing membrane electrode assembly (MEA) was compared to the reaction rates predicted by the kinetic model. It was found that methanol conversion rates in the IRFC were significantly less than would be for an ideal plug flow reactor (PFR) with an equal amount of catalyst due to the non-ideal flow through the reactor bed. However, despite the non-ideal flow caused by the design compromises inherent in an IRFC and the resulting drop in effective catalyst activity, it was projected that for fuel cell systems with a current density greater than 400 mA cm -2, the IRFC would require less catalyst mass than a traditional system with external reformer. This is the result of an experimentally verified accelerated methanol conversion rate in the IRFC caused by the extraction of H 2 from the reforming reactor bed. Long-term stability of the IRFC due to acid leaching still needs to be addressed. Additionally, the extraction of H 2 from the reformer bed, which occurs in the IRFC, introduces concerns of failure due to coking.

  1. Experimental Study on a Compact Methanol Steam Reformer with Pd/Ag Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Hasan Mohd; Kuwabara, Masato; Kizu, Ryo; Yokomori, Takeshi; Ueda, Toshihisa

    The performance of high purity hydrogen production from methanol for a compact steam reformer with a hydrogen purification membrane was investigated experimentally. A 77 wt.% Pd/23 wt.% Ag membrane with 25µm thickness and CuO/ZnO/ Al2O3 catalyst were used. Heating was performed by a Bunsen type burner using City Gas 13A. The methanol reforming and purification of H2 were investigated at different reference catalyst zone temperatures (589-689K), pressures at the retentate side (0.2-0.5MPa), steam to methanol(S/C) ratios (0.8-1.6) and reactant flow rates (1.7 ×10-4 to 4.4×10-4 mol/s). The results show that at high reference temperature, high pressure and certain points of the reactant flow rate, the maximum hydrogen permeation rate is obtained when the S/C ratio is around 1. The modified Sieverts’ equation which considers the decrease in H2 concentration at the membrane surface, was proposed. The experimental result was lower than the permeation rate estimated by the modified Sieverts’ equation, which is probably caused by the adsorption of non-H2 species during permeation. It is further demonstrated that the modified Sieverts’ equation is able to estimate a more reasonable hydrogen permeation rate in comparison to the estimation by the ordinary Sieverts’ equation. In addition, it is shown that the compact methanol steam reformer with a Pd/Ag membrane is able to produce high purity hydrogen with very low CO concentration, which fulfills the Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) requirement (<10ppm).

  2. Zircon Supported Copper Catalysts for the Steam Reforming of Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiastri, M.; Fendy, Marsih, I. N.

    2008-03-01

    Steam reforming of methanol (SRM) is known as one of the most favorable catalytic processes for producing hydrogen. Current research on zirconia, ZrO2 supported copper catalyst revealed that CuO/ZrO2 as an active catalyst for the SRM. Zircon, ZrSiO4 is available from the by-product of tin mining. In the work presented here, the catalytic properties of CuO/ZrSiO4 with various copper oxide compositions ranging from 2.70% (catalyst I), 4.12% (catalyst II), and 7.12%-mass (catalyst III), synthesized by an incipient wetness impregnation technique, were investigated to methanol conversion, selectivity towards CO formation, and effect of ZnO addition (7.83%CuO/8.01%ZnO/ZrSiO4 = catalyst V). The catalytic activity was obtained using a fixed bed reactor and the zircon supported catalyst activity was compared to those of CuO/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst (catalyst IV) and commercial Kujang LTSC catalyst. An X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis was done to identify the abundant phases of the catalysts. The catalysts topography and particle diameter were measured with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and composition of the catalysts was measured by SEM-EDX, scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive using X-ray analysis. The results of this research provide information on the possibility of using zircon (ZrSiO4) as solid support for SRM catalysts.

  3. A passively-fed methanol steam reformer heated with two-stage bi-fueled catalytic combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Kai-Fan; Wong, Shwin-Chung

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents further progress on our simple novel passively-fed methanol steam reformer. The present study focuses on the development of a catalytic combustor workable with both hydrogen and methanol fuels. The aim is to reutilize the exhaust hydrogen from a fuel cell under stable operation but burn methanol during the start-up. On a copper plate, the catalytic combustor in a u-turn channel is integrally machined under a two-turn serpentine-channel reformer. To resolve the highly different fuel reactivities, a suitably diluted catalyst formula demonstrates uniform temperature distributions burning with either liquid methanol or an H2/CO2 mixture simulating the exhaust gas from a fuel cell. In a two-stage process, it first takes 25 min to reach 270 °C by burning methanol. After the fuel is switched to the H2/CO2 mixture, another 20 min is needed to attain an optimal steady state which yields a high methanol conversion of 95% and acceptably low CO fraction of 1.04% at a reaction temperature of 278 °C. The H2 and CO2 concentrations are 75.1% and 23.6%.

  4. Controller design and experiment for autothermal reforming of methanol in miniature reactor.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiangang; Zhuang, Hong; Yang, Qinmin; Wang, Xuefei; Zheng, Jianfeng; Chen, Jinshui; Sun, Youxian

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a miniature methanol fuel processor and its controller design is introduced for onboard hydrogen production. The hydrogen is generated via autothermal reforming of methanol. The control scheme consists of a hydrogen flow rate controller and a reforming temperature controller. To deal with uncertain system dynamics and external disturbance, an adaptive sliding mode control algorithm is adopted as the hydrogen flow rate controller for regulating hydrogen flow rate by manipulating methanol flow rate. Additionally, a high-gain observer is implemented to estimate the unmeasurable system state. The stability of closed-loop system is guaranteed by standard Lyapunov analysis. Furthermore, a variable ratio control law is employed as the reforming temperature controller to achieve steady reforming temperature by adjusting the reforming air flow rate. Finally, the effectiveness of the entire system is testified by experimental means.

  5. Activation of catalysts for synthesizing methanol from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David B.; Gelbein, Abraham P.

    1985-01-01

    A method for activating a methanol synthesis catalyst is disclosed. In this method, the catalyst is slurried in an inert liquid and is activated by a reducing gas stream. The activation step occurs in-situ. That is, it is conducted in the same reactor as is the subsequent step of synthesizing methanol from a methanol gas stream catalyzed by the activated catalyst still dispersed in a slurry.

  6. Liquefaction of natural gas to methanol for shipping and storage

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hare, T.E.; Sapienza, R.S.; Mahajan, D.; Skaperdas, G.T.

    1986-07-01

    The penetration of natural gas into distant markets can be substantially increased by a new methanol synthesis process under development at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The new methanol process is made possible by the discovery of a catalyst that drops synthesis temperatures from about 275/sup 0/C to about 100/sup 0/C. The new low temperature liquid catalyst can convert synthesis gas completely to methanol in a single pass through the methanol synthesis reactor. This characteristic leads to a further major improvement in the methanol plant. As a result of process design factors made possible by the BNL catalyst, the plant required to convert natural gas to methanol is very simple. Conversion of natural gas to methanol requires two chemical reactions, both of which are exothermic, and thus represent a loss of heating value in the feed natural gas. This loss is about 20% of the feed gas energy, and is, therefore, higher than the 10% loss in energy in natural gas liquefaction, which is a simpler physical - not a chemical - change. The energy disadvantage of the methanol option must be balanced against the advantage of a much lower capital investment requirement made possible by the new BNL synthesis. Preliminary estimates show that methanol conversion and shipping require an investment for liquefaction to methanol, and shipping liquefied methanol that can range from 35 to 50% of the capital needed for the LNG plant and LNG tanker fleet. This large reduction in capital requirements is expected to make liquefaction to methanol attractive in many cases where the LNG capital needs are prohibitive. 3 tabs.

  7. In situ XPS study of methanol reforming on PdGa near-surface intermetallic phases

    PubMed Central

    Rameshan, Christoph; Stadlmayr, Werner; Penner, Simon; Lorenz, Harald; Mayr, Lukas; Hävecker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Rocha, Tulio; Teschner, Detre; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Memmel, Norbert; Klötzer, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy ion scattering were used to study the preparation, (thermo)chemical and catalytic properties of 1:1 PdGa intermetallic near-surface phases. Deposition of several multilayers of Ga metal and subsequent annealing to 503–523 K led to the formation of a multi-layered 1:1 PdGa near-surface state without desorption of excess Ga to the gas phase. In general, the composition of the PdGa model system is much more variable than that of its PdZn counterpart, which results in gradual changes of the near-surface composition with increasing annealing or reaction temperature. In contrast to near-surface PdZn, in methanol steam reforming, no temperature region with pronounced CO2 selectivity was observed, which is due to the inability of purely intermetallic PdGa to efficiently activate water. This allows to pinpoint the water-activating role of the intermetallic/support interface and/or of the oxide support in the related supported PdxGa/Ga2O3 systems, which exhibit high CO2 selectivity in a broad temperature range. In contrast, corresponding experiments starting on the purely bimetallic model surface in oxidative methanol reforming yielded high CO2 selectivity already at low temperatures (∼460 K), which is due to efficient O2 activation on PdGa. In situ detected partial and reversible oxidative Ga segregation on intermetallic PdGa is associated with total oxidation of intermediate C1 oxygenates to CO2. PMID:22875996

  8. Non-syngas direct steam reforming of methanol to hydrogen and carbon dioxide at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai Man Kerry; Tong, Weiyi; West, Adam; Cheung, Kevin; Li, Tong; Smith, George; Guo, Yanglong; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2012-01-01

    A non-syngas direct steam reforming route is investigated for the conversion of methanol to hydrogen and carbon dioxide over a CuZnGaO(x) catalyst at 150-200 °C. This route is in marked contrast with the conventional complex route involving steam reformation to syngas (CO/H2) at high temperature, followed by water gas shift and CO cleanup stages for hydrogen production. Here we report that high quality hydrogen and carbon dioxide can be produced in a single-step reaction over the catalyst, with no detectable CO (below detection limit of 1 ppm). This can be used to supply proton exchange membrane fuel cells for mobile applications without invoking any CO shift and cleanup stages. The working catalyst contains, on average, 3-4 nm copper particles, alongside extremely small size of copper clusters stabilized on a defective ZnGa2O4 spinel oxide surface, providing hydrogen productivity of 393.6 ml g(-1)-cat h(-1) at 150 °C. PMID:23187630

  9. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Erickson

    2005-04-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the sixth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1-March 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in four areas. These areas are: (1) Autothermal reforming of coal derived methanol, (2) Catalyst deactivation, (3) Steam reformer transient response, and (4) Catalyst degradation with bluff bodies. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

  10. Performance evaluation of a proof-of-concept 70 W internal reforming methanol fuel cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgouropoulos, G.; Schlicker, S.; Schelhaas, K.-P.; Papavasiliou, J.; Papadimitriou, K. D.; Theodorakopoulou, E.; Gourdoupi, N.; Machocki, A.; Ioannides, T.; Kallitsis, J. K.; Kolb, G.; Neophytides, S.

    2016-03-01

    A proof-of-concept 70 W Internal Reforming Methanol Fuel Cell (IRMFC) stack including Balance-of-Plant (BoP) was designed, assembled and tested. Advent TPS® high-temperature, polymer electrolyte membrane electrode assemblies were employed for fuel cell operation at 200 °C. In order to avoid phosphoric acid poisoning of the reformer, the anode electrocatalyst of each cell was indirectly adjoined, via a separation plate, to a highly active CuMnAlOx catalyst coated onto copper foam, which served as methanol reforming layer. The reformer was in-situ converting the methanol/steam feed to the required hydrogen (internal reforming concept) at 200 °C, which was readily oxidized at the anode electrodes. The operation of the IRMFC was supported through a number of BoP components consisting of a start-up subsystem (air blower, evaporator and monolithic burner), a combined afterburner/evaporator device, methanol/water supply and data acquisition units (reactants/products analysis, temperature control, flow control, system load/output control). Depending on the composition of the liquid MeOH/H2O feed streams, current densities up to 0.18 A cm-2 and power output up to 70 W could be obtained with remarkable repeatability. Specific targets for improvement of the efficiency were identified.

  11. A Methanol Steam Reforming Micro Reactor for Proton Exchange Membrane Micro Fuel Cell System

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H G; Piggott, W T; Chung, J; Morse, J D; Havstad, M; Grigoropoulos, C P; Greif, R; Benett, W; Sopchak, D; Upadhye, R

    2003-07-28

    The heat, mass and momentum transfer from a fuel reforming packed bed to a surrounding silicon wafer has been simulated. Modeling showed quantitatively reasonable agreement with experimental data for fuel conversion efficiency, hydrogen production rate, outlet methanol mole fraction and outlet steam mole fraction. The variation in fuel conversion efficiency with the micro reformer thermal isolation can be used to optimize fuel-processing conditions for micro PEM fuel cells.

  12. Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Erickson

    2004-09-30

    Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the fourth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of July 1-Sept 30, 2004 along with a recap of progress from the start of the project on Oct 1, 2003 to Sept 30, 2004. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule. This year saw progress in several areas. These areas are: (1) External and internal evaluation of coal based methanol and a fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design set up and initial testing of three laboratory scale steam reformers, (3) Design, set up and initial testing of a laboratory scale autothermal reactor, (4) Hydrogen generation from coal-derived methanol using steam reformation, (5) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (6) Initial catalyst degradation studies with steam reformation and coal based methanol, and (7) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

  13. Autothermal Reforming of Natural Gas to Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Steven F. Rice; David P. Mann

    2007-04-13

    This Project Final Report serves to document the project structure and technical results achieved during the 3-year project titled Advanced Autothermal Reformer for US Dept of Energy Office of Industrial Technology. The project was initiated in December 2001 and was completed March 2005. It was a joint effort between Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, CA), Kellogg Brown & Root LLC (KBR) (Houston, TX) and Süd-Chemie (Louisville, KY). The purpose of the project was to develop an experimental capability that could be used to examine the propensity for soot production in an Autothermal Reformer (ATR) during the production of hydrogen-carbon monoxide synthesis gas intended for Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) applications including ammonia, methanol, and higher hydrocarbons. The project consisted of an initial phase that was focused on developing a laboratory-scale ATR capable of reproducing conditions very similar to a plant scale unit. Due to budget constraints this effort was stopped at the advanced design stages, yielding a careful and detailed design for such a system including ATR vessel design, design of ancillary feed and let down units as well as a PI&D for laboratory installation. The experimental effort was then focused on a series of measurements to evaluate rich, high-pressure burner behavior at pressures as high as 500 psi. The soot formation measurements were based on laser attenuation at a view port downstream of the burner. The results of these experiments and accompanying calculations show that soot formation is primarily dependent on oxidation stoichiometry. However, steam to carbon ratio was found to impact soot production as well as burner stability. The data also showed that raising the operating pressure while holding mass flow rates constant results in considerable soot formation at desirable feed ratios. Elementary reaction modeling designed to illuminate the role of CO2 in the burner feed showed that the conditions in the burner allow for the direct

  14. An introduction of CO₂ conversion by dry reforming with methane and new route of low-temperature methanol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Guohui; Tao, Kai; Yoneyama, Yoshiharu; Tan, Yisheng; Tsubaki, Noritatsu

    2013-08-20

    Carbon dioxide is one of the highest contributors to the greenhouse effect, as well as a cheap and nontoxic building block for single carbon source chemistry. As such, CO₂ conversion is one of most important research areas in energy and environment sciences, as well as in catalysis technology. For chemical conversion of CO₂, natural gas (mainly CH₄) is a promising counterpart molecule to the CO₂-related reaction, due to its high availability and low price. More importantly, being able to convert CH₄ to useful fuels and molecules is advantageous, because it is also a kind of "greenhouse effect" gas, and can be an energy alternative to petroleum oil. In this Account, we discuss our development of efficient catalysts with precisely designed nanostructure for CO₂ reforming of CH₄ to produce syngas (mixture of CO and H₂), which can then be converted to many chemicals and energy products. This new production flow can establish a GTL (gas-to-liquid) industry, being currently pushed by the shale gas revolution. From the viewpoint of GTL industry, developing a catalyst for CO₂ reforming of CH₄ is a challenge, because they need a very high production rate to make the huge GTL methane reformer as small as possible. In addition, since both CO₂ and CH₄ give off carbon deposits that deactivate non-precious metallic catalysts very quickly, the total design of catalyst support and supported metallic nanoparticles is necessary. We present a simple but useful method to prepare bimodal catalyst support, where small pores are formed inside large ones during the self-organization of nanoparticles from solution. Large pores enhance the mass transfer rate, while small pores provide large surface areas to disperse active metallic nanoparticles. More importantly, building materials for small pores can also be used as promoters or cocatalysts to further enhance the total activity and stability. Produced syngas from methane reforming is generally catalytically

  15. Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Erickson

    2005-06-30

    Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the seventh report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in these areas. These areas are: (1) Steam reformer transient response, (2) Heat transfer enhancement, (3) Catalyst degradation, (4) Catalyst degradation with bluff bodies, and (5) Autothermal reforming of coal-derived methanol. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

  16. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Erickson

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the ninth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of October 1, 2005-December 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in four areas. These areas are: (1) reformate purification, (2) heat transfer enhancement, (3) autothermal reforming coal-derived methanol degradation test; and (4) model development for fuel cell system integration. The project is on schedule and is now shifting towards the design of an integrated PEM fuel cell system capable of using the coal-derived product. This system includes a membrane clean up unit and a commercially available PEM fuel cell.

  17. Process conditions for preparing methanol from cornstalk gas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling-Feng; Du, Lei; Li, Xin-Bao; Li, Guo-Ting; Zhang, Jie

    2007-01-01

    The low-heat-value cornstalk gas produced in the down-flow fixed bed gasifier was tentatively used for methanol synthesis. The cornstalk gas was purified and the technical procedures such as deoxygenation, desulfurization, catalytic cracking of tar, purification and hydrogenation were studied. The catalytic experiments of methanol synthesis with cornstalk syngas were carried out in a tubular-flow integral and isothermal reactor. The effect of reaction temperature, pressure, catalyst types, catalyst particle size, syngas flow at entering end and composition of syngas was investigated. The optimum process conditions and yield of methanol from cornstalk syngas were obtained. The experimental results indicated that the proper catalyst for the synthetic reaction was C301 and the optimum catalyst size was 0.833 mm x 0.351 mm. The optimum operating temperature and pressure were found to be 235 degrees C and 5 MPa, respectively. The suitable syngas flow 0.9-1.10 mol/h at entering end was selected and the best composition of syngas were CO 10.49%, CO2 8.8%, N2 37.32%, C(n)H(m) 0.95% and H2 40.49%. The best methanol yield was 0.418 g/g cornstalk. This study provided the technical support for the industrial test of methanol production from biomass (cornstalk) gas.

  18. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Erickson

    2004-04-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the second report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1--March 31, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) Internal and external evaluations of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel; (2) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation; (3) Design and set up of the autothermal reactor; (4) Steam reformation of Coal Based Methanol; and (5) Initial catalyst degradation studies. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

  19. Hynol: An economic process for methanol production from biomass and natural gas with reduced CO2 emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, M.; Dong, Yuanji

    1993-10-01

    The Hynol process is proposed to meet the demand for an economical process for methanol production with reduced CO2 emission. This new process consists of three reaction steps: (1) hydrogasification of biomass, (2) steam reforming of the produced gas with additional natural gas feedstock, and (3) methanol synthesis of the hydrogen and carbon monoxide produced during the previous two steps. The H2-rich gas remaining after methanol synthesis is recycled to gasify the biomass in an energy neutral reactor so that there is no need for an expensive oxygen plant as required by commercial steam gasifiers. Recycling gas allows the methanol synthesis reactor to perform at a relatively lower pressure than conventional while the plant still maintains high methanol yield. Energy recovery designed into the process minimizes heat loss and increases the process thermal efficiency. If the Hynol methanol is used as an alternative and more efficient automotive fuel, an overall 41% reduction in CO2 emission can be achieved compared to the use of conventional gasoline fuel. A preliminary economic estimate shows that the total capital investment for a Hynol plant is 40% lower than that for a conventional biomass gasification plant. The methanol production cost is $0.43/gal for a 1085 million gal/yr Hynol plant which is competitive with current U.S. methanol and equivalent gasoline prices. Process flowsheet and simulation data using biomass and natural gas as cofeedstocks are presented. The Hynol process can convert any condensed carbonaceous material, especially municipal solid waste (MSW), to produce methanol.

  20. Characteristics of hydrogen produced by partial oxidation and auto-thermal reforming in a small methanol reformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horng, Rong-Fang; Chou, Huann-Ming; Lee, Chiou-Hwang; Tsai, Hsien-Te

    This paper investigates experimentally, the transient characteristics of a small methanol reformer using partial oxidation (POX) and auto-thermal reforming (ATR) for fuel cell applications. The parameters varied were heating temperature, methanol supply rate, steady mode shifting temperature, O 2/C (O 2/CH 3OH) and S/C (H 2O/CH 3OH) molar ratios with the main aim of promoting a rapid response and a high flow rate of hydrogen. The experiments showed that a high steady mode shifting temperature resulted in a faster temperature rise at the catalyst outlet and vice versa and that a low steady mode shifting temperature resulted in a lower final hydrogen concentration. However, when the mode shifting temperature was too high, the hydrogen production response was not necessarily improved. It was subsequently shown that the optimum steady mode shifting temperature for this experimental set-up was approximately 75 °C. Further, the hydrogen concentration produced by the auto-thermal process was as high as 49.12% and the volume flow rate up to 23.0 L min -1 compared to 40.0% and 20.5 L min -1 produced by partial oxidation.

  1. CO(2)-selective methanol steam reforming on In-doped Pd studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rameshan, Christoph; Lorenz, Harald; Mayr, Lukas; Penner, Simon; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Arrigo, Rosa; Haevecker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert; Klötzer, Bernhard

    2012-11-01

    In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (in situ XPS) was used to study the structural and catalytic properties of Pd-In near-surface intermetallic phases in correlation with previously studied PdZn and PdGa.Room temperature deposition of ∼4 monolayer equivalents (MLEs) of In metal on Pd foil and subsequent annealing to 453 K in vacuum yields a ∼1:1 Pd/In near-surface multilayer intermetallic phase. This Pd(1)In(1) phase exhibits a similar "Cu-like" electronic structure and indium depth distribution as its methanol steam reforming (MSR)-selective multilayer Pd(1)Zn(1) counterpart.Catalytic characterization of the multilayer Pd(1)In(1) phase in MSR yielded a CO(2)-selectivity of almost 100% between 493 and 550 K. In contrast to previously studied In(2)O(3)-supported PdIn nanoparticles and pure In(2)O(3), intermediate formaldehyde is only partially converted to CO(2) using this Pd(1)In(1) phase. Strongly correlated with PdZn, on an In-diluted PdIn intermetallic phase with "Pd-like" electronic structure, prepared by thermal annealing at 623 K, methanol steam reforming is suppressed and enhanced CO formation via full methanol dehydrogenation is observed.To achieve CO(2)-TOF values on the isolated Pd(1)In(1) intermetallic phase as high as on supported PdIn/In(2)O(3), at least 593 K reaction temperature is required. A bimetal-oxide synergism, with both bimetallic and oxide synergistically contributing to the observed catalytic activity and selectivity, manifests itself by accelerated formaldehyde-to-CO(2) conversion at markedly lowered temperatures as compared to separate oxide and bimetal. Combination of suppression of full methanol dehydrogenation to CO on Pd(1)In(1) inhibited inverse water-gas-shift reaction on In(2)O(3) and fast water activation/conversion of formaldehyde is the key to the low-temperature activity and high CO(2)-selectivity of the supported catalyst. PMID:23226689

  2. CO2-selective methanol steam reforming on In-doped Pd studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rameshan, Christoph; Lorenz, Harald; Mayr, Lukas; Penner, Simon; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Arrigo, Rosa; Haevecker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert; Klötzer, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (in situ XPS) was used to study the structural and catalytic properties of Pd–In near-surface intermetallic phases in correlation with previously studied PdZn and PdGa. Room temperature deposition of ∼4 monolayer equivalents (MLEs) of In metal on Pd foil and subsequent annealing to 453 K in vacuum yields a ∼1:1 Pd/In near-surface multilayer intermetallic phase. This Pd1In1 phase exhibits a similar “Cu-like” electronic structure and indium depth distribution as its methanol steam reforming (MSR)-selective multilayer Pd1Zn1 counterpart. Catalytic characterization of the multilayer Pd1In1 phase in MSR yielded a CO2-selectivity of almost 100% between 493 and 550 K. In contrast to previously studied In2O3-supported PdIn nanoparticles and pure In2O3, intermediate formaldehyde is only partially converted to CO2 using this Pd1In1 phase. Strongly correlated with PdZn, on an In-diluted PdIn intermetallic phase with “Pd-like” electronic structure, prepared by thermal annealing at 623 K, methanol steam reforming is suppressed and enhanced CO formation via full methanol dehydrogenation is observed. To achieve CO2-TOF values on the isolated Pd1In1 intermetallic phase as high as on supported PdIn/In2O3, at least 593 K reaction temperature is required. A bimetal-oxide synergism, with both bimetallic and oxide synergistically contributing to the observed catalytic activity and selectivity, manifests itself by accelerated formaldehyde-to-CO2 conversion at markedly lowered temperatures as compared to separate oxide and bimetal. Combination of suppression of full methanol dehydrogenation to CO on Pd1In1 inhibited inverse water–gas-shift reaction on In2O3 and fast water activation/conversion of formaldehyde is the key to the low-temperature activity and high CO2-selectivity of the supported catalyst. PMID:23226689

  3. Methanol gas-treating scheme offers economics, versatility

    SciTech Connect

    Minkkinen, A.; Larue, J.Y. ); Patel, S. ); Levier, J.F. )

    1992-06-01

    This paper reports on a process that has been developed by Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP) to treat natural-gas using methanol as a single, basic solvent to dehydrate, control dew point, recover hydrocarbon liquids, and sweeten produced gas. The impetus for IFP's research and developmental efforts which began in 1986 was to integrate the functional process steps - dehydration, NGL extraction, and acid-gas removal - into a compact solvent process with which water, NGL, and acid gases could be extracted with only a single solvent. Pilot testing and detailed evaluation of Ifpexol with competitive technologies indicated that it exhibits low thermal-energy requirements, has no vent emissions, and allows recovery of process water. Petro-Canada has agreed to collaborate with IFP by installing the first industrial application at its East Gilby gas plant in Alberta.

  4. Where does methanol lose hydrogen to trigger steam reforming? A revisit of methanol dehydrogenation on the PdZn alloy model obtained from kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feng; Chen, Zhao-Xu

    2016-02-01

    Pd/ZnO is a promising catalyst studied for methanol steam reforming (MSR) and the 1 : 1 PdZn alloy is demonstrated to be the active component. It is believed that MSR starts from methanol dehydrogenation to methoxy. Previous studies of methanol dehydrogenation on the ideal PdZn(111) surface show that methanol adsorbs weakly on the PdZn(111) surface and it is hard for methanol to transform into methoxy because of the high dehydrogenation barrier, indicating that the catalyst model is not appropriate for investigating the first step of MSR. Using the model derived from our recent kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we examined the process CH3OH → CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO. Compared with the ideal model, methanol adsorbs much more strongly and the barrier from CH3OH → CH3O is much lower on the kMC model. On the other hand, the C-H bond breaking of CH3O, CH2O and CHO becomes harder. We show that co-adsorbed water is important for refreshing the active sites. The present study shows that the first MSR step most likely takes place on three-fold hollow sites formed by Zn atoms, and the inhomogeneity of the PdZn alloy may exert significant influences on reactions. PMID:26771029

  5. Where does methanol lose hydrogen to trigger steam reforming? A revisit of methanol dehydrogenation on the PdZn alloy model obtained from kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feng; Chen, Zhao-Xu

    2016-02-01

    Pd/ZnO is a promising catalyst studied for methanol steam reforming (MSR) and the 1 : 1 PdZn alloy is demonstrated to be the active component. It is believed that MSR starts from methanol dehydrogenation to methoxy. Previous studies of methanol dehydrogenation on the ideal PdZn(111) surface show that methanol adsorbs weakly on the PdZn(111) surface and it is hard for methanol to transform into methoxy because of the high dehydrogenation barrier, indicating that the catalyst model is not appropriate for investigating the first step of MSR. Using the model derived from our recent kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we examined the process CH3OH → CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO. Compared with the ideal model, methanol adsorbs much more strongly and the barrier from CH3OH → CH3O is much lower on the kMC model. On the other hand, the C-H bond breaking of CH3O, CH2O and CHO becomes harder. We show that co-adsorbed water is important for refreshing the active sites. The present study shows that the first MSR step most likely takes place on three-fold hollow sites formed by Zn atoms, and the inhomogeneity of the PdZn alloy may exert significant influences on reactions.

  6. Methanol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methanol ; CASRN 67 - 56 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  7. Viewpoint: methanol poisoning outbreak in Libya: a need for policy reforms.

    PubMed

    Taleb, Ziyad Ben; Bahelah, Raed

    2014-11-01

    We address the controversies surrounding a 2013 outbreak of methanol poisoning in Tripoli, Libya. We critically examine and systematically analyze the outbreak to highlight the lessons learned from this disaster and how to act properly to prevent similar outbreaks in future. Many health problems have been directly attributed to drinking alcohol; the type and quality of alcohol determines the detrimental effects. An unregulated and flourishing black market in alcohol is among the factors behind the Libyan tragedy, where approximately 90 deaths and about 1000 hospital admissions were reported. We reviewed gaps in local and regional alcohol policy, and highlighted the issue of illegally produced and home-made alcohol. Collaboration between countries in the region plus critical health and policy reforms in Libya, with emphasis on public health preparedness, can dramatically decrease morbidity and mortality associated with such outbreaks.

  8. Cu-Al spinel oxide as an efficient catalyst for methanol steam reforming.

    PubMed

    Xi, Hongjuan; Hou, Xiaoning; Liu, Yajie; Qing, Shaojun; Gao, Zhixian

    2014-10-27

    Cu-Al spinel oxide, which contains a small portion of the CuO phase, has been successfully used in methanol steam reforming (MSR) without prereduction. The omission of prereduction not only avoids the copper sintering prior to the catalytic reaction, but also slows down the copper-sintering rate in MSR. During this process, the CuO phase can initiate MSR at a lower temperature, and CuAl2O4 releases active copper gradually. The catalyst CA2.5-900, calcined at 900 °C with n(Al)/n(Cu) = 2.5, has a higher CuAl2O4 content, higher BET surface area, and smaller CuAl2O4 crystal size. Its activity first increases and then decreases during MSR. Furthermore, both fresh and regenerated CA2.5-900 showed better catalytic performance than the commercial Cu-Zn-Al catalyst. PMID:25213737

  9. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Erickson

    2004-04-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the first such report that will be submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of October 1--December 31, 2003. This quarter saw progress in three areas. These areas are: (1) Evaluations of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design and set up of the autothermal reactor, as well as (3) Set up and data collection of baseline performance using the steam reformer. All of the projects are proceeding on schedule. During this quarter one conference paper was written that will be presented at the ASME Power 2004 conference in March 2004, which outlines the research direction and basis for looking at the coal to hydrogen pathway.

  10. Steam reforming of methanol over copper loaded anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) prepared through electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linga Reddy, E.; Karuppiah, J.; Lee, Hyun Chan; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2014-12-01

    In order to study the steam reforming of methanol (SRM) to produce hydrogen for fuel cells, porous γ-alumina support is developed on Al substrate using anodic oxidation process and copper catalyst particles are deposited homogeneously over anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) surface by electrodeposition method. We investigated the effect of electrodeposition time and hot water treatment (HWT) on the activity of catalysts for SRM reaction in the temperature range between 160 and 360 °C. The experimental results indicate that the SRM activity, CO2 and dimethyl ether (DME) selectivity's over Cu catalysts increased as the electrodeposition time increased from 30 to 120 s, further increment in deposition time of Cu have no significant effect on it. The rates of SRM conversion are found to be higher for the catalysts made from the supports obtained after HWT, which may be due to the enhancement in the surface area of AAO support. It is found that the SRM activity and CO2 selectivity strongly depended upon the free exposed copper sites available for methanol adsorption and reaction, and DME in products is mainly observed in the reaction temperature range between 300 and 350 °C and it is higher for the catalysts with low Cu content.

  11. Methanol production with elemental phosphorus byproduct gas: technical and economic feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of using a typical, elemental, phosphorus byproduct gas stream in methanol production is assessed. The purpose of the study is to explore the potential of a substitute for natural gas. The first part of the study establishes economic tradeoffs between several alternative methods of supplying the hydrogen which is needed in the methanol synthesis process to react with CO from the off gas. The preferred alternative is the Battelle Process, which uses natural gas in combination with the off gas in an economically sized methanol plant. The second part of the study presents a preliminary basic design of a plant to (1) clean and compress the off gas, (2) return recovered phosphorus to the phosphorus plant, and (3) produce methanol by the Battelle Process. Use of elemental phosphorus byproduct gas in methanol production appears to be technically feasible. The Battelle Process shows a definite but relatively small economic advantage over conventional methanol manufacture based on natural gas alone. The process would be economically feasible only where natural gas supply and methanol market conditions at a phosphorus plant are not significantly less favorable than at competing methanol plants. If off-gas streams from two or more phosphorus plants could be combined, production of methanol using only offgas might also be economically feasible. The North American methanol market, however, does not seem likely to require another new methanol project until after 1990. The off-gas cleanup, compression, and phosphorus-recovery system could be used to produce a CO-rich stream that could be economically attractive for production of several other chemicals besides methanol.

  12. Activity and stability enhancement of copper-alumina catalysts using cerium and zinc promoters for the selective production of hydrogen via steam reforming of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Sanjay; Pant, K. K.

    The catalytic activity and hydrogen selectivity of cerium and zinc promoted copper-alumina catalysts have been investigated for the selective production of hydrogen via steam reforming of methanol (SRM). The SRM was carried out in a fixed bed tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure over a temperature range 200-300 °C. The major reaction products were hydrogen and carbon dioxide with traces of carbon monoxide. Catalysts of varying compositions were prepared by the wet impregnation method and characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), BET surface area, pore volume, pore size, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). Results revealed that the methanol conversion, hydrogen selectivity and carbon monoxide formation varied with the type of promoter and content of copper in the catalyst. Cerium promoted Cu-Zn-Ce-Al-oxide catalysts improved the activity and hydrogen selectivity greatly and also kept the CO formation very low. Using cerium the SRM could be carried out at lower temperature with high methanol conversion, results in suppression of methanol decomposition and reverse water gas shift reactions eventually end-up with the low carbon monoxide and hydrogen rich product stream. Cerium also stabilizes the copper-alumina catalysts effectively that was confirmed by deactivation studies in which cerium promoted Cu-Zn-Ce-Al-oxide catalysts gave the consistent performance for a long run-time compared to catalysts containing only zinc promoter. The optimum operating conditions for SRM have been investigated by detailed study of effects of reaction temperature, contact time and steam to methanol molar ratio on methanol conversion, hydrogen selectivity and CO formation. Reaction pathway has been proposed for the SRM based on results obtained.

  13. Twenty kW fuel cell units of compact design. Part 5: Hydrogen production by steam reforming of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grave, B.

    1980-09-01

    To assess its potential use in alkaline fuel cells, The production of hydrogen by steam reforming of methanol was studied analytically and experimentally. The reformer, the converter, and the purification system of a prototype installation were designed and the optimal operation parameters derived and experimentally confirmed. For comparison, hydrogen production by ammonia cracking was also studied. An estimate of the manufacturing costs for a fuel cell aggregate of 20 kW indicates economical operation only to be possible at very high duty cycles. As a result the project was terminated.

  14. Methanol Steam Reforming Promoted by Molten Salt-Modified Platinum on Alumina Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Kusche, Matthias; Agel, Friederike; Ní Bhriain, Nollaig; Kaftan, Andre; Laurin, Mathias; Libuda, Jörg; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We herein describe a straight forward procedure to increase the performance of platinum-on-alumina catalysts in methanol steam reforming by applying an alkali hydroxide coating according to the “solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer” (SCILL) approach. We demonstrate by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) studies that potassium doping plays an important role in the catalyst activation. Moreover, the hygroscopic nature and the basicity of the salt modification contribute to the considerable enhancement in catalytic performance. During reaction, a partly liquid film of alkali hydroxides/carbonates forms on the catalyst/alumina surface, thus significantly enhancing the availability of water at the catalytically active sites. Too high catalyst pore fillings with salt introduce a considerable mass transfer barrier into the system as indicated by kinetic studies. Thus, the optimum interplay between beneficial catalyst modification and detrimental mass transfer effects had to be identified and was found on the applied platinum-on-alumina catalyst at KOH loadings around 7.5 mass %. PMID:25124120

  15. Methanol steam reforming promoted by molten salt-modified platinum on alumina catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kusche, Matthias; Agel, Friederike; Ní Bhriain, Nollaig; Kaftan, Andre; Laurin, Mathias; Libuda, Jörg; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2014-09-01

    We herein describe a straight forward procedure to increase the performance of platinum-on-alumina catalysts in methanol steam reforming by applying an alkali hydroxide coating according to the "solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer" (SCILL) approach. We demonstrate by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) studies that potassium doping plays an important role in the catalyst activation. Moreover, the hygroscopic nature and the basicity of the salt modification contribute to the considerable enhancement in catalytic performance. During reaction, a partly liquid film of alkali hydroxides/carbonates forms on the catalyst/alumina surface, thus significantly enhancing the availability of water at the catalytically active sites. Too high catalyst pore fillings with salt introduce a considerable mass transfer barrier into the system as indicated by kinetic studies. Thus, the optimum interplay between beneficial catalyst modification and detrimental mass transfer effects had to be identified and was found on the applied platinum-on-alumina catalyst at KOH loadings around 7.5 mass%.

  16. Durable Cu composite catalyst for hydrogen production by high temperature methanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Yasuyuki

    2014-12-01

    Durable catalysts are necessitated for the high temperature methanol steam reforming in compact hydrogen processors. The high durability at 400 °C can be obtained with a composite Cu catalyst where a small amount of Cu-ZnO-ZrO2-Y2O3-In2O3 is coprecipitated on a zirconia support. The lifetime of the composite catalyst containing 3 wt.% Cu is estimated to be as long as 53 × 102 h at 400 °C to produce the full conversion at a contact time of 250 g h m-3. The deactivation rate empirically relates to the cube of the activity. The gradual deactivation is caused by the gradual reduction of the Cu surface amount and also by the reduction of the surface activity which is believed to decrease with an increase in the Cu particle size. The interaction between the thin layer of the coprecipitate and the support surface probably suppresses the aggregation of the coprecipitate leading to Cu sintering.

  17. Autothermal reforming of natural gas to synthesis gas:reference: KBR paper #2031.

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, David; Rice, Steven, D.

    2007-04-01

    This Project Final Report serves to document the project structure and technical results achieved during the 3-year project titled Advanced Autothermal Reformer for US Dept of Energy Office of Industrial Technology. The project was initiated in December 2001 and was completed March 2005. It was a joint effort between Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, CA), Kellogg Brown & Root LLC (KBR) (Houston, TX) and Sued-Chemie (Louisville, KY). The purpose of the project was to develop an experimental capability that could be used to examine the propensity for soot production in an Autothermal Reformer (ATR) during the production of hydrogen-carbon monoxide synthesis gas intended for Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) applications including ammonia, methanol, and higher hydrocarbons. The project consisted of an initial phase that was focused on developing a laboratory-scale ATR capable of reproducing conditions very similar to a plant scale unit. Due to budget constraints this effort was stopped at the advanced design stages, yielding a careful and detailed design for such a system including ATR vessel design, design of ancillary feed and let down units as well as a PI&D for laboratory installation. The experimental effort was then focused on a series of measurements to evaluate rich, high-pressure burner behavior at pressures as high as 500 psi. The soot formation measurements were based on laser attenuation at a view port downstream of the burner. The results of these experiments and accompanying calculations show that soot formation is primarily dependent on oxidation stoichiometry. However, steam to carbon ratio was found to impact soot production as well as burner stability. The data also showed that raising the operating pressure while holding mass flow rates constant results in considerable soot formation at desirable feed ratios. Elementary reaction modeling designed to illuminate the role of CO{sub 2} in the burner feed showed that the conditions in the burner allow for the

  18. METHANOL PRODUCTION FROM BIOMASS AND NATURAL GAS AS TRANSPORTATION FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two processes are examined for production of methanol. They are assessed against the essential requirements of a future alternative fuel for road transport: that it (i) is producible in amounts comparable to the 19 EJ of motor fuel annually consumed in the U.S., (ii) minimizes em...

  19. Are gas-phase models of interstellar chemistry tenable? The case of methanol.

    PubMed

    Garrod, Robin; Park, In Hee; Caselli, Paola; Herbst, Eric

    2006-01-01

    We consider the case of methanol production in cold dark clouds, also known as quiescent cores, for which recent work shows that a purely gas-phase synthesis is unlikely to produce a sufficient amount to explain the observational fractional abundance of approximately 10(-9). Moreover, recent experiments appear to confirm a previous hypothesis that methanol can be formed on cold grain surfaces by the hydrogenation of CO via successive reactions with hydrogen atoms. In this paper we consider two ways of including the surface formation of methanol into chemical models of cold dark clouds. First, we use a gas-phase model and artificially include the surface formation of methanol in the same manner that the formation of molecular hydrogen is included. Secondly, we utilize a gas-grain code with a new mechanism for desorption following exothermic chemical reactions on grain surfaces. The latter method can reproduce the observed fractional abundance of gas-phase methanol and many other gas-phase species in the well-studied cold dark cloud TMC1-CP but the best fit to the observational data occurs at times significantly later than at ages estimated from gas-phase models.

  20. Improvement in methanol production by regulating the composition of synthetic gas mixture and raw biogas.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjay K S; Mardina, Primata; Kim, Dongwook; Kim, Sang-Yong; Kalia, Vipin C; Kim, In-Won; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2016-10-01

    Raw biogas can be an alternative feedstock to pure methane (CH4) for methanol production. In this investigation, we evaluated the methanol production potential of Methylosinus sporium from raw biogas originated from an anaerobic digester. Furthermore, the roles of different gases in methanol production were investigated using synthetic gas mixtures of CH4, carbon dioxide (CO2), and hydrogen (H2). Maximum methanol production was 5.13, 4.35, 6.28, 7.16, 0.38, and 0.36mM from raw biogas, CH4:CO2, CH4:H2, CH4:CO2:H2, CO2, and CO2:H2, respectively. Supplementation of H2 into raw biogas increased methanol production up to 3.5-fold. Additionally, covalent immobilization of M. sporium on chitosan resulted in higher methanol production from raw biogas. This study provides a suitable approach to improve methanol production using low cost raw biogas as a feed containing high concentrations of H2S (0.13%). To our knowledge, this is the first report on methanol production from raw biogas, using immobilized cells of methanotrophs. PMID:27371792

  1. Water and methanol in low-mass protostellar outflows: gas-phase synthesis, ice sputtering and destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suutarinen, A. N.; Kristensen, L. E.; Mottram, J. C.; Fraser, H. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2014-05-01

    Water in outflows from protostars originates either as a result of gas-phase synthesis from atomic oxygen at T ≳ 200 K, or from sputtered ice mantles containing water ice. We aim to quantify the contribution of the two mechanisms that lead to water in outflows, by comparing observations of gas-phase water to methanol (a grain surface product) towards three low-mass protostars in NGC 1333. In doing so, we also quantify the amount of methanol destroyed in outflows. To do this, we make use of James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and Herschel-Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared data of H2O, CH3OH and CO emission lines and compare them to RADEX non-local thermodynamic equilibrium excitation simulations. We find up to one order of magnitude decrease in the column density ratio of CH3OH over H2O as the velocity increases in the line wings up to ˜15 km s-1. An independent decrease in X(CH3OH) with respect to CO of up to one order of magnitude is also found in these objects. We conclude that gas-phase formation of H2O must be active at high velocities (above 10 km s-1 relative to the source velocity) to re-form the water destroyed during sputtering. In addition, the transition from sputtered water at low velocities to form water at high velocities must be gradual. We place an upper limit of two orders of magnitude on the destruction of methanol by sputtering effects.

  2. Mm/submm Study of Gas-Phase Photoproducts from Methanol Interstellar Ice Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesko, AJ; Smith, Houston Hartwell; Milam, Stefanie N.; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2016-06-01

    Icy grain reactions have gained quite the popularity in the astrochemistry community to explain the formation of complex organic molecules. Through temperature programmed desorption and photolysis experiments we use rotational spectroscopy to measure the gas-phase products of icy grain reactions. Previous results include testing detection limits of the system by temperature programmed desorption of methanol and water ices, photochemistry of gas-phase methanol, and detection of photodesorbed water from a pure water ice surface. Current work that will be discussed focuses on the detection of gas-phase CO and other photoproducts from an ice surface.

  3. Using rare gas permeation to probe methanol diffusion near the glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, Jesper; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2009-12-11

    The permeation of rare-gas atoms through deeply supercooled metastable liquid methanol films is used to probe the diffusivity. The technique allows for measurement of supercooled liquid mobility at temperatures near the glass transition. The temperature dependence of the diffusivity is well described by a Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation. These new measurements and the temperature dependent kinetic parameters obtained from their analysis provide clear evidence that methanol is a fragile liquid near the glass transition. PMID:20366212

  4. Using Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the Glass Transition Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthiesen, Jesper; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2009-12-01

    The permeation of rare-gas atoms through deeply supercooled metastable liquid methanol films is used to probe the diffusivity. The technique allows for measurement of supercooled liquid mobility at temperatures near the glass transition. The temperature dependence of the diffusivity is well described by a Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation. These new measurements and the temperature dependent kinetic parameters obtained from their analysis provide clear evidence that methanol is a fragile liquid near the glass transition.

  5. A self-reductive mesoporous CuO(x)/Fe/silicate nanocomposite as a highly active and stable catalyst for methanol reforming.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Yan-Wun; Lin, Ran-Jin; Chang, Ching-Chun; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Lin, Hong-Ping; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2011-09-01

    A simple and convenient one-pot synthetic route to directly prepare a self-reductive mesoporous copper-iron-silicate (CuO(x)-Fe-silicate)-based catalyst has been developed. The resultant catalyst is highly active and stable in methanol reforming without needing a pre-reduction procedure. PMID:21773606

  6. Methanol: A Versatile Fuel for Immediate Use: Methanol can be made from gas, coal, or wood. It is stored and used in existing equipment.

    PubMed

    Reed, T B; Lerner, R M

    1973-12-28

    We believe that methanol is the most versatile synthetic fuel available and its use could stretch or eventually substitute for, the disappearing reserves of low-cost petroleum resources. Methanol could be used now as a means for marketing economically the natural gas that is otherwise going to waste in remote locations. If methanol were used as an additive to gasoline at a rate of 5 to 15 percent, for use in internal combustion engines, there would be an immediate reduction in atmospheric pollution, there would be less need for lead in fuel, and automobile performance would be improved. With increasing production of fuel-grade methanol from coal and other sources, we foresee the increasing use of methanol for electrical power plants, for heating, and for other fuel applications. We hope that a practical methanol fuel cell will be commercially available by the time that methanol becomes plentiful for fuel purposes. Methanol offers a particularly attractive form of solar-energy conservation, since agricultural and forest waste products can be used as the starting material. Indeed, at 1 percent conversion efficiency the forest lands could supply the entire present energy requirements of the United States.

  7. Effectiveness of heat-integrated methanol steam reformer and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack systems for portable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotrič, A.; Sekavčnik, M.; Hočevar, S.

    2014-12-01

    Efficiently combining proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack with methanol steam reformer (MSR) into a small portable system is still quite a topical issue. Using methanol as a fuel in PEMFC stack includes a series of chemical processes where each proceeds at a unique temperature. In a combined MSR-PEMFC-stack system with integrated auxiliary fuel processors (vaporizer, catalytic combustor, etc.) the processes are both endothermic and exothermic hence their proper thermal integration can help raising the system efficiency. A concept of such fully integrated and compact system is proposed in this study. Three separate systems are designed based on different PEMFC stacks and MSR. Low-temperature (LT) and conventional high-temperature (cHT) PEMFC stack characteristics are based on available data from suppliers. Also, a novel high-temperature (nHT) PEMFC stack is proposed because its operating temperature coincides with that of MSR. A comparative study of modelled systems is performed using a mass and energy balances zero-dimensional model, which is interdependently coupled to a physical model based on finite element method (FEM). The results indicate that a system with nHT PEMFC stack is feasible and has the potential to reach higher system efficiencies than systems with LT or cHT PEMFC stacks.

  8. Insights on the effective incorporation of a foam-based methanol reformer in a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgouropoulos, George; Papavasiliou, Joan; Ioannides, Theophilos; Neophytides, Stylianos

    2015-11-01

    Highly active Al-doped CuMnOx catalyst supported on metallic copper foam was prepared via the combustion method and placed adjacent to the anode electrocatalyst of a high temperature PEM fuel cell operating at 200-210 °C. The addition of aluminum oxide in the catalyst composition enhanced the specific surface area (19.1 vs. 8.6 m2 g-1) and the reducibility of the Cu-Mn spinel oxide. Accordingly, the catalytic performance of CuMnOx was also improved. The doped sample is up to 2.5 times more active than the undoped sample at 200 °C, depending on the methanol concentration at the inlet, while CO selectivity is less than 0.8% in all cases. A membrane-electrode assembly comprising the ADVENT cross-linked TPS® high-temperature polymer electrolyte was integrated with the Cu-based methanol reformer in an Internal Reforming Methanol Fuel Cell (IRMFC). In order to avoid extensive poisoning of the reforming catalyst by H3PO4, a thin separation plate was placed between the reforming catalyst and the electrooxidation catalyst. Preliminary results obtained from a single-cell laboratory prototype demonstrated the improved functionality of the unit. Indeed, promising electrochemical performance was obtained during the first 24 h, during which the required H2 for achieving 580 mV at 0.2 A cm-2, was supplied from the reformer.

  9. Liquid phase low temperature method for production of methanol from synthesis gas and catalyst formulations therefor

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2005-07-26

    The invention provides a homogenous catalyst for the production of methanol from purified synthesis gas at low temperature and low pressure which includes a transition metal capable of forming transition metal complexes with coordinating ligands and an alkoxide, the catalyst dissolved in a methanol solvent system, provided the transition metal complex is not transition metal carbonyl. The coordinating ligands can be selected from the group consisting of N-donor ligands, P-donor ligands, O-donor ligands, C-donor ligands, halogens and mixtures thereof.

  10. WO 3/CeO 2/YSZ nanocomposite as a potential catalyst for methanol reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natile, Marta Maria; Glisenti, Antonella

    A WO 3/CeO 2/YSZ nanocomposite material [W/Zr nominal atomic ratio = 0.025, Ce/Zr nominal atomic ratio = 0.020] was prepared by wet impregnation and characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopic techniques, X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis. Both tungsten and cerium oxides are significantly reduced at the interface with YSZ: Ce(III), in particular, seems to be the prevailing species. The interaction of the WO 3/CeO 2/YSZ nanopowder with pyridine and CO 2 allowed to investigate the acidic/basic sites. Weak contributions at 1602, 1625 and 1647 cm -1 suggest the presence of Lewis and Brønsted acidic sites, whereas basic sites are not evidenced by the interaction with carbon dioxide. The presence of tungsten oxide causes the decrement of the acidic/basic sites, as indicated by the comparison with the results obtained on the CeO 2/YSZ support. Consistently, the interaction with methanol is mainly molecular. The oxidation of methanol was investigated both in the absence and in the presence of water. In the last case carbon dioxide starts forming from room temperature.

  11. Regulation and competition: an analysis of natural gas policy reforms

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    In 1985 the federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued Order 436, a set of reforms intended to extend competition by opening transportation to all shippers and allowing market entry by competing pipelines. This thesis assesses the reforms' efficiency and equity. Efficient pricing and investment rules are derived and applied to the new policy. The reforms are probably an improvement, but the attempt to ensure parity with traditional sales service may hamstring potential gains, and rate design to stimulate competition may forgo benefits of multi-part tariffs and discourage efficient risk-sharing and investment. The analysis also addresses problems of competition in a regulated utility's traditional market. Even if wellhead markets are competitive, it may prove difficult to separate the commodity from pipeline market power. An industry simulation model is constructed from estimates of demand and supply, representing thirteen major interstate pipelines. The simulation is over 1985-90 for nine combinations of trading arrangements, regulation of commodity prices, and distortions from rigid purchase contracts. Deregulation policies risk large efficiency losses if contractual constraints distort prices. However, if new gas prices are flexible, rigidity in high-cost contracts and partial deregulation of old gas yield little efficiency loss relative to fully-flexible scenarios.

  12. Mutagenic effect of methanol in gas station operators from Sao Paulo/Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Gattas, G.J.F.; Cardoso, L.A.; Faria, M.M.

    1997-10-01

    The frequency of micronucleus (MN) in oral scamous cells of 76 gas station operators was investigated. Subjects were exposed to a fuel called MEG a mix of 33% methanol, 60% ethanol and 7% gasoline. In Brazil the ethyl alcohol, extracted from sugar cane have been used as a fuel since 70`s. In November 1991, for economical reasons, the MEG fuel was introduced in big cities. The MN frequency was evaluated in three different periods: before MEG introduction (1989), and twice after MEG utilization (1992 and 1995). Some individuals were analyzed more than one time. For each individual the frequency of MN was performed in 2000 oral cells. Statistical analysis through non parametric tests revealed a highly significant increase (P=0.001) in the frequency of MN before (1.38/2000 cells) and immediately after methanol introduction (3.0/2000 cells). The frequency of MN returned to be normal (1.4/2000 cells), in the third evaluation when the exposition to methanol decreased. It should represent genetic risk for individuals under occupational exposure and for the population as a whole when methanol has been introduced as a large-scale fuel.

  13. Assessment of methanol electro-oxidation for direct methanol-air fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, S.D.; Sen, R.K.

    1988-07-01

    The Office of Energy Storage and Distribution of the US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of a methanol-air fuel cell for transportation application. The approach used at Los Alamos National Laboratory converts the methanol fuel to a hydrogen-rich gas in a reformer, then operates the fuel cell on hydrogen and air. The reformer tends to be bulky (raising vehicle packaging problems), has a long startup period, and is not well suited for the transient operation required in a vehicle. Methanol, however, can be oxidized electrochemically in the fuel cell. If this process can be conducted efficiently, a direct methanol-air fuel cell can be used, which does not require a reformer. The objective of this study is to assess the potential of developing a suitable catalyst for the direct electrochemical oxidation of methanol. The primary conclusion of this study is that no acceptable catalysts exist can efficiently oxidize methanol electrochemically and have the desired cost and lifetime for vehicle applications. However, recent progress in understanding the mechanism of methanol oxidation indicates that a predictive base can be developed to search for methanol oxidation catalysts and can be used to methodically develop improved catalysts. Such an approach is strongly recommended. The study also recommends that until further progress in developing high-performance catalysts is achieved, research in cell design and testing is not warranted. 43 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Methanol incorporation in clathrate hydrates and the implications for oil and gas pipeline flow assurance and icy planetary bodies.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyuchul; Udachin, Konstantin A; Moudrakovski, Igor L; Leek, Donald M; Alavi, Saman; Ratcliffe, Christopher I; Ripmeester, John A

    2013-05-21

    One of the best-known uses of methanol is as antifreeze. Methanol is used in large quantities in industrial applications to prevent methane clathrate hydrate blockages from forming in oil and gas pipelines. Methanol is also assigned a major role as antifreeze in giving icy planetary bodies (e.g., Titan) a liquid subsurface ocean and/or an atmosphere containing significant quantities of methane. In this work, we reveal a previously unverified role for methanol as a guest in clathrate hydrate cages. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and NMR experiments showed that at temperatures near 273 K, methanol is incorporated in the hydrate lattice along with other guest molecules. The amount of included methanol depends on the preparative method used. For instance, single-crystal XRD shows that at low temperatures, the methanol molecules are hydrogen-bonded in 4.4% of the small cages of tetrahydrofuran cubic structure II hydrate. At higher temperatures, NMR spectroscopy reveals a number of methanol species incorporated in hydrocarbon hydrate lattices. At temperatures characteristic of icy planetary bodies, vapor deposits of methanol, water, and methane or xenon show that the presence of methanol accelerates hydrate formation on annealing and that there is unusually complex phase behavior as revealed by powder XRD and NMR spectroscopy. The presence of cubic structure I hydrate was confirmed and a unique hydrate phase was postulated to account for the data. Molecular dynamics calculations confirmed the possibility of methanol incorporation into the hydrate lattice and show that methanol can favorably replace a number of methane guests.

  15. Catalysts prepared from copper-nickel ferrites for the steam reforming of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yung-Han; Wang, Sea-Fue; Tsai, An-Pang; Kameoka, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    In this study, Fe3O4-supported Cu and Ni catalysts are prepared through reduction of Cu-Ni (Ni1-xCuxFe2O4) ferrites. The Cu-Ni ferrites, synthesized using a solid-state reaction method, are reduced at temperatures from 240 °C to 500 °C in a H2 atmosphere. All ferrites are characterized with granular morphology and a smooth particle surface before reduction. For the CuFe2O4, Ni0.5Cu0.5Fe2O4 and NiFe2O4 ferrites reduced at 240, 300, and 400 °C, respectively, nanosized Cu and/or Ni particles (5-32 nm) and mesopores (5-30 nm) are distributed and adhered on the surfaces of Fe3O4 supports. After increasing the reduction temperature of NiFe2O4 ferrite to 500 °C, the Ni particles and mesopores disappear from the Fe3O4 surfaces, which is due to the formation of a Fe-Ni alloy covering on the Fe3O4 surfaces. The CuFe2O4 ferrite after H2 reduction at 240 °C exhibits the highest H2 production rate of 149 ml STP/min g-cat at 360 °C. The existence of Ni content in the Cu-Ni ferrites enhances the reverse water gas shift reaction, and raises the CO selectivity while reducing the CO2 selectivity. Formation of a Fe-Ni alloy exaggerates the trend and poisons the H2 production rate.

  16. Isobutanol-methanol mixtures from synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Eglesia, E.

    1995-10-24

    Mechanistic and kinetic studies of methanol and ethanol coupling reactions on Cs/Cu/ZnO and Cu/ZnO/MnO catalysts using isotopically-labeled compounds have confirmed that coupling reactions proceed via intermediate dehydrogenation of alcohols to aldehydes. Ethanol coupling reactions are much faster than those of methanol because ethanol forms a more thermodynamically favored intermediate (acetaldehyde), with aldol condensation pathways kinetically available for chain growth. Cs decreases the rate of formation of aldehydes in alcohol dehydrogenation reaction and inhibits the undesired conversion of methanol and ethanol to synthesis gas (CO/H{sub 2}). Construction and start-up of the Catalytic Microreactor Unit (CMRU) for high pressure isobutanol synthesis studies have been completed. Initial certification runs have reproduced catalytic CO conversion rates on a standard APCI material (Cs/Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Condensation of higher alcohols in the transfer lines appears to be responsible for the observed low apparent selectivity to higher alcohols. The design and construction of the Temperature-Programmed Surface Reaction (TPSR) Unit for the study of the adsorption and reaction properties of alcohols and other oxygenates on isobutanol, synthesis catalysts and components is complete. The reduction of CuO powder and of a Cs/Cu/ZnO catalyst were used to certify the apparatus before proceeding with alcohol adsorption and reaction studies.

  17. Gas-phase reactivity of metavanadate [VO3]- towards methanol and ethanol: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Waters, Tom; Wedd, Anthony G; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2007-01-01

    The gas-phase reactivity of the metavanadate anion [VO3]- towards methanol and ethanol was examined by a combination of ion-molecule reaction and isotope labelling experiments in a quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometer. The experimental data were interpreted with the aid of density functional theory calculations. [VO3]- dehydrated methanol to eliminate water and form [VO2(eta2-OCH2)]-, which features an [eta2-C,O-OCH2]2- ligand formed by formal removal of two protons from methanol and which is isoelectronic with peroxide. [VO3]- reacted with ethanol in an analogous manner to form [VO2(eta2-OCHCH3)]-, as well as by loss of ethene to form [VO2(OH)2]-. The calculations predicted that important intermediates in these reactions were the hydroxo alkoxo anions [VO2(OH)(OCH2R)]- (R: H, CH3). These were predicted to undergo intramolecular hydrogen-atom transfer to form [VO(OH)2(eta1-OCHR)]- followed by eta1-O-->eta2-C,O rearrangements to form [VO(OH)2(eta2-OCHR)]-. The latter reacted further to eliminate water and generate the product [VO2(eta2-OCHR)]-. This major product observed for [VO3]- is markedly different from that observed previously for [NbO3]- containing the heavier Group 5 congener niobium. In that case, the major product of the reaction was an ion of stoichiometry [Nb, O3, H2]- arising from the formal dehydrogenation of methanol to formaldehyde. The origin of this difference was examined theoretically and attributed to the intermediate alkoxo anion [NbO2(OH)(OCH3)]- preferring hydride transfer to form [HNbO2(OH)]- with loss of formaldehyde. This contrasts with the hydrogen-atom-transfer pathway observed for [VO2(OH)(OCH3)]-. PMID:17661322

  18. Stabilization of Hydrogen Production via Methanol Steam Reforming in Microreactor by Al2O3 Nano-Film Enhanced Catalyst Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Heondo; Na, Jeong-Geol; Jang, Min Su; Ko, Chang Hyun

    2016-05-01

    In hydrogen production by methanol steam reforming reaction with microchannel reactor, Al2O3 thin film formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was introduced on the surface of microchannel reactor prior to the coating of catalyst particles. Methanol conversion rate and hydrogen production rate, increased in the presence of Al2O3 thin film. Over-view and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy study showed that the adhesion between catalyst particles and the surface of microchannel reactor enhanced due to the presence of Al2O3 thin film. The improvement of hydrogen production rate inside the channels of microreactor mainly came from the stable fixation of catalyst particles on the surface of microchannels. PMID:27483762

  19. Stabilization of Hydrogen Production via Methanol Steam Reforming in Microreactor by Al2O3 Nano-Film Enhanced Catalyst Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Heondo; Na, Jeong-Geol; Jang, Min Su; Ko, Chang Hyun

    2016-05-01

    In hydrogen production by methanol steam reforming reaction with microchannel reactor, Al2O3 thin film formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was introduced on the surface of microchannel reactor prior to the coating of catalyst particles. Methanol conversion rate and hydrogen production rate, increased in the presence of Al2O3 thin film. Over-view and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy study showed that the adhesion between catalyst particles and the surface of microchannel reactor enhanced due to the presence of Al2O3 thin film. The improvement of hydrogen production rate inside the channels of microreactor mainly came from the stable fixation of catalyst particles on the surface of microchannels.

  20. Analytical methods for measuring the parameters of interstellar gas using methanol observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenskii, S. V.; Kurtz, S.

    2016-08-01

    The excitation of methanol in the absence of external radiation is analyzed, and LTE methods for probing interstellar gas considered. It is shown that rotation diagrams correctly estimate the gas kinetic temperature only if they are constructed using lines whose upper levels are located in the same K-ladders, such as the J 0- J -1 E lines at 157 GHz, the J 1- J 0 E lines at 165 GHz, and the J 2- J 1 E lines at 25 GHz. The gas density must be no less than 107 cm-3. Rotation diagrams constructed from lines with different K values for their upper levels (e.g., 2 K -1 K at 96 GHz, 3 K -2 K at 145 GHz, 5 K -4 K at 241 GHz) significantly underestimate the temperature, but enable estimation of the density. In addition, diagrams based on the 2 K -1 K lines can be used to estimate the methanol column density within a factor of about two to five. It is suggested that rotation diagrams should be used in the following manner. First, two rotation diagrams should be constructed, one from the lines at 96, 145, or 241 GHz, and another from the lines at 157, 165, or 25 GHz. The former diagram is used to estimate the gas density. If the density is about 107 cm-3 or higher, the latter diagram reproduces the temperature fairly well. If the density is around 106 cm-3, the temperature obtained from the latter diagram should be multiplied by a factor of 1.5-2. If the density is about 105 cm-3 or lower, then the latter diagram yields a temperature that is lower than the kinetic temperature by a factor of three or more, and should be used only as a lower limit for the kinetic temperature. The errors in the methanol column density determined from the integrated intensity of a single line can be more than an order of magnitude, even when the gas temperature is well known. However, if the J 0-( J - 1)0 E lines, as well as the J 1-( J - 1)1 A + or A - lines are used, the relative error in the column density is no more than a factor of a few.

  1. Stepwise Internal Energy Control for Protonated Methanol Clusters by Using the Inert Gas Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamori, Takuto; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Fujii, Asuka

    2016-06-01

    Preferred isomer structures of hydrogen-bonded clusters should depend on their temperature because of the entropy term in the free energy. To observe such temperature dependence, we propose a new approach to control the internal energy (vibrational temperature) of protonated clusters in the gas phase. We performed IR spectroscopy of protonated methanol clusters, H+ (CH{_3}OH) {_n}, n= 5 and 7, with the tagging by various inert gas species (Ar, CO{_2}, CO, CS{_2}, C{_2}H{_2}, and C{_6}H{_6}). We found that vibrational temperature of the tagged clusters raises with increase of the interaction energy with the tag species, and the observed cluster structures follow the theoretical prediction of the temperature dependence of the isomer population.

  2. Efficient utilization of greenhouse gas in a gas-to-liquids process combined with carbon dioxide reforming of methane.

    PubMed

    Ha, Kyoung-Su; Bae, Jong Wook; Woo, Kwang-Jae; Jun, Ki-Won

    2010-02-15

    A process model for a gas-to-liquids (GTL) process mainly producing Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthetic oils has been developed to assess the effects of reforming methods, recycle ratio of unreacted syngas mixture on the process efficiency and the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. The reforming unit of our study is composed of both steam reforming of methane (SRM) and carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CDR) to form syngas, which gives composition flexibility, reduction in GHG emission, and higher cost-competitiveness. With recycling, it is found that zero emission of CO(2) from the process can be realized and the required amount of natural gas (NG) can be significantly reduced. This GTL process model has been built by using Aspen Plus software, and it is mainly composed of a feeding unit, a reforming unit, an FT synthesis unit, several separation units and a recycling unit. The composition flexibility of the syngas mixture due to the two different types of reforming reactions raises an issue that in order to attain the optimized feed composition of FT synthesis the amount of flow rate of each component in the fresh feed mixture should be determined considering the effects of the recycle and its split ratio. In the FT synthesis unit, the 15 representative reactions for the chain growth and water gas shift on the cobalt-based catalyst are considered. After FT synthesis, the unreacted syngas mixture is recycled to the reforming unit or the FT synthesis unit or both to enhance process efficiency. The effect of the split ratio, the recycle flow rate to the FT reactor over the recycle flow rate to the reforming unit, on the efficiency of the process was also investigated. This work shows that greater recycle to the reforming unit is less effective than that to the FT synthesis unit from the standpoint of the net heat efficiency of the process, since the reforming reactions are greatly endothermic and greater recycle to the reformer requires more energy.

  3. Effect of Gold Particle Size on Steam Reforming of Methanol Over Au/CeO2-ZrO2 Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Pandian; Kim, Dong Ha; Park, Eun Duck

    2016-05-01

    We examined the effect of the particle size of gold on steam reforming of methanol over Au/CeO2-ZrO2 catalysts. Gold was loaded onto CeO2-ZrO2 through deposition-precipitation. The average particle size (2-12 nm) of the gold was controlled by thermal reduction under H2 at various temperatures and by chemical reduction with various reducing agents. The catalytic activity decreased significantly with increasing particle size of the gold. The turnover frequency at the interface between gold and a support appeared to be independent of particle size in the range 2-5 nm, which implies that the perimeter of the particle may be the active site for this reaction. Methanol adsorption and conversion over these catalysts were also investigated with in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. Analytical results for various adsorbed intermediate species during methanol conversion suggests that transformation of methoxy species is facilitated by use of smaller gold particles. PMID:27483761

  4. Effect of Gold Particle Size on Steam Reforming of Methanol Over Au/CeO2-ZrO2 Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Pandian; Kim, Dong Ha; Park, Eun Duck

    2016-05-01

    We examined the effect of the particle size of gold on steam reforming of methanol over Au/CeO2-ZrO2 catalysts. Gold was loaded onto CeO2-ZrO2 through deposition-precipitation. The average particle size (2-12 nm) of the gold was controlled by thermal reduction under H2 at various temperatures and by chemical reduction with various reducing agents. The catalytic activity decreased significantly with increasing particle size of the gold. The turnover frequency at the interface between gold and a support appeared to be independent of particle size in the range 2-5 nm, which implies that the perimeter of the particle may be the active site for this reaction. Methanol adsorption and conversion over these catalysts were also investigated with in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. Analytical results for various adsorbed intermediate species during methanol conversion suggests that transformation of methoxy species is facilitated by use of smaller gold particles.

  5. A planar anode-supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell model with internal reforming of natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinda, P.; Chanchaona, S.; Brault, P.; Wechsatol, W.

    2011-05-01

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are of great interest due to their high energy efficiency, low emission level, and multiple fuel utilization. SOFC can operate with various kinds of fuels such as natural gas, carbon monoxide, methanol, ethanol, and hydrocarbon compounds, and they are becoming one of the main competitors among environmentally friendly energy sources for the future. In this study, a mathematical model of a co-flow planar anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with internal reforming of natural gas has been developed. The model simultaneously solves mass, energy transport equations, and chemical as well as electrochemical reactions. The model can effectively predict the compound species distributions as well as the cell performance under specific operating conditions. The main result is a rather small temperature gradient obtained at 800 °C with S/C = 1 in classical operating conditions. The cell performance is reported for several operating temperatures and pressures. The cell performance is specified in terms of cell voltage and power density at any specific current density. The influence of electrode microstructure on cell performance was investigated. The simulation results show that the steady state performance is almost insensitive to microstructure of cells such as porosity and tortuosity unlike the operating pressure and temperature. However, for SOFC power output enhancement, the power output could be maximized by adjusting the pore size to an optimal value, similarly to porosity and tortuosity. At standard operating pressure (1 atm) and 800 °C with 48% fuel utilization, when an output cell voltage was 0.73 V, a current density of 0.38 A cm-2 with a power density of 0.28 W cm-2 was predicted. The accuracy of the model was validated by comparing with existing experimental results from the available literature.

  6. Evaluation of the use of UCG gas to produce 4000 BPD and 12,000 BPD of methanol with conversion to M-gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, Donald

    1981-01-01

    This study involves an examination of the technical and economic feasibility of using raw gas from an underground coal gasification facility as feedstock for methanol synthesis, and producing M-gasoline from the methanol. It differs from previous studies in considering facilities smaller than those previously studied. Addressed also is the economic and technical feasibility of using equipment from existing ammonia plants for the production of methanol. Ammonia and methanol plants are very similar in type of equipment used and plant layout. Consequently, it is possible to convert an existing ammonia plant into a methanol facility. Existing ammonia and methanol plants which contain equipment that might be utilized with UCG all use natural gas for feedstock. The processing steps in these plants can be divided into unit operations which are described. The product price analysis shows that significant economies of scale exist for the larger of the two facility sizes considered in this study. The economies of scale are evident for both the methanol/M-gasoline and methanol-only facilities. Compared to current market prices, the calculated product prices for the 4000 BPD and 12,000 BPD methanol-only facilities are within the range of competitiveness with the prices of conventionally produced methanol. The product prices calculated for the 12,000 BPD methanol/4910 BPD M-gasoline facility are, under the most optimistic assumptions, 50% higher than the current market price for unleaded gasoline.

  7. Gas chromatographic quantitative analysis of methanol in wine: operative conditions, optimization and calibration model choice.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Rosario; Gambino, Grazia Laura; Scordino, Monica; Sabatino, Leonardo; Traulo, Pasqualino; Gagliano, Giacomo

    2011-12-01

    The influence of the wine distillation process on methanol content has been determined by quantitative analysis using gas chromatographic flame ionization (GC-FID) detection. A comparative study between direct injection of diluted wine and injection of distilled wine was performed. The distillation process does not affect methanol quantification in wines in proportions higher than 10%. While quantification performed on distilled samples gives more reliable results, a screening method for wine injection after a 1:5 water dilution could be employed. The proposed technique was found to be a compromise between the time consuming distillation process and direct wine injection. In the studied calibration range, the stability of the volatile compounds in the reference solution is concentration-dependent. The stability is higher in the less concentrated reference solution. To shorten the operation time, a stronger temperature ramp and carrier flow rate was employed. With these conditions, helium consumption and column thermal stress were increased. However, detection limits, calibration limits, and analytical method performances are not affected substantially by changing from normal to forced GC conditions. Statistical data evaluation were made using both ordinary (OLS) and bivariate least squares (BLS) calibration models. Further confirmation was obtained that limit of detection (LOD) values, calculated according to the 3sigma approach, are lower than the respective Hubaux-Vos (H-V) calculation method. H-V LOD depends upon background noise, calibration parameters and the number of reference standard solutions employed in producing the calibration curve. These remarks are confirmed by both calibration models used. PMID:22312744

  8. Design and Operation of the Synthesis Gas Generator System for Reformed Propane and Glycerin Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, Derek Kyle

    Due to an increased interest in sustainable energy, biodiesel has become much more widely used in the last several years. Glycerin, one major waste component in biodiesel production, can be converted into a hydrogen rich synthesis gas to be used in an engine generator to recover energy from the biodiesel production process. This thesis contains information detailing the production, testing, and analysis of a unique synthesis generator rig at the University of Kansas. Chapter 2 gives a complete background of all major components, as well as how they are operated. In addition to component descriptions, methods for operating the system on pure propane, reformed propane, reformed glycerin along with the methodology of data acquisition is described. This chapter will serve as a complete operating manual for future students to continue research on the project. Chapter 3 details the literature review that was completed to better understand fuel reforming of propane and glycerin. This chapter also describes the numerical model produced to estimate the species produced during reformation activities. The model was applied to propane reformation in a proof of concept and calibration test before moving to glycerin reformation and its subsequent combustion. Chapter 4 first describes the efforts to apply the numerical model to glycerin using the calibration tools from propane reformation. It then discusses catalytic material preparation and glycerin reformation tests. Gas chromatography analysis of the reformer effluent was completed to compare to theoretical values from the numerical model. Finally, combustion of reformed glycerin was completed for power generation. Tests were completed to compare emissions from syngas combustion and propane combustion.

  9. Gas-phase ions produced by freezing water or methanol for analysis using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pagnotti, Vincent S; Chakrabarty, Shubhashis; Wang, Beixi; Trimpin, Sarah; McEwen, Charles N

    2014-08-01

    Introducing water or methanol containing a low concentration of volatile or nonvolatile analyte into an inlet tube cooled with dry ice linking atmospheric pressure and the first vacuum stage of a mass spectrometer produces gas-phase ions even of small proteins that can be detected by mass spectrometry. Collision-induced dissociation experiments conducted in the first vacuum region of the mass spectrometer suggest analyte ions being protected by a solvent cage. The charges may be produced by processes similar to those proposed for charge separation under freezing conditions in thunderclouds. By this process, the surface of an ice pellet is charged positive and the interior negative so that removal of surface results in charge separation. A reversal of surface charge is expected for a heated droplet surface, and this is observed by heating rather than cooling the inlet tube. These observations are consistent with charged supercooled droplets or ice particles as intermediates in the production of analyte ions under freezing conditions. PMID:25014489

  10. Feasibility of flare gas reformation to practical energy in Farashband gas refinery: no gas flaring.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, Mohammad Reaza; Jokar, Seyyed Mohammad

    2012-03-30

    A suggested method for controlling the level of hazardous materials in the atmosphere is prevention of combustion in flare. In this work, three methods are proposed to recover flare gas instead of conventional gas-burning in flare at the Farashband gas refinery. These methods aim to minimize environmental and economical disadvantages of burning flare gas. The proposed methods are: (1) gas to liquid (GTL) production, (2) electricity generation with a gas turbine and, (3) compression and injection into the refinery pipelines. To find the most suitable method, the refinery units that send gas to the flare as well as the required equipment for the three aforementioned methods are simulated. These simulations determine the amount of flare gas, the number of GTL barrels, the power generated by the gas turbine and the required compression horsepower. The results of simulation show that 563 barrels/day of valuable GTL products is produced by the first method. The second method provides 25 MW electricity and the third method provides a compressed natural gas with 129 bar pressure for injection to the refinery pipelines. In addition, the economics of flare gas recovery methods are studied and compared. The results show that for the 4.176MMSCFD of gas flared from the Farashband gas refinery, the electricity production gives the highest rate of return (ROR), the lowest payback period, the highest annual profit and mild capital investment. Therefore, the electricity production is the superior method economically.

  11. Hydrogenolysis of cellulose to C4-C7 alcohols over bi-functional CuO-MO/Al2O3 (M=Ce, Mg, Mn, Ni, Zn) catalysts coupled with methanol reforming reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanhua; Gu, Fangna; Xu, Guangwen; Zhong, Ziyi; Su, Fabing

    2013-06-01

    This work demonstrates the efficient hydrogenolysis of cellulose to C4-C7 alcohols and gas products (reaction 1) by coupling it with the reforming reaction of methanol (reaction 2) over bi-functional CuO-based catalysts. In this process, the CuO-based catalysts catalyze both the reactions 1 and 2, and the in situ regenerated H2 in the reaction 2 is used for the reaction 1. A series of CuO-MO/Al2O3 (M=Ce, Mg, Mn, Ni, Zn) catalysts were prepared by the co-precipitation method. Among these catalysts, CuO-ZnO/Al2O3 exhibited the highest activity to generate a high cellulose conversion of 88% and a high C4-C7 alcohols content above 95% in the liquid products. The CuO-ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was stable under the reaction conditions and reusable after 4 runs. This work provides a cost-effective route to convert abundant renewable cellulose to liquid fuels.

  12. In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

    2002-09-20

    The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

  13. A comparison of electrochemical and gas-phase decomposition of methanol on platinum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Franaszczuk, K.; Herrero, E.; Zelenay, P.

    1992-10-15

    By using electrochemical and ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) techniques, combined with an isotope substitution method, it is found that the mechanism of methanol decomposition on platinum in the electrochemical environment is different than that in the UHV. In the UHV, the first step in the decomposition process is the scission of an O-H bond to yield a methoxy intermediate, whereas in the electrochemical environment, the first step is the scission of a C-H bond. The difference in the decomposition mechanism is discussed in terms of differences in the local electric field at the surface and in terms of methanol hydrophobic/hydrophilic interactions in solution. The latter affect methanol-water near-surface conformation and predetermine the destiny of the individual methanolic bonds in the catalytic splitting. 51 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Control of hydrocarbon content of a reforming gas by using a hydrogenation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kenichiro; Kawamoto, Katsuya

    2010-01-01

    To control of hydrocarbon content in waste pyrolysis-gasification and reforming processes, the use of a hydrogenation catalyst was examined in a test system with a model gas. To reduce the concentration of benzene in the reforming gas, benzene was hydrogenated with a nickel catalyst. The catalyst is usually used to convert gas-phase unsaturated hydrocarbons to saturated hydrocarbons, and the benzene was converted to cyclohexane at a temperature range of about 130 to 180 degrees C in the presence of steam. However, the conversion to methane occurred at about 250 to 300 degrees C. Methane seems to be a useful conversion compound because it does not cohere as a light tar. Sometimes the reforming gas needs to be cooled for use as generator fuel. In this case, it is possible to avoid the tar cohesion if the benzene in the gas is converted to methane at about 300 degrees C after the reforming. Reduction of the efficiency of conversion to methane was not observed over a 60h reaction period. The lower hydrocarbons (ethylene, ethane, and propylene) were also converted to methane at about 300 degrees C. Conversion of benzene was also possible when other hydrocarbons were present at high concentrations. PMID:20022077

  15. Method for forming synthesis gas using a plasma-catalyzed fuel reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Hartvigsen, Joseph J; Elangovan, S; Czernichowski, Piotr; Hollist, Michele

    2015-04-28

    A method of forming a synthesis gas utilizing a reformer is disclosed. The method utilizes a reformer that includes a plasma zone to receive a pre-heated mixture of reactants and ionize the reactants by applying an electrical potential thereto. A first thermally conductive surface surrounds the plasma zone and is configured to transfer heat from an external heat source into the plasma zone. The reformer further includes a reaction zone to chemically transform the ionized reactants into synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A second thermally conductive surface surrounds the reaction zone and is configured to transfer heat from the external heat source into the reaction zone. The first thermally conductive surface and second thermally conductive surface are both directly exposed to the external heat source. A corresponding apparatus and system are also disclosed herein.

  16. A rapid method for simultaneously determining ethanol and methanol content in wines by full evaporation headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Yun; Lin, Neng-Biao; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Zhong-Li; Barnes, Donald G

    2015-09-15

    This work reports on a full evaporation headspace gas chromatographic (FE HS-GC) method for simultaneously determining the ethanol (EtOH) and methanol (MeOH) content in wines. A small sample (10μL) was placed in a headspace sample vial, and a near-complete mass transfer of ethanol and methanol from the liquid sample to the vapor phase was obtained within three minutes at a temperature of 105°C, which allowed the measurement of the EtOH and MeOH content in the sample by GC. The results showed excellent precision and accuracy, as shown by the reproducibilities of 1.02% and 2.11% for EtOH and MeOH, respectively, and recoveries that ranged from 96.1% to 104% for both alcohols. The method is efficient, accurate and suitable for the determination of EtOH and MeOH in wine production and quality control.

  17. Headspace solid-phase micro-extraction gas chromatography method for the determination of methanol in aspartame sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Sales, J A; de Lourdes Cardeal, Z

    2003-06-01

    A headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) method for the extraction and determination of residual methanol in artificial sweeteners by capillary gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) is described. A manual SPME holder with an 85- microm polyacrylate fibre was used. The optimized conditions for methanol extraction by SPME were: sample agitation, absorption temperature of 30 degrees C, absorption time of 10 min, desorption time of 2 min and sample volume in the vial of 400.0 micro l. Under these conditions the calibration graphs were linear in the range 2.50-31.60 mg x l(-1), and the precision was good (relative standard deviation 4.9%). The detection limit was 0.40 mg x l(-1); the quantification limit was 2.06 mg x l(-1).

  18. Two-stage gas-phase bioreactor for the combined removal of hydrogen sulphide, methanol and alpha-pinene.

    PubMed

    Rene, Eldon R; Jin, Yaomin; Veiga, María C; Kennes, Christian

    2009-11-01

    Biological treatment systems have emerged as cost-effective and eco-friendly techniques for treating waste gases from process industries at moderately high gas flow rates and low pollutant concentrations. In this study, we have assessed the performance of a two-stage bioreactor, namely a biotrickling filter packed with pall rings (BTF, 1st stage) and a perlite + pall ring mixed biofilter (BF, 2nd stage) operated in series, for handling a complex mixture of hydrogen sulphide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH) and alpha-pinene (C10H16). It has been reported that the presence of H2S can reduce the biofiltration efficiency of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when both are present in the gas mixture. Hydrogen sulphide and methanol were removed in the first stage BTF, previously inoculated with H2S-adapted populations and a culture containing Candida boidinii, an acid-tolerant yeast, whereas, in the second stage, alpha-pinene was removed predominantly by the fungus Ophiostoma stenoceras. Experiments were conducted in five different phases, corresponding to inlet loading rates varying between 2.1 and 93.5 g m(-3) h(-1) for H2S, 55.3 and 1260.2 g m(-3) h(-1) for methanol, and 2.8 and 161.1 g m(-3) h(-1) for alpha-pinene. Empty bed residence times were varied between 83.4 and 10 s in the first stage and 146.4 and 17.6 s in the second stage. The BTF, working at a pH as low as 2.7 as a result of H2S degradation, removed most of the H2S and methanol but only very little alpha-pinene. On the other hand, the BF, at a pH around 6.0, removed the rest of the H2S, the non-degraded methanol and most of the alpha-pinene vapours. Attempts were originally made to remove the three pollutants in a single acidophilic bioreactor, but the Ophiostoma strain was hardly active at pH <4. The maximum elimination capacities (ECs) reached by the two-stage bioreactor for individual pollutants were 894.4 g m(-3) h(-1) for methanol, 45.1 g m(-3) h(-1) for H2S and 138.1 g m(-3) h(-1) for alpha-pinene. The

  19. Plasma reforming and partial oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel vapor to produce synthesis gas and/or hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2003-08-19

    Methods and systems for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  20. Plasma Reforming And Partial Oxidation Of Hydrocarbon Fuel Vapor To Produce Synthesis Gas And/Or Hydrogen Gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2004-10-19

    Methods and systems are disclosed for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  1. Vapor-liquid activity coefficients for methanol and ethanol from heat of solution data: application to steam-methane reforming.

    PubMed

    Kunz, R G; Baade, W F

    2001-11-16

    This paper presents equations and curves to calculate vapor-liquid phase equilibria for methanol and ethanol in dilute aqueous solution as a function of temperature, using activity coefficients at infinite dilution. These thermodynamic functions were originally derived to assess the distribution of by-product contaminants in the process condensate and the steam-system deaerator of a hydrogen plant [Paper ENV-00-171 presented at the NPRA 2000 Environmental Conference, San Antonio, TX, 10-12 September 2000], but have general applicability to other systems as well. The functions and calculation method described here are a necessary piece of an overall prediction technique to estimate atmospheric emissions from the deaerator-vent when the process condensate is recycled as boiler feed water (BFW) make-up. Having such an estimation technique is of particular significance at this time because deaerator-vent emissions are already coming under regulatory scrutiny in California [Emissions from Hydrogen Plant Process Vents, Adopted 21 January 2000] followed closely elsewhere in the US, and eventually worldwide. The overall technique will enable a permit applicant to estimate environmental emissions to comply with upcoming regulations, and a regulatory agency to evaluate those estimates. It may also be useful to process engineers as a tool to estimate contaminant concentrations and flow rates in internal process streams such as the steam-generating system. Metallurgists and corrosion engineers might be able to use the results for materials selection.

  2. Plasma reforming of glycerol for synthesis gas production.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinli; Hoang, Trung; Lobban, Lance L; Mallinson, Richard G

    2009-05-28

    Glycerol can be effectively converted to synthesis gas (selectivity higher than 80%) with small amounts of water or no water using plasmas at low temperature and atmospheric pressure, without external heating. PMID:19436906

  3. High-level ab-initio calculation of gas-phase NMR chemical shifts and secondary isotope effects of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Alexander A.

    2009-01-01

    In this contribution high-level ab-initio calculations of the chemical shifts of methanol including zero-point vibrational and temperature corrections are presented. For the first time, secondary isotope effects have been calculated via second order vibrational perturbation theory. In comparison with recent experimental gas-phase data and in contrast to other quantum-chemical methods the results are consistent and in very good agreement with the experimental 13C, 17O and 1H chemical shifts reported by Makulski [W. Makulski, J. Mol. Struct. 872 (2008) 81]. Secondary isotope effects can be calculated with remarkable accuracy of a few hundredths of a ppm in comparison to experiment.

  4. Bridging the Gap: From Model Surfaces to Nanoparticle Analogs for Selective Oxidation and Steam Reforming of Methanol and Selective Hydrogenation Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Matthew B.

    Most industrial catalysts are very complex, comprising of non-uniform materials with varying structures, impurities, and interaction between the active metal and supporting substrate. A large portion of the ongoing research in heterogeneous catalysis focuses on understanding structure-function relationships in catalytic materials. In parallel, there is a large area of surface science research focused on studying model catalytic systems for which structural parameters can be tuned and measured with high precision. It is commonly argued, however, that these systems are oversimplified, and that observations made in model systems do not translate to robust catalysts operating in practical environments; this discontinuity is often referred to as a "gap." The focus of this thesis is to explore the mutual benefits of surface science and catalysis, or "bridge the gap," by studying two catalytic systems in both ultra-high vacuum (UHV) and near ambient-environments. The first reaction is the catalytic steam reforming of methanol (SRM) to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The SRM reaction is a promising route for on-demand hydrogen production. For this catalytic system, the central hypothesis in this thesis is that a balance between redox capability and weak binding of reaction intermediates is necessary for high SRM activity and selectivity to carbon dioxide. As such, a new catalyst for the SRM reaction is developed which incorporates very small amounts of gold (<1 atomic %) supported on zinc oxide nanoparticles with controlled crystal structures. The performance of these catalysts was studied in a fixed-bed micro-reactor system at ambient pressures, and their structure was characterized by high-resolution microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. Pre-existing oxygen defects in zinc oxide {0001} surfaces, and those created by a perturbation of the defect equilibrium by addition of gold, provide an anchoring site for highly dispersed gold species. By utilizing shape control of

  5. Plasma steam reforming of E85 for hydrogen rich gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xinli; Hoang, Trung; Lobban, Lance L.; Mallinson, Richard G.

    2011-07-01

    E85 (85 vol% ethanol and 15 vol% gasoline) is a partly renewable fuel that is increasing in supply availability. Hydrogen production from E85 for fuel cell or internal combustion engine applications is a potential method for reducing CO2 emissions. Steam reforming of E85 using a nonthermal plasma (pulse corona discharge) reactor has been exploited at low temperature (200-300 °C) without external heating, diluent gas, oxidant or catalyst in this work. Several operational parameters, including the discharge current, E85 concentration and feed flow rate, have been investigated. The results show that hydrogen rich gases (63-67% H2 and 22-29% CO, with small amounts of CO2, C2 hydrocarbons and CH4) can be produced by this method. A comparison with ethanol reforming and gasoline reforming under identical conditions has also been made and the behaviour of E85 reforming is found to be close to that of ethanol reforming with slightly higher C2 hydrocarbons yields.

  6. Methanol test

    MedlinePlus

    ... sources of methanol in the body include fruits, vegetables, and diet drinks that contain aspartame. Methanol is ... eat or drink it in toxic amounts. Methanol poisoning mainly affects the digestive system, nervous system, and ...

  7. Optimized fuel cell grade hydrogen from methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongtaek

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate reaction rates liar making hydrogen from methanol, kinetic studies of methanol decomposition, methanol steam reforming, water gas shift reaction, and CO selective oxidation have been performed. These reactions were studied in a micro reactor testing unit using a commercial Cu-ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for the first three reactions and Pt-Fe/gamma-alumina catalyst for the last reaction. The activity tests were performed between 120˜325°C and atmospheric pressure with a range of feed rates and compositions. For methanol decomposition, water addition to the feed increased the yield of hydrogen and reduced the formation of by-products. XPS analysis of used catalyst samples and time on-stream data showed that the Cu2+ oxidation state of copper favors methanol decomposition. A simplified reaction network of 5 elementary reactions was proposed and all five rate expressions were obtained using non-linear least squares optimization, numerical integration of a one-dimensional PFR model, and extensive experimental data. Similar numerical analysis was carried out to obtain the rate expressions for methanol steam reaction, the water gas shift reaction, and CO selective oxidation. For the kinetics of the water gas shift reaction, an empirical rate expression was obtained from the experimental data. Based on a review of published work on the WGS reaction mechanism, our study found that a rate expression derived from a regenerative mechanism and another rate expression derived from adsorptive mechanism fit the experimental data equally well. For the kinetics of CO preferential oxidation, a reaction model in which three reactions (CO oxidation, H2 oxidation and the WGS reaction) occur simultaneously was chosen to predict the reactor performance. In particular the reverse water gas shift reaction had an important role when fitting the experimental data precisely and explained the selectivity decrease at higher reaction temperatures. Combining the three reactors and several

  8. Methanol-reforming reaction over copper-containing catalysts: the effects of anions and copper loading in the preparation of the catalysts by kneading method

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, H.; Takezawa, N.; Minochi, C.

    1981-06-01

    Methanol-reforming reaction CH/sub 3/OH + H/sub 2/O = 3H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ was carried out over copper-containing catalysts which were prepared from hydroxides of copper or from the hydroxide kneaded with various metal oxides. The specific activity (activity per weight of copper used) either of supported or support-free catalyst was markedly increased when the hydroxide was prepared from alkali solution with addition of copper salt solution at higher pH or when the weight percentage of copper on the support was decreased. However, other kinetic parameters such as activation energy and selectivity of the reaction were unaffected by the preparation of the catalyst unless copper chloride was employed as a starting material of the hydroxide preparation at lower pH. DTA, ir, XPS, AES and other chemical analyses of the catalysts revealed that hydroxide ion in the hydroxide precipitate prepared at lower pH exchanged in part with the anionic group of its starting material during the course of the preparation. The anion or its fragment was found to be strongly held on the surface and inhibited the reaction to a great extent. On the other hand, the anion held was markedly decreased when the catalyst was prepared at higher pH. This catalyst was found to be highly active for the title reaction. The surface areas of metallic copper were considerably increased when copper was kneaded with the support. This gave rise to the increase in the specific activity of the catalyst.

  9. The synthesis of methanol and the reverse water-gas shift reaction over Zn-deposited Cu(100) and Cu(110) surfaces: comparison with Zn/Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, I.; Fujitani, T.; Uchijima, T.; Nakamura, J.

    1998-03-01

    The catalytic activity of Zn vapor-deposited Cu(100) and Cu(110) surfaces for methanol synthesis by the hydrogenation of CO 2 and the reverse water-gas shift reaction were studied using an XPS apparatus combined with a high-pressure flow reactor (18 atm). At a reaction temperature of 523 K, no promotional effect of Zn was observed for the methanol synthesis on both Zn/Cu(100) and Zn/Cu(110). The results were quite different from those for Zn/Cu(111), on which a significant promotion of methanol synthesis activity appeared to be due to the deposition of Zn, indicating that the promotional effect of Zn was sensitive to the surface structure of Cu. However, hysteresis was observed in the catalytic activity for methanol synthesis over the Zn/Cu(110) surface upon heating above 543 K in the reaction mixture. The activity became twice that measured before heating, which was close to the methanol synthesis activity of Zn/Cu(111) at the same Zn coverage. On the other hand, no such hysteresis was observed for the reverse water-gas shift reaction on Zn/Cu(110), indicating that the active site for methanol synthesis was not identical to that for the reverse water-gas shift reaction. In the post-reaction surface analysis, formate species was detected on both Zn/Cu(100) and Zn/Cu(110), whose coverage increased with increasing Zn coverage at 0< ΘZn<0.2. No correlation between the formate coverage and the methanol synthesis activity was obtained, which was in contrast to the results for Zn/Cu(111). Thus, the structure sensitivity observed in the catalytic activity of methanol synthesis over Zn-deposited Cu surfaces is ascribed to the significant difference in the reactivity of the formate intermediate.

  10. High-Temperature Desulfurization of Heavy Fuel-Derived Reformate Gas Streams for SOFC Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Surgenor, Angela D.

    2007-01-01

    Desulfurization of the hot reformate gas produced by catalytic partial oxidation or autothermal reforming of heavy fuels, such as JP-8 and jet fuels, is required prior to using the gas in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Development of suitable sorbent materials involves the identification of sorbents with favorable sulfidation equilibria, good kinetics, and high structural stability and regenerability at the SOFC operating temperatures (650 to 800 C). Over the last two decades, a major barrier to the development of regenerable desulfurization sorbents has been the gradual loss of sorbent performance in cyclic sulfidation and regeneration at such high temperatures. Mixed oxide compositions based on ceria were examined in this work as regenerable sorbents in simulated reformate gas mixtures and temperatures greater than 650 C. Regeneration was carried out with dilute oxygen streams. We have shown that under oxidative regeneration conditions, high regeneration space velocities (greater than 80,000 h(sup -1)) can be used to suppress sulfate formation and shorten the total time required for sorbent regeneration. A major finding of this work is that the surface of ceria and lanthanan sorbents can be sulfided and regenerated completely, independent of the underlying bulk sorbent. This is due to reversible adsorption of H2S on the surface of these sorbents even at temperatures as high as 800 C. La-rich cerium oxide formulations are excellent for application to regenerative H2S removal from reformate gas streams at 650 to 800 C. These results create new opportunities for compact sorber/regenerator reactor designs to meet the requirements of solid oxide fuel cell systems at any scale.

  11. Regulatory reform for natural gas pipelines: The effect on pipeline and distribution company share prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurman, Elisabeth Antonie

    1997-08-01

    The natural gas shortages in the 1970s focused considerable attention on the federal government's role in altering energy consumption. For the natural gas industry these shortages eventually led to the passage of the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) in 1978 as part of the National Energy Plan. A series of events in the decade of the 1980s has brought about the restructuring of interstate natural gas pipelines which have been transformed by regulators and the courts from monopolies into competitive entities. This transformation also changed their relationship with their downstream customers, the LDCs, who no longer had to deal with pipelines as the only merchants of gas. Regulatory reform made it possible for LDCs to buy directly from producers using the pipelines only for delivery of their purchases. This study tests for the existence of monopoly rents by analyzing the daily returns of natural gas pipeline and utility industry stock price data from 1982 to 1990, a period of regulatory reform for the natural gas industry. The study's main objective is to investigate the degree of empirical support for claims that regulatory reforms increase profits in the affected industry, as the normative theory of regulation expects, or decrease profits, as advocates of the positive theory of regulation believe. I also test Norton's theory of risk which predicts that systematic risk will increase for firms undergoing deregulation. Based on a sample of twelve natural gas pipelines, and 25 utilities an event study concept was employed to measure the impact of regulatory event announcements on daily natural gas pipeline or utility industry stock price data using a market model regression equation. The results of this study provide some evidence that regulatory reforms did not increase the profits of pipeline firms, confirming the expectations of those who claim that excess profits result from regulation and will disappear, once that protection is removed and the firms are operating in

  12. The Methanol Economy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, George; Prakash, G. K.

    2014-02-01

    The Methanol Economy Project is based on the concept of replacing fossil fuels with methanol generated either from renewable resources or abundant natural (shale) gas. The full methanol cycle was investigated in this project, from production of methanol through bromination of methane, bireforming of methane to syngas, CO2 capture using supported amines, co-electrolysis of CO2 and water to formate and syngas, decomposition of formate to CO2 and H2, and use of formic acid in a direct formic acid fuel cell. Each of these projects achieved milestones and provided new insights into their respective fields.

  13. A Novel Study of Methane-Rich Gas Reforming to Syngas and Its Kinetics over Semicoke Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guojie; Su, Aiting; Qu, Jiangwen; Du, Yannian

    2014-01-01

    A small-size gasification unit is improved through process optimization to simulate industrial United Gas Improvement Company gasification. It finds that the reaction temperature has important impacts on semicoke catalyzed methane gas mixture. The addition of water vapor can enhance the catalytic activity of reforming, which is due to the fact that addition of water vapor not only removes carbon deposit produced in the reforming and gasification reaction processes, but also participates in gasification reaction with semicoke to generate some active oxygen-containing functional groups. The active oxygen-containing functional groups provide active sites for carbon dioxide reforming of methane, promoting the reforming reaction. It also finds that the addition of different proportions of methane-rich gas can yield synthesis gas with different H2/CO ratio. The kinetics study shows that the semicoke can reduce the activation energy of the reforming reaction and promote the occurrence of the reforming reaction. The kinetics model of methane reforming under the conditions of steam gasification over semicoke is as follows: k-=5.02×103·pCH40.71·pH20.26·exp(−74200/RT). PMID:24959620

  14. Thermal analysis of cylindrical natural-gas steam reformer for 5 kW PEMFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Taehyun; Han, Junhee; Koo, Bonchan; Lee, Dohyung

    2016-01-01

    The thermal characteristics of a natural-gas based cylindrical steam reformer coupled with a combustor are investigated for the use with a 5 kW polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. A reactor unit equipped with nickel-based catalysts was designed to activate the steam reforming reaction without the inclusion of high-temperature shift and low-temperature shift processes. Reactor temperature distribution and its overall thermal efficiency depend on various inlet conditions such as the equivalence ratio, the steam to carbon ratio (SCR), and the fuel distribution ratio (FDR) into the reactor and the combustor components. These experiments attempted to analyze the reformer's thermal and chemical properties through quantitative evaluation of product composition and heat exchange between the combustor and the reactor. FDR is critical factor in determining the overall performance as unbalanced fuel injection into the reactor and the combustor deteriorates overall thermal efficiency. Local temperature distribution also influences greatly on the fuel conversion rate and thermal efficiency. For the experiments, the operation conditions were set as SCR was in range of 2.5-4.0 and FDR was in 0.4-0.7 along with equivalence ratio of 0.9-1.1; optimum results were observed for FDR of 0.63 and SCR of 3.0 in the cylindrical steam reformer.

  15. Thermal analysis of cylindrical natural-gas steam reformer for 5 kW PEMFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Taehyun; Han, Junhee; Koo, Bonchan; Lee, Dohyung

    2016-11-01

    The thermal characteristics of a natural-gas based cylindrical steam reformer coupled with a combustor are investigated for the use with a 5 kW polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. A reactor unit equipped with nickel-based catalysts was designed to activate the steam reforming reaction without the inclusion of high-temperature shift and low-temperature shift processes. Reactor temperature distribution and its overall thermal efficiency depend on various inlet conditions such as the equivalence ratio, the steam to carbon ratio (SCR), and the fuel distribution ratio (FDR) into the reactor and the combustor components. These experiments attempted to analyze the reformer's thermal and chemical properties through quantitative evaluation of product composition and heat exchange between the combustor and the reactor. FDR is critical factor in determining the overall performance as unbalanced fuel injection into the reactor and the combustor deteriorates overall thermal efficiency. Local temperature distribution also influences greatly on the fuel conversion rate and thermal efficiency. For the experiments, the operation conditions were set as SCR was in range of 2.5-4.0 and FDR was in 0.4-0.7 along with equivalence ratio of 0.9-1.1; optimum results were observed for FDR of 0.63 and SCR of 3.0 in the cylindrical steam reformer.

  16. A study on methanol steam reforming to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} over the La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} nanofiber catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Lizhen Sun Gebiao; Kawi, Sibudjing

    2008-01-15

    The La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} crystal nanofibers were prepared by using single-walled carbon nanotubes as templates under mild hydrothermal conditions. The steam reforming of methanol (SRM) to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} over such nanofiber catalysts was studied. At the low temperature of 150 deg. C and steam/methanol=1.3, methanol was completely (100%, 13.8 g/h g catalyst) converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} without the generation of CO. Within the 60 h catalyst lifespan test, methanol conversion was maintained at 98.6% (13.6 g/h g catalyst) and with 100% CO{sub 2} selectivity. In the meantime, for distinguishing the advantage of nanoscale catalyst, the La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} bulk powder was prepared and tested for the SRM reaction for comparison. Compared with the La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} nanofiber, the bulk powder La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} showed worse catalytic activity for the SRM reaction. The 100% conversion of methanol was achieved at the temperature of 400 deg. C, with the products being H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} together with CO. The catalytic activity in terms of methanol conversion dropped to 88.7% (12.2 g/h g catalyst) in 60 h. The reduction temperature for nanofiber La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} was much lower than that for the La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} bulk powder. The nanofibers were of higher specific surface area (105.0 m{sup 2}/g), metal copper area and copper dispersion. The in situ FTIR and EPR experiments were employed to study the catalysts and catalytic process. In the nanofiber catalyst, there were oxygen vacancies. H{sub 2}-reduction resulted in the generation of trapped electrons [e] on the vacancy sites. Over the nanofiber catalyst, the intermediate H{sub 2}CO/HCO was stable and was reformed to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} by steam rather than being decomposed directly to CO and H{sub 2}. Over the bulk counterpart, apart from the direct decomposition of H{sub 2}CO/HCO to CO and H{sub 2}, the intermediate H{sub 2}COO might go through two decomposition ways: H{sub 2}COO=CO+H{sub 2}O and H

  17. Improving the fuel economy of stoichiometrically fueled S.I. engines by means of EGR and enhanced ignition -- A comparison of gasoline, methanol and natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Neame, G.R.; Gardiner, D.P.; Mallory, R.W.; Rao, V.K.; Bardon, M.F.; Battista, V.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes an experimental study in which the potential for fuel economy improvements with EGR was investigated using an automotive V6 engine. Steady state engine dynamometer tests were run at 2,000 rpm and 200 kPa Brake Mean Effective Pressure (BMEP). The engine was fueled with gasoline, methanol or natural gas. Plasma jet ignition was evaluated as a means of improving EGR tolerance. EGR tolerance with methanol was found to be better than with gasoline, while natural gas showed the poorest EGR tolerance. Plasma jet ignition extended EGR limits for all three fuels. Fuel economy benefits were realized with natural gas and gasoline at low EGR rates and without EGR but plasma jet ignition provided no improvements with methanol until over 10% EGR was used. Plasma jet ignition made stable operation possible with methanol at 40% EGR, where fuel economy improvements were ultimately limited by the slow burning associated with the high EGR rate. Both slow burning and high cyclic variation affected gasoline at high EGR rates, while stability limits to spark advance with natural gas caused fuel economy to degrade at relatively low EGR rates.

  18. Isobutanol-methanol mixtures from synthesis gas. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesia, E.

    1996-12-01

    A series of CuMgCeO{sub x} catalysts have been prepared by coprecipitating the corresponding metal nitrates with a mixed solution of potassium carbonate and potassium hydroxide. The bulk composition of the catalyst has been measured by atomic absorption (AA) analysis and the Cu dispersion has been determined by N{sub 2}O titration at 90 {degrees}C. CeO{sub x} does not contribute to the measured copper dispersion in K-CuO{sub 0.5}Mg{sub 5}CeO{sub x} samples and the high dispersion value indeed reflects the presence of Cu metal small crystallites. Kinetic studies of methanol and propionaldehyde coupling reactions on K-Cu/MgO/CeO{sub 2} and MgO/CeO{sub 2} catalysts indicate that Cu enhances the rates of alcohol dehydrogenation. High-pressure isobutanol synthesis from CO/H{sub 2} has been studied on CuO{sub 0.5}Mg{sub 5}O{sub x} catalysts at 593 K and 4.5 MPa. CuO{sub 0.5}Mg{sub 5}O{sub x} catalysts show high hydrocarbon and low isobutanol selectivities compared to K-CuO{sub 0.5}Mg{sub 5}CeO{sub x}, suggesting the presence of residual acidity in CuO{sub 0.5}Mg{sub 5}O{sub x}.

  19. Gas-liquid solubilities of the methanol synthesis components in various solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Graaf, G.H.; Smit, H.J.; Stamhuls, E.J.; Beenackers, A.A.C.M. )

    1992-04-01

    The solubilities of CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}OH, and H{sub 2}O were measured in hexadecane, octadecane, squalane, and benzophenone at 293-573 K and 1.013-90 bar using volume displacement and material balance techniques. The experimental results, consisting of 260 solubility data for 16 binary mixtures, were used to test the applicability of four solubility models. When using literature model parameters, the Skjold-Jorgensen group-contribution equation of state gives the best agreement with the experimental results with an average deviation of 15%. The Soave-Redlich-Kwong and Peng-Robinson equations of state give an excellent agreement with the experimental results when optimized binary interaction coefficients are used. The regular solutions theory gives reasonable results except for the methanol- and water-containing systems when using no optimized binary parameters. This paper reports that the authors' results show a reasonable agreement with the available literature data.

  20. Isobutanol-methanol mixtures from synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January--31 March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-20

    A series of CuMgCeO{sub x} catalysts have been prepared. Range of Cu dispersion, determined by N{sub 2}O titration, was 19-48% and are among the highest reported in the literature for Cu-based methanol and higher alcohol synthesis catalysts. Kinetics of MeOH and EtOH coupling reactions on Cu/ZnO and K-Cu/MgO/CeO{sub 2} catalysts indicate that Cu promotes alcohol dehydrogenation. Acetaldehyde is a reactive intermediate. High-pressure isobutanol synthesis studies have been carried out on K- and Cs-promoted Cu/MgO/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. The K promoter is more active than Cs for CO conversion, but the Cs promoter activates the C{sub 1} to C{sub 2} step more effectively. Catalysts with high alkali loading resulted in low conversions. Temperature programmed surface reaction studies of MeOH, EtOH, and acetaldehyde on MgO/CeO{sub 2}-based Cu catalysts show evolution of acetone, crotonaldehyde, methyl ethyl ketone, H2, carbon oxides. Neither EtOH nor acetaldehyde produces propionaldehyde or 1- propanol, suggesting that these C{sub 3} species can only form via reactions involving C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} oxygenate species.

  1. Isobutanol-methanol mixtures from synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesia, E.

    1996-01-10

    A series of Cu{sub 0.5}CeMe(II)O{sub x} catalysts (Me refers to Group II alkali earth elements) have been prepared by coprecipitating the corresponding metal nitrates with potassium carbonate. The bulk composition of the catalyst has been determined by atomic absorption (AA) analysis. High-pressure isobutanol synthesis studies have been carried out over a standard BASF Cs-promoted Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. At a CO conversion level of 32%, the isobutanol carbon selectivity is about 5%; whereas that of methanol is 40.2%. A 100% selectivity sum has now been obtained as a result of using response factors measured by the laboratory. The reactions of ethanol and acetic acid over a number of catalysts have been investigated using a temperature programmed surface reaction (TPSR) technique. Ethanol and acetone are the only desorption products observed over Cs-promoted Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Surface acetate ion is believed to be the precursor for acetone formation. Over calcined hydrotalcites, i.e., MgO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ethylene is formed instead of acetone. The amount of ethylene formed decreases as Mg/Al ratio increases, suggesting a role of aluminum ions in ethanol dehydration reactions.

  2. Gas-phase reactions of [VO2(OH)2]- and [V2O5(OH)]- with methanol: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Harris, Benjamin L; Waters, Tom; Khairallah, George N; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2013-02-14

    The gas-phase reactivity of the vanadium hydroxides [VO(2)(OH)(2)](-) and [V(2)O(5)(OH)](-) toward methanol was examined using a combination of ion-molecule reactions (IMRs) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Isotope-labeling experiments with CD(3)OH, (13)CH(3)OH, and CH(3)(18)OH were used to confirm the stoichiometry of ions and the observed sequence of reactions. The experimental data were interpreted with the aid of density functional theory calculations, carried out at the B3LYP/SDD6-311++G** level of theory. While [VO(2)(OH)(2)](-) is unreactive, [V(2)O(5)(OH)](-) undergoes a metathesis reaction to yield [V(2)O(5)(OCH(3))](-). The DFT calculations reveal that the metathesis reaction of methanol with [VO(2)(OH)(2)](-) suffers from a barrier of +0.52 eV (relative to separated reactants) but that the reaction of [V(2)O(5)(OH)](-) with methanol readily proceeds via addition/elimination reactions with both transition states being below the energy of the separated reactants. CID of [V(2)O(5)(OCH(3))](-) (m/z 213) yields three ions arising from activation of the methoxo ligand: [V(2), O(6), C, H](-) (m/z 211); [V(2), O(5), H](-) (m/z 183); and [V(2), O(4), H](-) (m/z 167). Additional experiments and DFT calculations suggest that these ions arise from losses of H(2), formaldehyde and the sequential losses of H(2) and CO(2), respectively. The use of an (18)O-labeled methoxo ligand in [V(2)O(5)((18)OCH(3))](-) (m/z 215) showed the competing losses of H(2)C(16)O and H(2)C(18)O and [H(2) and C(16)O(18)O] and [H(2) and C(16)O(2)], highlighting that (16)O/(18)O exchange between the methoxo ligand and the vanadium oxide occurs prior to the subsequent fragmentation of the ligand. DFT calculations reveal that a key step involves hydrogen atom transfer from the methoxo ligand to the oxo ligand of the same vanadium center, producing the intermediate [V(2)O(4)(OH)(OCH(2))](-) containing a ketyl radical ligand and a hydroxo ligand

  3. Process assessment of small scale low temperature methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriyana; Susanto, Herri Subagjo

    2015-12-29

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource and has the potential to make a significant impact on domestic fuel supplies. Biomass can be converted to fuel like methanol via several step process. The process can be split into following main steps: biomass preparation, gasification, gas cooling and cleaning, gas shift and methanol synthesis. Untill now these configuration still has a problem like high production cost, catalyst deactivation, economy of scale and a huge energy requirements. These problems become the leading inhibition for biomass conversion to methanol, which should be resolved to move towards the economical. To address these issues, we developed various process and new configurations for methanol synthesis via methyl formate. This configuration combining two reactors: the one reactor for the carbonylation of methanol and CO to form methyl formate, and the second for the hydrogenolysis of methyl formate and H{sub 2} to form two molecule of methanol. Four plant process configurations were compared with the biomass basis is 300 ton/day. The first configuration (A) is equipped with a steam reforming process for converting methane to CO and H{sub 2} for increasing H{sub 2}/CO ratio. CO{sub 2} removal is necessary to avoid poisoning the catalyst. COSORB process used for the purpose of increasing the partial pressure of CO in the feed gas. The steam reforming process in B configuration is not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. For C configuration, the steam reforming process and COSORB are not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. D configuration is almost similar to the configuration A. This configuration difference is in the synthesis of methanol which was held in a single reactor. Carbonylation and hydrogenolysis reactions carried out in the same reactor one. These processes were analyzed in term of technical process, material and energy

  4. Process assessment of small scale low temperature methanol synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriyana, Susanto, Herri; Subagjo

    2015-12-01

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource and has the potential to make a significant impact on domestic fuel supplies. Biomass can be converted to fuel like methanol via several step process. The process can be split into following main steps: biomass preparation, gasification, gas cooling and cleaning, gas shift and methanol synthesis. Untill now these configuration still has a problem like high production cost, catalyst deactivation, economy of scale and a huge energy requirements. These problems become the leading inhibition for biomass conversion to methanol, which should be resolved to move towards the economical. To address these issues, we developed various process and new configurations for methanol synthesis via methyl formate. This configuration combining two reactors: the one reactor for the carbonylation of methanol and CO to form methyl formate, and the second for the hydrogenolysis of methyl formate and H2 to form two molecule of methanol. Four plant process configurations were compared with the biomass basis is 300 ton/day. The first configuration (A) is equipped with a steam reforming process for converting methane to CO and H2 for increasing H2/CO ratio. CO2 removal is necessary to avoid poisoning the catalyst. COSORB process used for the purpose of increasing the partial pressure of CO in the feed gas. The steam reforming process in B configuration is not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. For C configuration, the steam reforming process and COSORB are not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. D configuration is almost similar to the configuration A. This configuration difference is in the synthesis of methanol which was held in a single reactor. Carbonylation and hydrogenolysis reactions carried out in the same reactor one. These processes were analyzed in term of technical process, material and energy balance and economic

  5. Catalytic performance of plate-type Cu/Fe nanocomposites on ZnO nanorods for oxidative steam reforming of methanol.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Cheng; Lin, Ran-Jin; Lin, Hong-Ping; Lin, Yu-Kai; Lin, Yan-Gu; Chang, Ching-Chun; Chen, Li-Chyong; Chen, Kuei-Hsien

    2011-02-01

    The unique nanoarchitecture developed in this study and the use of replaceable stainless steel grids as catalyst supports certainly provide a promising platform technique for catalytic generation of high methanol conversion, hydrogen production rate and durability to produce electrical energy.

  6. A novel methanol sensor based on gas-penetration through a porous polypyrrole-coated polyacrylonitrile nanofiber mat.

    PubMed

    Jun, Tae-Sun; Ho, Thi Anh; Rashid, Muhammad; Kim, Yong Shin

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we propose a novel chemoresistive gas sensor operated under a vertical analyte flow passing through a permeable sensing membrane. Such a configuration is different from the use of a planar sensor implemented under a conventional horizontal flow. A highly porous core-shell polyacrylonitrile-polypyrrole (PAN@PPy) nanofiber mat was prepared as the sensing element via electrospinning and two-step vapor-phase polymerization (VPP). Various analysis methods such as SEM, TEM, FT-IR and XPS measurements were employed in order to characterize structural features of the porous sensing mat. These analyses confirmed that very thin (ca. 10 nm) conductive PPy sheath layers were deposited by VPP on electrospun PAN nanofibers with an average diameter of 258 nm. Preliminary results revealed that the gas penetration-type PAN@PPy sensor had a higher sensor response and shorter detection and recovery times upon exposure to methanol analyte when compared with a conventional horizontal flow sensor due to efficient and fast analyte transfer into the sensing layer. PMID:24205639

  7. A novel multiple headspace extraction gas chromatographic method for measuring the diffusion coefficient of methanol in water and in olive oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Yun; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2015-03-13

    A novel method for the determination of the diffusion coefficient (D) of methanol in water and olive oil has been developed. Based on multiple headspace extraction gas chromatography (MHE-GC), the methanol released from the liquid sample of interest in a closed sample vial was determined in a stepwise fashion. A theoretical model was derived to establish the relationship between the diffusion coefficient and the GC signals from MHE-GC measurements. The results showed that the present method has an excellent precision (RSD<1%) in the linear fitting procedure and good accuracy for the diffusion coefficients of methanol in both water and olive oil, when compared with data reported in the literature. The present method is simple and practical and can be a valuable tool for the determination of the diffusion coefficient of volatile analyte(s) into food simulants from food and beverage packaging material, both in research studies and in actual applications.

  8. Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Scotto

    2010-05-30

    Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NO{sub x} emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of high-flammable content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. The actual NO{sub x} reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammable content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NO{sub x} reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NO{sub x} emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

  9. Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Mark V. Scotto; Mark A. Perna

    2010-05-30

    Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NOx emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of highflammables content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NOx emissions. The actual NOx reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammables content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NOx reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NOx emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NOx emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

  10. Effect of cooled EGR on performance and exhaust gas emissions in EFI spark ignition engine fueled by gasoline and wet methanol blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohadi, Heru; Syaiful, Bae, Myung-Whan

    2016-06-01

    Fuel needs, especially the transport sector is still dominated by fossil fuels which are non-renewable. However, oil reserves are very limited. Furthermore, the hazardous components produced by internal combustion engine forces many researchers to consider with alternative fuel which is environmental friendly and renewable sources. Therefore, this study intends to investigate the impact of cooled EGR on the performance and exhaust gas emissions in the gasoline engine fueled by gasoline and wet methanol blends. The percentage of wet methanol blended with gasoline is in the range of 5 to 15% in a volume base. The experiment was performed at the variation of engine speeds from 2500 to 4000 rpm with 500 intervals. The re-circulated exhaust gasses into combustion chamber was 5%. The experiment was performed at the constant engine speed. The results show that the use of cooled EGR with wet methanol of 10% increases the brake torque up to 21.3%. The brake thermal efficiency increases approximately 39.6% using cooled EGR in the case of the engine fueled by 15% wet methanol. Brake specific fuel consumption for the engine using EGR fueled by 10% wet methanol decreases up to 23% at the engine speed of 2500 rpm. The reduction of CO, O2 and HC emissions was found, while CO2 increases.

  11. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Phase 1: Multi-fuel reformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

  12. Reduction of carbon dioxide gas formation at the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell using chemically enhanced solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Michael D.; McCready, Mark J.

    The production of CO 2 gas at the DMFC anode leads to dramatic increases in pumping power requirements and reduced power output because of mass transfer limitations as bubble trains form in the channels of larger stacks. Experimental observations taken in a 5 cm 2 DMFC test cell operated at 60 °C, 1 atm, and with a methanol/water fuel flow rates of 5-10 cm 3 min -1 indicate that the rate of bubble formation can be reduced by increasing the fuel flow because more liquid is available for the CO 2 to dissolve in. Further observations indicate that KOH and LiOH added to the fuel eliminates CO 2 gas formation in situ at low concentrations because of the greatly increased solubility that results. A mathematical model for the volumetric rate of CO 2 gas production that includes effects of temperature and solubility is developed and extended to include the effects of hydroxide ions in solution. The model is used to predict the onset location of gas formation in the flow field as well as the void fraction at any point in the flow field. Predictions from the model agree very well with our experiments. Model predictions explain differences in the initial location of bubble formation for fuel solutions pre-saturated with CO 2 as opposed to CO 2-free solutions. Experiments with KOH and LiOH added to fuel solutions confirm the validity of the model extension that includes solubility that is enhanced by chemical reaction. Experiments with LiOH, KOH, and ammonium hydroxide show that the long-term durability of standard Pt-Ru/Nafion ®/Pt membrane electrode assemblies is compromised because of the presence of lithium, potassium, and ammonium cations that interact with the Nafion ® membrane and result in increasing the ohmic limitations of the polymer electrolyte membrane. Experiments with Ca(OH) 2, while reducing gas formation, precipitate the product CaCO 3 out of solution too rapidly for downstream filtering, blocking channels in the flow field.

  13. Review on dry reforming of methane, a potentially more environmentally-friendly approach to the increasing natural gas exploitation.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    With the actual growth of the natural gas industry in the US as well as the potential and availability of this non-renewable carbon source worldwide, reforming of methane gas is getting increasing attention. Methane can be used for the production of heat or electricity, as well, it can be converted to syngas, a building block that could lead to the production of liquid fuels and chemicals, a very promising pathway in light of the increasing price of oil. Amongst the different reforming techniques, dry reforming could represent a very interesting approach both to valorize a cheap source or carbon (CO2) as well as to reduce the overall carbon footprint of the increasing worldwide fossil-based methane consumption. In this short review, attention will be given to the thermodynamics of dry reforming followed by an investigation on dry reforming using heterogeneous catalyst by focusing on the most popular elements used in literature for dry reforming. Attention will as well be given to other emerging techniques that may allow countering at one point the high thermodynamic penalties that accompanies conversion of methane using carbon dioxide. PMID:25426488

  14. Review on dry reforming of methane, a potentially more environmentally-friendly approach to the increasing natural gas exploitation

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    With the actual growth of the natural gas industry in the US as well as the potential and availability of this non-renewable carbon source worldwide, reforming of methane gas is getting increasing attention. Methane can be used for the production of heat or electricity, as well, it can be converted to syngas, a building block that could lead to the production of liquid fuels and chemicals, a very promising pathway in light of the increasing price of oil. Amongst the different reforming techniques, dry reforming could represent a very interesting approach both to valorize a cheap source or carbon (CO2) as well as to reduce the overall carbon footprint of the increasing worldwide fossil-based methane consumption. In this short review, attention will be given to the thermodynamics of dry reforming followed by an investigation on dry reforming using heterogeneous catalyst by focusing on the most popular elements used in literature for dry reforming. Attention will as well be given to other emerging techniques that may allow countering at one point the high thermodynamic penalties that accompanies conversion of methane using carbon dioxide. PMID:25426488

  15. Review on dry reforming of methane, a potentially more environmentally-friendly approach to the increasing natural gas exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Jean-Michel

    2014-11-01

    With the actual growth of the natural gas industry in the US as well as the potential and availability of this non-renewable carbon source worldwide, reforming of methane gas is getting increasing attention. Methane can be used for the production of heat or electricity, as well, it can be converted to syngas, a building block that could lead to the production of liquid fuels and chemical, a very promising pathway in light of the increasing price of oil. Amongst the different reforming techniques, dry reforming could represent a very interesting approach both to valorize a cheap source or carbon (CO2) as well as to reduce the overall carbon footprint of the increasing worldwide fossil-based methane consumption. In this short review, attention will be given on the thermodynamics of dry reforming followed by an investigation on dry reforming using heterogeneous catalyst by focusing on the mots popular elements used in literature for dry reforming. Attention will as well be given to different other emerging techniques that may allow countering at one point the high thermodynamic penalties that accompanies conversion of methane using carbon dioxide.

  16. 40 CFR 86.1320-90 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... flow through the particulate filters, methanol impingers and formaldehyde impingers. These instruments... calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement. 86.1320-90 Section 86.1320-90 Protection of... AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and...

  17. 40 CFR 86.1320-90 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... flow through the particulate filters, methanol impingers and formaldehyde impingers. These instruments... calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement. 86.1320-90 Section 86.1320-90 Protection of... AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and...

  18. 40 CFR 86.1320-90 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... flow through the particulate filters, methanol impingers and formaldehyde impingers. These instruments... calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement. 86.1320-90 Section 86.1320-90 Protection of... AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and...

  19. Towards H2-rich gas production from unmixed steam reforming of methane: Thermodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima da Silva, Aline; Müller, Iduvirges Lourdes

    2011-10-01

    In this work, the Gibbs energy minimization method is applied to investigate the unmixed steam reforming (USR) of methane to generate hydrogen for fuel cell application. The USR process is an advanced reforming technology that relies on the use of separate air and fuel/steam feeds to create a cyclic process. Under air flow (first half of the cycle), a bed of Ni-based material is oxidized, providing the heat necessary for the steam reforming that occurs subsequently during fuel/steam feed stage (second half of the cycle). In the presence of CaO sorbent, high purity hydrogen can be produced in a single reactor. In the first part of this work, it is demonstrated that thermodynamic predictions are consistent with experimental results from USR isothermal tests under fuel/steam feed. From this, it is also verified that the reacted NiO to CH4 (NiOreacted/CH4) molar ratio is a very important parameter that affects the product gas composition and decreases with time. At the end of fuel/steam flow, the reforming reaction is the most important chemical mechanism, with H2 production reaching ∼75 mol%. On the other hand, at the beginning of fuel/steam feed stage, NiO reduction reactions dominate the equilibrium system, resulting in high CO2 selectivity, negative steam conversion and low concentrations of H2. In the second part of this paper, the effect of NiOreacted/CH4 molar ratio on the product gas composition and enthalpy change during fuel flow is investigated at different temperatures for inlet H2O/CH4 molar ratios in the range of 1.2-4, considering the USR process operated with and without CaO sorbent. During fuel/steam feed stage, the energy demand increases as time passes, because endothermic reforming reaction becomes increasingly important as this stage nears its end. Thus, the duration of the second half of the cycle is limited by the conditions under which auto-thermal operation can be achieved. In absence of CaO, H2 at concentrations of approximately 73 mol% can

  20. Reforming of biogas to synthesis gas by a rotating arc plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Woo-Jae; Park, Hyun-Woo; Liu, Jing-Lin; Park, Dong-Wha

    2015-09-01

    In order to produce synthesis gas, reforming of biogas composed with 60 percent for CH4 and 40 percent for CO2 was performed by a novel rotating arc plasma process. The effect of O2/CH4 ratio on the conversion, syngas composition and energy cost was investigated to evaluate the performance of proposed system compared with conventional gliding arc plasma process. When the O2/CH4 ratio was increased from 0.4 to 0.9, the conversions of CH4 and O2 increased up to 97.5 percent and 98.8 percent, respectively, while CO2 conversion was almost constant to be 38.6 percent. This is due to more enhance the partial oxidation of CH4 to CO and H2 than that of dry reforming by increasing the O2/CH4 ratio. In this work, energy cost of 32 kJ/mol was achieved with high syngas composition of 71 percent using pure O2 as oxidant reactant. These are lower than those of different arc plasma processes (energy cost of 122 - 1870 kJ/mol) such as spark, spark-shade and gliding arc plasma. Because, this rotating arc plasma can remain in a long arc length and a large volume of plasma with constant arc length mode.

  1. Chemical recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether: from greenhouse gas to renewable, environmentally carbon neutral fuels and synthetic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Olah, George A; Goeppert, Alain; Prakash, G K Surya

    2009-01-16

    Nature's photosynthesis uses the sun's energy with chlorophyll in plants as a catalyst to recycle carbon dioxide and water into new plant life. Only given sufficient geological time can new fossil fuels be formed naturally. In contrast, chemical recycling of carbon dioxide from natural and industrial sources as well as varied human activities or even from the air itself to methanol or dimethyl ether (DME) and their varied products can be achieved via its capture and subsequent reductive hydrogenative conversion. The present Perspective reviews this new approach and our research in the field over the last 15 years. Carbon recycling represents a significant aspect of our proposed Methanol Economy. Any available energy source (alternative energies such as solar, wind, geothermal, and atomic energy) can be used for the production of needed hydrogen and chemical conversion of CO(2). Improved new methods for the efficient reductive conversion of CO(2) to methanol and/or DME that we have developed include bireforming with methane and ways of catalytic or electrochemical conversions. Liquid methanol is preferable to highly volatile and potentially explosive hydrogen for energy storage and transportation. Together with the derived DME, they are excellent transportation fuels for internal combustion engines (ICE) and fuel cells as well as convenient starting materials for synthetic hydrocarbons and their varied products. Carbon dioxide thus can be chemically transformed from a detrimental greenhouse gas causing global warming into a valuable, renewable and inexhaustible carbon source of the future allowing environmentally neutral use of carbon fuels and derived hydrocarbon products. PMID:19063591

  2. A new headspace gas chromatographic method for the determination of methanol content in paper materials used for food and drink packaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hui-Chao; Tian, Ying-Xin; Jin, Hui-Jun; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Barnes, Donald G

    2013-10-01

    This study reports on a method for determination of methanol in paper products by headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC). The method is based on the hydrolysis of the pulp or paper matrix, using a phosphoric acid solution (42.5%) as the medium at 120 °C in 5 h (excluding air contact) in order to release matrix-entrapped methanol, which is then determined by HS-GC. Data show that, under the given conditions of hydrolysis, no methanol was formed from the methoxyl groups in the material. Reproducibility tests of the method generated a relative standard deviation of <3.5%, with recovery in the range of 93.4-102%. The present method is reliable, accurate, and suitable for use in batch testing of the methanol content in paper-related materials. The method can play an important role in addressing food safety concerns that may be raised regarding the use of paper materials in food and beverage packaging.

  3. Chemical recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether: from greenhouse gas to renewable, environmentally carbon neutral fuels and synthetic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Olah, George A; Goeppert, Alain; Prakash, G K Surya

    2009-01-16

    Nature's photosynthesis uses the sun's energy with chlorophyll in plants as a catalyst to recycle carbon dioxide and water into new plant life. Only given sufficient geological time can new fossil fuels be formed naturally. In contrast, chemical recycling of carbon dioxide from natural and industrial sources as well as varied human activities or even from the air itself to methanol or dimethyl ether (DME) and their varied products can be achieved via its capture and subsequent reductive hydrogenative conversion. The present Perspective reviews this new approach and our research in the field over the last 15 years. Carbon recycling represents a significant aspect of our proposed Methanol Economy. Any available energy source (alternative energies such as solar, wind, geothermal, and atomic energy) can be used for the production of needed hydrogen and chemical conversion of CO(2). Improved new methods for the efficient reductive conversion of CO(2) to methanol and/or DME that we have developed include bireforming with methane and ways of catalytic or electrochemical conversions. Liquid methanol is preferable to highly volatile and potentially explosive hydrogen for energy storage and transportation. Together with the derived DME, they are excellent transportation fuels for internal combustion engines (ICE) and fuel cells as well as convenient starting materials for synthetic hydrocarbons and their varied products. Carbon dioxide thus can be chemically transformed from a detrimental greenhouse gas causing global warming into a valuable, renewable and inexhaustible carbon source of the future allowing environmentally neutral use of carbon fuels and derived hydrocarbon products.

  4. Combustion synthesized copper-ion substituted FeAl2O4 (Cu0.1Fe0.9Al2O4): A superior catalyst for methanol steam reforming compared to its impregnated analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Sayantani; Llorca, Jordi; Dominguez, Montserrat; Colussi, Sara; Trovarelli, Alessandro; Priolkar, Kaustubh R.; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Gayen, Arup

    2016-02-01

    A series of copper ion substituted MAl2O4 (M = Mg, Mn, Fe and Zn) spinels is prepared by a single step solution combustion synthesis (SCS) and tested for methanol steam reforming (MSR). The copper ion substituted Cu0.1Fe0.9Al2O4 appears to be the most active, showing ∼98% methanol conversion at 300 °C with ∼5% CO selectivity at GHSV = 30,000 h-1 and H2O:CH3OH = 1.1. The analogous impregnated catalyst, CuO (10 at%)/FeAl2O4, is found to be much less active. These materials are characterized by XRD, H2-TPR, BET, HRTEM, XPS and XANES analyses. Spinel phase formation is highly facilitated upon Cu-ion substitution and Cu loading beyond 10 at% leads to the formation of CuO as an additional phase. The ionic substitution of copper in FeAl2O4 leads to the highly crystalline SCS catalyst containing Cu2+ ion sites that are shown to be more active than the dispersed CuO nano-crystallites on the FeAl2O4 impregnated catalyst, despite its lower surface area. The as prepared SCS catalyst contains also a portion of copper as Cu1+ that increases when subjected to reforming atmosphere. The MSR activity of the SCS catalyst decreases with time-on-stream due to the sintering of catalyst crystallites as established from XPS and HRTEM analyses.

  5. Synthesis gas and olefins from the catalytic autothermal reforming of volatile and non-volatile liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Bradon Justin

    2007-12-01

    The research presented in this thesis develops an understanding of a clean energy process technology, catalytic partial oxidation (CPO). CPO is a process in which a carbon containing fuel, such as a hydrocarbon, is passed over a noble metal catalyst (e.g. rhodium and platinum) to efficiently generate synthesis gas (H2 and CO) and olefins (e.g. ethylene and propylene) in millisecond contact times. Chapter 1 introduces CPO and compares this technology with conventional methods for synthesis gas and olefin production. CPO has several advantages over the traditional synthesis gas and olefin production methods. One advantage includes autothermal operation, requiring no external heat input from furnaces or heat exchangers. Autothermal operation allows these reactors to be built compactly. The short contact-times associated with CPO further enable for high throughput in relatively small reactor systems, and more compact reactors typically translate to faster response times if transient operation is required. Nobel metal based CPO catalysts are also resistant to deactivation, resulting in less catalyst replacement, regeneration, and maintenance, and an increase in operating efficiency. An overview of the many applications of the chemicals produced from CPO is also presented in Chapter 1. The chemicals produced are crucial in generating valuable chemical intermediates that are eventually incorporated in consumer products, medical devices, building structures, and fertilizers. Additionally, H2 can be used as a source of energy in mobile fuel applications. Fuel cells convert H2 and O2 into electricity and water at higher efficiencies than thermal engine generators. Due to the difficulties in H2 storage, these more efficient energy generators are dependent on hydrogen obtained from synthesis gas production in compact, portable fuel reformers, such as CPO reactors. Furthermore, H2 and CO can be used in reducing environmentally harmful emissions. Particularly, the implementation

  6. A detailed kinetic mechanism including methanol and nitrogen pollutants relevant to the gas-phase combustion and pyrolysis of biomass-derived fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Coda Zabetta, Edgardo; Hupa, Mikko

    2008-01-15

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the simulation of the gas-phase combustion and pyrolysis of biomass-derived fuels was compiled by assembling selected reaction subsets from existing mechanisms (parents). The mechanism, here referred to as ''AaA,'' includes reaction subsets for the oxidation of hydrogen (H{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), light hydrocarbons (C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}), and methanol (CH{sub 3}OH). The mechanism also takes into account reaction subsets of nitrogen pollutants, including the reactions relevant to staged combustion, reburning, and selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR). The AaA mechanism was validated against suitable experimental data from the literature. Overall, the AaA mechanism gave more accurate predictions than three other mechanisms of reference, although the reference mechanisms performed better occasionally. The predictions from AaA were also found to be consistent with the predictions of its parent mechanisms within most of their range of validity, thus transferring the validity of the parents to the inheriting mechanism (AaA). In parametric studies the AaA mechanism predicted that the effect of methanol on combustion and pollutants is often similar to that of light hydrocarbons, but it also showed that there are important exceptions, thus suggesting that methanol should be taken into account when simulating biomass combustion. To our knowledge, the AaA mechanism is currently the only mechanism that accounts for the chemistry of methanol and nitrogen relevant to the gas-phase combustion and pyrolysis of biomass-derived fuels. (author)

  7. Catalytic modification of conventional SOFC anodes with a view to reducing their activity for direct internal reforming of natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boder, M.; Dittmeyer, R.

    When using natural gas as fuel for the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), direct internal reforming lowers the requirement for cell cooling and, theoretically, offers advantages with respect to capital cost and efficiency. The high metal content of a nickel/zirconia anode and the high temperature, however, cause the endothermic reforming reaction to take place very fast. The resulting drop of temperature at the inlet produces thermal stresses, which may lower the system efficiency and limit the stack lifetime. To reduce the reforming rate without lowering the electrochemical activity of the cell, a wet impregnation procedure for modifying conventional cermets by coverage with a less active metal was developed. As the coating material copper was chosen. Copper is affordable, catalytically inert for the reforming reaction and exhibits excellent electronic conductivity. The current density-voltage characteristics of the modified units showed that it is possible to maintain a good electrochemical performance of the cells despite the catalytic modification. A copper to nickel ratio of 1:3 resulted in a strong diminution of the catalytic reaction rate. This indicates that the modification could be a promising method to improve the performance of solid oxide fuel cells with direct internal reforming of hydrocarbons.

  8. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Multi-fuel reformers: Phase 1 -- Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

  9. Water co-catalyzed selective dehydrogenation of methanol to formaldehyde and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Junjun; Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; El-Soda, Mostafa; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Sykes, E. Charles H.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    2016-08-01

    The non-oxidative dehydrogenation of methanol to formaldehyde is considered a promising method to produce formaldehyde and clean hydrogen gas. Although Cu-based catalysts have an excellent catalytic activity in the oxidative dehydrogenation of methanol, metallic Cu is commonly believed to be unreactive for the dehydrogenation of methanol in the absence of oxygen adatoms or oxidized copper. Herein we show that metallic Cu can catalyze the dehydrogenation of methanol in the absence of oxygen adatoms by using water as a co-catalyst both under realistic reaction conditions using silica-supported PtCu nanoparticles in a flow reactor system at temperatures below 250 °C, and in ultra-high vacuum using model PtCu(111) catalysts. Adding small amounts of isolated Pt atoms into the Cu surface to form PtCu single atom alloys (SAAs) greatly enhances the dehydrogenation activity of Cu. Under the same reaction conditions, the yields of formaldehyde from PtCu SAA nanoparticles are more than one order of magnitude higher than on the Cu nanoparticles, indicating a significant promotional effect of individual, isolated Pt atoms. Moreover, this study also shows the unexpected role of water in the activation of methanol. Water, a catalyst for methanol dehydrogenation at low temperatures, becomes a reactant in the methanol steam reforming reactions only at higher temperatures over the same metal catalyst.

  10. Gas-to-liquids synthetic fuels for use in fuel cells : reformability, energy density, and infrastructure compatibility.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.; Kopasz, J. P.; Russell, B. J.; Tomlinson, H. L.

    1999-09-08

    The fuel cell has many potential applications, from power sources for electric hybrid vehicles to small power plants for commercial buildings. The choice of fuel will be critical to the pace of its commercialization. This paper reviews the various liquid fuels being considered as an alternative to direct hydrogen gas for the fuel cell application, presents calculations of the hydrogen and carbon dioxide yields from autothermal reforming of candidate liquid fuels, and reports the product gas composition measured from the autothermal reforming of a synthetic fuel in a micro-reactor. The hydrogen yield for a synthetic paraffin fuel produced by a cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch process was found to be similar to that of retail gasoline. The advantages of the synthetic fuel are that it contains no contaminants that would poison the fuel cell catalyst, is relatively benign to the environment, and could be transported in the existing fuel distribution system.

  11. Direct methanol fuel cell and system

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2004-10-26

    A fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and a polymer electrolyte membrane located between anode and cathode gas diffusion backings uses a methanol vapor fuel supply. A permeable polymer electrolyte membrane having a permeability effective to sustain a carbon dioxide flux equivalent to at least 10 mA/cm.sup.2 provides for removal of carbon dioxide produced at the anode by reaction of methanol with water. Another aspect of the present invention includes a superabsorpent polymer material placed in proximity to the anode gas diffusion backing to hold liquid methanol or liquid methanol solution without wetting the anode gas diffusion backing so that methanol vapor from the liquid methanol or liquid methanol-water solution is supplied to the membrane.

  12. Fuel cell integrated with steam reformer

    DOEpatents

    Beshty, Bahjat S.; Whelan, James A.

    1987-01-01

    A H.sub.2 -air fuel cell integrated with a steam reformer is disclosed wherein a superheated water/methanol mixture is fed to a catalytic reformer to provide a continuous supply of hydrogen to the fuel cell, the gases exhausted from the anode of the fuel cell providing the thermal energy, via combustion, for superheating the water/methanol mixture.

  13. Cooperative Reformable Channel System with Unique Recognition of Small Gas Molecules in a two-dimensional ZIF-membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, Benyamin; Taherifar, Neda; Liu, Zhe

    We report a cooperative reformable channel system in a coordination porous polymer, named as ZIF-L. Three types of local flexible ligands coexist in the crystal structure of this polymer, resulting in ultra-flexibility. The reformable channel is able to regulate permeation of a nonspherical guest molecule, such as N2 or CO2, based on its longer molecular dimension, which is in a striking contrast to conventional molecular sieves that regulate the shorter cross-sectional dimension of the guest molecules. Our density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that the guest molecule induces dynamic motion of the flexible ligands, leading to the channel reformation, and then the guest molecule reorientates itself to fit in the reformed channel. Such a unique ``induced fit-in'' mechanism causes the gas molecule to pass through 6 membered-ring windows in the c- crystal direction of ZIF-L with its longer axis parallel to the window plane. Our experimental permeance of N2 through the ZIF-L membranes is about three times greater than that of CO2, supporting the DFT simulation predictions.

  14. Molecular gas dynamics applied to phase change processes at a vapor-liquid interface: shock-tube experiment and MGD computation for methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, S.; Yano, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Iwanami, K.; Ichijo, M.

    This paper deals with a molecular gas-dynamics method applied to the accurate determination of the condensation coefficient of methanol vapor. The method consisted of an experiment using a shock tube and computations using a molecular gas-dynamics equation. The experiments were performed in such situations where the shift from a vapor-liquid equilibrium state to a nonequilibrium one is realized by a shock wave in a scale of molecular mean free time of vapor molecules. The temporal evolution in thickness of a liquid film formed on the shock-tube endwall behind a reflected shock wave is measured by an optical interferometer. By comparing the measured liquid-film thickness with numerical solutions for a polyatomic version of the Gaussian-BGK model of the Boltzmann equation, the condensation coefficient of methanol vapor is accurately determined in vapor-liquid nonequilibrium states. As a result, it is clear that the condensation coefficient is just unity very near to an equilibrium state, but is smaller far from the equilibrium state.

  15. Isobutanol-methanol mixtures from synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 April--30 June 30 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-25

    A series of CuMgCeO{sub x} catalysts have been prepared by coprecipitating the corresponding metal nitrates with a mixed solution of potassium carbonate and potassium hydroxide. Kinetic studies of methanol and ethanol coupling reactions on K-Cu/MgO/CeO{sub 2} and MgO/CeO{sub 2} catalysts indicate that Cu enhances the rates of alcohol dehydrogenation. The cross-coupling reactions of acetaldehyde and {sup 13}C-labeled methanol produce singly-labeled propionaldehyde, suggesting that it forms by the condensation of acetaldehyde and a reactive intermediate derived from methanol. Isobutyraldehyde, a precursor to isobutanol, forms via the condensation of propionaldehyde and a reactive C{sub 1} intermediate resulting from methanol. CO{sub 2}, one of the reaction products, poisons both basic and metal sites on Ce-containing CuMgO{sub x} catalysts, resulting in decreases in the rates of both alcohol dehydrogenation (Cu sites) and chain-growth condensation reactions (basic sites). CO{sub 2} inhibits ethanol dehydrogenation on both low-Cu and high-Cu CuMgCeO{sub x} catalysts; however, CO{sub 2} has no effect on the activity of low-Cu Ce-free Cu-MgO{sub x} catalysts, suggesting that the Cu on CuMgCeO{sub x} catalysts is more likely to be oxidized by CO{sub 2} to Cu{sup +} species that can be subsequently stabilized by CeO{sub 2}. CO{sub 2} effects on high-pressure isobutanol synthesis from CO/H{sub 2} have been studied on low- and high-Cu CuMgCeO{sub x} catalysts at 320{degrees}C and 4.5 MPa. CO{sub 2} addition and removal on low- and high-Cu catalysts show similar directional effects on CO conversion. CO conversion is lower at all space velocities in the presence of CO{sub 2}, and removal Of CO{sub 2} from the feed partially recovers CO conversion. CO{sub 2} decreases methanol and isobutanol productivities on both catalysts. Addition of 1-propanol to CO/H{sub 2} feed increases isobutanol production, suggesting that 1-propanol is a precursor to isobutanol.

  16. OTEC energy via methanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, W.H.; Richards, D.; Niemeyer, W.G.; Shoemaker, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The conceptual design of an 160 MW/sub e/ OTEC plantship has been documented; it is designed to produce 1000 tonne/day of fuel-grade methanol from coal slurry shipped to the plantship, using oxygen and hydrogen from the on-board electrolysis of water. Data and components are used that were derived by Brown and Root Development, Inc. (BARDI) in designing a barge-mounted plant to make methanol from natural gas for Litton Industries and in the design and construction of a coal-to-ammonia demonstration plant in operation at Muscle Shoals, Alabama, for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The OTEC-methanol plant design is based on the use of the Texaco gasifier and Lurgi synthesis units. The sale price of OTEC methanol delivered to port from this first-of-a-kind plant is estimated to be marginally competitive with methanol from other sources at current market prices.

  17. Demonstration of a Highly Efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power System Using Adiabatic Steam Reforming and Anode Gas Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Mcvay, Gary L.

    2012-05-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are currently being developed for a wide variety of applications because of their high efficiency at multiple power levels. Applications for SOFCs encompass a large range of power levels including 1-2 kW residential combined heat and power applications, 100-250 kW sized systems for distributed generation and grid extension, and MW-scale power plants utilizing coal. This paper reports on the development of a highly efficient, small-scale SOFC power system operating on methane. The system uses adiabatic steam reforming of methane and anode gas recirculation to achieve high net electrical efficiency. The anode exit gas is recirculated and all of the heat and water required for the endothermic reforming reaction are provided by the anode gas emerging from the SOFC stack. Although the single-pass fuel utilization is only about 55%, because of the anode gas recirculation the overall fuel utilization is up to 93%. The demonstrated system achieved gross power output of 1650 to 2150 watts with a maximum net LHV efficiency of 56.7% at 1720 watts. Overall system efficiency could be further improved to over 60% with use of properly sized blowers.

  18. Formaldehyde and methanol formation from reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen on neutral Fe2S2 clusters in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shi; Wang, Zhechen; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2013-04-01

    Reaction of CO with H2 on neutral FemSn clusters in a fast flow reactor is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Single photon ionization at 118 nm is used to detect neutral cluster distributions through time of flight mass spectrometry. FemSn clusters are generated through laser ablation of a mixed iron-sulfur target in the presence of a pure helium carrier gas. A strong size dependent reactivity of (FeS)m clusters toward CO is characterized. The reaction FeS + CO → Fe + OCS is found for the FeS cluster, and the association product Fe2S2CO is observed for the Fe2S2 cluster. Products Fe2S2(13)COH2 and Fe2S2(13)COH4 are identified for reactions of (13)CO and H2 on Fe2S2 clusters: this suggests that the Fe2S2 cluster has a high catalytic activity for hydrogenation reactions of CO to form formaldehyde and methanol. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to explore the potential energy surfaces for the two reactions: Fe2S2 + CO + 2H2 → Fe2S2 + CH3OH; and Fe2S2 + CO + H2 → Fe2S2 + CH2O. A barrierless, thermodynamically favorable pathway is obtained for both catalytic processes. Catalytic cycles for formaldehyde and methanol formation from CO and H2 on a Fe2S2 cluster are proposed based on our experimental and theoretical investigations. The various reaction mechanisms explored by DFT are in good agreement with the experimental results. Condensed phase iron sulfide, which contains exposed Fe2S2 units on its surface, is suggested to be a good catalyst for low temperature formaldehyde/methanol synthesis.

  19. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  20. Application of near ambient pressure gas-phase X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to the investigation of catalytic properties of copper in methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosvirin, Igor P.; Bukhtiyarov, Andrey V.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I.

    2016-02-01

    Application of near ambient pressure (NAP) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for characterization of catalytic properties of a heterogeneous catalyst through measurement and analysis of the core-level spectra from gas phase constituents, which become measurable in submillibar pressure range, has been demonstrated for the reaction of methanol oxidation over polycrystalline copper foil. To improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis of the gas phase signals for the routine XPS spectrometer with double Al/Mg anode used in these experiments, the sample was removed from XPS analysis zone, but it was still located in high-pressure gas cell. As consequence, only gas phase peaks from reagents and reaction products have been observed in XPS spectra. Quantitative analysis of the spectra has allowed us to calculate conversions of the reagents and yields of the reaction products, or, other words, to characterize the catalytic properties of the catalyst and to track their changes with temperature. Further comparison of the catalytic properties with concentration of the surface species measured by in situ XPS in separate experiments, but under the same conditions, gives a possibility to discuss the reaction mechanisms.

  1. Rapid starting methanol reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Chludzinski, Paul J.; Dantowitz, Philip; McElroy, James F.

    1984-01-01

    The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

  2. Methanol selective fibre-optic gas sensor with a nanoporous thin film of organic-inorganic hybrid multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Okuda, H.; Lee, S.-W.

    2015-07-01

    The development of an evanescent wave optical fibre (EWOF) sensor modified with an organic-inorganic hybrid nanoporous thin film for alcohol vapor detection was demonstrated. The optical fibre with a core diameter of 200 μm was bent into U-shape probe optic fibre to enhance the penetation depth of light transferred into the evanescent filed. The bended region of the fibre was modified with a multilayered thin film of poly(allyamine hydrochloride) and silica nanoparticels, (PAH/SiO2)n, by a layer-by-layer (LbL) film deposition technique, followed by infusion of tetrakis(4- sulfophenyl)porphine, TPPS. The mesoporous film structure showed high sensitivity and selectivity to methanol by the aid of the TPPS infused inside the film. The optical sensor response was reversible and reproducible over many times of exposures to analytes, which was caused by the change in refractive index (RI) of the film.

  3. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  4. Slab reformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurrier, Francis R. (Inventor); DeZubay, Egon A. (Inventor); Murray, Alexander P. (Inventor); Vidt, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  5. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1985-03-12

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  6. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  7. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, F.R.; DeZubay, E.A.; Murray, A.P.; Vidt, E.J.

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations are disclosed particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant. 14 figs.

  8. Propane Clathrate Hydrate Formation Accelerated by Methanol.

    PubMed

    Amtawong, Jaruwan; Guo, Jin; Hale, Jared S; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Fleischer, Everly B; Martin, Rachel W; Janda, Kenneth C

    2016-07-01

    The role of methanol as both an inhibitor and a catalyst for the formation of clathrate hydrates (CHs) has been a topic of intense study. We report a new quantitative study of the kinetics of propane CH formation at 253 K from the reaction of propane gas with <75 μm ice particles that have been doped with varying amounts of methanol. We find that methanol significantly accelerates the formation reaction with quite small doping quantities. Even for only 1 methanol molecule per 10 000 water molecules, the maximum uptake rate of propane into CHs is enhanced and the initiation pressure is reduced. These results enable more efficient production of CHs for gas storage. This remarkable acceleration of the CH formation reaction by small quantities of methanol may place constraints on the mechanism of the inhibition effect observed under other conditions, usually employing much larger quantities of methanol. PMID:27275862

  9. Efficient utilization of greenhouse gases in a gas-to-liquids process combined with CO2/steam-mixed reforming and Fe-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chundong; Jun, Ki-Won; Ha, Kyoung-Su; Lee, Yun-Jo; Kang, Seok Chang

    2014-07-15

    Two process models for carbon dioxide utilized gas-to-liquids (GTL) process (CUGP) mainly producing light olefins and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthetic oils were developed by Aspen Plus software. Both models are mainly composed of a reforming unit, an F-T synthesis unit and a recycle unit, while the main difference is the feeding point of fresh CO2. In the reforming unit, CO2 reforming and steam reforming of methane are combined together to produce syngas in flexible composition. Meanwhile, CO2 hydrogenation is conducted via reverse water gas shift on the Fe-based catalysts in the F-T synthesis unit to produce hydrocarbons. After F-T synthesis, the unreacted syngas is recycled to F-T synthesis and reforming units to enhance process efficiency. From the simulation results, it was found that the carbon efficiencies of both CUGP options were successfully improved, and total CO2 emissions were significantly reduced, compared with the conventional GTL processes. The process efficiency was sensitive to recycle ratio and more recycle seemed to be beneficial for improving process efficiency and reducing CO2 emission. However, the process efficiency was rather insensitive to split ratio (recycle to reforming unit/total recycle), and the optimum split ratio was determined to be zero.

  10. Hydrogen-bonded ring closing and opening of protonated methanol clusters H(+)(CH3OH)(n) (n = 4-8) with the inert gas tagging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Cheng; Hamashima, Toru; Yamazaki, Ryoko; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Yuta; Mizuse, Kenta; Fujii, Asuka; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2015-09-14

    The preferential hydrogen bond (H-bond) structures of protonated methanol clusters, H(+)(MeOH)n, in the size range of n = 4-8, were studied by size-selective infrared (IR) spectroscopy in conjunction with density functional theory calculations. The IR spectra of bare clusters were compared with those with the inert gas tagging by Ar, Ne, and N2, and remarkable changes in the isomer distribution with the tagging were found for clusters with n≥ 5. The temperature dependence of the isomer distribution of the clusters was calculated by the quantum harmonic superposition approach. The observed spectral changes with the tagging were well interpreted by the fall of the cluster temperature with the tagging, which causes the transfer of the isomer distribution from the open and flexible H-bond network types to the closed and rigid ones. Anomalous isomer distribution with the tagging, which has been recently found for protonated water clusters, was also found for H(+)(MeOH)5. The origin of the anomaly was examined by the experiments on its carrier gas dependence.

  11. Production of syngas via partial oxidation and CO{sub 2} reforming of coke oven gas over a Ni catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Jianzhong Guo; Zhaoyin Hou; Jing Gao; Xiaoming Zheng

    2008-05-15

    The partial oxidation and CO{sub 2} reforming of coke oven gas (COG) to syngas was investigated on differently sized Ni catalysts in a fluidized-bed reactor. It was found that the catalytic performance of Ni depends strongly on its particle size. The small-sized Ni catalyst exhibited higher activity and higher selectivity in the partial oxidation of COG. The conversion of CH{sub 4} was kept at 80.7% at a lower temperature (750{sup o}C) and a wide space velocity (from 8000 to 80 000 h{sup -1}). CO{sub 2} reforming of COG is also an efficient route for syngas production. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio in the COG-derived syngas could be controlled by manipulating the concentration of O{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} added in the feed. The yield of produced syngas increases with an increase in temperature. 19 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas over a nickel catalyst supported on mesoporous alumina xerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeong Gil; Youn, Min Hye; Cho, Kyung Min; Park, Sunyoung; Song, In Kyu

    Mesoporous alumina xerogel (A-SG) is prepared by a sol-gel method for use as a support for a nickel catalyst. The Ni/A-SG catalyst is then prepared by an impregnation method, and is applied to hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effect of the mesoporous alumina xerogel support on the catalytic performance of Ni/A-SG catalyst is investigated. For the purpose of comparison, a nickel catalyst supported on commercial alumina (A-C) is also prepared by an impregnation method (Ni/A-C). Both the hydroxyl-rich surface and the electron-deficient sites of the A-SG support enhance the dispersion of the nickel species on the support during the calcination step. The formation of the surface nickel aluminate phase in the Ni/A-SG catalyst remarkably increases the reducibility and stability of the catalyst. Furthermore, the high-surface area and the well-developed mesoporosity of the Ni/A-SG catalyst enhance the gasification of surface hydrocarbons that are adsorbed in the reaction. In the steam reforming of LNG, the Ni/A-SG catalyst exhibits a better catalytic performance than the Ni/A-C catalyst in terms of LNG conversion and hydrogen production. Moreover, the Ni/A-SG catalyst shows strong resistance toward catalyst deactivation.

  13. Gas Cell Observations of Methanol from 0.6 to 1.9 Thz Using the Herschel Space Observatory Hifi Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Ronan D.; Pearson, John C.; Lord, Steve D.; Teyssier, David

    2009-06-01

    The Herschel HIFI instrument, in its ground testing, collected over 6000 spectra of methanol (with natural terrestrial isotopic abundance). These data were gathered primarily to validate the instrument's spectroscopic functionality and proper operation. They have a secondary benefit of increasing the database of methanol lines. Furthermore, the data has enormous and largely untapped potential for a fundamental spectroscopic investigation. We present the analysis of this broad range of methanol spectra and detail the instrument effects seen. Additionally we detail the new insight into the torsional states and self-broadening characteristics of methanol.

  14. Separation of aromatic solvents from oil refinery reformates by a newly designed ionic liquid using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, Indra; Mabaso, Mbongeni; Redhi, Gan; Singh, Prashant; Kumar, Sudharsan; Moodley, Kandasamy

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the new ionic liquid, N,N-dimethyl-2-oxopyrrolidonium iodide, synthesized in our laboratory is a suitable solvent for the separation of aromatic components benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes from petroleum mixtures (reformates) in liquid-liquid extraction. In pursuance of the above aim, a method to extract all components of a mixture, containing four aromatic components simultaneously, was developed. A new ionic liquid and a previously used liquid were compared for their extraction abilities. These ionic liquids were, respectively, N,N-dimethyl-2-oxopyrrolidinium iodide and 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium ethyl sulfate. The concentrations of each benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes component in the extract and raffinate phases were measured by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection as volume percent to determine the extraction ability of the ionic liquids. The results obtained for both the reformate samples and model mixtures indicated that the new ionic liquid was effective as an extracting solvent for the recovery of aromatic components from reformates. Also the analysis results, using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection, for the reformate samples were as good as the results obtained by a local oil refinery. The extraction results also show that the developed method is very suitable for the separation and analysis of aromatic components in reformates.

  15. Coke-free dry reforming of model diesel fuel by a pulsed spark plasma at low temperatures using an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Yasushi; Furukawa, Naotsugu; Matsukata, Masahiko; Kikuchi, Eiichi

    2011-07-01

    Dry reforming of diesel fuel, an endothermic reaction, is an attractive process for on-board hydrogen/syngas production to increase energy efficiency. For operating this dry reforming process in a vehicle, we can use the exhaust gas from an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system as a source of carbon dioxide. Catalytic dry reforming of heavy hydrocarbon is a very difficult reaction due to the high accumulation of carbon on the catalyst. Therefore, we attempted to use a non-equilibrium pulsed plasma for the dry reforming of model diesel fuel without a catalyst. We investigated dry reforming of model diesel fuel (n-dodecane) with a low-energy pulsed spark plasma, which is a kind of non-equilibrium plasma at a low temperature of 523 K. Through the reaction, we were able to obtain syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) and a small amount of C2 hydrocarbon without coke formation at a ratio of CO2/Cfuel = 1.5 or higher. The reaction can be conducted at very low temperatures such as 523 K. Therefore, it is anticipated as a novel and effective process for on-board syngas production from diesel fuel using an EGR system.

  16. A novel process for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1992-01-28

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol by a novel process. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two step reaction in series: the carbonylation of methanol to methyl formate taking place in a non-equilibrium region in the vicinity of the copper chromite surface, and the hydrogenolysis of methyl formate to methanol taking place on the surface of the copper chromite. The synergism between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we tested several copper chromites (with different surface areas and stabilizing agents) on the rate of methanol synthesis. It seems likely that pore diffusion limitations control the hydrogenolysis reaction since the rate of methanol formation is proportional to the square root of the copper chromite surface area. Elemental analyses using Inductively Coupled Plasma analysis and pore size distribution analysis of copper chromite were carried out.

  17. Asymptomatic blood methanol in emergency room patients.

    PubMed

    Wargotz, E S; Werner, M

    1987-06-01

    Over a four-month period, methanol was found in the blood of 18 patients among 687 sequential emergency room admissions screened for alcohols by gas chromatography. In the patients with positive results, blood ethanol ranged from 6 to 570 mg/dL (1.3-123.7 mmol/L), blood methanol from 2.3 to 4.0 mg/dL (0.72-1.25 mmol/L). Methanol exposure during preparation of the sampling site or in the course of specimen handling, ingestion of denatured alcohol, as well as methanol production from the metabolism of aspartame are ruled out as causes for these findings. The authors conclude that endogenous methanol production is the probable major cause, while methanol as a fermentation congener may be a contributory minor cause.

  18. Water, methanol and dense gas tracers in the local ULIRG Arp 220: results from the new SEPIA Band 5 Science Verification campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galametz, M.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Immer, K.; Humphreys, E.; Aladro, R.; De Breuck, C.; Ginsburg, A.; Madden, S. C.; Møller, P.; Arumugam, V.

    2016-10-01

    We present a line survey of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220, taken with the newly installed SEPIA (Swedish-European Southern Observatory PI receiver for APEX) Band 5 instrument on APEX (Atacama Pathfinder Experiment). We illustrate the capacity of SEPIA to detect the 183.3 GHz H2O 31,3-22,0 line against the atmospheric H2O absorption feature. We confirm the previous detection of the HCN(2-1) line, and detect new transitions of standard dense gas tracers such as HNC(2-1), HCO+(2-1), CS(4-3), C34S(4-3) and HC3N(20-19). We also detect HCN(2-1) v2 = 1 and the 193.5 GHz methanol (4-3) group for the first time. The absence of time variations in the megamaser water line compared to previous observations seems to rule out an AGN nuclear origin for the line. It could, on the contrary, favour a thermal origin instead, but also possibly be a sign that the megamaser emission is associated with star-forming cores washed out in the beam. We finally discuss how the new transitions of HCN, HNC and HCO+ refine our knowledge of the interstellar medium physical conditions in Arp 220.

  19. BHP may scale up methanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-06-23

    Broken Hill Pty. (BHP: Melbourne) says otherwise uneconomic gas reserves in the Timor Sea off northwest Australia could be developed if the company`s plans to commercialize a novel gas-to-methanol technology prove to be viable. BHP is building an A$70-million ($50 million) research unit in Victoria using ICI`s Leading Concept Methanol gas-to-methanol process. If this unit proves viable, it could be put on a vessel and taken to Timor Sea where BHP has oil exploration and production interests. Timor gas is not economically viable because of lack of nearby markets. The 54,000-m.t./year research plant, located at Werrbee near Melbourne, is scheduled to start production in the second half of 1994, according to BHP manager Joe Evon. The plant is being built by Davy/John Brown. Provided the economic climate is right, BHP is expected to build a world-scale methanol plant offshore.

  20. [Methanol metabolism in plants].

    PubMed

    Stepanov, S S; Zolotar'ova, O K

    2011-01-01

    Methabolism of methanol in plant organisms is considered in the paper. Enzymes of consecutive oxidation of methanol and enzymes responsible for incorporation of carbon from methanol molecule to methyl groups of phospholipids, carboxylic acids and carbohydrates have been described. The peculiarity of plant organisms is in interaction of reactions of methanol transformation with pathways of photorespiration and C1-metabolism and in the capacity to use methanol carbon to form organic matter through photosynthesis. The inclusion of methanol metabolites in anabolic processes occurs at the level of formaldehyde and formiate. As a result, exogenous methanol at low concentrations can stimulate the photosynthetic efficiency of plants.

  1. Studying the characteristics of a 5 kW power installation on solid-oxide fuel cells with steam reforming of natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munts, V. A.; Volkova, Yu. V.; Plotnikov, N. S.; Dubinin, A. M.; Tuponogov, V. G.; Chernishev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The results from tests of a 5 kW power plant on solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), in which natural gas is used as fuel, are presented. The installation's process circuit, the test procedure, and the analysis of the obtained results are described. The characteristics of the power plant developed by the Ural Industrial Company are investigated in four steady-state modes of its operation: with the SOFC nominal power capacity utilized by 40% (2 kW), 60% (3 kW), 90% (4.5 kW) and 110% (5.4 kW) (the peaking mode). The electrical and thermodynamic efficiencies are calculated for all operating modes, and the most efficient mode, in which the electrical efficiency reached almost 70%, is determined. The air excess coefficient and heat loss with flue gases q 2 are determined, and it is revealed that the heat loss q 5 decreases from 40 to 25% with increasing the load. Thermal balances are drawn up for the following components of the system the reformer, the SOFC battery, the catalytic burner for afterburning anode gases, the heat exchanger for heating the cathode air and the mixture of natural gas and steam, and the actual fuel utilization rates in the electrochemical generator are calculated. An equation for the resulting natural gas steam reforming reaction was obtained based on the results from calculating the equilibrium composition of reforming products for the achieved temperatures at the reformer outlet t 3.

  2. Hydrogen production from alcohol reforming in a microwave ‘tornado’-type plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarova, E.; Bundaleska, N.; Dias, F. M.; Tsyganov, D.; Saavedra, R.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, an experimental investigation of microwave plasma-assisted reforming of different alcohols is presented. A microwave (2.45 GHz) ‘tornado’-type plasma with a high-speed tangential gas injection (swirl) at atmospheric pressure is applied to decompose alcohol molecules, namely methanol, ethanol and propanol, and to produce hydrogen-rich gas. The reforming efficiency is investigated both in Ar and Ar+ water vapor plasma environments. The hydrogen yield dependence on the partial alcohol flux is analyzed. Mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used to detect the outlet gas products from the decomposition process. Hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and solid carbon are the main decomposition by-products. A significant increase in the hydrogen production rate is observed with the addition of a small amount of water. Furthermore, optical emission spectroscopy is applied to detect the radiation emitted by the plasma and to estimate the gas temperature and electron density.

  3. Neat methanol fuel cell power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abens, S.; Farooque, M.

    1985-12-01

    Attention is given to a fuel cell development effort which has been directed, by ease-of-supply, low weight, and low volume criteria toward the use of undiluted methanol. Partial oxidation and internal water recovery concepts are incorporated, allowing the onboard dilution of methanol fuel through mixing with exhaust-recovered water. This scheme is successfully demonstrated for the case of a 3 kW unit employing commercial cross flow heat exchangers, as well as for a 5 kW reformer flue exhaust water recovery design with U.S. Air force baseload stationary applications. The USAF powerplant has an overall thermal efficiency of 32 percent at rated load.

  4. Conversion of crude methanol to gasoline with extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.; Smyth, S.C.

    1987-11-24

    A continuous process for converting crude methanol to gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons in a catalytic reaction zone with a crystalline acid zeolite catalyst at elevated temperature and pressure is described comprising the steps of: (a) contacting a crude methanol feedstock containing a minor amount of water with a liquid hydrocarbon extraction stream under extraction conditions favorable to selective extraction of the methanol, thereby providing an extract liquid stream rich in methanol and an aqueous raffinate stream lean in methanol; (b) charging the extracted methanol substantially free of water to the reaction zone under process conditions to convert substantially all methanol to hydrocarbons; (c) cooling reaction effluent to recover aqueous liquid by-product stream, gas rich in C/sub 2/ + hydrocarbons, liquid rich in C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ and C/sub 5/ + hydrocarbons; and (d) contacting crude methanol feedstock with at least a portion of the liquid hydrocarbons employed as extraction liquid.

  5. Estimating the benefits of greenhouse gas emission reduction from agricultural policy reform

    SciTech Connect

    Adger, W.N. . Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment); Moran, D.C. . Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment)

    1993-09-01

    Land use and agricultural activities contribute directly to the increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Economic support in industrialized countries generally increases agriculture's contribution to global greenhouse gas concentrations through fluxes associated with land use change and other sources. Changes in economic support offers opportunities to reduce net emissions, through this so far has gone unaccounted. Estimates are presented here of emissions of methane from livestock in the UK and show that, in monetary terms, when compared to the costs of reducing support, greenhouse gases are a significant factor. As signatory parties to the Climate Change Convection are required to stabilize emissions of all greenhouse gases, options for reduction of emissions of methane and other trace gases from the agricultural sector should form part of these strategies.

  6. Sulfur passivated reforming process lowers syngas H sub 2 /CO ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Udengaard, N.R. )

    1992-03-09

    This paper reports that a decision by Sterling Chemicals Inc. to exit the methanol business in 1980 created a product slate that favored a decrease in the molar H{sub 2}.CO ratio from 2.7 to 1.8 in synthesis gas produced there. This paper reports that this made it necessary eventually to develop an economical way of achieving the changed product slate without hurting the economics of carbon monoxide, blend gas, and hydrogen production. The answer was the sulfur passivated reforming (Sparg) process. It was first commercialized at Sterling's Texas City, Tex., plant in 1987. In the years since, it has proven to be both economical and reliable.

  7. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.13 ), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  8. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1991-02-12

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.-), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  9. Determination of low levels of methanol in crude oils by multi-dimensional gas chromatography (MDGC) using novel micro channel flow technology.

    PubMed

    Tipler, Andrew; Marotta, Lee; DiSanzo, Frank; Grecsek, Heidi

    2012-03-01

    The accurate and precise determination of methanol in crude oils at concentrations less than 10 ppm is of economic value to the petroleum industry. This report presents the optimization, results and long term performance of a flow switching device MDGC hardware, the Swafer™, for the rapid and precise analysis of methanol from approximately 0.4 ppm (w/w) to 1000 ppm. The use of low temperature injection and backflush technique decreases maintenance and increases sample throughput. The short term quantitative percent relative standard deviations at 1, 30 and 1000 ppm (w/w) methanol in crude oils are 5, 3 and 0.3, respectively. The MDGC procedure follows closely that described in ASTM D7059 for determination of crude oils; however, D7059 previously has not been evaluated at concentrations of less than 10 ppm. This work further extends the application of D7059 to concentrations of <10 ppm.

  10. Reforming Science: Structural Reforms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Science has a critical role to play in addressing humanity's most important challenges in the twenty-first century. However, the contemporary scientific enterprise has developed in ways that prevent it from reaching maximum effectiveness and detract from the appeal of a research career. To be effective, the methodological and culture reforms discussed in the accompanying essay must be accompanied by fundamental structural reforms that include a renewed vigorous societal investment in science and scientists. PMID:22184420

  11. Determination of N-nitrosamines in processed meats by liquid extraction combined with gas chromatography-methanol chemical ionisation/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheeren, Marina Bergoli; Sabik, Hassan; Gariépy, Claude; Terra, Nelcindo Nascimento; Arul, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    A simple, accessible and reproducible method was developed and validated as an alternative for the determination of nine volatile N-nitrosamines (NAs) in meat products, using a low volume of organic solvent and without requiring specific apparatus, offering the possibility of practical implementation in routine laboratories. The NAs were extracted with dichloromethane followed by a clean-up with phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.0). The extracts were analysed by gas chromatography-chemical ionisation/mass spectrometry (GC-CI/MS) in positive-ion mode using methanol as reagent. Limits of detection and quantification, recovery and reproducibility were determined for all NAs (N-nitrosodimethylamine, N-nitrosomethylethylamine, N-nitrosodiethylamine, N-nitrosopyrrolidine, N-nitrosodipropylamine, N-nitrosomorpholine, N-nitrosopiperidine, N-nitrosodibutylamine and N-nitrosodiphenylamine). Satisfactory sensitivity and selectivity were obtained even without concentrating the extract by solvent evaporation, avoiding the loss of the nine NAs studied. Limits of detection ranged from 0.15 to 0.37 µg kg(-1), whereas limits of quantification ranged from 0.50 to 1.24 µg kg(-1). Recoveries calculated in cooked ham that had been spiked at 10 and 100 µg kg(-1) were found to be between 70% and 114% with an average relative standard deviation of 13.2%. The method was successfully used to analyse five samples of processed meat products on the day of purchase and 7 days later (after storage at 4°C). The most abundant NAs found in the analysed products were N-nitrosodipropylamine and N-nitrosopiperidine, which ranged from 1.75 to 34.75 µg kg(-1) and from 1.50 to 4.26 µg kg(-1), respectively. In general, an increase in the level of NAs was observed after the storage period. The proposed method may therefore be a useful tool for food safety control once it allows assessing the profile and the dietary intake of NAs in food over time.

  12. Upgrading light olefin fuel gas and catalytic reformate in a turbulent fluidized bed catalyst reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kushnerick, J.D.; Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1989-05-02

    A fluidized bed catalyst process is described for conversion of C/sub 4/- light olefinic gas feedstock to C/sub 5/+ hydrocarbons and for conversion of C/sub 6/ to C/sub 8/ aromatic feedstock to C/sub 7/ to C/sub 11/ aromatics. It consists of: maintaining a fluidized bed of zeolite catalyst particles in a turbulent reactor bed at a temperature of about 500/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/F, the catalyst having an apparent particle density of about 0.9 to 1.6 g/cm/sup 3/ and a size range of about 1 to 150 microns, an average catalyst particle size of about 20 to 100 microns containing about 10 to 25 weight percent of fine particles having a particle size less than 32 microns; contacting the feedstocks and passing the feedstocks upwardly through the fluidized catalyst bed under turbulent flow conditions at reaction conditions sufficient to convert at least about 70% of the olefin feedstock and to convert at least 5% of the C/sub 6/ to C/sub 8/ aromatic feedstock; maintaining turbulent fluidized bed conditions through the reactor bed between transition velocity and transport velocity at a superficial fluid velocity of about 0.3 to 2 meters per second; and recovering hydrocarbon product containing C/sub 5/+ hydrocarbons C/sub 7/ to C/sub 11/ aromatic hydrocarbons.

  13. Exergy analysis of polymer electrolyte fuel cell systems using methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Akimitsu; Mitsushima, Shigenori; Kamiya, Nobuyuki; Ota, Ken-ichiro

    An exergy (available energy) analysis has been conducted on a typical polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) system using methanol. The material balance and enthalpy balance were calculated for the PEFC system using methanol steam reforming, and the exergy flow was obtained. Based on these results, the exergy loss in each unit was obtained, and the difference between the enthalpy and exergy was discussed. The exergy loss in this system was calculated to be 193 kJ/mol MeOH for the steam reforming process of methanol. Although the enthalpy efficiency approached unity as the recovery rate of the waste heat from the cell approached unity, the exergy efficiency remained around 0.45 since the cell's operating temperature of 80 °C is low. It was also found that the cell voltage should exceed 0.82 V in order to obtain the exergy efficiency of 0.5 or higher. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) was analyzed using the exergy and compared with the methanol reforming PEFC. In order to obtain the exergy efficiency higher than that of PEFC with steam reforming, the cell voltage of the DMFC should be 0.50 V or larger at the current density of 600 mA/cm 2.

  14. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification.

    PubMed

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-09-19

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H₂ to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H₂, CO and CO₂. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H₂O, CO₂ and H₂. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H₂ and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H₂ and compressed CO₂ ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H₂ permeance and purity, high CH₄ conversion levels and reduced CO yields.

  15. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification.

    PubMed

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-01-01

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H₂ to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H₂, CO and CO₂. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H₂O, CO₂ and H₂. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H₂ and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H₂ and compressed CO₂ ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H₂ permeance and purity, high CH₄ conversion levels and reduced CO yields. PMID:27657143

  16. Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization of Small Methanol and Methanol-Water Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Belau, Leonid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-04-24

    In this work, we report on the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH+(n = 1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH+, (CH3OH)2+, (CH3OH)nH+ (n = 1-9), and (CH3OH)n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-9) as a function of photon energy. With an increasein the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for the methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

  17. Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Musahid; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Belau, Leonid; Kostko, Oleg

    2008-05-12

    In this work we report on thevacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuumultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH +, (CH 3OH)2 +, (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-9), and (CH 3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-9 ) as a function of photon energy. With an increase in the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

  18. Development of alternative fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas: Final topical report, demonstration of one-step slurry-phase process for the co-production of methanol and isobutanol

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Liquid phase co-production of methanol and isobutanol (LPIBOH) was de, demonstrated at DOE`s Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, Texas. Methanol and isobutanol are key intermediates in a synthesis gas-based route to methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE). The technology was demonstrated in a new 18 in. slurry bubble-column reactor that was designed to demonstrate higher pressures and temperatures,higher gas superficial velocities, and lower gas hourly space velocities--all of which are conducive to obtaining optimal isobutanol yield. The integration of the new reactor into the AFDU included the addition of a high-pressure synthesis gas compressor, a high-pressure hydrogen feed source, and a closed-loop methanol- solvent absorption system to remove CO{sub 2} from the unconverted synthesis gas. These modifications were completed in January 1994. The LPIBOH run followed after a short turnaround. It employed a cesium- promoted Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst developed in Air Products` laboratories and subsequently scaled up to a production- sized batch. Over a thirteen day campaign on simulated Shell gasifier gas, the catalyst and reactor system were tested at a matrix of pressures (750, 1300, 1735 psig) and space velocities (3000, 5000, 8200 sL/kg-hr), representing numerous first-of-a-kind run conditions for the AFDU. Inlet gas superficial velocities spanned an impressive 0.16 to 1.0 ft/sec. Stable reactor performance for a full twelve-hour data period at 1.0 ft/sec was another significant milestone for the liquid phase technology program. Apart from the catalyst deactivation, the run successfully demonstrated mixed alcohol synthesis in a slurry bubble-column reactor, as well as all of the new equipment installed for the trial. Although the full capabilities of the new oxygenates system will not be tested until future runs, the design objectives for the modifications were met with respect to the LPIBOH run.

  19. A comparison of hydrogen, methanol and gasoline as fuels for fuel cell vehicles: implications for vehicle design and infrastructure development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Joan M.; Steinbugler, Margaret M.; Kreutz, Thomas G.

    All fuel cells currently being developed for near term use in electric vehicles require hydrogen as a fuel. Hydrogen can be stored directly or produced onboard the vehicle by reforming methanol, or hydrocarbon fuels derived from crude oil (e.g., gasoline, diesel, or middle distillates). The vehicle design is simpler with direct hydrogen storage, but requires developing a more complex refueling infrastructure. In this paper, we present modeling results comparing three leading options for fuel storage onboard fuel cell vehicles: (a) compressed gas hydrogen storage, (b) onboard steam reforming of methanol, (c) onboard partial oxidation (POX) of hydrocarbon fuels derived from crude oil. We have developed a fuel cell vehicle model, including detailed models of onboard fuel processors. This allows us to compare the vehicle performance, fuel economy, weight, and cost for various vehicle parameters, fuel storage choices and driving cycles. The infrastructure requirements are also compared for gaseous hydrogen, methanol and gasoline, including the added costs of fuel production, storage, distribution and refueling stations. The delivered fuel cost, total lifecycle cost of transportation, and capital cost of infrastructure development are estimated for each alternative. Considering both vehicle and infrastructure issues, possible fuel strategies leading to the commercialization of fuel cell vehicles are discussed.

  20. Methanol production method and system

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Michael J.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    1984-01-01

    Ethanol is selectively produced from the reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a transition metal carbonyl catalyst. Methanol serves as a solvent and may be accompanied by a less volatile co-solvent. The solution includes the transition metal carbonyl catalysts and a basic metal salt such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal formate, carbonate or bicarbonate. A gas containing a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio, as is present in a typical gasifer product, is contacted with the solution for the preferential production of ethanol with minimal water as a byproduct. Fractionation of the reaction solution provides substantially pure ethanol product and allows return of the catalysts for reuse.

  1. Structure and energetics of hydrogen-bonded networks of methanol on close packed transition metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Colin J.; Carrasco, Javier; Lawton, Timothy J.; Liriano, Melissa L.; Baber, Ashleigh E.; Lewis, Emily A.; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2014-07-01

    Methanol is a versatile chemical feedstock, fuel source, and energy storage material. Many reactions involving methanol are catalyzed by transition metal surfaces, on which hydrogen-bonded methanol overlayers form. As with water, the structure of these overlayers is expected to depend on a delicate balance of hydrogen bonding and adsorbate-substrate bonding. In contrast to water, however, relatively little is known about the structures methanol overlayers form and how these vary from one substrate to another. To address this issue, herein we analyze the hydrogen bonded networks that methanol forms as a function of coverage on three catalytically important surfaces, Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111), using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory. We investigate the effect of intermolecular interactions, surface coverage, and adsorption energies on molecular assembly and compare the results to more widely studied water networks on the same surfaces. Two main factors are shown to direct the structure of methanol on the surfaces studied: the surface coverage and the competition between the methanol-methanol and methanol-surface interactions. Additionally, we report a new chiral form of buckled hexamer formed by surface bound methanol that maximizes the interactions between methanol monomers by sacrificing interactions with the surface. These results serve as a direct comparison of interaction strength, assembly, and chirality of methanol networks on Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111) which are catalytically relevant for methanol oxidation, steam reforming, and direct methanol fuel cells.

  2. Structure and energetics of hydrogen-bonded networks of methanol on close packed transition metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Colin J; Carrasco, Javier; Lawton, Timothy J; Liriano, Melissa L; Baber, Ashleigh E; Lewis, Emily A; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E Charles H

    2014-07-01

    Methanol is a versatile chemical feedstock, fuel source, and energy storage material. Many reactions involving methanol are catalyzed by transition metal surfaces, on which hydrogen-bonded methanol overlayers form. As with water, the structure of these overlayers is expected to depend on a delicate balance of hydrogen bonding and adsorbate-substrate bonding. In contrast to water, however, relatively little is known about the structures methanol overlayers form and how these vary from one substrate to another. To address this issue, herein we analyze the hydrogen bonded networks that methanol forms as a function of coverage on three catalytically important surfaces, Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111), using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory. We investigate the effect of intermolecular interactions, surface coverage, and adsorption energies on molecular assembly and compare the results to more widely studied water networks on the same surfaces. Two main factors are shown to direct the structure of methanol on the surfaces studied: the surface coverage and the competition between the methanol-methanol and methanol-surface interactions. Additionally, we report a new chiral form of buckled hexamer formed by surface bound methanol that maximizes the interactions between methanol monomers by sacrificing interactions with the surface. These results serve as a direct comparison of interaction strength, assembly, and chirality of methanol networks on Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111) which are catalytically relevant for methanol oxidation, steam reforming, and direct methanol fuel cells.

  3. Structure and energetics of hydrogen-bonded networks of methanol on close packed transition metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Colin J; Carrasco, Javier; Lawton, Timothy J; Liriano, Melissa L; Baber, Ashleigh E; Lewis, Emily A; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E Charles H

    2014-07-01

    Methanol is a versatile chemical feedstock, fuel source, and energy storage material. Many reactions involving methanol are catalyzed by transition metal surfaces, on which hydrogen-bonded methanol overlayers form. As with water, the structure of these overlayers is expected to depend on a delicate balance of hydrogen bonding and adsorbate-substrate bonding. In contrast to water, however, relatively little is known about the structures methanol overlayers form and how these vary from one substrate to another. To address this issue, herein we analyze the hydrogen bonded networks that methanol forms as a function of coverage on three catalytically important surfaces, Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111), using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory. We investigate the effect of intermolecular interactions, surface coverage, and adsorption energies on molecular assembly and compare the results to more widely studied water networks on the same surfaces. Two main factors are shown to direct the structure of methanol on the surfaces studied: the surface coverage and the competition between the methanol-methanol and methanol-surface interactions. Additionally, we report a new chiral form of buckled hexamer formed by surface bound methanol that maximizes the interactions between methanol monomers by sacrificing interactions with the surface. These results serve as a direct comparison of interaction strength, assembly, and chirality of methanol networks on Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111) which are catalytically relevant for methanol oxidation, steam reforming, and direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:25005297

  4. Direct and Highly Selective Conversion of Synthesis Gas into Lower Olefins: Design of a Bifunctional Catalyst Combining Methanol Synthesis and Carbon-Carbon Coupling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kang; Gu, Bang; Liu, Xiaoliang; Kang, Jincan; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Ye

    2016-04-01

    The direct synthesis of lower (C2 to C4) olefins, key building-block chemicals, from syngas (H2/CO), which can be derived from various nonpetroleum carbon resources, is highly attractive, but the selectivity for lower olefins is low because of the limitation of the Anderson-Schulz-Flory distribution. We report that the coupling of methanol-synthesis and methanol-to-olefins reactions with a bifunctional catalyst can realize the direct conversion of syngas to lower olefins with exceptionally high selectivity. We demonstrate that the choice of two active components and the integration manner of the components are crucial to lower olefin selectivity. The combination of a Zr-Zn binary oxide, which alone shows higher selectivity for methanol and dimethyl ether even at 673 K, and SAPO-34 with decreased acidity offers around 70% selectivity for C2-C4 olefins at about 10% CO conversion. The micro- to nanoscale proximity of the components favors the lower olefin selectivity.

  5. Standalone ethanol micro-reformer integrated on silicon technology for onboard production of hydrogen-rich gas.

    PubMed

    Pla, D; Salleras, M; Morata, A; Garbayo, I; Gerbolés, M; Sabaté, N; Divins, N J; Casanovas, A; Llorca, J; Tarancón, A

    2016-08-01

    A novel design of a silicon-based micro-reformer for onboard hydrogen generation from ethanol is presented in this work. The micro-reactor is fully fabricated with mainstream MEMS technology and consists of an active low-thermal-mass structure suspended by an insulating membrane. The suspended structure includes an embedded resistive metal heater and an array of ca. 20k vertically aligned through-silicon micro-channels per square centimetre. Each micro-channel is 500 μm in length and 50 μm in diameter allowing a unique micro-reformer configuration that presents a total surface per projected area of 16 cm(2) cm(-2) and per volume of 320 cm(2) cm(-3). The walls of the micro-channels become the active surface of the micro-reformer when coated with a homogenous thin film of Rh-Pd/CeO2 catalyst. The steam reforming of ethanol under controlled temperature conditions (using the embedded heater) and using the micro-reformer as a standalone device are evaluated. Fuel conversion rates above 94% and hydrogen selectivity values of ca. 70% were obtained when using operation conditions suitable for application in micro-solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs), i.e. 750 °C and fuel flows of 0.02 mlL min(-1) (enough to feed a one watt power source).

  6. Standalone ethanol micro-reformer integrated on silicon technology for onboard production of hydrogen-rich gas.

    PubMed

    Pla, D; Salleras, M; Morata, A; Garbayo, I; Gerbolés, M; Sabaté, N; Divins, N J; Casanovas, A; Llorca, J; Tarancón, A

    2016-08-01

    A novel design of a silicon-based micro-reformer for onboard hydrogen generation from ethanol is presented in this work. The micro-reactor is fully fabricated with mainstream MEMS technology and consists of an active low-thermal-mass structure suspended by an insulating membrane. The suspended structure includes an embedded resistive metal heater and an array of ca. 20k vertically aligned through-silicon micro-channels per square centimetre. Each micro-channel is 500 μm in length and 50 μm in diameter allowing a unique micro-reformer configuration that presents a total surface per projected area of 16 cm(2) cm(-2) and per volume of 320 cm(2) cm(-3). The walls of the micro-channels become the active surface of the micro-reformer when coated with a homogenous thin film of Rh-Pd/CeO2 catalyst. The steam reforming of ethanol under controlled temperature conditions (using the embedded heater) and using the micro-reformer as a standalone device are evaluated. Fuel conversion rates above 94% and hydrogen selectivity values of ca. 70% were obtained when using operation conditions suitable for application in micro-solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs), i.e. 750 °C and fuel flows of 0.02 mlL min(-1) (enough to feed a one watt power source). PMID:27378399

  7. First methanol-to-gasoline plant nears startup in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Haggin, J.

    1985-03-25

    Sometime during the summer 1985, New Zealand Synthetic Fuels Co. was scheduled to begin operating its new plant at Motunui, New Zealand. It marks the first commercial application of the Mobil methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process. Moreover, as the result of a modular approach directed by Bechtel Corp. personnel, the plant represents a major construction success. It is also the first example of a new technology that may seriously challenge traditional Fischer-Tropsch chemistry as a route to synthetic fuels and organic feedstocks. The MTG plant will produce 14,000 barrels per day of gasoline with an octane number rating of 92 to 94 (according to research results). This amount is about one third of present New Zealand demand. The gasoline will be made by catalytic conversion of methanol coming from two plants, each producing about 220 metric tons per day for the single-train MTG plant. The methanol, in turn, is derived from reforming of natural gas from offshore fields in the Tasman Sea.

  8. Dietary methanol and autism.

    PubMed

    Walton, Ralph G; Monte, Woodrow C

    2015-10-01

    The authors sought to establish whether maternal dietary methanol during pregnancy was a factor in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders. A seven item questionnaire was given to women who had given birth to at least one child after 1984. The subjects were solicited from a large primary care practice and several internet sites and separated into two groups - mothers who had given birth to a child with autism and those who had not. Average weekly methanol consumption was calculated based on questionnaire responses. 550 questionnaires were completed by women who gave birth to a non-autistic child. On average these women consumed 66.71mg. of methanol weekly. 161 questionnaires were completed by women who had given birth to an autistic child. The average estimated weekly methanol consumption for this group was 142.31mg. Based on the results of the Wilcoxon rank sum-test, we see a significant difference between the reported methanol consumption rates of the two groups. This study suggests that women who have given birth to an autistic child are likely to have had higher intake of dietary sources of methanol than women who have not. Further investigation of a possible link of dietary methanol to autism is clearly warranted.

  9. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P.; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G.; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K.; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-01-01

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H2 to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H2, CO and CO2. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H2O, CO2 and H2. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H2 and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H2 and compressed CO2 ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H2 permeance and purity, high CH4 conversion levels and reduced CO yields. PMID:27657143

  10. Ceramic oxygen transport membrane array reactor and reforming method

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Rosen, Lee J.; Robinson, Charles; Wilson, Jamie R.; Gonzalez, Javier E.; Doraswami, Uttam R.

    2016-09-27

    A commercially viable modular ceramic oxygen transport membrane reforming reactor for producing a synthesis gas that improves the thermal coupling of reactively-driven oxygen transport membrane tubes and catalyst reforming tubes required to efficiently and effectively produce synthesis gas.

  11. Microfluidic distillation chip for methanol concentration detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao-Nan; Liu, Chan-Chiung; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Ju, Wei-Jhong; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2016-03-17

    An integrated microfluidic distillation system is proposed for separating a mixed ethanol-methanol-water solution into its constituent components. The microfluidic chip is fabricated using a CO2 laser system and comprises a serpentine channel, a boiling zone, a heating zone, and a cooled collection chamber filled with de-ionized (DI) water. In the proposed device, the ethanol-methanol-water solution is injected into the microfluidic chip and driven through the serpentine channel and into the collection chamber by means of a nitrogen carrier gas. Following the distillation process, the ethanol-methanol vapor flows into the collection chamber and condenses into the DI water. The resulting solution is removed from the collection tank and reacted with a mixed indicator. Finally, the methanol concentration is inversely derived from the absorbance measurements obtained using a spectrophotometer. The experimental results show the proposed microfluidic system achieves an average methanol distillation efficiency of 97%. The practicality of the proposed device is demonstrated by detecting the methanol concentrations of two commercial fruit wines. It is shown that the measured concentration values deviate by no more than 3% from those obtained using a conventional bench top system.

  12. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  13. The Methanol Multibeam Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James A.; Cohen, R. J.; Caswell, J. L.; Fuller, G. A.; Brooks, K.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.; Diamond, P. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Hoare, M. G.; Masheder, M. R. W.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Phillips, C.; Quinn, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M.; Walsh, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Wong-McSweeney, D.; Yates, J. A.; Cox, J.

    2007-03-01

    A new 7-beam methanol multibeam receiver is being used to survey the Galaxy for newly forming massive stars, that are pinpointed by strong methanol maser emission at 6.668 GHz. The receiver, jointly constructed by Jodrell Bank Observatory (JBO) and the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), was successfully commissioned at Parkes in January 2006. The Parkes-Jodrell survey of the Milky Way for methanol masers is two orders of magnitude faster than previous systematic surveys using 30-m class dishes, and is the first systematic survey of the entire Galactic plane. The first 53 days of observations with the Parkes telescope have yielded 518 methanol sources, of which 218 are new discoveries. We present the survey methodology as well as preliminary results and analysis.

  14. Millisecond autothermal catalytic reforming of carbohydrates for synthetic fuels by reactive flash volatilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauenhauer, Paul Jakob

    Carbohydrates including glucose, cellulose, starch and polyols including glycerol, ethylene glycol and methanol produced in large quantities from biomass are considered as a carbon-based feedstock for high temperature catalytic reforming by catalytic partial oxidation. Autothermal catalytic partial oxidation of methanol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol with Rh and Pt-based catalysts with ceria on alumina foam supports at residence times less than ten milliseconds produced equilibrium selectivity to synthesis gas. The addition of steam at S/C>4 produced selectivity to H2 higher than 80% with little or no selectivity to minor products. In a new process referred to as 'reactive flash volatilization,' catalytic partial oxidation was combined with pyrolysis of biomass by directly impinging particles of cellulose, starch, polyethylene, soy oil, or Aspen (Populous Tremuloides) on an operating Rh-based reforming catalyst at 700-800°C. Solid particles endothermically pyrolyzed to volatile organic compounds which mixed with air and reformed on the catalyst exothermically generating heat to drive the overall process. Particles of ˜250 mum microcrystalline cellulose processed at the conditions of C/O=1.0 on a RhCe/gamma-Al2O3/alpha-Al 2O3 at a residence time of ˜70 milliseconds produced a gaseous effluent stream selecting for 50% H2 and 50% CO with no observable side products other than H2O and CO2, and <1% CH4. To obtain a more optimal synthesis gas stream, the reforming of ˜400 mum microcrystalline particles was examined over a fixed bed of RhCe/gamma-Al2O3/alpha-Al2O 3 spheres by varying the feed ratio of N2/O2, the temperature of the feed gas, the total particle feed rate, and the addition of steam permitting cellulose conversion with ˜75% fuel efficiency. Cellulose, sucrose, and glycerol particle conversion was examined with high-speed photography (1000 frames/second) revealing the formation of a liquid intermediate from cellulose permitting extremely high heat flux (

  15. Biological Methanol Production by a Type II Methanotroph Methylocystis bryophila.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjay K S; Mardina, Primata; Kim, Sang-Yong; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kim, In-Won

    2016-04-28

    Methane (CH₄) is the most abundant component in natural gas. To reduce its harmful environmental effect as a greenhouse gas, CH₄ can be utilized as a low-cost feed for the synthesis of methanol by methanotrophs. In this study, several methanotrophs were examined for their ability to produce methanol from CH₄; including Methylocella silvestris, Methylocystis bryophila, Methyloferula stellata, and Methylomonas methanica. Among these methanotrophs, M. bryophila exhibited the highest methanol production. The optimum process parameters aided in significant enhancement of methanol production up to 4.63 mM. Maximum methanol production was observed at pH 6.8, 30°C, 175 rpm, 100 mM phosphate buffer, 50 mM MgCl₂ as a methanol dehydrogenase inhibitor, 50% CH₄ concentration, 24 h of incubation, and 9 mg of dry cell mass ml(-1) inoculum load, respectively. Optimization of the process parameters, screening of methanol dehydrogenase inhibitors, and supplementation with formate resulted in significant improvements in methanol production using M. bryophila. This report suggests, for the first time, the potential of using M. bryophila for industrial methanol production from CH₄.

  16. Removal of sulfur contaminants in methanol for fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Kumar, R.; Sederquist, R.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cell power plants are being developed for transit bus and passenger car applications that use methanol as the on-board fuel. Commodity methanol by itself contains very little sulfur; however, it may occasionally be contaminated with up to about 1% diesel fuel or gasoline in current liquid-fuel distribution systems, leading to the presence of sulfur in the methanol fuel. This sulfur must be removed because of its deleterious effect on the reforming catalysts. International Fuel Cells has set the allowable sulfur limit in the methanol fuel at less than 1 ppm. The equilibrium adsorption isotherm and breakthrough data were used to assess the feasibility of developing a granular activated carbon adsorber for the removal of sulfur from transportation fuel cell systems.

  17. A novel process for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1992-01-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to study the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol (MEOH) in the liquid phase by a novel method. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two step reaction consisting of a carbonylation reaction taking place mainly in the film'' close to a copper chromite surface followed by a hydrogenolysis reaction taking place on the surface of the copper chromite. The interaction between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we reexamined the equilibrium concentration for methyl formate and obtained data at higher loadings of copper chromite.

  18. Hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG) over nickel catalysts supported on cationic surfactant-templated mesoporous aluminas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeong Gil; Youn, Min Hye; Park, Sunyoung; Jung, Ji Chul; Kim, Pil; Chung, Jin Suk; Song, In Kyu

    Two types of mesoporous γ-aluminas (denoted as A-A and A-S) are prepared by a hydrothermal method under different basic conditions using cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) as a templating agent. A-A and A-S are synthesized in a medium of ammonia solution and sodium hydroxide solution, respectively. Ni/γ-Al 2O 3 catalysts (Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S) are then prepared by an impregnation method, and are applied to hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effect of a mesoporous γ-Al 2O 3 support on the catalytic performance of Ni/γ-Al 2O 3 is investigated. The identity of basic solution strongly affects the physical properties of the A-A and A-S supports. The high surface-area of the mesoporous γ-aluminas and the strong metal-support interaction of supported catalysts greatly enhance the dispersion of nickel species on the catalyst surface. The well-developed mesopores of the Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S catalysts prohibit the polymerization of carbon species on the catalyst surface during the reaction. In the steam reforming of LNG, both Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S catalysts give better catalytic performance than the nickel catalyst supported on commercial γ-Al 2O 3 (Ni/A-C). In addition, the Ni/A-A catalyst is superior to the Ni/A-S catalyst. The relatively strong metal-support interaction of Ni/A-A catalyst effectively suppresses the sintering of metallic nickel and the carbon deposition in the steam reforming of LNG. The large pores of the Ni/A-A catalyst also play an important role in enhancing internal mass transfer during the reaction.

  19. Reformer Fuel Injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Jennifer L.

    2004-01-01

    Today's form of jet engine power comes from what is called a gas turbine engine. This engine is on average 14% efficient and emits great quantities of green house gas carbon dioxide and air pollutants, Le. nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides. The alternate method being researched involves a reformer and a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Reformers are becoming a popular area of research within the industry scale. NASA Glenn Research Center's approach is based on modifying the large aspects of industry reforming processes into a smaller jet fuel reformer. This process must not only be scaled down in size, but also decrease in weight and increase in efficiency. In comparison to today's method, the Jet A fuel reformer will be more efficient as well as reduce the amount of air pollutants discharged. The intent is to develop a 10kW process that can be used to satisfy the needs of commercial jet engines. Presently, commercial jets use Jet-A fuel, which is a kerosene based hydrocarbon fuel. Hydrocarbon fuels cannot be directly fed into a SOFC for the reason that the high temperature causes it to decompose into solid carbon and Hz. A reforming process converts fuel into hydrogen and supplies it to a fuel cell for power, as well as eliminating sulfur compounds. The SOFC produces electricity by converting H2 and CO2. The reformer contains a catalyst which is used to speed up the reaction rate and overall conversion. An outside company will perform a catalyst screening with our baseline Jet-A fuel to determine the most durable catalyst for this application. Our project team is focusing on the overall research of the reforming process. Eventually we will do a component evaluation on the different reformer designs and catalysts. The current status of the project is the completion of buildup in the test rig and check outs on all equipment and electronic signals to our data system. The objective is to test various reformer designs and catalysts in our test rig to determine the most

  20. Integrated reforming/aromatization process

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1990-06-26

    This patent describes an integrated process for increasing the gasoline yield from a catalytic reforming process. It comprises: charging a naphtha boiling range feedstream to a catalytic reforming reaction zone under reforming conversion conditions; withdrawing a reactor effluent stream from the reforming reaction zone; separating the reactor effluent stream into a hydrogen-rich gas stream and an unstabilized reformate stream; further separating the unstabilized reformate in a fractionator into an overhead stream containing C{sub 4} - components and a bottom stream containing C{sub 6} + components; charging the fractionator overhead stream to a catalytic aromatization zone under aromatization conversion conditions; withdrawing an aromatization zone effluent stream from the aromatization zone; cooling the aromatization zone effluent stream; separating the cooled aromatization zone effluent steam into a C{sub 4} - stream and a C{sub 5} + stream; and refluxing the C{sub 5} + aromatic gasoline stream to the fractionation zone.

  1. IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Keith

    2005-02-01

    This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

  2. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The first observation of methanol in cold dark clouds TMC 1, L 134 N, and B 335 is reported. In all three clouds, the relative abundance of methanol was found to be in the range of 10 to the -9th (i.e., almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde), with no observable variation between the clouds. Methanol emission showed a complex velocity structure; in TMC 1, clear indications of non-LTE were observed. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134 N; the upper limit of the column density of dimethyl ether in L 134 N was estimated to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm, assuming 5 K rotation temperature and LTE. This limit makes the abundance ratio (CH3)2O/CH3OH not higher than 1/5, indicating that dimethyl ether is not overabundant in this dark cloud.

  3. Opportunities for coal to methanol conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    The accumulations of mining residues in the anthracite coal regions of Pennsylvania offer a unique opportunity to convert the coal content into methanol that could be utilized in that area as an alternative to gasoline or to extend the supplies through blending. Additional demand may develop through the requirements of public utility gas turbines located in that region. The cost to run this refuse through coal preparation plants may result in a clean coal at about $17.00 per ton. After gasification and synthesis in a 5000 ton per day facility, a cost of methanol of approximately $3.84 per million Btu is obtained using utility financing. If the coal is to be brought in by truck or rail from a distance of approximately 60 miles, the cost of methanol would range between $4.64 and $5.50 per million Btu depending upon the mode of transportation. The distribution costs to move the methanol from the synthesis plant to the pump could add, at a minimum, $2.36 per million Btu to the cost. In total, the delivered cost at the pump for methanol produced from coal mining wastes could range between $6.20 and $7.86 per million Btu.

  4. Etherification of extracted crude methanol and conversion of raffinate

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1989-05-02

    A continuous process is described for converting crude methanol to methyl tertiary-alkyl ethers comprising the steps of: (a) contacting a crude methanol feedstock containing a minor amount of water with a liquid hydrocarbon extraction stream rich in C/sub 4/+ iso-alkene hydrocarbons under extraction conditions favorable to selective extraction of the methanol, thereby providing an extract liquid stream rich in methanol and an aqueous raffinate stream lean in methanol; (b) charging the liquid hydrocarbon and extracted methanol substantially free of water to a first catalytic reaction zone for contact with acid etherification catalyst under etherification process conditions for converting methanol to predominantly methyl iso-alkyl ether; (c) fractionating the etherification effluent from step (b) to recover unreacted methanol and light hydrocarbon overhead and C/sub 5/+ methyl tertiary-alkyl ether liquid product; (d) catalytically cracking a heavy hydrocarbon stream and recovering liquid hydrocarbon cracking product, an olefinic liquid hydrocarbon stream containing C/sub 4/+ isoalkene; and a light gas stream; and (e) charging the aqueous raffinate stream from step (a) for conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons concurrently with cracking in step (d).

  5. Methanol from coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Economic feasibility of methanol or methyl fuel produced from coal using existing technology is discussed. Other factors considered include environmental, safety, toxicity, transportation, so storage, ease of burning, and retrofitting of present boilers. Demonstrations of its uses as a boiler fuel and as a turbine fuel are cited.

  6. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to High Octane Gasoline: Thermochemical Research Pathway with Indirect Gasification and Methanol Intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Eric; Talmadge, M.; Dutta, Abhijit; Hensley, Jesse; Schaidle, Josh; Biddy, Mary J.; Humbird, David; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Ross, Jeff; Sexton, Danielle; Yap, Raymond; Lukas, John

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) promotes research for enabling cost-competitive liquid fuels production from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The research is geared to advance the state of technology (SOT) of biomass feedstock supply and logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. As part of their involvement in this program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) investigate the economics of conversion pathways through the development of conceptual biorefinery process models. This report describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction (IDL). The steps involve the conversion of biomass to syngas via indirect gasification followed by gas cleanup and catalytic syngas conversion to a methanol intermediate; methanol is then further catalytically converted to high octane hydrocarbons. The conversion process model leverages technologies previously advanced by research funded by the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and demonstrated in 2012 with the production of mixed alcohols from biomass. Biomass-derived syngas cleanup via tar and hydrocarbons reforming was one of the key technology advancements as part of that research. The process described in this report evaluates a new technology area with downstream utilization of clean biomass-syngas for the production of high octane hydrocarbon products through a methanol intermediate, i.e., dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether (DME) which subsequently undergoes homologation to high octane hydrocarbon products.

  7. Thermal decomposition of methanol in the sonolysis of methanol-water mixtures. Spin-trapping evidence for isotope exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, C.M.; Lion, Y.; Kondo, T.; Riesz, P.

    1987-11-05

    The spin trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzenesulfonate was used to monitor the yield of free radicals produced during sonolysis of water-methanol mixtures. Methyl radicals and CH/sub 2/OH radicals were observed as well as the isotopically mixed radicals CH/sub 2/D and CHD/sub 2/ when CH/sub 3/OD:D/sub 2/O mixtures were studied. The results clearly show that thermal decomposition of methanol to methyl radicals occurs in the gas phase. The methyl radical yield rises sharply at very low concentrations of methanol, reaches a maximum at 5 mol dm/sup -3/ in water and decreases to a smaller value in methanol. The yield of methyl radicals as a function of methanol concentration is discussed in terms of the different factors influencing the sonochemistry.

  8. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite for methanol synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  9. Modern Processes of Hydrocarbon Migration and Re-Formation of Oil and Gas Fields (Based on the Results of Monitoring and Geochemical Studies)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikova, Irina; Salakhidinova, Gulmira; Nosova, Fidania; Pronin, Nikita; Ostroukhov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    Special geochemical studies of oils allowed to allocate a movable migration component of oils in the industrial oil deposits. In the field the migration component of oils varies in different parts of the field. The largest percentage of the light migration component (gas condensate of the oil) was detected in the central part of the Kama-Kinel troughs system. Monitoring of the composition of water, oil and gas (condensate light oil component) in the sedimentary cover and ni crystalline basement led to the conclusion of modern migration of hydrocarbons in sedimentary cover. This proves the existence of the modern processes of formation and reformation of oil and gas fields. This presentation is dedicated to the problem of definition of geochemical criteria of selection of hydrocarbons deposit reformation zone in the sample wells of Minibaevskaya area of Romashkinskoye field. While carrying out this work we examined 11 samples of oil from the Upper Devonian Pashiysky horizon. Four oil samples were collected from wells reckoned among the "anomalous" zones that were marked out according to the results of geophysical, oil field and geological research. Geochemical studies of oils were conducted in the laboratory of geochemistry of the Kazan (Volga-region) Federal University. The wells where the signs of hydrocarbons influx from the deep zones of the crust were recorded are considered to be "anomalous". A number of scientists connect this fact to the hypothesis about periodic influx of deep hydrocarbons to the oil deposits of Romashkinskoye field. Other researchers believe that the source rocks of the adjacent valleys sedimentary cover generate gases when entering the main zone of gas formation, which then migrate up the section and passing through the previously formed deposits of oil, change and "lighten" their composition. Regardless of the point of view on the source of the hydrocarbons, the study of the process of deposits refilling with light hydrocarbons is an

  10. Eucomic acid methanol monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-Qiang; Li, Yao-Lan; Wang, Guo-Cai; Liang, Zhi-Hong; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound [systematic name: 2-hy­droxy-2-(4-hy­droxy­benz­yl)butane­dioic acid methanol monosolvate], C11H12O6·CH3OH, the dihedral angles between the planes of the carboxyl groups and the benzene ring are 51.23 (9) and 87.97 (9)°. Inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions involving the hy­droxy and carb­oxy­lic acid groups and the methanol solvent mol­ecule give a three-dimensional structure. PMID:22091200

  11. Improved Performance of Ru/γ-Al2O3 Catalysts in the Selective Methanation of CO in CO2-Rich Reformate Gases upon Transient Exposure to Water-Containing Reaction Gas.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Mageed, Ali M; Widmann, Daniel; Eckle, Stephan; Behm, R Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    To better understand the role of water in the selective methanation of CO in CO2-rich reformate gases on Ru/Al2O3 catalysts, the influence of exposing these catalysts to H2O-rich reformate gases on their reaction characteristics in transient experiments was investigated by employing kinetic and in situ spectroscopic measurements as well as ex situ catalyst characterization. Transient exposure of the ruthenium catalyst to wet reaction gas (5 or 15% H2O) results in significantly enhanced activity and selectivity for CO methanation in subsequent reactions in dry reformate compared with activation and reaction in dry reformate directly. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy results reveal that this is in accordance with a significant decrease in ruthenium particle size, which is stable during subsequent reaction in dry reformate. The implications of these data and additional results from in situ IR spectroscopy on the role and influence of H2O on the reaction, also in technical applications, are discussed. PMID:26457475

  12. Atmospheric deposition of methanol over the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingxi; Nightingale, Philip D; Beale, Rachael; Liss, Peter S; Blomquist, Byron; Fairall, Christopher

    2013-12-10

    In the troposphere, methanol (CH3OH) is present ubiquitously and second in abundance among organic gases after methane. In the surface ocean, methanol represents a supply of energy and carbon for marine microbes. Here we report direct measurements of air-sea methanol transfer along a ∼10,000-km north-south transect of the Atlantic. The flux of methanol was consistently from the atmosphere to the ocean. Constrained by the aerodynamic limit and measured rate of air-sea sensible heat exchange, methanol transfer resembles a one-way depositional process, which suggests dissolved methanol concentrations near the water surface that are lower than what were measured at ∼5 m depth, for reasons currently unknown. We estimate the global oceanic uptake of methanol and examine the lifetimes of this compound in the lower atmosphere and upper ocean with respect to gas exchange. We also constrain the molecular diffusional resistance above the ocean surface-an important term for improving air-sea gas exchange models.

  13. Atmospheric deposition of methanol over the Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingxi; Nightingale, Philip D.; Beale, Rachael; Liss, Peter S.; Blomquist, Byron; Fairall, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    In the troposphere, methanol (CH3OH) is present ubiquitously and second in abundance among organic gases after methane. In the surface ocean, methanol represents a supply of energy and carbon for marine microbes. Here we report direct measurements of air–sea methanol transfer along a ∼10,000-km north–south transect of the Atlantic. The flux of methanol was consistently from the atmosphere to the ocean. Constrained by the aerodynamic limit and measured rate of air–sea sensible heat exchange, methanol transfer resembles a one-way depositional process, which suggests dissolved methanol concentrations near the water surface that are lower than what were measured at ∼5 m depth, for reasons currently unknown. We estimate the global oceanic uptake of methanol and examine the lifetimes of this compound in the lower atmosphere and upper ocean with respect to gas exchange. We also constrain the molecular diffusional resistance above the ocean surface—an important term for improving air–sea gas exchange models. PMID:24277830

  14. Methanol in dark clouds.

    PubMed

    Friberg, P; Madden, S C; Hjalmarson, A; Irvine, W M

    1988-01-01

    We report observations, for the first time, of the 2(0) - 1(0)A+ and E, 2(-1) - 1(-1) E, and 1(0) - 0(0)A+ lines of methanol (CH3OH) in three dark cold clouds, TMC1, L134N, and B335. The CH3OH emission is extended in these clouds and shows a complex velocity structure. Clear indications of non LTE excitation are observed in TMC 1. Estimated column densities are a few 10(13) cm-2. Although less abundant than formaldehyde (H2CO), methanol is almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), in these clouds. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L134N, to an upper limit of 4 10(12) cm-2 (3 sigma). Implications for dark cloud excitation and chemistry are discussed. A new, more accurate, rest frequency 96741.39(0.01) MHz is determined for the 2(0) - 1(0) A+ E line of methanol.

  15. The toxicity of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tephly, T.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Methanol toxicity in humans and monkeys is characterized by a latent period of many hours followed by a metabolic acidosis and ocular toxicity. This is not observed in most lower animals. The metabolic acidosis and blindness is apparently due to formic acid accumulation in humans and monkeys, a feature not seen in lower animals. The accumulation of formate is due to a deficiency in formate metabolism which is, in turn, related, in part, to low hepatic tetrahydrofolate (H{sub 4}folate). An excellent correlation between hepatic H{sub 4} folate and formate oxidation rates has been shown within and across species. Thus, humans and monkeys possess low hepatic H{sub 4}folate levels, low rates of formate oxidation and accumulation of formate after methanol. Formate, itself, produces blindness in monkeys in the absence of metabolic acidosis. In addition to low hepatic H{sub 4}folate concentrations, monkeys and humans also have low hepatic 10-formyl H{sub 4}folate dehydrogenase levels, the enzyme which is the ultimate catalyst for conversion of formate to carbon dioxide. This review presents the basis for the role of folic acid-dependent reactions in the regulation of methanol toxicity.

  16. California methanol assessment. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    Energy feedstock sources for methanol; methanol and other synfuels; transport, storage, and distribution; air quality impact of methanol use in vehicles, chemical methanol production and use; methanol utilization in vehicles; methanol utilization in stationary applications; and environmental and regulatory constraints are discussed.

  17. A novel process for methanol synthesis. [Concurrent sythesis of methly formate and methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1992-01-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol (MeOH) by a novel process. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two-step reaction in series, the carbonylation reaction taking place mainly in a non-equilibrium region in the vicinity of the copper chromite surface, and the hydrogenolysis reaction taking place on the surface of the copper chromite. Interaction between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we investigated the effect of pore diffusion on reaction rate and obtained an expression for the rate of reaction for the methanol/methyl formate concurrent synthesis.

  18. A novel process for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1991-01-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol by a novel process. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two step reaction in series, the carbonylation reaction mainly taking place in a non-equilibrium region in the vicinity of the Cu-chromite surface, and the hydrogenolysis reaction taking place on the surface of the Cu-chromite. The synergism between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we studied the effect of pressure and temperature on the rate of MeOH synthesis. We also compared the reaction rate of a syngas feed simulated for an H{sub 2}/CO ratio from a Texaco gasifier with a methanol balanced syngas feed (H{sub 2}/CO=2). Atomic absorption analysis of solid and liquid samples for the KOMe/Cu-chromite runs was undertaken to identify the distribution of potassium at the end of the methanol synthesis runs. Modelling studies were initiated with emphasis on both kinetic and process behavior. 12 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Regional environmental impacts of methanol-fueled vehicles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Belian, T.; Morris, R.E.; Ligocki, M.P.; Whitten, G.Z.

    1991-12-27

    The objectives of the study were to obtain, through simulation modeling, preliminary estimates of the regional environmental impacts methanol-fueled vehicles and to estimate the sensitivity of the model to important parameters and assumptions that affect the calculation of the impacts. The regional environmental effects of the use of M85 fuel (85 percent methanol and 15 percent gasoline) and M100 (neat methanol) relative to gasoline (an indoline blend) were estimated using a Lagrangian (trajectory) acid deposition model. The Comprehensive Chemistry Acid Deposition Model (CCADM), contains a detailed treatment of gas-phase and aqueous-phase chemistry and associated mass transfer, but provides for a less comprehensive representation of advection and diffusion. Two different meteorological regimes were analyzed: clear sky conditions and cloudy skies with a rain event. The study also included a review of gas- and aqueous-phase chemistry, with particular emphasis on methanol. The CCADM chemical mechanism was updated to include state-of-the-science (as of 1990) gas- and aqueous-phase chemistry including methanol chemistry. The CCADM was then used to analyze the regional environmental impacts from the use of methanol fuels. In performing such an analysis it was necessary to make several assumptions. The sensitivity of the analysis was examined through a series of simulations that varied key input parameters within their ranges of uncertainty.

  20. Enzymatic conversion of carbon dioxide to methanol: Enhanced methanol production in silica sol-gel matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Obert, R.; Dave, B.C.

    1999-12-29

    Strategies for effective conversion of atmospheric CO{sub 2} to methanol offer promising new technologies not only for recycling of the greenhouse gas but also for an efficient production of fuel alternatives. Partial hydrogenation of carbon dioxide has been accomplished by means of heterogeneous catalysis, electrocatalysis, and photocatalysis. Oxide-based catalysts are predominantly used for industrial fixation of carbon dioxide. A unique approach in this direction involves the use of enzymes as catalysts for conversion of carbon dioxide to methanol. The use of enzymes is particularly appealing since it provides a facile low-temperature route for generation of methanol directly from gaseous carbon dioxide. The authors report an enzymatically coupled sequential reduction of carbon dioxide to methanol by using a series of reactions catalyzed by three different dehydrogenases. Overall, the process involves an initial reduction of CO{sub 2} to formate catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase (F{sub ate}DH), followed by reduction of formate to formaldehyde by formaldehyde dehydrogenase (F{sub ald}DH), and finally formaldehyde is reduced to methanol by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). In this process, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) acts as a terminal electron donor for each dehydrogenase-catalyzed reduction.

  1. A techno-economic & environmental analysis of a novel technology utilizing an internal combustion engine as a compact, inexpensive micro-reformer for a distributed gas-to-liquids system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, Joshua B.

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) contribute to global warming, and must be mitigated. With GHG mitigation as an overarching goal, this research aims to study the potential for newfound and abundant sources of natural gas to play a role as part of a GHG mitigation strategy. However, recent work suggests that methane leakage in the current natural gas system may inhibit end-use natural gas as a robust mitigation strategy, but that natural gas as a feedstock for other forms of energy, such as electricity generation or liquid fuels, may support natural-gas based mitigation efforts. Flaring of uneconomic natural gas, or outright loss of natural gas to the atmosphere results in greenhouse gas emissions that could be avoided and which today are very large in aggregate. A central part of this study is to look at a new technology for converting natural gas into methanol at a unit scale that is matched to the size of individual natural gas wells. The goal is to convert stranded or otherwise flared natural gas into a commercially valuable product and thereby avoid any unnecessary emission to the atmosphere. A major part of this study is to contribute to the development of a novel approach for converting natural gas into methanol and to assess the environmental impact (for better or for worse) of this new technology. This Ph. D. research contributes to the development of such a system and provides a comprehensive techno-economic and environmental assessment of this technology. Recognizing the distributed nature of methane leakage associated with the natural gas system, this work is also intended to advance previous research at the Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy that aims to show that small, modular energy systems can be made economic. This thesis contributes to and analyzes the development of a small-scale gas-to-liquids (GTL) system aimed at addressing flared natural gas from gas and oil wells. This thesis includes system engineering around a design that

  2. A techno-economic & environmental analysis of a novel technology utilizing an internal combustion engine as a compact, inexpensive micro-reformer for a distributed gas-to-liquids system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, Joshua B.

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) contribute to global warming, and must be mitigated. With GHG mitigation as an overarching goal, this research aims to study the potential for newfound and abundant sources of natural gas to play a role as part of a GHG mitigation strategy. However, recent work suggests that methane leakage in the current natural gas system may inhibit end-use natural gas as a robust mitigation strategy, but that natural gas as a feedstock for other forms of energy, such as electricity generation or liquid fuels, may support natural-gas based mitigation efforts. Flaring of uneconomic natural gas, or outright loss of natural gas to the atmosphere results in greenhouse gas emissions that could be avoided and which today are very large in aggregate. A central part of this study is to look at a new technology for converting natural gas into methanol at a unit scale that is matched to the size of individual natural gas wells. The goal is to convert stranded or otherwise flared natural gas into a commercially valuable product and thereby avoid any unnecessary emission to the atmosphere. A major part of this study is to contribute to the development of a novel approach for converting natural gas into methanol and to assess the environmental impact (for better or for worse) of this new technology. This Ph. D. research contributes to the development of such a system and provides a comprehensive techno-economic and environmental assessment of this technology. Recognizing the distributed nature of methane leakage associated with the natural gas system, this work is also intended to advance previous research at the Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy that aims to show that small, modular energy systems can be made economic. This thesis contributes to and analyzes the development of a small-scale gas-to-liquids (GTL) system aimed at addressing flared natural gas from gas and oil wells. This thesis includes system engineering around a design that

  3. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation: Assessment of hydrogen storage technologies. Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This report documents a portion of the work performed Multi-fuel Reformers for Fuel Cells Used in Transportation. One objective for development is to develop advanced fuel processing systems to reform methanol, ethanol, natural gas, and other hydrocarbons into hydrogen for use in transportation fuel cell systems, while a second objective is to develop better systems for on-board hydrogen storage. This report examines techniques and technology available for storage of pure hydrogen on board a vehicle as pure hydrogen of hydrides. The report focuses separately on near- and far-term technologies, with particular emphasis on the former. Development of lighter, more compact near-term storage systems is recommended to enhance competitiveness and simplify fuel cell design. The far-term storage technologies require substantial applied research in order to become serious contenders.

  4. Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived hydrocarbons in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Cortright, R D; Davda, R R; Dumesic, J A

    2002-08-29

    Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the pollution caused by continuously increasing energy demands make hydrogen an attractive alternative energy source. Hydrogen is currently derived from nonrenewable natural gas and petroleum, but could in principle be generated from renewable resources such as biomass or water. However, efficient hydrogen production from water remains difficult and technologies for generating hydrogen from biomass, such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars, steam-reforming of bio-oils and gasification, suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen can be produced from sugars and alcohols at temperatures near 500 K in a single-reactor aqueous-phase reforming process using a platinum-based catalyst. We are able to convert glucose -- which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals -- to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. We find that the selectivity for hydrogen production increases when we use molecules that are more reduced than sugars, with ethylene glycol and methanol being almost completely converted into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. These findings suggest that catalytic aqueous-phase reforming might prove useful for the generation of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from carbohydrates extracted from renewable biomass and biomass waste streams.

  5. Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived hydrocarbons in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortright, R. D.; Davda, R. R.; Dumesic, J. A.

    2002-08-01

    Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the pollution caused by continuously increasing energy demands make hydrogen an attractive alternative energy source. Hydrogen is currently derived from nonrenewable natural gas and petroleum, but could in principle be generated from renewable resources such as biomass or water. However, efficient hydrogen production from water remains difficult and technologies for generating hydrogen from biomass, such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars, steam-reforming of bio-oils and gasification, suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen can be produced from sugars and alcohols at temperatures near 500K in a single-reactor aqueous-phase reforming process using a platinum-based catalyst. We are able to convert glucose-which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals-to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. We find that the selectivity for hydrogen production increases when we use molecules that are more reduced than sugars, with ethylene glycol and methanol being almost completely converted into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. These findings suggest that catalytic aqueous-phase reforming might prove useful for the generation of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from carbohydrates extracted from renewable biomass and biomass waste streams.

  6. Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived hydrocarbons in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Cortright, R D; Davda, R R; Dumesic, J A

    2002-08-29

    Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the pollution caused by continuously increasing energy demands make hydrogen an attractive alternative energy source. Hydrogen is currently derived from nonrenewable natural gas and petroleum, but could in principle be generated from renewable resources such as biomass or water. However, efficient hydrogen production from water remains difficult and technologies for generating hydrogen from biomass, such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars, steam-reforming of bio-oils and gasification, suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen can be produced from sugars and alcohols at temperatures near 500 K in a single-reactor aqueous-phase reforming process using a platinum-based catalyst. We are able to convert glucose -- which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals -- to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. We find that the selectivity for hydrogen production increases when we use molecules that are more reduced than sugars, with ethylene glycol and methanol being almost completely converted into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. These findings suggest that catalytic aqueous-phase reforming might prove useful for the generation of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from carbohydrates extracted from renewable biomass and biomass waste streams. PMID:12198544

  7. Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Synthesis via Methanol and Dimethyl Ether Intermediates: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Zhu, Yunhua; Gray, Michel J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Wang, Yong; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Palo, Daniel R.

    2013-11-26

    The objective of the work was to enhance price-competitive, synthesis gas (syngas)-based production of transportation fuels that are directly compatible with the existing vehicle fleet (i.e., vehicles fueled by gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, etc.). To accomplish this, modifications to the traditional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process were investigated. In this study, we investigated direct conversion of syngas to distillates using methanol and dimethyl ether intermediates. For this application, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 (PdZnAl) catalyst previously developed for methanol steam reforming was evaluated. The PdZnAl catalyst was shown to be far superior to a conventional copper-based methanol catalyst when operated at relatively high temperatures (i.e., >300°C), which is necessary for MTG-type applications. Catalytic performance was evaluated through parametric studies. Process conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas-hour-space velocity, and syngas feed ratio (i.e., hydrogen:carbon monoxide) were investigated. PdZnAl catalyst formulation also was optimized to maximize conversion and selectivity to methanol and dimethyl ether while suppressing methane formation. Thus, a PdZn/Al2O3 catalyst optimized for methanol and dimethyl ether formation was developed through combined catalytic material and process parameter exploration. However, even after compositional optimization, a significant amount of undesirable carbon dioxide was produced (formed via the water-gas-shift reaction), and some degree of methane formation could not be completely avoided. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 used in combination with ZSM-5 was investigated for direct syngas-to-distillates conversion. High conversion was achieved as thermodynamic constraints are alleviated when methanol and dimethyl are intermediates for hydrocarbon formation. When methanol and/or dimethyl ether are products formed separately, equilibrium restrictions occur. Thermodynamic relaxation also enables the use of lower operating pressures than what

  8. Sulfur removal from diesel fuel-contaminated methanol.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. H. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.; Chemical Engineering

    2002-03-01

    Methanol is considered to be a potential on-board fuel for fuel cell-powered vehicles. In current distribution systems for liquid fuels used in the transportation sector, commodity methanol can occasionally become contaminated with the sulfur in diesel fuel or gasoline. This sulfur would poison the catalytic materials used in fuel reformers for fuel cells. We tested the removal of this sulfur by means of ten activated carbons (AC) that are commercially available. Tests were conducted with methanol doped with 1 vol.% grade D-2 diesel fuel containing 0.29% sulfur, which was present essentially as 33-35 wt.% benzothiophenes (BTs) and 65-67 wt.% dibenzothiophenes (DBT). In general, coconut shell-based carbons activated by high-temperature steam were more effective at sulfur removal than coal-based carbons. Equilibrium sorption data showed linear increase in sulfur capture with the increase of sulfur concentration in methanol. Both types of carbons had similar breakthrough characteristics, with the dynamic sorption capacity of each being about one-third of its equilibrium sorption capacity. Results of this study suggest that a fixed-bed sorber of granular AC can be used, such as in refueling stations, for the removal of sulfur in diesel fuel-contaminated methanol.

  9. Methanol Production by a Broad Phylogenetic Array of Marine Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Mincer, Tracy J; Aicher, Athena C

    2016-01-01

    Methanol is a major volatile organic compound on Earth and serves as an important carbon and energy substrate for abundant methylotrophic microbes. Previous geochemical surveys coupled with predictive models suggest that the marine contributions are exceedingly large, rivaling terrestrial sources. Although well studied in terrestrial ecosystems, methanol sources are poorly understood in the marine environment and warrant further investigation. To this end, we adapted a Purge and Trap Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (P&T-GC/MS) method which allowed reliable measurements of methanol in seawater and marine phytoplankton cultures with a method detection limit of 120 nanomolar. All phytoplankton tested (cyanobacteria: Synechococcus spp. 8102 and 8103, Trichodesmium erythraeum, and Prochlorococcus marinus), and Eukarya (heterokont diatom: Phaeodactylum tricornutum, coccolithophore: Emiliania huxleyi, cryptophyte: Rhodomonas salina, and non-diatom heterokont: Nannochloropsis oculata) produced methanol, ranging from 0.8-13.7 micromolar in culture and methanol per total cellular carbon were measured in the ranges of 0.09-0.3%. Phytoplankton culture time-course measurements displayed a punctuated production pattern with maxima near early stationary phase. Stabile isotope labeled bicarbonate incorporation experiments confirmed that methanol was produced from phytoplankton biomass. Overall, our findings suggest that phytoplankton are a major source of methanol in the upper water column of the world's oceans. PMID:26963515

  10. Methanol Production by a Broad Phylogenetic Array of Marine Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Mincer, Tracy J; Aicher, Athena C

    2016-01-01

    Methanol is a major volatile organic compound on Earth and serves as an important carbon and energy substrate for abundant methylotrophic microbes. Previous geochemical surveys coupled with predictive models suggest that the marine contributions are exceedingly large, rivaling terrestrial sources. Although well studied in terrestrial ecosystems, methanol sources are poorly understood in the marine environment and warrant further investigation. To this end, we adapted a Purge and Trap Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (P&T-GC/MS) method which allowed reliable measurements of methanol in seawater and marine phytoplankton cultures with a method detection limit of 120 nanomolar. All phytoplankton tested (cyanobacteria: Synechococcus spp. 8102 and 8103, Trichodesmium erythraeum, and Prochlorococcus marinus), and Eukarya (heterokont diatom: Phaeodactylum tricornutum, coccolithophore: Emiliania huxleyi, cryptophyte: Rhodomonas salina, and non-diatom heterokont: Nannochloropsis oculata) produced methanol, ranging from 0.8-13.7 micromolar in culture and methanol per total cellular carbon were measured in the ranges of 0.09-0.3%. Phytoplankton culture time-course measurements displayed a punctuated production pattern with maxima near early stationary phase. Stabile isotope labeled bicarbonate incorporation experiments confirmed that methanol was produced from phytoplankton biomass. Overall, our findings suggest that phytoplankton are a major source of methanol in the upper water column of the world's oceans.

  11. Methanol Production by a Broad Phylogenetic Array of Marine Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Mincer, Tracy J.; Aicher, Athena C.

    2016-01-01

    Methanol is a major volatile organic compound on Earth and serves as an important carbon and energy substrate for abundant methylotrophic microbes. Previous geochemical surveys coupled with predictive models suggest that the marine contributions are exceedingly large, rivaling terrestrial sources. Although well studied in terrestrial ecosystems, methanol sources are poorly understood in the marine environment and warrant further investigation. To this end, we adapted a Purge and Trap Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (P&T-GC/MS) method which allowed reliable measurements of methanol in seawater and marine phytoplankton cultures with a method detection limit of 120 nanomolar. All phytoplankton tested (cyanobacteria: Synechococcus spp. 8102 and 8103, Trichodesmium erythraeum, and Prochlorococcus marinus), and Eukarya (heterokont diatom: Phaeodactylum tricornutum, coccolithophore: Emiliania huxleyi, cryptophyte: Rhodomonas salina, and non-diatom heterokont: Nannochloropsis oculata) produced methanol, ranging from 0.8–13.7 micromolar in culture and methanol per total cellular carbon were measured in the ranges of 0.09–0.3%. Phytoplankton culture time-course measurements displayed a punctuated production pattern with maxima near early stationary phase. Stabile isotope labeled bicarbonate incorporation experiments confirmed that methanol was produced from phytoplankton biomass. Overall, our findings suggest that phytoplankton are a major source of methanol in the upper water column of the world’s oceans. PMID:26963515

  12. Catalytic gasification of bagasse for the production of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.; Robertus, R.J.

    1985-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of catalytic gasification of bagasse to produce methanol. In previous studies, a catalytic steam gasification process was developed which converted wood to methanol synthesis gas in one step using nickel based catalysts in a fluid-bed gasifier. Tests in a nominal 1 ton/day process development unit (PDU) gasifier with these same catalysts showed bagasse to be a good feedstock for fluid-bed gasifiers, but the catalysts deactivated quite rapidly in the presence of bagasse. Laboratory catalyst screening tests showed K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ doped on the bagasse to be a promising catalyst for converting bagasse to methanol synthesis gas. PDU tests with 10 wt % K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ doped on bagasse showed the technical feasibility of this type of catalyst on a larger scale. A high quality synthesis gas was produced and carbon conversion to gas was high. The gasifier was successfully operated without forming agglomerates of catalyst, ash, and char in the gasifier. There was no loss of activity throughout the runs because catalysts is continually added with the bagasse. Laboratory tests showed about 80% of the potassium carbonate could be recovered and recycled with a simple water wash. An economic evaluation of the process for converting bagasse to methanol showed the required selling price of methanol to be significantly higher than the current market price of methanol. Several factors make this current evaluaton using bagasse as a feedstock less favorable: (1) capital costs are higher due to inflation and some extra costs required to use bagasse, (2) smaller plant sizes were considered so economies of scale are lost, and (3) the market price of methanol in the US has fallen 44% in the last six months. 24 refs., 14 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. Applications of solar reforming technology

    SciTech Connect

    Spiewak, I.; Tyner, C.E.; Langnickel, U.

    1993-11-01

    Research in recent years has demonstrated the efficient use of solar thermal energy for driving endothermic chemical reforming reactions in which hydrocarbons are reacted to form synthesis gas (syngas). Closed-loop reforming/methanation systems can be used for storage and transport of process heat and for short-term storage for peaking power generation. Open-loop systems can be used for direct fuel production; for production of syngas feedstock for further processing to specialty chemicals and plastics and bulk ammonia, hydrogen, and liquid fuels; and directly for industrial processes such as iron ore reduction. In addition, reforming of organic chemical wastes and hazardous materials can be accomplished using the high-efficiency destruction capabilities of steam reforming. To help identify the most promising areas for future development of this technology, we discuss in this paper the economics and market potential of these applications.

  14. Rethinking Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, James C.

    2010-01-01

    As president of Miami University of Ohio from 1996 until 2006, James C. Garland redefined the public institution as a "semi-private" university by implementing the same tuition for both in-state and out-of-state students. Students from Ohio with need received large scholarships--but those who could afford to pay more did so. The reform, which…

  15. Toothless Reform?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smarick, Andy

    2010-01-01

    To many education reformers, the passage of the federal government's massive stimulus plan, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), appeared to be a final bright star falling into alignment. The ARRA seemed to complete the constellation: an astounding $100 billion of new federal funds--nearly twice the annual budget of the U.S.…

  16. What Reform?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Patrick

    1986-01-01

    A teacher explores the recent educational reform movement and discusses the studies of schools done by Sociologist Christopher Jencks in the 1970s. An important idea that can be extrapolated from Jencks' studies is that schools should function more like families than factories. This would empower teachers and make schooling more equitable,…

  17. Partial oxidation fuel reforming for automotive power systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.; Chalk, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Kumar, R.; Milliken, J.

    1999-09-07

    For widespread use of fuel cells to power automobiles in the near future, it is necessary to convert gasoline or other transportation fuels to hydrogen on-board the vehicle. Partial oxidation reforming is particularly suited to this application as it eliminates the need for heat exchange at high temperatures. Such reformers offer rapid start and good dynamic performance. Lowering the temperature of the partial oxidation process, which requires the development of a suitable catalyst, can increase the reforming efficiency. Catalytic partial oxidation (or autothermal) reformers and non-catalytic partial oxidation reformers developed by various organizations are presently undergoing testing and demonstration. This paper summarizes the process chemistries as well as recent test data from several different reformers operating on gasoline, methanol, and other fuels.

  18. Scaffoldless engineered enzyme assembly for enhanced methanol utilization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Price, J. Vincent; Chen, Long; Whitaker, W. Brian; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios; Chen, Wilfred

    2016-10-24

    Methanol is an important feedstock derived from natural gas and can be chemically converted into commodity and specialty chemicals at high pressure and temperature. Although biological conversion of methanol can proceed at ambient conditions, there is a dearth of engineered microorganisms that use methanol to produce metabolites. In nature, methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh), which converts methanol to formaldehyde, highly favors the reverse reaction. Thus, efficient coupling with the irreversible sequestration of formaldehyde by 3-hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloseisomerase (Phi) serves as the key driving force to pull the pathway equilibrium toward central metabolism. An emerging strategy to promote efficient substrate channelingmore » is to spatially organize pathway enzymes in an engineered assembly to provide kinetic driving forces that promote carbon flux in a desirable direction. Here, we report a scaffoldless, self-assembly strategy to organize Mdh, Hps, and Phi into an engineered supramolecular enzyme complex using an SH3–ligand interaction pair, which enhances methanol conversion to fructose-6-phosphate (F6P). To increase methanol consumption, an “NADH Sink” was created using Escherichia coli lactate dehydrogenase as an NADH scavenger, thereby preventing reversible formaldehyde reduction. Combination of the two strategies improved in vitro F6P production by 97-fold compared with unassembled enzymes. The beneficial effect of supramolecular enzyme assembly was also realized in vivo as the engineered enzyme assembly improved whole-cell methanol consumption rate by ninefold. This approach will ultimately allow direct coupling of enhanced F6P synthesis with other metabolic engineering strategies for the production of many desired metabolites from methanol.« less

  19. California methanol assessment. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    The near term methanol industry, the competitive environment, long term methanol market, the transition period, air quality impacts of methanol, roles of the public and private sectors are considered.

  20. Torsion-rotation intensities in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John

    Methanol exists in numerous kinds of astronomical objects featuring a wide range of local conditions. The light nature of the molecule coupled with the internal rotation of the methyl group with respect to the hydroxyl group results in a rich, strong spectrum that spans the entire far-infrared region. As a result, any modest size observational window will have a number of strong methanol transitions. This has made it the gas of choice for testing THz receivers and to extract the local physical conditions from observations covering small frequency windows. The latter has caused methanol to be dubbed the Swiss army knife of astrophysics. Methanol has been increasingly used in this capacity and will be used even more for subsequent investigations into the Herschel archive, and with SOFIA and ALMA. Interpreting physical conditions on the basis of a few methanol lines requires that the molecular data, line positions, intensities, and collision rates, be complete, consistent and accurate to a much higher level than previously required for astrophysics. The need for highly reliable data is even more critical for modeling the two classes of widespread maser action and many examples of optical pumping through the torsional bands. Observation of the torsional bands in the infrared will be a unique opportunity to directly connect JWST observations with those of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA. The theory for the intensities of torsion-rotation transitions in a molecule featuring a single internally rotating methyl group is well developed after 70 years of research. However, other than a recent very preliminary and not completely satisfactory investigation of a few CH3OH torsional bands, this theory has never been experimentally tested for any C3V internal rotor. More alarming is a set of recent intensity calibrated microwave measurements that showed deviations relative to calculations of up to 50% in some ground state rotational transitions commonly used by astronomers to extract

  1. Development incentives for fossil fuel subsidy reform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Michael; Chen, Claudine; Fuss, Sabine; Marxen, Annika; Edenhofer, Ottmar

    2015-08-01

    Reforming fossil fuel subsidies could free up enough funds to finance universal access to water, sanitation, and electricity in many countries, as well as helping to cut global greenhouse-gas emissions.

  2. ISOBUTANOL-METHANOL MIXTURES FROM SYNTHESIS GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Enrique Iglesia

    1998-09-01

    Isobutanol is potential as a fuel additive or precursor to methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). Alkali-promoted Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cu/MgO/CeO{sub 2} materials have been found to catalyze the formation of isobutanol from CO and H{sub 2} at temperatures (573-623 K) that allow their use in slurry reactors. Our studies focus on the mechanism and structural requirements for selective isobutanol synthesis on these types of catalysts. Alkali promoted Cu/MgO/CeO{sub 2}, Cu/MgO/ZnO, and CuZnAlO{sub x} materials and their individual components Cu/MgO, MgO/CeO{sub 2}, MgO and CeO{sub 2} have been prepared for the use in kinetic studies of alcohol coupling reactions, in identification of reaction intermediates, and in isobutanol synthesis at high pressures. These samples were prepared by coprecipitation of mixed nitrate solutions with an aqueous solution of KOH (2M) and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (1M) at 338 K at a constant pH of 9, except for Cs-Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at a pH of 7, in a well-stirred thermostated container. The precipitate was filtered, washed thoroughly with dioinized water at 303 K in order to remove residual K ions, and dried at 353 K overnight. Dried samples were calcined at 723 K, except for Cs-Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at 623 K, for 4 h in order to form the corresponding mixed oxides. Alkali addition (K or Cs) was performed by incipient wetness using K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (0.25 M) and CH{sub 3}COOCs (0.25 M) aqueous solutions. The crystallinity and phase structures of resulting materials were analyzed by powered X-ray diffraction.

  3. Effects of fuel cell anode recycle on catalytic fuel reforming

    SciTech Connect

    shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.; Gardner, T.; Haynes, D.; Spivey, J.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of steam in the reactant gas of a catalytic fuel reformer decreases the formation of carbon, minimizing catalyst deactivation. However, the operation of the reformer without supplemental water reduces the size, weight, cost, and overall complexity of the system. The work presented here examines experimentally two options for adding steam to the reformer inlet: (I) recycle of a simulated fuel cell anode exit gas (comprised of mainly CO2, H2O, and N2 and some H2 and CO) and (II) recycle of the reformate from the reformer exit back to the reformer inlet (mainly comprised of H2, CO, and N2 and some H2O and CO2). As expected, anode gas recycle reduced the carbon formation and increased the hydrogen concentration in the reformate. However, reformer recycle was not as effective due principally to the lower water content in the reformate compared to the anode gas. In fact, reformate recycle showed slightly increased carbon formation compared to no recycle. In an attempt to understand the effects of individual gases in these recycle streams (H2, CO, CO2, N2, and H2O), individual gas species were independently introduced to the reformer feed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Effects of Fuel Cell Anode Recycle on Catalytic Fuel Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhawat, Dushyant; Berry, D.A.; Gardner, T.H.; Haynes, D.J.; Spivey, J.J.

    2007-06-01

    The presence of steam in the reactant gas of a catalytic fuel reformer decreases the formation of carbon, minimizing catalyst deactivation. However, the operation of the reformer without supplemental water reduces the size, weight, cost, and overall complexity of the system. The work presented here examines experimentally two options for adding steam to the reformer inlet: (I) recycle of a simulated fuel cell anode exit gas (comprised of mainly CO2, H2O, and N2 and some H2 and CO) and (II) recycle of the reformate from the reformer exit back to the reformer inlet (mainly comprised of H2, CO, and N2 and some H2O and CO2). As expected, anode gas recycle reduced the carbon formation and increased the hydrogen concentration in the reformate. However, reformer recycle was not as effective due principally to the lower water content in the reformate compared to the anode gas. In fact, reformate recycle showed slightly increased carbon formation compared to no recycle. In an attempt to understand the effects of individual gases in these recycle streams (H2, CO, CO2, N2, and H2O), individual gas species were independently introduced to the reformer feed.

  5. Hydrogen generation utilizing integrated CO2 removal with steam reforming

    DOEpatents

    Duraiswamy, Kandaswamy; Chellappa, Anand S

    2013-07-23

    A steam reformer may comprise fluid inlet and outlet connections and have a substantially cylindrical geometry divided into reforming segments and reforming compartments extending longitudinally within the reformer, each being in fluid communication. With the fluid inlets and outlets. Further, methods for generating hydrogen may comprise steam reformation and material adsorption in one operation followed by regeneration of adsorbers in another operation. Cathode off-gas from a fuel cell may be used to regenerate and sweep the adsorbers, and the operations may cycle among a plurality of adsorption enhanced reformers to provide a continuous flow of hydrogen.

  6. Discovery of Methanol in a Planetary Birthplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has recently revealed the first detection of gas-phase methanol, a derivative of methane, in a protoplanetary disk. This milestone discovery is an important step in understanding the conditions for planet formation that can lead to life-supporting planets like Earth.Planetary ChemistryOne major goal in the study of exoplanets is to find planets that orbit in their host stars habitable zones, a measure that determines whether the planet receives the right amount of sunlight to support liquid water. But theres another crucial element in the formation of a life-supporting planet: chemistry.To understand the chemistry of newly born planets, we need to study protoplanetary disks because its from these that young planets form. The elements and molecules contained in these dusty disks are what initially make up the atmospheres of planets forming within the disks.The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array under the southern sky. [ESO/B. Tafreshi]The Hunt for ComplexityThe detection of complex molecules in protoplanetary disks is an important milestone, because complex molecules are necessary to build the correct chemistry to support life. Unfortunately, detecting these molecules is very difficult, requiring observations with both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity. Thus far, though weve observed elements and simple molecules in protoplanetary disks, detections of complex molecules have been elusive with only one success before now.Luckily, we now have an observatory up to the challenge! ALMAs unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity has recently allowed a team of scientists led by Catherine Walsh (Leiden University) to observe gas-phase methanol in a protoplanetary disk for the first time. This detection was made in the disk around the young star TW Hya, and it represents one of the largest molecules that has ever been observed in a disk to date.Locating IcesThe model (purple line

  7. Evaluation of the feasibility of ethanol steam reforming in a molten carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, S.; Passalacqua, E.; Maggio, G.; Patti, A.; Freni, S.

    1996-12-31

    The molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) utilizing traditional fuels represent a suitable technological progress in comparison with pure hydrogen-fed MCFCs. The more investigated fuel for such an application is the methane, which has the advantages of low cost and large availability; besides, several authors demonstrated the feasibility of a methane based MCFC. In particular, the methane steam-reforming allows the conversion of the fuel in hydrogen also inside the cell (internal reforming configuration), utilizing the excess heat to compensate the reaction endothermicity. In this case, however, both the catalyst and the cell materials are subjected to thermal stresses due to the cold spots arising near to the reaction sites MCFC. An alternative, in accordance with the recent proposals of other authors, may be to produce hydrogen from methane by the partial oxidation reaction, rather than by steam reforming. This reaction is exothermic ({Delta}H{degrees}=-19.1 kJ/mol H{sub 2}) and it needs to verify the possibility to obtain an acceptable distribution of the temperature inside the cell. The alcohols and, in particular, methanol shows the gas reformed compositions as a function of the steam/ethanol molar ratio, ranging from 1.0 to 3.5. The hydrogen production enhances with this ratio, but it presents a maximum at S/EtOH of about 2.0. Otherwise, the increase of S/EtOH depresses the production of CO and CH{sub 4}, and ethanol may be a further solution for the hydrogen production inside a MCFC. In this case, also, the reaction in cell is less endothermic compared with the methane steam reforming with the additional advantage of a liquid fuel more easily storable and transportable. Aim of the present work is to perform a comparative evaluation of the different solutions, with particular reference to the use of ethanol.

  8. Structures of protonated methanol clusters and temperature effects.

    PubMed

    Fifen, Jean Jules; Nsangou, Mama; Dhaouadi, Zoubeida; Motapon, Ousmanou; Jaidane, Nejm-Eddine

    2013-05-14

    The accurate evaluation of pKa's, or solvation energies of the proton in methanol at a given temperature is subject to the determination of the most favored structures of various isomers of protonated (H(+)(MeOH)n) and neutral ((MeOH)n) methanol clusters in the gas phase and in methanol at that temperature. Solvation energies of the proton in a given medium, at a given temperature may help in the determination of proton affinities and proton dissociation energies related to the deprotonation process in that medium and at that temperature. pKa's are related to numerous properties of drugs. In this work, we were interested in the determination of the most favored structures of various isomers of protonated methanol clusters in the gas phase and in methanol, at a given temperature. For this aim, the M062X/6-31++G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) levels of theory were used to perform geometries optimizations and frequency calculations on various isomers of (H(+)(MeOH)n) in both phases. Thermal effects were retrieved using our homemade FORTRAN code. Thus, we accessed the relative populations of various isomers of protonated methanol clusters, in both phases for temperatures ranging from 0 to 400 K. As results, in the gas phase, linear structures are entropically more favorable at high temperatures, while more compact ones are energetically more favorable at lower temperatures. The trend is somewhat different when bulk effects are taken into account. At high temperatures, the linear structure only dominates the population for n ≤ 6, while it is dominated by the cyclic structure for larger cluster sizes. At lower temperatures, compact structures still dominate the population, but with an order different from the one established in the gas phase. Hence, temperature effects dominate solvent effects in small cluster sizes (n ≤ 6), while the reverse trend is noted for larger cluster sizes. PMID:23676038

  9. Methanol crossover in direct methanol fuel cell systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovar, B. S.; Bender, G.; Davey, J. R.; Zelenay, P.

    2003-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are currently being investigated for a number of different applications from several milliwatts to near kilowatt size scales (cell phones, laptops, auxiliary power units, etc .). Because methanol has a very high energy density, over 6000 W hr/kg, a DMFC can possibly have greatly extended lifetimes compared to the batteries, doesn't present the storage problems associated with hydrogen fuel cells and can possibly operate more efficiently and cleanly than internal combustion engines.

  10. Reforming Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donmoyer, Robert, Ed.; Merryfield, Merry M., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue highlights the diversity of reform initiatives in order to provide a deep understanding of the complexities associated with educational reform in general and the reform of science education in particular. Systemic reform initiatives at the national and state levels along with locally-inspired efforts at reform are outlined.…

  11. Infrared Spectrum of Methanol: A First-Year Student Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehm, Garth; Dwyer, Mark

    1981-01-01

    Describes an experiment providing an experimental introduction to vibrational spectroscopy and experience in using an elementary vacuum line. The experiment, using a gas cell charged with methanol, is completed in a three-hour laboratory period and is directed toward understanding vibrational spectroscopy rather than the diagnostic value of the…

  12. Methanol Oxidation on Pt3Sn(111) for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells: Methanol Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Zhigang; Guo, Chen; Wang, Weili; Wei, Shuxian; Ng, Siu-Pang; Chen, Xiangfeng; Ding, Ning; Guo, Wenyue; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2016-05-18

    PtSn alloy, which is a potential material for use in direct methanol fuel cells, can efficiently promote methanol oxidation and alleviate the CO poisoning problem. Herein, methanol decomposition on Pt3Sn(111) was systematically investigated using periodic density functional theory and microkinetic modeling. The geometries and energies of all of the involved species were analyzed, and the decomposition network was mapped out to elaborate the reaction mechanisms. Our results indicated that methanol and formaldehyde were weakly adsorbed, and the other derivatives (CHxOHy, x = 1-3, y = 0-1) were strongly adsorbed and preferred decomposition rather than desorption on Pt3Sn(111). The competitive methanol decomposition started with the initial O-H bond scission followed by successive C-H bond scissions, (i.e., CH3OH → CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO). The Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations and energy barrier decomposition analyses identified the C-H and O-H bond scissions as being more competitive than the C-O bond scission. Microkinetic modeling confirmed that the vast majority of the intermediates and products from methanol decomposition would escape from the Pt3Sn(111) surface at a relatively low temperature, and the coverage of the CO residue decreased with an increase in the temperature and decrease in partial methanol pressure.

  13. Methanol - The efficient conversion of valueless fuels into a versatile fuel and chemical feedstock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othmer, D. F.

    1981-01-01

    The production of fuel-grade methanol and methyl chemicals is discussed with attention to production costs. Natural gas and low grade solid fuels such as peat, lignite, and sub-bituminous coal combined with water or ash can be converted to methanol with a thermal efficiency of 50 to 65%. Methanol can be used as a fuel for transportation engines and in electric power generation. The advantages of methanol use, such as ease and safety of transportation, are considered. The projected cost is 17 to 34 cents per gallon, or $2.50 to $5.00 per million Btu.

  14. A miniature fuel reformer system for portable power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolanc, Gregor; Belavič, Darko; Hrovat, Marko; Hočevar, Stanko; Pohar, Andrej; Petrovčič, Janko; Musizza, Bojan

    2014-12-01

    A miniature methanol reformer system has been designed and built to technology readiness level exceeding a laboratory prototype. It is intended to feed fuel cells with electric power up to 100 W and contains a complete setup of the technological elements: catalytic reforming and PROX reactors, a combustor, evaporators, actuation and sensing elements, and a control unit. The system is engineered not only for performance and quality of the reformate, but also for its lightweight and compact design, seamless integration of elements, low internal electric consumption, and safety. In the paper, the design of the system is presented by focussing on its miniaturisation, integration, and process control.

  15. Methanol related deaths in Edirne.

    PubMed

    Azmak, Derya

    2006-01-01

    In this retrospective autopsy study, a detailed analysis of methanol related deaths in Trakya region of Turkey is presented and departmental autopsy records, toxicology and histopathology results are analyzed. We found that methanol poisonings comprise 2.83% of all forensic autopsies (n:18), 88.8% of the cases were male, most of the victims were aged between 41 and 45. Blood methanol concentrations range widely from 55 to 479 mg per 100ml. Ethyl alcohol was detected in 44.4% of the cases. Most of the cases died in hospital and were poisoned through the consumption of alcoholic beverages from illicit sources and colognes. It is important for physicians to be aware of methanol poisoning symptoms and for forensic pathologists to obtain samples for toxicology during autopsies. Some preventative strategies including to routine control of the stores, to prevent the production of illegal alcoholic beverages, etc. should be developed.

  16. Hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material and configuration of the same

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Shockling, Larry A.; George, Raymond A.; Basel, Richard A.

    1996-01-01

    A hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material comprising a catalyst support impregnated with catalyst is provided for reforming hydrocarbon fuel gases in an electrochemical generator. Elongated electrochemical cells convert the fuel to electrical power in the presence of an oxidant, after which the spent fuel is recirculated and combined with a fresh hydrocarbon feed fuel forming the reformable gas mixture which is fed to a reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst material, where the reforming catalyst material includes discrete passageways integrally formed along the length of the catalyst support in the direction of reformable gas flow. The spent fuel and/or combusted exhaust gases discharged from the generator chamber transfer heat to the catalyst support, which in turn transfers heat to the reformable gas and to the catalyst, preferably via a number of discrete passageways disposed adjacent one another in the reforming catalyst support. The passageways can be slots extending inwardly from an outer surface of the support body, which slots are partly defined by an exterior confining wall. According to a preferred embodiment, the catalyst support is non-rigid, porous, fibrous alumina, wherein the fibers are substantially unsintered and compressible, and the reforming catalyst support is impregnated, at least in the discrete passageways with Ni and MgO, and has a number of internal slot passageways for reformable gas, the slot passageways being partly closed by a containing outer wall.

  17. Hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material and configuration of the same

    DOEpatents

    Singh, P.; Shockling, L.A.; George, R.A.; Basel, R.A.

    1996-06-18

    A hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material comprising a catalyst support impregnated with catalyst is provided for reforming hydrocarbon fuel gases in an electrochemical generator. Elongated electrochemical cells convert the fuel to electrical power in the presence of an oxidant, after which the spent fuel is recirculated and combined with a fresh hydrocarbon feed fuel forming the reformable gas mixture which is fed to a reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst material, where the reforming catalyst material includes discrete passageways integrally formed along the length of the catalyst support in the direction of reformable gas flow. The spent fuel and/or combusted exhaust gases discharged from the generator chamber transfer heat to the catalyst support, which in turn transfers heat to the reformable gas and to the catalyst, preferably via a number of discrete passageways disposed adjacent one another in the reforming catalyst support. The passageways can be slots extending inwardly from an outer surface of the support body, which slots are partly defined by an exterior confining wall. According to a preferred embodiment, the catalyst support is non-rigid, porous, fibrous alumina, wherein the fibers are substantially unsintered and compressible, and the reforming catalyst support is impregnated, at least in the discrete passageways with Ni and MgO, and has a number of internal slot passageways for reformable gas, the slot passageways being partly closed by a containing outer wall. 5 figs.

  18. Hydrogen Production by Steam Reforming of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Over Nickel-Phosphorus-Alumina Xerogel Catalyst Prepared by a Carbon-Templating Epoxide-Driven Sol-Gel Method.

    PubMed

    Bang, Yongju; Park, Seungwon; Han, Seung Ju; Yoo, Jaekyeong; Choi, Jung Ho; Kang, Tae Hun; Lee, Jinwon; Song, In Kyu

    2016-05-01

    A nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was prepared by a carbon-templating epoxide-driven sol-gel method (denoted as CNPA catalyst), and it was applied to the hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). For comparison, a nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was also prepared by a similar method in the absence of carbon template (denoted as NPA catalyst). The effect of carbon template addition on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of the catalysts in the steam reforming of LNG was investigated. Both CNPA and NPA catalysts showed excellent textural properties with well-developed mesoporous structure. However, CNPA catalyst retained a more reducible nickel aluminate phase than NPA catalyst. XRD analysis of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts revealed that nickel sintering on the CNPA catalyst was suppressed compared to that on the NPA catalyst. From H2-TPD and CH4-TPD measurements of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts, it was also revealed that CNPA catalyst with large amount of hydrogen uptake and strong hydrogen-binding sites showed larger amount of methane adsorption than NPA catalyst. In the hydrogen production by steam reforming of LNG, CNPA catalyst with large methane adsorption capacity showed a better catalytic activity than NPA catalyst. PMID:27483798

  19. Hydrogen Production by Steam Reforming of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Over Nickel-Phosphorus-Alumina Xerogel Catalyst Prepared by a Carbon-Templating Epoxide-Driven Sol-Gel Method.

    PubMed

    Bang, Yongju; Park, Seungwon; Han, Seung Ju; Yoo, Jaekyeong; Choi, Jung Ho; Kang, Tae Hun; Lee, Jinwon; Song, In Kyu

    2016-05-01

    A nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was prepared by a carbon-templating epoxide-driven sol-gel method (denoted as CNPA catalyst), and it was applied to the hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). For comparison, a nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was also prepared by a similar method in the absence of carbon template (denoted as NPA catalyst). The effect of carbon template addition on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of the catalysts in the steam reforming of LNG was investigated. Both CNPA and NPA catalysts showed excellent textural properties with well-developed mesoporous structure. However, CNPA catalyst retained a more reducible nickel aluminate phase than NPA catalyst. XRD analysis of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts revealed that nickel sintering on the CNPA catalyst was suppressed compared to that on the NPA catalyst. From H2-TPD and CH4-TPD measurements of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts, it was also revealed that CNPA catalyst with large amount of hydrogen uptake and strong hydrogen-binding sites showed larger amount of methane adsorption than NPA catalyst. In the hydrogen production by steam reforming of LNG, CNPA catalyst with large methane adsorption capacity showed a better catalytic activity than NPA catalyst.

  20. Solubility of methanol in low-temperature aqueous sulfuric acid and implications for atmospheric particle composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using traditional Knudsen cell techniques, we find well-behaved Henry's law uptake of methanol in aqueous 45 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions at temperatures between 197 and 231 K. Solubility of methanol increases with decreasing temperature and increasing acidity, with an effective Henry's law coefficient ranging from 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 8) M/atm. Equilibrium uptake of methanol into sulfuric acid aerosol particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere will not appreciably alter gas-phase concentrations of methanol. The observed room temperature reaction between methanol and sulfuric acid is too slow to provide a sink for gaseous methanol at the temperatures of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. It is also too slow to produce sufficient quantities of soluble reaction products to explain the large amount of unidentified organic material seen in particles of the upper troposphere.

  1. Batch conversion of methane to methanol using Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b as biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Yeub; Hur, Dong Hoon; Lee, Jae Hoon; Park, Chang-Ho; Chang, In Seop; Lee, Jin Won; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2015-03-01

    Recently, methane has attracted much attention as an alternative carbon feedstock since it is the major component of abundant shale and natural gas. In this work, we produced methanol from methane using whole cells of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b as the biocatalyst. M. trichosporium OB3b was cultured on NMS medium with a supply of 7:3 air/methane ratio at 30°C. The optimal concentrations of various methanol dehydrogenase inhibitors such as potassium phosphate and EDTA were determined to be 100 and 0.5 mM, respectively, for an efficient production of methanol. Sodium formate (40 mM) as a reducing power source was added to enhance the conversion efficiency. A productivity of 49.0 mg/l·h, titer of 0.393 g methanol/l, and conversion of 73.8% (mol methanol/mol methane) were obtained under the optimized batch condition. PMID:25563419

  2. A novel process for methanol synthesis. Progress report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1992-01-28

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol by a novel process. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two step reaction in series: the carbonylation of methanol to methyl formate taking place in a non-equilibrium region in the vicinity of the copper chromite surface, and the hydrogenolysis of methyl formate to methanol taking place on the surface of the copper chromite. The synergism between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we tested several copper chromites (with different surface areas and stabilizing agents) on the rate of methanol synthesis. It seems likely that pore diffusion limitations control the hydrogenolysis reaction since the rate of methanol formation is proportional to the square root of the copper chromite surface area. Elemental analyses using Inductively Coupled Plasma analysis and pore size distribution analysis of copper chromite were carried out.

  3. Attrition resistant fluidizable reforming catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Parent, Yves O.; Magrini, Kim; Landin, Steven M.; Ritland, Marcus A.

    2011-03-29

    A method of preparing a steam reforming catalyst characterized by improved resistance to attrition loss when used for cracking, reforming, water gas shift and gasification reactions on feedstock in a fluidized bed reactor, comprising: fabricating the ceramic support particle, coating a ceramic support by adding an aqueous solution of a precursor salt of a metal selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Cr, Co, Mn, Mg, K, La and Fe and mixtures thereof to the ceramic support and calcining the coated ceramic in air to convert the metal salts to metal oxides.

  4. Steam Reforming of Hydrocarbon Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ming, Qimin; Healey, T; Allen, Lloyd; Irving, Patricia M.

    2002-12-01

    has developed a proprietary catalyst formulation for the fuel processor that is being developed for use with polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The catalyst has been tested for the steam reforming of various hydrocarbons such as natural gas, iso-octane, retail gasoline, and hexadecane. A 300h continuous test has shown that the catalyst has very stable performance for steam reforming of iso-octane at 800?C with a steam/C ratio of 3.6. The same catalyst was also tested for steam reforming hexadecane (a surrogate of diesel) for 73h as well as natural gas for over 150h continuously, without deactivation or carbon deposition. Sulfur tolerance of the catalyst was tested using iso-octane containing various concentrations of sulfur. There was no catalyst deactivation after a 220h continuous test using iso-octane with 100ppm sulfur. For comparison, a nickel catalyst (12wt.% Ni/Al2O3) was also tested using different levels of sulfur in iso-octane. The results indicated that the InnovaTek catalyst has a substantially improved sulfur resistance compared to the nickel catalysts currently used for steam reforming. In addition, a variation of the catalyst was also used to reduce CO concentration to < 1% by water gas shift reaction.

  5. Thermally efficient melting and fuel reforming for glass making

    DOEpatents

    Chen, M.S.; Painter, C.F.; Pastore, S.P.; Roth, G.S.; Winchester, D.C.

    1991-10-15

    An integrated process is described for utilizing waste heat from a glass making furnace. The hot off-gas from the furnace is initially partially cooled, then fed to a reformer. In the reformer, the partially cooled off-gas is further cooled against a hydrocarbon which is thus reformed into a synthesis gas, which is then fed into the glass making furnace as a fuel. The further cooled off-gas is then recycled back to absorb the heat from the hot off-gas to perform the initial cooling. 2 figures.

  6. Thermally efficient melting and fuel reforming for glass making

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Michael S.; Painter, Corning F.; Pastore, Steven P.; Roth, Gary S.; Winchester, David C.

    1991-01-01

    An integrated process for utilizing waste heat from a glass making furnace. The hot off-gas from the furnace is initially partially cooled, then fed to a reformer. In the reformer, the partially cooled off-gas is further cooled against a hydrocarbon which is thus reformed into a synthesis gas, which is then fed into the glass making furnace as a fuel. The further cooled off-gas is then recycled back to absorb the heat from the hot off-gas to perform the initial cooling.

  7. Environmental information volume: Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) project

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the commercial viability of the Liquid Phase Methanol Process using coal-derived synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This report describes the proposed actions, alternative to the proposed action, the existing environment at the coal gasification plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, environmental impacts, regulatory requirements, offsite fuel testing, and DME addition to methanol production. Appendices include the air permit application, solid waste permits, water permit, existing air permits, agency correspondence, and Eastman and Air Products literature.

  8. Millimeter/submillimeter Spectroscopy to Measure the Branching Ratios for Methanol Photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Morgan N.; Powers, Carson Reed; Zinga, Samuel; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2016-06-01

    Methanol is one of the most abundant and important molecules in the interstellar medium, playing a key role in driving more complex organic chemistry both on grain surfaces and through gas-phase ion-molecule reactions. Methanol photolysis produces many radicals such as hydroxyl, methoxy, hydroxymethyl, and methyl that may serve as the building blocks for more complex organic chemistry in star-forming regions. The branching ratios for methanol photolysis may govern the relative abundances of many of the more complex species already detected in these environments. However, no direct, comprehensive, quantitative measurement of methanol photolysis branching ratios is available. Using a 193 nm excimer laser, the gas phase photolysis of methanol was studied in the (sub)millimeter range, where the rotational spectroscopic signatures of the photolysis products were probed. Here we present preliminary results from this experiment.

  9. S. 625: Natural Gas Regulatory Reform Act of 1989. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, March 16, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    S. 625 would eliminate artificial distortions in the natural gas marketplace to promote competition in the natural gas industry. It would do this by amending certain sections of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978. Title I: Decontrol of Natural Gas describes provisions for elimination of wellhead price controls; coordination with the Natural Gas Act; application to first sales; technical and conforming amendments; effective date (January 1, 1993). Title II: Transitional Provisions describes the decontrol of natural gas subject to a newly executed contract, a renegotiated contract, a terminated contract, or to a contract which expires; coordination with the Natural Gas Act; and effective date (enactment of this bill).

  10. Printable enzyme-embedded materials for methane to methanol conversion.

    PubMed

    Blanchette, Craig D; Knipe, Jennifer M; Stolaroff, Joshuah K; DeOtte, Joshua R; Oakdale, James S; Maiti, Amitesh; Lenhardt, Jeremy M; Sirajuddin, Sarah; Rosenzweig, Amy C; Baker, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    An industrial process for the selective activation of methane under mild conditions would be highly valuable for controlling emissions to the environment and for utilizing vast new sources of natural gas. The only selective catalysts for methane activation and conversion to methanol under mild conditions are methane monooxygenases (MMOs) found in methanotrophic bacteria; however, these enzymes are not amenable to standard enzyme immobilization approaches. Using particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), we create a biocatalytic polymer material that converts methane to methanol. We demonstrate embedding the material within a silicone lattice to create mechanically robust, gas-permeable membranes, and direct printing of micron-scale structures with controlled geometry. Remarkably, the enzymes retain up to 100% activity in the polymer construct. The printed enzyme-embedded polymer motif is highly flexible for future development and should be useful in a wide range of applications, especially those involving gas-liquid reactions. PMID:27301270

  11. Physical characteristics of bright Class I methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leurini, S.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Class I methanol masers are thought to be tracers of interstellar shock waves. However, they have received relatively little attention mostly as a consequence of their low luminosities compared to other maser transitions. This situation has changed recently and Class I methanol masers are now routinely used as signposts of outflow activity especially in high extinction regions. The recent detection of polarisation in Class I lines now makes it possible to obtain direct observational information about magnetic fields in interstellar shocks. Aims: We make use of newly calculated collisional rate coefficients for methanol to investigate the excitation of Class I methanol masers and to reconcile the observed Class I methanol maser properties with model results. Methods: We performed large velocity gradient calculations with a plane-parallel slab geometry appropriate for shocks to compute the pump and loss rates which regulate the interactions of the different maser systems with the maser reservoir. We study the dependence of the pump rate coefficient, the maser loss rate, and the inversion efficiency of the pumping scheme of several Class I masers on the physics of the emitting gas. Results: We predict inversion in all transitions where maser emission is observed. Bright Class I methanol masers are mainly high-temperature (>100 K) high-density (n(H2) ~ 107-108 cm-3) structures with methanol maser emission measures, ξ, corresponding to high methanol abundances close to the limits set by collisional quenching. Our model predictions reproduce reasonably well most of the observed properties of Class I methanol masers. Class I masers in the 25 GHz series are the most sensitive to the density of the medium and mase at higher densities than other lines. Moreover, even at high density and high methanol abundances, their luminosity is predicted to be lower than that of the 44 GHz and 36 GHz masers. Our model predictions also reflect the observational result that the

  12. The Revised Version of Class I Methanol Maser Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, G. M.; Litovchenko, I. D.; Val'tts, I. E.; Alakoz, A. V.

    2011-05-01

    The revised version of the class I methanol maser catalog is presented. It contains 198 sources in total. New class I methanol masers detected in the direction of EGOs (38 sources) were added to the previous list containing ˜ 160 sources (the list have been published in the first version of this catalog - see reference in the text). Electronic version of the catalog has been generated in the form of html file - http://www.asc.rssi.ru/MMI. A statistical analysis was carried out within 2' around a maser position to find an identification of class I methanol masers with any objects typical for star-forming regions - UCHII regions, IRAS sources, dark clouds, bipolar outflows, CS lines as of dense gas tracer, and other masers (class II methanol masers, OH and H_2O). Class I methanol masers identification was made with short-wave infrared objects EGO (extended green objects), which are tracers of bipolar outflows in young stellar objects. It was shown that in the new version of catalog more than 50% of class I methanol masers are identified with bipolar outflow - given EGOs as bipolar outflows (compared with the result of 22% in the first version of the catalog that contains no information about EGO). This result is a strong evidence in favor of the fact that EGOs are indeed active bipolar outflows. At the same time it is important to note, that none of the bipolar outflow, already registered in the direction of class I methanol maser, did not coincide with EGO (with the exception of G45.47+0.07). The results are submitted in a form of a diagram.

  13. Negligible photodesorption of methanol ice and active photon-induced desorption of its irradiation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Diaz, G. A.; Martín-Doménech, R.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Chen, Y.-J.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Methanol is a common component of interstellar and circumstellar ice mantles and is often used as an evolution indicator in star-forming regions. The observations of gas-phase methanol in the interiors of dense molecular clouds at temperatures as low as 10 K suggest that non-thermal ice desorption must be active. Ice photodesorption has been proposed to explain the abundances of gas-phase molecules toward the coldest regions. Aims: Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the potential photodesorption of methanol toward the coldest regions. Methods: Solid methanol was deposited at 8 K and UV-irradiated at various temperatures starting from 8 K. The irradiation of the ice was monitored by means of infrared spectroscopy and the molecules in the gas phase were detected using quadrupole mass spectroscopy. Fully deuterated methanol was used for confirmation of the results. Results: The photodesorption of methanol to the gas phase was not observed in the mass spectra at different irradiation temperatures. We estimate an upper limit of 3 × 10-5 molecules per incident photon. On the other hand, photon-induced desorption of the main photoproducts was clearly observed. Conclusions: The negligible photodesorption of methanol could be explained by the ability of UV-photons in the 114-180 nm (10.87-6.88 eV) range to dissociate this molecule efficiently. Therefore, the presence of gas-phase methanol in the absence of thermal desorption remains unexplained. On the other hand, we find CH4 to desorb from irradiated methanol ice, which was not found to desorb in the pure CH4 ice irradiation experiments.

  14. Reforming Again: Now Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Educational reform responds to local and national pressures to improve educational outcomes, and reform efforts cycle as similar pressures recur. Currently, reform efforts focus on teachers, even though confidence in a host of American social institutions is dropping. One of the most widespread reforms regarding teachers is the…

  15. Results from the second year of operation of the Federal Methanol Fleet at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    West, B.H.; McGill ); Hillis, S.L. )

    1990-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has completed its second year of operation of ten vehicles for the Federal Methanol Fleet Project; five of the vehicles are fueled with methanol. Over 56,000 miles were accumulated on the vehicles in the second year bringing the total to over 152,000 miles. Energy consumption for the methanol cars was slightly higher than that of the gasoline cars again this year, most likely as a result of shorter average trip lengths for the methanol gas. Iron and lead have accumulated at greater rates in the lubricating oil of the methanol cars. Driver's ratings of vehicles reflected some dissatisfaction with the cold-weather performance of the methanol cars, but the cars have no special provisions for cold weather starting, and the fuel vapor pressure has not been tailored to the season as at other test sites. Otherwise, drivers' opinions of the methanol cars have been favorable. 13 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. SMALL SCALE FUEL CELL AND REFORMER SYSTEMS FOR REMOTE POWER

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Witmer

    2003-12-01

    New developments in fuel cell technologies offer the promise of clean, reliable affordable power, resulting in reduced environmental impacts and reduced dependence on foreign oil. These developments are of particular interest to the people of Alaska, where many residents live in remote villages, with no roads or electrical grids and a very high cost of energy, where small residential power systems could replace diesel generators. Fuel cells require hydrogen for efficient electrical production, however. Hydrogen purchased through conventional compressed gas suppliers is very expensive and not a viable option for use in remote villages, so hydrogen production is a critical piece of making fuel cells work in these areas. While some have proposed generating hydrogen from renewable resources such as wind, this does not appear to be an economically viable alternative at this time. Hydrogen can also be produced from hydrocarbon feed stocks, in a process known as reforming. This program is interested in testing and evaluating currently available reformers using transportable fuels: methanol, propane, gasoline, and diesel fuels. Of these, diesel fuels are of most interest, since the existing energy infrastructure of rural Alaska is based primarily on diesel fuels, but this is also the most difficult fuel to reform, due to the propensity for coke formation, due to both the high vaporization temperature and to the high sulfur content in these fuels. There are several competing fuel cell technologies being developed in industry today. Prior work at UAF focused on the use of PEM fuel cells and diesel reformers, with significant barriers identified to their use for power in remote areas, including stack lifetime, system efficiency, and cost. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells have demonstrated better stack lifetime and efficiency in demonstrations elsewhere (though cost still remains an issue), and procuring a system for testing was pursued. The primary function of UAF in the fuel cell

  17. Building carbon-carbon bonds using a biocatalytic methanol condensation cycle.

    PubMed

    Bogorad, Igor W; Chen, Chang-Ting; Theisen, Matthew K; Wu, Tung-Yun; Schlenz, Alicia R; Lam, Albert T; Liao, James C

    2014-11-11

    Methanol is an important intermediate in the utilization of natural gas for synthesizing other feedstock chemicals. Typically, chemical approaches for building C-C bonds from methanol require high temperature and pressure. Biological conversion of methanol to longer carbon chain compounds is feasible; however, the natural biological pathways for methanol utilization involve carbon dioxide loss or ATP expenditure. Here we demonstrated a biocatalytic pathway, termed the methanol condensation cycle (MCC), by combining the nonoxidative glycolysis with the ribulose monophosphate pathway to convert methanol to higher-chain alcohols or other acetyl-CoA derivatives using enzymatic reactions in a carbon-conserved and ATP-independent system. We investigated the robustness of MCC and identified operational regions. We confirmed that the pathway forms a catalytic cycle through (13)C-carbon labeling. With a cell-free system, we demonstrated the conversion of methanol to ethanol or n-butanol. The high carbon efficiency and low operating temperature are attractive for transforming natural gas-derived methanol to longer-chain liquid fuels and other chemical derivatives.

  18. Building carbon–carbon bonds using a biocatalytic methanol condensation cycle

    PubMed Central

    Bogorad, Igor W.; Chen, Chang-Ting; Theisen, Matthew K.; Wu, Tung-Yun; Schlenz, Alicia R.; Lam, Albert T.; Liao, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol is an important intermediate in the utilization of natural gas for synthesizing other feedstock chemicals. Typically, chemical approaches for building C–C bonds from methanol require high temperature and pressure. Biological conversion of methanol to longer carbon chain compounds is feasible; however, the natural biological pathways for methanol utilization involve carbon dioxide loss or ATP expenditure. Here we demonstrated a biocatalytic pathway, termed the methanol condensation cycle (MCC), by combining the nonoxidative glycolysis with the ribulose monophosphate pathway to convert methanol to higher-chain alcohols or other acetyl-CoA derivatives using enzymatic reactions in a carbon-conserved and ATP-independent system. We investigated the robustness of MCC and identified operational regions. We confirmed that the pathway forms a catalytic cycle through 13C-carbon labeling. With a cell-free system, we demonstrated the conversion of methanol to ethanol or n-butanol. The high carbon efficiency and low operating temperature are attractive for transforming natural gas-derived methanol to longer-chain liquid fuels and other chemical derivatives. PMID:25355907

  19. Performance and endurance of a PEMFC operated with synthetic reformate fuel feed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sishtla, Chakravarthy; Koncar, Gerald; Platon, Renato; Gamburzev, Serguei; Appleby, A. John; Velev, Omourtag A.

    Widespread implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) powerplants for stationary and vehicular applications will be dependent in the near future on using readily available hydrocarbon fuels as the source of the hydrogen fuel. Methane and propane are ideal fuels for stationary applications, while methanol, gasoline, and diesel fuel are better suited for vehicular applications. Various means of fuel processing are possible to produce a gaseous fuel containing H2, CO2 and CO. CO is a known electrocatalyst poison and must be reduced to low (10's) ppm levels and CO2 is said to cause additional polarization effects. Even with no CO in the feed gas a H2/CO2/H2O gas mixture will form some CO. Therefore, as a first step of developing a PEMFC that can operate for thousands of hours using a reformed fuel, we used an anode gas feed of 80% H2 and 20% CO2 to simulate the reforming of CH4. To investigate the effect of reformate on cell performance and endurance, a single cell with an active area of 58 cm2 was assembled with a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) furnished by Texas A&M University using IGT's internally manifolded heat exchange (IMHEX™) design configuration. The MEA consisted of a Nafion 112 membrane with anode and cathode Pt catalyst loadings of 0.26 and 1.46 mg/cm2, respectively. The cell was set to operate on a synthetic reformate-air at 60°C and 1 atm and demonstrated over 5000 h of endurance with a decay rate of less than 1%/1000 h of operation. The cell also underwent four successful thermal cycles with no appreciable loss in performance. The stable performance is attributed to a combination of the IGT IMHEX plate design with its inherent uniform gas flow distribution across the entire active area and MEA quality. The effects of temperature, gas composition, fuel utilization (stoics) and thermal cycle on cell performance are described.

  20. Conceptual process design and economics for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass through methanol/dimethyl ether intermediates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, Eric C. D.; Talmadge, Michael; Dutta, Abhijit; Hensley, Jesse; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Humbird, David; Schaidle, Joshua; Biddy, Mary

    2015-10-28

    This paper describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass. The processing steps of this pathway include the conversion of biomass to synthesis gas via indirect gasification, gas clean-up via reforming of tars and other hydrocarbons, catalytic conversion of syngas to methanol, methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (DME), and the homologation of DME over a zeolite catalyst to high-octane gasoline-range hydrocarbon products. The current process configuration has similarities to conventional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) technologies, but there are key distinctions, specifically regarding the product slate, catalysts, and reactor conditions. A techno-economicmore » analysis is performed to investigate the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock. The design features a processing daily capacity of 2000 tonnes (2205 short tons) of dry biomass. The process yields 271 liters of liquid fuel per dry tonne of biomass (65 gal/dry ton), for an annual fuel production rate of 178 million liters (47 MM gal) at 90% on-stream time. The estimated total capital investment for an nth-plant is $438 million. The resulting minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) is $0.86 per liter or $3.25 per gallon in 2011 US dollars. A rigorous sensitivity analysis captures uncertainties in costs and plant performance. Sustainability metrics for the conversion process are quantified and assessed. The potential premium value of the high-octane gasoline blendstock is examined and found to be at least as competitive as fossil-derived blendstocks. A simple blending strategy is proposed to demonstrate the potential for blending the biomass-derived blendstock with petroleum-derived intermediates. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining published by Society of Industrial Chemistry and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.« less

  1. Conceptual process design and economics for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass through methanol/dimethyl ether intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Eric C. D.; Talmadge, Michael; Dutta, Abhijit; Hensley, Jesse; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Humbird, David; Schaidle, Joshua; Biddy, Mary

    2015-10-28

    This paper describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass. The processing steps of this pathway include the conversion of biomass to synthesis gas via indirect gasification, gas clean-up via reforming of tars and other hydrocarbons, catalytic conversion of syngas to methanol, methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (DME), and the homologation of DME over a zeolite catalyst to high-octane gasoline-range hydrocarbon products. The current process configuration has similarities to conventional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) technologies, but there are key distinctions, specifically regarding the product slate, catalysts, and reactor conditions. A techno-economic analysis is performed to investigate the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock. The design features a processing daily capacity of 2000 tonnes (2205 short tons) of dry biomass. The process yields 271 liters of liquid fuel per dry tonne of biomass (65 gal/dry ton), for an annual fuel production rate of 178 million liters (47 MM gal) at 90% on-stream time. The estimated total capital investment for an nth-plant is $438 million. The resulting minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) is $0.86 per liter or $3.25 per gallon in 2011 US dollars. A rigorous sensitivity analysis captures uncertainties in costs and plant performance. Sustainability metrics for the conversion process are quantified and assessed. The potential premium value of the high-octane gasoline blendstock is examined and found to be at least as competitive as fossil-derived blendstocks. A simple blending strategy is proposed to demonstrate the potential for blending the biomass-derived blendstock with petroleum-derived intermediates. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining published by Society of Industrial Chemistry and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of carbon formation boundary and reforming performance for steam reforming of dimethyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Kikuchi, Ryuji; Eguchi, Koichi

    Thermodynamic analysis of dimethyl ether steam reforming (DME SR) was investigated for carbon formation boundary, DME conversion, and hydrogen yield for fuel cell application. The equilibrium calculation employing Gibbs free minimization was performed to figure out the required steam-to-carbon ratio (S/C = 0-5) and reforming temperature (25-1000 °C) where coke formation was thermodynamically unfavorable. S/C, reforming temperature and product species strongly contributed to the coke formation and product composition. When chemical species DME, methanol, CO 2, CO, H 2, H 2O and coke were considered, complete conversion of DME and hydrogen yield above 78% without coke formation were achieved at the normal operating temperatures of molten carbonate fuel cell (600 °C) and solid oxide fuel cell (900 °C), when S/C was at or above 2.5. When CH 4 was favorable, production of coke and that of hydrogen were significantly suppressed.

  3. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons via Indirect Liquefaction. Thermochemical Research Pathway to High-Octane Gasoline Blendstock Through Methanol/Dimethyl Ether Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Eric C. D.; Talmadge, Michael; Dutta, Abhijit; Hensley, Jesse; Schaidle, Josh; Biddy, Mary; Humbird, David; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Ross, Jeff; Sexton, Danielle; Yap, Raymond; Lukas, John

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO’s) efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The research funded by BETO is designed to advance the state of technology of biomass feedstock supply and logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. As part of their involvement in this research and development effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigate the economics of conversion pathways through the development of conceptual biorefinery process models and techno-economic analysis models. This report describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass. The processing steps of this pathway include the conversion of biomass to synthesis gas or syngas via indirect gasification, gas cleanup, catalytic conversion of syngas to methanol intermediate, methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (DME), and catalytic conversion of DME to high-octane, gasoline-range hydrocarbon blendstock product. The conversion process configuration leverages technologies previously advanced by research funded by BETO and demonstrated in 2012 with the production of mixed alcohols from biomass. Biomass-derived syngas cleanup via reforming of tars and other hydrocarbons is one of the key technology advancements realized as part of this prior research and 2012 demonstrations. The process described in this report evaluates a new technology area for the downstream utilization of clean biomass-derived syngas for the production of high-octane hydrocarbon products through methanol and DME intermediates. In this process, methanol undergoes dehydration to

  4. Hydrogen production by aqueous phase reforming of light oxygenated hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabaker, John William

    Aqueous phase reforming (APR) of renewable oxygenated hydrocarbons (e.g., methanol, ethylene glycol, glycerol, sorbitol, glucose) is a promising new technology for the catalytic production of high-purity hydrogen for fuel cells and chemical processing. Supported Pt catalysts are effective catalysts for stable and rapid H2 production at temperatures near 500 K (H 2 turnover frequencies near 10 min-1). Inexpensive Raney Ni-based catalysts have been developed using a combination of fundamental and high-throughput studies that have similar catalytic properties as Pt-based materials. Promotion of Raney Ni with Sn by controlled surface reaction of organometallic tin compounds is necessary to control formation of thermodynamically-favorable alkane byproducts. Detailed characterization by Mossbauer spectroscopy, electron microscopy, adsorption studies, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS/ESCA) has shown that NiSn alloys are formed during heat treatment, and may be responsible for enhanced stability and selectivity for hydrogen production. Detailed kinetic studies led to the development of a kinetic mechanism for the APR reaction on Pt and NiSn catalysts, in which the oxygenate decomposes through C--H and O--H cleavage, followed by C--C cleavage and water gas shift of the CO intermediate. The rate limiting step on Pt surfaces is the initial dehydrogenation, while C--C cleavage appears rate limiting over NiSn catalysts. Tin promotion of Raney Ni catalysts suppresses C--O bond scission reactions that lead to alkane formation without inhibiting fast C--C and C--H cleavage steps that are necessary for high rates of reforming. A window of operating temperature, pressure, and reactor residence time has been identified for use of the inexpensive NiSn catalysts as a Pt substitute. Concentrated feed stocks and aggressive pretreatments have been found to counteract catalyst deactivation by sintering in the hydrothermal APR environment and allow stable, long-term production of H

  5. Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren; Xiaoming

    2003-07-22

    A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

  6. Production of methanol from heat-stressed pepper and corn leaf disks

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.A. . Dept. of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture)

    1994-05-01

    Early Calwonder'' pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and Jubilee'' corn (Zea mays L.) leaf disks exposed to high temperature stress produced ethylene, ethane, methanol, acetaldehyde, and ethanol based on comparison of retention times during gas chromatography to authentic standards. Methanol, ethanol, and acetaldehyde were also identified by mass spectroscopy. Corn leaf disks produced lower levels of ethylene, ethane, and methanol, but more acetaldehyde and ethanol than pepper. Production of ethane, a by-product of lipid peroxidation, coincided with an increase in electrolyte leakage (EL) in pepper but not in corn. Compared with controls, pepper leaf disks infiltrated with linolenic acid evolved significantly greater amounts of ethane, acetaldehyde, and methanol and similar levels of ethanol. EL and volatile hydrocarbon production were not affected by fatty acid infiltration in corn. Infiltration of pepper leaves with buffers increasing in pH from 5.5 to 9.5 increased methanol production.

  7. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  8. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-24

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  9. Printable enzyme-embedded materials for methane to methanol conversion

    PubMed Central

    Blanchette, Craig D.; Knipe, Jennifer M.; Stolaroff, Joshuah K.; DeOtte, Joshua R.; Oakdale, James S.; Maiti, Amitesh; Lenhardt, Jeremy M.; Sirajuddin, Sarah; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Baker, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    An industrial process for the selective activation of methane under mild conditions would be highly valuable for controlling emissions to the environment and for utilizing vast new sources of natural gas. The only selective catalysts for methane activation and conversion to methanol under mild conditions are methane monooxygenases (MMOs) found in methanotrophic bacteria; however, these enzymes are not amenable to standard enzyme immobilization approaches. Using particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), we create a biocatalytic polymer material that converts methane to methanol. We demonstrate embedding the material within a silicone lattice to create mechanically robust, gas-permeable membranes, and direct printing of micron-scale structures with controlled geometry. Remarkably, the enzymes retain up to 100% activity in the polymer construct. The printed enzyme-embedded polymer motif is highly flexible for future development and should be useful in a wide range of applications, especially those involving gas–liquid reactions. PMID:27301270

  10. Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2001-10-02

    The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

  11. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

  12. Methanex cuts its methanol costs with Fletcher purchase

    SciTech Connect

    Plishner, E.S.

    1993-02-17

    Methanex (Vancouver, BC) will significantly reduce' its unit cost of methanol production with the acquisition of all of Fletcher Challenge's (Auckland, NZ) methanol assets. These include the 800,000-m.t./year Cape Horn plant in Chile, one of the world's largest single train facilities. That plant is by far' the lowest-cost supplier of delivered methanol to the U.S., says analyst Sam Kanes of Scotia McLeod (Toronto), with gas costs below $1/1,000 cu.ft. Also included in the deal are two New Zealand plants: Petralgas, with capacity for 520,000 m.t./year, and Synfuel. Synfuel has the capacity to produce the equivalent of 1.8 million m.t./year of chemical-grade methanol, or 70,000 m.t./year of gasoline, or a combination. Currently rated at 450,000 m.t./year of methanol, that could double in 1994 with the addition of distillation capacity. After the transaction, Methanex will have a total of 2.4 million m.t./year of methanol capacity, plus marketing agreements for 1.0 million m.t./year. The company has plans to add 1.2 million m.t. of production (in Trinidad and the U.S.) and 0.6 million m.t. of further marketing arrangements over the next year and a half, bringing the total to over 5.0 million m.t./year. Methanex could have about twice as much capacity as the Saudis,' according to one consultant.

  13. [Study of blood concentration analysis for formate in acute methanol poisoning].

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Go; Okazawa, Katsuko; Shimizu, Takahiro; Otagiri, Sayoko; Fuwa, Fumiko; Nakagawa, Saori; Yamato, Susumu

    2015-09-01

    A 53-year-old woman ingested about 300 mL of 95% methanol. After immediate ethanol antagonist therapy and hemodialysis, she recovered completely. Few days later, the plasma concentration of methanol and formate was measured. A gas chromatography was used for the plasma methanol concentration measurement, and a colorimetric method was used for plasma formate concentration measurement (Formate Colorimetric Assay Kit; BioVision, California, USA). Patient's plasma methanol concentration before hemodialysis was 676.9 mg/dL and plasma formate concentration was 16.9 mg/dL. By removing blood methanol and formate using hemodialysis before formate accumulations in the body, the patient was discharged without any sequelae. We were able to obtain correlation between a gas chromatography and colorimetric method without gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, with good correlation coefficients. The sensitivity was sufficient for analyzing blood sample. Monitoring formate concentration is useful in determining the treatment and evaluating the prognosis of methanol poisoning. We suggest that this colorimetric method is useful in a facility with no access to a gas chromatography in order to measure a plasma formate concentration.

  14. Combining steam-methane reforming, water-gas shift, and CO{sub 2} removal in a single-step process for hydrogen production. Final report for period March 15, 1997 - December 14, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Alejandro Lopez Ortiz; Bhaskar Balasubramanian; Douglas P. Harrison

    2001-02-01

    The objective of the research project was to determine the feasibility of a simpler, more energy-efficient process for the production of 95+% H{sub 2} from natural gas, and to collect sufficient experimental data on the effect of reaction parameters to guide additional larger-scale process development. The overall objectives were accomplished. 95+% H{sub 2} was produced in a single reaction step by adding a calcium-based CO{sub 2} acceptor to standard Ni-based reforming catalyst. The spent acceptor was successfully regenerated and used in a number of reaction steps with only moderate loss in activity as the number of cycles increased. Sufficient experimental data were collected to guide further larger-scale experimental work designed to investigate the economic feasibility of the process.

  15. Sources and seasonality of atmospheric methanol based on tall tower measurements in the US Upper Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L.; Mohr, M.; Wells, K. C.; Griffis, T. J.; Helmig, D.; Millet, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    Methanol (CH3OH) plays an important role in the atmosphere as a source of carbon monoxide (CO) and formaldehyde (HCHO), however the magnitude and distribution of methanol emissions remain poorly constrained. Here we present over one year of continuous atmospheric methanol measurements from the University of Minnesota tall tower Trace Gas Observatory (KCMP tall tower; 185 m a.g.l.), and interpret the dataset in terms of constraints on regional methanol sources and seasonality. The seasonal cycle of methanol concentrations observed at the KCMP tall tower is generally similar to that simulated by a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem, driven with MEGANv2.0 biogenic emissions) except the seasonal peak occurs ~1 month earlier in the observations, apparently reflecting a model underestimate of emission rates for younger versus older leaves. Based on a source tracer approach, which we evaluate using GEOS-Chem and with multiple tracers, we estimate that anthropogenic emissions account for approximately 40% of ambient methanol abundance during winter and 10% during summer. During daytime in summer, methanol concentrations increase exponentially with temperature, reflecting the temperature sensitivity of the biogenic source, and the observed temperature dependence is statistically consistent with that in the model. Nevertheless, summertime concentrations are underestimated by on average 35% in the model for this region. The seasonal importance of methanol as a source of HCHO and CO is highest in spring through early summer, when biogenic methanol emissions are high but isoprene emissions are still relatively low. During that time observed methanol concentrations account for on average 20% of the total CO and HCHO production rates as simulated by GEOS-Chem, compared to 12% later in the summer and 12% on an annual average basis. The biased seasonality in the model means that the photochemical role for methanol early in the growing season is presently underestimated.

  16. Integrated reformer and shift reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Dorson, Matthew H.

    2006-06-27

    A hydrocarbon fuel reformer for producing diatomic hydrogen gas is disclosed. The reformer includes a first reaction vessel, a shift reactor vessel annularly disposed about the first reaction vessel, including a first shift reactor zone, and a first helical tube disposed within the first shift reactor zone having an inlet end communicating with a water supply source. The water supply source is preferably adapted to supply liquid-phase water to the first helical tube at flow conditions sufficient to ensure discharge of liquid-phase and steam-phase water from an outlet end of the first helical tube. The reformer may further include a first catalyst bed disposed in the first shift reactor zone, having a low-temperature shift catalyst in contact with the first helical tube. The catalyst bed includes a plurality of coil sections disposed in coaxial relation to other coil sections and to the central longitudinal axis of the reformer, each coil section extending between the first and second ends, and each coil section being in direct fluid communication with at least one other coil section.

  17. The direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Halpert, G.; Narayanan, S.R.; Frank, H.

    1995-08-01

    This presentation describes the approach and progress in the ARPA-sponsored effort to develop a Direct Methanol, Liquid-Feed Fuel Cell (DMLFFC) with a solid Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) for battery replacement in small portable applications. Using Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) developed by JPL and Giner, significant voltage was demonstrated at relatively high current densities. The DMLFFC utilizes a 3 percent aqueous solution of methanol that is oxidized directly in the anode (fuel) chamber and oxygen (air) in the cathode chamber to produce water and significant power. The only products are water and CO{sub 2}. The ARPA effort is aimed at replacing the battery in the BA 5590 military radio.

  18. AC plasma torch with a H2O/CO2/CH4 mix as the working gas for methane reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutberg, Ph G.; Nakonechny, Gh V.; Pavlov, A. V.; Popov, S. D.; Serba, E. O.; Surov, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents results of investigations implemented during construction of the three-phase ac plasma torch working on a mixture of steam with carbon dioxide and methane (H2O/CO2/CH4) with power upto 120 kW. Such thermal plasma generators are needed in industrial technologies for methane reforming with the aim of producing the syngas comprising of the hydrogen and carbon mono-oxide (H2/CO). It was shown that during plasma torch work there are two character parts of the high-voltage arc. In these parts, the arc column has a different diameter and temperature about (8.5  -  8.3) · 103 K and (10.5  -  10.0) · 103 K, respectively. The plasma torch output characteristics have been obtained for working regimes with various flow rates of the methane (0.0-0.8 g s-1) in the plasma-forming mix and constant flow rates of the carbon dioxide and water steam (each of 3.0 g s-1). For the mentioned mix of gases, the unit generates plasma with the mass-average temperature ~(3.2-3.3) · 103K and the thermal efficiency ~94-96%. This provides effective reforming of methane.

  19. The Carnol process system for CO2 mitigation and methanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.

    1995-08-14

    The feasibility of an alternative CO{sub 2} mitigation system and a methanol production process is investigated. The Carnol system has three components: (1) a coal fired power plant supplying flue gas CO{sub 2} to, (2) the Carnol process which converts the CO{sub 2} with hydrogen from natural gas to methanol which is used, (3) as a fuel component in the automotive sector. For the methanol production process alone, up to 100% CO{sub 2} emission reduction can be achieved while for the entire system up to 65% CO{sub 2} emission reduction can be obtained. The Carnol system is technically feasible and economically competitive with alternative CO{sub 2} disposal systems for coal fired power plants. The Carnol process is estimated to be economically attractive compared to the current market price of methanol, especially if credit can be taken for the carbon as a marketable coproduct.

  20. Infrared spectroscopy of the methanol cation and its methylene-oxonium isomer

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, J. D.; Young, J. W.; Duncan, M. A. E-mail: maduncan@uga.edu; Huang, M.; McCoy, A. B. E-mail: maduncan@uga.edu

    2015-03-21

    The carbenium ion with nominal formula [C,H{sub 4},O]{sup +} is produced from methanol or ethylene glycol in a pulsed-discharge supersonic expansion source. The ion is mass selected, and its infrared spectrum is measured from 2000 to 4000 cm{sup −1} using laser photodissociation spectroscopy and the method of rare gas atom tagging. Computational chemistry predicts two isomers, the methanol and methylene-oxonium cations. Predicted vibrational spectra based on scaled harmonic and reduced dimensional treatments are compared to the experimental spectra. The methanol cation is the only isomer produced when methanol is used as a precursor. When ethylene glycol is used as the precursor, methylene-oxonium is produced in addition to the methanol cation. Theoretical results at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level show that methylene-oxonium is lower in energy than methanol cation by 6.4 kcal/mol, and is in fact the global minimum isomer on the [C,H{sub 4},O]{sup +} potential surface. Methanol cation is trapped behind an isomerization barrier in our source, providing a convenient method to produce and characterize this transient species. Analysis of the spectrum of the methanol cation provides evidence for strong CH stretch vibration/torsion coupling in this molecular ion.

  1. Withanolide artifacts formed in methanol.

    PubMed

    Cao, Cong-Mei; Zhang, Huaping; Gallagher, Robert J; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2013-11-22

    Methanol solutions of the main withanolides (6-8) naturally present in Physalis longifolia yielded five artificial withanolides (1-5), including three new compounds (1-3). Withanolides 1 and 2 were identified as intramolecular Michael addition derivatives, while withanolides 3-5 were the result of intermolecular Michael addition. A comprehensive literature investigation was conducted to identify potential withanolide Michael addition artifacts isolated from Solanaceous species to date.

  2. Studies on methanol - oxidizing yeast. III. Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Volfová, O

    1975-01-01

    Oxidation of methanol, formaldehyde and formic acid was studied in cells and cell-free extract of the yeast Candida boidinii No. 11Bh. Methanol oxidase, an enzyme oxidizing methanol to formaldehyde, was formed inducibly after the addition of methanol to yeast cells. The oxidation of methanol by cell-free extract was dependent on the presence of oxygen and independent of any addition of nicotine-amide nucleotides. Temperature optimum for the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde was 35 degrees C, pH optimum was 8.5. The Km for methanol was 0.8mM. The cell-free extract exhibited a broad substrate specificity towards primary alcohols (C1--C6). The activity of methanol oxidase was not inhibited by 1mM KCN, EDTA or monoiodoacetic acid. The strongest inhibitory action was exerted by p-chloromercuribenzoate. Both the cells and the cell-free extract contained catalase which participated in the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde; the enzyme was constitutively formed by the yeast. The pH optimum for the degradation of H2O2 was in the same range as the optimum for methanol oxidation, viz. at 8.5. Catalase was more resistant to high pH than methanol oxidase. The cell-free extract contained also GSH-dependent NAD-formaldehyde dehydrogenase with Km = 0.29mM and NAD-formate dehydrogenase with Km = 55mM. PMID:240764

  3. Molecular dynamics study of liquid methanol with a flexible three-site model

    SciTech Connect

    Palinkas, G.; Hawlicka, E.; Heinzinger, K.

    1987-07-30

    A new potential is presented which describes the methanol-methanol interactions on the basis of a flexible three-site model. The intramolecular part of the potential has been derived from spectroscopic data. A molecular dynamics study has been performed with this potential at 286 K. The structural properties of liquid methanol calculated from the simulations are in good agreement with X-ray measurements. The average geometrical arrangement of nearest neighbors and their hydrogen bonding are discussed. The potential describes correctly the gas-liquid frequency shifts of the intramolecular vibrations. Several thermodynamic properties calculated from the simulation compare favorably with experimental results.

  4. Effects of fuel evaporation on the octane number of methanol-gasoline blended fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, D.P.

    1994-10-01

    A procedure is described to estimate the influence of end-gas temperature on Octane Number. Blending methanol with gasoline is known to cause a disproportionate increase in Research Octane Number, and this is found to correlate well with the evaporative cooling characteristics of these blends. The Motor Octane Number test eliminates evaporative effects, and the difference between the two test methods is evaluated in terms of evaporative cooling. It is concluded that the high heat of vaporization of methanol is largely responsible for the excellent RON performance of methanol-gasoline blended fuels. 17 refs., 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Methanol along the path from envelope to protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdovskaya, Maria; Van Dishoeck, Ewine; Walsh, Catherine; Visser, Ruud; Harsono, Daniel

    Interstellar methanol is considered a parent species of larger, more complex organic molecules. In this work a 2D physicochemical simulation of infalling parcels of matter is performed for a low-mass star-forming system to trace the chemical evolution from cloud to disk. Full continuum radiative transfer and a comprehensive gas-grain chemistry network are included. With this set up, two sets of collapse models are studied. Various disk zones are delineated for both, based upon their methanol budget. Some zones retain prestellar origins upon readsorption, while others are enhanced en route in the envelope. Under the right conditions, even further enrichment can occur in the disk itself. It is the infall paths that determine the zonal divisions for complex organic molecules in the disk, highlighting that the history of the material influences the disk composition. A comparison to cometary abundances is also performed. Critical chemical processes and parameters for the methanol chemistry under different physical conditions are identified. The exact abundance and distribution of methanol is important for the budget of complex organic molecules in the disk, which will be incorporated into forming planetary system objects such as protoplanets and comets.

  6. Anchors for Education Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alok, Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Education reforms, considering their significance, deserve better methods than mere "trial and error." This article conceptualizes a network of six anchors for education reforms: education policy, education system, curriculum, pedagogy, assessment, and teacher education. It establishes the futility to reform anchors in isolation and anticipates…

  7. Beyond Reform: Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Jill

    2007-01-01

    The Coalition of Essential Schools (CES) is not a reform movement. To reform is to make a thing again; reformation implies a stasis that doesn't deliver enough for the educational future. This issue of Horace demonstrates that Essential schools and the districts and networks that support them are at various points in the journey of transformation,…

  8. Sputnik Reform Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    Educational reforms being called for in the 1980's are compared to reforms of the 1950's. The Sputnik-inspired quest for quality called for reform in the content and structure of basic subjects. Current reports say that what educators are doing in the basic subjects is ok, but they need to do more. (RM)

  9. Safety concerns and suggested design approaches to the HTGR Reformer process concept

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R.C.

    1981-09-01

    This report is a safety review of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Reformer Application Study prepared by Gas-Cooled Reactor Associates (GCRA) of La Jolla, California. The objective of this review was to identify safety concerns and suggests design approaches to minimize risk in the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Reformer (HTGR-R) process concept.

  10. Catalytic steam gasification of bagasse for the production of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.

    1983-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) tested the catalytic gasification of bagasse for the production of methanol synthesis gas. The process uses steam, indirect heat, and a catalyst to produce synthesis gas in one step in fluidized bed gasifier. Both laboratory and process development scale (nominal 1 ton/day) gasifiers were used to test two different catalyst systems: (1) supported nickel catalysts and (2) alkali carbonates doped on the bagasse. This paper presents the results of laboratory and process development unit gasification tests and includes an economic evaluation of the process. 20 references, 6 figures, 9 tables.

  11. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF 12.2 GHz METHANOL MASERS ASSOCIATED WITH A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, S. L.; Caswell, J. L.; Green, J. A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Fuller, G. A.; Quinn, L. J.; Avison, A.

    2011-06-01

    We present definitive detection statistics for 12.2 GHz methanol masers toward a complete sample of 6.7 GHz methanol masers detected in the Methanol Multibeam survey south of declination -20{sup 0}. In total, we detect 250 12.2 GHz methanol masers toward 580 6.7 GHz methanol masers. This equates to a detection rate of 43.1%, which is lower than that of previous significant searches of comparable sensitivity. Both the velocity ranges and the flux densities of the target 6.7 GHz sources surpass that of their 12.2 GHz companion in almost all cases. Eighty percent of the detected 12.2 GHz methanol maser peaks are coincident in velocity with the 6.7 GHz maser peak. Our data support an evolutionary scenario whereby the 12.2 GHz sources are associated with a somewhat later evolutionary stage than the 6.7 GHz sources devoid of this transition. Furthermore, we find that the 6.7 GHz and 12.2 GHz methanol sources increase in luminosity as they evolve. In addition to this, evidence for an increase in velocity range with evolution is presented. This implies that it is not only the luminosity but also the volume of gas conducive to the different maser transitions that increases as the sources evolve. Comparison with GLIMPSE mid-infrared sources has revealed a coincidence rate between the locations of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers and GLIMPSE point sources similar to that achieved in previous studies. Overall, the properties of the GLIMPSE sources with and without 12.2 GHz counterparts are similar. There is a higher 12.2 GHz detection rate toward those 6.7 GHz methanol masers that are coincident with extended green objects.

  12. A novel process for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1992-01-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to study the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol (MeOH) by a novel process. In previous reports, we provided evidence that the reaction takes place in two steps. A molecule of MeOH is first carbonylated to form methyl formate (MeF) which then reacts with H{sub 2} to form two molecules of MeOH. The second reaction occurs on the surface of a heterogeneous catalyst such as copper chromite, while the first reaction requires a homegenous catalyst such as potassium methoxide (KOMe) and takes place in a non-equilibrium region in the vicinity of the heterogeneous catalyst. A synergism between the two catalysts enhances the rate of MeOH formation. In this quarter, we studied the effect of reaction conditions on the rate of formation of MeF and the effect of CO{sub 2} concentration in the feed gas on the rate of MeOH synthesis. Kinetic studies were also initiated and rate expressions were examined.

  13. Gasification Evaluation of Gas Turbine Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Battelle

    2003-12-30

    This report provides a preliminary assessment of the potential for use in gas turbines and reciprocating gas engines of gases derived from biomass by pyrolysis or partial oxidation with air. Consideration was given to the use of mixtures of these gases with natural gas as a means of improving heating value and ensuring a steady gas supply. Gas from biomass, and mixtures with natural gas, were compared with natural gas reformates from low temperature partial oxidation or steam reforming. The properties of such reformates were based on computations of gas properties using the ChemCAD computational tools and energy inputs derived from known engine parameters. In general, the biomass derived fuels compare well with reformates, so far as can be judged without engine testing. Mild reforming has potential to produce a more uniform quality of fuel gas from very variable qualities of natural gas, and could possibly be applied to gas from biomass to eliminate organic gases and condensibles other than methane.

  14. Plasma-catalyzed fuel reformer

    DOEpatents

    Hartvigsen, Joseph J.; Elangovan, S.; Czernichowski, Piotr; Hollist, Michele

    2013-06-11

    A reformer is disclosed that includes a plasma zone to receive a pre-heated mixture of reactants and ionize the reactants by applying an electrical potential thereto. A first thermally conductive surface surrounds the plasma zone and is configured to transfer heat from an external heat source into the plasma zone. The reformer further includes a reaction zone to chemically transform the ionized reactants into synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A second thermally conductive surface surrounds the reaction zone and is configured to transfer heat from the external heat source into the reaction zone. The first thermally conductive surface and second thermally conductive surface are both directly exposed to the external heat source. A corresponding method and system are also disclosed and claimed herein.

  15. Metabolic methanol: molecular pathways and physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V; Komarova, Tatiana V

    2015-04-01

    Methanol has been historically considered an exogenous product that leads only to pathological changes in the human body when consumed. However, in normal, healthy individuals, methanol and its short-lived oxidized product, formaldehyde, are naturally occurring compounds whose functions and origins have received limited attention. There are several sources of human physiological methanol. Fruits, vegetables, and alcoholic beverages are likely the main sources of exogenous methanol in the healthy human body. Metabolic methanol may occur as a result of fermentation by gut bacteria and metabolic processes involving S-adenosyl methionine. Regardless of its source, low levels of methanol in the body are maintained by physiological and metabolic clearance mechanisms. Although human blood contains small amounts of methanol and formaldehyde, the content of these molecules increases sharply after receiving even methanol-free ethanol, indicating an endogenous source of the metabolic methanol present at low levels in the blood regulated by a cluster of genes. Recent studies of the pathogenesis of neurological disorders indicate metabolic formaldehyde as a putative causative agent. The detection of increased formaldehyde content in the blood of both neurological patients and the elderly indicates the important role of genetic and biochemical mechanisms of maintaining low levels of methanol and formaldehyde.

  16. 40 CFR 86.1509 - Exhaust gas sampling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations for Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Methanol-Fueled Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled Diesel-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks, and New Methanol-Fueled Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled Diesel-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks; Idle...

  17. 40 CFR 86.1509 - Exhaust gas sampling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations for Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Methanol-Fueled Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled Diesel-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks, and New Methanol-Fueled Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled Diesel-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks; Idle...

  18. Design and Operation of an Electrochemical Methanol Concentration Sensor for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T. I.; Chun, W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of a 150-Watt packaged power source based on liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells is being pursued currently at the Jet propulsion Laboratory for defense applications. In our studies we find that the concentration of methanol in the fuel circulation loop affects the electrical performance and efficiency the direct methanol fuel cell systems significantly. The practical operation of direct methanol fuel cell systems, therefore, requires accurate monitoring and control of methanol concentration. The present paper reports on the principle and demonstration of an in-house developed electrochemical sensor suitable for direct methanol fuel cell systems.

  19. Recent Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, the effects of methanol crossover and airflow rates on the cathode potential of an operating direct methanol fuel cell are explored. Techniques for quantifying methanol crossover in a fuel cell and for separating the electrical performance of each electrode in a fuel cell are discussed. The effect of methanol concentration on cathode potential has been determined to be significant. The cathode is found to be mass transfer limited when operating on low flow rate air and high concentrations of methanol. Improvements in cathode structure and operation at low methanol concentration have been shown to result in improved cell performance.

  20. Towards a methanol economy based on homogeneous catalysis: methanol to H2 and CO2 to methanol.

    PubMed

    Alberico, E; Nielsen, M

    2015-04-21

    The possibility to implement both the exhaustive dehydrogenation of aqueous methanol to hydrogen and CO2 and the reverse reaction, the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol and water, may pave the way to a methanol based economy as part of a promising renewable energy system. Recently, homogeneous catalytic systems have been reported which are able to promote either one or the other of the two reactions under mild conditions. Here, we review and discuss these developments.

  1. Gradients in microbial methanol uptake: productive coastal upwelling waters to oligotrophic gyres in the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Joanna L; Sargeant, Stephanie; Nightingale, Philip D; Colin Murrell, J

    2013-03-01

    Methanol biogeochemistry and its importance as a carbon source in seawater is relatively unexplored. We report the first microbial methanol carbon assimilation rates (k) in productive coastal upwelling waters of up to 0.117±0.002 d(-1) (~10 nmol l(-1 )d(-1)). On average, coastal upwelling waters were 11 times greater than open ocean northern temperate (NT) waters, eight times greater than gyre waters and four times greater than equatorial upwelling (EU) waters; suggesting that all upwelling waters upon reaching the surface (≤20 m), contain a microbial population that uses a relatively high amount of carbon (0.3-10 nmol l(-1 )d(-1)), derived from methanol, to support their growth. In open ocean Atlantic regions, microbial uptake of methanol into biomass was significantly lower, ranging between 0.04-0.68 nmol l(-1 )d(-1). Microbes in the Mauritanian coastal upwelling used up to 57% of the total methanol for assimilation of the carbon into cells, compared with an average of 12% in the EU, and 1% in NT and gyre waters. Several methylotrophic bacterial species were identified from open ocean Atlantic waters using PCR amplification of mxaF encoding methanol dehydrogenase, the key enzyme in bacterial methanol oxidation. These included Methylophaga sp., Burkholderiales sp., Methylococcaceae sp., Ancylobacter aquaticus, Paracoccus denitrificans, Methylophilus methylotrophus, Methylobacterium oryzae, Hyphomicrobium sp. and Methylosulfonomonas methylovora. Statistically significant correlations for upwelling waters between methanol uptake into cells and both chlorophyll a concentrations and methanol oxidation rates suggest that remotely sensed chlorophyll a images, in these productive areas, could be used to derive total methanol biological loss rates, a useful tool for atmospheric and marine climatically active gas modellers, and air-sea exchange scientists. PMID:23178665

  2. Gradients in microbial methanol uptake: productive coastal upwelling waters to oligotrophic gyres in the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Joanna L; Sargeant, Stephanie; Nightingale, Philip D; Colin Murrell, J

    2013-03-01

    Methanol biogeochemistry and its importance as a carbon source in seawater is relatively unexplored. We report the first microbial methanol carbon assimilation rates (k) in productive coastal upwelling waters of up to 0.117±0.002 d(-1) (~10 nmol l(-1 )d(-1)). On average, coastal upwelling waters were 11 times greater than open ocean northern temperate (NT) waters, eight times greater than gyre waters and four times greater than equatorial upwelling (EU) waters; suggesting that all upwelling waters upon reaching the surface (≤20 m), contain a microbial population that uses a relatively high amount of carbon (0.3-10 nmol l(-1 )d(-1)), derived from methanol, to support their growth. In open ocean Atlantic regions, microbial uptake of methanol into biomass was significantly lower, ranging between 0.04-0.68 nmol l(-1 )d(-1). Microbes in the Mauritanian coastal upwelling used up to 57% of the total methanol for assimilation of the carbon into cells, compared with an average of 12% in the EU, and 1% in NT and gyre waters. Several methylotrophic bacterial species were identified from open ocean Atlantic waters using PCR amplification of mxaF encoding methanol dehydrogenase, the key enzyme in bacterial methanol oxidation. These included Methylophaga sp., Burkholderiales sp., Methylococcaceae sp., Ancylobacter aquaticus, Paracoccus denitrificans, Methylophilus methylotrophus, Methylobacterium oryzae, Hyphomicrobium sp. and Methylosulfonomonas methylovora. Statistically significant correlations for upwelling waters between methanol uptake into cells and both chlorophyll a concentrations and methanol oxidation rates suggest that remotely sensed chlorophyll a images, in these productive areas, could be used to derive total methanol biological loss rates, a useful tool for atmospheric and marine climatically active gas modellers, and air-sea exchange scientists.

  3. Pyrochlore catalysts for hydrocarbon fuel reforming

    DOEpatents

    Berry, David A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Haynes, Daniel; Smith, Mark; Spivey, James J.

    2012-08-14

    A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A2B2-y-zB'yB"zO7-.DELTA., where y>0 and z.gtoreq.0. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

  4. Effect of SiO 2-ZrO 2 supports prepared by a grafting method on hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas over Ni/SiO 2-ZrO 2 catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeong Gil; Youn, Min Hye; Song, In Kyu

    SiO 2-ZrO 2 supports with various zirconium contents are prepared by grafting a zirconium precursor onto the surface of commercial Carbosil silica. Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 catalysts are then prepared by an impregnation method, and are applied to hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effect of SiO 2-ZrO 2 supports on the performance of the Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 catalysts is investigated. SiO 2-ZrO 2 prepared by a grafting method serves as an efficient support for the nickel catalyst in the steam reforming of LNG. Zirconia enhances the resistance of silica to steam significantly and increases the interaction between nickel and the support, and furthermore, prevents the growth of nickel oxide species during the calcination process through the formation of a ZrO 2-SiO 2 composite structure. The crystalline structures and catalytic activities of the Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 catalysts are strongly influenced by the amount of zirconium grafted. The conversion of LNG and the yield of hydrogen show volcano-shaped curves with respect to zirconium content. Among the catalysts tested, the Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 (Zr/Si = 0.54) sample shows the best catalytic performance in terms of both LNG conversion and hydrogen yield. The well-developed and pure tetragonal phase of ZrO 2-SiO 2 (Zr/Si = 0.54) appears to play an important role in the adsorption of steam and subsequent spillover of steam from the support to the active nickel. The small particle size of the metallic nickel in the Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 (Zr/Si = 0.54) catalyst is also responsible for its high performance.

  5. First Detection of Methanol in a Class O Protostellar Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, William D.; Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2000-01-01

    We report the detection of emission from methanol in a compact source coincident with the position of the L1157 infrared source, which we attribute to molecules in the disk surrounding this young, Class O protostellar object. In addition, we identify a spectral feature in the outflow corresponding to an ethanol transition. Using the Caltech Owens Valley Millimeter Array with a synthesized beam size of 2", we detect spatially unresolved methanol in the 2k - 1k transitions at 3mm, which is coincident in position with the peak of the continuum emission. The gas phase methanol could be located in the central region (< 100 AU radius) of a flat disk, or in an extended heated surface layer (approx. 200 AU radius) of a flared disk. The fractional abundance of methanol X(CH3OH) is approx. 2 x l0-8 in the flat disk model, and 3 x l0-7 for the flared disk. The fractional abundance is small in the disk as a whole, but considerably larger in the warm portions. This difference indicates that substantial chemical processing probably takes place in the disk via depletion and desorption. The methanol desorbed from the grains in the warm surface layers returns to the icy grain mantles in the cooler interior of the disk, where it is available to become part of the composition of solar system-like bodies, such as comets, formed in the outer circumstellar region. This first millimeter-wavelength detection of a complex organic molecule in a young protostellar disk has implications for disk structure and chemical evolution and for potential use as a temperature probe. The research of TV and WL was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology with support from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. Methods of conditioning direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Cynthia; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2005-11-08

    Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer electrolyte membrane of the membrane electrode assembly to a cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, and an electrical current of polarity opposite to that in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is drawn through the membrane electrode assembly, wherein methanol is oxidized at the cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

  7. Formaldehyde-methanol, metallic-oxide agents head scavengers list

    SciTech Connect

    Schaack, J.P.; Chan, F.

    1989-01-23

    Use of batch-operated chemical H/sub 2/S scavengers as an inexpensive gas-sweetening process may be an attractive alternative for moderately sour gas wells with small production remote from a gas-processing plant. This article begins a four-part series describing the most common H/sub 2/S scavengers available to the natural gas-producing industry. Advantages, disadvantages, health and safety aspects, case histories, design guidelines, and economics of these scavengers will be addressed. Currently available, nonregenerative scavengers for small-plant H/sub 2/S removal may be categorized into four groups: Formaldehyde-methanol-based, metallic oxide-based, caustic-based, and other processes.

  8. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Water loss from the cell is minimized by making the conductive cathode assembly hydrophobic and the conductive anode assembly hydrophilic.

  9. Solar photocatalytic conversion of CO{sub 2} to methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Ryba, G.; Shelnutt, J.; Prairie, M.R.; Assink, R.A.

    1997-02-01

    This report summarizes the three-year LDRD program directed at developing catalysts based on metalloporphyrins to reduce carbon dioxide. Ultimately it was envisioned that such catalysts could be made part of a solar-driven photoredox cycle by coupling metalloporphyrins with semiconductor systems. Such a system would provide the energy required for CO{sub 2} reduction to methanol, which is an uphill 6-electron reduction. Molecular modeling and design capabilities were used to engineer metalloporphyrin catalysts for converting CO{sub 2} to CO and higher carbon reduction products like formaldehyde, formate, and methanol. Gas-diffusion electrochemical cells were developed to carry out these reactions. A tin-porphyrin/alumina photocatalyst system was partially developed to couple solar energy to this reduction process.

  10. Analytical procedure for the in-vial derivatization--extraction of phenolic acids and flavonoids in methanolic and aqueous plant extracts followed by gas chromatography with mass-selective detection.

    PubMed

    Fiamegos, Yiannis C; Nanos, Christos G; Vervoort, Jacques; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2004-07-01

    An in-vial simple method for the combined derivatization and extraction of phenolic acids and flavonoids from plant extracts and their direct determination with GC-MS, is described. The method is taking advantage of the beneficial potentials of phase transfer catalysis (PTC). Catalysts in soluble and polymer-bound form were tested with the latter being the format of choice due to its high reaction yield and facile separation from the rest of the reaction system. Optimization of experimental conditions was established. Chromatographic separation of eight phenolic acids and four flavonoids methylated via the PTC derivatization step was achieved in 45 min. The detection limits for the described GC-MS(SIM) method of analysis ranged between 2 and 40 ng/ml whereas limits of quantitation fall in the range 5-118 ng/ml, with flavonoids accounting for the lowest sensitivity due to their multiple reaction behavior. Four methanolic extracts from Tilia europea, Urtica dioica, Mentha spicata and Hypericum perforatum grown wild in north-western Greece and four aquatic infusions from commercially available Mentha spicata, Origanum dictamnus, Rosemarinus officinalis and Sideritis cretica were analyzed. Good trueness of the method was demonstrated as no matrix effects were found for the analytes concerned. PMID:15281249

  11. Methanol-Resistant Oxygen-Reduction Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, A. K.; Raman, R. K.

    2003-08-01

    Methanol oxidation in the cathode compartment of the fuel cell, which occurs during the oxygen-reduction reaction on Pt-based cathodes, constitutes a significant performance loss in the direct methanol fuel cells. Over the past decade, four types of methanol-resistant oxygen-reduction catalysts have been developed to circumvent this problem. Among these, transition-metal chalcogenides, and in particular RuSe, have shown effective selectivity to oxygen-reduction reaction in the presence of methanol. These catalysts not only can enhance the performance of the conventional direct methanol fuel cells but also could provide a route to develop mixed-reactants direct methanol fuel cells, which could be highly cost-effective in comparison with the conventional direct methanol fuel cells. This article is a brief update on the preparation, characterization, and implications of methanol-resistant oxygen-reduction catalysts.

  12. Optimization of manifold design for 1 kW-class flat-tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack operating on reformed natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Kashif; Dong, Sang Keun; Khan, Rashid Ali; Park, Seung Hwan

    2016-09-01

    This study focuses on optimizing the manifold design for a 1 kW-class flat-tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack by performing extensive three-dimensional numerical simulations on numerous manifold designs. The stack flow uniformity and the standard flow deviation indexes are implemented to characterize the flow distributions in the stack and among the channels of FT-SOFC's, respectively. The results of the CFD calculations demonstrate that the remodeled manifold without diffuser inlets and 6 mm diffuser front is the best among investigated designs with uniformity index of 0.996 and maximum standard flow deviation of 0.423%. To understand the effect of manifold design on the performance of stack, both generic and developed manifold designs are investigated by applying electrochemical and internal reforming reactions modeling. The simulation results of the stack with generic manifold are validated using experimental data and then validated models are adopted to simulate the stack with the developed manifold design. The results reveal that the stack with developed manifold design achieves more uniform distribution of species, temperature, and current density with comparatively lower system pressure drop. In addition, the results also showed ∼8% increase in the maximum output power due to the implementation of uniform fuel velocity distributions in the cells.

  13. A validated near-infrared spectroscopic method for methanol detection in biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Andrea; Bräuer, Bastian; Nieuwenkamp, Gerard; Ent, Hugo; Bremser, Wolfram

    2016-06-01

    Biodiesel quality control is a relevant issue as biodiesel properties influence diesel engine performance and integrity. Within the European metrology research program (EMRP) ENG09 project ‘Metrology for Biofuels’, an on-line/at-site suitable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) method has been developed in parallel with an improved EN14110 headspace gas chromatography (GC) analysis method for methanol in biodiesel. Both methods have been optimized for a methanol content of 0.2 mass% as this represents the maximum limit of methanol content in FAME according to EN 14214:2009. The NIRS method is based on a mobile NIR spectrometer equipped with a fiber-optic coupled probe. Due to the high volatility of methanol, a tailored air-tight adaptor was constructed to prevent methanol evaporation during measurement. The methanol content of biodiesel was determined from evaluation of NIRS spectra by partial least squares regression (PLS). Both GC analysis and NIRS exhibited a significant dependence on biodiesel feedstock. The NIRS method is applicable to a content range of 0.1% (m/m) to 0.4% (m/m) of methanol with uncertainties at around 6% relative for the different feedstocks. A direct comparison of headspace GC and NIRS for samples of FAMEs yielded that the results of both methods are fully compatible within their stated uncertainties.

  14. Convenient quantification of methanol concentration detection utilizing an integrated microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao-Nan; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Ju, Wei-Jhong; Wu, Ming-Chang; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2012-01-01

    A rapid and simple technique is proposed for methanol concentration detection using a PMMA (Polymethyl-Methacrylate) microfluidic chip patterned using a commercially available CO2 laser scriber. In the proposed device, methanol and methanol oxidase (MOX) are injected into a three-dimensional circular chamber and are mixed via a vortex stirring effect. The mixture is heated to prompt the formation of formaldehyde and is flowed into a rectangular chamber, to which fuchsin-sulphurous acid is then added. Finally, the microchip is transferred to a UV spectrophotometer for methanol detection purposes. The experimental results show that a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.9940 is obtained when plotting the optical density against the methanol concentration for samples and an accuracy as high as 93.1% are compared with the determined by the high quality gas chromatography with concentrations in the range of 2 ∼ 100 ppm. The methanol concentrations of four commercial red wines are successfully detected using the developed device. Overall, the results show that the proposed device provides a rapid and accurate means of detecting the methanol concentration for a variety of applications in the alcoholic beverage inspection and control field. PMID:23940501

  15. On-board reforming of biodiesel and bioethanol for high temperature PEM fuel cells: Comparison of autothermal reforming and steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Stefan; Wörner, Antje

    2011-03-01

    In the 21st century biofuels will play an important role as alternative fuels in the transportation sector. In this paper different reforming options (steam reforming (SR) and autothermal reforming (ATR)) for the on-board conversion of bioethanol and biodiesel into a hydrogen-rich gas suitable for high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cells are investigated using the simulation tool Aspen Plus. Special emphasis is placed on thermal heat integration. Methyl-oleate (C19H36O2) is chosen as reference substance for biodiesel. Bioethanol is represented by ethanol (C2H5OH). For the steam reforming concept with heat integration a maximum fuel processing efficiency of 75.6% (76.3%) is obtained for biodiesel (bioethanol) at S/C = 3. For the autothermal reforming concept with heat integration a maximum fuel processing efficiency of 74.1% (75.1%) is obtained for biodiesel (bioethanol) at S/C = 2 and λ = 0.36 (0.35). Taking into account the better dynamic behaviour and lower system complexity of the reforming concept based on ATR, autothermal reforming in combination with a water gas shift reactor is considered as the preferred option for on-board reforming of biodiesel and bioethanol. Based on the simulation results optimum operating conditions for a novel 5 kW biofuel processor are derived.

  16. Recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and derived products - closing the loop.

    PubMed

    Goeppert, Alain; Czaun, Miklos; Jones, John-Paul; Surya Prakash, G K; Olah, George A

    2014-12-01

    Starting with coal, followed by petroleum oil and natural gas, the utilization of fossil fuels has allowed the fast and unprecedented development of human society. However, the burning of these resources in ever increasing pace is accompanied by large amounts of anthropogenic CO2 emissions, which are outpacing the natural carbon cycle, causing adverse global environmental changes, the full extent of which is still unclear. Even through fossil fuels are still abundant, they are nevertheless limited and will, in time, be depleted. Chemical recycling of CO2 to renewable fuels and materials, primarily methanol, offers a powerful alternative to tackle both issues, that is, global climate change and fossil fuel depletion. The energy needed for the reduction of CO2 can come from any renewable energy source such as solar and wind. Methanol, the simplest C1 liquid product that can be easily obtained from any carbon source, including biomass and CO2, has been proposed as a key component of such an anthropogenic carbon cycle in the framework of a "Methanol Economy". Methanol itself is an excellent fuel for internal combustion engines, fuel cells, stoves, etc. It's dehydration product, dimethyl ether, is a diesel fuel and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) substitute. Furthermore, methanol can be transformed to ethylene, propylene and most of the petrochemical products currently obtained from fossil fuels. The conversion of CO2 to methanol is discussed in detail in this review. PMID:24935751

  17. Recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and derived products - closing the loop.

    PubMed

    Goeppert, Alain; Czaun, Miklos; Jones, John-Paul; Surya Prakash, G K; Olah, George A

    2014-12-01

    Starting with coal, followed by petroleum oil and natural gas, the utilization of fossil fuels has allowed the fast and unprecedented development of human society. However, the burning of these resources in ever increasing pace is accompanied by large amounts of anthropogenic CO2 emissions, which are outpacing the natural carbon cycle, causing adverse global environmental changes, the full extent of which is still unclear. Even through fossil fuels are still abundant, they are nevertheless limited and will, in time, be depleted. Chemical recycling of CO2 to renewable fuels and materials, primarily methanol, offers a powerful alternative to tackle both issues, that is, global climate change and fossil fuel depletion. The energy needed for the reduction of CO2 can come from any renewable energy source such as solar and wind. Methanol, the simplest C1 liquid product that can be easily obtained from any carbon source, including biomass and CO2, has been proposed as a key component of such an anthropogenic carbon cycle in the framework of a "Methanol Economy". Methanol itself is an excellent fuel for internal combustion engines, fuel cells, stoves, etc. It's dehydration product, dimethyl ether, is a diesel fuel and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) substitute. Furthermore, methanol can be transformed to ethylene, propylene and most of the petrochemical products currently obtained from fossil fuels. The conversion of CO2 to methanol is discussed in detail in this review.

  18. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Grimble, Ralph E.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

  19. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Grimble, R.E.

    1988-03-08

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

  20. Biogeochemical Cycle of Methanol in Anoxic Deep-Sea Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Tani, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naoya; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Kano, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Ryo; Suzuki, Yohey

    2016-01-01

    The biological flux and lifetime of methanol in anoxic marine sediments are largely unknown. We herein reported, for the first time, quantitative methanol removal rates in subsurface sediments. Anaerobic incubation experiments with radiotracers showed high rates of microbial methanol consumption. Notably, methanol oxidation to CO2 surpassed methanol assimilation and methanogenesis from CO2/H2 and methanol. Nevertheless, a significant decrease in methanol was not observed after the incubation, and this was attributed to the microbial production of methanol in parallel with its consumption. These results suggest that microbial reactions play an important role in the sources and sinks of methanol in subseafloor sediments. PMID:27301420

  1. Fabrication and Characterization of a Micro Methanol Sensor Using the CMOS-MEMS Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Chien-Fu; Dai, Ching-Liang; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2015-01-01

    A methanol microsensor integrated with a micro heater manufactured using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technique was presented. The sensor has a capability of detecting low concentration methanol gas. Structure of the sensor is composed of interdigitated electrodes, a sensitive film and a heater. The heater located under the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to provide a working temperature to the sensitive film. The sensitive film prepared by the sol-gel method is tin dioxide doped cadmium sulfide, which is deposited on the interdigitated electrodes. To obtain the suspended structure and deposit the sensitive film, the sensor needs a post-CMOS process to etch the sacrificial silicon dioxide layer and silicon substrate. The methanol senor is a resistive type. A readout circuit converts the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. The experimental results show that the methanol sensor has a sensitivity of 0.18 V/ppm. PMID:26512671

  2. Fabrication and Characterization of a Micro Methanol Sensor Using the CMOS-MEMS Technique.

    PubMed

    Fong, Chien-Fu; Dai, Ching-Liang; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2015-10-23

    A methanol microsensor integrated with a micro heater manufactured using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technique was presented. The sensor has a capability of detecting low concentration methanol gas. Structure of the sensor is composed of interdigitated electrodes, a sensitive film and a heater. The heater located under the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to provide a working temperature to the sensitive film. The sensitive film prepared by the sol-gel method is tin dioxide doped cadmium sulfide, which is deposited on the interdigitated electrodes. To obtain the suspended structure and deposit the sensitive film, the sensor needs a post-CMOS process to etch the sacrificial silicon dioxide layer and silicon substrate. The methanol senor is a resistive type. A readout circuit converts the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. The experimental results show that the methanol sensor has a sensitivity of 0.18 V/ppm.

  3. Fabrication and Characterization of a Micro Methanol Sensor Using the CMOS-MEMS Technique.

    PubMed

    Fong, Chien-Fu; Dai, Ching-Liang; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2015-01-01

    A methanol microsensor integrated with a micro heater manufactured using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technique was presented. The sensor has a capability of detecting low concentration methanol gas. Structure of the sensor is composed of interdigitated electrodes, a sensitive film and a heater. The heater located under the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to provide a working temperature to the sensitive film. The sensitive film prepared by the sol-gel method is tin dioxide doped cadmium sulfide, which is deposited on the interdigitated electrodes. To obtain the suspended structure and deposit the sensitive film, the sensor needs a post-CMOS process to etch the sacrificial silicon dioxide layer and silicon substrate. The methanol senor is a resistive type. A readout circuit converts the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. The experimental results show that the methanol sensor has a sensitivity of 0.18 V/ppm. PMID:26512671

  4. Can methanol be synthesized from CO by direct hydrogenation over Cu/ZnO catalysts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Zhi-Jun; Han, Pei-De; Li, Zhe; Hu, Jian-Shui; Huang, Wei

    2012-11-01

    Methanol synthesis from CO by direct hydrogenation has been studied using the density-functional theory (DFT). The charge of Cu has been found to be transferred to the ZnO carrier having low Cu cover. Due to the electron-charge transfer between the metallic Cu and the ZnO carrier, the Cu valency is greater than zero and less than one. Consideration of the water-gas-shift reaction and hydrogenation of CO2 to CHOO and COOH, the result shows that the active sites for the synthesis of methanol from CO2 and CO are different. Methanol is synthesized from CO by direct hydrogenation over Cuδ+ (0 < δ < 1) species through the intermediates CHO, CH2O, and CH3O, and the rate-limiting step is the hydrogenation of CHO, indicating that the Cuδ+ (0 < δ < 1) species comprise the active sites for the synthesis of methanol from CO by direct hydrogenation.

  5. Methanol tailgas combustor control method

    DOEpatents

    Hart-Predmore, David J.; Pettit, William H.

    2002-01-01

    A method for controlling the power and temperature and fuel source of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to supply heat to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual fuel inlet streams including a first fuel stream, and a second fuel stream of anode effluent from the fuel cell and reformate from the fuel processor. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is determined by regulating the amount of the first and/or second fuel streams and the quantity of the first air flow stream to support fuel processor power requirements.

  6. Plasma catalytic reforming of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Rabinovich, A.; Alexeev, N.

    1998-08-01

    Thermal plasma technology can be efficiently used in the production of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich gases from methane and a variety of fuels. This paper describes progress in plasma reforming experiments and calculations of high temperature conversion of methane using heterogeneous processes. The thermal plasma is a highly energetic state of matter that is characterized by extremely high temperatures (several thousand degrees Celsius) and high degree of dissociation and substantial degree of ionization. The high temperatures accelerate the reactions involved in the reforming process. Hydrogen-rich gas (50% H{sub 2}, 17% CO and 33% N{sub 2}, for partial oxidation/water shifting) can be efficiently made in compact plasma reformers. Experiments have been carried out in a small device (2--3 kW) and without the use of efficient heat regeneration. For partial oxidation/water shifting, it was determined that the specific energy consumption in the plasma reforming processes is 16 MJ/kg H{sub 2} with high conversion efficiencies. Larger plasmatrons, better reactor thermal insulation, efficient heat regeneration and improved plasma catalysis could also play a major role in specific energy consumption reduction and increasing the methane conversion. A system has been demonstrated for hydrogen production with low CO content ({approximately} 1.5%) with power densities of {approximately} 30 kW (H{sub 2} HHV)/liter of reactor, or {approximately} 10 m{sup 3}/hr H{sub 2} per liter of reactor. Power density should further increase with increased power and improved design.

  7. Sources and seasonality of atmospheric methanol based on tall tower measurements in the US Upper Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L.; Millet, D. B.; Mohr, M. J.; Wells, K. C.; Griffis, T. J.; Helmig, D.

    2011-11-01

    We present over one year (January 2010-February 2011) of continuous atmospheric methanol measurements from the University of Minnesota tall tower Trace Gas Observatory (KCMP tall tower; 244 m a.g.l.), and interpret the dataset in terms of constraints on regional methanol sources and seasonality. The seasonal cycle of methanol concentrations observed at the KCMP tall tower is generally similar to that simulated by a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem, driven with MEGANv2.0 biogenic emissions) except the seasonal peak occurs ~1 month earlier in the observations, apparently reflecting a model underestimate of emission rates for younger versus older leaves. Based on a source tracer approach, which we evaluate using GEOS-Chem and with multiple tracers, we estimate that anthropogenic emissions account for approximately 40% of ambient methanol abundance during winter and 10% during summer. During daytime in summer, methanol concentrations increase exponentially with temperature, reflecting the temperature sensitivity of the biogenic source, and the observed temperature dependence is statistically consistent with that in the model. Nevertheless, summertime concentrations are underestimated by on average 35% in the model for this region. The seasonal importance of methanol as a source of formaldehyde (HCHO) and carbon monoxide (CO) is highest in spring through early summer, when biogenic methanol emissions are high but isoprene emissions are still relatively low. During that time observed methanol concentrations account for on average 20% of the total CO and HCHO production rates as simulated by GEOS-Chem, compared to 12% later in the summer and 12% on an annual average basis. The biased seasonality in the model means that the photochemical role for methanol early in the growing season is presently underestimated.

  8. Sources and seasonality of atmospheric methanol based on tall tower measurements in the US Upper Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L.; Mohr, M. J.; Wells, K. C.; Griffis, T. J.; Helmig, D.; Millet, D. B.

    2011-06-01

    We present over one year of continuous atmospheric methanol measurements from the University of Minnesota tall tower Trace Gas Observatory (KCMP tall tower; 244 m a.g.l.), and interpret the dataset in terms of constraints on regional methanol sources and seasonality. The seasonal cycle of methanol concentrations observed at the KCMP tall tower is generally similar to that simulated by a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem, driven with MEGANv2.0 biogenic emissions) except the seasonal peak occurs ~1 month earlier in the observations, apparently reflecting a model underestimate of emission rates for younger versus older leaves. Based on a source tracer approach, which we evaluate using GEOS-Chem and with multiple tracers, we estimate that anthropogenic emissions account for approximately 40 % of ambient methanol abundance during winter and 10 % during summer. During daytime in summer, methanol concentrations increase exponentially with temperature, reflecting the temperature sensitivity of the biogenic source, and the observed temperature dependence is statistically consistent with that in the model. Nevertheless, summertime concentrations are underestimated by on average 35 % in the model for this region. The seasonal importance of methanol as a source of formaldehyde (HCHO) and carbon monoxide (CO) is highest in spring through early summer, when biogenic methanol emissions are high but isoprene emissions are still relatively low. During that time observed methanol concentrations account for on average 20 % of the total CO and HCHO production rates as simulated by GEOS-Chem, compared to 12 % later in the summer and 12 % on an annual average basis. The biased seasonality in the model means that the photochemical role for methanol early in the growing season is presently underestimated.

  9. THE ROLE OF METHANOL IN THE CRYSTALLIZATION OF TITAN'S PRIMORDIAL OCEAN

    SciTech Connect

    Deschamps, Frederic; Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2010-12-01

    A key parameter that controls the crystallization of primordial oceans in large icy moons is the presence of anti-freeze compounds, which may have maintained primordial oceans over the age of the solar system. Here we investigate the influence of methanol, a possible anti-freeze candidate, on the crystallization of Titan's primordial ocean. Using a thermodynamic model of the solar nebula and assuming a plausible composition of its initial gas phase, we first calculate the condensation sequence of ices in Saturn's feeding zone, and show that in Titan's building blocks methanol can have a mass fraction of {approx}4 wt% relative to water, i.e., methanol can be up to four times more abundant than ammonia. We then combine available data on the phase diagram of the water-methanol system and scaling laws derived from thermal convection to estimate the influence of methanol on the dynamics of the outer ice I shell and on the heat transfer through this layer. For a fraction of methanol consistent with the building blocks composition we determined, the vigor of convection in the ice I shell is strongly reduced. The effect of 5 wt% methanol is equivalent to that of 3 wt% ammonia. Thus, if methanol is present in the primordial ocean of Titan, the crystallization may stop, and a sub-surface ocean may be maintained between the ice I and high-pressure ice layers. A preliminary estimate indicates that the presence of 4 wt% methanol and 1 wt% ammonia may result in an ocean of thickness at least 90 km.

  10. Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology of Methanol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methanol is a high production volume chemical used as a feedstock for chemical syntheses and as a solvent and fuel additive. Methanol is acutely toxic to humans, causing acidosis, blindness in death at high dosages, but its developmental and reproductive toxicity in humans is poo...

  11. Conversion of Methanol, Ethanol and Propanol over Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Wang, Yong

    2013-06-04

    Renewable fuel from lignocellulosic biomass has recently attracted more attention due to its environmental and the potential economic benefits over the crude oil [1]. In particular the production of fuel range hydrocarbon (HC) from alcohol generated lots of interest since the alcohol can be produced from biomass via thermochemical [2] (mixed alcohol from gasification derived synthesis gas) as well as the biochemical routes [3] (alcohol fermentation). Along with the development of ZSM5 synthesis and the discovery of methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process by Mobil in 1970’s triggered lots of interest in research and development arena to understand the reaction mechanisms of alcohols over zeolites in particular ZSM5 [4]. More detailed research on methanol conversion was extensively reported [5] and in recent times the research work can be found on ethanol [6] and other alcohols as well but comprehensive comparison of catalyst activity and the deactivation mechanism of the conversion of various alcohols over zeolites has not been reported. The experiments were conducted on smaller alcohols such as methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol over HZSM5. The experimental results on the catalyst activity and the catalyst deactivation mechanism will be discussed.

  12. Verrucomicrobia and their role in soil methanol consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierer, N.

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria belonging to the phylum Verrucomicrobia are far more ubiquitous and abundant in soil than previous work would suggest. In many soils, a relatively small number of verrucomicrobial phylotypes or 'species' can represent more than 25% of the bacterial cells in soil. Since these phylotypes are not closely related to any known cultured isolates or any strains for which we have whole-genome data, we have limited information on what these bacteria are actually doing in soil, their metabolic capabilities, or the niches they inhabit. We have recently assembled the genomes of these dominant Verrucomicrobia from soil metagenomic data and found that these taxa appear to be oligotrophs that specialize in methanol oxidation. This is important because we have found in previous work that methanol likely represents an important source of labile organic carbon to soil microbes in many ecosystems with methanol fluxes likely representing an important, but under-studied, mechanism by which organic carbon is transferred from surface litter layers to mineral soils. Ongoing work has focused on using high-throughput cultivation methods to study soil Verrucomicrobia in vitro and better understand their controls on soil carbon dynamics. Together this work demonstrates how we can leverage recent methodological advances in metagenomics, high-throughput cultivation, and soil trace gas analyses to understand the biogeochemical relevance of an abundant, but mysterious, group of soil microorganisms.

  13. Thinking about Tax Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boskin, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    Providing pre-college teachers with an analysis of tax reform is the primary goal of this publication. The present tax system is both inefficient and inequitable. Three goals of tax reform proposals are detailed: (1) fairness--the dimensions of horizontal equity, or equal treatment of equals however defined, and vertical equity, reflecting the…

  14. Small Schools Reform Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Beth M.; Berghoff, Beth

    2013-01-01

    This study explored complicated personal narratives of school reform generated by participants in response to a particular small schools reform initiative. Narrative data was dialogically generated in interviews with nine past participants of an urban high school conversion project planned and implemented over a span of five years toward the goal…

  15. Reform: To What End?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The author looks at school reform in light of his experiences documenting effective public education in classrooms across the United States. Observing in an inner-city 1st grade classroom, he sees a teacher who is knowledgeable, resourceful, and particularly effective with her students. He notes that none of the current high-profile reform ideas…

  16. School Reform. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue addresses school reform, focusing on accountability, attrition, public-supported private education, equitable education, and schoolwide reform. "School-Student Performance and Accountability" (Jose A. Cardenas) discusses what constitutes good performance in school; the shifting emphasis among the input, output, and process of…

  17. Educational Reform in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butorac, Marylin M.; First, Patricia F.

    1994-01-01

    Oklahoma's answer to the cry for reform and involvement in education emerged as House Bill 1017, a comprehensive $223 million school reform and tax act. This article reviews the HR 1017 story, focusing on its legislative enactment history and offering a content analysis of mandated changes in finance, personnel, governance, student assessment,…

  18. Tax Reform & University Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, John Holt

    This brochure discusses the implications of the Tax Reform Act of 1969 for university and college development officers charged with the responsibility for solicitation of gifts, bequests and grants from foundations. The solicitation of deferred gifts, bequests and grants from foundations is discussed in chapter one in relation to tax reform and…

  19. Surface-Bound Intermediates in Low-Temperature Methanol Synthesis on Copper. Participants and Spectators

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yong; Mei, Donghai; Peden, Charles H.F.; Campbell, Charles T.; Mims, Charles A.

    2015-11-03

    The reactivity of surface adsorbed species present on copper catalysts during methanol synthesis at low temperatures was studied by simultaneous infrared spectroscopy (IR) and mass spectroscopy (MS) measurements during “titration” (transient surface reaction) experiments with isotopic tracing. The results show that adsorbed formate is a major bystander species present on the surface under steady-state methanol synthesis reaction conditions, but it cannot be converted to methanol by reaction with pure H2, nor with H2 plus added water. Formate-containing surface adlayers for these experiments were produced during steady state catalysis in (a) H2:CO2 (with substantial formate coverage) and (b) moist H2:CO (with no IR visible formate species). Both these reaction conditions produce methanol at steady state with relatively high rates. Adlayers containing formate were also produced by (c) formic acid adsorption. Various "titration" gases were used to probe these adlayers at modest temperatures (T = 410-450K) and 6 bar total pressure. Methanol gas (up to ~1% monolayer equivalent) was produced in "titration" from the H2:CO2 catalytic adlayers by H2 plus water, but not by dry hydrogen. The decay in the formate IR features accelerated in the presence of added water vapor. The H2:CO:H2O catalytic adlayer produced similar methanol titration yields in H2 plus water but showed no surface formate features in IR (less than 0.2% monolayer coverage). Finally, formate from formic acid chemisorption produced no methanol under any titration conditions. Even under (H2:CO2) catalytic reaction conditions, isotope tracing showed that pre-adsorbed formate from formic acid did not contribute to the methanol produced. Although non-formate intermediates exist during low temperature methanol synthesis on copper which can be converted to methanol gas

  20. Properties of a soft-core model of methanol: An integral equation theory and computer simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Huš, Matej; Urbic, Tomaz; Munaò, Gianmarco

    2014-10-28

    Thermodynamic and structural properties of a coarse-grained model of methanol are examined by Monte Carlo simulations and reference interaction site model (RISM) integral equation theory. Methanol particles are described as dimers formed from an apolar Lennard-Jones sphere, mimicking the methyl group, and a sphere with a core-softened potential as the hydroxyl group. Different closure approximations of the RISM theory are compared and discussed. The liquid structure of methanol is investigated by calculating site-site radial distribution functions and static structure factors for a wide range of temperatures and densities. Results obtained show a good agreement between RISM and Monte Carlo simulations. The phase behavior of methanol is investigated by employing different thermodynamic routes for the calculation of the RISM free energy, drawing gas-liquid coexistence curves that match the simulation data. Preliminary indications for a putative second critical point between two different liquid phases of methanol are also discussed.

  1. Reforming Science: Methodological and Cultural Reforms

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary science has brought about technological advances and an unprecedented understanding of the natural world. However, there are signs of dysfunction in the scientific community as well as threats from diverse antiscience and political forces. Incentives in the current system place scientists under tremendous stress, discourage cooperation, encourage poor scientific practices, and deter new talent from entering the field. It is time for a discussion of how the scientific enterprise can be reformed to become more effective and robust. Serious reform will require more consistent methodological rigor and a transformation of the current hypercompetitive scientific culture. PMID:22184414

  2. Process for the conversion of carbonaceous feedstocks to particulate carbon and methanol

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, Meyer; Grohse, Edward W.

    1995-01-01

    A process for the production of a pollutant-free particulate carbon (i.e., a substantially ash-, sulfur- and nitrogen-free carbon) from carbonaceous feedstocks. The basic process involves de-oxygenating one of the gas streams formed in a cyclic hydropyrolysis-methane pyrolysis process in order to improve conversion of the initial carbonaceous feedstock. De-oxygenation is effected by catalytically converting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen contained in one of the pyrolysis gas streams, preferably the latter, to a methanol co-product. There are thus produced two products whose use is known per se, viz., a substantially pollutant-free particulate carbon black and methanol. These products may be admixed in the form of a liquid slurry of carbon black in methanol.

  3. Process for the conversion of carbonaceous feedstocks to particulate carbon and methanol

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, M.; Grohse, E.W.

    1995-06-27

    A process is described for the production of a pollutant-free particulate carbon (i.e., a substantially ash-, sulfur- and nitrogen-free carbon) from carbonaceous feedstocks. The basic process involves de-oxygenating one of the gas streams formed in a cyclic hydropyrolysis-methane pyrolysis process in order to improve conversion of the initial carbonaceous feedstock. De-oxygenation is effected by catalytically converting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen contained in one of the pyrolysis gas streams, preferably the latter, to a methanol co-product. There are thus produced two products whose use is known per se, viz., a substantially pollutant-free particulate carbon black and methanol. These products may be admixed in the form of a liquid slurry of carbon black in methanol. 3 figs.

  4. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy genes" into Escherichia coli based on in silico considerations and flux balance analysis to enable methanol dissimilation and assimilation. We determined that the most promising approach allowing the utilization of methanol was the implementation of NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase and the establishment of the ribulose monophosphate cycle by expressing the genes for hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase (Phi). To test for the best-performing enzymes in the heterologous host, a number of enzyme candidates from different donor organisms were selected and systematically analyzed for their in vitro and in vivo activities in E. coli. Among these, Mdh2, Hps and Phi originating from Bacillus methanolicus were found to be the most effective. Labeling experiments using (13)C methanol with E. coli producing these enzymes showed up to 40% incorporation of methanol into central metabolites. The presence of the endogenous glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation pathway of E. coli did not adversely affect the methanol conversion rate. Taken together, the results of this study represent a major advancement towards establishing synthetic methylotrophs by gene transfer.

  5. On the Road to Reform: A Sociocultural Interpretation of Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mensah, Felicia Moore

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I discuss how reform in science education is interpreted by Barma as she recounts the story of Catherine, a grade 9 biology teacher, who reforms her teaching practices in response to a national curriculum reform in Quebec, Canada. Unlike some cases in response to reform, this case is hopeful and positive. Also in this paper, I…

  6. Advanced direct methanol fuel cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdan, Monjid; Kosek, John A.

    1999-11-01

    The goal of the program was an advanced proton-exchange membrane (PEM) for use as the electrolyte in a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell which provides reduced methanol crossover while simultaneously providing high conductivity and low membrane water content. The approach was to use a membrane containing precross-linked fluorinated base polymer films and subsequently to graft the base film with selected materials. Over 80 different membranes were prepared. The rate of methanol crossover through the advanced membranes was reduced 90%. A 5-cell stack provided stable performance over a 100-hour life test. Preliminary cost estimates predicted a manufacturing cost at $4 to $9 per kW.

  7. Performance comparison of autothermal reforming for liquid hydrocarbons, gasoline and diesel for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Inyong; Bae, Joongmyeon; Bae, Gyujong

    This paper discusses the reforming of liquid hydrocarbons to produce hydrogen for fuel cell applications, focusing on gasoline and diesel due to their high hydrogen density and well-established infrastructures. Gasoline and diesel are composed of numerous hydrocarbon species including paraffins, olefins, cycloparaffins, and aromatics. We have investigated the reforming characteristics of several representative liquid hydrocarbons. In the case of paraffin reforming, H 2 yield and reforming efficiency were close to thermodynamic equilibrium status (TES), although heavier hydrocarbons required slightly higher temperatures than lighter hydrocarbons. However, the conversion efficiency was much lower for aromatics than paraffins with similar carbon number. We have also investigated the reforming performance of simulated commercial diesel and gasoline using simple synthetic diesel and gasoline compositions. Reforming performances of our formulations were in good agreement with those of commercial fuels. In addition, the reforming of gas to liquid (GTL) resulted in high H 2 yield and reforming efficiency showing promise for possible fuel cell applications.

  8. Combustion behaviors of a compression-ignition engine fueled with diesel/methanol blends under various fuel delivery advance angles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zuohua; Lu, Hongbing; Jiang, Deming; Zeng, Ke; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Junqiang; Wang, Xibin

    2004-12-01

    A stabilized diesel/methanol blend was described and the basic combustion behaviors based on the cylinder pressure analysis was conducted in a compression-ignition engine. The study showed that increasing methanol mass fraction of the diesel/methanol blends would increase the heat release rate in the premixed burning phase and shorten the combustion duration of the diffusive burning phase. The ignition delay increased with the advancing of the fuel delivery advance angle for both the diesel fuel and the diesel/methanol blends. For a specific fuel delivery advance angle, the ignition delay increased with the increase of the methanol mass fraction (oxygen mass fraction) in the fuel blends and the behaviors were more obvious at low engine load and/or high engine speed. The rapid burn duration and the total combustion duration increased with the advancing of the fuel delivery advance angle. The centre of the heat release curve was close to the top-dead-centre with the advancing of the fuel delivery advance angle. Maximum cylinder gas pressure increased with the advancing of the fuel delivery advance angle, and the maximum cylinder gas pressure of the diesel/methanol blends gave a higher value than that of the diesel fuel. The maximum mean gas temperature remained almost unchanged or had a slight increase with the advancing of the fuel delivery advance angle, and it only slightly increased for the diesel/methanol blends compared to that of the diesel fuel. The maximum rate of pressure rise and the maximum rate of heat release increased with the advancing of the fuel delivery advance angle of the diesel/methanol blends and the value was highest for the diesel/methanol blends.

  9. Studies of binary oxide catalysts for the ammoxidation of methanol to hydrogen cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Ebner, J.R.; Gleaves, J.T.; Kuechler, T.C.; Li, T.P.

    1986-03-01

    Hydrogen cyanide is an important building block chemical for the synthesis of a variety of industrial important chemicals, such as adiponitrile, nitrilotriacetic acid, lactic acid, methylmethacrylate, and 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutyric acid. The primary commercial routes to hydrogen cyanide are the reaction of methane and ammonia under aerobic (Andrussow Process) or anaerobic conditions (Degussa Process), or the separation of hydrogen cyanide as a by-product of the ammoxidation of propylene. The ammoxidation of methanol represents an attractive alternative route to HCN for a number of reasons. First, on a molar basis, the price of methanol has become close to that of methane as world methanol capacity has increased. Second, shipment of methanol and ammonia for on-site production of HCN in areas where cheap natural gas is not available could offer a cost and safety advantage. The ammoxidation of methanol as a route to HCN was originally suggested by Andrussow, and Distillers has early patents on the use of silica supported molybdenum oxides and antimony tin oxides. More recently, Japanese companies have reported improved multicomponent systems. The studies of binary oxide systems containing molybdenum or phosphorous have led to the development of an iron molybdenum oxide catalyst and a manganese phosphorous oxide catalyst capable of ammoxidizing methanol in nearly 90% yields.

  10. Energy balances in the production and end-use of methanol derived from coal

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-10

    Analysis is performed for three combinations of fuels, specifically: net petroleum gain (petroleum only); net premium fuel gain (natural gas and petroleum); and net energy gain (includes all fuels; does not include free energy from sun). The base case selected for evaluation was that of an energy-efficient coal-to-methanol plant located in Montana/Wyoming and using the Lurgi conversion process. The following variations of the base coal-methanol case are also analyzed: gasoline from coal with methanol as an intermediate step (Mobil-M); and methanol from coal (Texaco gasification process). For each process, computations are made for the product methanol as a replacement for unleaded gasoline in a conventional spark ignition engine and as a chemical feedstock. For the purpose of the energy analysis, computations are made for three situations regarding mileage of methanol/ gasoline compared to that of regular unleaded gasoline: mileage of the two fuels equal, mileage 4 percent better with gasohol, and mileage 4 percent worse with gasohol. The standard methodology described for the base case applies to all of the variations.

  11. Deuterated methanol in the pre-stellar core L1544

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Caselli, P.; Spezzano, S.; Leonardo, E.

    2014-09-01

    Context. High methanol (CH3OH) deuteration has been revealed in Class 0 protostars with the detection of singly, doubly, and even triply D-substituted forms. Methanol is believed to form during the pre-collapse phase via gas-grain chemistry and then eventually injected into the gas when the heating produced by the newly formed protostar sublimates the grain mantles. The molecular deuterium fraction of the warm gas is thus a relic of the cold pre-stellar era and provides hints of the past history of the protostars. Aims: Pre-stellar cores represent the preceding stages in the process of star formation. We aim at measuring methanol deuteration in L1544, a prototypical dense and cold core on the verge of gravitational collapse. The aim is to probe the deuterium fractionation process while the "frozen" molecular reservoir is accumulated onto dust grains. Methods: Using the IRAM 30 m telescope, we mapped the methanol emission in the pre-stellar core L1544 and observed singly deuterated methanol (CH2DOH and CH3OD) towards the dust peak of L1544. Non-LTE radiative transfer modelling was performed on three CH3OH emissions lines at 96.7 GHz, using a Bonnor-Ebert sphere as a model for the source. We have also assumed a centrally decreasing abundance profile to take the molecule freeze-out in the inner core into account. The column density of CH2DOH was derived assuming LTE excitation and optically thin emission. Results: The CH3OH emission has a highly asymmetric morphology, resembling a non-uniform ring surrounding the dust peak, where CO is mainly frozen onto dust grains. The observations provide an accurate measure of methanol deuteration in the cold pre-stellar gas. The derived abundance ratio is [CH2DOH]/[CH3OH] = 0.10 ± 0.03, which is significantly smaller than the ones found in low-mass Class 0 protostars and smaller than the deuterium fraction measured in other molecules towards L1544. The singly-deuterated form CH3OD was not detected at 3σ sensitivity of 7 mK km s

  12. First application of supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysis for continuous methanol carbonylation.

    PubMed

    Riisager, Anders; Jørgensen, Betina; Wasserscheid, Peter; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2006-03-01

    A solid, silica-supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) rhodium iodide Monsanto-type catalyst system, [BMIM][Rh(CO)2I2]-[BMIM]I-SiO2, exhibits excellent activity and selectivity towards acetyl products in fixed-bed, continuous gas-phase methanol carbonylation.

  13. Base-free hydrogen generation from methanol using a bi-catalytic system.

    PubMed

    Monney, Angèle; Barsch, Enrico; Sponholz, Peter; Junge, Henrik; Ludwig, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2014-01-21

    A bi-catalytic system, in which Ru-MACHO-BH and Ru(H)2(dppe)2 interact in a synergistic manner, was developed for the base-free dehydrogenation of methanol. A total TON > 4200 was obtained with only trace amounts of CO contamination (<8 ppm) in the produced gas. PMID:24288039

  14. OXIDATION OF METHANOL USING OZONE ON TITANIA-SUPPORTED VANADIUM CATALYST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Catalytic ozone decomposition of methanol has been conducted at mild temperatures of 100 to 250°C using V2O5/TiO2 catalyst prepared by either sol-gel or wet impregnation methods. The catalysts were characterized using XRD, surface area measurements, and desorption of CH3OH. Gas p...

  15. Treatment of dilute clusters of methanol and water by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations.

    PubMed

    Ruckenstein, Eli; Shulgin, Ivan L; Tilson, Jeffrey L

    2005-02-10

    Large molecular clusters can be considered as intermediate states between gas and condensed phases, and information about them can help us understand condensed phases. In this paper, ab initio quantum mechanical methods have been used to examine clusters formed of methanol and water molecules. The main goal was to obtain information about the intermolecular interactions and the structure of methanol/water clusters at the molecular level. The large clusters (CH(4)O...(H(2)O)(12) and H(2)O...(CH(4)O)(10)) containing one molecule of one component (methanol or water) and many (12, 10) molecules of the other component were considered. Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) was used in the calculations. Several representative cluster geometries were optimized, and nearest-neighbor interaction energies were calculated for the geometries obtained in the first step. The results of the calculations were compared to the available experimental information regarding the liquid methanol/water mixtures and to the molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement was found. For the CH(4)O...(H(2)O)(12) cluster, it was shown that the molecules of water can be subdivided into two classes: (i) H bonded to the central methanol molecule and (ii) not H bonded to the central methanol molecule. As expected, these two classes exhibited striking energy differences. Although they are located almost the same distance from the carbon atom of the central methanol molecule, they possess very different intermolecular interaction energies with the central molecule. The H bonding constitutes a dominant factor in the hydration of methanol in dilute aqueous solutions. For the H(2)O...(CH(4)O)(10) cluster, it was shown that the central molecule of water has almost three H bonds with the methanol molecules; this result differs from those in the literature that concluded that the average number of H bonds between a central water molecule and methanol molecules in dilute solutions of

  16. Catalytic reforming methods

    DOEpatents

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  17. Atuarfitsialak: Greenland's Cultural Compatible Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Tasha R.

    2012-01-01

    In 2002, Greenlandic reform leaders launched a comprehensive, nation-wide reform to create culturally compatible education. Greenland's reform work spans the entire educational system and includes preschool through higher education. To assist their efforts, reform leaders adopted the Standards for Effective Pedagogy developed at the Center for…

  18. Coke formation and carbon atom economy of methanol-to-olefins reaction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yingxu; Yuan, Cuiyu; Li, Jinzhe; Xu, Shutao; Zhou, You; Chen, Jingrun; Wang, Quanyi; Xu, Lei; Qi, Yue; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Zhongmin

    2012-05-01

    The methanol-to-olefins (MTO) process is becoming the most important non-petrochemical route for the production of light olefins from coal or natural gas. Maximizing the generation of the target products, ethene and propene, and minimizing the production of byproducts and coke, are major considerations in the efficient utilization of the carbon resource of methanol. In the present work, the heterogeneous catalytic conversion of methanol was evaluated by performing simultaneous measurements of the volatile products generated in the gas phase and the confined coke deposition in the catalyst phase. Real-time and complete reaction profiles were plotted to allow the comparison of carbon atom economy of methanol conversion over the catalyst SAPO-34 at varied reaction temperatures. The difference in carbon atom economy was closely related with the coke formation in the SAPO-34 catalyst. The confined coke compounds were determined. A new type of confined organics was found, and these accounted for the quick deactivation and low carbon atom economy under low-reaction-temperature conditions. Based on the carbon atom economy evaluation and coke species determination, optimized operating conditions for the MTO process are suggested; these conditions guarantee high conversion efficiency of methanol.

  19. Fuel and power coproduction: The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) process demonstration at Kingsport

    SciTech Connect

    Drown, D.P.; Brown, W.R.; Heydorn, E.C.; Moore, R.B.; Schaub, E.S.; Brown, D.M.; Jones, W.C.; Kornosky, R.M.

    1997-12-31

    The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) process uses a slurry bubble column reactor to convert syngas (primarily a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) to methanol. Because of its superior heat management, the process is able to be designed to directly handle the carbon monoxide (CO)-rich syngas characteristic of the gasification of coal, petroleum coke, residual oil, wastes, or of other hydrocarbon feedstocks. When added to an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, the LPMEOH{trademark} process converts a portion of the CO-rich syngas produced by the gasifier to methanol, and the remainder of the unconverted gas is used to fuel the gas turbine combined-cycle power plant. The LPMEOH{trademark} process has the flexibility to operate in a daily electricity demand load-following manner. Coproduction of power and methanol via IGCC and the LPMEOH{trademark} process provides opportunities for energy storage for electrical demand peak shaving, clean fuel for export, and/or chemical methanol sales.

  20. Advances in direct oxidation methanol fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, S.; Narayanan, S. R.; Vamos, E.; Frank, H.; Halpert, G.; Laconti, Anthony B.; Kosek, J.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Olah, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells that can operate directly on fuels such as methanol are attractive for low to medium power applications in view of their low weight and volume relative to other power sources. A liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell has been developed based on a proton exchange membrane electrolyte and Pt/Ru and Pt catalyzed fuel and air/O2 electrodes, respectively. The cell has been shown to deliver significant power outputs at temperatures of 60 to 90 C. The cell voltage is near 0.5 V at 300 mA/cm(exp 2) current density and an operating temperature of 90 C. A deterrent to performance appears to be methanol crossover through the membrane to the oxygen electrode. Further improvements in performance appear possible by minimizing the methanol crossover rate.

  1. Methanol: A Versatile Fuel for Immediate Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. B.; Lerner, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Advocates the large-scale production and use of methanol as a substitute for the diminishing reserves of low-cost petroleum resources. Describes the manufacturing process and advantages of the versatile fuel. (JR)

  2. On-board hydrogen generation for transport applications: the HotSpot™ methanol processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Neil; Ellis, Suzanne R.; Frost, Jonathan C.; Golunski, Stanislaw E.; van Keulen, Arjan N. J.; Lindewald, Nicklas G.; Reinkingh, Jessica G.

    In the absence of a hydrogen infrastructure, development of effective on-board fuel processors is likely to be critical to the commercialisation of fuel-cell cars. The HotSpot™ reactor converts methanol, water and air in a single compact catalyst bed into a reformate containing mainly CO2 and hydrogen (and unreacted nitrogen). The process occurs by a combination of exothermic partial oxidation and endothermic steam reforming of methanol, to produce 750 l of hydrogen per hour from a 245-cm3 reactor. The relative contribution of each reaction can be tuned to match the system requirements at a given time. Scale-up is achieved by the parallel combination of the required number of individual HotSpot reactors, which are fed from a central manifold. Using this modular design, the start-up and transient characteristics of a large fuel-processor are identical to that of a single reactor. When vaporised liquid feed and air are introduced into cold reactors, 100% output is achieved in 50 s; subsequent changes in throughput result in instantaneous changes in output. Surplus energy within the fuel-cell powertrain can be directed to the manifold, where it can be used to vaporise the liquid feeds and so promote steam reforming, resulting in high system efficiency. The small amount of CO that is produced by the HotSpot reactions is attenuated to <10 ppm by a catalytic clean-up unit. The HotSpot concept and CO clean-up strategy are not limited to the processing of methanol, but are being applied to other organic fuels.

  3. An Experiment on the Methane-Methanol-Iodo-methane Cycle to Produce Nuclear Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Youngjoon, Shin; Wonjae, Lee; Kiyoung, Lee; Jonghwa, Chang; Sangbong, Lee

    2006-07-01

    Steam reforming is a mature and well-established technology on an industrial scale, and its research and development have focused on a high efficiency and low cost through the use of a cheaper material and production methods. However the new task presented due to the Kyoto Protocol to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in December 1997 is how to overcome the carbon dioxide generation problem in this technology. One of several CO{sub 2}-free alternatives based on a steam reforming of methane were introduced conceptually, named as the closed Methane-Methanol-Iodo-methane (MMI) cycle. We have calculated the thermodynamic properties as a function of the temperature on the chemical reactions that are supporting this CO{sub 2}- free process and evaluated theoretically the realization of each chemical reaction step. By analyzing the Gibbs free energy change, it has been found that most reactions are available within the temperature range of 298 K - 1,298 K except for the conversion of methanol to methyl iodide. In order to obtain methyl iodide from methanol to satisfy the closed MMI cycle, a SO{sub 2}-catalytic chemical reaction pathway during the step of an iodizing of methanol is possible. The experimental confirmation has been performed in an I{sub 2}-CH{sub 3}OH-SO{sub 2} system. The sulfuric acid produced as a byproduct can be thermally decomposed to SO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O, and then the H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} are recycled in the MMI cycle, respectively. The productivity of methyl iodide has been confirmed at up to 86% for a typical chemical reaction condition. (authors)

  4. Esterification of acrylic acid with methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chubarov, G.A.; Danov, S.M.; Logutov, V.I.; Obmelyukhina, T.N.

    1984-01-01

    The esterification of acrylic acid with methanol in the absence of catalysis by strong mineral acids has been studied. The esterification rate was estimated from the amount of methyl acrylate formed at the end of a definite time, and the reaction rate was found to be first order with respect to methanol and second order with respect to acrylic acid. Mathematical relationships in good agreement with experimental data were derived from the results of the kinetic studies.

  5. Methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst composite for direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Zelenay, Piotr

    2006-09-05

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of Pt.sub.3Cr/C so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  6. Methanol-Tolerant Cathode Catalyst Composite For Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Zelenay, Piotr

    2006-03-21

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of a platinum-chromium alloy so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  7. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Pulse sonication effect on transesterification of waste vegetable oil was studied. • Effects of ethanol, methanol, and alcohol mixtures on FAMEs yield were evaluated. • Effect of ultrasonic intensity, power density, and its output rates were evaluated. • Alcohol mixtures resulted in higher biodiesel yields due to better solubility. - Abstract: This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanol–methanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 1–2 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanol–methanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions.

  8. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  9. Ritualism, Privilege, and Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hefferlin, JB Lon

    1970-01-01

    Revised version of paper given at National Conference on Higher Education in March 1970, on the need to break away from routine and ritual in higher education insitutions and establish educational and institutional reforms. (IR)

  10. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-12

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  11. Solar central receiver reformer system for ammonia plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-07-01

    An overview of a study to retrofit the Valley Nitrogen Producers, Inc., El Centro, California 600 ST/SD Ammonia Plant with Solar Central Receiver Technology is presented. The retrofit system consists of a solar central receiver reformer (SCRR) operating in parallel with the existing fossil fired reformer. Steam and hydrocarbon react in the catalyst filled tubes of the inner cavity receiver to form a hydrogen rich mixture which is the syngas feed for the ammonia production. The SCRR system will displace natural gas presently used in the fossil reformer combustion chamber.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of methanol and formate in female cynomolgus monkeys exposed to methanol vapors.

    PubMed

    Medinsky, M A; Dorman, D C; Bond, J A; Moss, O R; Janszen, D B; Everitt, J I

    1997-06-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments contain mandates for reduced automotive emissions and add new requirements for the use of alternative fuels such as methanol to reduce certain automotive pollutants. Methanol is acutely toxic in humans at relatively low doses, and the potential for exposure to methanol will be increased if it is used in automotive fuel. Formate is the metabolite responsible for neurotoxic effects of acute methanol exposure. Since formate metabolism is dependent on folate, potentially sensitive folate-deficient subpopulations, such as pregnant women, may accumulate formate and be at higher risk from low-level methanol exposure. Our objective was to determine the pharmacokinetics of 14C-methanol and 14C-formate in normal and folate-deficient monkeys after exposure to 14C-methanol vapors at environmentally relevant concentrations: below the threshold limit value (TLV), at the TLV of 200 parts per million (ppm), and above the TLV. Four normal adult female cynomolgus monkeys were individually anesthetized with isoflurane, and each was exposed by endotracheal intubation to 10, 45, 200, or 900 ppm 14C-methanol for 2 hours. Concentrations of the inhaled and exhaled 14C-methanol, blood concentrations of 14C-methanol and 14C-formate, exhaled 14C-carbon dioxide (14CO2), and respiratory parameters were measured during exposure. After exposure, 14C-methanol and 14CO2 exhaled, 14C-methanol and 14C-formate excreted in urine, and 14C-methanol and 14C-formate in blood were quantified. The amounts of exhaled 14C-methanol and 14CO2, blood concentrations of 14C-methanol and 14C-formate, and 14C-methanol and 14C-formate excreted in urine were linearly related to methanol exposure concentration. For all exposures, blood concentrations of 14C-methanol-derived formate were 10 to 1000 times lower than endogenous blood formate concentrations (100 to 200 mM) reported for monkeys and were several orders of magnitude lower than levels of formate known to be toxic. Since the

  13. Autothermal hydrodesulfurizing reforming method and catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Kopasz, John P.; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kao, Richard Li-chih; Randhava, Sarabjit Singh

    2005-11-22

    A method for reforming a sulfur-containing carbonaceous fuel in which the sulfur-containing carbonaceous fuel is mixed with H.sub.2 O and an oxidant, forming a fuel/H.sub.2 O/oxidant mixture. The fuel H.sub.2 O/oxidant mixture is brought into contact with a catalyst composition comprising a dehydrogenation portion, an oxidation portion and a hydrodesulfurization portion, resulting in formation of a hydrogen-containing gas stream.

  14. A novel process for methanol synthesis. Progress report, June 1, 1992--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1992-12-31

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to study the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol (MEOH) in the liquid phase by a novel method. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two step reaction consisting of a carbonylation reaction taking place mainly in the ``film`` close to a copper chromite surface followed by a hydrogenolysis reaction taking place on the surface of the copper chromite. The interaction between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we reexamined the equilibrium concentration for methyl formate and obtained data at higher loadings of copper chromite.

  15. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs.; Cormos, C. C.; Agachi, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO2 emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  16. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs. Cormos, C. C. Agachi, P. S.

    2015-12-23

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO{sub 2} emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  17. In situ XPS and MS study of methanol decomposition and oxidation on Pd(111) under millibar pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaichev, V. V.; Miller, A. V.; Prosvirin, I. P.; Bukhtiyarov, V. I.

    2012-02-01

    The methanol decomposition and oxidation on a Pd(111) single crystal have been investigated in situ using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and mass-spectrometry (MS) in the temperature range of 300-600 K. It was found that even in the oxygen presence the methanol decomposition on palladium proceeds through two competitive routes: fast dehydrogenation to CO and H2, and slow decomposition of methanol via the C-O bond scission. The rate of the second route is significant even in the millibar pressure range, which leads to a blocking of the palladium surface by carbon and to a prevention of the further methanol conversion. As a result, no gas phase products of methanol decomposition were detected by mass-spectrometry at 0.1 mbar CH3OH in the whole temperature range. The methanol C-O bond scission produces CHx species, which fast dehydrogenate to atomic carbon even at room temperature and further partially dissolve in the palladium bulk at 400 K with the formation of the PdCx phase. According to in situ XPS data, the PdCx phase forms even in the oxygen excess. The application of an in situ XPS-MS technique unambiguously shows a good correlation between a decrease in the surface concentration of all carbon-containing species and the rate of methanol conversion. Since these carbon species have a high reactivity towards oxygen, heating of Pd(111) above 450 K in a methanol-oxygen mixture yields CO, CO2, and water. The product distribution indicates that the main route of methanol conversion is the dehydrogenation of methanol to CO and hydrogen. However, under the experimental conditions used, hydrogen is completely oxidized to water, while CO is partially oxidized to CO2. No palladium oxide was detected by XPS in these conditions.

  18. On the road to reform: a sociocultural interpretation of reform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, Felicia Moore

    2011-09-01

    In this paper I discuss how reform in science education is interpreted by Barma as she recounts the story of Catherine, a grade 9 biology teacher, who reforms her teaching practices in response to a national curriculum reform in Quebec, Canada. Unlike some cases in response to reform, this case is hopeful and positive. Also in this paper, I address some familiar areas that must be considered when teachers undertake curriculum reform and how science educators may fulfill the role of facilitator and advocate in the support of teachers on the road to reform. The commentary focuses on how Barma retells the story through the lens of activity theory.

  19. Electrochemical fuel cell generator having an internal and leak tight hydrocarbon fuel reformer

    DOEpatents

    Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Hager, Charles A.

    1998-01-01

    An electrochemical fuel cell generator configuration is made having a generator section which contains a plurality of axially elongated fuel cells, each cell containing a fuel electrode, air electrode, and solid oxide electrolyte between the electrodes, in which axially elongated dividers separate portions of the fuel cells from each other, and where at least one divider also reforms a reformable fuel gas mixture prior to electricity generation reactions, the at least one reformer-divider is hollow having a closed end and an open end entrance for a reformable fuel mixture to pass to the closed end of the divider and then reverse flow and pass back along the hollowed walls to be reformed, and then finally to pass as reformed fuel out of the open end of the divider to contact the fuel cells, and further where the reformer-divider is a composite structure having a gas diffusion barrier of metallic foil surrounding the external walls of the reformer-divider except at the entrance to prevent diffusion of the reformable gas mixture through the divider, and further housed in an outer insulating jacket except at the entrance to prevent short-circuiting of the fuel cells by the gas diffusion barrier.

  20. Electrochemical fuel cell generator having an internal and leak tight hydrocarbon fuel reformer

    DOEpatents

    Dederer, J.T.; Hager, C.A.

    1998-03-31

    An electrochemical fuel cell generator configuration is made having a generator section which contains a plurality of axially elongated fuel cells, each cell containing a fuel electrode, air electrode, and solid oxide electrolyte between the electrodes, in which axially elongated dividers separate portions of the fuel cells from each other, and where at least one divider also reforms a reformable fuel gas mixture prior to electricity generation reactions, the at least one reformer-divider is hollow having a closed end and an open end entrance for a reformable fuel mixture to pass to the closed end of the divider and then reverse flow and pass back along the hollowed walls to be reformed, and then finally to pass as reformed fuel out of the open end of the divider to contact the fuel cells, and further where the reformer-divider is a composite structure having a gas diffusion barrier of metallic foil surrounding the external walls of the reformer-divider except at the entrance to prevent diffusion of the reformable gas mixture through the divider, and further housed in an outer insulating jacket except at the entrance to prevent short-circuiting of the fuel cells by the gas diffusion barrier. 10 figs.

  1. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanol-methanol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-12-01

    This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanol-methanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanol-methanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 1-2 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanol-methanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions.

  2. A novel process for methanol synthesis. Progress report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1992-09-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol (MeOH) by a novel process. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two-step reaction in series, the carbonylation reaction taking place mainly in a non-equilibrium region in the vicinity of the copper chromite surface, and the hydrogenolysis reaction taking place on the surface of the copper chromite. Interaction between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we investigated the effect of pore diffusion on reaction rate and obtained an expression for the rate of reaction for the methanol/methyl formate concurrent synthesis.

  3. Methanol ice VUV photoprocessing: GC-MS analysis of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Mrad, Ninette; Duvernay, Fabrice; Chiavassa, Thierry; Danger, Grégoire

    2016-05-01

    Next to water, methanol is one of the most abundant molecules in astrophysical ices. A new experimental approach is presented here for the direct monitoring via gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of a sublimating photoprocessed pure methanol ice. Unprecedentedly, in a same analysis, compelling evidences for the formation of 33 volatile organic compounds are provided. The latter are C1-C6 products including alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, esters, ethers and carboxylic acids. Few C3 and all C4 detected compounds have been identified for the first time. Tentative detections of few C5 and C6 compounds are also presented. GC-MS allows for the first time the direct quantification of C2-C4 photoproducts and shows that their abundances decrease with the increase of their carbon chain length. These qualitative and quantitative measurements provide important complementary results to previous experiments, and present interesting similarities with observations of sources rich in methanol.

  4. Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    The United States has vast natural gas reserves which could contribute significantly to our energy security if economical technologies for conversion to liquid fuels and chemicals were developed. Many of these reserves are small scale or in remote locations and of little value unless they can be transported to consumers. Transportation is economically performed via pipeline, but this route is usually unavailable in remote locations. Another option is to convert the methane in the gas to liquid hydrocarbons, such as methanol, which can easily and economically be transported by truck. Therefore, the conversion of methane to liquid hydrocarbons has the potential to decrease our dependence upon oil imports by opening new markets for natural gas and increasing its use in the transportation and chemical sectors of the economy. In this project, we are attempting to develop, and explore new catalysts capable of direct oxidation of methane to methanol. The specific objectives of this work are discussed.

  5. Methanol from urban refuse: a liquid fuel from a renewable resource

    SciTech Connect

    Arnason, B.

    1983-12-01

    Despite the recent glut in world oil markets the long run need to develop alternatives to petroleum derived fuels is still apparent. The long lead times required to alter the economy's energy infrastructure and inherent uncertainties about future developments point to the need for alternatives with built-in flexibilities. Methanol can be produced from any carbonaceous matter (natural gas, heavy fuel oil, coal, peat, wood, urban refuse, etc.) and used in place of most conventional fuels. Thus, methanol meets one of the main requirements a candidate future energy carrier must satisfy. Furthermore, whereas a massive synthetic fuels industry based on coal or oil shale could threaten the stability of the global climate, the use of methanol produced from biomass at a sustainable rate would have a minimal impact on the atmospheric carbon dioxide level. In the near term, biomass-based methanol faces two obstacles. First, no established markets exist for fuel methanol. Second, at present wood, which is the main component of the biomass resource; may be too costly a feedstock for methanol production. These are among the problems addressed in this paper. Urban refuse is one form of biomass that does not suffer the cost disadvantage of wood. Rising costs of land and environmental regulations have made landfilling an increasingly unattractive method of waste disposal. Alternative means of waste disposal, including incineration, have proved both expensive and polluting. It is proposed that the production of methanol is and economical and environmentally safe method for disposing of municipal solid waste (MSW) and, therefore, a promising strategy for the early commercialization of advanced biomass conversion technologies.

  6. Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Synthesis over Cu from CO/CO2/H2/H2O Mixtures: the Source of C in Methanol and the Role of Water

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yong; Mims, Charles A.; Mei, Donghai; Peden, Charles HF; Campbell, Charles T.

    2013-02-01

    The low temperature (403 – 453K) conversions of CO:hydrogen and CO2:hydrogen mixtures (6 bar total pressure) to methanol over copper catalysts are both assisted by the presence of small amounts of water (mole fraction ~0.04%-0.5%). For CO2:hydrogen reaction mixtures, the water product from both methanol synthesis and reverse water gas shift serves to initiate both reactions in an autocatalytic manner. In the case of CO:D2 mixtures, very little methanol is produced until small amounts of water are added. The effect of water on methanol production is more immediate than in CO2:D2, yet the steady state rates are similar. Tracer experiments in 13CO:12CO2:hydrogen (with or without added water), show that the dominant source of C in the methanol product gradually shifts from CO2 to CO as the temperature is lowered. Cu-bound formate, the major IR visible surface species under CO2:hydrogen, is not visible in CO:moist hydrogen. Though formate is visible in the tracer experiments, the symmetric stretch is absent. These results, in conjunction with recent DFT calculations on Cu(111), point to carboxyl as a common intermediate for both methanol synthesis and reverse water gas shift, with formate playing a spectator co-adsorbate role.

  7. Ecuador's silent health reform.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Pierre; Echeverría Tapia, Ramiro; Aguilar Santacruz, Edison; Unger, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Health sector reform was implemented in many Latin American countries in the 1980s and 1990s, leading to reduced public expenditure on health, limitations on public provision for disease control, and a minimum package of services, with concomitant growth of the private sector. At first sight, Ecuador appeared to follow a different pattern: no formal reform was implemented, despite many plans to reform the Ministry of Health and social health insurance. The authors conducted an in-depth review and analysis of published and gray literature on the Ecuadorian health sector from 1990 onward. They found that although neoliberal reform of the health sector was not openly implemented, many of its typical elements are present: severe reduction of public budgets, "universal" health insurance with limited coverage for targeted groups, and contracting out to private providers. The health sector remains segmented and fragmented, explaining the population's poor health status. The leftist Correa government has prepared an excellent long-term plan to unite services of the Ministry of Health and social security, but implementation is extremely slow. In conclusion, the health sector in Ecuador suffered a "silent" neoliberal reform. President Correa's progressive government intends to reverse this, increasing public budgets for health, but hesitates to introduce needed radical changes.

  8. WIDESPREAD METHANOL EMISSION FROM THE GALACTIC CENTER: THE ROLE OF COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Royster, M.; Cotton, W.; Viti, S.; Wardle, M.

    2013-02-20

    We report the discovery of a widespread population of collisionally excited methanol J = 4{sub -1} to 3{sub 0} E sources at 36.2 GHz from the inner 66' Multiplication-Sign 18' (160 Multiplication-Sign 43 pc) of the Galactic center. This spectral feature was imaged with a spectral resolution of 16.6 km s{sup -1} taken from 41 channels of a Very Large Array continuum survey of the Galactic center region. The revelation of 356 methanol sources, most of which are maser candidates, suggests a large abundance of methanol in the gas phase in the Galactic center region. There is also spatial and kinematic correlation between SiO (2-1) and CH{sub 3}OH emission from four Galactic center clouds: the +50 and +20 km s{sup -1} clouds and G0.13-0.13 and G0.25 + 0.01. The enhanced abundance of methanol is accounted for in terms of induced photodesorption by cosmic rays as they travel through a molecular core, collide, dissociate, ionize, and excite Lyman Werner transitions of H{sub 2}. A time-dependent chemical model in which cosmic rays drive the chemistry of the gas predicts CH{sub 3}OH abundance of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -7} on a chemical timescale of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} years. The average methanol abundance produced by the release of methanol from grain surfaces is consistent with the available data.

  9. Methanol and the productivity of tropical crops

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, T.U.

    1995-12-31

    Studies are being conducted in Trinidad and Tobago, St. Lucia and St. Kitts/Nevis to determine the effect of aqueous solutions of methanol on the growth and yield of a wide range of vegetable, field and perennial crops. The paper presents a summary of results to data for ten of the crops studied. Six of these crops, lettuce, sweet pepper, tomato, mango and breadfruit, have shown significant increases in growth or yield with methanol application, while others such as pigeon pea, rice, banana and cocoa have shown more limited responses. There appears to be some potential for the use of methanol in tropical crop production but further studies are required before this apparent potential can be harnessed.

  10. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, C E; Self, J L; Copley, J R D; Faraone, A

    2016-07-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids. PMID:27394112

  11. Intracranial hemorrhage associated with methanol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Ahmet; Satar, Salim; Uzun, Belkan; Topal, Metin; Yesilagac, Hasan; Avci, Andakkan

    2006-12-01

    Methanol is a common component of gasoline, antifreeze, washer fluid, perfume, household cleaners and various other industrial products. Acute methanol poisoning produces severe metabolic acidosis, serious neurologic sequelae and rarely imaging findings. In this paper, we describe a 35-year-old man with methanol intoxication who was in a comatose stage. Computed tomography (CT) showed widespread brain edema and hemorrhages localized in the supratentorial region of the temporal lobe, nearly 3 x 1 cm in a crescent shape, in the white matter surrounding the capsula externa and extending to the periventricular white matter and occipital lobes. Temporal lobe hemorrhage in our patient might also have been due to the effect of heparinization during hemodialysis, metabolic and lactic acidosis, or formate.

  12. Efficient green methanol synthesis from glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Muhammad H.; Dummer, Nicholas F.; Knight, David W.; Jenkins, Robert L.; Howard, Mark; Moulijn, Jacob; Taylor, Stuart H.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2015-12-01

    The production of biodiesel from the transesterification of plant-derived triglycerides with methanol has been commercialized extensively. Impure glycerol is obtained as a by-product at roughly one-tenth the mass of the biodiesel. Utilization of this crude glycerol is important in improving the viability of the overall process. Here we show that crude glycerol can be reacted with water over very simple basic or redox oxide catalysts to produce methanol in high yields, together with other useful chemicals, in a one-step low-pressure process. Our discovery opens up the possibility of recycling the crude glycerol produced during biodiesel manufacture. Furthermore, we show that molecules containing at least two hydroxyl groups can be converted into methanol, which demonstrates some aspects of the generality of this new chemistry.

  13. Methanol sensor operated in a passive mode

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    A sensor outputs a signal related to a concentration of methanol in an aqueous solution adjacent the sensor. A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is included with an anode side and a cathode side. An anode current collector supports the anode side of the MEA and has a flow channel therethrough for flowing a stream of the aqueous solution and forms a physical barrier to control access of the methanol to the anode side of the MEA. A cathode current collector supports the cathode side of the MEA and is configured for air access to the cathode side of the MEA. A current sensor is connected to measure the current in a short circuit across the sensor electrodes to provide an output signal functionally related to the concentration of methanol in the aqueous solution.

  14. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, C. E.; Self, J. L.; Copley, J. R. D.; Faraone, A.

    2016-07-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids.

  15. DR 21(OH), a cluster in the making. 1: Observations in carbon monosulphide and methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, K. J.; Sandell, G.; Cunningham, C. T.; Davies, S. R.

    1994-06-01

    The star formation region DR 21(OH) was observed in the J=5-4 transitions of CS and C34S, and in several J=5-4 transitions of methanol. High velocity wings are detected in CS towards the main DR 21(OH) peak, extending over 80 km/s. They are very faint, and the outer wings are detected only at the center position. Since the outflow is not seen in the CO J=1-0 or 2-1 transitions, the CS observations suggest that this is a young, compact, dense and hot outflow. Many of the known NH3 cores are also seen in CS and methanol. Three known submm-continuum sources, DR 21(OH)S, DR 21(OH)SW, and DR 21(OH)NW, are suprisingly faint in the CS J=5-4 line, probably because the gas, though sufficiently dense, is too cold to fully excite the CS J=5-4 transition. They are, however, strong in methanol. An additional source, DR 21(OH)SE, is strong in CS but weak in methanol. The methanol lines were interpreted with an local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis to estimate rotational temperatures and column densities at the main peaks, and the results discussed in the context of chemical models.

  16. Vapor permeation-stepwise injection simultaneous determination of methanol and ethanol in biodiesel with voltammetric detection.

    PubMed

    Shishov, Andrey; Penkova, Anastasia; Zabrodin, Andrey; Nikolaev, Konstantin; Dmitrenko, Maria; Ermakov, Sergey; Bulatov, Andrey

    2016-02-01

    A novel vapor permeation-stepwise injection (VP-SWI) method for the determination of methanol and ethanol in biodiesel samples is discussed. In the current study, stepwise injection analysis was successfully combined with voltammetric detection and vapor permeation. This method is based on the separation of methanol and ethanol from a sample using a vapor permeation module (VPM) with a selective polymer membrane based on poly(phenylene isophtalamide) (PA) containing high amounts of a residual solvent. After the evaporation into the headspace of the VPM, methanol and ethanol were transported, by gas bubbling, through a PA membrane to a mixing chamber equipped with a voltammetric detector. Ethanol was selectively detected at +0.19 V, and both compounds were detected at +1.20 V. Current subtractions (using a correction factor) were used for the selective determination of methanol. A linear range between 0.05 and 0.5% (m/m) was established for each analyte. The limits of detection were estimated at 0.02% (m/m) for ethanol and methanol. The sample throughput was 5 samples h(-1). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of biodiesel samples.

  17. 40 CFR 86.1511 - Exhaust gas analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Methanol-Fueled Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled Diesel-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks, and New Methanol-Fueled...

  18. 40 CFR 86.1509 - Exhaust gas sampling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is permitted as applicable. The inclusion of an additional raw carbon dioxide... Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Methanol-Fueled Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled Diesel-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks, and New Methanol-Fueled...

  19. Photocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.; D`Este, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    A long-term goal of our research group is the exploration of novel pathways for the direct oxidation of methane to liquid fuels, chemicals, and intermediates. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol is attractive. The products of reaction, methanol and hydrogen, are both commercially desirable, methanol being used as is or converted to a variety of other chemicals, and the hydrogen could be utilized in petroleum and/or chemical manufacturing. Methane is produced as a by-product of coal gasification. Depending upon reactor design and operating conditions, up to 18% of total gasifier product may be methane. In addition, there are vast proven reserves of geologic methane in the world. Unfortunately, a large fraction of these reserves are in regions where there is little local demand for methane and it is not economically feasible to transport it to a market. There is a global research effort under way in academia, industry, and government to find methods to convert methane to useful, more readily transportable and storable materials. Methanol, the initial product of methane oxidation, is a desirable product of conversion because it retains much of the original energy of the methane while satisfying transportation and storage requirements. Investigation of direct conversion of methane to transportation fuels has been an ongoing effort at PETC for over 10 years. One of the current areas of research is the conversion of methane to methanol, under mild conditions, using light, water, and a semiconductor photocatalyst. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol, is attractive. Research in the laboratory is directed toward applying the techniques developed for the photocatalytic splitting of the water and the photochemical conversion of methane.

  20. Neuromuscular Functions on Experimental Acute Methanol Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Moral, Ali Reşat; Çankayalı, İlkin; Sergin, Demet; Boyacılar, Özden

    2015-01-01

    Objective The incidence of accidental or suicidal ingestion of methyl alcohol is high and methyl alcohol intoxication has high mortality. Methyl alcohol intoxication causes severe neurological sequelae and appears to be a significant problem. Methyl alcohol causes acute metabolic acidosis, optic neuropathy leading to permanent blindness, respiratory failure, circulatory failure and death. It is metabolised in the liver, and its metabolite formic acid has direct toxic effects, causing oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and increased lipid peroxidation associated with the mechanism of neurotoxicity. Methanol is known to cause acute toxicity of the central nervous system; however, the effects on peripheral neuromuscular transmission are unknown. In our study, we aimed to investigate the electrophysiological effects of experimentally induced acute methanol intoxication on neuromuscular transmission in the early period (first 24 h). Methods After approval by the Animal Experiment Ethics Committee of Ege University, the study was carried out on 10 Wistar rats, each weighing about 200 g. During electrophysiological recordings and orogastric tube insertion, the rats were anaesthetised using intra-peritoneal (IP) injection of ketamine 100 mg kg−1 and IP injection of xylazine 10 mg kg−1. The rats were given 3 g kg−1 methyl alcohol by the orogastric tube. Electrophysiological measurements from the gastrocnemius muscle were compared with baseline. Results Latency measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 0.81±0.11 ms and 0.76±0.12 ms, respectively. CMAP amplitude measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 9.85±0.98 mV and 9.99±0.40 mV, respectively. CMAP duration measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 9.86±0.03 ms and 9.86±0.045 ms, respectively. Conclusion It was concluded that experimental methanol intoxication in the acute phase (first 24 h) did not affect neuromuscular function. PMID:27366524

  1. Health care reforms

    PubMed Central

    Prevolnik Rupel, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In large systems, such as health care, reforms are underway constantly. The article presents a definition of health care reform and factors that influence its success. The factors being discussed range from knowledgeable personnel, the role of involvement of international experts and all stakeholders in the country, the importance of electoral mandate and governmental support, leadership and clear and transparent communication. The goals set need to be clear, and it is helpful to have good data and analytical support in the process. Despite all debates and experiences, it is impossible to clearly define the best approach to tackle health care reform due to a different configuration of governance structure, political will and state of the economy in a country. PMID:27703543

  2. Natural Gas Pipeline Permitting Reform Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Pompeo, Mike [R-KS-4

    2013-05-09

    12/09/2013 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Comprehensive Solutions for Urban Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgore, Sally

    2005-01-01

    The comprehensive school reform (CSR) models build consistency throughout a district while addressing the needs of individual schools. The high-quality CSR programs offer a most effective option for urban education reform.

  4. Solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of methanol. Predictions by molecular simulation and comparison with experimental data.

    PubMed

    Urukova, Ilina; Vorholz, Johannes; Maurer, Gerd

    2006-08-01

    The solubility of carbon dioxide in pure methanol, and in aqueous solutions of methanol, was computed using the Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) technique for 313, 354, and 395 K at pressures up to 9 MPa. Three solvent mixtures (of methanol and water) with methanol mole fractions of 10, 50, and 75 mole percent (in the gas-free solvent mixture) were studied. The Monte Carlo simulations were conducted in an isothermal-isobaric ensemble applying effective pair potentials for the pure components from literature. Common mixing rules without any adjustable binary interaction parameters were used to describe the interactions between the mixture components. Overall, a good agreement between simulation results and recently published experimental data is achieved. PMID:16869608

  5. Solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of methanol. Predictions by molecular simulation and comparison with experimental data.

    PubMed

    Urukova, Ilina; Vorholz, Johannes; Maurer, Gerd

    2006-08-01

    The solubility of carbon dioxide in pure methanol, and in aqueous solutions of methanol, was computed using the Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) technique for 313, 354, and 395 K at pressures up to 9 MPa. Three solvent mixtures (of methanol and water) with methanol mole fractions of 10, 50, and 75 mole percent (in the gas-free solvent mixture) were studied. The Monte Carlo simulations were conducted in an isothermal-isobaric ensemble applying effective pair potentials for the pure components from literature. Common mixing rules without any adjustable binary interaction parameters were used to describe the interactions between the mixture components. Overall, a good agreement between simulation results and recently published experimental data is achieved.

  6. Synthetic methylotrophy: engineering the production of biofuels and chemicals based on the biology of aerobic methanol utilization.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, William B; Sandoval, Nicholas R; Bennett, Robert K; Fast, Alan G; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2015-06-01

    Synthetic methylotrophy is the development of non-native methylotrophs that can utilize methane and methanol as sole carbon and energy sources or as co-substrates with carbohydrates to produce metabolites as biofuels and chemicals. The availability of methane (from natural gas) and its oxidation product, methanol, has been increasing, while prices have been decreasing, thus rendering them as attractive fermentation substrates. As they are more reduced than most carbohydrates, methane and methanol, as co-substrates, can enhance the yields of biologically produced metabolites. Here we discuss synthetic biology and metabolic engineering strategies based on the native biology of aerobic methylotrophs for developing synthetic strains grown on methanol, with Escherichia coli as the prototype.

  7. Heat exchanger for fuel cell power plant reformer

    DOEpatents

    Misage, Robert; Scheffler, Glenn W.; Setzer, Herbert J.; Margiott, Paul R.; Parenti, Jr., Edmund K.

    1988-01-01

    A heat exchanger uses the heat from processed fuel gas from a reformer for a fuel cell to superheat steam, to preheat raw fuel prior to entering the reformer and to heat a water-steam coolant mixture from the fuel cells. The processed fuel gas temperature is thus lowered to a level useful in the fuel cell reaction. The four temperature adjustments are accomplished in a single heat exchanger with only three heat transfer cores. The heat exchanger is preheated by circulating coolant and purge steam from the power section during startup of the latter.

  8. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  9. 37 GHz Methanol Masers : Horsemen of the Apocalypse for the Class II Methanol Maser Phase?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  10. Ethanol reforming on Co(0001) surfaces: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuguang; Hernández, Liliana; Guadarrama-Pérez, Carlos; Balbuena, Perla B

    2012-02-01

    A computational study using density functional theory is carried out to investigate the reaction mechanism of ethanol steam reforming on Co(0001) surfaces. The adsorption properties of the reactant, possible intermediates, and products are carefully examined. The reaction pathway and related transition states are also analyzed. According to our calculations, the reforming mechanism primarily consisting of dehydrogenation steps of ethanol, ethoxy, methanol, methoxy, and formic acid, is feasible on Co(0001) surfaces. It is also found that the reaction of formaldehyde yielding formic acid and hydrogen may not be an elementary reaction. The dehydrogenation of ethoxy possesses the highest barrier and is accordingly identified as the rate-determining step. PMID:22250968

  11. Improved Anode for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    A modified chemical composition has been devised to improve the performance of the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell. The main feature of the modified composition is the incorporation of hydrous ruthenium oxide into the anode structure. This modification can reduce the internal electrical resistance of the cell and increase the degree of utilization of the anode catalyst. As a result, a higher anode current density can be sustained with a smaller amount of anode catalyst. These improvements can translate into a smaller fuel-cell system and higher efficiency of conversion. Some background information is helpful for understanding the benefit afforded by the addition of hydrous ruthenium oxide. The anode of a direct methanol fuel cell sustains the electro-oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide in the reaction CH3OH + H2O--->CO2 + 6H(+) + 6e(-). An electrocatalyst is needed to enable this reaction to occur. The catalyst that offers the highest activity is an alloy of approximately equal numbers of atoms of the noble metals platinum and ruthenium. The anode is made of a composite material that includes high-surface-area Pt/Ru alloy particles and a proton-conducting ionomeric material. This composite is usually deposited onto a polymer-electrolyte (proton-conducting) membrane and onto an anode gas-diffusion/current-collector sheet that is subsequently bonded to the proton-conducting membrane by hot pressing. Heretofore, the areal density of noble-metal catalyst typically needed for high performance has been about 8 mg/cm2. However, not all of the catalyst has been utilized in the catalyzed electro-oxidation reaction. Increasing the degree of utilization of the catalyst would make it possible to improve the performance of the cell for a given catalyst loading and/or reduce the catalyst loading (thereby reducing the cost of the cell). The use of carbon and possibly other electronic conductors in the catalyst layer has been proposed for increasing the utilization of the

  12. Methanol and hydrogen sulfide in comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, P.; Meier, R.; Krankowsky, D.; Hodges, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Neutral Mass Spectrometer on the Giotto spacecraft measured the gas and ion composition in the coma of comet P/Halley. A detailed model of the ion chemistry inside the contact surface located at 4660 km is used to interpret the measured ion desnity profiles in the 32 to 35 amu/e mass range. The masses 33 and 35 amu/e are dominated by the protonated methanol and hydrogen sulfide ions CH3OH2(+) and H3S(+). Both profiles are essentially compatible with CH3OH and H2S originating from the nucleus only. The production rates relative to water are Y(CH3OH) = Q(CH3OH)/Q(H2O) = 1.7% and Y(H2S) = 0.41%. Our Y(CH3OH) agrees well with a determination from IR spectra obtained about 6 weeks after the Giotto encounter with P/Halley. In 7 other comets IR and microwave observations give Y(CH3OH) values between about 0.7 and 6%, indicating that the methanol abundance shows a strong variability from comet to comet. In three other comets Y(H2S) values between 0.2 and 0.5% have been reported. In addition to H2S(+), only ions containing minor isotopes of H, C, O and S contribute to mass 34 amu/e (e.g. (34)S(+), (13)CH3OH2(+), CH4DO(+)). These contributions can be calculated from the measured densities of the ions containing the major isotopes and the H2S(+) contribution from the measured H3S(+) density. From mass 34 amu/e we can also derive an upper limit of 1% for the abundance of deuterated methanol. This limit is at most marginally compatible with a direct interstellar origin of the CH3OH in P/Halley as the measured interstellar abundance of deuterated methanol is 1 to 6%.

  13. Liquid phase methanol reactor staging process for the production of methanol

    DOEpatents

    Bonnell, Leo W.; Perka, Alan T.; Roberts, George W.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention is a process for the production of methanol from a syngas feed containing carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Basically, the process is the combination of two liquid phase methanol reactors into a staging process, such that each reactor is operated to favor a particular reaction mechanism. In the first reactor, the operation is controlled to favor the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and in the second reactor, the operation is controlled so as to favor the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. This staging process results in substantial increases in methanol yield.

  14. The Effects of Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez-Martinez, Claudio-Rafael; Giron, Graciela; De-La-Luz-Arellano, Ivan; Ayon-Bañuelos, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Educational reform implies questions of social production and of state regulation that are the key words in educational reform, education and educational policies. These reforms are always on the political agenda of countries and involve international organisms, since education is a vehicle of development for social progress. A point of departure…

  15. Kudzu, Rabbits, and School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodlad, John I.

    2002-01-01

    Essay on school reform argues that quality teachers are key to successful reform, not reform rhetoric by state governors and U.S. Presidents. Asserts that primary mission of schooling is to provide students an educational apprenticeship in democracy. Qualified, caring, competent teachers are essential to accomplish this mission. (PKP)

  16. Globalization, Citizenship and Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qi, Jie

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the notions of globalization as embodied in Japanese educational reforms during the 1980s and 1990s. Modern institutional discourses of educational reform in Japan have shifted over time and all of these reform movements have been constructed by particular social and historical trajectories. Generally speaking, it has been…

  17. The Latest Chapter in Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imber, Michael

    2003-01-01

    As David Tyack and Larry Cuban demonstrate in "Tinkering Toward Utopia," the history of U.S. education reforms is that of mixed success and failure. Characteristics of reforms that take hold in schools include those that involve building new facilities, are easy to administer, and are legally mandated. Another major school reform initiative, the…

  18. Reforming Technical and Technological Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David N.

    1993-01-01

    Review of technical and technological educational reform in Brazil, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Sweden shows that reform takes time to complete effectively, long-term approaches are needed, and reform is linked to industrial development, regional cooperation, and decentralized decision making. (SK)

  19. Teacher Education Reforms in Albania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Joan

    2000-01-01

    Drawing on insights from Albanian teacher educators and government representatives, this paper examines processes of change and types of reform (modernization, structural, and systemic reform) in Albania. It also discusses the initial implementation of one of the reforms, which was directed at the balance and role of school experiences, analyzing…

  20. Methanol oxidation on Fe2O3 catalysts and the effects of surface Mo.

    PubMed

    Bowker, M; Gibson, E K; Silverwood, I P; Brookes, C

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption of methanol on haematite has been investigated using temperature programmed methods, combined with in situ DRIFTS. Model catalysts based on this material have then been made with a shell-core configuration of molybdenum oxide monolayers on top of the haematite core. These are used as models of industrial iron molybdate catalysts, used to selectively oxidise methanol to formaldehyde, one of the major chemical outlets for methanol. Haematite itself is completely ineffective in this respect since it oxidises it to CO2 and the DRIFTS shows that this occurs by oxidation of methoxy to formate at around 200 °C. The decomposition behaviour is affected by the absence or presence of oxygen in the gas phase; oxygen destabilises the methoxy and enhances formate production. In contrast, when a monolayer of molybdena is placed onto the surface by incipient wetness, and it remains there after calcination, the pathway to formate production is blocked and formaldehyde is the main gas phase product in TPD after methanol dosing. PMID:27101412

  1. A Theoretical Study of Methanol Synthesis from CO(2) Hydrogenation on Metal-doped Cu(111) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu P.; Yang, Y.; White, M.G.

    2012-01-12

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations were employed to investigate the methanol synthesis reaction from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation (CO{sub 2} + 3H{sub 2} {yields} CH{sub 3}OH + H{sub 2}O) on metal-doped Cu(111) surfaces. Both the formate pathway and the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction followed by a CO hydrogenation pathway (RWGS + CO-Hydro) were considered in the study. Our calculations showed that the overall methanol yield increased in the sequence: Au/Cu(111) < Cu(111) < Pd/Cu(111) < Rh/Cu(111) < Pt/Cu(111) < Ni/Cu(111). On Au/Cu(111) and Cu(111), the formate pathway dominates the methanol production. Doping Au does not help the methanol synthesis on Cu(111). Pd, Rh, Pt, and Ni are able to promote the methanol production on Cu(111), where the conversion via the RWGS + CO-Hydro pathway is much faster than that via the formate pathway. Further kinetic analysis revealed that the methanol yield on Cu(111) was controlled by three factors: the dioxomethylene hydrogenation barrier, the CO binding energy, and the CO hydrogenation barrier. Accordingly, two possible descriptors are identified which can be used to describe the catalytic activity of Cu-based catalysts toward methanol synthesis. One is the activation barrier of dioxomethylene hydrogenation, and the other is the CO binding energy. An ideal Cu-based catalyst for the methanol synthesis via CO{sub 2} hydrogenation should be able to hydrogenate dioxomethylene easily and bond CO moderately, being strong enough to favor the desired CO hydrogenation rather than CO desorption but weak enough to prevent CO poisoning. In this way, the methanol production via both the formate and the RWGS + CO-Hydro pathways can be facilitated.

  2. Control of autothermal reforming reactor of diesel fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolanc, Gregor; Pregelj, Boštjan; Petrovčič, Janko; Pasel, Joachim; Kolb, Gunther

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a control system for autothermal reforming reactor for diesel fuel is presented. Autothermal reforming reactors and the pertaining purification reactors are used to convert diesel fuel into hydrogen-rich reformate gas, which is then converted into electricity by the fuel cell. The purpose of the presented control system is to control the hydrogen production rate and the temperature of the autothermal reforming reactor. The system is designed in such a way that the two control loops do not interact, which is required for stable operation of the fuel cell. The presented control system is a part of the complete control system of the diesel fuel cell auxiliary power unit (APU).

  3. Methanol synthesis on ZnO(0001{sup ¯}). IV. Reaction mechanisms and electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Frenzel, Johannes Marx, Dominik

    2014-09-28

    Methanol synthesis from CO and H{sub 2} over ZnO, which requires high temperatures and high pressures giving rise to a complex interplay of physical and chemical processes over this heterogeneous catalyst surface, is investigated using ab initio simulations. The redox properties of the surrounding gas phase are known to directly impact on the catalyst properties and thus, set the overall catalytic reactivity of this easily reducible oxide material. In Paper III of our series [J. Kiss, J. Frenzel, N. N. Nair, B. Meyer, and D. Marx, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 064710 (2011)] we have qualitatively shown that for the partially hydroxylated and defective ZnO(0001{sup ¯}) surface there exists an intricate network of surface chemical reactions. In the present study, we employ advanced molecular dynamics techniques to resolve in detail this reaction network in terms of elementary steps on the defective surface, which is in stepwise equilibrium with the gas phase. The two individual reduction steps were investigated by ab initio metadynamics sampling of free energy landscapes in three-dimensional reaction subspaces. By also sampling adsorption and desorption processes and thus molecular species that are in the gas phase but close to the surface, our approach successfully generated several alternative pathways of methanol synthesis. The obtained results suggest an Eley-Rideal mechanism for both reduction steps, thus involving “near-surface” molecules from the gas phase, to give methanol preferentially over a strongly reduced catalyst surface, while important side reactions are of Langmuir-Hinshelwood type. Catalyst re-reduction by H{sub 2} stemming from the gas phase is a crucial process after each reduction step in order to maintain the catalyst's activity toward methanol formation and to close the catalytic cycle in some reaction channels. Furthermore, the role of oxygen vacancies, side reactions, and spectator species is investigated and mechanistic details are discussed

  4. Methanol decomposition bottoming cycle for IC engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purohit, G.; Houseman, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of methanol decomposition using engine exhaust heat, and examines its potential for use in the operation of passenger cars, diesel trucks, and diesel-electric locomotives. Energy economy improvements of 10-20% are calculated over the representative driving cycles without a net loss in power. Some reductions in exhaust emissions are also projected.

  5. A Search for Class I Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratap, P.

    2001-12-01

    Class I masers are thought to be associated with outflow activity from young stars and are easily explained with a collisional pumping model. However, masers have been found in regions where there is no apparent star formation or outflow activity. These masers could be probing a very early stage of star formation. Most searches for Class I masers have been done toward regions of known star formation. Such searches are biased as they would not find masers offset by distances greater than the telescope beam. The MIT Haystack Observatory Class I methanol maser survey is a project conducted by undergraduate students using the Haystack 37-m telescope. Each student maps a chosen molecular cloud and searches for maser emission. Once the student project is complete the data becomes part of a database of methanol masers. This collaborative observing strategy results in an unbiased search for new sites of methanol maser activity. Currently five clouds have been mapped and several new sites of methanol maser activity have been discovered. This project is funded by the Divisions of Astronomy and Undergraduate Education of the National Science Foundation.

  6. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  7. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  8. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Improvements to non-acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  9. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  10. HYDROGEN BONDING IN THE METHANOL DIMER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, two methanol molecules are placed in different arrangements to study hydrogen bonding in carbohydrate materials such as cellulose. Energy was calculated as a function of both hydrogen bond length and angle over wide ranges, using quantum mechanics (QM). The QM wavefunctions are analyze...

  11. Methanex, Hoechst Celanese dissolve methanol partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1993-03-31

    One of the many joint venture alliances recently announced in the petrochemical sector is ending in divorce. Hoechst Celanese Chemical (Dallas) and Methanex Corp. (Vancouver) are in the process of dissolving the partnership they had formed to restart Hoechst Celanese's methanol plant at Clear Lake, TX. Hoechst Celanese says it is actively seeking replacement partners and has several likely prospects, while Methanex is concentrating on its other ventures. Those include its just-completed acquisition of Fletcher Challenge's (Auckland, NZ) methanol business and a joint venture with American Cyanamid to convert an ammonia plant at Fortier, LA to methanol. Methanex will still be the world's largest producer of methanol. Officially, the negotiations between Methanex and Hoechst Celanese just broke down over the last month or so,' says Steve Yurich, operations manager for the Clear Lake plant. Market sources, however, say that Methanex found itself with too many irons in the fire' and pulled out before it ran into financial or perhaps even antitrust difficulties.

  12. Metacridamide B methanol-d4 monosolvate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The title compound was extracted from conidia of the fungus Metarhizium acridum. Crystals were obtained as a methanol-d4 solvate. The tail part of the 4-methylhexan-2-yl group exhibits disorder over two positions, with an occupancy ratio of 0.682 (9):0.318 (9). The crystal structure confirms the abs...

  13. Reforming the Undergraduate Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanderPol, Diane; Brown, Jeanne M.; Iannuzzi, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    The higher education literature abounds with reports and studies calling for reform in undergraduate education. An alphabet soup of higher education associations creates or advocates desired learning outcomes for postsecondary education and endorses approaches for student learning. This article shows connections between some of the major…

  14. Prisons and Sentencing Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvin, Jim

    1983-01-01

    Reviews current themes in sentencing and prison policy. The eight articles of this special issue discuss selective incapacitation, prison bed allocation models, computer-scored classification systems, race and gender relations, commutation, parole, and a historical review of sentencing reform. (JAC)

  15. Reforming Underperforming High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MDRC, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Urban high schools are in trouble--high dropout rates, low student academic achievement, and graduates who are unprepared for college are just some of the disappointing indicators. However, recent research points to a select number of approaches to improving student outcomes and reforming underperforming schools--from particular ways of creating…

  16. Educational Reform in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Nicholas

    1975-01-01

    Recommendations for the reform of the administrative structure, curriculum and methods, and equality of Thailand's educational system are provided. This journal is available from the Unesco Regional Office for Education in Asia, Darakarn Building, 920 Sukhumvit Road, P.O. Box 1425, Bangkok, Thailand.

  17. Children and Welfare Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Richard E., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of "The Future of Children" examines whether programs implemented by the federal welfare reform law accomplished the goal of reducing the number of children growing up in poor, single-parent families and whether these programs benefited children. This examination coincides with debates in Congress on the reauthorization of the Personal…

  18. Welfare Reform and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitler, Marianne P.; Gelback, Jonah B.; Hoynes, Hilary W.

    2005-01-01

    A study of the effect of state and federal welfare reforms over the period 1990-2000 on health insurance coverage and healthcare utilization by single women aged between 20-45 is presented. It is observed that Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act of 1996 which replaced the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program of 1990s with…

  19. Reform and Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hefferlin, JB Lon

    This article is the 7th in a series of AAHE research reports. It summarizes research that has been done on academic reform and the resistance to it and speculates what this research implies for future practice. Academic or curricular change is first of all organizational change and colleges and universities are organized and run in such a way as…

  20. Examining Comprehensive School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aladjem, Daniel K., Ed.; Borman, Kathryn M., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Urban school reformers for decades have tried to improve educational outcomes for underserved and disadvantaged students, with the assistance of constantly evolving federal and state policies. In recent years, education policies have shifted from targeting individual students to developing universal standards for teaching and learning, and…

  1. The Stuttgart Reform Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bienert, F.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews curriculum reform being implemented at the Library School of Stuttgart for students planning to work in public libraries. Components of the new curriculum include core courses in library science, electives in special areas of librarianship, seminars in chosen subject disciplines, and field work in libraries and government agencies. (LRW)

  2. Reforming using erionite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Liers, J.; Meusinger, J.; Moesch, A. ); Reschetilowski, W. )

    1993-08-01

    The advantage of reforming on erionite catalysts is a product with high octane numbers and low amounts of aromatics. This advantage seems to be slight at reaction pressures lower than 25 bar. But it is possible to compensate for the influence of pressure by varying the erionite content within the catalyst and the reaction temperature. When reforming on Pt/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalysts, the following reactions take place: dehydrocyclization of paraffins to naphthenes, dehydrogenation of naphthenes to aromatics, isomerication of normal paraffins remains in the product, lowering its octane number. By using a Ni/H-erionite catalyst, the octane rating can be increased by 3 to 7 numbers through selective hydrocracking of n-alkanes in the reformate. Erionite catalysts favor shape-selective hydrocracking of normal paraffins and the formation of cyclopentane derivatives lowering the content of aromatics during reforming reactions. Reducing the reaction pressure decreases hydrocracking activity and cyclopentane formation. These results can be interpreted in terms of thermodynamic restrictions and deactivation.

  3. Reforming Teacher Pay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Susan Freeman; Gardner, Catherine D.

    2010-01-01

    A recent Google search for information regarding performance pay in education produced 6.1 million results. This number should come as no surprise given the current level of interest in incentives as a popular reform option in public education. Supporters believe pay-for-performance programs encourage less effective teachers to improve and will…

  4. Educational Reform in Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxcy, Spencer J.; Maxcy, Doreen O.

    1993-01-01

    Although education has appealed to southern governors as a catapult to historical recognition, future governors should consider Louisiana Governor Buddy Roemer's ill-fated educational reform plan for Louisiana State University's College of Education, particularly its teacher evaluation and internship program. Public education seems a low-priority…

  5. Scaling up Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Jon D. H.; Richards, Evan; Kustusch, Mary Bridget; Ding, Lin; Beichner, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    The SCALE-UP (Student-Centered Activities for Large Enrollment for Undergraduate Programs) project was developed to implement reforms designed for small classes into large physics classes. Over 50 schools across the country, ranging from Wake Technical Community College to Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have adopted it for classes of…

  6. Reform on the Move

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Janet; Otte, Michelle; Fair, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Aurora (Colorado) Public Schools responded to the Colorado State Model Content Standards for Reading and Writing and the accountability measures attached to the state assessments by implementing the Aurora Achievement Initiative in 2001. Originating from literature on best practices and large-scale school reform, the goal of the districtwide…

  7. Comprehensive School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertling, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    This issue reviews publications that provide school leaders with guidance in determining how to choose and implement the schoolwide program that is best for their school. American Institutes for Research's "An Educator's Guide to Schoolwide Reform" provides educators with comprehensive profiles and evaluations of 24 of the leading schoolwide…

  8. Benzene upgrading reformer integration

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes a continuous process for providing an integrated product recovery system for a primary catalytic hydrocarbon reforming reactor and a secondary catalytic olefins oligomerization-alkylation reactor. It comprises: withdrawing reformer effluent from primary reformer reactor; separating in a primary separation zone the reformer effluent into a primary overhead stream comprising noncondensible light paraffins and a primary bottoms stream comprising C{sub 6} to C{sub 8} aromatic hydrocarbons; withdrawing oligomerization effluent from secondary oligomerization-alkylation reactor; separating in a secondary separation zone the oligomerization effluent into a secondary overhead stream; adding the primary bottoms stream and the secondary bottoms stream to the fractionation column; withdrawing from the top of the fractionation column a stream comprising C{sub 4} {minus} hydrocarbons; withdrawing from the bottom of the fractionation column a stream comprising C{sub 5} + hydrocarbons; adding the C{sub 5} + hydrocarbon stream to the reboiler unit; withdrawing from the reboiler unit a vapor stream comprising benzene and a liquid stream comprising C{sub 5} + hydrocarbons boiling in the gasoline range; adding at least a portion of the vapor stream comprising benzene to the secondary catalytic olefins oligomerization-alkylation reactor; and adding a light olefins feedstream.

  9. Cyclic operation of a heterogeneous industrial methanol-synthesis reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lafarov, V.V.; Ivanov, V.A.; Khalepa, N.V.; Emel'yanov, V.I.

    1988-07-20

    The authors consider the question of increasing the efficiency of a heterogeneous catalytic methanol-synthesis reactor. It is considered that the reactor functions optimally under stationary conditions. It is proposed that to improve the efficiency of the process, operation under nonstationary conditions should be restricted by means of artificially created cyclic operating conditions. To deal with the problem of identifying the hydrodynamic parameters of a reactor model, a cellular model was proposed. The response curves of the reactor to carbon dioxide, gradually metered into the synthesis gas according to its consumption, was examined. It was considered that the carbon dioxide fulfilled the role of a tracer and its concentration was determined in the inlet to and outlet from the reactor.

  10. Progress on the Development of a Microchannel Steam Reformer for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Whyatt, Greg A.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Davis, James M.

    2002-03-15

    A compact, energy efficient steam reforming system for automotive applications has been under development at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. At the IMRET 5 conference, results were presented describing the operation of a thermally integrated, energy efficient, compact, microchannel steam reforming system capable of converting a liquid hydrocarbon fuel (isooctane) into a reformate stream sufficient for a PEM fuel cell with >10 kWe capacity (Whyatt et al., 2001). Since this demonstration, the project has focused on performing testing in smaller scale steam reforming reactors to further reduce the reforming reactor volume, demonstrate fuel flexibility and address other issues. A test stand, nominally 1/20th the scale of the previous steam reforming demonstration, was constructed and smaller scale reactors have been used in testing. Significant gains have been made with respect to increasing the volumetric productivity of the reactor, suggesting that the 10 kWe reactor could now be made considerably smaller than the previous prototype. In addition the reformer has been demonstrated on a variety of fuels including methane, methanol, ethanol, propane, butane, isooctane, and a benchmark fuel mix intended to simulate a sulfur-free gasoline. The development effort is being funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Technology.

  11. Thermal chemical recuperation method and system for use with gas turbine systems

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wen-Ching; Newby, Richard A.; Bannister, Ronald L.

    1999-01-01

    A system and method for efficiently generating power using a gas turbine, a steam generating system (20, 22, 78) and a reformer. The gas turbine receives a reformed fuel stream (74) and an air stream and produces shaft power and exhaust. Some of the thermal energy from the turbine exhaust is received by the reformer (18). The turbine exhaust is then directed to the steam generator system that recovers thermal energy from it and also produces a steam flow from a water stream. The steam flow and a fuel stream are directed to the reformer that reforms the fuel stream and produces the reformed fuel stream used in the gas turbine.

  12. Thermal chemical recuperation method and system for use with gas turbine systems

    DOEpatents

    Yang, W.C.; Newby, R.A.; Bannister, R.L.

    1999-04-27

    A system and method are disclosed for efficiently generating power using a gas turbine, a steam generating system and a reformer. The gas turbine receives a reformed fuel stream and an air stream and produces shaft power and exhaust. Some of the thermal energy from the turbine exhaust is received by the reformer. The turbine exhaust is then directed to the steam generator system that recovers thermal energy from it and also produces a steam flow from a water stream. The steam flow and a fuel stream are directed to the reformer that reforms the fuel stream and produces the reformed fuel stream used in the gas turbine. 2 figs.

  13. A Review of Study on Thermal Energy Transport System by Synthesis and Decomposition Reactions of Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiusheng; Yabe, Akira; Kajiyama, Shiro; Fukuda, Katsuya

    The study on thermal energy transport system by synthesis and decomposition reactions of methanol was reviewed. To promote energy conservation and global environment protection, a two-step liquid-phase methanol synthesis process, which starts with carbonylation of methanol to methyl formate, then followed by the hydrogenolysis of the formate, was studied to recover wasted or unused discharged heat from industrial sources for the thermal energy demands of residential and commercial areas by chemical reactions. The research and development of the system were focused on the following three points. (1) Development of low-temperature decomposition and synthetic catalysts, (2) Development of liquid phase reactor (heat exchanger accompanying chemical reaction), (3) Simulation of the energy transport efficiency of entire system which contains heat recovery and supply sections. As the result of the development of catalyst, promising catalysts which agree with the development purposes for the methyl formate decomposition reaction and the synthetic reaction are being developed though some studies remain for the methanol decomposition and synthetic reactions. In the fundamental development of liquid phase reactor, the solubilities of CO and H2 gases in methanol and methyl formate were measured by the method of total pressure decrease due to absorption under pressures up to 1500kPa and temperatures up to 140°C. The diffusivity of CO gas in methanol was determined by measuring the diameter and solution time of single CO bubbles in methanol. The chemical reaction rate of methanol synthesis by hydrogenolysis of methyl formate was measured using a plate-type of Raney copper catalyst in a reactor with rectangular channel and in an autoclave reactor. The reaction characteristics were investigated by carrying out the experiments at various temperatures, flow rates and at various catalyst development conditions. We focused on the effect of Raney copper catalyst thickness on the liquid

  14. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Aricò, Antonino S; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D'Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-11-24

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion(®) were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate-PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion(®) 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm(-2) vs. 64 mW·cm(-2)). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm(-2) equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm(-2) for Nafion(®) 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm² for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm² for Nafion(®) 115).

  15. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aricò, Antonino S.; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D’Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115). PMID:26610582

  16. Improved Cathode Structure for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    An improved cathode structure on a membrane/electrode assembly has been developed for a direct methanol fuel cell, in a continuing effort to realize practical power systems containing such fuel cells. This cathode structure is intended particularly to afford better cell performance at a low airflow rate. A membrane/electrode assembly of the type for which the improved cathode structure was developed (see Figure 1) is fabricated in a process that includes brush painting and spray coating of catalyst layers onto a polymer-electrolyte membrane and onto gas-diffusion backings that also act as current collectors. The aforementioned layers are then dried and hot-pressed together. When completed, the membrane/electrode assembly contains (1) an anode containing a fine metal black of Pt/Ru alloy, (2) a membrane made of Nafion 117 or equivalent (a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, proton-conducting ion-exchange polymer), (3) a cathode structure (in the present case, the improved cathode structure described below), and (4) the electrically conductive gas-diffusion backing layers, which are made of Toray 060(TradeMark)(or equivalent) carbon paper containing between 5 and 6 weight percent of poly(tetrafluoroethylene). The need for an improved cathode structure arises for the following reasons: In the design and operation of a fuel-cell power system, the airflow rate is a critical parameter that determines the overall efficiency, cell voltage, and power density. It is desirable to operate at a low airflow rate in order to obtain thermal and water balance and to minimize the size and mass of the system. The performances of membrane/electrode assemblies of prior design are limited at low airflow rates. Methanol crossover increases the required airflow rate. Hence, one way to reduce the required airflow rate is to reduce the effect of methanol crossover. Improvement of the cathode structure - in particular, addition of hydrophobic particles to the cathode - has been

  17. An undercovered health threat in Turkey: transdermal methanol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Uca, Ali Ulvi; Kozak, Hasan Hüseyin; Altaş, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is a clear, colorless solvent used in antifreeze solutions, varnishes, cologne, copying machine fluids, perfume, spirit, paint, and fuel. Even small amounts of ingested methanol can cause acute permanent neurological dysfunction and irreversible blindness. Although there are many reports of methanol poisoning due to suicidal or accidental ingestion, reports of transdermal absorption are rare. We present a 68-year-old man with transdermal methanol intoxication applied to our hospital's emergency department with weakness, loss of vision, and altered state of consciousness.

  18. Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    This feasibility study includes all phases of methanol production from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The study examines: production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-day methanol production facility; potential environmental impacts of the whole project; safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol; and development of site specific cost estimates.

  19. Dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Yatish T.; Gardner, Todd H.

    2014-09-25

    Developments in catalyst technology for the dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks are reviewed for methane, higher hydrocarbons and alcohols. Thermodynamics, mechanisms and the kinetics of dry reforming are also reviewed. The literature on Ni catalysts, bi-metallic Ni catalysts and the role of promoters on Ni catalysts is critically evaluated. The use of noble and transitional metal catalysts for dry reforming is discussed. The application of solid oxide and metal carbide catalysts to dry reforming is also evaluated. Finally, various mechanisms for catalyst deactivation are assessed. This review also examines the various process related issues associated with dry reforming such as its application and heat optimization. Novel approaches such as supercritical dry reforming and microwave assisted dry reforming are briefly expanded upon.

  20. Pyrochlore-type catalysts for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    DOEpatents

    Berry, David A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Haynes, Daniel; Smith, Mark; Spivey, James J.

    2012-03-13

    A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A.sub.2-w-xA'.sub.wA''.sub.xB.sub.2-y-zB'.sub.yB''.sub.zO.sub.7-.DELTA.. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H.sub.2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.