Science.gov

Sample records for methanol temperature dependence

  1. Pressure and temperature dependence of excess enthalpies of methanol + tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether and methanol + polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether 250

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, E.R.; Coxam, J.Y.; Fernandez, J.; Grolier, J.P.E.

    1999-12-01

    The excess molar enthalpies at 323.15 K, 373.15 K, and 423.15 K, at 8 MPa, are reported for the binary mixtures methanol + tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (TEGDME) and methanol + poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether 250 (PEGDME 250). Excess molar enthalpies were determined with a Setaram C-80 calorimeter equipped with a flow mixing cell. For both systems, the excess enthalpies are positive over the whole composition range, increasing with temperature. The H{sup E}(x) curves are slightly asymmetrical, and their maxima are skewed toward the methanol-rich region. The excess enthalpies slightly change with the pressure, the sign of this change being composition-dependent. In the case of mixtures with TEGDME, the experimental H{sup E} values have been compared with those predicted with the Gmehling et al. version of UNIFAC (Dortmund) and the Nitta-Chao and DISQUAC group contribution models.

  2. Ab initio molecular dynamics study of temperature and pressure-dependent infrared dielectric functions of liquid methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. C.; Tan, J. Y.; Liu, L. H.

    2017-03-01

    The temperature and pressure-dependent dielectric functions of liquids are of great importance to the thermal radiation transfer and the diagnosis and control of fuel combustion. In this work, we apply the state-of-the-art ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method to calculate the infrared dielectric functions of liquid methanol at 183-573 K and 0.1-160 MPa in the spectral range 10-4000 cm-1, and study the temperature and pressure effects on the dielectric functions. The AIMD approach is validated by the Infrared Variable Angle Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (IR-VASE) experimental measurements at 298 K and 0.1 MPa, and the proposed IR-VASE method is verified by comparison with paper data of distilled water. The results of the AIMD approach agrees well with the experimental values of IR-VASE. The experimental and theoretical analyses indicate that the temperature and pressure exert a noticeable influence on the infrared dielectric functions of liquid methanol. As temperature increases, the average molecular dipole moment decreases. The amplitudes of dominant absorption peaks reduce to almost one half as temperature increases from 183 to 333 K at 0.1 MPa and from 273 to 573 K at 160 MPa. The absorption peaks below 1500 cm-1 show a redshift, while those centered around 3200 cm-1 show a blueshift. Moreover, larger average dipole moments are observed as pressure increases. The amplitudes of dominant absorption peaks increase to almost two times as pressure increases from 1 to 160 MPa at 373 K.

  3. Low temperature catalyst system for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.

    1984-04-20

    This patent discloses a catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (150/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The catalyst components are used in slurry form and comprise (1) a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-ROH-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms and (2) a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. For the first component, Nic is preferred (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). For the second component, Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is preferred. The mixture is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  4. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1986-09-30

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1--6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  5. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1985-03-12

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-RONa-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  6. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.; Mahajan, Devinder

    1986-01-01

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160.degree. C.) and preferably in the range 80.degree.-120.degree. C. used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa--M(OAc).sub.2 where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M=Ni and R=tertiary amyl). Mo(CO).sub.6 is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  7. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1986-10-28

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is NiC (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  8. Structures of protonated methanol clusters and temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fifen, Jean Jules; Nsangou, Mama; Dhaouadi, Zoubeida; Motapon, Ousmanou; Jaidane, Nejm-Eddine

    2013-05-01

    The accurate evaluation of pKa's, or solvation energies of the proton in methanol at a given temperature is subject to the determination of the most favored structures of various isomers of protonated (H+(MeOH)n) and neutral ((MeOH)n) methanol clusters in the gas phase and in methanol at that temperature. Solvation energies of the proton in a given medium, at a given temperature may help in the determination of proton affinities and proton dissociation energies related to the deprotonation process in that medium and at that temperature. pKa's are related to numerous properties of drugs. In this work, we were interested in the determination of the most favored structures of various isomers of protonated methanol clusters in the gas phase and in methanol, at a given temperature. For this aim, the M062X/6-31++G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) levels of theory were used to perform geometries optimizations and frequency calculations on various isomers of (H+(MeOH)n) in both phases. Thermal effects were retrieved using our homemade FORTRAN code. Thus, we accessed the relative populations of various isomers of protonated methanol clusters, in both phases for temperatures ranging from 0 to 400 K. As results, in the gas phase, linear structures are entropically more favorable at high temperatures, while more compact ones are energetically more favorable at lower temperatures. The trend is somewhat different when bulk effects are taken into account. At high temperatures, the linear structure only dominates the population for n ⩽ 6, while it is dominated by the cyclic structure for larger cluster sizes. At lower temperatures, compact structures still dominate the population, but with an order different from the one established in the gas phase. Hence, temperature effects dominate solvent effects in small cluster sizes (n ⩽ 6), while the reverse trend is noted for larger cluster sizes.

  9. Methanol Uptake by Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Essin, A. M.; Golden, D. M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global methanol budget is currently unbalanced, with source terms significantly larger than the sinks terms. To evaluate possible losses of gaseous methanol to sulfate aerosols, the solubility and reactivity of methanol in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols is under investigation. Methanol will partition into sulfate aerosols according to its Henry's law solubility. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H*, for cold (196 - 220 K) solutions ranging between 45 and 70 wt % H2SO4. We have found that methanol solubility ranges from approx. 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 7) M/atm for UT/LS conditions. Solubility increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. Although methanol is slightly more soluble than are acetone and formaldehyde, current data indicate that uptake by clean aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and any rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H is not significant over our experimental time scale for solutions below 80 wt % H2SO4. To confirm this directly, results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique will also be presented.

  10. Methanol Uptake By Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols in the global budget of methanol, the solubility and reactivity of CH3OH in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions are under investigation. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H(*), for methanol dissolution into 45 to 70 percent by weight H2SO4. We find that methanol solubility ranges from 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 8) M/atm and increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and all rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Our data indicate that simple uptake by aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These results differ from those recently reported in the literature, and an explanation of this disparity will be presented. In addition to solvation, reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H may proceed in the atmosphere but is not significant under our experimental conditions. Results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique confirm this directly. In addition, the extent of methanol sequestration via formation of mono- and dimethylsulfate will be evaluated under several atmospheric conditions.

  11. Temperature of maximum density and excess thermodynamics of aqueous mixtures of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Salgado, D.; Zemánková, K.; Noya, E. G.; Lomba, E.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present a study of representative excess thermodynamic properties of aqueous mixtures of methanol over the complete concentration range, based on extensive computer simulation calculations. In addition to test various existing united atom model potentials, we have developed a new force-field which accurately reproduces the excess thermodynamics of this system. Moreover, we have paid particular attention to the behavior of the temperature of maximum density (TMD) in dilute methanol mixtures. The presence of a temperature of maximum density is one of the essential anomalies exhibited by water. This anomalous behavior is modified in a non-monotonous fashion by the presence of fully miscible solutes that partly disrupt the hydrogen bond network of water, such as methanol (and other short chain alcohols). In order to obtain a better insight into the phenomenology of the changes in the TMD of water induced by small amounts of methanol, we have performed a new series of experimental measurements and computer simulations using various force fields. We observe that none of the force-fields tested capture the non-monotonous concentration dependence of the TMD for highly diluted methanol solutions.

  12. High-temperature passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with concentrated fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuxin; Yuan, Wenxiang; Wu, Qixing; Sun, Hongyuan; Luo, Zhongkuan; Fu, Huide

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, passive direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) are fed with diluted methanol solutions and can hardly be operated at elevated temperatures (>120 °C) because the ionic conductivity of Nafion-type proton exchange membranes depends strongly on water content. Such a system design would limit its energy density and power density in mobile applications. In this communication, a passive vapor feed DMFC capable of operating with concentrated fuels at high temperatures is reported. The passive DMFC proposed in this work consists of a fuel reservoir, a perforated silicone sheet, a vapor chamber, two current collectors and a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) based on a phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The experimental results reveal that the methanol crossover through a PBI membrane is substantially low when compared with the Nafion membranes and the PBI-based passive DMFC can yield a peak power density of 37.2 mW cm-2 and 22.1 mW cm-2 at 180 °C when 16 M methanol solutions and neat methanol are used respectively. In addition, the 132 h discharge test indicates that the performance of this new DMFC is quite stable and no obvious performance degradation is observed after activation, showing its promising applications in portable power sources.

  13. Methanol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 11 / 001Fa www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHANOL ( NONCANCER ) ( CAS No . 67 - 56 - 1 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2013 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER This document

  14. Methanol induces low temperature resilient methanogens and improves methane generation from domestic wastewater at low to moderate temperatures.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shaswati; Badhe, Neha; De Vrieze, Jo; Biswas, Rima; Nandy, Tapas

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature (<20 °C) limits bio-methanation of sewage. Literature shows that hydrogenotrophic methanogens can adapt themselves to low temperature and methanol is a preferred substrate by methanogens in cold habitats. The study hypothesizes that methanol can induce the growth of low-temperature resilient, methanol utilizing, hydrogenotrophs in UASB reactor. The hypothesis was tested in field conditions to evaluate the impact of seasonal temperature variations on methane yield in the presence and absence of methanol. Results show that 0.04% (v/v) methanol increased methane up to 15 times and its effect was more pronounced at lower temperatures. The qPCR analysis showed the presence of Methanobacteriales along with Methanosetaceae in large numbers. This indicates methanol induced the growth of both the hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic groups through direct and indirect routes, respectively. This study thus demonstrated that methanol can impart resistance in methanogenic biomass to low temperature and can improve performance of UASB reactor.

  15. Solubility of methanol in low-temperature aqueous sulfuric acid and implications for atmospheric particle composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using traditional Knudsen cell techniques, we find well-behaved Henry's law uptake of methanol in aqueous 45 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions at temperatures between 197 and 231 K. Solubility of methanol increases with decreasing temperature and increasing acidity, with an effective Henry's law coefficient ranging from 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 8) M/atm. Equilibrium uptake of methanol into sulfuric acid aerosol particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere will not appreciably alter gas-phase concentrations of methanol. The observed room temperature reaction between methanol and sulfuric acid is too slow to provide a sink for gaseous methanol at the temperatures of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. It is also too slow to produce sufficient quantities of soluble reaction products to explain the large amount of unidentified organic material seen in particles of the upper troposphere.

  16. Lanthanide-Dependent Regulation of Methanol Oxidation Systems in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 and Their Contribution to Methanol Growth

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Huong N.; Subuyuj, Gabriel A.; Vijayakumar, Srividhya; Good, Nathan M.; Martinez-Gomez, N. Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 has two distinct types of methanol dehydrogenase (MeDH) enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde. MxaFI-MeDH requires pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) and Ca in its active site, while XoxF-MeDH requires PQQ and lanthanides, such as Ce and La. Using MeDH mutant strains to conduct growth analysis and MeDH activity assays, we demonstrate that M. extorquens AM1 has at least one additional lanthanide-dependent methanol oxidation system contributing to methanol growth. Additionally, the abilities of different lanthanides to support growth were tested and strongly suggest that both XoxF and the unknown methanol oxidation system are able to use La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and, to some extent, Sm. Further, growth analysis using increasing La concentrations showed that maximum growth rate and yield were achieved at and above 1 μM La, while concentrations as low as 2.5 nM allowed growth at a reduced rate. Contrary to published data, we show that addition of exogenous lanthanides results in differential expression from the xox1 and mxa promoters, upregulating genes in the xox1 operon and repressing genes in the mxa operon. Using transcriptional reporter fusions, intermediate expression from both the mxa and xox1 promoters was detected when 50 to 100 nM La was added to the growth medium, suggesting that a condition may exist under which M. extorquens AM1 is able to utilize both enzymes simultaneously. Together, these results suggest that M. extorquens AM1 actively senses and responds to lanthanide availability, preferentially utilizing the lanthanide-dependent MeDHs when possible. IMPORTANCE The biological role of lanthanides is a nascent field of study with tremendous potential to impact many areas in biology. Our studies demonstrate that there is at least one additional lanthanide-dependent methanol oxidation system, distinct from the MxaFI and XoxF MeDHs, that may aid in classifying additional environmental organisms as

  17. Process assessment of small scale low temperature methanol synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriyana, Susanto, Herri; Subagjo

    2015-12-01

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource and has the potential to make a significant impact on domestic fuel supplies. Biomass can be converted to fuel like methanol via several step process. The process can be split into following main steps: biomass preparation, gasification, gas cooling and cleaning, gas shift and methanol synthesis. Untill now these configuration still has a problem like high production cost, catalyst deactivation, economy of scale and a huge energy requirements. These problems become the leading inhibition for biomass conversion to methanol, which should be resolved to move towards the economical. To address these issues, we developed various process and new configurations for methanol synthesis via methyl formate. This configuration combining two reactors: the one reactor for the carbonylation of methanol and CO to form methyl formate, and the second for the hydrogenolysis of methyl formate and H2 to form two molecule of methanol. Four plant process configurations were compared with the biomass basis is 300 ton/day. The first configuration (A) is equipped with a steam reforming process for converting methane to CO and H2 for increasing H2/CO ratio. CO2 removal is necessary to avoid poisoning the catalyst. COSORB process used for the purpose of increasing the partial pressure of CO in the feed gas. The steam reforming process in B configuration is not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. For C configuration, the steam reforming process and COSORB are not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. D configuration is almost similar to the configuration A. This configuration difference is in the synthesis of methanol which was held in a single reactor. Carbonylation and hydrogenolysis reactions carried out in the same reactor one. These processes were analyzed in term of technical process, material and energy balance and economic

  18. Process assessment of small scale low temperature methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriyana; Susanto, Herri Subagjo

    2015-12-29

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource and has the potential to make a significant impact on domestic fuel supplies. Biomass can be converted to fuel like methanol via several step process. The process can be split into following main steps: biomass preparation, gasification, gas cooling and cleaning, gas shift and methanol synthesis. Untill now these configuration still has a problem like high production cost, catalyst deactivation, economy of scale and a huge energy requirements. These problems become the leading inhibition for biomass conversion to methanol, which should be resolved to move towards the economical. To address these issues, we developed various process and new configurations for methanol synthesis via methyl formate. This configuration combining two reactors: the one reactor for the carbonylation of methanol and CO to form methyl formate, and the second for the hydrogenolysis of methyl formate and H{sub 2} to form two molecule of methanol. Four plant process configurations were compared with the biomass basis is 300 ton/day. The first configuration (A) is equipped with a steam reforming process for converting methane to CO and H{sub 2} for increasing H{sub 2}/CO ratio. CO{sub 2} removal is necessary to avoid poisoning the catalyst. COSORB process used for the purpose of increasing the partial pressure of CO in the feed gas. The steam reforming process in B configuration is not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. For C configuration, the steam reforming process and COSORB are not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. D configuration is almost similar to the configuration A. This configuration difference is in the synthesis of methanol which was held in a single reactor. Carbonylation and hydrogenolysis reactions carried out in the same reactor one. These processes were analyzed in term of technical process, material and energy

  19. Methanol emissions from maize: Ontogenetic dependence to varying light conditions and guttation as an additional factor constraining the flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffar, A.; Schoon, N.; Digrado, A.; Bachy, A.; Delaplace, P.; du Jardin, P.; Fauconnier, M.-L.; Aubinet, M.; Heinesch, B.; Amelynck, C.

    2017-03-01

    Because of its high abundance and long lifetime compared to other volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere, methanol (CH3OH) plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry. Even though agricultural crops are believed to be a large source of methanol, emission inventories from those crop ecosystems are still scarce and little information is available concerning the driving mechanisms for methanol production and emission at different developmental stages of the plants/leaves. This study focuses on methanol emissions from Zea mays L. (maize), which is vastly cultivated throughout the world. Flux measurements have been performed on young plants, almost fully grown leaves and fully grown leaves, enclosed in dynamic flow-through enclosures in a temperature and light-controlled environmental chamber. Strong differences in the response of methanol emissions to variations in PPFD (Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density) were noticed between the young plants, almost fully grown and fully grown leaves. Moreover, young maize plants showed strong emission peaks following light/dark transitions, for which guttation can be put forward as a hypothetical pathway. Young plants' average daily methanol fluxes exceeded by a factor of 17 those of almost fully grown and fully grown leaves when expressed per leaf area. Absolute flux values were found to be smaller than those reported in the literature, but in fair agreement with recent ecosystem scale flux measurements above a maize field of the same variety as used in this study. The flux measurements in the current study were used to evaluate the dynamic biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emission model of Niinemets and Reichstein. The modelled and measured fluxes from almost fully grown leaves were found to agree best when a temperature and light dependent methanol production function was applied. However, this production function turned out not to be suitable for modelling the observed emissions from the young plants

  20. Temperature dependent BRDF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airola, Marc B.; Brown, Andrea M.; Hahn, Daniel V.; Thomas, Michael E.; Congdon, Elizabeth A.; Mehoke, Douglas S.

    2014-09-01

    Applications involving space based instrumentation and aerodynamically heated surfaces often require knowledge of the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of an exposed surface at high temperature. Addressing this need, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) developed a BRDF facility that features a multiple-port vacuum chamber, multiple laser sources covering the spectral range from the longwave infrared to the ultraviolet, imaging pyrometry and laser heated samples. Laser heating eliminates stray light that would otherwise be seen from a furnace and requires minimal sample support structure, allowing low thermal conduction loss to be obtained, which is especially important at high temperatures. The goal is to measure the BRDF of ceramic-coated surfaces at temperatures in excess of 1000°C in a low background environment. Most ceramic samples are near blackbody in the longwave infrared, thus pyrometry using a LWIR camera can be very effective and accurate.

  1. Degradation of Coflon in Methanol at Temperatures Around 140 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campion, R. P.; Samulak, M.; Morgan, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    An unexpected and significant physico-chemical degradation of Coflon PVDF specimens was observed at the end of 1994 during routine scheduled exposure exercises on strained material. The intent was to age various samples, including some strained in a 4-point bend configuration, in methanol at 140 C and subsequently submit the aged samples to various tests including dynamic fatigue and fracture toughness. However, the samples deteriorated to such an extent that such testing was not possible: only when conditions were made less severe was it found possible to perform such testing. The purpose of the current report is to describe the nature of the PVDF deterioration observed during a number of tests performed to examine this phenomenon. This report also records, as Appendix 1, some SEM/X-ray microanalysis data on Coflon samples exposed to a methanol/amine mixture, and to other amine or H2S-aged samples.

  2. Surface Tension of Methanol as a Function of cut-off Radius and Temperature Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeidat, Abdalla; Jaradat, Adnan; Hamdan, Bushra

    Molecular dynamics is used to calculate the surface tension of van Leeuwen methanol. The van Leeuwen model of methanol is chosen over other models of methanol, since this model is widely used to study nucleation at low temperature. Usually, scientists use the cut-off radius to be three order of magnitude of segment diameter. In this study, we varied the cut-off radius to estimate the best cut-off at which the surface tension reaches its plateau. After deciding the best cut-off radius for van der Waals and Coulomb interactions (CUT-OFF and PME were used for Coulomb interaction), we varied the temperature controller (van-Housen, Berendsen, and v-rescale) to decide the best temperature controller to be used to study methanol. In all simulations, Gromacs is used at T =200-300K with periodic boundary conditions in all dimensions. JUST.

  3. Biomarkers to evaluate the effects of temperature and methanol on recombinant Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Andrea B; Figueroa, Carolina A; Abdalla, Dulcineia S P; Maranhão, Andrea Q; Ulloa, Patricio H; Pessoa, Adalberto; Farías, Jorge G

    2014-01-01

    Pichia pastoris is methylotrophic yeast used as an efficient expression system for heterologous protein production. In order to evaluate the effects of temperature (10 and 30 °C) and methanol (1 and 3% (v/v)) on genetically-modified Pichia pastoris, different biomarkers were evaluated: Heat stress (HSF-1 and Hsp70), oxidative stress (OGG1 and TBARS) and antioxidant (GLR). Three yeast cultures were performed: 3X = 3% methanol-10 °C, 4X = 3% methanol-30 °C, and 5X = 1% methanol-10°C. The expression level of HIF-1α, HSF-1, HSP-70 and HSP-90 biomarkers were measured by Western blot and in situ detection was performed by immunocytochemistry. Ours results show that at 3% methanol -30 °C there is an increase of mitochondrial OGG1 (mtOGG1), Glutathione Reductase (GLR) and TBARS. In addition, there was a cytosolic expression of HSF-1 and HSP-70, which indicates a deprotection against nucleolar fragmentation (apoptosis). On the other hand, at 3% methanol -10 °C and 1% and at methanol -10 °C conditions there was nuclear expression of OGG1, lower levels of TBARS and lower expression of GLR, cytosolic expression of HSF-1 and nuclear expression HSP-70. In conclusion, our results suggest that 3% methanol-30 °C is a condition that induces a strong oxidative stress and risk factors of apoptosis in modified-genetically P. pastoris.

  4. Biomarkers to evaluate the effects of temperature and methanol on recombinant Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Zepeda, Andrea B.; Figueroa, Carolina A.; Abdalla, Dulcineia S.P.; Maranhão, Andrea Q.; Ulloa, Patricio H.; Pessoa, Adalberto; Farías, Jorge G.

    2014-01-01

    Pichia pastoris is methylotrophic yeast used as an efficient expression system for heterologous protein production. In order to evaluate the effects of temperature (10 and 30 °C) and methanol (1 and 3% (v/v)) on genetically-modified Pichia pastoris, different biomarkers were evaluated: Heat stress (HSF-1 and Hsp70), oxidative stress (OGG1 and TBARS) and antioxidant (GLR). Three yeast cultures were performed: 3X = 3% methanol-10 °C, 4X = 3% methanol-30 °C, and 5X = 1% methanol-10°C. The expression level of HIF-1α, HSF-1, HSP-70 and HSP-90 biomarkers were measured by Western blot and in situ detection was performed by immunocytochemistry. Ours results show that at 3% methanol −30 °C there is an increase of mitochondrial OGG1 (mtOGG1), Glutathione Reductase (GLR) and TBARS. In addition, there was a cytosolic expression of HSF-1 and HSP-70, which indicates a deprotection against nucleolar fragmentation (apoptosis). On the other hand, at 3% methanol −10 °C and 1% and at methanol −10 °C conditions there was nuclear expression of OGG1, lower levels of TBARS and lower expression of GLR, cytosolic expression of HSF-1 and nuclear expression HSP-70. In conclusion, our results suggest that 3% methanol-30 °C is a condition that induces a strong oxidative stress and risk factors of apoptosis in modified-genetically P. pastoris. PMID:25242930

  5. A rapid procedure for the in situ assay of periplasmic, PQQ-dependent methanol dehydrogenase in intact single bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Vemuluri, Venkata Ramana; Shaw, Shreya; Autenrieth, Caroline; Ghosh, Robin

    2017-03-23

    Mechanistic details of methanol oxidation catalyzed by the periplasmically-located pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent methanol dehydrogenase of methylotrophs can be elucidated using site-directed mutants. Here, we present an in situ colony assay of methanol dehydrogenase, which allows robotic screening of large populations of intact small colonies, and regrowth of colonies for subsequent analysis.

  6. Temperature dependency of quantitative ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Pocock, N A; Babichev, A; Culton, N; Graney, K; Rooney, J; Bell, D; Chu, J

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters are temperature dependent. We examined the effect of temperature on QUS using Lunar Achilles+ and Hologic Sahara units. In vivo studies were performed in a cadaveric foot and in 5 volunteers. QUS scans were performed in the cadaveric foot, using both machines, at temperatures ranging from 15 to 40 degrees C. To assess the effect of change in water bath temperature in the Achilles+, independently of foot temperature, 5 volunteers were studied at water temperatures ranging from 10 to 42 degrees C. In the cadaveric foot there were strong negative correlations between temperature and speed of sound (SOS) but a moderately positive correlation between temperature and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA). Stiffness and the Quantitative Ultrasound Index (QUI) in the cadaveric foot showed strong negative correlations with temperature, reflecting their high dependence on SOS. In the 5 volunteers, in whom foot temperature was assumed to be constant, there was a small change in Stiffness in the Achilles+, with variation in water temperature. In conclusion, while there are opposite effects of temperature on SOS and BUA in vivo, there is still a significant effect of temperature variation on Stiffness and the QUI. This may have clinical significance in particular subjects. The precision of QUS may be affected by temperature variation of the environment or of the patient's limb. Instruments utilizing a water bath may be able partly to compensate for changes in environmental temperature, but standardization of water bath temperature is crucial to maximize precision.

  7. NMR analysis of diacyl peroxide decomposition in methanol in response to temperature and microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidukevich, O. A.; Skakovskii, E. D.; Tychinskaya, L. Yu.; Zvereva, T. D.; Dikusar, E. A.; Lamotkin, S. A.; Rykov, S. V.

    2012-05-01

    We have studied the decomposition of benzoyl and acetyl benzoyl peroxides in methanol-d4 in response to temperature and microwave radiation. We have shown that chemically-induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) can be observed even when the reactions are carried out in spectrometers with high magnetic fields. In this case, spin correlation persists in geminal radical pairs involving labile acyloxyl radicals. Regardless of the method used to initiate peroxide decomposition, the same amount of products are formed. Homolysis occurs according to a chain mechanism. The contribution of induced decomposition decreases over the course of the reaction. Dissolved oxygen molecules efficiently terminate the chain, decreasing the rate of peroxide decomposition. In the case of acetyl benzoyl peroxide, the product yield depends on the initiation mechanism: for microwave irradiation, the solvent molecules are more active while dissolved oxygen is less active than in thermolysis.

  8. Surface-Bound Intermediates in Low-Temperature Methanol Synthesis on Copper. Participants and Spectators

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yong; Mei, Donghai; Peden, Charles H.F.; Campbell, Charles T.; Mims, Charles A.

    2015-11-03

    The reactivity of surface adsorbed species present on copper catalysts during methanol synthesis at low temperatures was studied by simultaneous infrared spectroscopy (IR) and mass spectroscopy (MS) measurements during “titration” (transient surface reaction) experiments with isotopic tracing. The results show that adsorbed formate is a major bystander species present on the surface under steady-state methanol synthesis reaction conditions, but it cannot be converted to methanol by reaction with pure H2, nor with H2 plus added water. Formate-containing surface adlayers for these experiments were produced during steady state catalysis in (a) H2:CO2 (with substantial formate coverage) and (b) moist H2:CO (with no IR visible formate species). Both these reaction conditions produce methanol at steady state with relatively high rates. Adlayers containing formate were also produced by (c) formic acid adsorption. Various "titration" gases were used to probe these adlayers at modest temperatures (T = 410-450K) and 6 bar total pressure. Methanol gas (up to ~1% monolayer equivalent) was produced in "titration" from the H2:CO2 catalytic adlayers by H2 plus water, but not by dry hydrogen. The decay in the formate IR features accelerated in the presence of added water vapor. The H2:CO:H2O catalytic adlayer produced similar methanol titration yields in H2 plus water but showed no surface formate features in IR (less than 0.2% monolayer coverage). Finally, formate from formic acid chemisorption produced no methanol under any titration conditions. Even under (H2:CO2) catalytic reaction conditions, isotope tracing showed that pre-adsorbed formate from formic acid did not contribute to the methanol produced. Although non-formate intermediates exist during low temperature methanol synthesis on copper which can be converted to methanol gas

  9. Viscosity and density of methanol/water mixtures at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, J. G.; Kurata, F.; Swift, G. W.

    1968-01-01

    Viscosity and density are measured at low temperatures for three methanol/water mixtures. Viscosity is determined by a modified falling cylinder method or a calibrated viscometer. Density is determined by the volume of each mixture contained in a calibrated glass cell placed in a constant-temperature bath.

  10. Coadsorbed species explain the mechanism of methanol temperature-desorption on CeO2(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Jonathan E.; Steven H. Overbury; Beste, Ariana

    2016-03-24

    Here, we have used density functional theory calculations to investigate the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of methanol from CeO2(111). For the first time, low-temperature water formation and high-temperature methanol desorption are explained by our calculations. High coverages of methanol, which correspond to experimental conditions, are required to properly describe these features of the TPD spectrum. We identify a mechanism for the low-temperature formation of water involving the dissociation of two methanol molecules on the same surface O atom and filling of the resulting surface vacancy with one of the methoxy products. After water desorption, methoxy groups are stabilized on the surface and react at higher temperatures to form methanol and formaldehyde by a disproportionation mechanism. Alternatively, the stabilized methoxy groups undergo sequential C–H scission reactions to produce formaldehyde. Calculated energy requirements and methanol/formaldehyde selectivity agree with the experimental data.

  11. Coadsorbed species explain the mechanism of methanol temperature-desorption on CeO2(111)

    DOE PAGES

    Sutton, Jonathan E.; Steven H. Overbury; Beste, Ariana

    2016-03-24

    Here, we have used density functional theory calculations to investigate the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of methanol from CeO2(111). For the first time, low-temperature water formation and high-temperature methanol desorption are explained by our calculations. High coverages of methanol, which correspond to experimental conditions, are required to properly describe these features of the TPD spectrum. We identify a mechanism for the low-temperature formation of water involving the dissociation of two methanol molecules on the same surface O atom and filling of the resulting surface vacancy with one of the methoxy products. After water desorption, methoxy groups are stabilized on the surfacemore » and react at higher temperatures to form methanol and formaldehyde by a disproportionation mechanism. Alternatively, the stabilized methoxy groups undergo sequential C–H scission reactions to produce formaldehyde. Calculated energy requirements and methanol/formaldehyde selectivity agree with the experimental data.« less

  12. Dynamics of water, methanol, and ethanol in a room temperature ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Patrick L; Giammanco, Chiara H; Fayer, Michael D

    2015-06-07

    The dynamics of a series of small molecule probes with increasing alkyl chain length: water, methanol, and ethanol, diluted to low concentration in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, was investigated with 2D infrared vibrational echo (2D IR) spectroscopy and polarization resolved pump-probe (PP) experiments on the deuterated hydroxyl (O-D) stretching mode of each of the solutes. The long timescale spectral diffusion observed by 2D IR, capturing complete loss of vibrational frequency correlation through structural fluctuation of the medium, shows a clear but not dramatic slowing as the probe alkyl chain length is increased: 23 ps for water, 28 ps for methanol, and 34 ps for ethanol. Although in each case, only a single population of hydroxyl oscillators contributes to the infrared line shapes, the isotropic pump-probe decays (normally caused by population relaxation) are markedly nonexponential at short times. The early time features correspond to the timescales of the fast spectral diffusion measured with 2D IR. These fast isotropic pump-probe decays are produced by unequal pumping of the OD absorption band to a nonequilibrium frequency dependent population distribution caused by significant non-Condon effects. Orientational correlation functions for these three systems, obtained from pump-probe anisotropy decays, display several periods of restricted angular motion (wobbling-in-a-cone) followed by complete orientational randomization. The cone half-angles, which characterize the angular potential, become larger as the experimental frequency moves to the blue. These results indicate weakening of the angular potential with decreasing hydrogen bond strength. The slowest components of the orientational anisotropy decays are frequency-independent and correspond to the complete orientational randomization of the solute molecule. These components slow appreciably with increasing chain length: 25 ps for water

  13. Liquid phase low temperature method for production of methanol from synthesis gas and catalyst formulations therefor

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2005-07-26

    The invention provides a homogenous catalyst for the production of methanol from purified synthesis gas at low temperature and low pressure which includes a transition metal capable of forming transition metal complexes with coordinating ligands and an alkoxide, the catalyst dissolved in a methanol solvent system, provided the transition metal complex is not transition metal carbonyl. The coordinating ligands can be selected from the group consisting of N-donor ligands, P-donor ligands, O-donor ligands, C-donor ligands, halogens and mixtures thereof.

  14. The influence of methanol on the chemical state of PtRu anodes in a high-temperature direct methanol fuel cell studied in situ by synchrotron-based near-ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saveleva, Viktoriia A.; Daletou, Maria K.; Savinova, Elena R.

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based near-ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) has recently become a powerful tool for the investigation of interfacial phenomena in electrochemical power sources such as batteries and fuel cells. Here we present an in situ NAP-XPS study of the anode of a high-temperature direct methanol fuel cell with a phosphoric acid-doped hydrocarbon membrane, which reveals an enhanced flooding of the Pt3Ru anode with phosphoric acid in the presence of methanol. An analysis of the electrode surface composition depending on the cell voltage and on the presence of methanol reveals the strong influence of the latter on the extent of Pt oxidation and on the transformation of Ru into Ru (IV) hydroxide.

  15. Low-temperature hydrogen production from water and methanol using Pt/α-MoC catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lili; Zhou, Wu; Gao, Rui; Yao, Siyu; Zhang, Xiao; Xu, Wenqian; Zheng, Shijian; Jiang, Zheng; Yu, Qiaolin; Li, Yong-Wang; Shi, Chuan; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Ding

    2017-03-22

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) running on hydrogen are attractive alternative power supplies for a range of applications, with in situ release of the required hydrogen from a stable liquid offering one way of ensuring its safe storage and transportation before use. The use of methanol is particularly interesting in this regard, because it is inexpensive and can reform itself with water to release hydrogen with a high gravimetric density of 18.8 per cent by weight. But traditional reforming of methanol steam operates at relatively high temperatures (200-350 degrees Celsius), so the focus for vehicle and portable PEMFC applications has been on aqueous-phase reforming of methanol (APRM). This method requires less energy, and the simpler and more compact device design allows direct integration into PEMFC stacks. There remains, however, the need for an efficient APRM catalyst. Here we report that platinum (Pt) atomically dispersed on α-molybdenum carbide (α-MoC) enables low-temperature (150-190 degrees Celsius), base-free hydrogen production through APRM, with an average turnover frequency reaching 18,046 moles of hydrogen per mole of platinum per hour. We attribute this exceptional hydrogen production-which far exceeds that of previously reported low-temperature APRM catalysts-to the outstanding ability of α-MoC to induce water dissociation, and to the fact that platinum and α-MoC act in synergy to activate methanol and then to reform it.

  16. Development of Anodic Flux and Temperature Controlling System for Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. M.; Liu, C.; Liang, J. S.; Wu, C. B.; Xu, Z.

    2006-10-01

    Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (μDMFC) is a kind of newly developed power sources, which effective apparatus for its performance evaluation is still in urgent need at present. In this study, a testing system was established for the purpose of testing the continuous working performance such as micro flux and temperature of μDMFC. In view of the temperature controlling for micro-flux liquid fuel, a heating block with labyrinth-like single pass channel inside for heating up the methanol solution was fabricated. A semiconductorrefrigerating chip was utilized to heat and cool the liquid flow during testing procedures. On the other hand, the two channels of a high accuracy double-channel syringe pump that can suck and pump in turn so as to transport methanol solution continuously was adopted. Based on the requirements of wide-ranged temperature and micro flux controlling, the solenoid valves and the correlative component were used. A hydraulic circuit, which can circulate the fed methanol cold to hot in turn, has also been constructed to test the fatigue life of the μDMFC. The automatic control was actualized by software module written with Visual C++. Experimental results show that the system is perfect in stability and it may provide an important and advanced evaluation apparatus to satisfy the needs for real time performance testing of μDMFC.

  17. Dehydrogenation of anhydrous methanol at room temperature by o-aminophenol-based photocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Wakizaka, Masanori; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryota; Chang, Ho-Chol

    2016-01-01

    Dehydrogenation of anhydrous methanol is of great importance, given its ubiquity as an intermediate for the production of a large number of industrial chemicals. Since dehydrogenation of methanol is an endothermic reaction, heterogeneous or homogeneous precious-metal-based catalysts and high temperatures are usually required for this reaction to proceed. Here we report the photochemical dehydrogenation of anhydrous methanol at room temperature catalysed by o-aminophenol (apH2), o-aminophenolate (apH−) and the non-precious metal complex trans-[FeII(apH)2(MeOH)2]. Under excitation at 289±10 nm and in the absence of additional photosensitizers, these photocatalysts generate hydrogen and formaldehyde from anhydrous methanol with external quantum yields of 2.9±0.15%, 3.7±0.19% and 4.8±0.24%, respectively, which are the highest values reported so far to the best of our knowledge. Mechanistic investigations reveal that the photo-induced formation of hydrogen radicals triggers the reaction. PMID:27457731

  18. Low-temperature ceria-electrolyte solid oxide fuel cells for efficient methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xie; Zhan, Zhongliang; Liu, Xuejiao; Wu, Hao; Wang, Shaorong; Wen, Tinglian

    Low temperature anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells with thin films of samarium-doped ceria (SDC) as electrolytes, graded porous Ni-SDC anodes and composite La 0.6Sr 0.4Co 0.2Fe 0.8O 3 (LSCF)-SDC cathodes are fabricated and tested with both hydrogen and methanol fuels. Power densities achieved with hydrogen are between 0.56 W cm -2 at 500 °C and 1.09 W cm -2 at 600 °C, and with methanol between 0.26 W cm -2 at 500 °C and 0.82 W cm -2 at 600 °C. The difference in the cell performance can be attributed to variation in the interfacial polarization resistance due to different fuel oxidation kinetics, e.g., 0.21 Ω cm 2 for methanol versus 0.10 Ω cm 2 for hydrogen at 600 °C. Further analysis suggests that the leakage current densities as high as 0.80 A cm -2 at 600 °C and 0.11 A cm -2 at 500 °C, resulting from the mixed electronic and ionic conductivity in the SDC electrolyte and thus reducing the fuel efficiency, can nonetheless help remove any carbon deposit and thereby ensure stable and coking-free operation of low temperature SOFCs in methanol fuels.

  19. Temperature dependence of basalt weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojun; Hartmann, Jens; Derry, Louis A.; West, A. Joshua; You, Chen-Feng; Long, Xiaoyong; Zhan, Tao; Li, Laifeng; Li, Gen; Qiu, Wenhong; Li, Tao; Liu, Lianwen; Chen, Yang; Ji, Junfeng; Zhao, Liang; Chen, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic balance of Earth's long-term carbon cycle and the equable state of Earth's climate are maintained by negative feedbacks between the levels of atmospheric CO2 and the chemical weathering rate of silicate rocks. Though clearly demonstrated by well-controlled laboratory dissolution experiments, the temperature dependence of silicate weathering rates, hypothesized to play a central role in these weathering feedbacks, has been difficult to quantify clearly in natural settings at landscape scale. By compiling data from basaltic catchments worldwide and considering only inactive volcanic fields (IVFs), here we show that the rate of CO2 consumption associated with the weathering of basaltic rocks is strongly correlated with mean annual temperature (MAT) as predicted by chemical kinetics. Relations between temperature and CO2 consumption rate for active volcanic fields (AVFs) are complicated by other factors such as eruption age, hydrothermal activity, and hydrological complexities. On the basis of this updated data compilation we are not able to distinguish whether or not there is a significant runoff control on basalt weathering rates. Nonetheless, the simple temperature control as observed in this global dataset implies that basalt weathering could be an effective mechanism for Earth to modulate long-term carbon cycle perturbations.

  20. Test Temperature Dependence of Transesterification of Triolein under Low-Frequency Ultrasonic Irradiation Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanh, Hoang Duc; Dong, Nguyen The; Okitsu, Kenji; Maeda, Yasuaki; Nishimura, Rokuro

    2007-07-01

    The test temperature dependence of the transesterification of triolein with methanol and a base catalyst (NaOH and KOH) was investigated using a molar ratio of methanol to triolein of 6:1, a catalyst concentration of 1% and a temperature range of 3-50 °C under a low-frequency ultrasonic irradiation condition (40 kHz). It was found that the methyl ester concentration at an irradiation time of 5 min increased with increasing temperature, where it tended to level off at temperatures higher than 20 °C. Furthermore, apparent activation energy was estimated from the relationship between the rate and the reciprocal of temperature.

  1. Catalytic Oxidation of Methane into Methanol over Copper-Exchanged Zeolites with Oxygen at Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Karthik; Iyoki, Kenta; Dinh, Kimberly; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-06-22

    The direct catalytic conversion of methane to liquid oxygenated compounds, such as methanol or dimethyl ether, at low temperature using molecular oxygen is a grand challenge in C-H activation that has never been met with synthetic, heterogeneous catalysts. We report the first demonstration of direct, catalytic oxidation of methane into methanol with molecular oxygen over copper-exchanged zeolites at low reaction temperatures (483-498 K). Reaction kinetics studies show sustained catalytic activity and high selectivity for a variety of commercially available zeolite topologies under mild conditions (e.g., 483 K and atmospheric pressure). Transient and steady state measurements with isotopically labeled molecules confirm catalytic turnover. The catalytic rates and apparent activation energies are affected by the zeolite topology, with caged-based zeolites (e.g., Cu-SSZ-13) showing the highest rates. Although the reaction rates are low, the discovery of catalytic sites in copper-exchanged zeolites will accelerate the development of strategies to directly oxidize methane into methanol under mild conditions.

  2. Catalytic Oxidation of Methane into Methanol over Copper-Exchanged Zeolites with Oxygen at Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The direct catalytic conversion of methane to liquid oxygenated compounds, such as methanol or dimethyl ether, at low temperature using molecular oxygen is a grand challenge in C–H activation that has never been met with synthetic, heterogeneous catalysts. We report the first demonstration of direct, catalytic oxidation of methane into methanol with molecular oxygen over copper-exchanged zeolites at low reaction temperatures (483–498 K). Reaction kinetics studies show sustained catalytic activity and high selectivity for a variety of commercially available zeolite topologies under mild conditions (e.g., 483 K and atmospheric pressure). Transient and steady state measurements with isotopically labeled molecules confirm catalytic turnover. The catalytic rates and apparent activation energies are affected by the zeolite topology, with caged-based zeolites (e.g., Cu-SSZ-13) showing the highest rates. Although the reaction rates are low, the discovery of catalytic sites in copper-exchanged zeolites will accelerate the development of strategies to directly oxidize methane into methanol under mild conditions. PMID:27413787

  3. Temperature Dependence of Optical Phonon Lifetimes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This reprint reports an application of a picosecond laser system to the measurement of the temperature dependence of the relaxation time of LO...Raman linewidths, and to the theoretically predicted temperature dependence of the relaxation time. (Author).

  4. Improvement of porcine interferon-α production by recombinant Pichia pastoris via induction at low methanol concentration and low temperature.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hu; Liu, Guoqiang; Dai, Keke; Wang, Huihui; Li, Zhen; Shi, Zhongping

    2011-09-01

    Improved porcine interferon-α (pIFN-α) production by recombinant Pichia pastoris was achieved by culture conditions optimization in a 5-l bioreactor. The results indicated that the pIFN-α concentration, specific methanol consumption rate, specific activities of alcohol oxidase, formaldehyde dehydrogenase, and formate dehydrogenase could be significantly enhanced by decreasing induction temperature. The highest pIFN-α concentration (1.35 g l(-1)) was obtained by simultaneously controlling methanol concentration at 5 g l(-1) and induction temperature at 20 °C, which was about 1.6-fold higher than the maximum obtained with previous optimal methanol concentration level (about 10 g l(-1)) when inducing at 30 °C. The potential mechanisms behind low temperature and low methanol concentration effect on pIFN-α production may be ascribed to higher cell metabolic activity, more carbon flux towards pIFN-α production, and less intracellular/extracellular protease release.

  5. The electrolyte challenge for a direct methanol-air polymer electrolyte fuel cell operating at temperatures up to 200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savinell, Robert; Yeager, Ernest; Tryk, Donald; Landau, Uziel; Wainright, Jesse; Gervasio, Dominic; Cahan, Boris; Litt, Morton; Rogers, Charles; Scherson, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Novel polymer electrolytes are being evaluated for use in a direct methanol-air fuel cell operating at temperatures in excess of 100 C. The evaluation includes tests of thermal stability, ionic conductivity, and vapor transport characteristics. The preliminary results obtained to date indicate that a high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell is feasible. For example, Nafion 117 when equilibrated with phosphoric acid has a conductivity of at least 0.4 Omega(exp -1)cm(exp -1) at temperatures up to 200 C in the presence of 400 torr of water vapor and methanol vapor cross over equivalent to 1 mA/cm(exp 2) under a one atmosphere methanol pressure differential at 135 C. Novel polymers are also showing similar encouraging results. The flexibility to modify and optimize the properties by custom synthesis of these novel polymers presents an exciting opportunity to develop an efficient and compact methanol fuel cell.

  6. Temperature Dependence of Laser Induced Breakdown

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    consistent dependence on the temperature of the medium. The theory of the temperature dependence of LIB and experimental observations for all pulse...durations and their implications for retinal damage are discussed. Laser Induced Breakdown, Temperature dependence , Threshold valve, Nanosecond, Picosecond, Femtosecond, laser pulses.

  7. The Complete, Temperature Resolved Spectrum of Methanol Between 214 and 265 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, James; Neese, Christopher F.; Fortman, Sarah; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-06-01

    We have studied methanol, one of the so-called 'astronomical weeds', in the 215--265 GHz band. We have gathered a set of intensity calibrated, complete, experimental, and temperature resolved spectra from across the temperature range of 240--389 K. A number of low lying transitions, including the ν_t = 3, have not been produced by available catalogs. Using our previously reported method of analysis we were able generate a line list that contains lower state energies and linestrengths, for all of the observed lines in the band. This line list includes those lines which have no quantum mechanical assignment. In addition to this line list we provide a point by point method capable of generating the complete spectrum at an arbitrary temperature. The sensitivity of the point by point analysis is such that we are able to identify lines which would not have manifest in a single scan across the band. The consequence has been to reveal not only a number of new methanol lines, but also trace amounts of contaminants. We show how the intensities from the contaminants can be removed with indiscernible impact on the signal from methanol. To do this we use the point by point results from our previous studies of these contaminants. The efficacy of this process serves as strong proof of concept for usage of our point by point results on the problem of the weeds. The success of this approach for dealing with the weeds has also previously been reported. S. Fortman et al. 2014 ApJ 782 75 S. Fortman et al. 2012 J. Mol. Spectrosc. 782, 75

  8. Pressure, temperature and density drops along supercritical fluid chromatography columns in different thermal environments. III. Mixtures of carbon dioxide and methanol as the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Poe, Donald P; Veit, Devon; Ranger, Megan; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Tarafder, Abhijit; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-01-03

    The pressure, temperature and density drops along SFC columns eluted with a CO2/methanol mobile phase were measured and compared with theoretical values. For columns packed with 3- and 5-μm particles the pressure and temperature drops were measured using a mobile phase of 95% CO2 and 5% methanol at a flow rate of 5mL/min, at temperatures from 20 to 100°C, and outlet pressures from 80 to 300bar. The density drop was calculated based on the temperature and pressure at the column inlet and outlet. The columns were suspended in a circulating air bath, either bare or covered with foam insulation. The experimental measurements were compared to theoretical results obtained by numerical simulation. For the convective air condition at outlet pressures above 100bar the average difference between the experimental and calculated temperature drops and pressure drops were 0.1°C and 0.7% for the bare 3-μm column, respectively, and were 0.6°C and 4.1% for the insulated column. The observed temperature drops for the insulated columns are consistent with those predicted by the Joule-Thomson coefficients for isenthalpic expansion. The dependence of the temperature and the pressure drops on the Joule-Thomson coefficient and kinematic viscosity are described for carbon dioxide mobile phases containing up to 20% methanol.

  9. A High-Sensitivity Gas Sensor Toward Methanol Using ZnO Microrods: Effect of Operating Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, M.; Mahapatra, R.; Mondal, B.; Ghosh, R.

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, zinc oxide (ZnO) microrods with the average diameter of 350 nm have been synthesized on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate using a hydrothermal reaction process at a low temperature of 90°C. The methanol gas sensing behaviour of as-synthesized ZnO microrods have been studied at different operating temperatures (100-300°C). The gas sensing results show that the ZnO microrods exhibit excellent sensitivity, selectivity, and stability toward methanol gas at 300°C. The as-grown ZnO microrods sensor also shows the good sensitivity for methanol even at a low operating temperature of 100°C. The ultra-high sensitivity of 4.41 × 104% [gas sensitivity, S g = ( I g - I a)/ I a × 100%] and 5.11 × 102% to 100 ppm methanol gas at a temperature of 300°C and 100°C, respectively, has been observed. A fast response time of 200 ms and 270 ms as well as a recovery time of 120 ms and 1330 ms to methanol gas have also been found at an operating temperature of 300°C and 100°C, respectively. The response and recovery time decreases with increasing operation temperature of the sensor.

  10. The Viscosity-Temperature-Dependence of Liquids,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The viscosity-temperature- dependence of liquids of different types can be represented by the formula lg kinematic viscosity = A/T to the x power + B...if A has a constant value, only one viscosity measurement at one temperature is necessary for the characterization of the viscosity-temperature- dependence . Examples for each different case are given. (Author)

  11. Concentration-dependent dynamics of hydrogen bonding between acetonitrile and methanol as determined by 1D vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Alberding, Brian G; Lear, Benjamin J

    2014-06-26

    Solutions of acetonitrile (MeCN) in methanol (MeOH) at various concentrations have been investigated by variable temperature Raman spectroscopy. In the ν(CN) region of the spectrum, the variable temperature spectra at each concentration show two overlapping bands from hydrogen bound and free MeCN. These two species undergo dynamic exchange that gives rise to increasing coalescence of the two bands with increasing temperature. By simulation of the band shape, the rate of exchange was determined at each temperature. Arrhenius plots yielded values for the activation energy, Ea, and the natural log of the pre-exponential factor, ln[A/s(-1)], for the hydrogen bond formation/cleavage. Both of these dynamic parameters were found to depend on the relative amounts of MeCN and MeOH in the solutions. In particular, two different concentration regimes of dynamic hydrogen bonding were observed. First, at low MeCN concentration, the dynamics are largely independent of changes in MeCN concentration. Second, at higher MeCN concentration (above ∼0.2 MeCN mole fraction) the dynamics are strongly dependent on further increases of MeCN content. Over the range of MeCN mole fractions that we studied (0.03-0.5), the ln[A/s(-1)] changes from 32.5 ± 0.1 to 30.1 ± 0.2 and Ea changes from 3.73 ± 0.08 to 2.7 ± 0.1 kcal/mol. We suggest the observed changes in dynamics arise from changes in the local solvent microstructure that occur above a critical mole fraction of MeCN.

  12. Temperature Dependence of Large Polaron Superconductivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-07-18

    to explain the variation of critical temperature Tc with chemical composition and the temperature dependence of high-Tc superconductor properties is...One result of this refinement is a clearer picture of the dependence of electron hopping activation energy on crystal-field parameters. A... dependence is more typically exponential. With these improvements, precise fits to penetration depth versus temperature measurements for high-purity YBCO

  13. The Complete, Temperature Resolved Experimental Spectrum of Methanol Between 560 and 654 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2013-06-01

    The complete spectrum of methanol (CH_3OH) in the 560.4-654.0 GHz spectral region has been characterized over a range of astrophysically significant temperatures, 248-397 K. Analysis of experimental spectra recorded with absolute intensity calibration over a slow temperature ramp provides a means for the simulation of the spectrum as a function of temperature without a complete quantum mechanical (QM) model. These results include contributions from v_t = 3 and other higher states that are difficult to model via QM techniques. They also contain contributions from the ^{13}C isotopologue in natural abundance. These results are used to both provide catalogs in the usual line frequency, linestrength, and lower state energy format and in a frequency point-by-point format that is particularly well suited for the characterization of blended lines. In contrast to our earlier work on the semi-rigid species ethyl cyanide and vinyl cyanide, significant intensity difference between these experimental values and those calculated by QM methods were found for some of the lines. Analysis of these differences points to the difficulty of the calculation of dipole matrix elements in the context of the internal rotation of the methanol molecule. We will compare our experimental intensities with the most recent QM model, as well as an earlier QM model that includes the variation of the dipole moment function with the torsional angle. S. M. Fortman, I. R. Medvedev, C. F. Neese, and F. C. De Lucia, Astrophys. J. 737, 20/1-6 (2011). L.-H. Xu, et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 251, 305-313 (2008). M. A. Mekhtiev, P. D. Godfrey, and J. T. Hougen, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 194, 171-178 (1999).

  14. Temperature dependence of nucleation in Yukawa fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-S.; Wilemski, G.

    2002-03-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of gas-liquid nucleation in Yukawa fluids with gradient theory (GT) and density functional theory (DFT). Each of these nonclassical theories exhibits a weaker (i.e. better) temperature dependence than classical nucleation theory. At a given temperature, the difference between GT and DFT for the reversible work to form a critical nucleus gets smaller with increasing superaturation. For the temperature dependence, the reversible work for GT is very close to that for DFT at high temperatures. The difference between the two theories increases with decreasing temperature and supersaturation. Thus, in contrast to the behavior of a Peng-Robinson fluid, we find that GT can improve the temperature dependence over that of classical nucleation theory, although not always to the same degree as DFT.

  15. Composition dependent structural organization in trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium chloride ionic liquid-methanol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Aditya; Sharma, Shobha; Kashyap, Hemant K.

    2015-04-07

    This article reports results from the molecular dynamics simulations on the structural arrangement of the ions and molecules in the mixtures of trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium chloride ([P{sub 666,14}{sup +}][Cl{sup −}]) ionic liquid (IL) and methanol (MeOH) over the entire composition range. Effects of composition on the charge and polarity orderings have been investigated via computation of X-ray scattering structure function, S(q), and by using a partitioning scheme proposed for such multi-component mixtures. Except for the neat methanol liquid, the total S(q) shows two peaks in its intermolecular region for all the mole-fractions. The lowest q peak is dominated primarily by anion-anion, cation-anion, and methanol-anion correlations. Our results signify that the methanol bulk structure, which predominantly has short-distance characteristic correlations and is governed by polar group of methanol, is retained for x{sub IL} ≤ 0.1. Then, the mixture goes through gradual structural changes from methanol-like to the IL-like for 0.1 < x{sub IL} ≤ 0.7. The dipolar interaction between methanol molecules weakens in this range, and the structural landscape of the mixture is steered by strong ion-ion, anion-methanol, and nonpolar interactions. The IL-like structural arrangement is virtually recovered for x{sub IL} > 0.7. At all the compositions studied, while the cation head groups are predominantly solvated by anions and subsequently by methanol molecules, the polar hydroxyl group of methanol is preferentially solvated by the anions. The radial distribution functions of selected pair of atomic species have also confirmed these observations.

  16. Direct methanol fuel cell for portable applications

    SciTech Connect

    Valdez, T.I.; Narayanan, S.R.; Frank, H.; Chun, W.

    1997-12-01

    A five cell direct methanol fuel cell stack has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Presently direct methanol fuel cell technology is being incorporated into a system for portable applications. Electrochemical performance and its dependence on flow rate and temperature for a five cell stack are presented. Water transport data, and water transport mechanisms for direct methanol fuel cells are discussed. Stack response to pulse loads has been characterized. Implications of stack performance and operating conditions on system design have been addressed.

  17. Multiple hydrogen bonding in excited states of aminopyrazine in methanol solution: time-dependent density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Chai, Shuo; Yu, Jie; Han, Yong-Chang; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Aminopyrazine (AP) and AP-methanol complexes have been theoretically studied by using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The excited-state hydrogen bonds are discussed in detail. In the ground state the intermolecular multiple hydrogen bonds can be formed between AP molecule and protic solvents. The AP monomer and hydrogen-bonded complex of AP with one methanol are photoexcited initially to the S2 state, and then transferred to the S1 state via internal conversion. However the complex of AP with two methanol molecules is directly excited to the S1 state. From the calculated electronic excited energies and simulated absorption spectra, we find that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds are strengthened in the electronic excited states. The strengthening is confirmed by the optimized excited-state geometries. The photochemical processes in the electronic excited states are significantly influenced by the excited-state hydrogen bond strengthening.

  18. The effect of Ru on unsupported Pt-Ru alloys for methanol electro-oxidation at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.; Walker, C.; Gilman, S.

    1995-12-31

    Unsupported different atomic ratios of platinum-ruthenium bulk alloys were prepared. The alloys were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. These alloys were also tested as anodes for methanol electro-oxidation in sulfuric acid over a range of temperatures. Ruthenium is inactive for methanol electro-oxidation at 25 C, but becomes active at higher temperatures. When a comparison is made on the basis of true (hydrogen adsorption) surface area, a 30 atomic percent Ru electrocatalyst provides the highest activity for methanol electro-oxidation as measured at either 0.4 or 0.5 V vs RHE at both 25 and 60 C.

  19. Temperature-dependent susceptibility in ALON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.

    2001-02-01

    Herein, we propose a stochastic model of the complex susceptibility in aluminum nitride (ALON), a polycrystalline transparent ceramic. The proposed model yields an inverse power-law dependence of the dielectric loss tangent on frequency, in remarkably close agreement with data. In addition, the phenomenological parameters are found to be strongly temperature-dependent. This temperature dependence is determined, in the theoretical model, to be a consequence of the thermodynamic properties of the molecular dipoles in the material.

  20. Shape-dependence of the thermal and photochemical reactions of methanol on nanocrystalline anatase TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, David A.; Cargnello, Matteo; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Murray, Christopher B.; Vohs, John M.

    2016-12-01

    Structure-activity relationships and the influence of particle size and shape on the partial- and photo-oxidation of methanol on nanocrystalline anatase TiO2 were investigated using temperature-programmed desorption. The study employed two distinct nanoparticle morphologies: truncated bipyramids exposing primarily {101} facets, and flatter platelets exposing primarily {001} surfaces, whose nominal sizes ranged from 10 to 25 nm. The platelets were found to be more active for thermally-driven reactions, such as coupling of methoxide groups to produce dimethyl ether, and deoxygenation to produce methane. A dependence of the reactivity of {001} facets for the coupling of methoxide groups to produce dimethyl ether on facet size was also observed. In contrast to the thermally-driven reactions, the bipyramidal nanoparticles were observed to be more active for a range of photochemical reactions, including oxidation and coupling to produce methyl formate, and photo-decomposition of surface methoxide species. This study also shows how well-defined nanocrystals can be used to help bridge the materials gap between studies of single crystal model catalysts and their high surface area industrial analogs.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Factors Controlling Isoprene Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Damon, Megan R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the relationship of variability in the formaldehyde (HCHO) columns measured by the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) to isoprene emissions in the southeastern United States for 2005-2007. The data show that the inferred, regional-average isoprene emissions varied by about 22% during summer and are well correlated with temperature, which is known to influence emissions. Part of the correlation with temperature is likely associated with other causal factors that are temperature-dependent. We show that the variations in HCHO are convolved with the temperature dependence of surface ozone, which influences isoprene emissions, and the dependence of the HCHO column to mixed layer height as OMI's sensitivity to HCHO increases with altitude. Furthermore, we show that while there is an association of drought with the variation in HCHO, drought in the southeastern U.S. is convolved with temperature.

  2. Selective oxidation of methanol and ethanol on supported ruthenium oxide clusters at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haichao; Iglesia, Enrique

    2004-03-04

    RuO2 domains supported on SnO2, ZrO2, TiO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 catalyze the oxidative conversion of methanol to formaldehyde, methylformate, and dimethoxymethane with unprecedented rates and high combined selectivity (>99 percent) and yield at low temperatures (300-400 K). Supports influence turnover rates and the ability of RuO2 domains to undergo redox cycles required for oxidation turnovers. Oxidative dehydrogenation turnover rates and rates of stoichiometric reduction of RuO2 in H2 increased in parallel when RuO2 domains were dispersed on more reducible supports. These support effects, the kinetic effects of CH3OH and O2 on reaction rates, and the observed kinetic isotope effects with CH3OD and CD3OD reactants are consistent with a sequence of elementary steps involving kinetically relevant H-abstraction from adsorbed methoxide species using lattice oxygen atoms and with methoxide formation in quasi-equilibrated CH3OH dissociation on nearly stoichiometric RuO2 surfaces. Anaerobic transient experiments confirmed that CH3OH oxidation to HCHO requires lattice oxygen atoms and that selectivities are not influenced by the presence of O2. Residence time effects on selectivity indicate that secondary HCHO-CH3OH acetalization reactions lead to hemiacetal or methoxymethanol intermediates that convert to dimethoxymethane in reactions with CH3OH on support acid sites or dehydrogenate to form methylformate on RuO2 and support redox sites. These conclusions are consistent with the tendency of Al2O3 and SiO2 supports to favor dimethoxymethane formation, while SnO2, ZrO2, and TiO2 preferentially form methylformate. These support effects on secondary reactions were confirmed by measured CH3OH oxidation rates and selectivities on physical mixtures of supported RuO2 catalysts and pure supports. Ethanol also reacts on supported RuO2 domains to form predominately acetaldehyde and diethoxyethane at 300-400 K. The bifunctional nature of these reaction pathways and the remarkable

  3. Insights on the effective incorporation of a foam-based methanol reformer in a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgouropoulos, George; Papavasiliou, Joan; Ioannides, Theophilos; Neophytides, Stylianos

    2015-11-01

    Highly active Al-doped CuMnOx catalyst supported on metallic copper foam was prepared via the combustion method and placed adjacent to the anode electrocatalyst of a high temperature PEM fuel cell operating at 200-210 °C. The addition of aluminum oxide in the catalyst composition enhanced the specific surface area (19.1 vs. 8.6 m2 g-1) and the reducibility of the Cu-Mn spinel oxide. Accordingly, the catalytic performance of CuMnOx was also improved. The doped sample is up to 2.5 times more active than the undoped sample at 200 °C, depending on the methanol concentration at the inlet, while CO selectivity is less than 0.8% in all cases. A membrane-electrode assembly comprising the ADVENT cross-linked TPS® high-temperature polymer electrolyte was integrated with the Cu-based methanol reformer in an Internal Reforming Methanol Fuel Cell (IRMFC). In order to avoid extensive poisoning of the reforming catalyst by H3PO4, a thin separation plate was placed between the reforming catalyst and the electrooxidation catalyst. Preliminary results obtained from a single-cell laboratory prototype demonstrated the improved functionality of the unit. Indeed, promising electrochemical performance was obtained during the first 24 h, during which the required H2 for achieving 580 mV at 0.2 A cm-2, was supplied from the reformer.

  4. Theoretical temperature dependence of solar cell parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, John C. C.

    1986-01-01

    A simple formulation has been derived for the temperature dependence of cell parameters for any solar cell material. Detailed calculations have been performed for high-quality monocrystalline GaAs, Si and Ge cells. Preliminary experimental data for GaAs and Si cells are close to the calculated values. In general, the higher the energy gap of a material, the small is the temperature dependence of its solar cell parameters.

  5. Temperature dependence of Vortex Charges in High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, C. S.; Chen, Yan; Wang, Z. D.

    2003-03-01

    By considering of competition between antiferromagnetic (AF) and d-wave superconductivity orders, the temperature dependence of the vortex charge in high Tc superconductors is investigated by solving self-consistently the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. The magnitude of induced antiferromagnetic order inside the vortex core is temperature dependent. The vortex charge is always negative when a sufficient strength of AF order presents at low temperature while the AF order may be suppressed at higher temperature and there the vortex charge becomes positive. A first order like transition from negative to the positive vortex charges occurs at certain temperature TN which is very close to the temperature for the disappearence of the local AF order. The vortex charges at various doping levels will also going to be examined. We show that the temperature dependence of the vortex core radius with induced AF order exhibits a weak Kramer-Pesch effect. The local density of states spectrum has a broad peak pattern at higher temperature while it exhibits two splitting peak at lower temperature. This temperature evolution may be detected by the future scanning-tunnel-microscope experiment. In addition, the effect of the vortex charge on the mixed state Hall effect will be discussed.

  6. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  7. E. coli survival in waters: temperature dependence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important for evaluating microbial contamination and in making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature; this dependency is routinely expressed using an analog of the Q10 model. This suggestion...

  8. Non-syngas direct steam reforming of methanol to hydrogen and carbon dioxide at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai Man Kerry; Tong, Weiyi; West, Adam; Cheung, Kevin; Li, Tong; Smith, George; Guo, Yanglong; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2012-01-01

    A non-syngas direct steam reforming route is investigated for the conversion of methanol to hydrogen and carbon dioxide over a CuZnGaO(x) catalyst at 150-200 °C. This route is in marked contrast with the conventional complex route involving steam reformation to syngas (CO/H2) at high temperature, followed by water gas shift and CO cleanup stages for hydrogen production. Here we report that high quality hydrogen and carbon dioxide can be produced in a single-step reaction over the catalyst, with no detectable CO (below detection limit of 1 ppm). This can be used to supply proton exchange membrane fuel cells for mobile applications without invoking any CO shift and cleanup stages. The working catalyst contains, on average, 3-4 nm copper particles, alongside extremely small size of copper clusters stabilized on a defective ZnGa2O4 spinel oxide surface, providing hydrogen productivity of 393.6 ml g(-1)-cat h(-1) at 150 °C.

  9. Liquid-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, L.; Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Pardo, J.; Pazos, A.; Pena, J.; Zapata, M.

    2006-05-01

    Temperature and pressure corrections of the read-out signal of ionization chambers have a crucial importance in order to perform high-precision absolute dose measurements. In the present work the temperature and pressure dependences of a sealed liquid isooctane filled ionization chamber (previously developed by the authors) for radiotherapy applications have been studied. We have analyzed the thermal response of the liquid ionization chamber in a ˜20C interval around room temperature. The temperature dependence of the signal can be considered linear, with a slope that depends on the chamber collection electric field. For example, a relative signal slope of 0.27×10-2 K-1 for an operation electric field of 1.67×106 V m-1 has been measured in our detector. On the other hand, ambient pressure dependence has been found negligible, as expected for liquid-filled chambers. The thermal dependence of the liquid ionization chamber signal can be parametrized within the Onsager theory on initial recombination. Considering that changes with temperature of the detector response are due to variations in the free ion yield, a parametrization of this dependence has been obtained. There is a good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical model from the Onsager framework.

  10. Two-step method preparation of graphene without hydrogen on methanol pretreatment copper substrate by PECVD at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Linzhi; Liu, JingJing; Zhao, Zhanxia; Chen, Shumin; Ma, Zhongquan; Zhao, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is one effective method to prepare graphene at low temperature in a short time. However, the low temperature in PECVD could not provide substrate a proper state for large area and few layer graphene preparation. Herein, we propose a two-step method to grow graphene on Cu foils. In the first step, in order to acquire a smooth and oxide-free surface state, methanol was used as a reductant to pretreat Cu. In the second step, graphene films were prepared on Cu foils by PECVD using CH4 as carbon source with H2-free. Few-layer graphene sheets with diameter about 1 μm under low temperature (700 °C) and at a short time (10 min) on well pretreated Cu foils were successfully gotten. The effect of methanol pretreatment on graphene synthesis and the graphene growth mechanism on Cu substrate by PECVD are analyzed comprehensively.

  11. Temperature dependence of sapphire fiber Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bo; Yu, Zhihao; Tian, Zhipeng; Homa, Daniel; Hill, Cary; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-04-27

    Anti-Stokes Raman scattering in sapphire fiber has been observed for the first time. Temperature dependence of Raman peaks’ intensity, frequency shift, and linewidth were also measured. Three anti-Stokes Raman peaks were observed at temperatures higher than 300°C in a 0.72-m-long sapphire fiber excited by a second-harmonic Nd YAG laser. The intensity of anti-Stokes peaks are comparable to that of Stokes peaks when the temperature increases to 1033°C. We foresee the combination of sapphire fiber Stokes and anti-Stokes measurement in use as a mechanism for ultrahigh temperature sensing.

  12. Study of the use of methanol-filled Er-doped suspended-core fibres in a temperature-sensing ring laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, J. C.; Berdejo, V.; Vallés, J. A.; Sánchez-Martín, J. A.; Díez, A.; Andrés, M. V.

    2013-10-01

    We report on an experimental/numerical investigation into the use of methanol-filled Er-doped suspended-core fibres (SCFs) in temperature-sensing ring laser systems. We have adopted a ring laser configuration that includes an Er-doped SCF as a temperature-dependent attenuator (TDA) with a step-index Er-doped fibre (EDF) as the laser active medium. The laser performance dependence on the temperature was measured both in continuous wave (CW) and transient regimes. CW laser output power and build-up time values are compared with those of similar laser systems based on other types of Er-doped PCFs or using other laser configurations. A notable variation of 0.73% °C-1 was achieved in CW operation. Then, by means of parameters obtained by numerically fitting the experimental results, the potential sensing performance of the laser configuration with an SCF as a TDA is studied. Moreover, two ring cavity laser configurations (with the SCF acting basically as an attenuator or also as the active media) are compared and the influence of the position of the coupler inside the ring cavity and the contribution of the erbium doping to improve the sensor features are analysed. The longer interaction lengths compatible with laser action using the Er-doped SCF as a TDA could provide variations of laser output power up to 8.6% °C-1 for 90 mW pump power and a 1 m methanol-filled SCF.

  13. Radiation-induced transformations of methanol molecules in low-temperature solids: a matrix isolation study.

    PubMed

    Saenko, Elizaveta V; Feldman, Vladimir I

    2016-11-30

    The effect of X-ray irradiation on methanol molecules (CH3OH, CD3OH, and (13)CH3OH) isolated in solid noble gas matrices (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) was studied by FTIR spectroscopy at 6 K. CH2OH˙, H2CO, HCO˙ and CO were found to be the main degradation products. Somewhat unexpectedly, the production of CO is quite prominent, even at low doses, and it strongly predominates in low-polarizable matrices (especially, in neon). This result is explained by inefficient quenching of excess energy in the H2CO molecules initially generated from methanol. Relatively small amounts of CH4, CH3˙ and CO2 were also observed directly after irradiation. The latter species presumably originates from methanol dimers or methanol-water complexes. The mechanisms of radiolysis and annealing-induced reactions are discussed and possible implications for the astrochemically relevant ices are considered.

  14. The solvent dependent shift of the amide I band of a fully solvated peptide in methanol/water mixtures as a local probe for the solvent composition in the peptide/solvent interface

    SciTech Connect

    Gnanakaran, S

    2008-01-01

    We determine the shift and line-shape of the amide I band of a model AK-peptide from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the peptide dissolved in methanol/water mixtures with varying composition. The IR-spectra are determined from a transition dipole coupling exciton model. A simplified empirical model Hamiltonian is employed, taking both the effect of hydrogen bonding, as well as intramolecular vibrational coupling into account. We consider a single isolated AK-peptide in a mostly helical conformation, while the solvent is represented by 2600 methanol or water molecules, simulated for a pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 300 K. Over the course of the simulations minor reversible conformational changes at the termini are observed, which are found to only slightly affect the calculated spectral properties. Over the entire composition range, varying from pure water to the pure methanol solvent, a monotonous blue-shift of the IR amide I band of about 8 wavenumbers is observed. The shift is found to be caused by two counter-compensating effects: An intramolecular red-shift of about 1.2 wavenumbers, due to stronger intramolecular hydrogen-bonding in a methanol-rich environment. Dominating, however, is the intermolecular solvent-dependent blue-shift of about 10 wavenumbers, being attributed to the less effective hydrogen bond donor capabilities of methanol compared to water. The importance of solvent-contribution to the IR-shift, as well as the significantly different hydrogen formation capabilities of water and methanol make the amide I band sensitive to composition changes in the local environment close the peptide/solvent interface. This allows, in principle, an experimental determination of the composition of the solvent in close proximity to the peptide surface. For the AK-peptide case they observe at low methanol concentrations a significantly enhanced methanol concentration at the peptide/solvent-interface, supposedly promoted by the partially hydrophobic

  15. Temperature dependence of standard model CP violation.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Tomáš; Taanila, Olli; Tranberg, Anders; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2012-01-27

    We analyze the temperature dependence of CP violation effects in the standard model by determining the effective action of its bosonic fields, obtained after integrating out the fermions from the theory and performing a covariant gradient expansion. We find nonvanishing CP violating terms starting at the sixth order of the expansion, albeit only in the C-odd-P-even sector, with coefficients that depend on quark masses, Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements, temperature and the magnitude of the Higgs field. The CP violating effects are observed to decrease rapidly with temperature, which has important implications for the generation of a matter-antimatter asymmetry in the early Universe. Our results suggest that the cold electroweak baryogenesis scenario may be viable within the standard model, provided the electroweak transition temperature is at most of order 1 GeV.

  16. Temperature dependence of polymer photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Yuko

    One of many steps to develop a sustainable society is to reduce the use of fossil fuels by replacing them with renewable energy sources, such as solar energy. This dissertation concerns one of the most contemporary methods to harvest solar radiation and covert it to electricity, using thin polymer films. The photovoltaic devices in this study consisted of a thin layer of p-phenylenevinylene (PPV) based semiconducting polymer sandwiched between two metals (semi-transparent ITO and evaporated metal electrode). Two modified device structures were studied, an interfacial heterojunction device, which includes an additional layer of inorganic n-type semiconductor (Ti-oxides) and a bulk heterojunction device, which is formed by blending electron-attracting materials. Both modifications resulted in higher device performances under ambient conditions due to an increased number of dissociation sites. From studies of inorganic solar cells, it is well known that temperature has a large effect on device performance. However, there are only a few studies on organic Solar cells, concerning the temperature dependence. This thesis focuses on understanding the temperature dependent behaviors of polymer photovoltaic devices. Temperature dependence study allows us to examine how the device parameters such as short circuit current (Isc) and open circuit voltage (Voc) are affected by the material properties and the device architectures. The current-voltage relationships were measured in a temperature controlled OXFORD cryostat operating between 150K and 404K. From the dark current-voltage measurements, the field-independent hole mobility (mu0) was extracted, using a space charge limited current analysis. From the photocurrent-voltage measurements, the temperature dependence on Isc, Voc, and fill factor were studied. The temperature characteristics of Isc (T) were compared to that of mu0(T), and two different dependencies were obtained for different device architectures. The temperature

  17. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  18. Interactions of methanol, ethanol, and 1-propanol with polar and nonpolar species in water at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Souda, Ryutaro

    2017-01-18

    Methanol is known as a strong inhibitor of hydrate formation, but clathrate hydrates of ethanol and 1-propanol can be formed in the presence of help gases. To elucidate the hydrophilic and hydrophobic effects of alcohols, their interactions with simple solute species are investigated in glassy, liquid, and crystalline water using temperature-programmed desorption and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Nonpolar solute species embedded underneath amorphous solid water films are released during crystallization, but they tend to withstand water crystallization under the coexistence of methanol additives. The CO2 additives are released after crystallization along with methanol desorption. These results suggest strongly that nonpolar species that are hydrated (i.e., caged) associatively with methanol can withstand water crystallization. In contrast, ethanol and 1-propanol additives weakly affect the dehydration of nonpolar species during water crystallization, suggesting that the former tend to be caged separately from the latter. The hydrophilic vs. hydrophobic behavior of alcohols, which differs according to the aliphatic group length, also manifests itself in the different abilities of surface segregation of alcohols and their effects on the water crystallization kinetics.

  19. Effects of temperature and glycerol and methanol-feeding profiles on the production of recombinant galactose oxidase in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Anasontzis, George E; Salazar Penã, Margarita; Spadiut, Oliver; Brumer, Harry; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of protein production from methanol-induced Pichia pastoris cultures is necessary to ensure high productivity rates and high yields of recombinant proteins. We investigated the effects of temperature and different linear or exponential methanol-feeding rates on the production of recombinant Fusarium graminearum galactose oxidase (EC 1.1.3.9) in a P. pastoris Mut+ strain, under regulation of the AOX1 promoter. We found that low exponential methanol feeding led to 1.5-fold higher volumetric productivity compared to high exponential feeding rates. The duration of glycerol feeding did not affect the subsequent product yield, but longer glycerol feeding led to higher initial biomass concentration, which would reduce the oxygen demand and generate less heat during induction. A linear and a low exponential feeding profile led to productivities in the same range, but the latter was characterized by intense fluctuations in the titers of galactose oxidase and total protein. An exponential feeding profile that has been adapted to the apparent biomass concentration results in more stable cultures, but the concentration of recombinant protein is in the same range as when constant methanol feeding is employed. © 2014 The Authors Biotechnology Progress published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 30:728–735, 2014 PMID:24493559

  20. The complete, temperature resolved experimental spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) between 560 and 654 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-02-20

    The complete spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) has been characterized over a range of astrophysically significant temperatures in the 560.4-654.0 GHz spectral region. Absolute intensity calibration and analysis of 166 experimental spectra recorded over a slow 248-398 K temperature ramp provide a means for the simulation of the complete spectrum of methanol as a function of temperature. These results include contributions from v{sub t} = 3 and other higher states that are difficult to model via quantum mechanical (QM) techniques. They also contain contributions from the {sup 13}C isotopologue in terrestrial abundance. In contrast to our earlier work on semi-rigid species, such as ethyl cyanide and vinyl cyanide, significant intensity differences between these experimental values and those calculated by QM methods were found for many of the lines. Analysis of these differences shows the difficulty of the calculation of dipole matrix elements in the context of the internal rotation of the methanol molecule. These results are used to both provide catalogs in the usual line frequency, linestrength, and lower state energy format, as well as in a frequency point-by-point catalog that is particularly well suited for the characterization of blended lines.

  1. Colloidal solitary waves with temperature dependent compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, A.; Marchant, T. R.

    2014-05-01

    Spatial solitary waves which form in colloidal suspensions of dielectric nanoparticles are considered. The interactions, or compressibility, of the colloidal particles, is modelled using a series in the particle density, or packing fraction, where the virial, or series, coefficients depend on the type of particle interaction model. Both the theoretical hard disk and sphere repulsive models, and a model with temperature dependent compressibility, are considered. Experimental results show that particle interactions can be temperature dependent and either repulsive or attractive in nature, so we model the second virial coefficient using a physically realistic temperature power law. One- and two-dimensional semi-analytical colloidal solitary wave solutions are found. Trial functions, based on the form of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation soliton, are used, together with averaging, to develop the semi-analytical solutions. When the background packing fraction is low, the one-dimensional solitary waves have three solutions branches (with a bistable regime) while the two-dimensional solitary waves have two solution branches, with a single stable branch. The temperature dependent second virial coefficient results in changes to the solitary wave properties and the parameter space, in which multiple solutions branches occur. An excellent comparison is found between the semi-analytical and numerical solutions.

  2. PQQ-dependent methanol dehydrogenases: rare-earth elements make a difference.

    PubMed

    Keltjens, Jan T; Pol, Arjan; Reimann, Joachim; Op den Camp, Huub J M

    2014-01-01

    Methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes the first step in methanol use by methylotrophic bacteria and the second step in methane conversion by methanotrophs. Gram-negative bacteria possess an MDH with pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as its catalytic center. This MDH belongs to the broad class of eight-bladed β propeller quinoproteins, which comprise a range of other alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases. A well-investigated MDH is the heterotetrameric MxaFI-MDH, which is composed of two large catalytic subunits (MxaF) and two small subunits (MxaI). MxaFI-MDHs bind calcium as a cofactor that assists PQQ in catalysis. Genomic analyses indicated the existence of another MDH distantly related to the MxaFI-MDHs. Recently, several of these so-called XoxF-MDHs have been isolated. XoxF-MDHs described thus far are homodimeric proteins lacking the small subunit and possess a rare-earth element (REE) instead of calcium. The presence of such REE may confer XoxF-MDHs a superior catalytic efficiency. Moreover, XoxF-MDHs are able to oxidize methanol to formate, rather than to formaldehyde as MxaFI-MDHs do. While structures of MxaFI- and XoxF-MDH are conserved, also regarding the binding of PQQ, the accommodation of a REE requires the presence of a specific aspartate residue near the catalytic site. XoxF-MDHs containing such REE-binding motif are abundantly present in genomes of methylotrophic and methanotrophic microorganisms and also in organisms that hitherto are not known for such lifestyle. Moreover, sequence analyses suggest that XoxF-MDHs represent only a small part of putative REE-containing quinoproteins, together covering an unexploited potential of metabolic functions.

  3. Bimetallic Nickel/Ruthenium Catalysts Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition for Low-Temperature Direct Methanol Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Heonjae; Kim, Jun Woo; Park, Joonsuk; An, Jihwan; Lee, Tonghun; Prinz, Fritz B; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2016-11-09

    Nickel and ruthenium bimetallic catalysts were heterogeneously synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD) for use as the anode of direct methanol solid oxide fuel cells (DMSOFCs) operating in a low-temperature range. The presence of highly dispersed ALD Ru islands over a porous Ni mesh was confirmed, and the Ni/ALD Ru anode microstructure was observed. Fuel cell tests were conducted using Ni-only and Ni/ALD Ru anodes with approximately 350 μm thick gadolinium-doped ceria electrolytes and platinum cathodes. The performance of fuel cells was assessed using pure methanol at operating temperatures of 300-400 °C. Micromorphological changes of the anode after cell operation were investigated, and the content of adsorbed carbon on the anode side of the operated samples was measured. The difference in the maximum power density between samples utilizing Ni/ALD Ru and Pt/ALD Ru, the latter being the best catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells, was observed to be less than 7% at 300 °C and 30% at 350 °C. The improved electrochemical activity of the Ni/ALD Ru anode compared to that of the Ni-only anode, along with the reduction of the number of catalytically active sites due to agglomeration of Ni and carbon formation on the Ni surface as compared to Pt, explains this decent performance.

  4. Temperature dependent phonon properties of thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, Olle; Broido, David; Fultz, Brent

    2015-03-01

    We present recent developments using the temperature dependent effective potential technique (TDEP) to model thermoelectric materials. We use ab initio molecular dynamics to generate an effective Hamiltonian that reproduce neutron scattering spectra, thermal conductivity, phonon self energies, and heat capacities. Results are presented for (among others) SnSe, Bi2Te3, and Cu2Se proving the necessity of careful modelling of finite temperature properties for strongly anharmonic materials. Supported by the Swedish Research Council (VR) Project Number 637-2013-7296.

  5. Temperature-dependent reflectivity of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The spectral reflectivity of a commercial silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic surface was measured at wavelengths from 2.5 to 14.5 microns and at temperatures ranging from 358 to 520 K using a NASA-developed multiwavelength pyrometer. The SiC surface reflectivity was low at the short wavelengths, decreasing to almost zero at 10 microns, then increasing rapidly to a maximum at approximately 12.5 microns, and decreasing gradually thereafter. The reflectivity maximum increased in magnitude with increasing surface temperature. The wavelength and temperature dependence can be explained in terms of the classical dispersion theory of crystals and the Lorentz electron theory. Electronic transitions between the donor state and the conduction band states were responsible for the dispersion. The concentration of the donor state in SiC was determined to be approximately 4 x 10 exp 18 and its ionization energy was determined to be approximately 71 meV.

  6. Alumina-supported Pd-Ag catalysts for low-temperature CO and methanol oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccabe, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Pd-Ag bimetallic catalysts, supported on gamma-Al2O3, have been evaluated as exhaust catalysts for methanol-fueled vehicles. Laboratory studies have shown that a 0.01% Pd-5% Ag catalyst has greater CO and CH3OH oxidation activity than either 0.01% Pd or 5% Ag catalysts alone. Moreover, Pd and Ag interact synergistically in the bimetallic catalyst to produce greater CO and CH3OH oxidation rates and lower yields of methanol partial oxidation products than expected from a mixture of the single-component catalysts. The Pd-Ag synergism results from Pd promoting the rate of O2 adsorption and reaction with CO and CH3OH on Ag. Rate enhancement by the bimetallic catalyst is greatest at short reactor residence times where the oxygen adsorption rate limits the overall reaction rate.

  7. Temperature dependent light transmission in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brojabasi, Surajit; Mahendran, V.; Lahiri, B. B.; Philip, John

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the influence of temperature on the magnetic field induced light transmission in a kerosene based ferrofluid containing oleic acid coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles, where the direction of propagation of light is parallel to the direction of the external magnetic field. At a fixed temperature the transmitted light intensity is found to monotonically increase with incident wavelength due to reduced extinction efficiency at higher wavelength. The transmitted intensity decreases with external magnetic field due to enhanced scattering from the field induced linear chain like structures along the direction of the external magnetic field and due to the build-up of standing waves inside the scattering medium. The extinction of the field induced transmitted light intensity is found to occur at a lower external field as the sample temperature is lowered. The rate of extinction of normalized transmitted light intensity decreased linearly with increasing sample temperature due to slower field induced aggregation kinetics because of an increased Brownian motion of the suspended nanoparticles and a reduced coupling constant. The observed temperature dependent magneto-optical properties of magnetic nanofluids can be exploited for applications in optical devices.

  8. Self-Activated Micro Direct-Methanol Fuel Cell (muDMFC) at Near Room Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    control of multiphase flows at the microscale is crucial to micro-DMFC development. Through micro channel experiments we showed that wettability ...channel experiments study the effects of wettability (hydrophilic/hydrophobic) as well as the presence of impurities in the fuel on the operating...and gas are flowing into square cross-sectional microchannels. The optimal wettability properties for Micro-Direct Methanol Fuel Cells are hydrophilic

  9. Low-Temperature Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol with a Homogeneous Cobalt Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Schneidewind, Jacob; Adam, Rosa; Baumann, Wolfgang; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2017-02-06

    Herein we describe the first homogeneous non-noble metal catalyst for the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol. The catalyst is formed in situ from [Co(acac)3 ], Triphos, and HNTf2 and enables the reaction to be performed at 100 °C without a decrease in activity. Kinetic studies suggest an inner-sphere mechanism, and in situ NMR and MS experiments reveal the formation of the active catalyst through slow removal of the acetylacetonate ligands.

  10. Heat and fuel coupled operation of a high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell with a heat exchanger methanol steam reformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, G.; Vázquez, F. Vidal; Waiblinger, W.; Auvinen, S.; Ribeirinha, P.

    2017-04-01

    In this work a methanol steam reforming (MSR) reactor has been operated thermally coupled to a high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack (HT-PEMFC) utilizing its waste heat. The operating temperature of the coupled system was 180 °C which is significantly lower than the conventional operating temperature of the MSR process which is around 250 °C. A newly designed heat exchanger reformer has been developed by VTT (Technical Research Center of Finland LTD) and was equipped with commercially available CuO/ZnO/Al2O3 (BASF RP-60) catalyst. The liquid cooled, 165 cm2, 12-cell stack used for the measurements was supplied by Serenergy A/S. The off-heat from the electrochemical fuel cell reaction was transferred to the reforming reactor using triethylene glycol (TEG) as heat transfer fluid. The system was operated up to 0.4 A cm-2 generating an electrical power output of 427 Wel. A total stack waste heat utilization of 86.4% was achieved. It has been shown that it is possible to transfer sufficient heat from the fuel cell stack to the liquid circuit in order to provide the needed amount for vaporizing and reforming of the methanol-water-mixture. Furthermore a set of recommendations is given for future system design considerations.

  11. Viviparity and temperature-dependent sex determination.

    PubMed

    Robert, K A; Thompson, M B

    2010-01-01

    Although temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) has been a 'hot topic' for well over 30 years, the discovery of TSD in viviparous taxa is recent. Viviparity and TSD was regarded unlikely on theoretical grounds as viviparity allows for high stable developmental temperatures through maternal basking. However, pregnant squamates of many species choose different body temperatures from non-pregnant females and males, and we now know that differential temperature selection by viviparous species with TSD allows for the production of sons or daughters. Three species of squamate reptiles (all are skinks) are now know to exhibit TSD. The physiological mechanism by which viviparous reptiles control the sex of their offspring is not understood, but exposure to different operational sex ratios in the adult population is a factor in some species. The functional role of sex steroid hormones in egg yolk and how the hormones are manipulated in utero is still an area requiring detailed investigation. Fast maturing squamate reptiles provide an excellent, but as yet underutilized, model system for studying the adaptive significance of TSD, and the occurrence of TSD in viviparous species requires substantially more work on a phylogenetically diverse range of species.

  12. Detection of a plant enzyme exhibiting chlorogenate-dependant caffeoyltransferase activity in methanolic extracts of arbuscular mycorrhizal tomato roots.

    PubMed

    Negrel, Jonathan; Javelle, Francine; Morandi, Dominique

    2013-05-01

    When Glomus intraradices-colonised tomato roots were extracted in methanol at 6 °C, chlorogenic acid (5-caffeoylquinic acid), naturally present in the extract, was slowly converted by transesterification into methyl caffeate. The progress of the reaction could be monitored by HPLC. The reaction only occurred when the ground roots were left in contact with the hydro-alcoholic extract and required the presence of 15-35% water in the mixture. When the roots were extracted in ethanol, chlorogenic acid was transformed to ethyl caffeate in the same conditions. The reaction was also detected in Glomus mosseae-colonised tomato root extracts. It was also detectable in non-mycorrhizal root extracts but was 10-25 times slower. By contrast it was undetectable in extracts of the aerial parts of tomato plants, which also contain high amounts of chlorogenic acid, whether or not these plants were inoculated by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. We found that this transesterification reaction is catalysed by a tomato enzyme, which remains active in hydro-alcoholic mixtures and exhibits chlorogenate-dependant caffeoyltransferase activity in the presence of methanol or ethanol. This transferase activity is inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride. The 4- and 3-caffeoylquinic acid isomers were also used as substrates but were less active than chlorogenic acid. Highest activity was detected in mycorrhizal roots of nutrient-deprived tomato plants. Surprisingly this caffeoyltransferase activity could also be detected in hydro-alcoholic extracts of G. intraradices-colonised roots of leek, sorghum or barrel medic.

  13. Temperature dependent spin structures in Hexaferrite crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Y. C.; Lin, J. G.; Chun, S. H.; Kim, K. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the Hexaferrite Ba0.5Sr1.5Zn2Fe12O22 (BSZFO) is studied due to its interesting characteristics of long-wavelength spin structure. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is used to probe the magnetic states of BSZFO single crystal and its temperature dependence behavior is analyzed by decomposing the multiple lines of FMR spectra into various phases. Distinguished phase transition is observed at 110 K for one line, which is assigned to the ferro(ferri)-magnetic transition from non-collinear to collinear spin state.

  14. Temperature dependence of the Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Iver; Høye, Johan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Casimir force—at first, a rather unexpected consequence of quantum electrodynamics—was discovered by Hendrik Casimir in Eindhoven in 1948. It predicts that two uncharged metal plates experience an attractive force because of the zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The idea was tested experimentally in the 1950s and 1960s, but the results were not so accurate that one could make a definite conclusion regarding the existence of the effect. Evgeny Lifshitz expanded the theory in 1955 so as to deal with general dielectric media. Much experimental work was later done to test the theory’s predictions, especially with regards to the temperature dependence of the effect. The existence of the effect itself was verified beyond doubt by Sabisky and Anderson in 1973. Another quarter century had to pass before Lamoreaux and collaborators were able to confirm—or at least make plausible—the temperature dependence predicted by Lifshitz formula in combination with reasonable input data for the material’s dispersive properties. The situation is not yet clear-cut, however, there are recent experiments indicating results in disagreement with those of Lamoreaux. In this paper, a brief review is given of the status of this research field.

  15. Escherichia coli survival in waters: temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, R A; Pachepsky, Y; Hill, R L; Shelton, D R; Whelan, G

    2013-02-01

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q₁₀ model. This suggestion was made 34 years ago based on 20 survival curves taken from published literature, but has not been revisited since then. The objective of this study was to re-evaluate the accuracy of the Q₁₀ equation, utilizing data accumulated since 1978. We assembled a database of 450 E. coli survival datasets from 70 peer-reviewed papers. We then focused on the 170 curves taken from experiments that were performed in the laboratory under dark conditions to exclude the effects of sunlight and other field factors that could cause additional variability in results. All datasets were tabulated dependencies "log concentration vs. time." There were three major patterns of inactivation: about half of the datasets had a section of fast log-linear inactivation followed by a section of slow log-linear inactivation; about a quarter of the datasets had a lag period followed by log-linear inactivation; and the remaining quarter were approximately linear throughout. First-order inactivation rate constants were calculated from the linear sections of all survival curves and the data grouped by water sources, including waters of agricultural origin, pristine water sources, groundwater and wells, lakes and reservoirs, rivers and streams, estuaries and seawater, and wastewater. Dependency of E. coli inactivation rates on temperature varied among the water sources. There was a significant difference in inactivation rate values at the reference temperature between rivers and agricultural waters, wastewaters and agricultural waters, rivers and lakes, and wastewater and lakes. At specific sites, the Q₁₀ equation was more accurate in rivers and coastal waters than in lakes making the value of

  16. An introduction of CO₂ conversion by dry reforming with methane and new route of low-temperature methanol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Guohui; Tao, Kai; Yoneyama, Yoshiharu; Tan, Yisheng; Tsubaki, Noritatsu

    2013-08-20

    converted in situ via one of two main routes. The first is to use Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS), a process that catalytically converts syngas to hydrocarbons of varying molecular weights. The second is methanol synthesis. The latter has better atomic economy, since the oxygen atom in CO is included in the product and CO₂ can be blended into syngas as a reactant. However, production of methanol is very inefficient in this reaction: only 10-15% one-pass conversion typically at 5.0-10.0 MPa and 523-573 K, due to the severe thermodynamic limitations of this exothermal reaction (CO + 2H₂ = CH₃OH). In this Account, we propose and develop a new route of low-temperature methanol synthesis from CO₂-containing syngas only by adding alcohols, including methanol itself. These alcohols act as homogeneous cocatalysts and the solvent, realizing 70-100% one-pass conversion at only 5.0 MPa and 443 K. The key step is the reaction of the adsorbed formate species with alcohols to yield ester species at low temperatures, followed by the hydrogenation of ester by hydrogen atoms on metallic Cu. This changes the normal reaction path of conventional, high-temperature methanol synthesis from formate via methoxy to methanol.

  17. Effects of Shapes of Solute Molecules on Diffusion: A Study of Dependences on Solute Size, Solvent, and Temperature.

    PubMed

    Chan, T C; Li, H T; Li, K Y

    2015-12-24

    Diffusivities of basically linear, planar, and spherical solutes at infinite dilution in various solvents are studied to unravel the effects of solute shapes on diffusion. On the basis of the relationship between the reciprocal of diffusivity and the molecular volume of solute molecules with similar shape in a given solvent at constant temperature, the diffusivities of solutes of equal molecular volume but different shapes are evaluated and the effects due to different shapes of two equal-sized solute molecules on diffusion are determined. It is found that the effects are dependent on the size of the solute pairs studied. Evidence of the dependence of the solute-shape effects on solvent properties is also demonstrated and discussed. Here, some new diffusion data of aromatic compounds in methanol at different temperatures are reported. The result for methanol in this study indicates that the effects of solute shape on diffusivity are only weakly dependent on temperature.

  18. Development of molecular and solid catalysts for the direct low-temperature oxidation of methane to methanol.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, Regina; von Malotki, Christian; Baumgarten, Martin; Müllen, Klaus; Baltes, Christian; Antonietti, Markus; Kuhn, Pierre; Weber, Jens; Thomas, Arne; Schüth, Ferdi

    2010-02-22

    The direct low-temperature oxidation of methane to methanol is demonstrated on a highly active homogeneous molecular catalyst system and on heterogeneous molecular catalysts based on polymeric materials possessing ligand motifs within the material structure. The N-(2-methylpropyl)-4,5-diazacarbazolyl-dichloro-platinum(II) complex reaches significantly higher activity compared to the well-known Periana system and allows first conclusions on electronic and structural requirements for high catalytic activity in this reaction. Interestingly, comparable activities could be achieved utilizing a platinum modified poly(benzimidazole) material, which demonstrates for the first time a solid catalyst with superior activity compared to the Periana system. Although the material shows platinum leaching, improved activity and altered electronic properties, compared to the conventional Periana system, support the proposed conclusions on structure-activity relationships. In comparison, platinum modified triazine-based catalysts show lower catalytic activity, but rather stable platinum coordination even after several catalytic cycles. Based on these systems, further development of improved solid catalysts for the direct low-temperature oxidation of methane to methanol is feasible.

  19. Reduction of methanol in brewed wine by the use of atmospheric and room-temperature plasma method and the combination optimization of malt with different adjuncts.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming-Hua; Liang, Ying-Jie; Chai, Jiang-Yan; Zhou, Shi-Shui; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2014-11-01

    Methanol, often generated in brewed wine, is highly toxic for human health. To decrease the methanol content of the brewed wine, atmospheric and room-temperature plasma (ARTP) was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with lower methanol content. Headspace gas chromatography was used to determine the identity and concentration of methanol with butyl acetate as internal standard in brewed wine. With 47.4% higher and 26.3% positive mutation rates were obtained, the ARTP jet exhibited a strong effect on mutation breeding of S. cerevisiae. The mutant S. cerevisiae S12 exhibited the lowest methanol content, which was decreased by 72.54% compared with that of the wild-type strain. Subsequently, the mutant S. cerevisiae S12 was used to ferment different combinations of malt and adjuncts for lower methanol content and higher alcoholic content. It was shown that the culture 6#, which was 60% malt, 20% wheat, and 20% corn, was the best combinations of malt and adjuncts, with the lowest methanol content (104.8 mg/L), and a relatively higher alcoholic content (15.3%, v/v). The optimal malt-adjunct culture 6#, treated with the glucoamylase dose of 0.04 U/mg of grain released the highest reducing sugars (201.6 mg/mL). It was indicated that the variation in reducing sugars among the combinations of malt and different adjuncts could be due to the dose of exogenous enzymes.

  20. Mechanism for stabilizing mRNAs involved in methanol-dependent methanogenesis of cold-adaptive Methanosarcina mazei zm-15.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Li, Jie; Jiang, Na; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2014-02-01

    Methylotrophic methanogenesis predominates at low temperatures in the cold Zoige wetland in Tibet. To elucidate the basis of cold-adapted methanogenesis in these habitats, Methanosarcina mazei zm-15 was isolated, and the molecular basis of its cold activity was studied. For this strain, aceticlastic methanogenesis was reduced 7.7-fold during growth at 15°C versus 30°C. Methanol-derived methanogenesis decreased only 3-fold under the same conditions, suggesting that it is more cold adaptive. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) detected <2-fold difference in the transcript abundances of mtaA1, mtaB1, and mtaC1, the methanol methyltransferase (Mta) genes, in 30°C versus 15°C culture, while ackA and pta mRNAs, encoding acetate kinase (Ack) and phosphotransacetylase (Pta) in aceticlastic methanogenesis, were 4.5- and 6.8-fold higher in 30°C culture than in 15°C culture. The in vivo half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs were similar in 30°C and 15°C cultures. However, the pta-ackA mRNA half-life was significantly reduced in 15°C culture compared to 30°C culture. Using circularized RNA RT-PCR, large 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) (270 nucleotides [nt] and 238 nt) were identified for mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs, while only a 27-nt 5' UTR was present in the pta-ackA transcript. Removal of the 5' UTRs significantly reduced the in vitro half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs. Remarkably, fusion of the mtaA1 or mtaC1B1 5' UTRs to pta-ackA mRNA increased its in vitro half-life at both 30°C and 15°C. These results demonstrate that the large 5' UTRs significantly enhance the stability of the mRNAs involved in methanol-derived methanogenesis in the cold-adaptive M. mazei zm-15.

  1. Mechanism for Stabilizing mRNAs Involved in Methanol-Dependent Methanogenesis of Cold-Adaptive Methanosarcina mazei zm-15

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yi; Li, Jie; Jiang, Na

    2014-01-01

    Methylotrophic methanogenesis predominates at low temperatures in the cold Zoige wetland in Tibet. To elucidate the basis of cold-adapted methanogenesis in these habitats, Methanosarcina mazei zm-15 was isolated, and the molecular basis of its cold activity was studied. For this strain, aceticlastic methanogenesis was reduced 7.7-fold during growth at 15°C versus 30°C. Methanol-derived methanogenesis decreased only 3-fold under the same conditions, suggesting that it is more cold adaptive. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) detected <2-fold difference in the transcript abundances of mtaA1, mtaB1, and mtaC1, the methanol methyltransferase (Mta) genes, in 30°C versus 15°C culture, while ackA and pta mRNAs, encoding acetate kinase (Ack) and phosphotransacetylase (Pta) in aceticlastic methanogenesis, were 4.5- and 6.8-fold higher in 30°C culture than in 15°C culture. The in vivo half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs were similar in 30°C and 15°C cultures. However, the pta-ackA mRNA half-life was significantly reduced in 15°C culture compared to 30°C culture. Using circularized RNA RT-PCR, large 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) (270 nucleotides [nt] and 238 nt) were identified for mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs, while only a 27-nt 5′ UTR was present in the pta-ackA transcript. Removal of the 5′ UTRs significantly reduced the in vitro half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs. Remarkably, fusion of the mtaA1 or mtaC1B1 5′ UTRs to pta-ackA mRNA increased its in vitro half-life at both 30°C and 15°C. These results demonstrate that the large 5′ UTRs significantly enhance the stability of the mRNAs involved in methanol-derived methanogenesis in the cold-adaptive M. mazei zm-15. PMID:24317083

  2. Temperature dependent nonlinear metal matrix laminae behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, D. J.; Buesking, K. W.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical method is described for computing the nonlinear thermal and mechanical response of laminated plates. The material model focuses upon the behavior of metal matrix materials by relating the nonlinear composite response to plasticity effects in the matrix. The foundation of the analysis is the unidirectional material model which is used to compute the instantaneous properties of the lamina based upon the properties of the fibers and matrix. The unidirectional model assumes that the fibers properties are constant with temperature and assumes that the matrix can be modelled as a temperature dependent, bilinear, kinematically hardening material. An incremental approach is used to compute average stresses in the fibers and matrix caused by arbitrary mechanical and thermal loads. The layer model is incorporated in an incremental laminated plate theory to compute the nonlinear response of laminated metal matrix composites of general orientation and stacking sequence. The report includes comparisons of the method with other analytical approaches and compares theoretical calculations with measured experimental material behavior. A section is included which describes the limitations of the material model.

  3. The application of diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption to investigate the interaction of methanol on eta-alumina.

    PubMed

    McInroy, Alastair R; Lundie, David T; Winfield, John M; Dudman, Chris C; Jones, Peter; Lennon, David

    2005-11-22

    The adsorption of methanol and its subsequent transformation to form dimethyl ether (DME) on a commercial grade eta-alumina catalyst has been investigated using a combination of mass selective temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The infrared spectrum of a saturated overlayer of methanol on eta-alumina shows the surface to be comprised of associatively adsorbed methanol and chemisorbed methoxy species. TPD shows methanol and DME to desorb with respective maxima at 380 and 480 K, with desorption detectable for both molecules up to ca. 700 K. At 673 K, infrared spectroscopy reveals the formation of a formate species; the spectral line width of the antisymmetric C-O stretch indicates the adoption of a high symmetry adsorbed state. Conventional TPD using a tubular reactor, combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the gas stream exiting the IR cell, indicate hydrogen and methane evolution to be associated with formation of the surface formate group and CO evolution with its decomposition. A reaction scheme is proposed for the generation and decomposition of this important reaction intermediate. The overall processes involved in (i) the adsorption/desorption of methanol, (ii) the transformation of methanol to DME, and (iii) the formation and decomposition of formate species are discussed within the context of a recently developed four-site model for the Lewis acidity of eta-alumina.

  4. DFT study of the active site of the XoxF-type natural, cerium-dependent methanol dehydrogenase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Justin A; Lewis, Andrew J; Schelter, Eric J

    2015-01-19

    Rare-earth metal cations have recently been demonstrated to be essential co-factors for the growth of the methanotrophic bacterium Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV. A crystal structure of the rare-earth-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) includes a cerium cation in the active site. Herein, the Ce-MDH active site has been analyzed through DFT calculations. The results show the stability of the Ce(III)-pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) semiquinone configuration. Calculations on the active oxidized form of this complex indicate a 0.81 eV stabilization of the PQQ(0) LUMO at cerium versus calcium, supporting the observation that the cerium cation in the active site confers a competitive advantage to Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV. Using reported aqueous electrochemical data, a semi-empirical correlation was established based on cerium(IV/III) redox potentials. The correlation allowed estimation of the cerium oxidation potential of +1.35 V versus saturated calomel electrode (SCE) in the active site. The results are expected to guide the design of functional model complexes and alcohol-oxidation catalysts based on lanthanide complexes of biologically relevant quinones.

  5. Improving Performance and Operational Stability of Porcine Interferon-α Production by Pichia pastoris with Combinational Induction Strategy of Low Temperature and Methanol/Sorbitol Co-feeding.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min-Jie; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Xu; Dong, Shi-Juan; Li, Zhen; Shi, Zhong-Ping; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2015-05-01

    Various induction strategies were investigated for effective porcine interferon-α (pIFN-α) production by Pichia pastoris in a 10 L fermenter. We found that pIFN-α concentration could be significantly improved with the strategies of low-temperature induction or methanol/sorbitol co-feeding. On this basis, a combinational strategy of induction at lower temperature (20 °C) with methanol/sorbitol co-feeding has been proposed for improvement of pIFN-α production. The results reveal that maximal pIFN-α concentration and antiviral activity reach the highest level of 2.7 g/L and 1.8 × 10(7) IU/mg with the proposed induction strategy, about 1.3-2.1 folds higher than those obtained with other sub-optimal induction strategies. Metabolic analysis and online multi-variable measurement results indicate that energy metabolic enrichment is responsible for the performance enhancement of pIFN-α production, as a large amount of ATP could be simultaneously produced from both formaldehyde oxidation pathway in methanol metabolism and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in sorbitol metabolism. In addition, the proposed combinational induction strategy enables P. pastoris to be resistant to high methanol concentration (42 g/L), which conceivably occur associating with the error-prone methanol over-feeding. As a result, the proposed combinational induction strategy simultaneously increased the targeted protein concentration and operational stability leading to significant improvement of pIFN-α production.

  6. An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

    2014-03-01

    Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

  7. Temperature-dependent spectral mismatch corrections

    DOE PAGES

    Osterwald, Carl R.; Campanelli, Mark; Moriarty, Tom; ...

    2015-11-01

    This study develops the mathematical foundation for a translation of solar cell short-circuit current from one thermal and spectral irradiance operating condition to another without the use of ill-defined and error-prone temperature coefficients typically employed in solar cell metrology. Using the partial derivative of quantum efficiency with respect to temperature, the conventional isothermal expression for spectral mismatch corrections is modified to account for changes of current due to temperature; this modification completely eliminates the need for short-circuit-current temperature coefficients. An example calculation is provided to demonstrate use of the new translation.

  8. Water temperature dependence of single bubble sonoluminescence threshold.

    PubMed

    Germano, M; Alippi, A; Bettucci, A; Brizi, F; Passeri, D

    2010-01-01

    Water temperature dependence of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) threshold has been experimentally measured to perform measurements at different temperatures on the very same bubble. Results show lower thresholds, i.e. an easier prime of mechanism, of sonoluminescence at lower water temperatures. Dependence is almost linear at lower temperatures while between 14 degrees C and about 20 degrees C the curve changes its slope reaching soon a virtual independence from water temperature above about 20 degrees C.

  9. Modeling temperature dependence of trace element concentrations in groundwater using temperature dependent distribution coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, H.; Saito, T.; Hamamoto, S.; Komatsu, T.

    2015-12-01

    In our previous study, we have observed trace element concentrations in groundwater increased when groundwater temperature was increased with constant thermal loading using a 50-m long vertical heat exchanger installed at Saitama University, Japan. During the field experiment, 38 degree C fluid was circulated in the heat exchanger resulting 2.8 kW thermal loading over 295 days. Groundwater samples were collected regularly from 17-m and 40-m deep aquifers at four observation wells located 1, 2, 5, and 10 m, respectively, from the heat exchange well and were analyzed with ICP-MS. As a result, concentrations of some trace elements such as boron increased with temperature especially at the 17-m deep aquifer that is known as marine sediment. It has been also observed that the increased concentrations have decreased after the thermal loading was terminated indicating that this phenomenon may be reversible. Although the mechanism is not fully understood, changes in the liquid phase concentration should be associated with dissolution and/or desorption from the solid phase. We therefore attempt to model this phenomenon by introducing temperature dependence in equilibrium linear adsorption isotherms. We assumed that distribution coefficients decrease with temperature so that the liquid phase concentration of a given element becomes higher as the temperature increases under the condition that the total mass stays constant. A shape function was developed to model the temperature dependence of the distribution coefficient. By solving the mass balance equation between the liquid phase and the solid phase for a given element, a new term describing changes in the concentration was implemented in a source/sink term of a standard convection dispersion equation (CDE). The CDE was then solved under a constant ground water flow using FlexPDE. By calibrating parameters in the newly developed shape function, the changes in element concentrations observed were quite well predicted. The

  10. AlN Bandgap Temperature Dependence from its Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-07

    In the present work we report on the AlN gap energy temperature dependence studied through the optical properties of high-quality large bulk AlN...evolution of these features up to room temperature and inferred the gap energy temperature dependence using the exciton binding energy obtained by our group in the past.

  11. Temperature Dependent Frictional Properties of Crustal Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Erica Kate

    In this dissertation, I study the effects of temperature on frictional properties of crustal rocks at conditions relevant to earthquake nucleation. I explore how temperature affects fault healing after an earthquake. I present results from slide-hold-slide experiments on Westerly granite that show that frictional healing rate increases slightly and shear strength increases with temperature. Based on our results, if the effects of temperature are neglected, fault strength could be under-predicted by as much as 10 percent. I use finite element numerical experiments to show that our frictional healing data can be explained by increases in contact area between viscoelastic rough surfaces. I investigate the influence of temperature on the transition from seismogenic slip to aseismic creep with depth in continental crust. I present results from velocity-stepping and constant load-point velocity experiments on Westerly granite conducted at a wide range of temperatures. I construct a numerical model incorporating the rate-state friction equations to estimate the values of (a-b) that provide the best fit to the stick-slip data. I find that sliding becomes more unstable ((a-b) < 0) with temperature up to the maximum temperature tested, 600 ºC. This contradicts a traditional view that the deep limit to seismicity in continental upper crust is caused by a transition to stable creep ((a-b) > 0) in granite at temperatures above ˜350 ºC. These results may help explain the occurrence of anomalously deep earthquakes found in areas of active extension and convergence. I explore the frictional properties of gabbro at conditions corresponding to slow slip events in subduction zones. I present results from experiments on gabbro conducted at low effective normal stress and temperatures between 20-600 ºC. I find that (a-b) decreases with temperature based on direct measurements and numerical modeling. I conclude that the occurrence of slow slip events at the base of the seismogenic

  12. Temperature Dependence of Phonons in Pyrolitic Graphite

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, B. N.; Shirane, G.

    1977-01-01

    Dispersion curves for longitudinal and transverse phonons propagating along and near the c-axis in pyrolitic graphite at temperatures between 4°K and 1500°C have been measured by neutron spectroscopy. The observed frequencies decrease markedly with increasing temperature (except for the transverse optical ''rippling'' modes in the hexagonal planes). The neutron groups show interesting asymmetrical broadening ascribed to interference between one phonon and many phonon processes.

  13. Temperature dependence of interaction-induced entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Khasin, Michael; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2005-11-15

    Both direct and indirect weak nonresonant interactions are shown to produce entanglement between two initially disentangled systems prepared as a tensor product of thermal states, provided the initial temperature is sufficiently low. Entanglement is determined by the Peres-Horodecki criterion, which establishes that a composite state is entangled if its partial transpose is not positive. If the initial temperature of the thermal states is higher than an upper critical value T{sub uc} the minimal eigenvalue of the partially transposed density matrix of the composite state remains positive in the course of the evolution. If the initial temperature of the thermal states is lower than a lower critical value T{sub lc}{<=}T{sub uc} the minimal eigenvalue of the partially transposed density matrix of the composite state becomes negative, which means that entanglement develops. We calculate the lower bound T{sub lb} for T{sub lc} and show that the negativity of the composite state is negligibly small in the interval T{sub lb}temperature T{sub lb} can be considered as the critical temperature for the generation of entanglement. It is conjectured that above this critical temperature a composite quantum system could be simulated using classical computers.

  14. Electro-osmotic drag coefficient of water and methanol in polymer electrolytes at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, D.; Wainright, J.S.; Landau, U.; Savinell, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    The electro-osmotic drag coefficient of water in two polymer electrolytes was experimentally determined as a function of water activity and current density for temperatures up to 200 C. The results show that the electro-osmotic drag coefficient varies from 0.2 to 0.6 in Nafion{reg_sign}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} membrane electrolyte, but is essentially zero in phosphoric acid-doped PBI (polybenzimidazole) membrane electrolyte over the range of water activity considered. The near-zero electro-osmotic drag coefficient found in PBI indicates that this electrolyte should lessen the problems associated with water redistribution in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  15. Temperature dependent behavior of ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Mulvana, Helen; Stride, Eleanor; Hajnal, Jo V; Eckersley, Robert J

    2010-06-01

    Recent interest in ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) as tools for quantitative imaging and therapy has increased the need for accurate characterization. Laboratory investigations are frequently undertaken in a water bath at room temperature; however, implications for in vivo applications are not presented. Acoustic investigation of a bulk suspension of SonoVue (Bracco Research, Geneva, Switzerland) was made in a water bath at temperatures of 20-45 degrees C. UCA characteristics were significantly affected by temperature, particularly between 20 and 40 degrees C, leading to an increase in attenuation from 1.7-2.5 dB, respectively (p = 0.002) and a 2-dB increase in scattered signal over the same range (p = 0.05) at an insonation pressure of 100 kPa. Optical data supported the hypothesis that a temperature-mediated increase in diameter was the dominant cause, and revealed a decrease in bubble stability. In conclusion, measurements made at room temperature require careful interpretation with regard to behavior in vivo.

  16. Temperature Dependence of Lithium Reactions with Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrod, Roman; Skinner, C. H.; Koel, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Liquid lithium plasma facing components (PFCs) are being developed to handle long pulse, high heat loads in tokamaks. Wetting by lithium of its container is essential for this application, but can be hindered by lithium oxidation by residual gases or during tokamak maintenance. Lithium PFCs will experience elevated temperatures due to plasma heat flux. This work presents measurements of lithium reactions at elevated temperatures (298-373 K) when exposed to natural air. Cylindrical TZM wells 300 microns deep with 1 cm2 surface area were filled with metallic lithium in a glovebox containing argon with less than 1.6 ppm H20, O2, and N2. The wells were transferred to a hot plate in air, and then removed periodically for mass gain measurements. Changes in the surface topography were recorded with a microscope. The mass gain of the samples at elevated temperatures followed a markedly different behavior to that at room temperature. One sample at 373 K began turning red indicative of lithium nitride, while a second turned white indicative of lithium carbonate formation. Data on the mass gain vs. temperature and associated topographic changes of the surface will be presented. Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship funded by Department of Energy.

  17. Temperature Dependent Residual Stress Models for Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramics on High Temperature Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruzhuan; Li, Weiguo

    2016-11-01

    The strength of SiC-depleted layer of ultra-high-temperature ceramics on high temperature oxidation degrades seriously. The research for residual stresses developed within the SiC-depleted layer is important and necessary. In this work, the residual stress evolutions in the SiC-depleted layer and the unoxidized substrate in various stages of oxidation are studied by using the characterization models. The temperature and oxidation time dependent mechanical/thermal properties of each phase in SiC-depleted layer are considered in the models. The study shows that the SiC-depleted layer would suffer from large tensile stresses due to the great temperature changes and the formation of pores on high temperature oxidation. The stresses may lead to the cracking and even the delamination of the oxidation layer.

  18. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF LINE STRUCTURE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE EDGE EMISSION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The temperature dependence of the line structure in Cds edge emission stimulated by UV light was investigated from 4.2 K to 367 K. The spectral... dependence of the primary line groups is a linear function of temperature above 220 K with coefficients of change of 1.27 and 1.8 Angstroms degree K for the...lines observed. Below 220 K the dependence departs from linearity and approaches its limiting value more rapidly with decreasing temperature

  19. Quasipermanent magnets of high temperature superconductor - Temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, In-Gann; Liu, Jianxiong; Ren, Yanru; Weinstein, Roy; Kozlowski, Gregory; Oberly, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    We report on persistent field in quasi-permanent magnets of high temperature superconductors. Magnets composed of irradiated Y(1+)Ba2Cu3O7 trapped field Bt = 1.52 T at 77 K and 1.9 T at lower temperature. However, the activation magnet limited Bt at lower temperature. We present data on Jc(H,T) for unirradiated materials, and calculate Bt at various T. Based upon data at 65 K, we calculate Bt in unirradiated single grains at 20 K and find that 5.2 T will be trapped for grain diameter d about 1.2 cm, and 7.9 T for d = 2.3 cm. Irradiated grains will trap four times these values.

  20. Temperature dependence of soil water potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, S.C.H. )

    1992-12-01

    To understand the process of coupled heat and water transport, the relationship between temperature and soil water potential must be known. Two clays, Avonlea bentonite and Lake Agassiz clay, are being considered as the clay-based sealing materials for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. Avonlea bentonite is distinguished from Lake Agassiz clay by its high sealing potential in water. A series of experiments was performed in which the two clays were mixed with equal amounts of sand and were compacted to a dry density of 1.67 Mg/m[sup 3] under various moisture contents and temperatures. A psychrometer was placed within the compacted clay-sand to measure the soil water potential based on the electromotive force measured by the psychrometer. The results indicate that the soil water potential at a particular temperature is higher for both clay-sand mixtures than predicted by the change in the surface tension of water; this effect is much more prominent in the Avonlea bentonite and at low moisture contents. The paper presents empirical equations relating the soil water potential with the moisture content and temperature of the two clay-sand mixtures. 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Temperature-dependent Study of Isobutanol Decomposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    conventional petrol becomes increasingly more fervent. New legislations and pressure is being forced on the fuel industry to reduce America’s dependence on...A. R.; Sakai, S.; Devasher, R. B. Time Resolved FTIR Analysis of Combustion of Ethanol, E85, and Gasoline in an Internal Combustion Engine . Rose

  2. Temperature dependent terahertz properties of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Abul K.; Whitley, Von H.; Brown, Kathryn E.; Ahmed, Towfiq; Sorensen, Christian J.; Moore, David S.

    2016-04-01

    Reliable detection of energetic materials is still a formidable challenge which requires further investigation. The remote standoff detection of explosives using molecular fingerprints in the terahertz spectral range has been an evolving research area for the past two decades. Despite many efforts, identification of a particular explosive remains difficult as the spectral fingerprints often shift due to the working conditions of the sample such as temperature, crystal orientation, presence of binders, etc. In this work, we investigate the vibrational spectrum of energetic materials including RDX, PETN, AN, and 1,3-DNB diluted in a low loss PTFE host medium using terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) at cryogenic temperatures. The measured absorptions of these materials show spectral shifts of their characteristic peaks while changing their operating temperature from 300 to 7.5 K. We have developed a theoretical model based on first principles methods, which is able to predict most of the measured modes in 1, 3-DNB between 0.3 to 2.50 THz. These findings may further improve the security screening of explosives.

  3. Temperature dependence of the internal friction of polycrystalline indium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, K. V.; Golyandin, S. N.; Kustov, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    The temperature dependences of the internal friction and the elastic modulus of polycrystalline indium have been investigated in the temperature range 7-320 K at oscillatory loading frequencies of approximately 100 kHz. The effect of temperature on the amplitude dependence and the effect of high-amplitude loading at 7 K on the temperature and amplitude dependences of the internal friction of indium have been analyzed. It has been demonstrated that the thermocycling leads to microplastic deformation of indium due to the anisotropy of thermal expansion and the appearance of a "recrystallization" maximum in the spectrum of the amplitude-dependent internal friction. The conclusion has been drawn that the bulk diffusion of vacancies and impurities begins at temperatures of approximately 90 K and that, at lower temperatures, the diffusion occurs in the vicinity of dislocations. It has been revealed that the high-temperature internal friction background becomes noticeable after the dissolution of Cottrell atmospheres.

  4. Temperature dependent heterogeneous rotational correlation in lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadashvand, Neda; Othon, Christina M.

    2016-12-01

    Lipid structures exhibit complex and highly dynamic lateral structure; and changes in lipid density and fluidity are believed to play an essential role in membrane targeting and function. The dynamic structure of liquids on the molecular scale can exhibit complex transient density fluctuations. Here the lateral heterogeneity of lipid dynamics is explored in free standing lipid monolayers. As the temperature is lowered the probes exhibit increasingly broad and heterogeneous rotational correlation. This increase in heterogeneity appears to exhibit a critical onset, similar to those observed for glass forming fluids. We explore heterogeneous relaxation in in a single constituent lipid monolayer of 1, 2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine by measuring the rotational diffusion of a fluorescent probe (1-palmitoyl-2-[1]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), which is embedded in the lipid monolayer at low labeling density. Dynamic distributions are measured using wide-field time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. The observed relaxation exhibits a narrow, liquid-like distribution at high temperatures (τ ˜ 2.4 ns), consistent with previous experimental measures (Dadashvand et al 2014 Struct. Dyn. 1 054701, Loura and Ramalho 2007 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1768 467-478). However, as the temperature is quenched, the distribution broadens, and we observe the appearance of a long relaxation population (τ ˜ 16.5 ns). This supports the heterogeneity observed for lipids at high packing densities, and demonstrates that the nanoscale diffusion and reorganization in lipid structures can be significantly complex, even in the simplest amorphous architectures. Dynamical heterogeneity of this form can have a significant impact on the organization, permeability and energetics of lipid membrane structures.

  5. Temperature dependent heterogeneous rotational correlation in lipids.

    PubMed

    Dadashvand, Neda; Othon, Christina M

    2016-11-15

    Lipid structures exhibit complex and highly dynamic lateral structure; and changes in lipid density and fluidity are believed to play an essential role in membrane targeting and function. The dynamic structure of liquids on the molecular scale can exhibit complex transient density fluctuations. Here the lateral heterogeneity of lipid dynamics is explored in free standing lipid monolayers. As the temperature is lowered the probes exhibit increasingly broad and heterogeneous rotational correlation. This increase in heterogeneity appears to exhibit a critical onset, similar to those observed for glass forming fluids. We explore heterogeneous relaxation in in a single constituent lipid monolayer of 1, 2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine  by measuring the rotational diffusion of a fluorescent probe (1-palmitoyl-2-[1]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), which is embedded in the lipid monolayer at low labeling density. Dynamic distributions are measured using wide-field time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. The observed relaxation exhibits a narrow, liquid-like distribution at high temperatures (τ ∼ 2.4 ns), consistent with previous experimental measures (Dadashvand et al 2014 Struct. Dyn. 1 054701, Loura and Ramalho 2007 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1768 467-478). However, as the temperature is quenched, the distribution broadens, and we observe the appearance of a long relaxation population (τ ∼ 16.5 ns). This supports the heterogeneity observed for lipids at high packing densities, and demonstrates that the nanoscale diffusion and reorganization in lipid structures can be significantly complex, even in the simplest amorphous architectures. Dynamical heterogeneity of this form can have a significant impact on the organization, permeability and energetics of lipid membrane structures.

  6. Temperature-dependent fluorescence in nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Li-Xia; Lou, Qing; Zang, Jin-Hao; Shan, Chong-Xin; Gao, Yuan-Fei

    2017-02-01

    Here, we report that nanodiamonds (NDs) exhibit blue fluorescence with an emission peak at around 400 nm. With increasing temperature, the peak energy of fluorescence was found to demonstrate a blue shift, possibly due to excited excitons populating higher-energy states, such as oxidation defect states. The intensity evolution of the fluorescence was attributed to a thermally activated process. Moreover, the bandwidth of fluorescence also increased because of exciton–phonon interactions and ionized impurity scattering. The above results indicate that the fluorescence of NDs could originate from radiative recombination through intrinsic transitions between highly localized π states.

  7. Antioxidant Activity and ROS-Dependent Apoptotic Effect of Scurrula ferruginea (Jack) Danser Methanol Extract in Human Breast Cancer Cell MDA-MB-231

    PubMed Central

    Marvibaigi, Mohsen; Amini, Neda; Supriyanto, Eko; Abdul Majid, Fadzilah Adibah; Kumar Jaganathan, Saravana; Jamil, Shajarahtunnur; Hamzehalipour Almaki, Javad; Nasiri, Rozita

    2016-01-01

    Scurrula ferruginea (Jack) Danser is one of the mistletoe species belonging to Loranthaceae family, which grows on the branches of many deciduous trees in tropical countries. This study evaluated the antioxidant activities of S. ferruginea extracts. The cytotoxic activity of the selected extracts, which showed potent antioxidant activities, and high phenolic and flavonoid contents, were investigated in human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) and non-cancer human skin fibroblast cells (HSF-1184). The activities and characteristics varied depending on the different parts of S. ferruginea, solvent polarity, and concentrations of extracts. The stem methanol extract showed the highest amount of both phenolic (273.51 ± 4.84 mg gallic acid/g extract) and flavonoid contents (163.41 ± 4.62 mg catechin/g extract) and strong DPPH• radical scavenging (IC50 = 27.81 μg/mL) and metal chelation activity (IC50 = 80.20 μg/mL). The stem aqueous extract showed the highest ABTS•+ scavenging ability. The stem methanol and aqueous extracts exhibited dose-dependent cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-231 cells with IC50 of 19.27 and 50.35 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, the extracts inhibited the migration and colony formation of MDA-MB-231 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Morphological observations revealed hallmark properties of apoptosis in treated cells. The methanol extract induced an increase in ROS generation and mitochondrial depolarization in MDA-MB-231 cells, suggesting its potent apoptotic activity. The present study demonstrated that the S. ferruginea methanol extract mediated MDA-MB-231 cell growth inhibition via induction of apoptosis which was confirmed by Western blot analysis. It may be a potential anticancer agent; however, its in vivo anticancer activity needs to be investigated. PMID:27410459

  8. Temperature dependence of heterogeneous nucleation: Extension of the Fletcher model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Robert; Winkler, Paul; Wagner, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Recently there have been several cases reported where the critical saturation ratio for onset of heterogeneous nucleation increases with nucleation temperature (positive slope dependence). This behavior contrasts with the behavior observed in homogeneous nucleation, where a decreasing critical saturation ratio with increasing nucleation temperature (negative slope dependence) seems universal. For this reason the positive slope dependence is referred to as anomalous. Negative slope dependence is found in heterogeneous nucleation as well, but because so few temperature-dependent measurements have been reported, it is not presently clear which slope condition (positive or negative) will become more frequent. Especially interesting is the case of water vapor condensation on silver nanoparticles [Kupc et al., AS&T 47: i-iv, 2013] where the critical saturation ratio for heterogeneous nucleation onset passes through a maximum, at about 278K, with higher (lower) temperatures showing the usual (anomalous) temperature dependence. In the present study we develop an extension of Fletcher's classical, capillarity-based, model of heterogeneous nucleation that explicitly resolves the roles of surface energy and surface entropy in determining temperature dependence. Application of the second nucleation theorem, which relates temperature dependence of nucleation rate to cluster energy, yields both necessary and sufficient conditions for anomalous temperature behavior in the extended Fletcher model. In particular it is found that an increasing contact angle with temperature is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for anomalous temperature dependence to occur. Methods for inferring microscopic contact angle and its temperature dependence from heterogeneous nucleation probability measurements are discussed in light of the new theory.

  9. Crossing regimes of temperature dependence in animal movement.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Jean P; Chelini, Marie-Claire; Rosenthal, Malcolm F; DeLong, John P

    2016-05-01

    A pressing challenge in ecology is to understand the effects of changing global temperatures on food web structure and dynamics. The stability of these complex ecological networks largely depends on how predator-prey interactions may respond to temperature changes. Because predators and prey rely on their velocities to catch food or avoid being eaten, understanding how temperatures may affect animal movement is central to this quest. Despite our efforts, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of how the effect of temperature on metabolic processes scales up to animal movement and beyond. Here, we merge a biomechanical approach, the Metabolic Theory of Ecology and empirical data to show that animal movement displays multiple regimes of temperature dependence. We also show that crossing these regimes has important consequences for population dynamics and stability, which depend on the parameters controlling predator-prey interactions. We argue that this dependence upon interaction parameters may help explain why experimental work on the temperature dependence of interaction strengths has so far yielded conflicting results. More importantly, these changes in the temperature dependence of animal movement can have consequences that go well beyond ecological interactions and affect, for example, animal communication, mating, sensory detection, and any behavioral modality dependent on the movement of limbs. Finally, by not taking into account the changes in temperature dependence reported here we might not be able to properly forecast the impact of global warming on ecological processes and propose appropriate mitigation action when needed.

  10. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE ANTIFERROMAGNETIC ANISOTROPY IN MNF2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Existing data on the temperature dependence of the sublattice magnetization and of the antiferromagnetic resonance frequency of MnF2, together with...new antiferromagnetic resonance data, are used to determine the temperature dependence of the antiferromagnetic anisotropy energy. The experimental

  11. The Temperature Dependence of the Viscosity of Simple Liquids,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The purpose of the work is investigation of the temperature dependence of the viscosity of simple liquids on the basis of the molecular-kinetic...theory. In literature there is vast experimental material on the investigation of the viscosity of liquids and its temperature dependence both based on the

  12. Selecting temperature for protein crystallization screens using the temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Yin, Da-Chuan; Guo, Yun-Zhu; Wang, Xi-Kai; Xie, Si-Xiao; Lu, Qin-Qin; Liu, Yong-Ming

    2011-03-30

    Protein crystals usually grow at a preferable temperature which is however not known for a new protein. This paper reports a new approach for determination of favorable crystallization temperature, which can be adopted to facilitate the crystallization screening process. By taking advantage of the correlation between the temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient (B(22)) and the solubility of protein, we measured the temperature dependence of B(22) to predict the temperature dependence of the solubility. Using information about solubility versus temperature, a preferred crystallization temperature can be proposed. If B(22) is a positive function of the temperature, a lower crystallization temperature is recommended; if B(22) shows opposite behavior with respect to the temperature, a higher crystallization temperature is preferred. Otherwise, any temperature in the tested range can be used.

  13. Temperature dependence of the excited state absorption of alexandrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Jenssen, H.P.

    1983-03-01

    The temperature dependence from 28 to 290/sup 0/C of the excited-state absorption cross section sigma /SUB 2a/ (E) in the gain wavelength region of alexandrite has been determined from the temperature dependence of the single pass gain (SPG) and of the fluorescence. sigma /SUB 2a/ (E) and the emission cross section increase with temperature at approximately the same rate.

  14. NMR-based microbial metabolomics and the temperature-dependent coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus.

    PubMed

    Boroujerdi, Arezue F B; Vizcaino, Maria I; Meyers, Alexander; Pollock, Elizabeth C; Huynh, Sara Lien; Schock, Tracey B; Morris, Pamela J; Bearden, Daniel W

    2009-10-15

    Coral bleaching occurs when the symbioses between coral animals and their zooxanthellae is disrupted, either as part of a natural cycle or as the result of unusual events. The bacterium Vibrio coralliilyticus (type strain ATCC BAA-450) has been linked to coral disease globally (for example in the Mediterranean, Red Sea, Indian Ocean, and Great Barrier Reef) and like many other Vibrio species exhibits a temperature-dependent pathogenicity. The temperature-dependence of V. corallillyticus in regard to its metabolome was investigated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained of methanol-water extracts of intracellula rmetabolites (endometabolome) from multiple samples of the bacteria cultured into late stationary phase at 27 degrees C (virulent form) and 24 degrees C (avirulent form). The spectra were subjected to principal components analysis (PCA), and significant temperature-based separations in PC1, PC2, and PC3 dimensions were observed. Betaine, succinate, and glutamate were identified as metabolites that caused the greatest temperature-based separations in the PC scores plots. With increasing temperature, betaine was shown to be down regulated, while succinate and glutamate were up regulated.

  15. Temperature dependence of DNA condensation at high ionic concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wei; Gao, Qingqing; Liu, Yanhui; Fan, Yangtao; Hu, Lin; Xu, Houqiang

    2016-08-01

    A series of experiments pointed out that compact states of DNA condensed by multivalent cation prefer higher temperature. The condensed DNA takes elongated coil or compact globule states and the population of the compact globule states increases with an increase in temperature. At the same time, a recent experimental work carried out in buffer solution without multivalent cation points out that DNA persistence length strongly depends on the temperature. DNA persistence length is a key parameter for quantitative interpretation of the conformational properties of DNA and related to the bending rigidity of DNA. It is necessary to revolve the effects of temperature dependence of persistence length on DNA condensation, and a model including the temperature dependence of persistence length and strong correlation of multivalent cation on DNA is provided. The autocorrelation function of the tangent vectors is found as an effective way to detect the temperature dependence of toroid conformations. With an increase in temperature, the first periodic oscillation in the autocorrelation function shifts left and the number of segments containing the first periodic oscillation decreases gradually. According to the experiments mentioned above, the long-axis length is defined to estimate the temperature dependence of condensation process further. At the temperatures defined in experiments mentioned above, the relation between long-axis length and temperature matches the experimental results.

  16. Temperature dependence of the zeta potential in intact natural carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mahrouqi, Dawoud; Vinogradov, Jan; Jackson, Matthew D.

    2016-11-01

    The zeta potential is a measure of the electrical charge on mineral surfaces and is an important control on subsurface geophysical monitoring, adsorption of polar species in aquifers, and rock wettability. We report the first measurements of zeta potential in intact, water-saturated, natural carbonate samples at temperatures up to 120°C. The zeta potential is negative and decreases in magnitude with increasing temperature at low ionic strength (0.01 M NaCl, comparable to potable water) but is independent of temperature at high ionic strength (0.5 M NaCl, comparable to seawater). The equilibrium calcium concentration resulting from carbonate dissolution also increases with increasing temperature at low ionic strength but is independent of temperature at high ionic strength. The temperature dependence of the zeta potential is correlated with the temperature dependence of the equilibrium calcium concentration and shows a Nernstian linear relationship. Our findings are applicable to many subsurface carbonate rocks at elevated temperature.

  17. Climate change and temperature-dependent sex determination in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Janzen, F J

    1994-08-02

    Despite increasing concern over the possible impact of global temperature change, there is little empirical evidence of direct temperature effects on biotic interactions in natural systems. Clear assessment of the ecological and evolutionary impact of changing climatic temperature requires a natural system in which populations exhibit a direct unambiguous fitness response to thermal fluctuation. I monitored nests of a population of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) with temperature-dependent sex determination to investigate the causal relationship between local climatic variation in temperature and offspring sex ratio. Consistent with theoretical predictions, annual offspring sex ratio was highly correlated with mean July air temperature, validating concerns about the effect of climate change on population demography. This correlation implies that even modest increases in mean temperature (< 2 degrees C) may drastically skew the sex ratio. Statistical evaluation of the variance in climate change indicates that an increase in mean temperature of 4 degrees C would effectively eliminate production of male offspring. Quantitative genetic analyses and behavioral data suggest that populations with temperature-dependent sex determination may be unable to evolve rapidly enough to counteract the negative fitness consequences of rapid global temperature change. Populations of species with temperature-dependent sex determination may serve as ideal indicators of the biological impact of global temperature change.

  18. Position dependent analysis of membrane electrode assembly degradation of a direct methanol fuel cell via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Zamel, Nada; Gerteisen, Dietmar

    2013-11-01

    The performance of a direct methanol fuel cell MEA degraded during an operational period of more than 3000 h in a stack is locally examined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Therefore, after disassembling the MEA is cut into small pieces and analyzed in a 1 cm2 test cell. Using a reference electrode, we were capable of measuring the anode and cathode spectra separately. The spectra of the segments at different positions do not follow a specified trend from methanol inlet to outlet of the stack flow field. The anode spectra were analyzed with an equivalent circuit simulation. The conductance of the charge transfer was found to increase with current density up to a point where a raising limitation process of the complex methanol oxidation dominates, which is not a bottleneck at low current density. Further, an increase of the double layer capacitance with current density was observed. The diffusion resistance was calculated as an effective diffusion coefficient in the order of 10-10 m2 s-1; implying that the diffusion limitation is not the bulk diffusion in the backing layer. Finally, the degree of poisoning of the catalysts by carbon monoxide was measured as a pseudo inductive arc and decreases with increasing current.

  19. Dielectric function dependence on temperature for Au and Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Lee, Meng-Chang; Wang, Chih-Ming

    2014-08-01

    The dielectric functions of Au and Ag are measured using a spectral ellipsometer. The temperature dependence parameters ωp, τ, and ɛ∞, in the Drude-Sommerfeld model have been studied. Furthermore, we provide an empirical function to describe the temperature dependence of the dielectric function for Au and Ag. The empirical function shows a good agreement with previous results. Through the empirical function, one can obtain the dielectric constant at arbitrary temperature and wavelength. This database is useful for the applications that use surface plasmon (SP) resonance at high temperatures, such as the plasmonic thermal emitter, SP-assisted thermal cancer treatment and so on.

  20. Temperature dependent core photoemission in Ce 24Co 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbati, I.; Braicovich, L.; Michelis, B.; Fasana, A.; Olcese, G. L.; Canepa, F.; Costa, G. A.

    1985-09-01

    We present Ce 3 d photoemission results (XPS with Al Kα) in the temperature range 100-660°K. The mixed valence behaviour of Ce is very clear with an increase of the valence at lower temperature. A model analysis (of the Gunnarsson and Schönhammer type) gives the weight of the ⨍ 0 configuration equal to 0.19 at 300°K and equal to 0.23 at 100°K. This soft temperature dependence is discussed in connection with the temperature dependence of magnetic properties and with the chemistry of Ce intermetallics.

  1. Temperature dependent electrical transport of disordered reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchharla, Baleeswaraiah; Narayanan, T. N.; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Talapatra, Saikat

    2014-06-01

    We report on the simple route for the synthesis of chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO) using ascorbic acid (a green chemical) as a reducing agent. Temperature-dependent electrical transport properties of rGO thin films have been studied in a wide range (50 K T 400 K) of temperature. Electrical conduction in rGO thin films was displayed in two different temperature regimes. At higher temperatures, Arrhenius-like temperature dependence of resistance was observed indicating a band gap dominating transport behavior. At lower temperatures, the rGO sample showed a conduction mechanism consistent with Mott's two-dimensional variable range hopping (2D-VRH). An unsaturated negative magnetoresistance (MR) was observed up to 3 T field. A decrease in negative MR at high temperatures is attributed to the phonon scattering of charge carriers.

  2. Temperature dependence of nonlinear optical phenomena in silica glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, K.; Motokoshi, S.; Fujita, M.; Jitsuno, T.; Murakami, M.

    2010-11-01

    A linear increase of the laser-induced damage thresholds in silica glasses with decreasing the temperature was reported in this conference at last year. Various nonlinear phenomena should be generated in silica glasses besides the damage in high intensity. Temperature dependences of the nonlinear refractive indices and the SBS (stimulated Brillouin scattering) thresholds in silica glasses at temperature 173 K to 473 K were measured with single-mode Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength. As the result, the nonlinear refractive indices increased with decreasing temperature. Because the change was not enough to explain the temperature dependence of laser-induced damage thresholds, the temperature dependence of nonlinear refractive indices would be negligible on laser-induced damage thresholds. On the other hand, the SBS thresholds also increased with decreasing temperature. This result means that acoustic phonons arise easily at high temperature. Probably, the SBS phenomenon is one of reasons for temperature dependence of laser-induced damage thresholds.

  3. The Temperature Dependence of a Large Dynamic Range Photodetector Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    to achieve a logarithmic steady state response. This paper analyzes the temperature dependence of the circuit operation and presents experimental results demonstrating the capabilities and limitations of the model.

  4. Temperature Dependence of Thermopower in Strongly Correlated Multiorbital Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sekino, M; Okamoto, Satoshi; Koshibae, W; Mori, Michiyasu; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2014-01-01

    Temperature dependence of thermopower in the multiorbital Hubbard model is studied by using the dynamical mean-field theory with the non-crossing approximation impurity solver. It is found that the Coulomb interaction, the Hund coupling, and the crystal filed splitting bring about nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the hermopower, including its sign reversal. The implication of our theoretical results to some materials is discussed.

  5. The temperature dependence of electrical excitability in fish hearts.

    PubMed

    Vornanen, Matti

    2016-07-01

    Environmental temperature has pervasive effects on the rate of life processes in ectothermic animals. Animal performance is affected by temperature, but there are finite thermal limits for vital body functions, including contraction of the heart. This Review discusses the electrical excitation that initiates and controls the rate and rhythm of fish cardiac contraction and is therefore a central factor in the temperature-dependent modulation of fish cardiac function. The control of cardiac electrical excitability should be sensitive enough to respond to temperature changes but simultaneously robust enough to protect against cardiac arrhythmia; therefore, the thermal resilience and plasticity of electrical excitation are physiological qualities that may affect the ability of fishes to adjust to climate change. Acute changes in temperature alter the frequency of the heartbeat and the duration of atrial and ventricular action potentials (APs). Prolonged exposure to new thermal conditions induces compensatory changes in ion channel expression and function, which usually partially alleviate the direct effects of temperature on cardiac APs and heart rate. The most heat-sensitive molecular components contributing to the electrical excitation of the fish heart seem to be Na(+) channels, which may set the upper thermal limit for the cardiac excitability by compromising the initiation of the cardiac AP at high temperatures. In cardiac and other excitable cells, the different temperature dependencies of the outward K(+) current and inward Na(+) current may compromise electrical excitability at temperature extremes, a hypothesis termed the temperature-dependent depression of electrical excitation.

  6. Temperature and size-dependent Hamaker constants for metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, K.; Pinchuk, P.

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical values of the Hamaker constant have been calculated for metal nanoparticles using Lifshitz theory. The theory describes the Hamaker constant in terms of the permittivity of the interacting bodies. Metal nanoparticles exhibit an internal size effect that alters the dielectric permittivity of the particle when its size falls below the mean free path of the conducting electrons. This size dependence of the permittivity leads to size-dependence of the Hamaker constant for metal nanoparticles. Additionally, the electron damping and the plasma frequency used to model the permittivity of the particle exhibit temperature-dependence, which lead to temperature dependence of the Hamaker constant. In this work, both the size and temperature dependence for gold, silver, copper, and aluminum nanoparticles is demonstrated. The results of this study might be of interest for studying the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution.

  7. The complete, temperature resolved experimental spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) between 214.6 and 265.4 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, James P.; Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-11-01

    The spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) has been characterized between 214.6 and 265.4 GHz for astrophysically significant temperatures. Four hundred and eighty-six spectra with absolute intensity calibration recorded between 240 and 389 K provided a means for the calculation of the complete experimental spectrum (CES) of methanol as a function of temperature. The CES includes contributions from v{sub t} = 3 and other higher states that are difficult to model quantum mechanically (QM). It also includes the spectrum of the {sup 13}C isotopologue in terrestrial abundance. In general the QM models provide frequencies that are within 1 MHz of their experimental values, but there are several outliers that differ by tens of MHz. As in our recent work on methanol in the 560-654 GHz region, significant intensity differences between our experimental intensities and cataloged values were found. In this work these differences are explored in the context of several QM analyses. The experimental results presented here are analyzed to provide a frequency point-by-point catalog that is well suited for the simulation of crowded and overlapped spectra. Additionally, a catalog in the usual line frequency, line strength, and lower state energy format is provided.

  8. Temperature dependence of photovoltaic cells, modules, and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.; Burdick, J.; Caiyem, Y.

    1996-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules are often rated in terms of a set of standard reporting conditions defined by a temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Because PV devices operates over a wide range of temperatures and irradiances, the temperature and irradiance related behavior must be known. This paper surveys the temperature dependence of crystalline and thin-film, state-of-the-art, research-size cells, modules, and systems measured by a variety of methods. The various error sources and measurement methods that contribute to cause differences in the temperature coefficient for a given cell or module measured with various methods are discussed.

  9. Temperature dependence of photovoltaic cells, modules, and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.; Burdick, J.; Caiyem, Y.

    1996-09-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules are often rated in terms of a set of standard reporting conditions defined by a temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Because PV devices operate over a wide range of temperatures and irradiances, the temperature and irradiance related behavior must be known. This paper surveys the temperature dependence of crystalline and thin-film, state-of-the-art, research-size cells, modules, and systems measured by a variety of methods. The various error sources and measurement methods that contribute to cause differences in the temperature coefficient for a given cell or module measured with various methods are discussed.

  10. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Azar Alizadeh; Vaibhav Bahadur; Sheng Zhong; Wen Shang; Ri Li; James Ruud; Masako Yamada; Liehi Ge; Ali Dhinojwala; Manohar S Sohal

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially for hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-structure interaction at various temperatures.

  11. Low-temperature conversion of methane to methanol on CeOx/Cu2O catalysts: Water controlled activation of the C–H Bond

    DOE PAGES

    Zuo, Zhijun; Ramírez, Pedro J.; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; ...

    2016-10-10

    Here, an inverse CeO2/Cu2O/Cu(111) catalyst is able to activate methane at room temperature producing C, CHx fragments and COx species on the oxide surface. The addition of water to the system leads to a drastic change in the selectivity of methane activation yielding only adsorbed CHx fragments. At a temperature of 450 K, in the presence of water, a CH4 → CH3OH catalytic transformation occurs with a high selectivity. OH groups formed by the dissociation of water saturate the catalyst surface, removing sites that could decompose CHx fragments, and generating centers on which methane can directly interact to yield methanol.

  12. Liquid-liquid equilibria of water + methanol + 1-octanol and water + ethanol + 1-octanol at various temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Arce, A.; Blanco, A.; Souza, P.; Vidal, I. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    This study is part of a wider program of research on the recovery of light alcohols from dilute aqueous solutions using high molecular weight solvents. The authors report liquid-liquid equilibrium data and binodal curves for the systems water + methanol + 1-octanol and water + ethanol + 1-octanol at 25, 35, and 45 C. The data were fitted to the NRTL and UNIQUAC equations.

  13. A temperature dependent SPICE macro-model for power MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The power MOSFET SPICE Macro-Model has been developed suitable for use over the temperature range {minus}55 to 125 {degrees}C. The model is comprised of a single parameter set with temperature dependence accessed through the SPICE .TEMP card. SPICE parameter extraction techniques for the model and model predictive accuracy are discussed. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric properties of chicken meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric properties of chicken breast meat were measured with an open-ended coaxial-line probe between 200 MHz and 20 GHz at temperatures ranging from -20 degree C to +25 degree C. At a given temperature, the frequency dependence of the dielectric constant reveals two relaxations while those of th...

  15. Temperature-dependent egg development of Lygus hesperus (Hemiptera: Miridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lygus hesperus Knight (Hemiptera: Miridae) is a key agricultural pest in the western United States, but certain aspects of its temperature-dependent development are poorly defined. Accurate models describing the relationships between temperature and development of L. hesperus would facilitate the s...

  16. Temperature Dependence of Viscosities of Common Carrier Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Trent S.; Nahir, Tal M.

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidence for the dependence of viscosities of the real gases on temperature is described, suggesting that this dependence is greater than that predicted by the kinetic theory of gases. The experimental results were obtained using common modern instrumentation and could be reproduced by students in analytical or…

  17. Temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Dubtsov, S. N.; Baklanov, A. M.

    2008-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles in gases has been experimentally studied. It is established that this dependence significantly differs from that predicted by various correlations, in particular, by the Cunningham-Millikan-Davies correlation that is used as an instrumental basis for virtually all methods of measurement of the diffusion coefficient in aerosols.

  18. Renewable Electricity Generation via Solar-Powered Methanol Reforming: Hybrid Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems Based on Novel Non-Concentrating, Intermediate-Temperature Solar Collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, Daniel J.

    Tremendous research efforts have been conducted studying the capturing and conversion of solar energy. Solar thermal power systems offer a compelling opportunity for renewable energy utilization with high efficiencies and excellent cost-effectiveness. The goal of this work was to design a non-concentrating collector capable of reaching temperatures above 250 °C, use this collector to power methanol steam reforming, and operate a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell using the generated hydrogen. The study presents the construction and characterization of a non-concentrating, intermediate-temperature, fin-in-tube evacuated solar collector, made of copper and capable of reaching stagnation temperatures of 268.5 °C at 1000 W/m2 irradiance. The collector was used to power methanol steam reforming, including the initial heating and vaporization of liquid reactants and the final heating of the gaseous reactants. A preferential oxidation (PROX) catalyst was used to remove CO from simulated reformate gas, and this product gas was used to operate a PEM fuel cell. The results show 1) that the outlet temperature is not limited by heat transfer from the absorber coating to the heat transfer fluid, but by the amount of solar energy absorbed. This implicates a constant heat flux description of the heat transfer process and allows for the usage of materials with lower thermal conductivity than copper. 2) It is possible to operate a PEM fuel cell from reformate gas if a PROX catalyst is used to remove CO from the gas. 3) The performance of the fuel cell is only slightly decreased (~4%) by CO2 dilution present in the reformate and PROX gas. These results provide a foundation for the first renewable electricity generation via solar-powered methanol reforming through a hybrid PEM fuel cell system based on novel non-concentrating, intermediate-temperature solar collectors.

  19. On the temperature dependence of flammability limits of gases.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Shigeo; Takizawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Akifumi; Tokuhashi, Kazuaki

    2011-03-15

    Flammability limits of several combustible gases were measured at temperatures from 5 to 100 °C in a 12-l spherical flask basically following ASHRAE method. The measurements were done for methane, propane, isobutane, ethylene, propylene, dimethyl ether, methyl formate, 1,1-difluoroethane, ammonia, and carbon monoxide. As the temperature rises, the lower flammability limits are gradually shifted down and the upper limits are shifted up. Both the limits shift almost linearly to temperature within the range examined. The linear temperature dependence of the lower flammability limits is explained well using a limiting flame temperature concept at the lower concentration limit (LFL)--'White's rule'. The geometric mean of the flammability limits has been found to be relatively constant for many compounds over the temperature range studied (5-100 °C). Based on this fact, the temperature dependence of the upper flammability limit (UFL) can be predicted reasonably using the temperature coefficient calculated for the LFL. However, some compounds such as ethylene and dimethyl ether, in particular, have a more complex temperature dependence.

  20. Universal temperature dependence of the magnetization of gapped spin chains.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yoshitaka; Hotta, Chisa; Oshikawa, Masaki

    2007-08-03

    A Haldane chain under applied field is analyzed numerically, and a clear minimum of magnetization is observed as a function of temperature. We elucidate its origin using the effective theory near the critical field and propose a simple method to estimate the gap from the magnetization at finite temperatures. We also demonstrate that there exists a relation between the temperature dependence of the magnetization and the field dependence of the spin-wave velocity. Our arguments are universal for general axially symmetric one-dimensional spin systems.

  1. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor; Freedman, Holly

    2013-10-01

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump-probe experiments.

  2. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THERMAL NEUTRONS FROM THE MOON

    SciTech Connect

    R.C. LITTLE; W. FELDMAN; ET AL

    2000-10-01

    Planetary thermal neutron fluxes provide a sensitive proxy for mafic and feldspathic terranes, and are also necessary for translating measured gamma-ray line strengths to elemental abundances. Both functions require a model for near surface temperatures and a knowledge of the dependence of thermal neutron flux on temperature. We have explored this dependence for a representative sample of lunar soil compositions and surface temperatures using MCNP{trademark}. For all soil samples, the neutron density is found to be independent of temperature, in accord with neutron moderation theory. The thermal neutron flux, however, does vary with temperature in a way that depends on {Delta}, the ratio of macroscopic absorption to energy-loss cross sections of soil compositions. The weakest dependence is for the largest {Delta} (which corresponds to the Apollo 17 high Ti basalt in our soil selection), and the largest dependence is for the lowest {Delta} (which corresponds to ferroan anorthosite, [FAN] in our selection). For the lunar model simulated, the depth at which the thermal neutron population is most sensitive to temperature is {approx}30 g/cm{sup 2}.

  3. Temperature-dependent bursting pattern analysis by modified Plant model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Many electrophysiological properties of neuron including firing rates and rhythmical oscillation change in response to a temperature variation, but the mechanism underlying these correlations remains unverified. In this study, we analyzed various action potential (AP) parameters of bursting pacemaker neurons in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia juliana to examine whether or not bursting patterns are altered in response to temperature change. Here we found that the inter-burst interval, burst duration, and number of spike during burst decreased as temperature increased. On the other hand, the numbers of bursts per minute and numbers of spikes per minute increased and then decreased, but interspike interval during burst firstly decreased and then increased. We also tested the reproducibility of temperature-dependent changes in bursting patterns and AP parameters. Finally we performed computational simulations of these phenomena by using a modified Plant model composed of equations with temperature-dependent scaling factors to mathematically clarify the temperature-dependent changes of bursting patterns in burst-firing neurons. Taken together, we found that the modified Plant model could trace the ionic mechanism underlying the temperature-dependent change in bursting pattern from experiments with bursting pacemaker neurons in the abdominal ganglia of Aplysia juliana. PMID:25051923

  4. Temperature-dependent μ-Raman investigation of struvite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prywer, Jolanta; Kasprowicz, D.; Runka, T.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of temperature on the vibrational properties of struvite crystals grown from silica gels was systematically studied by μ-Raman spectroscopy. The time-dependent Raman spectra recorded in the process of long time annealing of struvite crystal at 353 K do not indicate structural changes in the struvite crystal with the time of annealing. The temperature-dependent Raman spectra recorded in the range 298-423 K reveal a phase transition in struvite at about 368 K. Above this characteristic temperature, some of bands assigned to vibrations of the PO4 and NH4 tetrahedra and water molecules observed in the Raman spectra in low temperatures (orthorhombic phase) change their spectral parameters or disappear, which indicates a transition to a higher symmetry structure of struvite in the range of high temperatures.

  5. Temperature dependent Raman scattering in YCrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Mall, A. K. Sharma, Y.; Mukherjee, S.; Garg, A.; Gupta, R.

    2014-04-24

    High quality polycrystalline YCrO{sub 3} samples were synthesized using solid-state-reaction method. The samples were subsequently characterized using X-ray diffraction and magnetometry. Further, temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy over a spectral range from 100 to 800 cm{sup −1} was used to examine the variation of phonons as a function of temperature from 90 to 300 K. In the low temperature ferroelectric phase of YCrO{sub 3}, the observed phonon spectra showed softening of some Raman modes below the magnetic ordering temperature (T{sub N} ∼ 142K), suggesting a coupling between the spin and phonon degrees of freedom.

  6. Temperature dependence of piezoelectric properties for textured SBN ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masahiko; Ogawa, Hirozumi; Kuroda, Daisuke; Sawada, Takuya; Higuchi, Yukio; Takagi, Hiroshi; Sakabe, Yukio

    2007-12-01

    Temperature dependences of piezoelectric properties were studied for h001i textured ceramics of bismuth layer-structured ferroelectrics, SrBi(2)Nb(2)O(9) (SBN). The textured ceramics with varied orientation degrees were fabricated by templated, grain-growth method, and the temperature dependences of resonance frequency were estimated. Excellent temperature stability of resonance frequency was obtained for the 76% textured ceramics. The resonance frequency of the 76% textured specimens varied almost linearly over a wide temperature range. Therefore, the variation was slight, even in a high temperature region above 150 degrees C. Temperature stability of a quartz crystal oscillator is generally higher than that of a ceramic resonator around room temperature. The variation of resonance frequency for the 76% textured SrBi(2)Nb(2)O(9) was larger than that of oscillation frequency for a typical quartz oscillator below 150 degrees C also in this study. However, the variation of the textured SrBi(2)Nb(2)O(9) was smaller than that of the quartz oscillator over a wide temperature range from -50 to 250 degrees C. Therefore, textured SrBi(2)Nb(2)O(9) ceramics is a major candidate material for the resonators used within a wide temperature range.

  7. Temperature dependence of the plastic scintillator detector for DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhao-Min; Yu, Yu-Hong; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Yue, Ke; Yan, Duo; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Zhou, Yong; Fang, Fang; Huang, Wen-Xue; Chen, Jun-Ling

    2017-01-01

    The Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) is one of the main sub-detectors in the DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) project. It will be operated over a large temperature range from -10 to 30 °C, so the temperature effect of the whole detection system should be studied in detail. The temperature dependence of the PSD system is mainly contributed by the three parts: the plastic scintillator bar, the photomultiplier tube (PMT), and the Front End Electronics (FEE). These three parts have been studied in detail and the contribution of each part has been obtained and discussed. The temperature coefficient of the PMT is -0.320(±0.033)%/°C, and the coefficient of the plastic scintillator bar is -0.036(±0.038)%/°C. This result means that after subtracting the FEE pedestal, the variation of the signal amplitude of the PMT-scintillator system due to temperature mainly comes from the PMT, and the plastic scintillator bar is not sensitive to temperature over the operating range. Since the temperature effect cannot be ignored, the temperature dependence of the whole PSD has been also studied and a correction has been made to minimize this effect. The correction result shows that the effect of temperature on the signal amplitude of the PSD system can be suppressed. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program on Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA04040202-3) and Youth Innovation Promotion Association, CAS

  8. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, George J.; Dhamija, Ashima; Bavani, Nazli; Wagner, Kenneth R.; Holland, Christy K.

    2007-06-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T <= 35 °C) and ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Such interest may lead to combining these therapies with tPA to treat stroke, however little is known about the effects of temperature on the thrombolytic efficacy of tPA. In this work, we measure the temperature dependence of the fractional clot mass loss Δm(T) resulting from tPA exposure in an in vitro human clot model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy Eeff of 42.0 ± 0.9 kJ mole-1. Eeff approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole-1. A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies.

  9. Temperature dependent ablation threshold in silicon using ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorstensen, Jostein; Erik Foss, Sean

    2012-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated the ablation threshold in silicon as a function of temperature when applying ultrashort laser pulses at three wavelengths. By varying the temperature of a silicon substrate from room temperature to 320 °C, we observe that the ablation threshold for a 3 ps pulse using a wavelength of 1030 nm drops from 0.43 J/cm2 to 0.24 J/cm2, a reduction of 43%. For a wavelength of 515 nm, the ablation threshold drops from 0.22 J/cm2 to 0.15 J/cm2, a reduction of 35%. The observed ablation threshold for pulses at 343 nm remains constant with temperature, at 0.10 J/cm2. These results indicate that substrate heating is a useful technique for lowering the ablation threshold in industrial silicon processing using ultrashort laser pulses in the IR or visible wavelength range. In order to investigate and explain the observed trends, we apply the two-temperature model, a thermodynamic model for investigation of the interaction between silicon and ultrashort laser pulses. Applying the two-temperature model implies thermal equilibrium between optical and acoustic phonons. On the time scales encountered herein, this need not be the case. However, as discussed in the article, the two-temperature model provides valuable insight into the physical processes governing the interaction between the laser light and the silicon. The simulations indicate that ablation occurs when the number density of excited electrons reaches the critical electron density, while the lattice remains well below vaporization temperature. The simulated laser fluence required to reach critical electron density is also found to be temperature dependent. The dominant contributor to increased electron density is, in the majority of the investigated cases, the linear absorption coefficient. Two-photon absorption and impact ionization also generate carriers, but to a lesser extent. As the linear absorption coefficient is temperature dependent, we find that the simulated reduction in

  10. Universal temperature-dependent normalized optoacoustic response of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Elena V.; Liopo, Anton; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Ermilov, Sergey A.

    2015-03-01

    We found and interpreted the universal temperature-dependent optoacoustic (photoacoustic) response (ThOR) in blood; the normalized ThOR is invariant with respect to hematocrit at the hemoglobin's isosbestic point. The unique compartmentalization of hemoglobin, the primary optical absorber at 805 nm, inside red blood cells (RBCs) explains the effect. We studied the temperature dependence of Gruneisen parameter in blood and aqueous solutions of hemoglobin and for the first time experimentally observed transition through the zero optoacoustic response at temperature T0, which was proved to be consistent for various blood samples. On the other hand, the hemoglobin solutions demonstrated linear concentration function of the temperature T0. When this function was extrapolated to the average hemoglobin concentration inside erythrocytes, the temperature T0 was found equivalent to that measured in whole and diluted blood. The obtained universal curve of blood ThOR was validated in both transparent and light scattering media. The discovered universal optoacoustic temperature dependent blood response provides foundation for future development of non-invasive in vivo temperature monitoring in vascularized tissues and blood vessels.

  11. Temperature-dependent transitions in isometric contractions of rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, K W; Wylie, S R

    1983-01-01

    The effect of temperature on tetanic tension development was examined in extensor digitorum longus (fast-twitch) and soleus (slow-twitch) muscles of the rat, in vitro and with direct stimulation. The temperature range was from 35 to 10 degrees C. 2. The maximum tetanic tension decreased slightly on cooling from 35 to 25 degrees C. Cooling below 20 degrees C resulted in a marked depression of tetanic tension. The results were similar in the two muscles. 3. Analysis (in the form of Arrhenius plots) of the rate of tetanic tension development and relaxation clearly showed the occurrence of two phases in their temperature dependence, due to an increased temperature sensitivity below about 25 degrees C. Arrhenius activation energy estimates for temperatures lower than 21 degrees C were around twice as high as those for temperatures higher than 24 degrees C in both muscles. PMID:6887040

  12. Temperature Dependent Constitutive Modeling for Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong K.; Lee, June K.; Kim, Hyung S.; Kim, Heon Y.

    2010-06-15

    Magnesium alloys have been increasingly used in automotive and electronic industries because of their excellent strength to weight ratio and EMI shielding properties. However, magnesium alloys have low formability at room temperature due to their unique mechanical behavior (twinning and untwining), prompting for forming at an elevated temperature. In this study, a temperature dependent constitutive model for magnesium alloy (AZ31B) sheet is developed. A hardening law based on non linear kinematic hardening model is used to consider Bauschinger effect properly. Material parameters are determined from a series of uni-axial cyclic experiments (T-C-T or C-T-C) with the temperature ranging 150-250 deg. C. The influence of temperature on the constitutive equation is introduced by the material parameters assumed to be functions of temperature. Fitting process of the assumed model to measured data is presented and the results are compared.

  13. Temperature dependence of damage coefficient in electron irradiated solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faith, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of light-generated current vs cell temperature on electron-irradiated n/p silicon solar cells show the temperature coefficient of this current to increase with increasing fluence for both 10-ohm and 20-ohm cells. A relationship between minority-carrier diffusion length and light-generated current was derived by combining measurements of these two parameters: vs fluence at room temperature, and vs cell temperature in cells irradiated to a fluence of 1 x 10 to the 15th power e/sq cm. This relationship was used, together with the light-generated current data, to calculate the temperature dependence of the diffusion-length damage coefficient. The results show a strong decrease in the damage coefficient with increasing temperature in the range experienced by solar panels in synchronous earth orbit.

  14. On the detection of precipitation dependence on temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu; Luo, Ming; Leung, Yee

    2016-05-01

    Employing their newly proposed interannual difference method (IADM), Liu et al. (2009) and Shiu et al. (2012) reported a shocking increase of around 100% K-1 in heavy precipitation with warming global temperature in 1979-2007. Such increase is alarming and prompts us to probe into the IADM. In this study, both analytical derivations and numerical analyses demonstrate that IADM provides no additional information to that of the conventional linear regression, and also, it may give a false indication of dependence. For clarity and simplicity, we therefore recommend linear regression analysis over the IADM for the detection of dependence. We also find that heavy precipitation decreased during the global warming hiatus, and the precipitation dependence on temperature drops by almost 50% when the study period is extended to 1979-2014 and it may keep dropping in the near future. The risk of having heavy precipitation under warming global temperature may have been overestimated.

  15. Temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient of ionic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehnem, A. L.; Figueiredo Neto, A. M.; Aquino, R.; Campos, A. F. C.; Tourinho, F. A.; Depeyrot, J.

    2015-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient ST(T ) in electrostatically charged magnetic colloids is investigated. Two different ferrofluids, with different particles' mean dimensions, are studied. In both cases we obtain a thermophilic behavior of the Soret effect. The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient is described assuming that the nanoparticles migrate along the ionic thermoelectric field created by the thermal gradient. A model based on the contributions from the thermoelectrophoresis and variation of the double-layer energy, without fitting parameters, is used to describe the experimental results of the colloid with the bigger particles. To do so, independent measurements of the ζ potential, mass diffusion coefficient, and Seebeck coefficient are performed. The agreement of the theory and the experimental results is rather good. In the case of the ferrofluid with smaller particles, it is not possible to get experimentally reliable values of the ζ potential and the model described is used to evaluate this parameter and its temperature dependence.

  16. Temperature Dependence of Magnetic Excitations: Terahertz Magnons above the Curie Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, H. J.; Zakeri, Kh.; Ernst, A.; Kirschner, J.

    2017-03-01

    When an ordered spin system of a given dimensionality undergoes a second order phase transition, the dependence of the order parameter, i.e., magnetization on temperature, can be well described by thermal excitations of elementary collective spin excitations (magnons). However, the behavior of magnons themselves, as a function of temperature and across the transition temperature TC, is an unknown issue. Utilizing spin-polarized high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy, we monitor the high-energy (terahertz) magnons, excited in an ultrathin ferromagnet, as a function of temperature. We show that the magnons' energy and lifetime decrease with temperature. The temperature-induced renormalization of the magnons' energy and lifetime depends on the wave vector. We provide quantitative results on the temperature-induced damping and discuss the possible mechanism, e.g., multimagnon scattering. A careful investigation of physical quantities determining the magnons' propagation indicates that terahertz magnons sustain their propagating character even at temperatures far above TC.

  17. Temperature-dependent morphology of chemical vapor grown molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yantao; Zhou, Jiadong; Liu, Zheng

    2017-04-01

    Monolayered molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a 2D direct band gap semiconductor with promising potential applications. In this work, we observed the temperature dependency of the morphologies of MoS2 monolayers from chemical vapor deposition. At a low growing temperature below 850 °C, MoS2 flakes tend to be trianglular in shape. At 850–950 °C, hexagonal MoS2 flakes can be observed. While at a temperature over 950 °C, MoS2 flakes can form rectangular shapes. Complementary characterizations have been made to these samples. We also proposed a mechanism for such temperature-dependent shape evolution based on thermodynamic simulation.

  18. Temperature-dependent collective effects for silicene and germanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iurov, Andrii; Gumbs, Godfrey; Huang, Danhong

    2017-04-01

    We have numerically calculated electron exchange and correlation energies and dynamical polarization functions for recently discovered silicene, germanene and other buckled honeycomb lattices at various temperatures. We have compared the dependence of these energies on the chemical potential, field-induced gap and temperature and we have concluded that in many cases they behave qualitatively in a similar way, i.e. increasing with the doping, decreasing significantly at elevated temperatures, and displaying different dependences on the asymmetry gap at various temperatures. Furthermore, we have used the dynamical polarizability to study the ‘split’ plasmon branches in the buckled lattices and predicted a unique splitting, different from that in gapped graphene, for various energy gaps. Our results are crucial for stimulating electronic, transport and collective studies of silicene and germanene, as well as for enhancing silicene-based fabrication and technologies for photovoltaics and transistor devices.

  19. Origins of the temperature dependence of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Peracchi, A

    1999-01-01

    The difficulties in interpreting the temperature dependence of protein enzyme reactions are well recognized. Here, the hammerhead ribozyme cleavage was investigated under single-turnover conditions between 0 and 60 degrees C as a model for RNA-catalyzed reactions. Under the adopted conditions, the chemical step appears to be rate-limiting. However, the observed rate of cleavage is affected by pre-catalytic equilibria involving deprotonation of an essential group and binding of at least one low-affinity Mg2+ion. Thus, the apparent entropy and enthalpy of activation include contributions from the temperature dependence of these equilibria, precluding a simple physical interpretation of the observed activation parameters. Similar pre-catalytic equilibria likely contribute to the observed activation parameters for ribozyme reactions in general. The Arrhenius plot for the hammerhead reaction is substantially curved over the temperature range considered, which suggests the occurrence of a conformational change of the ribozyme ground state around physiological temperatures. PMID:10390528

  20. Temperature dependence of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, Daniel V; Jonsson, Magnus P; Dekker, Cees

    2015-06-12

    In order to gain a better physical understanding of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores, we study the temperature dependence of λ-DNA translocations through 10 nm diameter silicon nitride nanopores, both experimentally and theoretically. The measured ionic conductance G, the DNA-induced ionic-conductance blockades [Formula: see text] and the event frequency Γ all increase with increasing temperature while the DNA translocation time τ decreases. G and [Formula: see text] are accurately described when bulk and surface conductances of the nanopore are considered and access resistance is incorporated appropriately. Viscous drag on the untranslocated part of the DNA coil is found to dominate the temperature dependence of the translocation times and the event rate is well described by a balance between diffusion and electrophoretic motion. The good fit between modeled and measured properties of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores in this first comprehensive temperature study, suggest that our model captures the relevant physics of the process.

  1. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  2. Temperature and Depth Dependence of Order in Liquid Crystal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Miranda,L.; Hu, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the depth dependence and temperature behavior of the ordering of smectic-A films close to the smectic A-nematic transition, deposited on grated glass. X-ray grazing incidence geometry in reflection mode through the glass substrate was used to characterize the samples. Our results indicate the presence of a structure similar to the helical twist grain boundary phase. The structure has two maxima, one close to the glass-liquid crystal interface and another about 8 {mu}m above the surface. The structure at 8 {mu}m is the one that dominates at higher temperatures. In addition, we find that order is preserved to temperatures close to the nematic-isotropic transition temperature for the deeper gratings. We find also a dependence of the orientation of the structure with the depth of the grating and the elastic constant of the liquid crystal.

  3. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    Relative absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor were measured over the temperature ranges 285-381 K for lambda = 230 nm-295 nm and 300-381 K for lambda = 193 nm-350 nm. The well established 298 K cross sections at 202.6 and 228.8 nm were used as an absolute calibration. A significant temperature dependence was observed at the important tropospheric photolysis wavelengths lambda over 300 nm. Measured cross sections were extrapolated to lower temperatures, using a simple model which attributes the observed temperature dependence to enhanced absorption by molecules possessing one quantum of O-O stretch vibrational excitation. Upper tropospheric photodissociation rates calculated using the extrapolated cross sections are about 25 percent lower than those calculated using currently recommended 298 K cross sections.

  4. Temperature dependence of the acoustoelectric current in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandhu, L.; Nash, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    The acoustoelectric current in graphene has been investigated as a function of temperature, surface acoustic wave (SAW) intensity, and frequency. At high SAW frequencies, the measured acoustoelectric current decreases with decreasing temperature, but remains positive, which corresponds to the transport of holes, over the whole temperature range studied. The current also exhibits a linear dependence on the SAW intensity, consistent with the interaction between the carriers and SAWs being described by a relatively simple classical relaxation model. At low temperatures and SAW frequencies, the measured acoustoelectric current no longer exhibits a simple linear dependence on the SAW intensity, and the direction of the acoustoelectric current is also observed to reverse under certain experimental conditions.

  5. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1988-03-01

    Relative absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor were measured over the temperature ranges 285-381 K for lambda = 230 nm-295 nm and 300-381 K for lambda = 193 nm-350 nm. The well established 298 K cross sections at 202.6 and 228.8 nm were used as an absolute calibration. A significant temperature dependence was observed at the important tropospheric photolysis wavelengths lambda over 300 nm. Measured cross sections were extrapolated to lower temperatures, using a simple model which attributes the observed temperature dependence to enhanced absorption by molecules possessing one quantum of O-O stretch vibrational excitation. Upper tropospheric photodissociation rates calculated using the extrapolated cross sections are about 25 percent lower than those calculated using currently recommended 298 K cross sections.

  6. Temperature dependent surface modification of silica spheres with methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kwang-Sun; Kim, Byoung-Ju; Jo, Dong-Hyun; Lim, Sae-Han; Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Do-gyun

    2014-09-01

    Surface modification of silica spheres with 3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) has been performed at ambient condition. However, the FTIR spectra and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images show no evidence of the surface modification. The reaction temperatures were varied from 60 to 80 °C with various reaction periods. Small absorption shoulder of the C=O stretching vibration was at 1700 cm-1, and slightly increased with the increase of the reaction time at 60 °C. The clear absorption peak appeared at 1698 cm-1 for the spheres reacted for 80 min at 70 °C and shifted toward 1720 cm-1 with the increase the reaction time. Strong absorption peak showed at 1698 cm-1 and shifted toward 1725 cm-1 with the increase of the reaction time at 80 °C. The spheres were dispersed to methanol and added photoinitiator (Irgacure-184). The solution was poured to a patterned glass substrate and exposed to the 254 nm UV-light during a self-assembly process. A large area and crack-free silica sphere film was formed. To increase the mechanical stability, a cellulose acetate solution was spin-coated to the film. The film was lift-off from the glass substrate to analyze the surface nanostructures. The surface nanostructures were maintained, and the film is stable enough to use as a mold to duplicate the nanopattern and flexible.

  7. Temperature dependence of temporal resolution in an insect nervous system.

    PubMed

    Franz, A; Ronacher, B

    2002-05-01

    The vast majority of animals are poikilotherms, and thus face the problem that the temperature of their nervous systems rather smoothly follows the temperature changes imposed by their environment. Since basic properties of nerve cells, e.g., the time constants of ion channels, strongly depend on temperature, a temperature shift likely affects the processing of the temporal structure of sensory stimuli. This can be critical in acoustic communication systems in which time patterns of signals are decisive for recognition by the receiver. We investigated the temperature dependence of the responses of locust auditory receptors and interneurons by varying the temperature of the experimental animals during intracellular recordings. The resolution of fast amplitude modulations of acoustic signals was determined in a gap detection paradigm. In auditory receptors and local (second order) interneurons, temporal resolution was improved at higher temperatures. This gain could be attributed to a higher precision of spike timing. In a third-order neuron, a rise in temperature affected the interactions of inhibition and excitation in a complex manner, also resulting in a better resolution of gaps in the millisecond range.

  8. Temperature dependence of action potential parameters in Aplysia neurons.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Nam Gyu; Hyun, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Kyungmin; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2012-01-01

    Although the effects of temperature changes on the activity of neurons have been studied in Aplysia, the reproducibility of the temperature dependence of the action potential (AP) parameters has not been verified. To this end, we performed experiments using Aplysia neurons. Fourteen AP parameters were analyzed using the long-term data series recorded during the experiments. Our analysis showed that nine of the AP parameters decreased as the temperature increased: the AP amplitude (A(AP)), membrane potential at the positive peak (V(pp)), interspike interval, first half (Δt(r1)) and last half (Δt(r2)) of the temperature rising phase, first half (Δt(f1)) and last half (Δt(f2)) of the temperature falling phase, AP (Δt(AP, 1/2)), and differentiated signal (Δt(DS, 1/2)) half-width durations. Five of the AP parameters increased with temperature: the differentiated signal amplitude (A(DS)), absolute value of the membrane potential at negative peak (|V(np)|), absolute value of the maximum slope of the AP during the temperature rising (|-MSR|) and falling (|MSF|) phases, and spiking frequency (Frequency). This work could provide the basis for a better understanding of the elementary processes underlying the temperature-dependent neuronal activity in Aplysia.

  9. Temperature dependence of hydrophobic hydration dynamics: from retardation to acceleration.

    PubMed

    Duboué-Dijon, Elise; Fogarty, Aoife C; Laage, Damien

    2014-02-13

    The perturbation induced by a hydrophobic solute on water dynamics is essential in many biochemical processes, but its mechanism and magnitude are still debated. A stringent test of the different proposed pictures is provided by recent NMR measurements by Qvist and Halle (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 10345-10353) which showed that, unexpectedly, the perturbation changes in a non-monotonic fashion when the solution is cooled below room temperature. Here we perform and analyze molecular dynamics simulations of a small paradigm amphiphilic solute, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), in dilute aqueous solutions over the 218-350 K temperature range. We first show that our simulations properly reproduce the non-monotonic temperature dependence. We then develop a model which combines our previously suggested entropic excluded-volume effect with a perturbation factor arising from the difference between local structural fluctuations in the shell and the bulk. Our model provides a detailed molecular understanding of the hydrophobic perturbation over the full temperature range investigated. It shows that the excluded-volume factor brings a dominant temperature-independent contribution to the perturbation at all temperatures, and provides a very good approximation at room temperature. The non-monotonic temperature dependence of the perturbation is shown to arise from the structural factor and mostly from relative shifts between the shell and bulk distributions of local structures, whose amplitude remains very small compared to the widths of those distributions.

  10. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The first observation of methanol in cold dark clouds TMC 1, L 134 N, and B 335 is reported. In all three clouds, the relative abundance of methanol was found to be in the range of 10 to the -9th (i.e., almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde), with no observable variation between the clouds. Methanol emission showed a complex velocity structure; in TMC 1, clear indications of non-LTE were observed. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134 N; the upper limit of the column density of dimethyl ether in L 134 N was estimated to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm, assuming 5 K rotation temperature and LTE. This limit makes the abundance ratio (CH3)2O/CH3OH not higher than 1/5, indicating that dimethyl ether is not overabundant in this dark cloud.

  11. Anomalous temperature dependence of the IR spectrum of polyalanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helenius, V.; Korppi-Tommola, J.; Kotila, S.; Nieminen, J.; Lohikoski, R.; Timonen, J.

    1997-12-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of the infrared spectra of acetanilide (ACN), tryptophan-(alanine) 15, and tyrosine-(alanine) 15. No sidebands of the amide-I vibration were observed in the polypeptides, but two anomalous sidebands of the NH stretch with a similar temperature dependence as that of the anomalous amide-I vibrational mode at 1650 cm -1 of crystalline ACN were detected. Fermi resonance combined with the appearance of a red-shifted sideband of NH stretch through coupling to lattice modes seems to explain this band structure. Observations are indicative of excitons that may occur in polypeptides as well as in single crystals of ACN.

  12. Honeybee flight metabolic rate: does it depend upon air temperature?

    PubMed

    Woods, William A; Heinrich, Bernd; Stevenson, Robert D

    2005-03-01

    Differing conclusions have been reached as to how or whether varying heat production has a thermoregulatory function in flying honeybees Apis mellifera. We investigated the effects of air temperature on flight metabolic rate, water loss, wingbeat frequency, body segment temperatures and behavior of honeybees flying in transparent containment outdoors. For periods of voluntary, uninterrupted, self-sustaining flight, metabolic rate was independent of air temperature between 19 and 37 degrees C. Thorax temperatures (T(th)) were very stable, with a slope of thorax temperature on air temperature of 0.18. Evaporative heat loss increased from 51 mW g(-1) at 25 degrees C to 158 mW g(-1) at 37 degrees C and appeared to account for head and abdomen temperature excess falling sharply over the same air temperature range. As air temperature increased from 19 to 37 degrees C, wingbeat frequency showed a slight but significant increase, and metabolic expenditure per wingbeat showed a corresponding slight but significant decrease. Bees spent an average of 52% of the measurement period in flight, with 19 of 78 bees sustaining uninterrupted voluntary flight for periods of >1 min. The fraction of time spent flying declined as air temperature increased. As the fraction of time spent flying decreased, the slope of metabolic rate on air temperature became more steeply negative, and was significant for bees flying less than 80% of the time. In a separate experiment, there was a significant inverse relationship of metabolic rate and air temperature for bees requiring frequent or constant agitation to remain airborne, but no dependence for bees that flew with little or no agitation; bees were less likely to require agitation during outdoor than indoor measurements. A recent hypothesis explaining differences between studies in the slope of flight metabolic rate on air temperature in terms of differences in metabolic capacity and thorax temperature is supported for honeybees in voluntary

  13. Temperature dependence of the colloidal agglomeration inhibition: computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Barcenas, Mariana; Douda, Janna; Duda, Yurko

    2007-09-21

    There exist experimental evidences that the structure and extension of colloidal aggregates in suspensions change dramatically with temperature. This results in an associated change in the suspension rheology. Experimental studies of the inhibitor applications to control the particle clustering have revealed some unexpected tendencies. Namely, the heating of colloidal suspensions has provoked either extension or reduction of the colloidal aggregates. To elucidate the origin of this behavior, we investigate the influence of temperature on the stabilizing effect of the inhibitor, applying an associative two-component fluid model. Our results of the canonical Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the anomalous effect of the temperature may not be necessarily explained by the temperature dependent changes in the inhibitor tail conformation, as has been suggested recently by Won et al. [Langmuir 21, 924 (2005)]. We show that the competition between colloid-colloid and colloid-inhibitor associations, which, in turn, depends on the temperature and the relative concentrations, may be one of the main reasons for the unexpected temperature dependence of inhibitor efficacy.

  14. The temperature dependence of ponded infiltration under isothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Murphy, F.

    1991-01-01

    A simple temperature-sensitive modification to the Green and Ampt infiltration equation is described; this assumes that the temperature dependence of the hydraulic conductivity is reciprocally equal to the temperature dependence of the viscosity of liquid water, and that both the transmission zone saturation and the wetting front matric potential gradient are independent of temperature. This modified Green and Ampt equation is compared with ponded, isothermal infiltration experiments run on repacked columns of Olympic Sand and Aiken Loam at 5, 25, and 60??C. Experimental results showed increases in infiltration rates of at least 300% between 5 and 60??C for both soil materials, with subsequent increases in cumulative infiltration of even greater magnitudes for the loam. There is good agreement between measured and predicted initial infiltration rates at 25??C for both soil materials, yet at 60??C, the predicted results overestimate initial infiltration rates for the sand and underestimate initial rates for the loam. Measurements of the wetting depth vs. cumulative infiltration indicate that the transmission zone saturation increased with increasing temperature for both soil materials. In spite of this increased saturation with temperature, the final infiltration rates at both 25 and 60??C were predicted accurately using the modified Green and Ampt equation. This suggests that increased saturation occurred primarily in dead-end pore spaces, so that transmission zone hydraulic conductivities were unaffected by these temperature-induced changes in saturation. In conclusion, except for initial infiltration rates at 60??C, the measured influence of temperature on infiltration rates was fully accounted for by the temperature dependence of the viscosity of liquid water. ?? 1991.

  15. Enthalpies and constants of dissociation of several neutral and cationic acids in aqueous and methanol/water solutions at various temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shoghi, Elham; Romero, Lilian; Reta, Mario; Ràfols, Clara; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2009-05-01

    The acidic dissociation enthalpies and constants of anilinium, protonated tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (HTris(+)), benzoic and acetic acids, have been determined at several temperatures in pure water and in methanol/water mixtures by potentiometry and by isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC). The pK(a) values determined by both techniques are in accordance when the dissociation process involves large amounts of heat. However, for the neutral acids the ITC technique gave slightly lower pK(a) values than those from potentiometry at the highest temperatures studied due to the small amounts of heat involved in the acidic dissociation. The dissociation enthalpies have been determined directly by calorimetry and the obtained values slightly decrease with the increase of temperature. Therefore, only a rough estimation of the dissociation enthalpies can be obtained from potentiometric pK(a) by means of the Van't Hoff approach.

  16. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Benjamin J.; Marlowe, Daniel L.; Choi, Joshua J. E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu; Sun, Keye; Gupta, Mool C. E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu; Saidi, Wissam A.; Scudiero, Louis E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu

    2015-06-15

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature.

  17. Temperature dependence of nucleation rate in a binary solid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Y.; Philippe, T.; Duguay, S.; Blavette, D.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of regression (partial dissolution) effects on the temperature dependence of nucleation rate in a binary solid solution has been studied theoretically. The results of the analysis are compared with the predictions of the simplest Volmer-Weber theory. Regression effects are shown to have a strong influence on the shape of the curve of nucleation rate versus temperature. The temperature TM at which the maximum rate of nucleation occurs is found to be lowered, particularly for low interfacial energy (coherent precipitation) and high-mobility species (e.g. interstitial atoms).

  18. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Azar; Bahadur, Vaibhav; Zhong, Sheng; Shang, Wen; Li, Ri; Ruud, James; Yamada, Masako; Ge, Liehui; Dhinojwala, Ali; Sohal, Manohar

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling, and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially on hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures combined with an increased work of adhesion can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve as a starting point to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-surface interaction at various temperatures.

  19. Compensation of Verdet Constant Temperature Dependence by Crystal Core Temperature Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Petricevic, Slobodan J.; Mihailovic, Pedja M.

    2016-01-01

    Compensation of the temperature dependence of the Verdet constant in a polarimetric extrinsic Faraday sensor is of major importance for applying the magneto-optical effect to AC current measurements and magnetic field sensing. This paper presents a method for compensating the temperature effect on the Faraday rotation in a Bi12GeO20 crystal by sensing its optical activity effect on the polarization of a light beam. The method measures the temperature of the same volume of crystal that effects the beam polarization in a magnetic field or current sensing process. This eliminates the effect of temperature difference found in other indirect temperature compensation methods, thus allowing more accurate temperature compensation for the temperature dependence of the Verdet constant. The method does not require additional changes to an existing Δ/Σ configuration and is thus applicable for improving the performance of existing sensing devices. PMID:27706043

  20. High temperature dependence of thermal transport in graphene foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Man; Sun, Yi; Xiao, Huying; Hu, Xuejiao; Yue, Yanan

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to the decreased thermal property of carbon materials with temperature according to the Umklapp phonon scattering theory, highly porous free-standing graphene foam (GF) exhibits an abnormal characteristic that its thermal property increases with temperature above room temperature. In this work, the temperature dependence of thermal properties of free-standing GF is investigated by using the transient electro-thermal technique. Significant increase for thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity from ˜0.3 to 1.5 W m-1 K-1 and ˜4 × 10-5 to ˜2 × 10-4 m2 s-1 respectively is observed with temperature from 310 K to 440 K for three GF samples. The quantitative analysis based on a physical model for porous media of Schuetz confirms that the thermal conductance across graphene contacts rather than the heat conductance inside graphene dominates thermal transport of our GFs. The thermal expansion effect at an elevated temperature makes the highly porous structure much tighter is responsible for the reduction in thermal contact resistance. Besides, the radiation heat exchange inside the pores of GFs improves the thermal transport at high temperatures. Since free-standing GF has great potential for being used as supercapacitor and battery electrode where the working temperature is always above room temperature, this finding is beneficial for thermal design of GF-based energy applications.

  1. Investigation of temperature dependence of development and aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacher, G. A.

    1969-01-01

    Temperature dependence of maturation and metabolic rates in insects, and the failure of vital processes during development were investigated. The paper presented advances the general hypothesis that aging in biological systems is a consequence of the production of entropy concomitant with metabolic activity.

  2. Temperature dependence of bag pressure from quasiparticle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, N.; Singh, C. P.

    2001-03-01

    A quasiparticle model with effective thermal gluon and quark masses is used to derive a temperature /T- and baryon chemical potential /μ-dependent bag constant /B(μ,T). Consequences of such a bag constant are obtained on the equation of state (EOS) for a deconfined quark-gluon plasma (QGP).

  3. Time- and temperature-dependent failures of a bonded joint

    SciTech Connect

    Sihn, Sangwook; Miyano, Yasushi; Tsai, S.W.

    1997-07-01

    Time and temperature dependent properties of a tubular lap bonded joint are reported. The joint bonds a cast iron rod and a composite pipe together with an epoxy type of an adhesive material containing chopped glass fiber. A new fabrication method is proposed.

  4. Temperature dependent phonon shifts in few-layer black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Late, Dattatray J

    2015-03-18

    Atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) sheets of black phosphorus have attracted much attention due to their potential for future nanoelectronic and photonics device applications. Present investigations deal with the temperature dependent phonon shifts in a few-layer black phosphorus nanosheet sample prepared using micromechanical exfoliation on a 300 nm SiO2/Si substrate. The temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy experiments were carried out on a few-layer black phosphorus sample, which depicts softening of Ag(1), B2g, and Ag(2) modes as temperature increases from 77 to 673 K. The calculated temperature coefficients for Ag(1), B2g, and Ag(2) modes of the few-layer black phosphorus nanosheet sample were observed to be -0.01, -0.013, and -0.014 cm(-1) K(-1), respectively. The temperature dependent softening modes of black phosphorus results were explained on the basis of a double resonance process which is more active in an atomically thin sample. This process can also be fundamentally pertinent in other promising and emerging 2D ultrathin layer and heterostructured materials.

  5. Study of the PTW microLion chamber temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; González-Castaño, D.; Díaz-Botana, P.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2014-06-01

    The use of liquid ionization chambers in radiotherapy has grown during the past few years. While for air ionization chambers the kTP correction for air mass density due to pressure and temperature variations is well known, less work has been done on the case of liquid ionization chambers, where there is still the need to take into account the influence of temperature in the free ion yield. We have measured the PTW microLion isooctane-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence in a ˜ ±10 °C interval around the standard 20 °C room temperature for three operation voltages, including the manufacturer recommended voltage, and two beam qualities, 60Co and 50 kV x-rays. Within the measured temperature range, the microLion signal exhibits a positive linear dependence, which is around 0.24% K-1 at 800 V with 60Co irradiation. This effect is of the same order of magnitude as the T dependence found in air ionization chambers, but its nature is completely different and its sign opposite to that of an air chamber. Onsager theory has been used to model the results and is consistent with this linear behaviour. However, some inconsistencies in the modelling of the 50 kV x-ray results have been found that are attributed to the failure of Onsager's isolated pair assumption for such radiation quality.

  6. Temperature dependence of anuran distortion product otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Meenderink, Sebastiaan W F; van Dijk, Pim

    2006-09-01

    To study the possible involvement of energy-dependent mechanisms in the transduction of sound within the anuran ear, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were recorded in the northern leopard frog over a range of body temperatures. The effect of body temperature depended on the stimulus levels used and on the hearing organ under investigation. Low-level DPOAEs from the amphibian papilla (AP) were reversibly depressed for decreased body temperatures. Apparently, DPOAE generation in the AP depends on metabolic rate, indicating the involvement of active processes in the transduction of sound. In contrast, in the other hearing organ, the basilar papilla (BP), the effects of body temperature on DPOAEs were less pronounced, irrespective of the stimulus levels used. Apparently, metabolic rate is less influencing DPOAE generation. We interpret these results as evidence that no amplifier is involved in sound transduction in the BP. The passive functioning of the anuran BP would place this hearing organ in a unique position within tetrapod hearing, but may actually be beneficial to ectothermic species because it will provide the animal with a consistent spectral window, regardless of ambient or body temperature.

  7. Decomposition is always temperature dependent, except when its not

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding of the temperature dependence of decomposition of soil organic matter has been complicated by the two following facts: (1) all enzymatic activity, including biologically mediated breakdown of organic matter in soils, is temperature dependent; and (2) much of the organic matter in soils is effectively isolated from enzymatic activity, either in space or time, through a wide variety of environmental constraints, including physical and chemical protection, spatial heterogeneity, lack of oxygen, or sub-zero temperatures. Because of the second fact, the first has been questioned in papers that report lack of observed temperature sensitivity of decomposition of soil organic matter. In my 2006 review paper with Ivan Janssens, we attempted to clarify these facts and their interactions and why temperature dependence is sometimes observed and sometimes not. However, it appears that our discussion of how Arrhenius kinetics affects enzymatic activity has become the paper's main recognized legacy, and it has been cited in support of the "carbon-quality-temperature" hypothesis. Here I will update and clarify aspects of that review as follows: (1) a Dual Arrhenius Michaelis-Menten (DAMM) model that merges these kinetic models with substrate diffusion processes can parsimoniously and mechanistically explain fast responses of carbon metabolism in soils as temperature and water content vary over time scales of minutes to months; and (2) variations in activation energies of enzymatic reactions have little or no effect on C metabolism when substrate is not available to enzymes, and this second point applies to both short and long-term turnover of soil organic matter. Because of this latter point, mean residence times and decomposition constants often do not correlate well with the chemical structure ("carbon quality") of soil organic matter, as is predicted by Arrhenius kinetics alone. While it is true that biological decomposition reactions, when they occur, are always

  8. Stress versus temperature dependence of activation energies for creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1992-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is associated with lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from dislocation climb to obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change in deformation mechanism occurs a change in the activation energy. When the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is obstacle-controlled dislocation glide, it is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does better than a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy in correlating steady-state creep data for both copper and LiF-22mol percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  9. Stress versus temperature dependent activation energies in creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from that of dislocation climb to one of obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change, there occurs a change in the activation energy. It is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does a good job of correlating steady-state creep data, while a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy does a less desirable job of correlating the same data. Applications are made to copper and a LiF-22 mol. percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  10. Temperature dependence of penetration depth in thin film niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    More, N.; Muhlfelder, B.; Lockhart, J.

    1989-01-01

    A novel technique is presented which should allow precise determination of the temperature dependence of the inductance, and hence of the penetration depth, of superconducting niobium thin-film structures. Four niobium thin-film stripline inductors are arranged in a bridge configuration, and inductance differences are measured using a potentiometric technique with a SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the null detector. Numerical simulations of the stripline inductances are presented which allow the performance of the measurement technique to be evaluated. The prediction of the two-fluid model for the penetration-depth temperature dependence is given for reduced temperatures of 0.3 to 0.9. The experimental apparatus and its resolution and accuracy are discussed.

  11. Energy based model for temperature dependent behavior of ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sah, Sanjay; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2017-03-01

    An energy based model for temperature dependent anhysteretic magnetization curves of ferromagnetic materials is proposed and benchmarked against experimental data. This is based on the calculation of macroscopic magnetic properties by performing an energy weighted average over all possible orientations of the magnetization vector. Most prior approaches that employ this method are unable to independently account for the effect of both inhomogeneity and temperature in performing the averaging necessary to model experimental data. Here we propose a way to account for both effects simultaneously and benchmark the model against experimental data from 5 K to 300 K for two different materials in both annealed (fewer inhomogeneities) and deformed (more inhomogeneities) samples. This demonstrates that this framework is well suited to simulate temperature dependent experimental magnetic behavior.

  12. Temperature dependence of angular momentum transport across interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Lin, Weiwei; Chien, C. L.; Zhang, Shufeng

    2016-08-01

    Angular momentum transport in magnetic multilayered structures plays a central role in spintronic physics and devices. The angular momentum currents or spin currents are carried by either quasiparticles such as electrons and magnons, or by macroscopic order parameters such as local magnetization of ferromagnets. Based on the generic interface exchange interaction, we develop a microscopic theory that describes interfacial spin conductance for various interfaces among nonmagnetic metals, ferromagnetic insulators, and antiferromagnetic insulators. Spin conductance and its temperature dependence are obtained for different spin batteries including spin pumping, temperature gradient, and spin Hall effect. As an application of our theory, we calculate the spin current in a trilayer made of a ferromagnetic insulator, an antiferromagnetic insulator, and a nonmagnetic heavy metal. The calculated results on the temperature dependence of spin conductance quantitatively agree with the existing experiments.

  13. TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT INFRARED OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF OLIVINE AND ENSTATITE

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidler, S.; Mutschke, H.; Posch, Th. E-mail: harald.mutschke@uni-jena.de

    2015-01-10

    Since the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) mission, it has become clear that dust in circumstellar disks and outflows consists partly of crystalline silicates of pyroxene and olivine type. An exact mineralogical analysis of the dust infrared emission spectra relies on laboratory spectra, which, however, have been mostly measured at room temperature so far. Given that infrared spectral features depend on the thermal excitation of the crystal's vibrational modes, laboratory spectra measured at various (low and high) temperatures, corresponding to the thermal conditions at different distances from the star, can improve the accuracy of such analyses considerably. We have measured the complex refractive index in a temperature range of 10-973 K for one mineral of each of those types of silicate, i.e., for an olivine and an enstatite of typical (terrestrial) composition. Thus, our data extend the temperature range of previous data to higher values and the compositional range to higher iron contents. We analyze the temperature dependence of oscillator frequencies and damping parameters governing the spectral characteristics of the bands and calculate absorption cross-sectional spectra that can be compared with astronomical emission spectra. We demonstrate the usefulness of our new data by comparing spectra calculated for a 100 K dust temperature with the ISO SWS spectrum of IRAS 09425-6040.

  14. Temperature-Dependent Dielectric Properties of Al/Epoxy Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zijun; Zhou, Wenying; Sui, Xuezhen; Dong, Lina; Cai, Huiwu; Zuo, Jing; Chen, Qingguo

    2016-06-01

    Broadband dielectric spectroscopy was carried out to study the transition in electrical properties of Al/epoxy nanocomposites over the frequency range of 1-107 Hz and the temperature range of -20°C to 200°C. The dielectric permittivity, dissipation factor, and electrical conductivity of the nanocomposites increased with temperature and showed an abrupt increase around the glass transition temperature ( T g). The results clearly reveal an interesting transition of the electrical properties with increasing temperature: insulator below 70°C, conductor at about 70°C. The behavior of the transition in electrical properties of the nanocomposites was explored at different temperatures. The presence of relaxation peaks in the loss tangent and electric modulus spectra of the nanocomposites confirms that the chain segmental dynamics of the polymer is accompanied by the absorption of energy given to the system. It is suggested that the temperature-dependent transition of the electric properties in the nanocomposite is closely associated with the α-relaxation. The large increase in the dissipation factor and electric conductivity depends on the direct current conduction of thermally activated charge carriers resulting from the epoxy matrix above T g.

  15. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    SciTech Connect

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17/sup 0/C nights, 23/sup 0/C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4% per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in /sup 13/C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0% per thousand at 27/sup 0/C/33/sup 0/C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. 28 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  16. A Temperature-Dependent Battery Model for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Leonardo M.; Montez, Carlos; Moraes, Ricardo; Portugal, Paulo; Vasques, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Energy consumption is a major issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), as nodes are powered by chemical batteries with an upper bounded lifetime. Estimating the lifetime of batteries is a difficult task, as it depends on several factors, such as operating temperatures and discharge rates. Analytical battery models can be used for estimating both the battery lifetime and the voltage behavior over time. Still, available models usually do not consider the impact of operating temperatures on the battery behavior. The target of this work is to extend the widely-used Kinetic Battery Model (KiBaM) to include the effect of temperature on the battery behavior. The proposed Temperature-Dependent KiBaM (T-KiBaM) is able to handle operating temperatures, providing better estimates for the battery lifetime and voltage behavior. The performed experimental validation shows that T-KiBaM achieves an average accuracy error smaller than 0.33%, when estimating the lifetime of Ni-MH batteries for different temperature conditions. In addition, T-KiBaM significantly improves the original KiBaM voltage model. The proposed model can be easily adapted to handle other battery technologies, enabling the consideration of different WSN deployments. PMID:28241444

  17. A Temperature-Dependent Battery Model for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Leonardo M; Montez, Carlos; Moraes, Ricardo; Portugal, Paulo; Vasques, Francisco

    2017-02-22

    Energy consumption is a major issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), as nodes are powered by chemical batteries with an upper bounded lifetime. Estimating the lifetime of batteries is a difficult task, as it depends on several factors, such as operating temperatures and discharge rates. Analytical battery models can be used for estimating both the battery lifetime and the voltage behavior over time. Still, available models usually do not consider the impact of operating temperatures on the battery behavior. The target of this work is to extend the widely-used Kinetic Battery Model (KiBaM) to include the effect of temperature on the battery behavior. The proposed Temperature-Dependent KiBaM (T-KiBaM) is able to handle operating temperatures, providing better estimates for the battery lifetime and voltage behavior. The performed experimental validation shows that T-KiBaM achieves an average accuracy error smaller than 0.33%, when estimating the lifetime of Ni-MH batteries for different temperature conditions. In addition, T-KiBaM significantly improves the original KiBaM voltage model. The proposed model can be easily adapted to handle other battery technologies, enabling the consideration of different WSN deployments.

  18. Temperature dependence of resonance Raman spectra of carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, A.; Apostolova, I.; Velitchkova, M.

    2011-04-01

    To understand the mechanism of the photoprotective and antioxidative functions of carotenoids, it is essential to have a profound knowledge of their excited electronic and vibronic states. In the present study we investigate the most powerful antioxidants: β-carotene and lutein by means of resonance Raman spectroscopy. The aim was to study in detail their Raman spectra in solution at room temperature and their changes as a function of temperature. To measure the spectra in their natural environment pyridine has been used as a solvent. It has been chosen because of its polarizability ( n = 1.5092) which is close to that of membrane lipids and proteins. The temperature dependence of the most intensive ν1 band in the range from 77 K to 295 K at 514.5 nm excitation has been obtained. It was found that in pyridine the C dbnd C stretching frequency, its intensity, line shape, and line width are very sensitive to the temperature (the sensitivity being different for the two studied carotenoids). The observed linear temperature dependence of the C dbnd C stretching frequency is explained by a mechanism involving changes of the vibronic coupling and the extent of π-electron delocalization. The different behavior of the temperature-induced broadening of the ν1 band and its intensity for the two studied carotenoids can be associated with the different nature of their solid matrices: glassy for β-carotene and crystalline-like for lutein, owing to their different chemical structures.

  19. Temperature dependence of denitrification in phototrophic river biofilms.

    PubMed

    Boulêtreau, S; Salvo, E; Lyautey, E; Mastrorillo, S; Garabetian, F

    2012-02-01

    Denitrification is an ecosystem service of nitrogen load regulation along the terrestrial-freshwater-marine continuum. The present study documents the short-term temperature sensitivity of denitrification enzyme activity in phototrophic river biofilms as a typical microbial assemblage of this continuum. Denitrification measurements were performed using the acetylene inhibition method at four incubation temperatures: 1.1, 12.1, 21.2 and 30.9°C. For this range of temperature, N(2)O production could be fitted to an exponential function of incubation temperature, yielding mean (±standard error) activation energy of 1.42 (±0.24) eV and Q(10) of 7.0 (±1.4). This first quantification of denitrification enzyme activity temperature dependence in phototrophic river biofilms compares with previous studies performed in soils and sediments. This demonstrates the high temperature dependence of denitrification as compared to other community-level metabolisms such as respiration or photosynthesis. This result suggests that global warming can unbalance natural community metabolisms in phototrophic river biofilms and affect their biogeochemical budget.

  20. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    PubMed

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems.

  1. Multi-Relaxation Temperature-Dependent Dielectric Model of the Arctic Soil at Positive Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, I. V.; Mironov, V. L.

    2014-11-01

    Frequency spectra of the dielectric permittivity of the Arctic soil of Alaska are investigated with allowance for the dipole and ionic relaxation of molecules of the soil moisture at frequencies from 40 MHz to 16 GHz and temperatures from -5 to +25°С. A generalized temperature-dependent multi-relaxation refraction dielectric model of the humid Arctic soil is suggested.

  2. Temperature dependent soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquids.

    PubMed

    Meibohm, Jan; Schreck, Simon; Wernet, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    A novel sample holder is introduced which allows for temperature dependent soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquids in transmission mode. The setup is based on sample cells with x-ray transmissive silicon nitride windows. A cooling circuit allows for temperature regulation of the sample liquid between -10 °C and +50 °C. The setup enables to record soft x-ray absorption spectra of liquids in transmission mode with a temperature resolution of 0.5 K and better. Reliability and reproducibility of the spectra are demonstrated by investigating the characteristic temperature-induced changes in the oxygen K-edge x-ray absorption spectrum of liquid water. These are compared to the corresponding changes in the oxygen K-edge spectra from x-ray Raman scattering.

  3. Temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Roger D.

    1978-01-01

    A temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device includes a magnet and a ferromagnetic member defining therebetween a flow path for liquid metal, the ferromagnetic member being formed of a material having a curie temperature at which a change in the flow rate of the liquid metal is desired. According to the preferred embodiment the magnet is a cylindrical rod magnet axially disposed within a cylindrical member formed of a curie material and having iron pole pieces at the ends. A cylindrical iron shunt and a thin wall stainless steel barrier are disposed in the annulus between magnet and curie material. Below the curie temperature flow between steel barrier and curie material is impeded and above the curie temperature flow impedance is reduced.

  4. Temperature dependent Raman and DFT study of creatine.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Sharma, Poornima; Singh, Ranjan K

    2015-01-01

    Temperature dependent Raman spectra of creatine powder have been recorded in the temperature range 420-100K at regular intervals and different clusters of creatine have been optimized using density functional theory (DFT) in order to determine the effect of temperature on the hydrogen bonded network in the crystal structure of creatine. Vibrational assignments of all the 48 normal modes of the zwitterionic form of creatine have been done in terms of potential energy distribution obtained from DFT calculations. Precise analysis gives information about thermal motion and intermolecular interactions with respect to temperature in the crystal lattice. Formation of higher hydrogen bonded aggregates on cooling can be visualized from the spectra through clear signature of phase transition between 200K and 180K.

  5. Temperature Dependent Anisotropy of Oxypnictide Superconductors Studied by Torque Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyeneth, Stephen; Puzniak, Roman; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Katrych, Sergiy; Bukowski, Zbigniew; Karpinski, Janusz; Mosele, Urs; Kohout, Stefan; Roos, Josef; Keller, Hugo

    2009-03-01

    Single crystals of different oxypnictide superconductors of the family ReFeAsO1-xFy (Re = Sm, Nd, Pr) with various carrier dopings and with masses m˜100 ng have been investigated by means of torque magnetometry. We present most recent data, obtained by using highly sensitive piezoresistive torque sensors from which the superconducting anisotropy parameter γ and the in-plane magnetic penetration depth λab were extracted. As an important result γ was found to increase strongly as the temperature is decreased from Tc down to low temperatures. This unconventional temperature dependence of γ is similar to that observed in the two-band superconductor MgB2 and cannot be explained within the classical Ginzburg-Landau model. This scenario strongly suggests a new multi-band mechanism in the novel class of oxypnictide high-temperature superconductors.

  6. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y. Y.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-06-14

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale.

  7. Time- and temperature-dependent failures of a bonded joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihn, Sangwook

    This dissertation summarizes my study of time- and temperature-dependent behavior of a tubular lap bonded joint to provide a design methodology for windmill blade structures. The bonded joint is between a cast-iron rod and a GFRP composite pipe. The adhesive material is an epoxy containing chopped glass fibers. We proposed a new fabrication method to make concentric and void-less specimens of the tubular joint with a thick adhesive bondline to stimulate the root bond of a blade. The thick bondline facilitates the joint assembly of actual blades. For a better understanding of the behavior of the bonded joint, we studied viscoelastic behavior of the adhesive materials by measuring creep compliance at several temperatures during loading period. We observed that the creep compliance depends highly on the period of loading and the temperature. We applied time-temperature equivalence to the creep compliance of the adhesive material to obtain time-temperature shift factors. We also performed constant-rate of monotonically increased uniaxial tensile tests to measure static strength of the tubular lap joint at several temperatures and different strain-rates. We observed two failure modes from load-deflection curves and failed specimens. One is the brittle mode, which was caused by weakness of the interfacial strength occurring at low temperature and short period of loading. The other is the ductile mode, which was caused by weakness of the adhesive material at high temperature and long period of loading. Transition from the brittle to the ductile mode appeared as the temperature or the loading period increased. We also performed tests under uniaxial tensile-tensile cyclic loadings to measure fatigue strength of the bonded joint at several temperatures, frequencies and stress ratios. The fatigue data are analyzed statistically by applying the residual strength degradation model to calculate statistical distribution of the fatigue life. Combining the time-temperature

  8. Temperature-Dependent Giant Magnetoimpedance Effect in Amorphous Soft Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, M.; Roy, R. K.; Panda, A. K.; Greve, D. W.; Ohodnicki, P.; McHenry, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Giant magnetoimpedance (GMI)-based devices offer potential as next-generation low-cost, flexible, ultrasensitive sensors. They can be used in applications that include current sensors, field sensors, stress sensors, and others. Challenging applications involve operation at high temperatures, and therefore studies of GMI temperature dependence and performance of soft magnetic materials are needed. We present a high-temperature GMI study on an amorphous soft magnetic microwire from room temperature to 560°C. The GMI ratio was observed to be nearly constant at ˜86% at low temperatures and to decrease rapidly at ˜290°C, finally reaching a near-zero value at 500°C. The rapid drop in GMI ratio at 290°C is associated with a reduction in the long-range ferromagnetic order as measured by the spontaneous magnetization ( M) at the Curie temperature ( T c). We also correlated the impedance with the magnetic properties of the material. From room temperature to 290°C, the impedance was found to be proportional to the square root of the magnetization to magnetic anisotropy ratio. Lastly, M( T) has been fit using a Handrich-Kobe model, which describes the system with a modified Brillouin function and an asymmetrical distribution of exchange interactions. We infer that the structural fluctuations of the amorphous phase result in a relatively small asymmetry in the fluctuation parameters.

  9. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.; Wilson, Michael A.; Schaller, Emily L.

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  10. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O; Wilson, Michael A; Schaller, Emily L

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  11. Temperature dependence of the scanning performance of an electrostatic microscanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Noriaki; Ikeda, Kentaro; Sawada, Renshi

    2016-03-01

    An optical microscanner is one examples of an optical-MEMS device, which scans a laser beam across one or two dimensions by reflecting it. The microscanner has a range of applications, such as laser printers, laser displays and bio-medical imaging. For each application, the mirror is required to oscillated at a certain frequency and optical scan angle. However, its scanning performance varies with temperature. To address this issue, the temperature dependence of the natural frequency of a 1D electrostatic microscanner formed of single-crystal silicon is investigated both theorectically and experimentally in this paper. As the temperature rises from 30 °C to 80 °C, the calculated value of the natural frequency decreased from 1910.81 Hz to 1908.68 Hz, and the experimental value decreased from 2123.85 Hz to 2120.56 Hz. The percentage changes in calculated and experimental results were  -0.11% and  -0.15%, and thus the former was consistent with the latter. The factors of the variation of natural frequency are the deformation caused by thermal expansion and the temperature dependence of shear modulus. The results of theoretical calculations indicated that the principal factor in the change of natural frequency was the shear modulus on the temperature.

  12. Temperature-Dependent Adhesion of Graphene Suspended on a Trench.

    PubMed

    Budrikis, Zoe; Zapperi, Stefano

    2016-01-13

    Graphene deposited over a trench has been studied in the context of nanomechanical resonators, where experiments indicate adhesion of the graphene sheet to the trench boundary and sidewalls leads to self-tensioning; however, this adhesion is not well understood. We use molecular dynamics to simulate graphene deposited on a trench and study how adhesion to the sidewalls depends on substrate interaction, temperature, and curvature of the edge of the trench. Over the range of parameters we study, the depth at the center of the sheet is approximately linear in substrate interaction strength and temperature but not trench width, and we explain this using a one-dimensional model for the sheet configuration.

  13. Temperature Dependence of Thermal Expansion for Geophysical Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zheng-Hua

    2015-07-01

    A simple and straightforward method for evaluating and predicting the volume and volumetric thermal expansivity for geophysical minerals at high temperatures is developed in this paper based on the approximations that the product of the thermal expansion coefficient and the isothermal bulk modulus as well as the isothermal bulk modulus are both linearly dependent with temperature. The tests on four geophysical minerals (MgO, CaO, , and lend strong support to the validity of this method. The analyses and comparisons presented here demonstrate that this method is far better than similar models given by earlier workers.

  14. Temperature-dependent dielectric properties of a thermoplastic gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni; Neitzert, Heinz C.; Sorrentino, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    The frequency and the temperature dependence of the dielectric properties of a thermoplastic gelatin based bio-material have been investigated. At lower frequencies the dielectric response is strongly affected by charge carrier accumulation at the electrodes which modifies the dominating hopping conduction mechanism. The variation of the ac conductivity with frequency obeys a Jonscher type power law except for a small deviation in the low frequency range due to the electrode polarization effect. The master curve of the ac conductivity data shows that the conductivity relaxation of the gelatin is temperature independent.

  15. Temperature Dependent Electron Transport Studies for Diffuse Discharge Switching Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    of <e>, k (<e >), for C2F6 and C3F8 at gas temperature up to 7!fu K. These results may be used to under stand the influence of elevated gas...of k (<&>) have also been performed in c3F8 as a functionaof gas temperature up to 750 R in Ar buffer gas (over the mean electron energy range 0.76...dependent electron attachment pro- cesses are negligible indicating that electron attachment to C3F8 at t hese t emperatures i s predomi- nantly dissociati

  16. A temperature dependent SPICE macro-model for power MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.G.

    1992-05-01

    A power MOSFET macro-model for use with the circuit simulator SPICE has been developed suitable for use over the temperature range of {minus}55 to 125{degrees}C. The model is comprised of a single parameter set with the temperature dependence accessed through the SPICE TEMP card. This report describes in detail the development of the model and the extraction algorithms used to obtain model parameters. The extraction algorithms are described in sufficient detail to allow for automated measurements which in turn allows for rapid and cost effective development of an accurate SPICE model for any power MOSFET. 22 refs.

  17. Composition dependence of ternary Pt-Ni-Cr catalyst activity for the methanol electro-oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Min Ku; McGinn, Paul J.

    Various compositions of binary and ternary Pt-Ni-Cr alloys were investigated as catalysts for the methanol electro-oxidation reaction (MOR). Among the binary (Pt 28Ni 72/C and Pt 28Cr 72/C) and ternary Pt-Ni-Cr catalysts (Pt 28Ni 36Cr 36/C, Pt 22Ni 39Cr 39/C, Pt 33Ni 31Cr 36/C, and Pt 33Ni 36Cr 31/C) examined, the Pt 28Ni 36Cr 36/C composition exhibited the highest MOR mass activity (4.42 A g cat. -1) in the as-prepared version, which was higher than the 3.58 A g cat. -1 value of the PtRu/C catalyst after 60 min of chronoamperometry testing. The order of mass activity for the MOR was Pt 28Ni 36Cr 36/C > Pt 33Ni 36Cr 31/C > Pt 22Ni 39Cr 39/C > Pt 33Ni 31Cr 36/C > Pt 28Cr 72/C > Pt 28Ni 72/C, which was slightly changed to Pt 28Ni 36Cr 36/C > Pt 22Ni 39Cr 39/C > Pt 33Ni 36Cr 31/C > Pt 33Ni 31Cr 36/C > Pt 28Cr 72/C > Pt 28Ni 72/C after a conditioning process. The effect of anodic conditioning was also studied. A combination of X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, and chronoamperometry experiments revealed that the conditioning process caused dissolution and an oxidation state change of metallic Ni and Cr 2O 3 in the binary catalysts. The higher MOR mass activities of the ternary catalysts compared to the binary ones is attributed to co-alloying of Ni and Cr, leading to exposure of more Pt on the catalyst surface without reducing specific activities of the catalysts. The results of this study also correlate well with a prior ranking of catalytic activity of the same compositions in the form of thin film catalysts that we processed and evaluated by a high-throughput combinatorial approach [J.S. Cooper, M.K. Jeon, P.J. McGinn, Electrochem. Commun. 10 (2008) 1545-1547].

  18. Effect of solvent strength and temperature on retention for a polar-endcapped, octadecylsiloxane-bonded silica stationary phase with methanol-water mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Kiridena, Waruna; Poole, Colin F; Koziol, Wladyslaw W

    2004-12-10

    Synergi Hydro-RP is a new type of polar-endcapped, octadecylsiloxane-bonded silica packing for reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Its retention properties as a function of solvent strength and temperature are evaluated from the change in retention factors over the composition range (0-70% v/v methanol) and temperature range (25-65 degrees C) using the solvation parameter model and response surface methodologies. The main factors that affect retention are solute size and hydrogen-bond basicity, with minor contributions from solute hydrogen-bond acidity, dipole-type and electron lone pair interactions. Within the easily accessible range for both temperature and solvent strength, the ability to change selectivity is much greater for solvent strength than temperature. Also, a significant portion of the effect of increasing temperature is to reduce retention without changing selectivity. Response surfaces for the system constants are smooth and non-linear, except for cavity formation and dispersion interactions (v system constant), which is linear. Modeling of the response surfaces suggests that solvent strength and temperature are not independent factors for the b, s and e system constants and for the model intercept (c term).

  19. Temperature dependence of predation depends on the relative performance of predators and prey.

    PubMed

    Öhlund, Gunnar; Hedström, Per; Norman, Sven; Hein, Catherine L; Englund, Göran

    2015-01-22

    The temperature dependence of predation rates is a key issue for understanding and predicting the responses of ecosystems to climate change. Using a simple mechanistic model, we demonstrate that differences in the relative performances of predator and prey can cause strong threshold effects in the temperature dependence of attack rates. Empirical data on the attack rate of northern pike (Esox lucius) feeding on brown trout (Salmo trutta) confirm this result. Attack rates fell sharply below a threshold temperature of +11°C, which corresponded to a shift in relative performance of pike and brown trout with respect to maximum attack and escape swimming speeds. The average attack speed of pike was an order of magnitude lower than the escape speed of brown trout at 5°C, but approximately equal at temperatures above 11°C. Thresholds in the temperature dependence of ecological rates can create tipping points in the responses of ecosystems to increasing temperatures. Thus, identifying thresholds is crucial when predicting future effects of climate warming.

  20. Temperature dependence of carrier capture by defects in gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, William R.; Modine, Normand A.

    2015-08-01

    This report examines the temperature dependence of the capture rate of carriers by defects in gallium arsenide and compares two previously published theoretical treatments of this based on multi phonon emission (MPE). The objective is to reduce uncertainty in atomistic simulations of gain degradation in III-V HBTs from neutron irradiation. A major source of uncertainty in those simulations is poor knowledge of carrier capture rates, whose values can differ by several orders of magnitude between various defect types. Most of this variation is due to different dependence on temperature, which is closely related to the relaxation of the defect structure that occurs as a result of the change in charge state of the defect. The uncertainty in capture rate can therefore be greatly reduced by better knowledge of the defect relaxation.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Mechanical Stiffness and Dissipation in Ultrananocrystalline Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    In nanocrystalline / nano -scale materials the temperature dependence of the modulus can be much different than for single crystals because of the...presence of a large proportion of grain boundaries. Recent progress has shown that it is possible to correlate changes in Young’s modulus of nano ...thermal properties of nanocrystalline elemental selenium studied by x-ray diffraction," Physical Review B, vol. 56, p. 14330, 1997. [26] C. Seoanez

  2. Time temperature-stress dependence of boron fiber deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Flexural stress relaxation (FSR) and flexural internal friction (FIF) techniques were employed to measure the time-dependent deformation of boron fibers from -190 to 800 C. The principal specimens were 203 micrometers diameter fibers commercially produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a 13 micrometer tungsten substrate. The observation of complete creep strain recovery with time and temperature indicated that CVD boron fibers deform flexurally as anelastic solids with no plastic component.

  3. Temperature-Dependent Conformations of Model Viscosity Index Improvers

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Uma Shantini; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-05-01

    Lubricants are comprised of base oils and additives where additives are chemicals that are deliberately added to the oil to enhance properties and inhibit degradation of the base oils. Viscosity index (VI) improvers are an important class of additives that reduce the decline of fluid viscosity with temperature [1], enabling optimum lubricant performance over a wider range of operating temperatures. These additives are typically high molecular weight polymers, such as, but not limited to, polyisobutylenes, olefin copolymer, and polyalkylmethacrylates, that are added in concentrations of 2-5% (w/w). Appropriate polymers, when dissolved in base oil, expand from a coiled to an uncoiled state with increasing temperature [2]. The ability of VI additives to increase their molar volume and improve the temperature-viscosity dependence of lubricants suggests there is a strong relationship between molecular structure and additive functionality [3]. In this work, we aim to quantify the changes in polymer size with temperature for four polyisobutylene (PIB) based molecular structures at the nano-scale using molecular simulation tools. As expected, the results show that the polymers adopt more conformations at higher temperatures, and there is a clear indication that the expandability of a polymer is strongly influenced by molecular structure.

  4. Temperature dependence of the lumirhodopsin I-lumirhodopsin II equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Szundi, Istvan; Epps, Jacqueline; Lewis, James W; Kliger, David S

    2010-07-20

    Time-resolved absorbance measurements, over a spectral range from 300 to 700 nm, were made at delays from 1 micros to 2 ms after photoexcitation of bovine rhodopsin in hypotonically washed membrane suspensions over a range of temperature from 10 to 35 degrees C. The purpose was to better understand the reversibility of the Lumi I-Lumi II process that immediately precedes Schiff base deprotonation in the activation of rhodopsin under physiological conditions. To prevent artifacts due to rotation of rhodopsin and its photoproducts in the membrane, probe light in the time-resolved absorbance studies was polarized at the magic angle (54.7 degrees) relative to the excitation laser polarization axis. The difference spectrum associated with the Lumi I to Lumi II reaction was found to have larger amplitude at 10 degrees C compared to higher temperatures, suggesting that a significant back-reaction exists for this process and that an equilibrated mixture forms. The equilibrium favors Lumi I entropically, and van't Hoff plot curvature shows the reaction enthalpy depends on temperature. The results suggest that Lumi II changes its interaction with the membrane in a temperature-dependent way, possibly binding a membrane lipid more strongly at lower temperatures (compared to its precursor). To elucidate the origin of the time-resolved absorbance changes, linear dichroism measurements were also made at 20 degrees C. The time constant for protein rotation in the membrane was found to be identical to the time constant for the Lumi I-Lumi II process, which is consistent with a common microscopic origin. We conclude that Lumi II (the last protonated Schiff base photointermediate under physiological conditions) is the first photointermediate whose properties depend on the protein-lipid environment.

  5. Imidazolium-functionalized poly(ether ether ketone) as membrane and electrode ionomer for low-temperature alkaline membrane direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaoming; Gu, Shuang; He, Gaohong; Wu, Xuemei; Benziger, Jay

    2014-03-01

    A series of imidazolium-functionalized poly(ether ether ketone)s (PEEK-ImOHs) were successfully synthesized by a two-step chloromethylation-Menshutkin reaction followed by hydroxide exchange. PEEK-ImOH membranes with ion exchange capacity (IEC) ranging from 1.56 to 2.24 mmol g-1 were prepared by solution casting. PEEK-ImOHs show selective solubility in aqueous solutions of acetone and tetrahydrofuran, but are insoluble in lower alcohols. PEEK-ImOH membranes with IEC of 2.03 mmol g-1 have high hydroxide conductivity (52 mS cm-1 at 20 °C), acceptable water swelling ratio (51% at 60 °C), and great tensile strength (78 MPa), and surprising flexibility (elongation-to-break of 168%), and high thermal stability (Decomposition temperature: 193 °C). In addition, PEEK-ImOH membranes show low methanol permeability (1.3-6.9 × 10-7 cm2 s-1). PEEK-ImOH membrane was tested in methanol/O2 fuel cell as both the HEM and the ionomer impregnated into the catalyst layer; the open circuit voltage is 0.84 V and the peak power density is 31 mW cm-2.

  6. Temperature dependence of the properties of vapor-deposited polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, F. Y.; Blanton, T. N.; Harding, D. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2003-04-01

    The Young's modulus and helium gas permeability of vapor-deposited poly(4,4'-oxydiphenylenepyromellitimide) were measured at cryogenic and elevated temperatures (10-573 K). The Young's modulus decreased with increasing temperature from 5.5 GPa at 10 K to 1.8 GPa at 573 K. The temperature dependency of the permeability followed the Arrhenius' relationship, with different activation energy for permeation for samples imidized under different conditions. The effect of the imidization conditions on the permeation properties could be explained in terms of morphology/crystallinity as determined by x-ray diffraction techniques. Imidizing in air instead of nitrogen increased the permeability while lowering the activation energy for permeation and crystallinity. Imidizing at higher heating rates (in nitrogen) resulted in higher permeability, lower activation energy for permeation, and larger and fewer crystallites with better-aligned lattice planes.

  7. Temperature-dependent particle-number projected moment of inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2008-05-15

    Expressions of the parallel and perpendicular temperature-dependent particle-number projected nuclear moment of inertia have been established by means of a discrete projection method. They generalize that of the FTBCS method and are well adapted to numerical computation. The effects of particle-number fluctuations have been numerically studied for some even-even actinide nuclei by using the single-particle energies and eigenstates of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It has been shown that the parallel moment of inertia is practically not modified by the use of the projection method. In contrast, the discrepancy between the projected and FTBCS perpendicular moment of inertia values may reach 5%. Moreover, the particle-number fluctuation effects vary not only as a function of the temperature but also as a function of the deformation for a given temperature. This is not the case for the system energy.

  8. Temperature dependence of charge transport in conjugated single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Eek; Kamenetska, Masha; Venkataraman, Latha

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, the break junction technique using a scanning tunneling microscope geometry has proven to be an important tool to understand electron transport through single molecule junctions. Here, we use this technique to probe transport through junctions at temperatures ranging from 5K to 300K. We study three amine-terminated (-NH2) conjugated molecules: a benzene, a biphenyl and a terphenyl derivative. We find that amine groups bind selectively to undercoordinate gold atoms gold all the way down to 5K, yielding single molecule junctions with well-defined conductances. Furthermore, we find that the conductance of a single molecule junction increases with temperature and we present a mechanism for this temperature dependent transport result. Funded by a Rubicon Grant from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the NSEC program of NSF under grant # CHE-0641523.

  9. Density of biogas digestate depending on temperature and composition.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Mandy; Schneider, Nico

    2015-09-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of biogas digestate to ensure an optimal dimensioning and a precise design of biogas plant components like stirring devices, pumps and heat exchangers. In this study the density of biogas digestates with different compositions was measured using pycnometers at ambient pressure in a temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15K. The biogas digestates were taken from semi-continuous experiments, in which the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina, corn silage and a mixture of both were used as feedstocks. The results show an increase of density with increasing total solid content and a decrease with increasing temperature. Three equations to calculate the density of biogas digestate were set up depending on temperature as well as on the total solid content, organic composition and elemental composition, respectively. All correlations show a relative deviation below 1% compared to experimental data.

  10. Dielectric properties of blood: an investigation of temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Jaspard, F; Nadi, M

    2002-08-01

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the electrical parameters (permittivity and conductivity) of blood. The measuring system, composed of an impedancemeter (HP 4291 A), an open-ended coaxial line and a temperature controlling set, was designed for dielectric measurement in the frequency range of 1 MHz to 1 GHz. Measurements were performed on ex vivo blood of humans and animals (cow and sheep). The results obtained show the weak sensibility and a change of sign of the temperature coefficient of the relative permittivity (about 0.3% degrees C(-1) at 1 MHz and -0.3% degrees C(-1) at 1 GHz). The conductivity presents a more significant variation (of the order of 1% degrees C(-1) over the whole operating frequency range.

  11. The temperature-dependence of elementary reaction rates: beyond Arrhenius.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ian W M

    2008-04-01

    The rates of chemical reactions and the dependence of their rate constants on temperature are of central importance in chemistry. Advances in the temperature-range and accuracy of kinetic measurements, principally inspired by the need to provide data for models of combustion, atmospheric, and astrophysical chemistry, show up the inadequacy of the venerable Arrhenius equation--at least, over wide ranges of temperature. This critical review will address the question of how to reach an understanding of the factors that control the rates of 'non-Arrhenius' reactions. It makes use of a number of recent kinetic measurements and shows how developments in advanced forms of transition state theory provide satisfactory explanations of complex kinetic behaviour (72 references).

  12. Temperature Dependent Cyclic Deformation Mechanisms in Haynes 188 Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Castelli, Michael G.; Allen, Gorden P.; Ellis, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The cyclic deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188, has been investigated over a range of temperatures between 25 and 1000 C under isothermal and in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions. Constant mechanical strain rates (epsilon-dot) of 10(exp -3)/s and 10(exp -4)/s were examined with a fully reversed strain range of 0.8%. Particular attention was given to the effects of dynamic strain aging (DSA) on the stress-strain response and low cycle fatigue life. A correlation between cyclic deformation behavior and microstructural substructure was made through detailed transmission electron microscopy. Although DSA was found to occur over a wide temperature range between approximately 300 and 750 C the microstructural characteristics and the deformation mechanisms responsible for DSA varied considerably and were dependent upon temperature. In general, the operation of DSA processes led to a maximum of the cyclic stress amplitude at 650 C and was accompanied by pronounced planar slip, relatively high dislocation density, and the generation of stacking faults. DSA was evidenced through a combination of phenomena, including serrated yielding, an inverse dependence of the maximum cyclic hardening with epsilon-dot, and an instantaneous inverse epsilon-dot sensitivity verified by specialized epsilon-dot -change tests. The TMF cyclic hardening behavior of the alloy appeared to be dictated by the substructural changes occuring at the maximum temperature in the TMF cycle.

  13. Temperature dependence of Brewer UV measurements at Rome station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siani, Anna M.; Benevento, Giuseppe; Casale, Giuseppe R.

    2003-11-01

    Decreasing trends of total ozone affect mainly solar ultraviolet (UV) levels at ground level with adverse effects on the biosphere. Highly accurate measurements of solar UV irradiance have become an important issue to assess UV trends. To detect these trends stations with well calibrated instruments, with long-term stability and Quality Assurance (QA)/ Quality Control (QC) carefully followed procedures, are necessary. The Solar Radiometry Observatory of Rome, University "La Sapienza" (city center) is one of the stations regularly measuring UV irradiance in Italy. Measurements of UV spectral (290-325 nm) irradiance started in 1992, using Brewer MKIV 067. Measurements of total irradiance contained in the 280 - 320 nm waveband begun in 2000 with the YES UVB-1 broad-band radiometer. An investigation of the internal temperature dependence of the spectral responsivity to improve the quality of the Brewer UV data was carried out. The study was based on the analysis of responsivity files recorded during the years 2000-2002. Responsivities are provided by specific tests through a set of five 50 W quartz tungsten-halogen lamps, traceable to the standards of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The lamp tests allow to measure any changes in the instrument response over time. It was observed that a decrease in the instrument's responsivity resulted from an increase of the internal temperature. A methodology based on a family of responsivity files at different temperature intervals is proposed to allow correction of UV irradiances using the responsivity file at the corresponding temperatures. The mean percentage differnce between temperature corrected and non-corrected Brewer data varies from 0.8% to 1.5% over an internal temperature of 8°C-42°C. In addition the results of a field evaluation in Rome between Brewer 067 and two temperature stabilized instruments, a broad-band radiometer (YES UVB-1) and a moderate bandwidth multichannel radiometer

  14. Quantitative Transcriptomics Reveals the Growth- and Nutrient-Dependent Response of a Streamlined Marine Methylotroph to Methanol and Naturally Occurring Dissolved Organic Matter

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Oscar A.; Repeta, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The members of the OM43 clade of Betaproteobacteria are abundant coastal methylotrophs with a range of carbon-utilizing capabilities. However, their underlying transcriptional and metabolic responses to shifting conditions or different carbon substrates remain poorly understood. We examined the transcriptional dynamics of OM43 isolate NB0046 subjected to various inorganic nutrient, vitamin, and carbon substrate regimes over different growth phases to (i) develop a quantitative model of its mRNA content; (ii) identify transcriptional markers of physiological activity, nutritional state, and carbon and energy utilization; and (iii) identify pathways involved in methanol or naturally occurring dissolved organic matter (DOM) metabolism. Quantitative transcriptomics, achieved through addition of internal RNA standards, allowed for analyses on a transcripts-per-cell scale. This streamlined bacterium exhibited substantial shifts in total mRNA content (ranging from 1,800 to 17 transcripts cell−1 in the exponential and deep stationary phases, respectively) and gene-specific transcript abundances (>1,000-fold increases in some cases), depending on the growth phase and nutrient conditions. Carbon metabolism genes exhibited substantial dynamics, including those for ribulose monophosphate, tricarboxylic acid (TCA), and proteorhodopsin, as well as methanol dehydrogenase (xoxF), which, while always the most abundant transcript, increased from 5 to 120 transcripts cell−1 when cultures were nutrient and vitamin amended. In the DOM treatment, upregulation of TCA cycle, methylcitrate cycle, vitamin, and organic phosphorus genes suggested a metabolic route for this complex mixture of carbon substrates. The genome-wide inventory of transcript abundances produced here provides insight into a streamlined marine bacterium’s regulation of carbon metabolism and energy flow, providing benchmarks for evaluating the activity of OM43 populations in situ. PMID:27879330

  15. The Temperature Dependence of Soil Moisture Characteristics of Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehzadeh, Amir

    1990-01-01

    The temperature dependence of static and dynamic characteristics of four soils: glass beads, Plainfield sand, Plano silt loam, and Elkmound sandy loam were explored. Gain -factor model was employed for quantifying the temperature dependences. The study required novel methods and technologies which were developed and employed for the rapid, and transient measurement of soil-moisture characteristics of these soils. A pressurized 2 cm-high column of soil is sandwiched between two air blocking membranes interfacing outside pressurized water system. Water content (Theta ) is measured with a 2 Curie gamma-ray source combined with a fast detection system giving a statistical accuracy of +/-0.2%. Moisture potential ( Psi) down to -2000 cm was measured with a newly developed "stripper" tensionmeter. While a slowly varying soil-water pressure was imposed on the thin sample through the membranes, firmly held in contact with the soil, water content and moisture -potentials were being monitored in the sample. A plot of water content versus water pressure gave the static characteristics (Theta,Psi ) of soils. An array of tensiometers (between the membranes) allowed measurement of the potential profile; in conjunction with the time-varying water content this permitted measurement of dynamic characteristics, conductivity versus water content (K,Theta). For the (Theta, Psi) characteristics, the measurements indicated that, wholly for glass beads, and largely for sand, the surface tension of pure water governs the temperature response. The temperature dependence of Plano silt loam was largely independent of water content and was roughly five times the temperature dependence of the surface tension of pure water. For Elkmound sandy loam the dependence was complex and not easily explained. Two factors appear to limit further system improvement. (1) A sample thinner than 2 cm faces difficulties of fitting three tensionmeters into the thickness. This limit on the thickness, in turn

  16. Temperature dependent conformation studies of Calmodulin Protein using Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneja, Sahil; Bhartiya, Vivek Kumar; Negi, Sunita

    2016-10-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) protein plays a very crucial role in the calcium signaling inside the eukaryotic cell structure [1, 2]. It can also bind to other proteins/targets and facilitate various activities inside the cell [3, 4]. Temperature dependent conformation changes in the CaM protein are studied with extensive molecular dynamics simulations. The quantitative comparison of simulation data with various forms of experimental results probing different aspects of the folding process can facilitate robust assessment of the accuracy of the calculations. It can also provide a detailed structural interpretation for the experimental observations as well as physical interpretation for theory behind different aspects of the experiment. Earlier these kinds of studies have been performed experimentally using fluorescence measurements as in [5]. The calcium bound form of CaM is observed to undergo a reversible conformation change in the range 295-301 K at calcium ion concentration 150 mM. The transition temperature was observed to depend on the calcium ion concentration of the protein. Leap-dynamics approach was used earlier to study the temperature dependent conformation change of CaM [6]. At 290 K, both the N- and C-lobes were stable, at 325 K, the C-lobe unfolds whereas at 360 both the lobes unfold [6]. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of 100 ns each for the temperatures 325 K and 375 K on the apo form of CaM, 3CLN and 1CFD. A remarkable dependence of the temperature is observed on the overall dynamics of both the forms of the protein as reported in our earlier study [7, 8]. 1CFD shows a much flexible linker as compared to 3CLN whereas the overall dynamics of the lobes mainly N-lobe is observed to be more in later case. Salt bridge formation between the residues 2 (ASP) and 148 (LYS) leads to a more compact form of 1CFD at 325 K. The unfolding of the protein is observed to increase with the increase in the temperature similar to the earlier reported

  17. Complete FDTD analysis of microwave heating processes in frequency-dependent and temperature dependent media

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, F.; Jecko, B.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the temperature rise in a material modifies its physical properties and, particularly, its dielectric permittivity. The dissipated electromagnetic power involved in microwave heating processes depending on {var_epsilon}({omega}), the electrical characteristics of the heated media must vary with the temperature to achieve realistic simulations. In this paper, the authors present a fast and accurate algorithm allowing, through a combined electromagnetic and thermal procedure, to take into account the influence of the temperature on the electrical properties of materials. First, the temperature dependence of the complex permittivity ruled by a Debye relaxation equation is investigated, and a realistic model is proposed and validated. Then, a frequency-dependent finite-differences time-domain ((FD){sup 2}TD) method is used to assess the instantaneous electromagnetic power lost by dielectric hysteresis. Within the same iteration, a time-scaled form of the heat transfer equation allows one to calculate the temperature distribution in the heated medium and then to correct the dielectric properties of the material using the proposed model. These new characteristics will be taken into account by the EM solver at the next iteration. This combined algorithm allows a significant reduction of computation time. An application to a microwave oven is proposed.

  18. Age-dependent changes in temperature regulation - a mini review.

    PubMed

    Blatteis, Clark M

    2012-01-01

    It is now well recognized that the body temperature of older men and women is lower than that of younger people and that their tolerance of thermal extremes is more limited. The regulation of body temperature does not depend on a single organ, but rather involves almost all the systems of the body, i.e. systems not exclusively dedicated to thermoregulatory functions such as the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Since these deteriorate naturally with advancing age, the decrement in their functions resonates throughout all the bodily processes, including those that control body temperature. To the extent that the age-related changes in some of these, e.g. in the musculoskeletal system, can be slowed, or even prevented, by certain measures, e.g. fitness training, so can the decrements in thermoregulatory functions. Some deficits, however, are unavoidable, e.g. structural skin changes and metabolic alterations. These impact directly on the ability of the elderly to maintain thermal homeostasis, particularly when challenged by ambient thermal extremes. Since the maintenance of a relatively stable, optimal core temperature is one of the body's most important activities, its very survival can be threatened by these disorders. The present article describes the principal, age-associated changes in physiological functions that could affect the ability of seniors to maintain their body temperature when exposed to hot or cold environments.

  19. Temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in pure amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, M. S. R. N. Haberl, B.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.

    2014-03-21

    High temperature nanoindentation has been performed on pure ion-implanted amorphous silicon (unrelaxed a-Si) and structurally relaxed a-Si to investigate the temperature dependence of mechanical deformation, including pressure-induced phase transformations. Along with the indentation load-depth curves, ex situ measurements such as Raman micro-spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis on the residual indents reveal the mode of deformation under the indenter. While unrelaxed a-Si deforms entirely via plastic flow up to 200 °C, a clear transition in the mode of deformation is observed in relaxed a-Si with increasing temperature. Up to 100 °C, pressure-induced phase transformation and the observation of either crystalline (r8/bc8) end phases or pressure-induced a-Si occurs in relaxed a-Si. However, with further increase of temperature, plastic flow rather than phase transformation is the dominant mode of deformation. It is believed that the elevated temperature and pressure together induce bond softening and “defect” formation in structurally relaxed a-Si, leading to the inhibition of phase transformation due to pressure-releasing plastic flow under the indenter.

  20. Temperature dependence and shape effect in high-temperature microwave heating of nickel oxide powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, H.; Kashimura, K.; Hayashi, M.; Matsumuro, T.; Watanabe, T.; Mitani, T.; Shinohara, N.

    2015-02-01

    The temperature dependence of microwave absorption was investigated for Ni1-yO particles over the frequency range 2.0-13.5 GHz and temperature range 25-1000 °C. Using a coaxial transmission line method with a network analyzer, both the real and imaginary parts of the relative permittivity (ε‧r and ε″r, respectively) and permeability (μ‧r and μ″r, respectively) were measured; finding that both are largely dependent on the temperature at all frequencies. Furthermore, permeability loss factors related to shape effects were observed at high frequencies, indicating an increase in the microwave-absorption properties. A modified form of Mie's theory was applied to discuss these effects, wherein a spherical model demonstrating a close fit to the shape effect data suggests a more complex microwave-absorption behavior at increased temperature.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Magnetic Excitations: Terahertz Magnons above the Curie Temperature.

    PubMed

    Qin, H J; Zakeri, Kh; Ernst, A; Kirschner, J

    2017-03-24

    When an ordered spin system of a given dimensionality undergoes a second order phase transition, the dependence of the order parameter, i.e., magnetization on temperature, can be well described by thermal excitations of elementary collective spin excitations (magnons). However, the behavior of magnons themselves, as a function of temperature and across the transition temperature T_{C}, is an unknown issue. Utilizing spin-polarized high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy, we monitor the high-energy (terahertz) magnons, excited in an ultrathin ferromagnet, as a function of temperature. We show that the magnons' energy and lifetime decrease with temperature. The temperature-induced renormalization of the magnons' energy and lifetime depends on the wave vector. We provide quantitative results on the temperature-induced damping and discuss the possible mechanism, e.g., multimagnon scattering. A careful investigation of physical quantities determining the magnons' propagation indicates that terahertz magnons sustain their propagating character even at temperatures far above T_{C}.

  2. Temperature-dependent Refractive Index of Silicon and Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley J.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Madison, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon and germanium are perhaps the two most well-understood semiconductor materials in the context of solid state device technologies and more recently micromachining and nanotechnology. Meanwhile, these two materials are also important in the field of infrared lens design. Optical instruments designed for the wavelength range where these two materials are transmissive achieve best performance when cooled to cryogenic temperatures to enhance signal from the scene over instrument background radiation. In order to enable high quality lens designs using silicon and germanium at cryogenic temperatures, we have measured the absolute refractive index of multiple prisms of these two materials using the Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, as a function of both wavelength and temperature. For silicon, we report absolute refractive index and thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) at temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K at wavelengths from 1.1 to 5.6 pin, while for germanium, we cover temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K and wavelengths from 1.9 to 5.5 microns. We compare our measurements with others in the literature and provide temperature-dependent Sellmeier coefficients based on our data to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures. Citing the wide variety of values for the refractive indices of these two materials found in the literature, we reiterate the importance of measuring the refractive index of a sample from the same batch of raw material from which final optical components are cut when absolute accuracy greater than k5 x 10" is desired.

  3. Ubiquitous and temperature-dependent neural plasticity in hibernators.

    PubMed

    von der Ohe, Christina G; Darian-Smith, Corinna; Garner, Craig C; Heller, H Craig

    2006-10-11

    Hibernating mammals are remarkable for surviving near-freezing brain temperatures and near cessation of neural activity for a week or more at a time. This extreme physiological state is associated with dendritic and synaptic changes in hippocampal neurons. Here, we investigate whether these changes are a ubiquitous phenomenon throughout the brain that is driven by temperature. We iontophoretically injected Lucifer yellow into several types of neurons in fixed slices from hibernating ground squirrels. We analyzed neuronal microstructure from animals at several stages of torpor at two different ambient temperatures, and during the summer. We show that neuronal cell bodies, dendrites, and spines from several cell types in hibernating ground squirrels retract on entry into torpor, change little over the course of several days, and then regrow during the 2 h return to euthermia. Similar structural changes take place in neurons from the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus, suggesting a global phenomenon. Investigation of neural microstructure from groups of animals hibernating at different ambient temperatures revealed that there is a linear relationship between neural retraction and minimum body temperature. Despite significant temperature-dependent differences in extent of retraction during torpor, recovery reaches the same final values of cell body area, dendritic arbor complexity, and spine density. This study demonstrates large-scale and seemingly ubiquitous neural plasticity in the ground squirrel brain during torpor. It also defines a temperature-driven model of dramatic neural plasticity, which provides a unique opportunity to explore mechanisms of large-scale regrowth in adult mammals, and the effects of remodeling on learning and memory.

  4. Temperature-dependent dielectric properties of slightly hydrated horn keratin.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Tasneem Zahra; Khan, Muhammad Abdullah

    2008-04-01

    With an aim to reveal the mechanism of protein-water interaction in a predominantly two phase model protein system this study investigates the frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric constant epsilon' and loss factor epsilon'' in cow horn keratin in the frequency range 30 Hz to 3 MHz and temperature range 30-200 degrees C at two levels of hydration. These two levels of hydration were achieved by exposing the sample to air at 50% relative humidity (RH) at ambient temperature and by evacuating the sample for 72 h at 105 degrees C. A low frequency dispersion (LFD) and an intermediate frequency alpha-dispersion were the two main dielectric responses observed in the air-dried sample. The LFD and the high frequency arm of the alpha-dispersion followed the same fractional power law of frequency. Within the framework of percolation cluster model these dispersions, respectively have been attributed to percolation of protons between and within the clusters of hydrogen-bonded water molecules bound to polar or ionizable protein components. The alpha-dispersion peak, which results from intra-cluster charge percolation conformed to Cole-Cole modified Debye equation. Temperature dependence of the dielectric constant in the air-dried sample exhibited peaks at 120 and 155 degrees C which have been identified as temperatures of onset of release of water bound to polar protein components in the amorphous and crystalline regions, respectively. An overall rise in the permittivity was observed above 175 degrees C, which has been identified as the onset of chain melting in the crystalline region of the protein.

  5. Methanol Oxidation on Pt3Sn(111) for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells: Methanol Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Zhigang; Guo, Chen; Wang, Weili; Wei, Shuxian; Ng, Siu-Pang; Chen, Xiangfeng; Ding, Ning; Guo, Wenyue; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2016-05-18

    PtSn alloy, which is a potential material for use in direct methanol fuel cells, can efficiently promote methanol oxidation and alleviate the CO poisoning problem. Herein, methanol decomposition on Pt3Sn(111) was systematically investigated using periodic density functional theory and microkinetic modeling. The geometries and energies of all of the involved species were analyzed, and the decomposition network was mapped out to elaborate the reaction mechanisms. Our results indicated that methanol and formaldehyde were weakly adsorbed, and the other derivatives (CHxOHy, x = 1-3, y = 0-1) were strongly adsorbed and preferred decomposition rather than desorption on Pt3Sn(111). The competitive methanol decomposition started with the initial O-H bond scission followed by successive C-H bond scissions, (i.e., CH3OH → CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO). The Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations and energy barrier decomposition analyses identified the C-H and O-H bond scissions as being more competitive than the C-O bond scission. Microkinetic modeling confirmed that the vast majority of the intermediates and products from methanol decomposition would escape from the Pt3Sn(111) surface at a relatively low temperature, and the coverage of the CO residue decreased with an increase in the temperature and decrease in partial methanol pressure.

  6. Temperature dependent mistranslation in a hyperthermophile adapts proteins to lower temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Michael H.; Pan, Tao

    2016-01-01

    All organisms universally encode, synthesize and utilize proteins that function optimally within a subset of growth conditions. While healthy cells are thought to maintain high translational fidelity within their natural habitats, natural environments can easily fluctuate outside the optimal functional range of genetically encoded proteins. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix (A. pernix) can grow throughout temperature variations ranging from 70 to 100°C, although the specific factors facilitating such adaptability are unknown. Here, we show that A. pernix undergoes constitutive leucine to methionine mistranslation at low growth temperatures. Low-temperature mistranslation is facilitated by the misacylation of tRNALeu with methionine by the methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS). At low growth temperatures, the A. pernix MetRS undergoes a temperature dependent shift in tRNA charging fidelity, allowing the enzyme to conditionally charge tRNALeu with methionine. We demonstrate enhanced low-temperature activity for A. pernix citrate synthase that is synthesized during leucine to methionine mistranslation at low-temperature growth compared to its high-fidelity counterpart synthesized at high-temperature. Our results show that conditional leucine to methionine mistranslation can make protein adjustments capable of improving the low-temperature activity of hyperthermophilic proteins, likely by facilitating the increasing flexibility required for greater protein function at lower physiological temperatures. PMID:26657639

  7. New approaches towards novel composite and multilayer membranes for intermediate temperature-polymer electrolyte fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, Carolina Musse; Sharma, Surbhi; de Camargo Forte, Maria Madalena; Steinberger-Wilckens, Robert

    2016-06-01

    This review analyses the current and existing literature on novel composite and multilayer membranes for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell applications, including intermediate temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell (IT-PEFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) systems. It provides a concise scrutiny of the vast body of literature available on organic and inorganic filler based polymer membranes and links it to the new emerging trend towards novel combinations of multilayered polymer membranes for applications in DMFC and IT-PEFC. The paper carefully explores the advantages and disadvantages of the most common preparation techniques reported for multilayered membranes such as hot-pressing, casting and dip-coating and also summarises various other fresh and unique techniques employed for multilayer membrane preparation.

  8. Temperature-Dependent Photoluminescence of g-C3N4: Implication for Temperature Sensing.

    PubMed

    Das, Debanjan; Shinde, S L; Nanda, K K

    2016-01-27

    We report the temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) properties of polymeric graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C3N4) and a methodology for the determination of quantum efficiency along with the activation energy. The PL is shown to originate from three different pathways of transitions: σ*-LP, π*-LP, and π*-π, respectively. The overall activation energy is found to be ∼73.58 meV which is much lower than the exciton binding energy reported theoretically but ideal for highly sensitive wide-range temperature sensing. The quantum yield derived from the PL data is 23.3%, whereas the absolute quantum yield is 5.3%. We propose that the temperature-dependent PL can be exploited for the evaluation of the temperature dependency of quantum yield as well as for temperature sensing. Our analysis further indicates that g-C3N4 is well-suited for wide-range temperature sensing.

  9. Temperature-dependence of biomass accumulation rates during secondary succession.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kristina J; Allen, Andrew P; Gillooly, James F; Brown, James H

    2006-06-01

    Rates of ecosystem recovery following disturbance affect many ecological processes, including carbon cycling in the biosphere. Here, we present a model that predicts the temperature dependence of the biomass accumulation rate following disturbances in forests. Model predictions are derived based on allometric and biochemical principles that govern plant energetics and are tested using a global database of 91 studies of secondary succession compiled from the literature. The rate of biomass accumulation during secondary succession increases with average growing season temperature as predicted based on the biochemical kinetics of photosynthesis in chloroplasts. In addition, the rate of biomass accumulation is greater in angiosperm-dominated communities than in gymnosperm-dominated ones and greater in plantations than in naturally regenerating stands. By linking the temperature-dependence of photosynthesis to the rate of whole-ecosystem biomass accumulation during secondary succession, our model and results provide one example of how emergent, ecosystem-level rate processes can be predicted based on the kinetics of individual metabolic rate.

  10. Temperature dependent atomic transport properties of liquid Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Amit B.; Bhatt, Nisarg K.; Thakore, Brijmohan Y.; Vyas, Pulastya R.; Jani, Ashwinkumar R.

    2014-02-01

    A simple analytical model for atomic motion of Tankeshwar et al. [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 3, 3173 (1991)] is used to obtain velocity autocorrelation function (VACF) with the inter-atomic potential and the pair correlation function as required inputs for liquid Sn. For the electron-ion interaction the modified empty-core potential is used, which represents the orthogonalisation effect due to s-core states in such sp-bonded metals. Temperature dependence of structure factor is considered through temperature dependent potential parameter in the pair potential. The coherent behaviour of liquid Sn in terms of the dynamic structure factor employing viscoelastic theory has also been studied. Intrinsic temperature effect has been studied through damping term{exp}( {-{π k}_{{B}} {T}/{2k_{{F}} }{r}} ) exp (-πkBT2kFr)in the pair potential. The predicted results for VACF, cosine power spectrum, mean square displacement, diffusion and viscosity coefficients have been compared with recent available data, and a good agreement has been achieved.

  11. Temperature Dependence of the Band Gap of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Tangney, Paul; Spataru, Catalin D.

    2005-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the band gap of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is calculated by direct evaluation of electron-phonon couplings within a ``frozen-phonon'' scheme. An interesting diameter and chirality dependence of Eg(T) is obtained, including non-monotonic behavior for certain tubes and distinct ``family'' behavior. These results are traced to a strong and complex coupling between band-edge states and the lowest-energy optical phonon modes in SWNTs. The Eg(T) curves are modeled by an analytic function with diameter and chirality dependent parameters; these provide a valuable guide for systematic estimates of Eg(T) for any given SWNT. Magnitudes of the temperature shifts at 300 K are smaller than 12 meV and should not affect (n,m) assignments based on optical measurements. RBC acknowledges financial support from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and Brazilian funding agencies CNPq, FAPERJ, Instituto de Nanociências, FUJB-UFRJ and PRONEX-MCT. Work partially supported by NSF Grant No. DMR00-87088 and DOE Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Computer resources were provided by NERSC and NPACI.

  12. Investigating temperature degradation in THz quantum cascade lasers by examination of temperature dependence of output power

    SciTech Connect

    Albo, Asaf Hu, Qing

    2015-03-30

    In this paper, we demonstrate a method to investigate the temperature degradation of THz quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) based on analyzing the dependence of lasing output power on temperature. The output power is suggested to decrease exponentially with some characteristic activation energy indicative of the degradation mechanism. As a proof of concept, Arrhenius plots of power versus temperature are used to extract the activation energy in vertical transition THz QCLs. The extracted energies are consistent with thermally activated longitudinal optical-phonon scattering being the dominant degradation mechanism, as is generally accepted. The extracted activation energy values are shown to be in good agreement with the values predicted from laser spectra.

  13. Characterization and evolution of an activator-independent methanol dehydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator N-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tung-Yun; Chen, Chang-Ting; Liu, Jessica Tse-Jin; Bogorad, Igor W; Damoiseaux, Robert; Liao, James C

    2016-06-01

    Methanol utilization by methylotrophic or non-methylotrophic organisms is the first step toward methanol bioconversion to higher carbon-chain chemicals. Methanol oxidation using NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh) is of particular interest because it uses NAD(+) as the electron carrier. To our knowledge, only a limited number of NAD-dependent Mdhs have been reported. The most studied is the Bacillus methanolicus Mdh, which exhibits low enzyme specificity to methanol and is dependent on an endogenous activator protein (ACT). In this work, we characterized and engineered a group III NAD-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (Mdh2) from Cupriavidus necator N-1 (previously designated as Ralstonia eutropha). This enzyme is the first NAD-dependent Mdh characterized from a Gram-negative, mesophilic, non-methylotrophic organism with a significant activity towards methanol. Interestingly, unlike previously reported Mdhs, Mdh2 does not require activation by known activators such as B. methanolicus ACT and Escherichia coli Nudix hydrolase NudF, or putative native C. necator activators in the Nudix family under mesophilic conditions. This enzyme exhibited higher or comparable activity and affinity toward methanol relative to the B. methanolicus Mdh with or without ACT in a wide range of temperatures. Furthermore, using directed molecular evolution, we engineered a variant (CT4-1) of Mdh2 that showed a 6-fold higher K cat/K m for methanol and 10-fold lower K cat/K m for n-butanol. Thus, CT4-1 represents an NAD-dependent Mdh with much improved catalytic efficiency and specificity toward methanol compared with the existing NAD-dependent Mdhs with or without ACT activation.

  14. Temperature dependence of graphene oxide reduced by hydrazine hydrate.

    PubMed

    Ren, Peng-Gang; Yan, Ding-Xiang; Ji, Xu; Chen, Tao; Li, Zhong-Ming

    2011-02-04

    Graphene oxide (GO) was successfully prepared by a modified Hummer's method. The reduction effect and mechanism of the as-prepared GO reduced with hydrazine hydrate at different temperatures and time were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis (EA), x-ray diffractions (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that the reduction effect of GO mainly depended on treatment temperature instead of treatment time. Desirable reduction of GO can only be obtained at high treatment temperature. Reduced at 95 °C for 3 h, the C/O atomic ratio of GO increased from 3.1 to 15.1, which was impossible to obtain at low temperatures, such as 80, 60 or 15 °C, even for longer reduction time. XPS, 13C NMR and FTIR results show that most of the epoxide groups bonded to graphite during the oxidation were removed from GO and form the sp(2) structure after being reduced by hydrazine hydrate at high temperature (>60 °C), leading to the electric conductivity of GO increasing from 1.5 × 10(-6) to 5 S cm(-1), while the hydroxyls on the surface of GO were not removed by hydrazine hydrate even at high temperature. Additionally, the FTIR, XRD and Raman spectrum indicate that the GO reduced by hydrazine hydrate can not be entirely restored to the pristine graphite structures. XPS and FTIR data also suggest that carbonyl and carboxyl groups can be reduced by hydrazine hydrate and possibly form hydrazone, but not a C = C structure.

  15. Temperature dependence of graphene oxide reduced by hydrazine hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng-Gang; Yan, Ding-Xiang; Ji, Xu; Chen, Tao; Li, Zhong-Ming

    2011-02-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was successfully prepared by a modified Hummer's method. The reduction effect and mechanism of the as-prepared GO reduced with hydrazine hydrate at different temperatures and time were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis (EA), x-ray diffractions (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that the reduction effect of GO mainly depended on treatment temperature instead of treatment time. Desirable reduction of GO can only be obtained at high treatment temperature. Reduced at 95 °C for 3 h, the C/O atomic ratio of GO increased from 3.1 to 15.1, which was impossible to obtain at low temperatures, such as 80, 60 or 15 °C, even for longer reduction time. XPS, 13C NMR and FTIR results show that most of the epoxide groups bonded to graphite during the oxidation were removed from GO and form the sp2 structure after being reduced by hydrazine hydrate at high temperature (>60 °C), leading to the electric conductivity of GO increasing from 1.5 × 10 - 6 to 5 S cm - 1, while the hydroxyls on the surface of GO were not removed by hydrazine hydrate even at high temperature. Additionally, the FTIR, XRD and Raman spectrum indicate that the GO reduced by hydrazine hydrate can not be entirely restored to the pristine graphite structures. XPS and FTIR data also suggest that carbonyl and carboxyl groups can be reduced by hydrazine hydrate and possibly form hydrazone, but not a C = C structure.

  16. Study on temperature-dependent carrier transport for bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yali; Li, Weilong; Qi, Mei; Li, Xiaojun; Zhou, Yixuan; Ren, Zhaoyu

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the temperature-dependent carrier transport property of the bilayer graphene, graphene films were synthesized on Cu foils by a home-built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with C2H2. Samples regularity, transmittance (T) and layer number were analyzed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) images, transmittance spectra and Raman spectra. Van Der Pauw method was used for resistivity measurements and Hall measurements at different temperatures. The results indicated that the sheet resistance (Rs), carrier density (n), and mobility (μ) were 1096.20 Ω/sq, 0.75×1012 cm-2, and 7579.66 cm2 V-1 s-1 at room temperature, respectively. When the temperature increased from 0 °C to 240 °C, carrier density (n) increased from 0.66×1012 cm-2 to 1.55×1012 cm-2, sheet resistance (Rs) decreased from 1215.55 Ω/sq to 560.77 Ω/sq, and mobility (μ) oscillated around a constant value 7773.99 cm2 V-1 s-1. The decrease of the sheet resistance (Rs) indicated that the conductive capability of the bilayer graphene film increased with the temperature. The significant cause of the increase of carrier density (n) was the thermal activation of carriers from defects and unconscious doping states. Because the main influence on the carrier mobility (μ) was the lattice defect scattering and a small amount of impurity scattering, the carrier mobility (μ) was temperature-independent for the bilayer graphene.

  17. Electro-osmotic drag effect on the methanol permeation for sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and nafion 117 membranes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Nguyen Thi Que; Bae, Byungchan; Kim, Dukjoon

    2013-11-01

    Electro-osmotic drag effect on the methanol permeation was investigated for sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) membrane, and its result was compared with that of Nafion 117 membrane. The electro-osmotic drag coefficient was determined from the limiting current density measured at different temperature. The methanol permeability of sPEEK membrane increased with temperature but its temperature dependence was not as strong as that of Nafion 117 membrane. The methanol permeability or the total methanol flux of Nafion 117 membrane was at least twice higher than that of sPEEK70 membrane (sPEEK membrane with 70% sulfonation degree), as the methanol permeation was highly contributed by the electro-osmotic drag effect. This higher electro-osmotic drag of Nafion 117 membrane is attributed to the bigger ion cluster and waster channel in nanophase and thus more free water absorption than sPEEK membrane.

  18. Temperature-Dependent Adhesion of Graphene Suspended on a Trench

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Graphene deposited over a trench has been studied in the context of nanomechanical resonators, where experiments indicate adhesion of the graphene sheet to the trench boundary and sidewalls leads to self-tensioning; however, this adhesion is not well understood. We use molecular dynamics to simulate graphene deposited on a trench and study how adhesion to the sidewalls depends on substrate interaction, temperature, and curvature of the edge of the trench. Over the range of parameters we study, the depth at the center of the sheet is approximately linear in substrate interaction strength and temperature but not trench width, and we explain this using a one-dimensional model for the sheet configuration. PMID:26652939

  19. Tunable hollow waveguide Bragg grating with low-temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yasuki; Yokota, Yasushi; Matsutani, Akihiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2005-02-01

    We demonstrate a tunable hollow waveguide Bragg grating with low-temperature dependence. We fabricated a distributed Bragg reflector consisting of a grating loaded slab semiconductor hollow waveguide with a variable air-core. A change in an air-core thickness enables us to achieve a tunable propagation constant of several percents resulting in a large shift of several tens of nanometers in Bragg wavelength. We demonstrate 10nm continuous wavelength tuning of a peak reflectivity. This value corresponds to a propagation constant change of 0.64%, which is larger than that of thermo-optic effects or electro-optic effects. The measured temperature sensitivity of the peak wavelength is as low as 0.016nm/K, which is seven times smaller than that of conventional semiconductor waveguide devices.

  20. Temperature Dependence of Current Transport in Metal-SWNT Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daine, Robert

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been under the microscope recently due to their incredible and unique mechanical, electrical, and optical properties, which are influenced by their chirality and diameter. Many different applications have been looked into, such as nanotechnology, electronics, and biomedical applications. Recently, it has been suggested that SWNTs may act as a tunnel between the p-n junction in a solar cell. In this thesis, the temperature dependence of the activation energy between SWNTs and metal electrodes was looked at, using a mixture of gold, aluminum and copper electrodes. Because we formed a Schottky barrier between the semiconducting SWNTs and the metal electrode, we know that the decrease in activation energy allows the electrons and holes to travel quicker and easier than at higher temperatures.

  1. Temperature-dependent potential in cluster-decay process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaei, R.; Zanganeh, V.

    2016-08-01

    Role of the thermal effects of the parent nucleus in the Coulomb barrier and the half-life of 28 cluster-decays is systematically analyzed within the framework of the proximity formalism, namely proximity potential 2010. The WKB approximation is used to determine the penetration probability of the emitted cluster. It is shown that the height and width of the Coulomb barrier in the temperature-dependent proximity potential are less than its temperature-independent version. Moreover, this investigation reveals that the calculated values of half-life for selected cluster-decays are in better agreement with the experimental data when the mentioned effects are imposed on the proximity approach. A discussion is also presented about the predictions of the present thermal approach for cluster-decay half-lives of the super-heavy-elements.

  2. On the temperature dependence of oceanic export efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cael, B. B.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-05-01

    Quantifying the fraction of primary production exported from the euphotic layer (termed the export efficiency ef) is a complicated matter. Studies have suggested empirical relationships with temperature which offer attractive potential for parameterization. Here we develop what is arguably the simplest mechanistic model relating the two, using established thermodynamic dependencies for primary production and respiration. It results in a single-parameter curve that constrains the envelope of possible efficiencies, capturing the upper bounds of several ef-T data sets. The approach provides a useful theoretical constraint on this relationship and extracts the variability in ef due to temperature but does not idealize out the remaining variability which evinces the substantial complexity of the system in question.

  3. Calibration of Gyros with Temperature Dependent Scale Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belur, Sheela V.; Harman, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The general problem of gyro calibration can be stated as the estimation of the scale factors, misalignments, and drift-rate biases of the gyro using the on-orbit sensor measurements. These gyro parameters have been traditionally treated as temperature-independent in the operational flight dynamics ground systems at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), a scenario which has been successfully applied in the gyro calibration of a large number of missions. A significant departure from this is the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission where, due to the high thermal variations expected during the mission phase, it is necessary to model the scale factors as functions of temperature. This paper addresses the issue of gyro calibration for the MAP gyro model using a manufacturer-supplied model of the variation of scale factors with temperature. The problem is formulated as a least squares problem and solved using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm in the MATLAB(R) library function NLSQ. The algorithm was tested on simulated data with Gaussian noise for the quaternions as well as the gyro rates and was found to consistently converge close to the true values. Significant improvement in accuracy was noticed due to the estimation of the temperature-dependent scale factors as against constant scale factors.

  4. Temperature-dependent magnetic anisotropy in Ni nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorritsma, J.; Mydosh, J. A.

    1998-07-01

    Magnetic properties of Ni nanowire arrays, prepared by oblique evaporation of Ni onto V-groove InP substrates, were investigated between 5 and 300 K using magnetoresistance and SQUID magnetization measurements. The results show that as-prepared wires, which range from 70-130 nm in width, have an easy axis of magnetization parallel to the wire axis at room temperature, but transverse to the wire axis at low temperature. The crossover of the easy axis direction from transverse to parallel as a function of temperature is more pronounced for the narrower wires. We interpret our results in terms of a competition between a temperature-dependent magnetic anisotropy (K⊥), which tends to align the magnetization transverse to the wire axis, and the shape anisotropy of the wires which tends to orient it along the wire axis. Several mechanisms are proposed (e.g., oblique evaporation, stress, and surface oxidation) from which K⊥ could originate. Based upon the stress values deduced from K⊥, and the thermal expansion mismatch between Ni and InP, the stress mechanism appears to dominate.

  5. Temperature Dependence of the O + HO2 Rate Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed laser photolysis technique has been employed to investigate the kinetics of the radical-radical reaction O((sup 3)P) + HO2 OH + O2 over the temperature range 266-391 K in 80 Torr of N2 diluent gas. O((sup 3)P) was produced by 248.5-nm KrF laser photolysis of O3 followed by rapid quenching of O(1D) to O((sup 3)P) while HO2 was produced by simultaneous photolysis of H2O2 to create OH radicals which, in turn, reacted with H2O2 to yield HO2. The O((sup 3)P) temporal profile was monitored by using time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy. The HO2 concentration was calculated based on experimentally measured parameters. The following Arrhenius expression describes our experimental results: k(sub 1)(T) equals (2.91 +/- 0.70) x 10(exp -11) exp[(228 +/- 75)/T] where the errors are 2 sigma and represent precision only. The absolute uncertainty in k, at any temperature within the range 266-391 K is estimated to be +/- 22 percent. Our results are in excellent agreement with a discharge flow study of the temperature dependence of k(sub 1) in 1 Torr of He diluent reported by Keyser, and significantly reduce the uncertainty in the rate of this important stratospheric reaction at subambient temperatures.

  6. Analyzing chiral condensate dependence on temperature and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockcliffe, Keighley

    2016-09-01

    Determining the thermodynamic properties of the chiral condensate, the order parameter for chiral symmetry restoration, gives insight into whether there are phase transitions in dense astrophysical objects, such as young neutron stars. The chiral condensate is the scalar density of quarks in the ground state, and its presence violates chiral symmetry. Chiral effective field theory is used to study the behavior of the scalar quark condensate with changing temperature and density of neutron matter. Two-body and three-body chiral nuclear forces were employed to find the free energy and its dependence on the pion mass at lower temperatures. With increasing temperature (up to 100 MeV), the chiral condensate is strongly reduced, indicating a fast approach to chiral symmetry restoration. Chiral restoration seems to be hindered, however, at higher densities (around 0.2 fm-3). The role of the different perturbative contributions and their change with temperature and density was extracted. Although the dominant contribution is the noninteracting term in the perturbation series expansion, nuclear interactions are important particularly at high densities where they delay chiral symmetry restoration.

  7. Temperature Dependence of the Flare Fluence Scaling Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretzschmar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares result in an increase of the solar irradiance at all wavelengths. While the distribution of the flare fluence observed in coronal emission has been widely studied and found to scale as f(E)˜ E^{-α}, with α slightly below 2, the distribution of the flare fluence in chromospheric lines is poorly known. We used the solar irradiance measurements observed by the SDO/EVE instrument at a 10 s cadence to investigate the dependency of the scaling exponent on the formation region of the lines (or temperature). We analyzed all flares above the C1 level since the start of the EVE observations (May 2010) to determine the flare fluence distribution in 16 lines covering a wide range of temperatures, several of which were not studied before. Our results show a weak downward trend with temperature of the scaling exponent of the PDF that reaches from above 2 at lower temperature (a few 104 K) to {˜ }1.8 for hot coronal emission (several 106 K). However, because colder lines also have fainter contrast, we cannot exclude that this behavior is caused by including more noise for smaller flares for these lines. We discuss the method and its limitations and tentatively associate this possible trend with the different mechanisms responsible for the heating of the chromosphere and corona during flares.

  8. Temperature dependence of the electrical properties of hydrogen titanate nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Diego C. B.; Brandão, Frederico D.; Krambrock, Klaus; Ferlauto, Andre S.; Fonseca, Fabio C.

    2014-11-14

    The temperature dependence of the electrical properties of hydrogen-rich titanate nanotubes (H-TNTs) in the 90–270 °C range was investigated by impedance spectroscopy. Three types of dominant conduction were found which depend on the previous thermal treatment of the samples. For untreated samples, at low temperatures (T < 100 °C), electrical conductivity is relatively high (>10{sup −4} S/cm at T ≈ 90 °C) and is dominated by protonic transport within structural water molecules. For thermal annealing in inert atmosphere up to 150 °C, water molecules are released from the nanotube structure resulting in a dehydrated H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} phase. Such phase has a low, thermally-dependent, electrical conductivity (10{sup −8} S/cm at T ≈ 90 °C) with activation energy of 0.68 eV. For samples annealed up to 260 °C, loss of OH groups, and consequent generation of oxygen vacancies, occurs that result in the non-stoichiometric H{sub 2(1−z)}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7−z} phase. This phase has much higher conductivity (10{sup −5} S/cm at T ≈ 90 °C) and lower associated activation energy (0.40 eV). The generation of oxygen vacancies is confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements at room temperature, which revealed the presence of single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancies. The activation energy value found is consistent with the thermal ionization energy of the oxygen vacancies. Such defect formation represents the initial stage of the phase transformation from titanate to TiO{sub 2} (B). X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements also support such interpretation.

  9. Methanol incorporation in clathrate hydrates and the implications for oil and gas pipeline flow assurance and icy planetary bodies

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyuchul; Udachin, Konstantin A.; Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Leek, Donald M.; Alavi, Saman; Ratcliffe, Christopher I.; Ripmeester, John A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the best-known uses of methanol is as antifreeze. Methanol is used in large quantities in industrial applications to prevent methane clathrate hydrate blockages from forming in oil and gas pipelines. Methanol is also assigned a major role as antifreeze in giving icy planetary bodies (e.g., Titan) a liquid subsurface ocean and/or an atmosphere containing significant quantities of methane. In this work, we reveal a previously unverified role for methanol as a guest in clathrate hydrate cages. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and NMR experiments showed that at temperatures near 273 K, methanol is incorporated in the hydrate lattice along with other guest molecules. The amount of included methanol depends on the preparative method used. For instance, single-crystal XRD shows that at low temperatures, the methanol molecules are hydrogen-bonded in 4.4% of the small cages of tetrahydrofuran cubic structure II hydrate. At higher temperatures, NMR spectroscopy reveals a number of methanol species incorporated in hydrocarbon hydrate lattices. At temperatures characteristic of icy planetary bodies, vapor deposits of methanol, water, and methane or xenon show that the presence of methanol accelerates hydrate formation on annealing and that there is unusually complex phase behavior as revealed by powder XRD and NMR spectroscopy. The presence of cubic structure I hydrate was confirmed and a unique hydrate phase was postulated to account for the data. Molecular dynamics calculations confirmed the possibility of methanol incorporation into the hydrate lattice and show that methanol can favorably replace a number of methane guests. PMID:23661058

  10. Time-dependent correlations in quantum magnets at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauseweh, B.; Groitl, F.; Keller, T.; Rolfs, K.; Tennant, D. A.; Habicht, K.; Uhrig, G. S.

    2016-11-01

    In this Rapid Communication we investigate the time dependence of the gap mode of copper nitrate at various temperatures. We combine state-of-the-art theoretical calculations with high precision neutron resonance spin-echo measurements to understand the anomalous decoherence effects found previously in this material. It is shown that the time domain offers a complementary view on this phenomenon, which allows us to directly compare experimental data and theoretical predictions without the need of further intensive data analysis, such as (de)convolution.

  11. On the temperature dependence of polar stratospheric clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Fiocco, G.; Cacciani, M.; Di Girolamo, P. ); Fua, D. CNR De Luisi, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds were frequently observed by lidar at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station during May-October 1988. The dependence of the backscattering cross section on the temperature can be referred to transitions of the HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O system: it appears possible to distinguish the pure trihydrate from the mixed ice-trihydrate phase in the composition of the aerosol and, in some cases, to bracket the HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O content of the ambient gas, and to provide indications on the size of the particles.

  12. Method for making methanol

    DOEpatents

    Mednick, R. Lawrence; Blum, David B.

    1986-01-01

    Methanol is made in a liquid-phase methanol reactor by entraining a methanol-forming catalyst in an inert liquid and contacting said entrained catalyst with a synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  13. Method for making methanol

    DOEpatents

    Mednick, R. Lawrence; Blum, David B.

    1987-01-01

    Methanol is made in a liquid-phase methanol reactor by entraining a methanol-forming catalyst in an inert liquid and contacting said entrained catalyst with a synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  14. Interpretation of the temperature dependence of equilibrium and rate constants.

    PubMed

    Winzor, Donald J; Jackson, Craig M

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this review is to draw attention to potential pitfalls in attempts to glean mechanistic information from the magnitudes of standard enthalpies and entropies derived from the temperature dependence of equilibrium and rate constants for protein interactions. Problems arise because the minimalist model that suffices to describe the energy differences between initial and final states usually comprises a set of linked equilibria, each of which is characterized by its own energetics. For example, because the overall standard enthalpy is a composite of those individual values, a positive magnitude for DeltaH(o) can still arise despite all reactions within the subset being characterized by negative enthalpy changes: designation of the reaction as being entropy driven is thus equivocal. An experimenter must always bear in mind the fact that any mechanistic interpretation of the magnitudes of thermodynamic parameters refers to the reaction model rather than the experimental system. For the same reason there is little point in subjecting the temperature dependence of rate constants for protein interactions to transition-state analysis. If comparisons with reported values of standard enthalpy and entropy of activation are needed, they are readily calculated from the empirical Arrhenius parameters.

  15. Temperature dependence of the two photon absorption in indium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, K.W.; Rella, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    Nonlinear optical processes in semiconductors have long been a source of interesting physics. Two photon absorption (TPA) is one such process, in which two photons provide the energy for the creation of an electron-hole pair. Researchers at other FEL centers have studied room temperature TPA in InSb, InAs, and HgCdTe. Working at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center, we have extended and refined this work by measuring the temperature dependence of the TPA coefficient in InAs over the range from 80 to 350 K at four wavelengths: 4.5, 5.06, 6.01, and 6.3 microns. The measurements validate the functional dependence of recent band structure calculations with enough precision to discriminate parabolic from non-parabolic models, and to begin to observe smaller effects, such as contributions due to the split-off band. These experiments therefore serve as a strong independent test of the Kane band theory, as well as providing a starting point for detailed observations of other nonlinear absorption mechanisms.

  16. Optofluidic intracavity spectroscopy for spatially, temperature, and wavelength dependent refractometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindt, Joel D.

    A microfluidic refractometer was designed based on previous optofluidic intracavity spectroscopy (OFIS) chips utilized to distinguish healthy and cancerous cells. The optofluidic cavity is realized by adding high reflectivity dielectric mirrors to the top and bottom of a microfluidic channel. This creates a plane-plane Fabry-Perot optical cavity in which the resonant wavelengths are highly dependent on the optical path length inside the cavity. Refractometry is a useful method to determine the nature of fluids, including the concentration of a solute in a solvent as well as the temperature of the fluid. Advantages of microfluidic systems are the easy integration with lab-on-chip devices and the need for only small volumes of fluid. The unique abilities of the microfluidic refractometer in this thesis include its spatial, temperature, and wavelength dependence. Spatial dependence of the transmission spectrum is inherent through a spatial filtering process implemented with an optical fiber and microscope objective. A sequence of experimental observations guided the change from using the OFIS chip as a cell discrimination device to a complimentary refractometer. First, it was noted the electrode structure within the microfluidic channel, designed to trap and manipulate biological cells with dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces, caused the resonant wavelengths to blue-shift when the electrodes were energized. This phenomenon is consistent with the negative dn/dT property of water and water-based solutions. Next, it was necessary to develop a method to separate the optical path length into physical path length and refractive index. Air holes were placed near the microfluidic channel to exclusively measure the cavity length with the known refractive index of air. The cavity length was then interpolated across the microfluidic channel, allowing any mechanical changes to be taken into account. After the separation of physical path length and refractive index, it was of interest

  17. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, A; Mahajan, R L

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, we present our experimental results on the determination of the thermal conductivity of biological tissues using a transient technique based on the principles of the cylindrical hot-wire method. A novel, 1.45 mm diameter, 50 mm long hot-wire probe was deployed. Initial measurements were made on sponge, gelatin and Styrofoam insulation to test the accuracy of the probe. Subsequent experiments conducted on sheep collagen in the range of 25 degrees C < T < 55 degrees C showed the thermal conductivity to be a linear function of temperature. Further, these changes in the thermal conductivity were found to be reversible. However, when the tissue was heated beyond 55 degrees C, irreversible changes in thermal conductivity were observed. Similar experiments were also conducted for determining the thermal conductivity of cow liver. In this case, the irreversible effects were found to set in much later at around 90 degrees C. Below this temperature, in the range of 25 degrees C < T < 90 degrees C, the thermal conductivity, as for sheep collagen, varied linearly with temperature. In the second part of our study, in vivo measurements were taken on the different organs of a living pig. Comparison with reported values for dead tissues shows the thermal conductivities of living organs to be higher, indicating thereby the dominant role played by blood perfusion in enhancing the net heat transfer in living tissues. The degree of enhancement is different in different organs and shows a direct dependence on the blood flow rate.

  18. Dependence of friction on roughness, velocity, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yi; Dubé, Martin; Grant, Martin

    2008-03-01

    We study the dependence of friction on surface roughness, sliding velocity, and temperature. Expanding on the classic treatment of Greenwood and Williamson, we show that the fractal nature of a surface has little influence on the real area of contact and the static friction coefficient. A simple scaling argument shows that the static friction exhibits a weak anomaly mu ~ A(0)(-chi/4), where A0 is the apparent area and chi is the roughness exponent of the surface. We then develop a method to calculate atomic-scale friction between a microscopic asperity, such as the tip of a friction force microscope (FFM) and a solid substrate. This method, based on the thermal activation of the FFM tip, allows a quantitative extraction of all the relevant microscopic parameters and reveals a universal scaling behavior of atomic friction on velocity and temperature. This method is extended to include a soft atomic substrate in order to simulate FFM scans more realistically. The tip is connected with the support of the cantilever by an ideal spring and the substrate is simulated with a ball-spring model. The tip and substrate are coupled with repulsive potentials. Simulations are done at different temperatures and scanning velocities on substrates with different elastic moduli. Stick-slip motion of the tip is observed, and the numerical results of the friction force and distribution of force maxima match the theoretical framework.

  19. Anomalous Temperature Dependence of the Band Gap in Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Cesar E P; Rocha, A R; Marini, Andrea

    2016-08-10

    Black phosphorus (BP) has gained renewed attention due to its singular anisotropic electronic and optical properties that might be exploited for a wide range of technological applications. In this respect, the thermal properties are particularly important both to predict its room temperature operation and to determine its thermoelectric potential. From this point of view, one of the most spectacular and poorly understood phenomena is indeed the BP temperature-induced band gap opening; when temperature is increased, the fundamental band gap increases instead of decreases. This anomalous thermal dependence has also been observed recently in its monolayer counterpart. In this work, based on ab initio calculations, we present an explanation for this long known and yet not fully explained effect. We show that it arises from a combination of harmonic and lattice thermal expansion contributions, which are in fact highly interwined. We clearly narrow down the mechanisms that cause this gap opening by identifying the peculiar atomic vibrations that drive the anomaly. The final picture we give explains both the BP anomalous band gap opening and the frequency increase with increasing volume (tension effect).

  20. Temperature-dependent adsorption of nitrogen on porous vycor glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Tito E.; Tsou, Hsi Lung

    1998-03-01

    Adsorption isotherms of N2 have been measured in the temperature range from 77 to 120 K in samples of porous vycor glass. From the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller theory the surface layer coverages are determined. These are found to be temperature dependent. When adsorption-isotherm coverage data are expressed as a function of the adsorption potential δμ, the result is roughly temperature independent for coverages ranging from submonolayer to thin film, below capillary condensation. This characteristic curve, which represents the distribution of adsorption sites vs the adsorption potential, is compared with results from two models for the adsorbate: Dubinin's isotherm for microporous solids and its extension to rough surfaces, which places importance on the porosity of the surface, and Halsey's extension of the Frankel-Halsey-Hill isotherm, which takes into account the long-range variations of the substrate adsorption potential. The impact of this work on the interpretation of N2 adsorption data in terms of a surface area is discussed.

  1. Quantitative Transcriptomics Reveals the Growth- and Nutrient-Dependent Response of a Streamlined Marine Methylotroph to Methanol and Naturally Occurring Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Scott M; Becker, Jamie W; Sosa, Oscar A; Repeta, Daniel J; DeLong, Edward F

    2016-11-22

    The members of the OM43 clade of Betaproteobacteria are abundant coastal methylotrophs with a range of carbon-utilizing capabilities. However, their underlying transcriptional and metabolic responses to shifting conditions or different carbon substrates remain poorly understood. We examined the transcriptional dynamics of OM43 isolate NB0046 subjected to various inorganic nutrient, vitamin, and carbon substrate regimes over different growth phases to (i) develop a quantitative model of its mRNA content; (ii) identify transcriptional markers of physiological activity, nutritional state, and carbon and energy utilization; and (iii) identify pathways involved in methanol or naturally occurring dissolved organic matter (DOM) metabolism. Quantitative transcriptomics, achieved through addition of internal RNA standards, allowed for analyses on a transcripts-per-cell scale. This streamlined bacterium exhibited substantial shifts in total mRNA content (ranging from 1,800 to 17 transcripts cell(-1) in the exponential and deep stationary phases, respectively) and gene-specific transcript abundances (>1,000-fold increases in some cases), depending on the growth phase and nutrient conditions. Carbon metabolism genes exhibited substantial dynamics, including those for ribulose monophosphate, tricarboxylic acid (TCA), and proteorhodopsin, as well as methanol dehydrogenase (xoxF), which, while always the most abundant transcript, increased from 5 to 120 transcripts cell(-1) when cultures were nutrient and vitamin amended. In the DOM treatment, upregulation of TCA cycle, methylcitrate cycle, vitamin, and organic phosphorus genes suggested a metabolic route for this complex mixture of carbon substrates. The genome-wide inventory of transcript abundances produced here provides insight into a streamlined marine bacterium's regulation of carbon metabolism and energy flow, providing benchmarks for evaluating the activity of OM43 populations in situ IMPORTANCE: Bacteria exert a

  2. Temperature-dependent transient creep and dynamics of cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birger, Boris I.

    2013-11-01

    Large-scale mantle convection forms the upper boundary layer (lithosphere) where the vertical temperature drop is about 1300 K. Theoretical rheology and laboratory experiments with rock samples show that transient creep occurs while creep strains are sufficiently small. The transient creep is described by the temperature-dependent Andrade rheological model. Since plate tectonics allows only small deformations in lithospheric plates, creep of the lithosphere plates is transient whereas steady-state creep, described by non-Newtonian power-law rheological model, takes place in the underlying mantle. The solution of stability problem shows that the lithosphere is stable but small-scale convective oscillations are attenuated very weakly in regions of thickened lithosphere beneath continental cratons (subcratonic roots) where the thickness of the lithosphere is about 200 km. These oscillations create small-scale convective cells (the horizontal dimensions of the cells are of the order of the subcratonic lithosphere thickness). Direction of motion within the cells periodically changes (the period of convective oscillations is of the order of 3 × 108 yr). In this study, the oscillations of cratonic lithosphere caused by initial relief perturbation are considered. This relief perturbation is assumed to be created by overthrusting in orogenic belts surrounding cratons. The perturbation of the Earth's surface relief leads to a fast isothermal process of isostatic recovery. In the presence of vertical temperature gradient, vertical displacements, associated with the recovery process in the lithosphere interior, instantly produce the initial temperature perturbations exciting thermoconvective oscillations in the cratonic lithosphere. These small-amplitude convective oscillations cause oscillatory crustal movements which form sedimentary basins on cratons.

  3. Carbon microspheres from ethanol at low temperature: Fabrication, characterization and their use as an electrocatalyst support for methanol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Suoyuan; Ming, Hai; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui; Liu, Yang

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Carbon microbeads were prepared by the carbonization of ethanol at low temperature. ► The low temperature carbonization of ethanol was catalyzed by iodine. ► Carbon microbeads can serve as ideal candidate for catalyst supports. -- Abstract: Carbon microspheres (CMSs) with a diameter range of 2–3 μm were prepared by the iodine-catalyzed carbonization of ethanol at low temperatures by solvothermal synthesis. The reaction time, concentrations of reactants, temperatures, different alcohols as carbon precursors and reaction environments were systematically altered to determine the optimal synthesis conditions. The size and shape were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and their structure was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that abundant oxygen-containing functional groups remain on the surface of the carbon spheres. The formation mechanism involves iodine promotion of the oxidation of ethanol, which results in formation of the CMSs. The specific activity of the CMS-supported Pt catalyst is higher than that of a commercial Pt catalyst from E-TEK or the unsupported Pt catalyst.

  4. Cloning and high-level expression of β-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium in Pichia pastoris by optimizing of pH, methanol concentration and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Dehnavi, Ehsan; Ranaei Siadat, Seyed Omid; Fathi Roudsari, Mehrnoosh; Khajeh, Khosro

    2016-08-01

    β-xylosidase and several other glycoside hydrolase family members, including xylanase, cooperate together to degrade hemicelluloses, a commonly found xylan polymer of plant-cell wall. β-d-xylosidase/α-l-arabinofuranosidase from the ruminal anaerobic bacterium Selenomonas ruminantium (SXA) has potential utility in industrial processes such as production of fuel ethanol and other bioproducts. The optimized synthetic SXA gene was overexpressed in methylotrophic Pichia pastoris under the control of alcohol oxidase I (AOX1) promoter and secreted into the medium. Recombinant protein showed an optimum pH 4.8 and optimum temperature 50 °C. Furthermore, optimization of growth and induction conditions in shake flask was carried out. Using the optimum expression condition (pH 6, temperature 20 °C and 1% methanol induction), protein production was increased by about three times in comparison to the control. The recombinant SXA we have expressed here showed higher turnover frequency using ρ-nitrophenyl β-xylopyranoside (PNPX) substrate, in contrast to most xylosidase experiments reported previously. This is the first report on the cloning and expression of a β-xylosidase gene from glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 43 in Pichia pastoris. Our results confirm that P. pastoris is an appropriate host for high level expression and production of SXA for industrial applications.

  5. The toxicity of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tephly, T.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Methanol toxicity in humans and monkeys is characterized by a latent period of many hours followed by a metabolic acidosis and ocular toxicity. This is not observed in most lower animals. The metabolic acidosis and blindness is apparently due to formic acid accumulation in humans and monkeys, a feature not seen in lower animals. The accumulation of formate is due to a deficiency in formate metabolism which is, in turn, related, in part, to low hepatic tetrahydrofolate (H{sub 4}folate). An excellent correlation between hepatic H{sub 4} folate and formate oxidation rates has been shown within and across species. Thus, humans and monkeys possess low hepatic H{sub 4}folate levels, low rates of formate oxidation and accumulation of formate after methanol. Formate, itself, produces blindness in monkeys in the absence of metabolic acidosis. In addition to low hepatic H{sub 4}folate concentrations, monkeys and humans also have low hepatic 10-formyl H{sub 4}folate dehydrogenase levels, the enzyme which is the ultimate catalyst for conversion of formate to carbon dioxide. This review presents the basis for the role of folic acid-dependent reactions in the regulation of methanol toxicity.

  6. Temperature dependence of the response of ultra fast silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, R.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bellora, A.; Boscardin, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Cirio, R.; Dalla Betta, G. F.; Durando, S.; Fadavi, A.; Ferrero, M.; Galloway, Z.; Gruey, B.; Freeman, P.; Kramberger, G.; Mandic, I.; Monaco, V.; Obertino, M.; Pancheri, L.; Paternoster, G.; Ravera, F.; Sacchi, R.; Sadrozinski, H. F. W.; Seiden, A.; Sola, V.; Spencer, N.; Staiano, A.; Wilder, M.; Woods, N.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Ultra Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD) are a novel concept of silicon detectors based on the Low Gain Avalanche Diode (LGAD) technology, which are able to obtain time resolution of the order of few tens of picoseconds. First prototypes with different geometries (pads/pixels/strips), thickness (300 and 50 μm) and gain (between 5 and 20) have been recently designed and manufactured by CNM (Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, Barcelona) and FBK (Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento). Several measurements on these devices have been performed in laboratory and in beam test and a dependence of the gain on the temperature has been observed. Some of the first measurements will be shown (leakage current, breakdown voltage, gain and time resolution on the 300 μm from FBK and gain on the 50 μm-thick sensor from CNM) and a comparison with the theoretically predicted trend will be discussed.

  7. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Poncé, S. Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X.; Marini, A.; Verstraete, M.

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  8. Analogy between temperature-dependent and concentration-dependent bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Neef, C; van Gils, S A; IJzerman, W L

    2002-11-01

    In this article an analogy between temperature-dependent and concentration-dependent bacterial killing is described. The validation process of autoclaves uses parameters such as reduction rate constant k, decimal reduction time D and resistance coefficient z from an imaginary microorganism to describe the sterilization process. Total lethality of the process is calculated as the integral of the lethality (a function of the temperature) over time. In the case of concentration-dependent killing-i.e. using antibiotic drugs-the k-value is not necessarily a constant; it is the difference between growth and killing of the microorganism. Equations are derived for the decimal reduction time D and resistance coefficient z. Pharmacodynamic models of tobramycin, ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime are used to demonstrate that there is an optimal concentration for all three drugs: C(opt-tobra)=3.20 MICmg/l, C(opt-cipro)=3.45 MICmg/l and C(opt-cefta)=1.35 MICmg/l.

  9. [Study on temperature dependence of ultraviolet absorption cross sections of nitric oxide at high temperatures].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Shi-Liang; Chen, Xiao-Hu

    2007-07-01

    To study the temperature dependence of ultraviolet absorption characteristics of NO species in flue gas, the absorption cross sections of NO in the spectral region 200-230 nm at temperatures ranging from 285 to 410 K were measured using a grating monochromator with 0.2 nm resolution, a deuterium lamp and a specially-fabricated closed sample cell. The absorption spectrum of NO consists of discrete bands superimposed on a continuous base. Results indicated that discrete absorption bands were present with a fixed wavelength interval of roughly 10.5 nm. The peaks of discrete bands decreased first and started to increase later as the temperature rose from 285 to 410 K, with a maximum relative variation of 19.3%. Peak position and half width of the absorption peaks did not exhibit apparent change with the variation of temperature. Continuous absorption cross section increased monotonously with the temperature, and the variation gradient gradually decrease with wavelength red shift. The absorption cross section of NO should not be considered as constant when applied in online monitoring of NO concentration in flue gas. A compensation calculation of absorption cross section with respect to temperature effect is indispensable for the purpose of improving online measurement precision of NO concentration.

  10. Time-temperature-stress dependence of boron fiber deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The time-dependent deformation of boron fibers over the temperature range from -190 to 800 C is studied by flexural stress relaxation and flexural internal friction techniques on 203-micron diam specimen fibers commercially produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a 13-micron tungsten substrate. It is shown that up to at least 800 C all nonelastic behavior observed during axial deformation of CVD boron fibers can be explained solely by anelastic mechanisms and that although creep strains are small, boron fiber anelasticity can produce significant mechanical effects which would otherwise be neglected under the elastic approximation. Relations are obtained to demonstrate the considerable effects of anelasticity on such fiber/composite properties as modulus, creep, creep recovery, stress relaxation, and damping capacity. For an elastic-core/anelastic-sheath model, boron fibers on tungsten substrates are shown to have predictable fracture stresses for time-temperature conditions ranging from impact to long-time stress rupture. Possible techniques for altering these stresses are discussed.

  11. Temperature dependences of rate coefficients for electron catalyzed mutual neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    The flowing afterglow technique of variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) has recently yielded evidence for a novel plasma charge loss process, electron catalyzed mutual neutralization (ECMN), i.e., A+ + B- + e- → A + B + e-. Here, rate constants for ECMN of two polyatomic species (POCl3- and POCl2-) and one diatomic species (Br2-) each with two monatomic cations (Ar+and Kr+) are measured using VENDAMS over the temperature range 300 K-500 K. All rate constants show a steep negative temperature dependence, consistent with that expected for a three body process involving two ions and an electron. No variation in rate constants as a function of the cation type is observed outside of uncertainty; however, rate constants of the polyatomic anions (˜1 × 10-18 cm6 s-1 at 300 K) are measurably higher than that for Br2- [(5.5 ± 2) × 10-19 cm6 s-1 at 300 K].

  12. The Temperature Dependent Enthalpy of Vaporization of Pure Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jianxiang

    Recently the universal behavior of the temperature dependent enthalpy of vaporization along with the whole liquid-vapor coexistence curve at equilibrium is described and explained by Roman et al.5 The work (called RWVM relation) succeeds in the combination of the linear relation near the triple point and the renormalization group theory result near the critical point. For the convenience of chemical designs and engineering applications, we report its b values yielding the minimum average absolute deviation (AAD) for 74 pure substances from the NIST web-book and compare the results with other correlations. We find that with an adapted b value, the RWVM relation predicts the data of 47 pure substances with an AAD less than 0.0093, with six more than 0.02 and all less than 0.03 except quantum fluid hydrogen, that is clearly better than other correlations. For most pure substances, b covers the range from 0 to 1. Only one negative value stands for the quantum fluid helium because of its enthalpy of vaporization being experimentally not a monotonic function of the temperature in the range near the triple point.

  13. Temperature dependences of rate coefficients for electron catalyzed mutual neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-07-14

    The flowing afterglow technique of variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) has recently yielded evidence for a novel plasma charge loss process, electron catalyzed mutual neutralization (ECMN), i.e., A{sup +}+ B{sup -}+ e{sup -}{yields} A + B + e{sup -}. Here, rate constants for ECMN of two polyatomic species (POCl{sub 3}{sup -} and POCl{sub 2}{sup -}) and one diatomic species (Br{sub 2}{sup -}) each with two monatomic cations (Ar{sup +}and Kr{sup +}) are measured using VENDAMS over the temperature range 300 K-500 K. All rate constants show a steep negative temperature dependence, consistent with that expected for a three body process involving two ions and an electron. No variation in rate constants as a function of the cation type is observed outside of uncertainty; however, rate constants of the polyatomic anions ({approx}1 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K) are measurably higher than that for Br{sub 2}{sup -}[(5.5 {+-} 2) x 10{sup -19} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K].

  14. Temperature Dependent Rate Coefficients for the OH + Pinonaldehyde Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, M. E.; Talukdar, R.; Notte, G.; Ellison, G. B.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2005-12-01

    The biogenic emission of monoterpenes is an important source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere, approximately 10% of the biogenic hydrocarbons emitted yearly. The oxidation of alpha-pinene, the most abundant monoterpene in the atmosphere, by OH leads to the formation of pinonaldehyde (3-acetyl-2,2-dimethyl-cyclobutyl-ethanal) as a major oxidation product formed in yields > 50%. The atmospheric oxidation of pinonaldehyde will impact radical cycling, ozone formation and air quality on a regional scale. Previous laboratory studies of the OH + pinonaldehyde rate coefficient have used relative rate methods and were limited to room temperature. The reported rate coefficients are in poor agreement with values ranging from 4.0 to 9.1 × 10-11 cm#3 molecule-1 s-1. In this study we have measured absolute rate coefficients to resolve these discrepancies and have extended the measurements to include the temperature dependence. The rate coefficient for the gas phase reaction of OH with pinonaldehyde was measured over the temperature range 297 to 374 K and between 55 and 96 Torr under pseudo first order conditions in OH. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was used to monitor the OH radical which was produced by pulsed laser photolysis. The pinonaldehyde concentration was determined in situ using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV (185 nm) absorption spectroscopy. The rate coefficient for the OH + pinonaldehyde reaction will be presented. Our results will be compared with previous rate coefficient measurements and the discrepancies and the atmospheric implications of these measurements will be discussed.

  15. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  16. Positronium bubble oscillation in room temperature ionic liquids-Temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirade, T.

    2015-06-01

    The temperature dependent oscillation of the ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation rate was successfully observed for a room temperature ionic liquid (IL), N,N,N-trimethyl-N- propylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TMPA-TFSI). The fundamental frequencies at 25C and 30C were 5.85GHz and 4.00GHz, respectively. The decay of the oscillation was faster at higher temperature, 30C. Moreover, the higher harmonic frequencies could explain the change of ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation rate successfully. The macroscopic viscosity of the IL could not explain the appearance of the oscillation. It indicated that the positron annihilation methods were very strong tools to study the properties of IL's in sub-nanometer scale that must be very different from the macroscopic properties.

  17. Temperature and frequency dependent dielectric properties of electrically conducting oxidatively synthesized polyazomethines and their structural, optical, and thermal characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dineshkumar, Sengottuvelu; Muthusamy, Athianna; Chandrasekaran, J.

    2017-01-01

    Three azomethine diol monomers were synthesized by condensing with methanolic solution of aromatic aldehydes with ethylenediamine. These monomers were oxidatively polymerized using NaOCl as an oxidant. The structures of the monomers and polymers were confirmed by various spectroscopic techniques. Spectral results showed that the repeating units are linked by Csbnd C and Csbnd Osbnd C couplings. The polyazomethines have fluorescent property with high stokes shift. Solid state electrical conductivity of polymers both in I2 doped and undoped states, temperature and frequency dependent dielectric measurements were made by two probe method. The electrical conductivities of polyazomethines were compared based on the charge densities on imine nitrogens obtained from Huckel calculation. The conductivity of polymers increases with increase in iodine vapour contact time. Among the synthesized polymers PHNAE has shown high dielectric constant at low applied frequency of 50 Hz at 393 K due the presence of bulky naphthalene unit in polymer chain.

  18. Fish introductions reveal the temperature dependence of species interactions.

    PubMed

    Hein, Catherine L; Öhlund, Gunnar; Englund, Göran

    2014-01-22

    A major area of current research is to understand how climate change will impact species interactions and ultimately biodiversity. A variety of environmental conditions are rapidly changing owing to climate warming, and these conditions often affect both the strength and outcome of species interactions. We used fish distributions and replicated fish introductions to investigate environmental conditions influencing the coexistence of two fishes in Swedish lakes: brown trout (Salmo trutta) and pike (Esox lucius). A logistic regression model of brown trout and pike coexistence showed that these species coexist in large lakes (more than 4.5 km(2)), but not in small, warm lakes (annual air temperature more than 0.9-1.5°C). We then explored how climate change will alter coexistence by substituting climate scenarios for 2091-2100 into our model. The model predicts that brown trout will be extirpated from approximately half of the lakes where they presently coexist with pike and from nearly all 9100 lakes where pike are predicted to invade. Context dependency was critical for understanding pike-brown trout interactions, and, given the widespread occurrence of context-dependent species interactions, this aspect will probably be critical for accurately predicting climate impacts on biodiversity.

  19. Temperature Dependence in Femtosecond Desorption at Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misewich, James

    1998-03-01

    Femtosecond laser induced desorption at metal surfaces is distinguished by two salient observations: the high yield of the reaction and the short correlation time in pump-probe measurements. This has led to the proposal of a model for desorption induced by multiple electronic transitions (DIMET). (J.A. Misewich, T.F. Heinz, and D.M. Newns, Phys. Rev. Lett. v.68 (1992) 3737.) The effect of the adsorbate temperature in DIMET has been studied using stochastic trajectory calculations with initial adsorbate vibrational quantum state occupation. We find that initial vibrational excitation substantially increases the desorption yield. These findings are related to two experimental observations. The long time-scale wings found in femtosecond time-resolved correlation measurements are thought to reflect the residual vibrational excitation left in the undesorbed adlayer following the first laser pulse. (J.A. Misewich, A. Kalamarides, T.F. Heinz, U. Hoefer, and M.M.T. Loy, J. Chem. Phys. v.100 (1994) 736.) Also, the wavelength dependence of femtosecond desorption experiments (S. Deliwala, R.J. Finlay, J.R. Goldman, T.H. Her, W.D. Mieher, and E. Mazur, Chem. Phys. Lett. v.242 (1995) 617 and D.G. Busch and W. Ho, Phys. Rev. Lett. v.77 (1996) 1338.) suggests a role for nonthermalized electrons which is interpreted in terms of the vibrational excitation left in the adlayer from unsuccessful DIET (single excitation) events as a result of the wavelength dependent nonthermalized electron distribution.

  20. Method of steam reforming methanol to hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Beshty, Bahjat S.

    1990-01-01

    The production of hydrogen by the catalyzed steam reforming of methanol is accomplished using a reformer of greatly reduced size and cost wherein a mixture of water and methanol is superheated to the gaseous state at temperatures of about 800.degree. to about 1,100.degree. F. and then fed to a reformer in direct contact with the catalyst bed contained therein, whereby the heat for the endothermic steam reforming reaction is derived directly from the superheated steam/methanol mixture.

  1. Temperature dependence of polyhedral cage volumes in clathrate hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chakoumakos, B.C.; Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Ishii, Y.; Jones, C.Y.; Toby, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    The polyhedral cage volumes of structure I (sI) (carbon dioxide, methane, trimethylene oxide) and structure II (sII) (methane-ethane, propane, tetrahydrofuran, trimethylene oxide) hydrates are computed from atomic positions determined from neutron powder-diffraction data. The ideal structural formulas for sI and sII are, respectively, S2L6 ?? 46H2O and S16L???8 ?? 136H2O, where S denotes a polyhedral cage with 20 vertices, L a 24-cage, and L??? a 28-cage. The space-filling polyhedral cages are defined by the oxygen atoms of the hydrogen-bonded network of water molecules. Collectively, the mean cage volume ratio is 1.91 : 1.43 : 1 for the 28-cage : 24-cage : 20-cage, which correspond to equivalent sphere radii of 4.18, 3.79, and 3.37 A??, respectively. At 100 K, mean polyhedral volumes are 303.8, 227.8, and 158.8 A??3 for the 28-cage, 24-cage, and 20-cage, respectively. In general, the 20-cage volume for a sII is larger than that of a sI, although trimethylene oxide is an exception. The temperature dependence of the cage volumes reveals differences between apparently similar cages with similar occupants. In the case of trimethylene oxide hydrate, which forms both sI and sII, the 20-cages common to both structures contract quite differently. From 220 K, the sII 20-cage exhibits a smooth monotonic reduction in size, whereas the sI 20-cage initially expands upon cooling to 160 K, then contracts more rapidly to 10 K, and overall the sI 20-cage is larger than the sII 20-cage. The volumes of the large cages in both structures contract monotonically with decreasing temperature. These differences reflect reoriented motion of the trimethyelene oxide molecule in the 24-cage of sI, consistent with previous spectroscopic and calorimetric studies. For the 20-cages in methane hydrate (sI) and a mixed methane-ethane hydrate (sII), both containing methane as the guest molecule, the temperature dependence of the 20-cage volume in sII is much less than that in sI, but sII is overall

  2. Dependence of the Brittle Ductile Transition on Strain-Rate-Dependent Critical Homologous Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Paul M.

    2017-02-01

    Earthquakes mainly occur in crust or mantle that is below a critical temperature for the tectonic strain-rate, \\dot{e}_t, such that stress builds up to the breaking point before it can relax due to creep. Then long-range stress correlation gives rise to power law seismicity including large events. The limiting temperature depends on pressure, which is taken into account by finding a critical homologous temperature THc = T/TM above which earthquakes are rarely observed (where T, TM are temperature and average melting temperature of constituent minerals). We find that THc for ocean plates is ∼0.55. For California earthquakes, it is also close to 0.55. The uppermost mantle layer of oceanic plates of thickness ∼50 km is composed of harzburgite and depleted peridotite from which basalt has been removed to form ocean crust. Thus it has a higher melting temperature than the peridotite of the surrounding mantle, or the lower halves of plates. Thicknesses of seismicity in deep subduction zones, determined from 2D polynomial fits to a relocated catalog, are ∼50 km, which suggests that the earthquake channel is confined to this layer. We construct models to find homologous temperatures in slabs, and find that seismicity thicknesses are also, on average, confined to TH ≤ 0.55 ± 0.05. The associated rheology is compared with that obtained from flexure models of ocean lithosphere. The brittle-ductile transition occurs where viscosity drops from high values in the cold cores of slabs to values of 1022 to 1023 Pa s, i.e., where creep strain-rates become comparable to tectonic rates. The cutoff for deep earthquakes is not sharp. However they appear unlikely to occur if homologous temperature is high TH > 0.55. Exceptions to the rule are anomalously deep earthquakes such as those beneath the Iceland and the Hawaiian hotspots, and the Newport Inglewood Fault. These are smaller events with short-range stress correlation, and can be explained if strain-rates are 2 to 3 orders

  3. Acute methanol toxicity in minipigs

    SciTech Connect

    Dorman, D.C.; Dye, J.A.; Nassise, M.P.; Ekuta, J.; Bolon, B.

    1993-01-01

    The pig has been proposed as a potential animal model for methanol-induced neuro-ocular toxicosis in humans because of its low liver tetrahydrofolate levels and slower rate of formate metabolism compared to those of humans. To examine the validity of this animal model, 12 4-month-old female minipigs (minipig YU) were given a single oral dose of water or methanol at 1.0, 2.5, or 5.0 g/kg body wt by gavage (n = 3 pigs/dose). Dose-dependent signs of acute methanol intoxication, which included mild CNS depression, tremors, ataxia, and recumbency, developed within 0.5 to 2.0 hr, and resolved by 52 hr. Methanol- and formate-dosed pigs did not develop optic nerve lesions, toxicologically significant formate accumulation, or metabolic acidosis. Based on results following a single dose, female minipigs do not appear to be overtly sensitive to methanol and thus may not be a suitable animal model for acute methanol-induced neuroocular toxicosis.

  4. Near-infrared (NIR) study of hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules in polar and nonpolar solvents: an approach from concentration-dependent molar absorptivity.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Yuho; Ikehata, Akifumi; Hashimoto, Chihiro; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Differences in the hydrogen-bonding states of methanol in polar and nonpolar solvents were studied by using the first overtone of O-H stretching vibrations observed in the near-infrared (NIR) band ranging from 7500 to 6000 cm(-1). To eliminate the absorption of solvents, NIR-inactive nonpolar solvents carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and tetrachloroethylene (C2Cl4) were chosen, along with deuterium-substituted polar solvents acetone-d6, acetonitrile-d3, 1,4-dioxane-d8, and tetrahydrofuran (THF)-d8. The changes in the hydrogen-bonding states of methanol during mixing with the solvents were estimated using the extended molar absorption spectrum, which was defined as the concentration difference. The extended molar absorption spectra in different concentrations were decomposed into a finite number of independent factors using a multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares calculation. Two and three such factors were sufficient to reproduce the extended molar absorption spectra for the nonpolar and polar solvents, respectively. The detailed assignments of each factor were estimated using the calculated loadings and scores. A similarity analysis was also applied to the extended molar absorption spectra of methanol and effectively quantified the deviation from the spectrum of pure methanol. The methanol and solvent affinities were also compared.

  5. Climatological assessment of explosion airblast propagations. [Temperature dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Sound waves or explosion airblast waves are refracted by the atmosphere depending upon temperature-dependent sound speeds and winds at various altitudes. In comparison with propagation expected from a spherical explosion overpressure-distance function, long-range overpressures (below about 2 kPa) may be attenuated by a strong decrease (gradient) in sound velocity with height; they may be enhanced by an inversion or increasing sound velocity with height; or there may be blast focusing by as much as 3 to 5X from complex sound velocity structures. In general, for a wave passing through a layer where sound velocity decreases with height, wave normals (rays) are curved upward away from ground, so that overpressures are subject to excess attenuation compared to undistorted radial propagations from an assumed model explosion. In a layer where sound velocity increases with height, shock rays are curved downward toward the ground. When they strike ground, they are almost perfectly reflected, at least for the low frequencies and long wave lengths of most explosion tests, and follow repetitious paths. At moderate to long ranges, the result is a restriction to near cylindrical wave expansion, rather than spherical, with an associated amplification of wave overpressure, by comparison with an undistorted spherically expanding wave. In the more complex dogleg case, with a decreasing sound velocity strata above the surface capped by a layer of increasing sound velocities (to a value higher than at the surface), the result may be a folding of the wave front to form a caustic (in 3-D) or a focus that may reach the ground. Very strong overpressure amplifications may develop in such foci; 5X overpressure amplifications (25X in energy flux) have been recorded.

  6. Temperature dependence of microwave oscillations in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Peng; Feng, Jiafeng E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Wei, Hongxiang E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Han, Xiufeng; Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming

    2015-01-05

    We experimentally study the temperature dependence of the spin-transfer-torque-induced microwave oscillations in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer. We demonstrate that the oscillation frequency increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which is mainly ascribed to the temperature dependence of both the saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We also find that a strong temperature dependence of the output power while a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of spectral linewidth are maintained for a constant dc bias in measured temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different dependences of oscillation frequency, output power, and linewidth are discussed.

  7. Rapid starting methanol reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Chludzinski, Paul J.; Dantowitz, Philip; McElroy, James F.

    1984-01-01

    The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

  8. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence in light-emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Taiping; Ma, Ziguang; Du, Chunhua; Fang, Yutao; Wu, Haiyan; Jiang, Yang; Wang, Lu; Dai, Longgui; Jia, Haiqiang; Liu, Wuming; Chen, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-dependent photoluminescence (TDPL), one of the most effective and powerful optical characterisation methods, is widely used to investigate carrier transport and localized states in semiconductor materials. Resonant excitation and non-resonant excitation are the two primary methods of researching this issue. In this study, the application ranges of the different excitation modes are confirmed by analysing the TDPL characteristics of GaN-based light-emitting diodes. For resonant excitation, the carriers are generated only in the quantum wells, and the TDPL features effectively reflect the intrinsic photoluminescence characteristics within the wells and offer certain advantages in characterising localized states and the quality of the wells. For non-resonant excitation, both the wells and barriers are excited, and the carriers that drift from the barriers can contribute to the luminescence under the driving force of the built-in field, which causes the existing equations to become inapplicable. Thus, non-resonant excitation is more suitable than resonant excitation for studying carrier transport dynamics and evaluating the internal quantum efficiency. The experimental technique described herein provides fundamental new insights into the selection of the most appropriate excitation mode for the experimental analysis of carrier transport and localized states in p-n junction devices. PMID:25139682

  9. Temperature and stress dependence of ultrasonic velocity: Further measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Richard; Lobkis, Oleg

    2002-05-01

    Large and erratic values for the material parameter d ln[dV/dT]/dσ have been reported in the past, including (our own) values indistinguishable from zero. Naive theoretical estimates for the parameter suggest that it should be of the order of an inverse Young's modulus, but some groups have reported values as much as 100 times greater, as high as an inverse Yield modulus. This suggests that an explanation for the anomalously high and variable coefficient is that it depends on plastic history. In an effort to resolve the discrepancies we revisit the measurements, but now on specimens with different plastic histories. The times-of-flight of multiply reflected 10 MHz ultrasound pulses in aluminum bars were resolved to within 1 nanosecond. Variations in natural wavespeeds were measured to within by cross-correlating late echoes received at different temperatures and stresses. Compressive elastic loads were applied on an axis perpendicular to the direction of the longitudinal acoustic wave, as the specimens cooled from 50 degrees C to 20. The specimen with large (10%) plastic pre-strain was found to show a 4% change in d ln V/dT when applied elastic strain was 0.1%, but the effect was not linear in stress. Consistent with our previous reports, specimens with no significant plastic history showed no discernable coefficient.

  10. Soft self-assembled nanoparticles with temperature-dependent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Capone, Barbara; Likos, Christos N.

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of versatile building blocks that reliably self-assemble into desired ordered and disordered phases is amongst the hottest topics in contemporary materials science. To this end, microscopic units of varying complexity, aimed at assembling the target phases, have been thought, designed, investigated and built. Such a path usually requires laborious fabrication techniques, especially when specific functionalisation of the building blocks is required. Telechelic star polymers, i.e., star polymers made of a number of f di-block copolymers consisting of solvophobic and solvophilic monomers grafted on a central anchoring point, spontaneously self-assemble into soft patchy particles featuring attractive spots (patches) on the surface. Here we show that the tunability of such a system can be widely extended by controlling the physical and chemical parameters of the solution. Indeed, under fixed external conditions the self-assembly behaviour depends only on the number of arms and on the ratio of solvophobic to solvophilic monomers. However, changes in temperature and/or solvent quality make it possible to reliably change the number and size of the attractive patches. This allows the steering of the mesoscopic self-assembly behaviour without modifying the microscopic constituents. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that diverse combinations of the parameters can generate stars with the same number of patches but different radial and angular stiffness. This mechanism could provide a neat way of further fine-tuning the elastic properties of the supramolecular network without changing its topology.

  11. Tuning the temperature dependence for switching in dithienylethene photochromic switches.

    PubMed

    Kudernac, Tibor; Kobayashi, Takao; Uyama, Ayaka; Uchida, Kingo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Feringa, Ben L

    2013-08-29

    Diarylethene photochromic switches use light to drive structural changes through reversible electrocyclization reactions. High efficiency in dynamic photoswitching is a prerequisite for applications, as is thermal stability and the selective addressability of both isomers ring-opened and -closed diarylethenes. These properties can be optimized readily through rational variation in molecular structure. The efficiency with regard to switching as a function of structural variation is much less understood, with the exception of geometric requirements placed on the reacting atoms. Ultimately, increasing the quantum efficiency of photochemical switching in diarylethenes requires a detailed understanding of the excited-state potential energy surface(s) and the mechanisms involved in switching. Through studies of the temperature dependence, photoswitching and theoretical studies demonstrate the occurrence or absence of thermal activation barriers in three constitutional isomers that bear distinct π-conjugated systems. We found that a decrease in the thermal barriers correlates with an increase in switching efficiency. The origin of the barriers is assigned to the decrease in π-conjugation that is concomitant with the progress of the photoreaction. Furthermore, we show that balanced molecular design can minimize the change in the extent of π-conjugation during switching and lead to optimal bidirectional switching efficiencies. Our findings hold implications for future structural design of diarylethene photochromic switches.

  12. Physical characteristics of bright Class I methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leurini, S.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Class I methanol masers are thought to be tracers of interstellar shock waves. However, they have received relatively little attention mostly as a consequence of their low luminosities compared to other maser transitions. This situation has changed recently and Class I methanol masers are now routinely used as signposts of outflow activity especially in high extinction regions. The recent detection of polarisation in Class I lines now makes it possible to obtain direct observational information about magnetic fields in interstellar shocks. Aims: We make use of newly calculated collisional rate coefficients for methanol to investigate the excitation of Class I methanol masers and to reconcile the observed Class I methanol maser properties with model results. Methods: We performed large velocity gradient calculations with a plane-parallel slab geometry appropriate for shocks to compute the pump and loss rates which regulate the interactions of the different maser systems with the maser reservoir. We study the dependence of the pump rate coefficient, the maser loss rate, and the inversion efficiency of the pumping scheme of several Class I masers on the physics of the emitting gas. Results: We predict inversion in all transitions where maser emission is observed. Bright Class I methanol masers are mainly high-temperature (>100 K) high-density (n(H2) ~ 107-108 cm-3) structures with methanol maser emission measures, ξ, corresponding to high methanol abundances close to the limits set by collisional quenching. Our model predictions reproduce reasonably well most of the observed properties of Class I methanol masers. Class I masers in the 25 GHz series are the most sensitive to the density of the medium and mase at higher densities than other lines. Moreover, even at high density and high methanol abundances, their luminosity is predicted to be lower than that of the 44 GHz and 36 GHz masers. Our model predictions also reflect the observational result that the

  13. Reduced methanol kinetic mechanisms for combustion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yalamanchili, S.; Sirignano, W.A.; Seiser, R.; Seshadri, K.

    2005-08-01

    Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for methanol combustion were investigated by evaluating ignition delay magnitudes and combustion in a continuously stirred reactor. Unsteady computations were made to study the characteristics of the kinetic mechanisms proposed in the literature and to compare the dependence of various parameters on methanol combustion. All computations were done under isobaric conditions, and, to capture the influence of all the reactions involved in the mechanism, a very small time step was used. Finite-difference methods were used to solve the coupled differential equations. The five-step mechanism developed by C.M. Mueller and N. Peters [in: N. Peters, B. Rogg (Eds.), Reduced Kinetic Mechanisms for Applications in Combustion Systems, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1993, pp. 143-155] for premixed flames and both the five-step mechanism and the four-step mechanisms developed by C.M. Mueller, K. Seshadri, J.Y. Chen [ibid, pp. 284-307] for non-premixed flames were considered. It was found that the Mueller et al. five-step mechanism, with some modifications, best supported the spontaneous ignition and continuous stirred reactor combustion. The results were validated by comparing calculated ignition delays with available experimental data of C.T. Bowman [Combust. Flame 25 (1975) 343-354], and calculated final steady-state concentrations with chemical equilibrium calculations [J.-Y. Chen, Combust. Sci. Technol. 78 (1991) 127]. Initial temperature and concentration and the operating pressure of the system have a major effect on the delay of methanol ignition. The residence time of the continuous stirred reactor affects ignition delay and also changes the transient characteristic of chemical composition of the fuel-vapor mixture. The computations are intended to guide and explain many combustion studies that require a methanol kinetic mechanism.

  14. Excessive S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine-Dependent Methylation Increases Levels of Methanol, Formaldehyde and Formic Acid in Rat Brain Striatal Homogenates: Possible role in S-adenosyl-L-methionine-induced Parkinson’s disease-like disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Sook; Chen, Hongtao; Hardman, Chadwick; Simm, Anthony; Charlton, Clivel

    2009-01-01

    Aims Excessive methylation may be a precipitating factor for Parkinson’s disease (PD) since S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the endogenous methyl donor, induces PD-like changes when injected into the rat brain. The hydrolysis of the methyl ester bond of the methylated proteins produces methanol. Since methanol is oxidized into formaldehyde, and formaldehyde into formic acid in the body, we investigated the effects of SAM on the production of methanol, formaldehyde and formic acid in rat brain striatal homogenates and the toxicity of these products in PC12 cells. Main methods radio-enzymatic and colorimetric assays, cell viability, Western blot. Key findings SAM increased the formation of methanol, formaldehyde and formic acid in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Concentrations of [3H-methyl]-SAM at 0.17, 0.33, 0.67 and 1.34 nM produced 3.8, 8.0, 18.3 and 34.4 fmol/mg protein/h of [3H] methanol in rat striatal homogenates, respectively. SAM also significantly generated formaldehyde and formic acid in striatal homogenates. Formaldehyde was the most toxic metabolite to differentiated PC12 pheochromocytoma cells in cell culture studies, indicating that formaldehyde formed endogenously may contribute to neuronal damage in excessive methylation conditions. Subtoxic concentration of formaldehyde decreased the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, the limiting factor in dopamine synthesis. Formaldehyde was more toxic to catecholaminergic PC12 cells than C6 glioma cells, indicating that neurons are more vulnerable to formaldehyde than glia cells. Significance We suggest that excessive carboxylmethylation of proteins might be involved in the SAM-induced PD-like changes and in the aging process via the toxic effects of formaldehyde. PMID:18930743

  15. Temperature dependence of water diffusion pools in brain white matter.

    PubMed

    Dhital, Bibek; Labadie, Christian; Stallmach, Frank; Möller, Harald E; Turner, Robert

    2016-02-15

    Water diffusion in brain tissue can now be easily investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) techniques, providing unique insights into cellular level microstructure such as axonal orientation. The diffusive motion in white matter is known to be non-Gaussian, with increasing evidence for more than one water-containing tissue compartment. In this study, freshly excised porcine brain white matter was measured using a 125-MHz MR spectrometer (3T) equipped with gradient coils providing magnetic field gradients of up to 35,000 mT/m. The sample temperature was varied between -14 and +19 °C. The hypothesis tested was that white matter contains two slowly exchanging pools of water molecules with different diffusion properties. A Stejskal-Tanner diffusion sequence with very short gradient pulses and b-factors up to 18.8 ms/μm(2) was used. The dependence on b-factor of the attenuation due to diffusion was robustly fitted by a biexponential function, with comparable volume fractions for each component. The diffusion coefficient of each component follows Arrhenius behavior, with significantly different activation energies. The measured volume fractions are consistent with the existence of three water-containing compartments, the first comprising relatively free cytoplasmic and extracellular water molecules, the second of water molecules in glial processes, and the third comprising water molecules closely associated with membranes, as for example, in the myelin sheaths and elsewhere. The activation energy of the slow diffusion pool suggests proton hopping at the surface of membranes by a Grotthuss mechanism, mediated by hydrating water molecules.

  16. Determination of the Temperature Dependence of the Rate Constants for HO2/Acetonylperoxy Reaction and Acetonylperoxy Self-Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, E. C.; Grieman, F. J.; Hui, A. O.; Okumura, M.; Sander, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Reactions of hydroperoxy radical, HO2, with carbonyl containing RO2 can play an important role in the oxidation chemistry of the troposphere. Discovered radical product channels in addition to radical termination channels have resulted in increased study of these important reactions. In our continued study of HO2 reactions with acetonylperoxy and acetylperoxy radicals, we report here our first results on the kinetics of the acetonylperoxy system. Previous studies have resulted in conflicting results and no temperature dependence of the rate constants. Using the Infrared Kinetic Spectroscopy (IRKS) method in which a temperature-controlled slow-flow tube apparatus and laser flash photolysis of Cl2 are used to produce HO2 and CH3C(O)CH2O2 from methanol and acetone, respectively, we studied the chemical kinetics involved over the temperature range of 295 to 240 K. Rates of chemical reaction were determined by monitoring the HO2 concentration as a function of time by sensitive near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy while simultaneously measuring the disappearance of [CH3C(O)CH2O2] in the ultraviolet at 300 nm. The simultaneous fits resulted in the determination of the temperature dependence of the rate constants for the HO2/acetonylperoxy reaction and the acetonylperoxy self-reaction. At the lower temperatures, the reactions of HO2 and CH3C(O)CH2O2 with the adducts HO2•CH3OH and HO2•CH3C(O)CH3 formed in significant concentrations needed to be included in the fitting models.

  17. Temperature-dependent appearance of forensically useful flies on carcasses.

    PubMed

    Matuszewski, Szymon; Szafałowicz, Michał; Grzywacz, Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    Flies are frequently used for postmortem interval (PMI) estimations. These estimates are usually based on the age of larval or pupal specimens. However, the age defines only the minimum PMI. In order to move forensic entomology further, a method useful for the estimation of an interval preceding insect appearance on a corpse called the pre-appearance interval (PAI) is needed. Recently, it was demonstrated that the PAI of several carrion beetles is closely related to the temperature prevailing throughout this interval. Hence, it was postulated to estimate PAI from temperature. In order to check premises for using this approach with flies, a test of the relationship between adult or oviposition PAI and temperature was made for nine species of European flies. Data on PAI originated from pig carcasses decomposing under various temperatures. Adult PAI of Hydrotaea dentipes, Hydrotaea ignava, Hydrotaea similis, Phormia regina, and Stearibia nigriceps and oviposition PAI of S. nigriceps were exponentially related to temperature. Only S. nigriceps revealed a close relationship, demonstrating solid premises for PAI estimation from temperature alone. Adult and oviposition PAI of Calliphora vomitoria and adult PAI of Hydrotaea pilipes were not related to temperature. Adult and oviposition PAI of Lucilia sericata and Lucilia caesar responded similarly, with an abrupt and large increase in a narrow range of low temperatures and no response in a broad range of high temperatures. Probably, different mechanisms form the basis for the response of PAI to temperature in flies colonizing carcasses shortly after death and flies colonizing carcasses later in the decomposition process.

  18. To probe the interaction of methanol and acetonitrile with the ionic liquid N,N,N-Trimethyl-N-propyl ammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide at different temperatures by solvation dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Rajib; Rao, Vishal Govind; Sarkar, Souravi; Ghatak, Chiranjib; Setua, Palash; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2009-06-25

    The dynamics of solvent and rotational relaxation of coumarin 153 (C-153) has been studied in neat N,N,N-trimethyl-N-propyl ammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide ([N(3111)][Tf(2)N]) and its mixtures with polar solvents, namely, methanol and acetonitrile at three different temperatures from 294 to 303 K. Both the solvent and rotational relaxation dynamics of C-153 in neat [N(3111)][Tf(2)N] are linearly correlated with the bulk viscosity at different temperatures. The solvent relaxation time and rotational relaxation time of C-153 decrease with gradual addition of cosolvents in [N(3111)][Tf(2)N]. The gradual addition of cosolvent decreases the viscosity of the medium, and consequently, the solvation and rotational relaxation time also decrease. The decrease of solvation time is more pronounced on addition of acetonitrile compared to methanol.

  19. Temperature and strain-rate dependent fracture strength of graphynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying-Yan; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Gu, Yuan-Tong

    2014-10-01

    Graphyne is an allotrope of graphene. The mechanical properties of graphynes (α-, β-, γ- and 6,6,12-graphynes) under uniaxial tension deformation at different temperatures and strain rates are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that graphynes are more sensitive to temperature changes than graphene in terms of fracture strength and Young's modulus. The temperature sensitivity of the different graphynes is proportionally related to the percentage of acetylenic linkages in their structures, with the α-graphyne (having 100% of acetylenic linkages) being most sensitive to temperature. For the same graphyne, temperature exerts a more pronounced effect on the Young's modulus than fracture strength, which is different from that of graphene. The mechanical properties of graphynes are also sensitive to strain rate, in particular at higher temperatures.

  20. Temperature-dependent macromolecular X-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Weik, Martin Colletier, Jacques-Philippe

    2010-04-01

    The dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. X-ray crystallography provides structural details of biological macromolecules. Whereas routine data are collected close to 100 K in order to mitigate radiation damage, more exotic temperature-controlled experiments in a broader temperature range from 15 K to room temperature can provide both dynamical and structural insights. Here, the dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. Experimental strategies of kinetic crystallography are discussed that have allowed the generation and trapping of macromolecular intermediate states by combining reaction initiation in the crystalline state with appropriate temperature profiles. A particular focus is on recruiting X-ray-induced changes for reaction initiation, thus unveiling useful aspects of radiation damage, which otherwise has to be minimized in macromolecular crystallography.

  1. Temperature and frequency dependence of ultrasonic attenuation in selected tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.; Croissette, D. H. L.; Heyser, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation over the frequency range of 1.5-10 MHz has been measured as a function of temperature for porcine liver, backfat, kidney and spleen as well as for a single specimen of human liver. The attenuation in these excised specimens increases nearly linearly with frequency. Over the temperature range of approximately 4-37 C the attenuation decreases with increasing temperature for most soft tissue studied.

  2. Temperature-dependent optical properties of titanium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Justin A.; Naik, Gururaj V.; Zhao, Yang; Petach, Trevor A.; Sahasrabuddhe, Kunal; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2017-03-01

    The refractory metal titanium nitride is promising for high-temperature nanophotonic and plasmonic applications, but its optical properties have not been studied at temperatures exceeding 400 °C. Here, we perform in-situ high-temperature ellipsometry to quantify the permittivity of TiN films from room temperature to 1258 °C. We find that the material becomes more absorptive at higher temperatures but maintains its metallic character throughout visible and near infrared frequencies. X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and mass spectrometry confirm that TiN retains its bulk crystal quality and that thermal cycling increases the surface roughness, reduces the lattice constant, and reduces the carbon and oxygen contaminant concentrations. The changes in the optical properties of the material are highly reproducible upon repeated heating and cooling, and the room-temperature properties are fully recoverable after cooling. Using the measured high-temperature permittivity, we compute the emissivity, surface plasmon polariton propagation length, and two localized surface plasmon resonance figures of merit as functions of temperature. Our results indicate that titanium nitride is a viable plasmonic material throughout the full temperature range explored.

  3. Erroneous Arrhenius: modified arrhenius model best explains the temperature dependence of ectotherm fitness.

    PubMed

    Knies, Jennifer L; Kingsolver, Joel G

    2010-08-01

    The initial rise of fitness that occurs with increasing temperature is attributed to Arrhenius kinetics, in which rates of reaction increase exponentially with increasing temperature. Models based on Arrhenius typically assume single rate-limiting reactions over some physiological temperature range for which all the rate-limiting enzymes are in 100% active conformation. We test this assumption using data sets for microbes that have measurements of fitness (intrinsic rate of population growth) at many temperatures and over a broad temperature range and for diverse ectotherms that have measurements at fewer temperatures. When measurements are available at many temperatures, strictly Arrhenius kinetics are rejected over the physiological temperature range. However, over a narrower temperature range, we cannot reject strictly Arrhenius kinetics. The temperature range also affects estimates of the temperature dependence of fitness. These results indicate that Arrhenius kinetics only apply over a narrow range of temperatures for ectotherms, complicating attempts to identify general patterns of temperature dependence.

  4. Determination of time-dependent skin temperature decrease rates in the case of abrupt changes of environmental temperature.

    PubMed

    Mall, G; Hubig, M; Beier, G; Büttner, A; Eisenmenger, W

    2000-09-11

    The present study deals with the development of a method for determining time-dependent temperature decrease rates and its application to postmortem surface cooling. The study concentrates on evaluating skin cooling behavior since data on skin cooling in the forensic literature are scarce. Furthermore, all heat transfer mechanisms strongly depend on the temperature gradient between body surface and environment. One of the main problems in modelling postmortem cooling processes is the dependence on the environmental temperature. All models for postmortem rectal cooling essentially presuppose a constant environmental temperature. In medico-legal practice, the temperature of the surrounding of a corpse mostly varies; therefore, an approach for extending the models to variable environmental temperatures is desirable. It consists in 'localizing' them to infinitesimal small intervals of time. An extended model differential equation is obtained and solved explicitly. The approach developed is applied to the single-exponential Newtonian model of surface cooling producing the following differential equation:T(S)'(t)=-lambda(t)(T(S)(t)-T(E)(t))(with T(S)(t) the surface/skin temperature, T(E)(t) the environmental temperature, lambda(t) the temperature decrease rate and T(S)'(t) the actual change of skin temperature or first-order derivative of T(S)). The differential equation directly provides an estimator:lambda(t)=-T(S)'(t)T(S)(t)-T(E)(t)for the time-dependent temperature decrease rate. The estimator is applied to two skin cooling experiments with different types of abrupt changes of environmental temperature, peak-like and step-like; the values of the time-dependent temperature decrease rate function were calculated. By reinserting them, the measured surface temperature curve could be accurately reconstructed, indicating that the extended model is well suited for describing surface cooling in the case of abrupt changes of environmental temperature.

  5. Strain- and Temperature-Dependence of Electromagnetic Metamaterials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Analytic Expressions are powerful tools for describing metamaterial strain/temp- dependence : - Provide insight into physics behind linkage; - Enable...strain/temp- dependence for unit cells in same design family. Analytic Expressions enable efficient determination of EM(Electromagnetic) performance of

  6. Refractive Indices and Some Other Optical Properties of Synthetic Emerald: Temperature Dependence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-29

    The temperature dependence of the refractive indices for ordinary and extraordinary rays of mercury spectrum three lines and laser line independently...temperature growth and this dependence has quasilinear character. Emerald has quite low birefringence values that increases slightly along with the temperature

  7. Temperature dependence of self-consistent full matrix material constants of lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wenwu

    2015-01-01

    Up to date, there are no self-consistent data in the literature on the temperature dependence of full matrix material properties for piezoelectric materials because they are extremely difficult to determine. Using only one sample, we have measured the temperature dependence of full matrix constants of lead zirconate titanate (PZT-4) from room temperature to 120 °C by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. Self-consistency is guaranteed here because all data at different temperatures come from one sample. Such temperature dependence data would make it a reality to accurately predict device performance at high temperatures using computer simulations. PMID:25713470

  8. Temperature Dependence of Vibrational Relaxation from the Upper Vibrational Levels of HF and DF.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-29

    dependent quenching rate coefficients for relaxation of HF(v) and DF(v) by HF(v = 0) and DF(v = 0). The temperature dependence is predicted to be...halide molecules. This theoretical study is the first in which the temperature dependence of the V to R rate coefficients for HF(v sub 1) + HF(v sub 2

  9. The Temperature-Dependent Nature of Coronal Dimmings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Chromospheric evaporation fills each newly reconnected loop with high-temperature plasma, which cools as the loop collapses; thus the hottest loops are... chromospheric evaporation and underwent subsequent cooling, and reconnected loops that were already filled with cool plasma, but were then heated to...temperature lines such as Fe XII 19.5 nm, where the pinched-off loops are refilled by chromospheric evaporation? This preliminary study suggests that the

  10. Temperature Dependence of Isotope Ratios in Tree Rings

    PubMed Central

    Libby, L. M.; Pandolfi, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The stable isotope ratios of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen have been measured for a German oak in wood samples of roughly three years each, for the years 1712-1954 A.D., and correlated with the existing weather records from England, Basel, and Geneva to evaluate the empirical temperature coefficients. Isotope ratios in a second official oak, measured for the years 1530-1800 A.D., show the cold temperatures of the Little Ice Age interspersed with warm intervals. PMID:16592163

  11. Size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient of thin films.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Ye; Huang, Bao-Ling; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-08-21

    Nanomaterials possess a high surface/volume ratio and surfaces play an essential role in size-dependent material properties. In the present study, nanometer-thick thin films were taken as an ideal system to investigate the surface-induced size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient. The surface eigenstress model was further developed with the consideration of thermal expansion, leading to analytic formulas of size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus, and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient of thin films. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on face-centered cubic (fcc) Ag, Cu, and Ni(001) thin films were conducted at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 600 K. The MD simulation results are perfectly consistent with the theoretical predictions, thereby verifying the theoretical approach. The newly developed surface eigenstress model will be able to attack similar problems in other types of nanomaterials.

  12. Methanol along the path from envelope to protoplanetary disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdovskaya, Maria N.; Walsh, Catherine; Visser, Ruud; Harsono, Daniel; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2014-11-01

    Interstellar methanol is considered to be a parent species of larger, more complex organic molecules. A physicochemical simulation of infalling parcels of matter is performed for a low-mass star-forming system to trace the chemical evolution from cloud to disc. An axisymmetric 2D semi-analytic model generates the time-dependent density and velocity distributions, and full continuum radiative transfer is performed to calculate the dust temperature and the UV radiation field at each position as a function of time. A comprehensive gas-grain chemical network is employed to compute the chemical abundances along infall trajectories. Two physical scenarios are studied, one in which the dominant disc growth mechanism is viscous spreading, and another in which continuous infall of matter prevails. The results show that the infall path influences the abundance of methanol entering each type of disc, ranging from complete loss of methanol to an enhancement by a factor of >1 relative to the prestellar phase. Critical chemical processes and parameters for the methanol chemistry under different physical conditions are identified. The exact abundance and distribution of methanol is important for the budget of complex organic molecules in discs, which will be incorporated into forming planetary system objects such as protoplanets and comets. These simulations show that the comet-forming zone contains less methanol than in the precollapse phase, which is dominantly of prestellar origin, but also with additional layers built up in the envelope during infall. Such intriguing links will soon be tested by upcoming data from the Rosetta mission.

  13. Intraspecific variation in temperature dependence of gas exchange characteristics among Plantago asiatica ecotypes from different temperature regimes.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazumasa; Onoda, Yusuke; Hikosaka, Kouki

    2007-01-01

    There are large inter- and intraspecific differences in the temperature dependence of photosynthesis, but the physiological cause of the variation is poorly understood. Here, the temperature dependence of photosynthesis was examined in three ecotypes of Plantago asiatica transplanted from different latitudes, where the mean annual temperature varies between 7.5 and 16.8 degrees C. Plants were raised at 15 or 30 degrees C, and the CO(2) response of photosynthetic rates was determined at various temperatures. When plants were grown at 30 degrees C, no difference was found in the temperature dependence of photosynthesis among ecotypes. When plants were grown at 15 degrees C, ecotypes from a higher latitude maintained a relatively higher photosynthetic rate at low measurement temperatures. This difference was caused by a difference in the balance between the capacities of two processes, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration (J(max)) and carboxylation (V(cmax)), which altered the limiting step of photosynthesis at low temperatures. The organization of photosynthetic proteins also varied among ecotypes. The ecotype from the highest latitude increased the J(max) : V(cmax) ratio with decreasing growth temperature, while that from the lowest latitude did not. It is concluded that nitrogen partitioning in the photosynthetic apparatus and its response to growth temperature were different among ecotypes, which caused an intraspecific variation in temperature dependence of photosynthesis.

  14. Temperature-dependent regulation of vocal pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayako; Gooler, David; Herrold, Amy; Patel, Shailja; Pong, Winnie W

    2008-12-01

    Vocalizations of Xenopus laevis are generated by central pattern generators (CPGs). The advertisement call of male X. laevis is a complex biphasic motor rhythm consisting of fast and slow trills (a train of clicks). We found that the trill rate of these advertisement calls is sensitive to temperature and that this rate modification of the vocal rhythms originates in the central pattern generators. In vivo the rates of fast and slow trills increased linearly with an increase in temperature. In vitro a similar linear relation between temperature and compound action potential frequency in the laryngeal nerve was found when fictive advertisement calls were evoked in the isolated brain. Temperature did not limit the contractile properties of laryngeal muscles within the frequency range of vocalizations. We next took advantage of the temperature sensitivity of the vocal CPG in vitro to localize the source of the vocal rhythms. We focused on the dorsal tegmental area of the medulla (DTAM), a brain stem nucleus that is essential for vocal production. We found that bilateral cooling of DTAM reduced both fast and slow trill rates. Thus we conclude that DTAM is a source of biphasic vocal rhythms.

  15. Amplified temperature dependence in ecosystems developing on the lava flows of Mauna Loa, Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J; Vitousek, Peter M; Brown, James H

    2008-01-08

    Through its effect on individual metabolism, temperature drives biologically controlled fluxes and transformations of energy and materials in ecological systems. Because primary succession involves feedbacks among multiple biological and abiotic processes, we expected it to exhibit complex dynamics and unusual temperature dependence. We present a model based on first principles of chemical kinetics to explain how biologically mediated temperature dependence of "reactant" concentrations can inflate the effective temperature dependence of such processes. We then apply this model to test the hypothesis that the temperature dependence of early primary succession is amplified due to more rapid accumulation of reactants at higher temperatures. Using previously published data from the lava flows of Mauna Loa, HI, we show that rates of vegetation and soil accumulation as well as rates of community compositional change all display amplified temperature dependence (Q(10) values of approximately 7-50, compared with typical Q(10) values of 1.5-3 for the constituent biological processes). Additionally, in young ecosystems, resource concentrations increase with temperature, resulting in inflated temperature responses of biogeochemical fluxes. Mauna Loa's developing ecosystems exemplify how temperature-driven, biologically mediated gradients in resource availability can alter the effective temperature dependence of ecological processes. This mechanistic theory should contribute to understanding the complex effects of temperature on the structure and dynamics of ecological systems in a world where regional and global temperatures are changing rapidly.

  16. Amplified temperature dependence in ecosystems developing on the lava flows of Mauna Loa, Hawai'i

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Vitousek, Peter M.; Brown, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Through its effect on individual metabolism, temperature drives biologically controlled fluxes and transformations of energy and materials in ecological systems. Because primary succession involves feedbacks among multiple biological and abiotic processes, we expected it to exhibit complex dynamics and unusual temperature dependence. We present a model based on first principles of chemical kinetics to explain how biologically mediated temperature dependence of “reactant” concentrations can inflate the effective temperature dependence of such processes. We then apply this model to test the hypothesis that the temperature dependence of early primary succession is amplified due to more rapid accumulation of reactants at higher temperatures. Using previously published data from the lava flows of Mauna Loa, HI, we show that rates of vegetation and soil accumulation as well as rates of community compositional change all display amplified temperature dependence (Q10 values of ≈7–50, compared with typical Q10 values of 1.5–3 for the constituent biological processes). Additionally, in young ecosystems, resource concentrations increase with temperature, resulting in inflated temperature responses of biogeochemical fluxes. Mauna Loa's developing ecosystems exemplify how temperature-driven, biologically mediated gradients in resource availability can alter the effective temperature dependence of ecological processes. This mechanistic theory should contribute to understanding the complex effects of temperature on the structure and dynamics of ecological systems in a world where regional and global temperatures are changing rapidly. PMID:18156366

  17. Temperature dependence of isotopic quantum effects in water.

    PubMed

    Hart, R T; Benmore, C J; Neuefeind, J; Kohara, S; Tomberli, B; Egelstaff, P A

    2005-02-04

    The technique of high energy x-ray diffraction has been used to measure the temperature variation of hydrogen versus deuterium isotopic quantum effects on the structure of water. The magnitude of the effect is found to be inversely proportional to the temperature, varying by a factor of 2.5 over the range 6 to 45 degrees C. In addition, the H216O versus H218O effect has been measured at 26 degrees C and the structural difference shown to be restricted to the nearest neighbor molecular interactions. The results are compared to recent simulations and previously measured isochoric temperature differentials; additionally, implications for H/D substitution experiments are considered.

  18. Temperature-dependent structural heterogeneity in calcium silicate liquids.

    SciTech Connect

    Benmore, C. J.; Weber, J. K. R.; Wilding, M. C.; Du, J.; Parise, J. B.

    2010-12-07

    X-ray diffraction measurements performed on aerodynamically levitated CaSiO{sub 3} droplets have been interpreted using a structurally heterogeneous liquid-state model. When cooled, the high-temperature liquid shows evidence of the polymerization of edge shared Ca octahedra. Diffraction isosbestic points are used to characterize the polymerization process in the pair-distribution function. This behavior is linear in the high-temperature melt but exhibits rapid growth just above the glass transition temperature around 1.2T{sub g}. The heterogeneous liquid interpretation is supported by molecular-dynamics simulations which show the CaSiO{sub 3} glass has more edge-shared polyhedra and fewer corner shared polyhedra than the liquid model.

  19. TEMPERATURE DEPENDANT BEHAVIOUR OBSERVED IN THE AFIP-6 IRRADIATION TEST

    SciTech Connect

    A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs; P. Medvedev; S.J. Miller; F. J. Rice; M. K. Meyer; D. M. Perez

    2012-03-01

    The AFIP-6 test assembly was irradiated for one cycle in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The experiment was designed to test two monolithic fuel plates at power and burn-ups which bounded the operating conditions of both ATR and HFIR driver fuel. Both plates contained a solid U-Mo fuel foil with a zirconium diffusion barrier between 6061-aluminum cladding plates bonded by hot isostatic pressing. The experiment was designed with an orifice to restrict the coolant flow in order to obtain prototypic coolant temperature conditions. While these coolant temperatures were obtained, the reduced flow resulted in a sufficiently low heat transfer coefficient that failure of the fuel plates occurred. The increased fuel temperature led to significant variations in the fission gas retention behaviour of the U-Mo fuel. These variations in performance are outlined herein.

  20. Temperature dependence of Schottky diode characteristics prepared with photolithography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korucu, Demet; Turut, Abdulmecit

    2014-11-01

    A Richardson constant (RC) of 8.92 Acm-2K-2 from the conventional Richardson plot has been obtained because the current-voltage data of the device quite well obey the thermionic emission (TE) model in 190-320 K range. The experimental nT versus T plot of the device has given a value of T0 = 7.40 K in temperature range of 160-320 K. The deviations from the TE current mechanism at temperatures below 190 K have been ascribed to the patches introduced by lateral inhomogeneity of the barrier heights. Therefore, an experimental RC value of 7.49 A(cmK)-2 has been obtained by considering Tung's patch model in the temperature range of 80-190 K. This value is in very close agreement with the known value of 8.16 Acm-2K-2 for n-type GaAs.

  1. Temperature-dependent demography of Supella longipalpa (Blattodea: Blattellidae).

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Ju; Chi, Hsin

    2007-09-01

    The demography of the brownbanded cockroach, Supella longipalpa (F.) (Blattodea: Blattellidae), was studied based on the age-stage, two-sex life table at 25, 29, and 33 degrees C. Females incubated at the three temperatures produced 11.8, 14.6, and 12.8 oothecae per female, respectively. The life expectancy for a newborn was 157.2, 207.7, and 147.9 d, respectively. The intrinsic rate of increase at these temperatures was 0.0161, 0.0306, and 0.0398 d(-1), respectively. The net reproductive rate was 35.3, 100.9, and 87.2 offspring, respectively. The mean generation time was 222.1, 151.1, and 112.5 d, respectively. In the absence of other limiting factors, our results indicate that populations of S. longipalpa would be expected to establish and increase if introduced into environments where temperature was within 25 and 33 degrees C.

  2. Temperature dependency of the silicon heterojunction lifetime model based on the amphoteric nature of dangling bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, R.; Poli, I.; Deligiannis, D.; Zeman, M.; Smets, A. H. M.

    2016-11-01

    This work adapts a model to simulate the carrier injection dependent minority carrier lifetime of crystalline silicon passivated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon at elevated temperatures. Two existing models that respectively calculate the bulk lifetime and surface recombination velocity are used and the full temperature dependency of these models are explored. After a thorough description of these temperature dependencies, experimental results using this model show that the minority carrier lifetime changes upon annealing of silicon heterojunction structures are not universal. Furthermore, comparisons of the temperature dependent model to using the room temperature model at elevated temperatures is given and significant differences are observed when using temperatures above 100 °C. This shows the necessity of taking temperature effects into account during in-situ annealing experiments.

  3. Temperature-dependent indentation behavior of transformation-toughened zirconia-based ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tikare, Veena; Heuer, Arthur H.

    1991-01-01

    Indentation behavior of Ce-TZP, Y-TZP, and Mg-PSZ between room temperature and 1300 C was investigated. Hardness decreased with increasing temperature for all three materials, but indentation cracking increased with increasing temperature. The opposing temperature dependences are discussed in terms of dislocation and transformation plasticity.

  4. Dependence of rate constants on vibrational temperatures - An Arrhenius description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, D. I.; Johnson, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    An interpretation of the variation of rate constants with vibrational temperature is proposed which introduces parameters analogous to those of the classical Arrhenius expression. The constancy of vibrational activation energy is studied for the dissociaton of NO, the ion-molecular reaction of O(+) with N2, and the atom exchange reaction of I with H2. It is found that when a Boltzmann distribution for vibrational states is applicable, the variation of the rate constant with the vibrational temperature can be used to define a vibrational activation energy. The method has application to exchange reactions where a vibrational energy threshold exists.

  5. Temperature dependence of infrared bands produced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangeli, L.; Mennella, V.; Bussoletti, E.

    1992-02-01

    The behavior of IR absorption bands with temperature has been examined systematically in the laboratory for three representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules: coronene, chrysene, and 1-methylcoronene. A careful description of both intensity and profile measured for most of the bands is reported. A tentative interpretation of the observed variations is given in terms of extra-molecular effects produced by the anharmonicity of the vibrational energy levels as a function of temperature. These new laboratory data provide an accurate description of the optical properties for representative molecules often used to account for the so-called unidentified infrared bands emitted by astronomical sources.

  6. Size and temperature dependent plasmons of quantum particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Mufei; Rakov, Nikifor

    2015-08-01

    This work reports on the influences of temperature changes on plasmons of metallic particles that are so small that electric carriers in the conduction band are forced to be at discrete sub-bands due to quantum confinement. In the framework of the electron-in-a-box model and with an every-electron-count computational scheme, the spatial electric distribution inside the particle is calculated. In the calculations, the intra-subband fluctuations are taken into account. The numerical results have shown that the small-particle plasmon frequency shifts with the temperature. The findings suggest that it would be possible to control the plasmons of quantum particles externally.

  7. Temperature dependence of the upper critical field of high- Tc superconductors from isothermal magnetization data: influence of a temperature dependent Ginzburg-Landau parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, I. L.; Ott, H. R.

    2003-11-01

    We show that the scaling procedure, recently proposed for the evaluation of the temperature variation of the normalized upper critical field of type-II superconductors, may easily be modified in order to take into account a possible temperature dependence of the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. As an example we consider κ( T) as it follows from the microscopic theory of superconductivity.

  8. A method to correct for temperature dependence and measure simultaneously dose and temperature using a plastic scintillation detector

    PubMed Central

    Therriault-Proulx, Francois; Wootton, Landon; Beddar, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) work well for radiation dosimetry. However, they show some temperature dependence, and a priori knowledge of the temperature surrounding the PSD is required to correct for this dependence. We present a novel approach to correct PSD response values for temperature changes instantaneously and without the need for prior knowledge of the temperature value. In addition to rendering the detector temperature-independent, this approach allows for actual temperature measurement using solely the PSD apparatus. With a temperature-controlled water tank, the temperature was varied from room temperature to more than 40°C and the PSD was used to measure the dose delivered from a cobalt-60 photon beam unit to within an average of 0.72% from the expected value. The temperature was measured during each acquisition with the PSD and a thermocouple and values were within 1°C of each other. The depth-dose curve of a 6-MV photon beam was also measured under warm non-stable conditions and this curve agreed to within an average of −0.98% from the curve obtained at room temperature. The feasibility of rendering PSDs temperature-independent was demonstrated with our approach, which also enabled simultaneous measurement of both dose and temperature. This novel approach improves both the robustness and versatility of PSDs. PMID:26407188

  9. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E. Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Geiss, Roy H.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-02-09

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  10. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E.; Geiss, Roy H.; Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-02-01

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  11. Temperature Dependences on Various Types of Photovoltaic (PV) Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audwinto, I. A.; Leong, C. S.; Sopian, K.; Zaidi, S. H.

    2015-09-01

    Temperature is one of the key roles in PV technology performance, since with the increases of temperature the open-circuit voltage will drop accordingly so do the electrical efficiency and power output generation. Different types of Photovoltaic (PV) panels- silicon solar panels and thin film solar panels; mono-crystalline, poly-crystalline, CIS, CIGS, CdTe, back-contact, and bi-facial solar panel under 40°C to 70°C approximately with 5°C interval have been comparatively analyzed their actual performances with uniformly distribution of light illumination from tungsten halogen light source, ±500W/m2. DC-Electronic Load and Data Logger devices with “Lab View” data program interface were used to collect all the necessary parameters in this study. Time needed to achieve a certain degree of temperature was recorded. Generally, each of the panels needed 15 minutes to 20 minutes to reach 70°C. Halogen based light source is not compatible in short wave-length in response to thin-film solar cell. Within this period of times, all the panels are facing a performance loss up to 15%. Other parameters; Pmax, Vmax, Imax, Voc, Isc, Rserries, Rshunt, Fillfactor were collected as study cases. Our study is important in determining Photovoltaic type selection and system design as for study or industrial needed under different temperature condition.

  12. [Temperature dependence of parameters of plant photosynthesis models: a review].

    PubMed

    Borjigidai, Almaz; Yu, Gui-Rui

    2013-12-01

    This paper reviewed the progress on the temperature response models of plant photosynthesis. Mechanisms involved in changes in the photosynthesis-temperature curve were discussed based on four parameters, intercellular CO2 concentration, activation energy of the maximum rate of RuBP (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate) carboxylation (V (c max)), activation energy of the rate of RuBP regeneration (J(max)), and the ratio of J(max) to V(c max) All species increased the activation energy of V(c max) with increasing growth temperature, while other parameters changed but differed among species, suggesting the activation energy of V(c max) might be the most important parameter for the temperature response of plant photosynthesis. In addition, research problems and prospects were proposed. It's necessary to combine the photosynthesis models at foliage and community levels, and to investigate the mechanism of plants in response to global change from aspects of leaf area, solar radiation, canopy structure, canopy microclimate and photosynthetic capacity. It would benefit the understanding and quantitative assessment of plant growth, carbon balance of communities and primary productivity of ecosystems.

  13. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-07-12

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy-entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy-entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme.

  14. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates

    PubMed Central

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-01-01

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy–entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy–entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme. PMID:27354533

  15. Temperature-dependent VNIR spectroscopy of hydrated Mg-sulfates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, S.; Carli, C.; Tosi, F.; Beck, P.; Schmitt, B.; Piccioni, G.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Capaccioni, F.; Di Iorio, T.; Philippe, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    We investigate two poly-hydrated magnesium sulfates, hexahydrite (MgSO4 · 6H2O) and epsomite (MgSO4 · 7H2O), in the visible and infrared (VNIR) spectral range 0.5/4.0 μm, as particulate for three different grain size ranges: 20-50 μm, 75-100 μm and 125-150 μm. All samples were measured in the 93-298 K temperature range. The spectra of these hydrated salts are characterized by strong OH absorption bands in the 1.0-1.5 μm region, and by H2O absorption bands near 2 and 3 μm. Other weak features show up at low temperatures near 1.75 μm (in both hexahydrite and epsomite) and 2.2 μm (only in hexahydrite). The spectral behavior of the absorption bands of these two minerals has been analyzed as a function of both grain size and temperature, deriving trends related to specific spectral parameters such as band center, band depth, band area, and band width. Hydrated minerals, in particular mono- and poly-hydrated sulfates, are present in planetary objects such as Mars and the icy Galilean satellites. Safe detection of these minerals shall rely on detailed laboratory investigation of these materials in different environmental conditions. Hence an accurate spectral analysis of such minerals as a function of temperature is key to better understand and constrain future observations.

  16. Le Chatelier's Principle Applied to the Temperature Dependence of Solubility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treptow, Richard S.

    1984-01-01

    One effect of temperature is its influence on solubility, and that effect is used as a common example when teaching Le Chatelier's principle. Attempts to clarify the question of whether the principle holds in the case of the solubility of ionic compounds in water by investigating the literature data in detail. (JN)

  17. Finite-element technique applied to heat conduction in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguirre-Ramirez, G.; Oden, J. T.

    1969-01-01

    Finite element method applied to heat conduction in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity, using nonlinear constitutive equation for heat ABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGH

  18. Temperature Dependence of Raman Scattering in ZnO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-06

    Callahan 5e. TASK NUMBER HC 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 01 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) * Consell Superior d’Investigacions...dependence of Raman scattering in ZnO Ramon Cuscó, Esther Alarcón-Lladó, Jordi Ibáñez, and Luis Artús Institut Jaume Almera, Consell Superior

  19. Temperature-dependent high resolution absorption cross sections of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Christopher A.; Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2016-10-01

    High resolution (0.005 cm-1) absorption cross sections have been measured for pure propane (C3H8). These cross sections cover the 2550-3500 cm-1 region at five temperatures (from 296 to 700 K) and were measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer and a quartz cell heated by a tube furnace. Calibrations were made by comparison to the integrated cross sections of propane from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. These are the first high resolution absorption cross sections of propane for the 3 μm region at elevated temperatures. The cross sections provided may be used to monitor propane in combustion environments and in astronomical sources such as the auroral regions of Jupiter, brown dwarfs and exoplanets.

  20. The scaling and temperature dependence of vertebrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    White, Craig R; Phillips, Nicole F; Seymour, Roger S

    2006-03-22

    Body size and temperature are primary determinants of metabolic rate, and the standard metabolic rate (SMR) of animals ranging in size from unicells to mammals has been thought to be proportional to body mass (M) raised to the power of three-quarters for over 40 years. However, recent evidence from rigorously selected datasets suggests that this is not the case for birds and mammals. To determine whether the influence of body mass on the metabolic rate of vertebrates is indeed universal, we compiled SMR measurements for 938 species spanning six orders of magnitude variation in mass. When normalized to a common temperature of 38 degrees C, the SMR scaling exponents of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are significantly heterogeneous. This suggests both that there is no universal metabolic allometry and that models that attempt to explain only quarter-power scaling of metabolic rate are unlikely to succeed.

  1. Temperature dependence of porous silica antireflective (AR) coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongxing; Le, Yueqin; Zhang, Weiqing; Jiang, Minhua; Sun, Jinren; Liu, Xiaolin

    1998-02-01

    In this paper, the antireflective coatings consisting of porous silica particles from a silica sol are applied by dip method. The relationships among composition, viscosity and temperature have been studied. The coating homogeneity is opium for the laser wavelengths of 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm. The peak transmission of coated BK-7 glass substrate is higher than 99.5%. The laser induced damage thresholds of the antireflective coatings were range of 7 - 10 J/cm2, for 1 ns pulse width and 1064 nm wavelength. These damage thresholds were suitable for our national ICF program. It is noted that the optical homogeneity of coating and the viscosity of coating sol were strongly influenced by the temperatures in the duration of sol ripening.

  2. Rate dependent of strength in metallic glasses at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. W.; Bian, X. L.; Wu, S. W.; Hussain, I.; Jia, Y. D.; Yi, J.; Wang, G.

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between the strength at the macroscale and the elastic deformation as well as shear cracking behavior at the microscale of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is investigated. The temperatures of 298 K and 77 K as well as the strain rate ranging from 10−6 s−1 to 10−2 s−1 are applied to the BMGs, in which the mechanical responses of the BMGs are profiled through the compression tests. The yield strength is associated with the activation of the elementary deformation unit, which is insensitive to the strain rate. The maximum compressive strength is linked to the crack propagation during shear fracture process, which is influenced by the strain rate. The cryogenic temperature of 77 K significantly improves the yield strength and the maximum compressive strength of the BMGs. PMID:27270688

  3. Temperature-dependent Sellmeier equations for rare-earth sesquioxides.

    PubMed

    Zelmon, David E; Northridge, Jessica M; Haynes, Nicholas D; Perlov, Dan; Petermann, Klaus

    2013-06-01

    High-power lasers are making increasing demands on laser hosts especially in the area of thermal management. Traditional hosts, such as YAG, are unsuitable for many high-power applications and therefore, new hosts are being developed including rare-earth sesquioxides. We report new measurements of the refractive indices of these materials as functions of wavelength and temperature, which will aid in the design of laser cavities and other nonlinear optical elements.

  4. A physical explanation of the temperature dependence of physiological processes mediated by cilia and flagella

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The majority of biological rates are known to exhibit temperature dependence. Here I reveal a direct link between temperature and ecologically relevant rates such as swimming speeds in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryotes as well as fluid-pumping and filtration rates in many metazoans, and show that this relationship is driven by movement rates of cilia and flagella. I develop models of the temperature dependence of cilial and flagellar movement rates and evaluate these with an extensive compilation of data from the literature. The model captures the temperature dependence of viscosity and provides a mechanistic and biologically interpretable explanation for the temperature dependence of a range of ecologically relevant processes; it also reveals a clear dependence on both reaction rate-like processes and the physics of the environment. The incorporation of viscosity allows further insight into the effects of environmental temperature variation and of processes, such as disease, that affect the viscosity of blood or other body fluids. PMID:23959901

  5. Temperature dependence of Henry's law constants of metolachlor and diazinon.

    PubMed

    Feigenbrugel, Valérie; Le Calvé, Stéphane; Mirabel, Philippe

    2004-10-01

    A dynamic system based on the water/air equilibrium at the interface within the length of a microporous tube has been used to determine experimentally the Henry's law constants (HLC) of two pesticides: metolachlor and diazinon. The measurements were conducted over the temperature range 283-301 K. At 293 K, HLCs values are (42.6+/-2.8) x 10(3) (in units of M atm(-1)) for metolachlor and (3.0+/-0.3)x10(3) for diazinon. The obtained data were used to derive the following Arrhenius expressions: HLC=(3.0+/-0.4) x 10(-11) exp((10,200+/-1,000)/T) for metolachlor and (7.2+/-0.5) x 10(-15) exp((11,900+/-700)/T) for diazinon. At a cumulus cloud temperature of 283 K, the fractions of metolachlor and diazinon in the atmospheric aqueous phase are about 57% and 11% respectively. In order to evaluate the impact of a cloud on the atmospheric chemistry of both studied pesticides, we compare also their atmospheric lifetimes under clear sky (tau(gas)), and cloudy conditions (tau(multiphase)). The calculated multiphase lifetimes (in units of hours) are significantly lower than those in gas phase at a cumulus temperature of 283 K (in parentheses): metolachlor, 0.4 (2.9); diazinon, 1.9 (5.0).

  6. Frequency and temperature dependence of high damping elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1993-08-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are one of the preferred devices for isolating large buildings and structures. In the US, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of high damping rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 and 100% and are expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading conditions. Elastomeric bearings are currently designed to provide a system frequency between 0.4 and 0.8 Hz and expected to operate between {minus}20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. To assure proper performance of isolation bearings, it is necessary to characterize the elastomer`s response under expected variations of frequency and temperature. The dynamic response of the elastomer must be characterized within the frequency range that spans the bearing acceptance test frequency, which may be as low as 0.005 Hz, and the design frequency. Similarly, the variation in mechanical characteristics of the elastomer must be determined over the design temperature range, which is between {minus}20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. This paper reports on (1) the capabilities of a testing facility at ANL for testing candidate elastomers, (2) the variation with frequency and temperature of the stiffness and damping of one candidate elastomer, and (3) the effect of these variations on bearing acceptance testing criteria and on the choice of bearing design values for stiffness and damping.

  7. Temperature dependent elasticity and damping in dehydrated sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, T. W.; Struble, W.

    2013-12-01

    Work reported previously at this conference, outlining our observation of anomalously large elastic softening and damping in dehydrated Berea sandstone at elevated temperatures, has been analysed to study shear and compressional effects separately. Modeling of the sample using COMSOL software was necessary to identify modes, as the vibration spectrum of the sample is poorly approximated by a uniform isotropic solid. The first torsional mode of our evacuated, dry, core softens at nearly twice the rate of Young's modulus modes (bending and compressional) and is also damped nearly twice as strongly as temperature increases. We consider two possible models for explaining this behavior, based on the assumption that the mechanical properties of the sandstone are dominated by the framework of quartz grains and polycrystalline cementation, neglecting initially the effects of clay and feldspar inclusions. The 20cm x 2.54cm diameter core is dry such that the pressure of water vapor in the experiment chamber is below 1e-6 Torr at 70C, suggesting that surface water beyond a small number of monolayers is negligible. Our models consider (1) enhanced sliding of grain boundaries in the cementation at elevated temperature and reduced internal water content, and (2) strain microcracking of the cementatioin at low water content due to anisotropic expansion in the quartz grains. In model (1) interfaces parallel to polyhedral grain surfaces were placed in the cement bonds and assigned frictional properties. Model (2) has not yet been implemented. The overall elasticity of a 3-D several-grain model network was determined by modeling quasistatic loading and measuring displacements. Initial results with a small number of grains/bonds suggests that only the first model provides softening and damping for all the modes, however the details of the effects of defect motioin at individual interfaces as the source for the frictional properties is still being evaluated. Nonlinear effects are

  8. Quantitative analysis of the temperature dependency in Raman active vibrational modes of molybdenum disulfide atomic layers.

    PubMed

    Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, J

    2013-10-21

    Raman spectroscopy is utilized to quantify the temperature dependency of the vibrational modes in molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) atomic layers. These analyses are essential for understanding the structural properties and phononic behaviors of this two-dimensional (2D) material. We quantitatively analyze the temperature dependent shifts of the Raman peak positions in the temperature range from 300 to 550 K, and find that both planar and out-of-plane characteristic modes are highly sensitive to temperature variations. This temperature dependency is linear and can be fully explained by the first-order temperature coefficient. Using a semi-quantitative model, we evaluate the contributions of the material's thermal expansion and intrinsic temperature effects to this dependency. We reveal that the dominating source of shift in the peak position of planar mode E2g(1) for samples of all thicknesses investigated is the four-phonon process. In addition to the four-phonon process, thermal expansion plays a significant role in the temperature dependency of the out-of-plane mode, A1g. The thickness dependency of the temperature coefficient for MoS2 and a drastic change in behaviors of samples from bi- to single-layered are also demonstrated. We further explore the role of defects in the thermal properties of MoS2 by examining the temperature dependency of Raman modes in CVD-grown samples.

  9. Dynamical properties of water-methanol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Cirino; Vasi, Sebastiano; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-02-01

    We study the relaxation times tα in the water-methanol system. We examine new data and data from the literature in the large temperature range 163 < T < 335 K obtained using different experimental techniques and focus on how tα affects the hydrogen bond structure of the system and the hydrophobicity of the alcohol methyl group. We examine the relaxation times at a fixed temperature as a function of the water molar fraction XW and observe two opposite behaviors in their curvature when the system moves from high to low T regimes. This behavior differs from that of an ideal solution in that it has excess values located at different molar fractions (XW = 0.5 for high T and 0.75 in the deep supercooled regime). We analyze the data and find that above a crossover temperature T ˜ 223 K, hydrophobicity plays a significant role and below it the water tetrahedral network dominates. This temperature is coincident with the fragile-to-strong dynamical crossover observed in confined water and supports the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the reported data suggest that this crossover temperature (identified as the Widom line temperature) also depends on the alcohol concentration.

  10. Methanol conversion to light olefins over SAPO-34. Sorption, diffusion, and catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.; Rebo, H.P.; Moljord, K.; Holmen, A.

    1999-11-01

    The catalytic conversion of methanol to lower olefins (MTO) is a way of converting natural gas and coal to chemicals via methanol. The effects of adsorption and diffusion of the reactants on methanol to olefins (MTO) and propene conversion over SAPO-34 have been studied in an oscillating microbalance reactor. The adsorption parameters of methanol and propene at reaction conditions (698 K) were determined by a pulse method, and the results were identical to the values obtained by extrapolation from low temperatures (323--398 K). Inverse uptake diffusion times were calculated form adsorption data at low temperatures, and these results were dependent on the temperature and the adsorbed amount. The inverse steady-state diffusion times calculated form the inverse uptake diffusion times were independent of the temperature and the adsorbed amount. The influence of diffusion on the reaction rates was estimated on the basis of the inverse steady-state diffusion times, using the Weisz-Prater criterion. The methanol conversion over SAPO-34 was influenced by diffusion of the reactant, while the propene conversion was not. A kinetic study revealed that both the rate constant and the site coverage of propene were much lower than that of methanol at 698 K. The deactivation behavior during the MTO reaction over SAPO-34 was studied by measuring both the adsorbed amount of methanol and the conversion at different coke contents. Catalyst deactivation was proposed to be due to a decreasing number of sites available for adsorption at high coke contents and a lower diffusivity, hence a lower effectiveness factor due to coke deposition.

  11. The Methanol Economy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, George; Prakash, G. K.

    2014-02-01

    The Methanol Economy Project is based on the concept of replacing fossil fuels with methanol generated either from renewable resources or abundant natural (shale) gas. The full methanol cycle was investigated in this project, from production of methanol through bromination of methane, bireforming of methane to syngas, CO2 capture using supported amines, co-electrolysis of CO2 and water to formate and syngas, decomposition of formate to CO2 and H2, and use of formic acid in a direct formic acid fuel cell. Each of these projects achieved milestones and provided new insights into their respective fields.

  12. Temperature Dependence of Diffusivities in Liquid Elements (LMD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banish, R. Michael; Rosenberger, Franz

    1998-01-01

    This research was to advance the understanding of diffusion mechanisms in liquid metals and alloys through accurate diffusivity measurements over a wide range of temperatures, including the proximity of the materials melting points. Specifically, it was driven towards developing a methodology (and subsequent flight hardware) to enable several diffusion coefficient measurements (i.e., at several different temperatures) to be performed using a single sample. The Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD) was funded as a Flight Definition Project in February 1993 in response to NRA 91-OSSA-20 (Microgravity Science and Applications Division). The Science Concept Review for LAID was held during April 1994. In January 1995 we were informed that we had failed this review and the project was change to ground-based activities only. A new proposal was submitted for the next NRA addressing the panels concerns. As part of NASA's Risk Mitigation program, a scaled-down version of the hardware was funded in July of 1995 for a flight opportunity utilizing experiment on the Microgravity Isolation Mount. This experiment was to determine the self-diffusivity of indium at 185 C. The LMD was transferred to the Mir Space Station in STS-81 and returned on STS-84 (January - May 1997). Three, out of five, self-diffusion data sets were returned. A description of this experiment/hardware is included below. This summary is only intended to give the reader an overview of the results obtained for the tasks outlined in the original proposal. Research that was not published is explained in more detail. At the end of this report is a list of refereed publications and invited talks that were given as a result of this work. The reader is directed to these for further details. Attachment: Real-time diffusivity measurements in liquids at several temperatures with one sample, On the insensitivity of liquid diffusivity measurements to deviations from 1D transport, and Numerical simulations of the convective

  13. Engineering a Hyperthermophilic Archaeon for Temperature-Dependent Product Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Basen, M; Sun, JS; Adams, MWW

    2012-02-24

    Microorganisms growing near the boiling point have enormous biotechnological potential but only recently have molecular engineering tools become available for them. We have engineered the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100 degrees C, to switch its end products of fermentation in a temperature-controlled fashion without the need for chemical inducers. The recombinant strain (LAC) expresses a gene (ldh) encoding lactate dehydrogenase from the moderately thermophilic Caldicellulosiruptor bescii (optimal growth temperature [T-opt] of 78 degrees C) controlled by a "cold shock" promoter that is upregulated when cells are transferred from 98 degrees C to 72 degrees C. At 98 degrees C, the LAC strain fermented sugar to produce acetate and hydrogen as end products, and lactate was not detected. When the LAC strain was grown at 72 degrees C, up to 3 mM lactate was produced instead. Expression of a gene from a moderately thermophilic bacterium in a hyperthermophilic archaeon at temperatures at which the hyperthermophile has low metabolic activity provides a new perspective to engineering microorganisms for bioproduct and biofuel formation. IMPORTANCE Extremely thermostable enzymes from microorganisms that grow near or above the boiling point of water are already used in biotechnology. However, the use of hyperthermophilic microorganisms themselves for biotechnological applications has been limited by the lack of their genetic accessibility. Recently, a genetic system for Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally near 100 degrees C, was developed in our laboratory. In this study, we present the first heterologous protein expression system for a microorganism that grows optimally at 100 degrees C, a first step towards the potential expression of genes involved in biomass degradation or biofuel production in hyperthermophiles. Moreover, we developed the first system for specific gene induction in P. furiosus. As the cold shock promoter

  14. Binary accretion rates: dependence on temperature and mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. D.; Clarke, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    We perform a series of 2D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of gas accretion on to binaries via a circumbinary disc, for a range of gas temperatures and binary mass ratios (q). We show that increasing the gas temperature increases the accretion rate on to the primary for all values of the binary mass ratio: for example, for q = 0.1 and a fixed binary separation, an increase of normalized sound speed by a factor of 5 (from our `cold' to `hot' simulations) changes the fraction of the accreted gas that flows on to the primary from 10 to ˜40 per cent. We present a simple parametrization for the average accretion rate of each binary component accurate to within a few per cent and argue that this parametrization (rather than those in the literature based on warmer simulations) is relevant to supermassive black hole accretion and all but the widest stellar binaries. We present trajectories for the growth of q during circumbinary disc accretion and argue that the period distribution of stellar `twin' binaries is strong evidence for the importance of circumbinary accretion. We also show that our parametrization of binary accretion increases the minimum mass ratio needed for spin alignment of supermassive black holes to q ˜ 0.4, with potentially important implications for the magnitude of velocity kicks acquired during black hole mergers.

  15. Seafloor Weathering Dependence on Temperature and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, D. S.; Farahat, N. X.; Archer, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Most thinking on Earth's carbon cycle implicates silicate weathering as the dominant control of atmospheric CO2 concentration over long timescales. Recent analyses of alteration of basalt at the seafloor, however, suggest that seafloor weathering (low-temperature (<60C) chemical alteration of the upper oceanic crust due to hydrothermal seawater circulation) increases dramatically in warm, high CO2 periods of Earth's history. This raises the possibility that seafloor weathering could complement silicate weathering in maintaining Earth's long term climate stability. Moreover, seafloor weathering would be the only type of weathering available on an exoplanet entirely covered by water, so understanding how it might work is essential for understanding the habitable zones of such waterworlds. We have built a 2D numerical model of the flow of seawater through porous basalt coupled to chemical alteration reactions that can calculate alkalinity fluxes and carbonate deposition (seafloor weathering). I will present simulations in which we vary the seawater temperature and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration, which are boundary conditions to our model, over large ranges. These results will provide a constraint on the ability of seafloor weathering to act as an effective climate buffer on Earth and other planets. I can't give you a preview of the results yet because at the time of writing this abstract we haven't completed the simulations!

  16. Temperature dependent simulation of diamond depleted Schottky PIN diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathwar, Raghuraj; Dutta, Maitreya; Koeck, Franz A. M.; Nemanich, Robert J.; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Goodnick, Stephen M.

    2016-06-01

    Diamond is considered as an ideal material for high field and high power devices due to its high breakdown field, high lightly doped carrier mobility, and high thermal conductivity. The modeling and simulation of diamond devices are therefore important to predict the performances of diamond based devices. In this context, we use Silvaco® Atlas, a drift-diffusion based commercial software, to model diamond based power devices. The models used in Atlas were modified to account for both variable range and nearest neighbor hopping transport in the impurity bands associated with high activation energies for boron doped and phosphorus doped diamond. The models were fit to experimentally reported resistivity data over a wide range of doping concentrations and temperatures. We compare to recent data on depleted diamond Schottky PIN diodes demonstrating low turn-on voltages and high reverse breakdown voltages, which could be useful for high power rectifying applications due to the low turn-on voltage enabling high forward current densities. Three dimensional simulations of the depleted Schottky PIN diamond devices were performed and the results are verified with experimental data at different operating temperatures

  17. Temperature-dependent electron transport in quantum dot photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Derek J.

    Quantum dot photovoltaics have attracted much interest from researchers in recent years. They have the potential to address both costs and efficiencies of solar cells while simultaneously demonstrating novel physics. Thin-film devices inherently require less material than bulk crystalline silicon, and solution deposition removes the high energy used in fabrication processes. The ease of bandgap tunability in quantum dots through size control allows for simple graded bandgap structures, which is one method of breaking beyond the Shockley-Queisser limit. Power output can also be increased through the process of multiple exciton generation, whereby more than one electron participates in conduction after the absorption of a single photon. In this dissertation work, quantum dot photovoltaics are examined through a range of temperatures. Exploring the current-voltage-temperature parameter space provides insight into the dominant conduction mechanisms within these materials, which is largely not agreed upon. Beginning with PbS quantum dots, changes in device structure are examined by varying the capping ligand and nanoparticle size. This leads similar studies of new, germanium quantum dot devices. Through this understanding, further optimization of device structure can lead to enhanced device performance.

  18. Microbial dynamics of commercial makgeolli depending on the storage temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Ryun; Lee, Ae Ran; Kim, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Byung-Hak

    2012-08-01

    Market fresh makgeolli was stored at different temperatures of 4°C and 25°C to assess the change of the microbial diversity according to the storage temperature and period. Yeast counts increased until day 3 of storage and decreased thereafter. General and lactic acid bacterial counts continuously increased during storage. The data indicated that the control of growth of microorganisms, particularly general bacteria and lactic acid bacteria (LAB), is essential. Total acid levels started to decrease in the makgeolli stored at 4°C, and increased from day 6 of storage in the makgeolli stored at 25°C. The increase of total acid in the non-refrigerated condition greatly affected the quality of makgeolli. In both the fresh makgeolli samples stored at 4°C and 25°C, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and molds (Aspergillus tubingensis, Candida glaebosa, and Aspergillus niger) were noted. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) band patterns were almost constant regardless of the storage period. As for bacteria, Lactobacillus crustorum, L. brevis, and Microlaena stipoides were found in the makgeolli stored at 4°C, and L. crustorum, Lactobacillus sp., L. plantarum, L. brevis, L. rhamnosus, and L. similis were found in the makgeolli stored at 25°C. In particular, in the makgeolli stored at 25°C, L. crustorum and L. plantarum presented dark bands and were identified as the primary microorganisms that affected spoilage of fresh makgeolli.

  19. Temperature dependent rheological property of copper oxide nanoparticles suspension (nanofluid).

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Devdatta P; Das, Debendra K; Chukwu, Godwin A

    2006-04-01

    A nanofluid is the dispersion of metallic solid particles of nanometer size in a base fluid such as water or ethylene glycol. The presence of these nanoparticles affects the physical properties of a nanofluid via various factors including shear stress, particle loading, and temperature. In this paper the rheological behavior of copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles of 29 nm average diameter dispersed in deionized (DI) water is investigated over a range of volumetric solids concentrations of 5 to 15% and various temperatures varying from 278-323 degrees K. These experiments showed that these nanofluids exhibited time-independent pseudoplastic and shear-thinning behavior. The suspension viscosities of nanofluids decrease exponentially with respect to the shear rate. Suspension viscosity follows the correlation in the form ln(mus) = A(1/T)-B, where constants A and B are the functions of volumetric concentrations. The calculated viscosities from the developed correlations and experimental values were found to be within +/- 10% of their values.

  20. Temperature Dependence on The Synthesis of Jatropha Biolubricant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunam Resul, Muhammad Faiz M.; Idaty Mohd Ghazi, Tinia; Idris, Azni

    2011-02-01

    Jatropha oil has good potential as the renewable energy as well as lubricant feedstock. The synthesis of jatropha biolubricant was performed by transesterification of jatropha methyl ester (JME) with trimethyl-ol-propane (TMP) with sodium methoxide (NaOCH3) catalyst. The effects of temperature on the synthesis were studied at a range between 120°C and 200°C with pressure kept at 10mbar. The conversion of JME to jatropha biolubricant was found to be the highest (47%) at 200°C. However, it was suggested that the optimum temperature of the reaction is at 150°C due to insignificant improvement in biolubricant production. To maintain forward reaction, the excess amount of JME was maintained at 3.9:1 ratios to TMP. Kinetic study was done and compared. The synthesis was found to follow a second order reaction with overall rate constant of 1.49 × 10-1 (%wt/wt.min.°C)-1. The estimated activation energy was 3.94 kJ/mol. Pour point for jatropha biolubricant was at -3°C and Viscosity Index (VI) ranged from 178 to 183. The basic properties of jatropha biolubricant, pour point and viscosities are found comparable to other plant based biolubricant, namely palm oil and soybean based biolubricant.

  1. Temperature Dependent Dielectric Behavior of Nanocrystalline Ca Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samariya, Arvind; Pareek, S. P.; Sharma, P. K.; Prasad, Arun S.; Dhawan, M. S.; Dolia, S. N.; Sharma, K. B.

    Dielectric behaviour of Nanocrystalline CaFe2O4 ferrite synthesized by advanced sol- gel method has been investigated as a function of frequency at different temperatures. Rietveld profile refinement of the XRD pattern confirms formation of cubic spinel structure of the specimen.The dispersion in dielectric behavior of CaFe2O4ferrite sample has been observed in the temperature range of 100-250˚C as a function of frequency in the range 75 kHz to 10 MHz Both the real value of dielectric constant (ɛ‧) and the dielectric loss factor (tanδ) decrease with frequency. This decrease in the values of ɛ‧ and tanδ could be explained on the basis of available ferrous, i.e. Fe2+, ions on octahedral sites such that beyond a certain frequency of applied electric field the electronic exchange between the ferrous and ferric ions i.e. Fe2+↔Fe3+ cannot follow the applied alternating electric field.

  2. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy genes" into Escherichia coli based on in silico considerations and flux balance analysis to enable methanol dissimilation and assimilation. We determined that the most promising approach allowing the utilization of methanol was the implementation of NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase and the establishment of the ribulose monophosphate cycle by expressing the genes for hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase (Phi). To test for the best-performing enzymes in the heterologous host, a number of enzyme candidates from different donor organisms were selected and systematically analyzed for their in vitro and in vivo activities in E. coli. Among these, Mdh2, Hps and Phi originating from Bacillus methanolicus were found to be the most effective. Labeling experiments using (13)C methanol with E. coli producing these enzymes showed up to 40% incorporation of methanol into central metabolites. The presence of the endogenous glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation pathway of E. coli did not adversely affect the methanol conversion rate. Taken together, the results of this study represent a major advancement towards establishing synthetic methylotrophs by gene transfer.

  3. Temperature Dependence of Errors in Parameters Derived from Van't Hoff Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dec, Steven F.; Gill, Stanley J.

    1985-01-01

    The method of Clarke and Glew is broadly applicable to studies of the temperature dependence of equilibrium constant measurements. The method is described and examples of its use in comparing calorimetric results and temperature dependent gas solubility studies are provided. (JN)

  4. Temperature Dependence of the Reaction O(singlet S) + CO2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The temperature dependence of the collisional deactivation of O(singlet S) has been investigated in the range 153-500K. O(singlet S) was produced in...of time after the production pulse. Rate constants were derived from the decay rate of the Osinglet S) concentration. The temperature dependence was found to follow the Arrhenius equation. (Modified author abstract)

  5. Analysis of the Temperature Dependence of Resistivity in N-Type Silicon.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-16

    This work consists of an analytical development of the observed temperature dependence of the resistivity in n-type silicon. This is accomplished by...considering the temperature dependence of each physical parameter (such as electron scattering terms) contributing to resistivity in various doping ranges. (Author)

  6. Temperature Dependence of Single-Event Burnout in N-Channel Power MOSFET’s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-15

    The temperature dependence of single-event burnout (SEB) in n-channel power metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) is...is shown to agree with the experimental trends. SEU, DMOS, HEXFET, Single-Event- Burnout (SEB), N-Channel MOSFET, Temperature dependence .

  7. Temperature Dependence of Optical Linewidth in Single InAs Quantum Dots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-19

    We consider the temperature dependence of the exciton linewidth in single InAs self-assembled quantum dots. We show that in cases where etched mesas...are used to isolate the dots, the magnitude of the linear temperature coefficient and its dependence on mesa size are described well by exciton

  8. Advances in direct oxidation methanol fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, S.; Narayanan, S. R.; Vamos, E.; Frank, H.; Halpert, G.; Laconti, Anthony B.; Kosek, J.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Olah, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells that can operate directly on fuels such as methanol are attractive for low to medium power applications in view of their low weight and volume relative to other power sources. A liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell has been developed based on a proton exchange membrane electrolyte and Pt/Ru and Pt catalyzed fuel and air/O2 electrodes, respectively. The cell has been shown to deliver significant power outputs at temperatures of 60 to 90 C. The cell voltage is near 0.5 V at 300 mA/cm(exp 2) current density and an operating temperature of 90 C. A deterrent to performance appears to be methanol crossover through the membrane to the oxygen electrode. Further improvements in performance appear possible by minimizing the methanol crossover rate.

  9. Dissolution of cellulose in room temperature ionic liquids: anion dependence.

    PubMed

    Payal, Rajdeep Singh; Bejagam, Karteek K; Mondal, Anirban; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2015-01-29

    The dissolution of cellulosic biomass in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) is studied through free energy calculations of its monomer, viz., cellobiose, within a molecular dynamics simulation approach. The solvation free energy (SFE) of cellobiose in ionic liquids containing any of seven different anions has been calculated. The ranking of these liquids based on SFE compares well with experimental data on the solubility of cellulose. The dissolution is shown to be enthalpically dominated, which is correlated with the strength of intermolecular hydrogen bonding between cellobiose and the anions of the IL. Large entropic changes upon solvation in [CF3SO3](-) and [OAc](-) based ionic liquids have been explained in terms of the solvent-aided conformational flexibility of cellobiose.

  10. Dependence of electric strength on the ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Čaja, Alexander E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk Nemec, Patrik E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk Malcho, Milan E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk

    2014-08-06

    At present, the volume concentration of electronic components in their miniaturization to different types of microchips and increasing their performance raises the problem of cooling such elements due to the increasing density of heat flow of heat loss. Compliance with safe operating temperature of active semiconductor element is very closely related to the reliability and durability not only components, but also the entire device. Often it is also necessary to electrically isolate the unit from the side of the cooler air. Cooling demand by natural convection is typical for applications with high operating reliability. To the reliability of the system for removing heat loss increased, it is necessary to minimize need to use the mechanically or electrically powered elements, such as circulation pumps or fans. Experience to date with applications of heat pipe in specific systems appears to be the most appropriate method of cooling.

  11. Dependence of electric strength on the ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čaja, Alexander; Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    At present, the volume concentration of electronic components in their miniaturization to different types of microchips and increasing their performance raises the problem of cooling such elements due to the increasing density of heat flow of heat loss. Compliance with safe operating temperature of active semiconductor element is very closely related to the reliability and durability not only components, but also the entire device. Often it is also necessary to electrically isolate the unit from the side of the cooler air. Cooling demand by natural convection is typical for applications with high operating reliability. To the reliability of the system for removing heat loss increased, it is necessary to minimize need to use the mechanically or electrically powered elements, such as circulation pumps or fans. Experience to date with applications of heat pipe in specific systems appears to be the most appropriate method of cooling.

  12. Temperature dependence of intensities of the 8-12 micron bands of CFCl3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanes, R.; Silvaggio, P. M.; Boese, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute intensities of the 8-12 micron bands from Freon 11 (CFCl3) were measured at temperatures of 294 and 216 K. Intensities of the bands centered at 798, 847, 934, and 1082 per cm are all observed to depend on temperature. The temperature dependence for the 847 and 1082 per cm fundamental regions is attributed to underlying hot bands; for the nu2 + nu5 combination band (934 per cm), the observed temperature dependence is in close agreement with theoretical prediction. The implication of these results on atmospheric IR remote-sensing is briefly discussed.

  13. Temperature dependence of resistance in epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Q. L.; Wang, Shouguo; Wang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Ward, R. C. C.; Kohn, A.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of resistance in parallel P and antiparallel AP configurations RP,AP has been investigated in epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe junctions with varying MgO barrier thicknesses tMgO. RAP exhibits a substantial decrease with increasing temperature for samples with tMgO ranging from 3.0 to 1.5 nm. In contrast, RP is approximately temperature independent when tMgO =3.0 nm and increases with temperature when tMgO=2.1 and 1.5 nm. Possible origins of this temperature dependence of resistance, which include taking into account a spin independent term and consideration of spin-flip scattering, are discussed. We attribute the temperature dependence of RP,AP to the misalignment of magnetic moments in the electrodes due to thermal excitations and its effect on the spin dependent tunneling.

  14. Integrated optic current transducers incorporating photonic crystal fiber for reduced temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Chu, Woo-Sung; Kim, Sung-Moon; Oh, Min-Cheol

    2015-08-24

    Optical current transducers (OCT) are indispensable for accurate monitoring of large electrical currents in an environment suffering from severe electromagnetic interference. Temperature dependence of OCTs caused by its components, such as wave plates and optical fibers, should be reduced to allow temperature-independent operation. A photonic crystal fiber with a structural optical birefringence was incorporated instead of a PM fiber, and a spun PM fiber was introduced to overcome the temperature-dependent linear birefringence of sensing fiber coil. Moreover, an integrated optic device that provides higher stability than fiber-optics was employed to control the polarization and detect the phase of the sensed optical signal. The proposed OCT exhibited much lower temperature dependence than that from a previous study. The OCT satisfied the 0.5 accuracy class (IIEC 60044-8) and had a temperature dependence less than ± 1% for a temperature range of 25 to 78 °C.

  15. Compact Fuel-Cell System Would Consume Neat Methanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Kindler, Andrew; Valdez, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    In a proposed direct methanol fuel-cell electric-power-generating system, the fuel cells would consume neat methanol, in contradistinction to the dilute aqueous methanol solutions consumed in prior direct methanol fuel-cell systems. The design concept of the proposed fuel-cell system takes advantage of (1) electro-osmotic drag and diffusion processes to manage the flows of hydrogen and water between the anode and the cathode and (2) evaporative cooling for regulating temperature. The design concept provides for supplying enough water to the anodes to enable the use of neat methanol while ensuring conservation of water for the whole fuel-cell system.

  16. Resolving the energy and temperature dependence of C6H6∗ collisional relaxation via time-dependent bath temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Niclas A.; Winner, Joshua D.; Bowersox, Rodney D. W.; North, Simon W.

    2016-07-01

    The relaxation of highly vibrationally excited benzene, generated by 193 nm laser excitation, was studied using the transient rotational-translational temperature rise of the N2 bath, which was measured by proxy using two-line laser induced fluorescence of seeded NO. The resulting experimentally measured time-dependent N2 temperature rises were modeled with MultiWell based simulations of Collisional Energy Transfer (CET) from benzene vibration to N2 rotation-translation. We find that the average energy transferred in benzene deactivating collisions depends linearly on the internal energy of the excited benzene molecules and depends approximately linearly on the N2 bath temperature between 300 K and 600 K. The results are consistent with experimental studies and classical trajectory calculations of CET in similar systems.

  17. Temperature dependence of the Raman-active phonon frequencies in indium sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasanly, N. M.; Özkan, H.; Aydinli, A.; Yilmaz, İ.

    1999-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the Raman-active mode frequencies in indium sulfide was measured in the range from 10 to 300 K. The analysis of the temperature dependence of the A g intralayer optical modes show that Raman frequency shift results from the change of harmonic frequency with volume expansion and anharmonic coupling to phonons of other branches. The pure-temperature contribution (phonon-phonon coupling) is due to three- and four-phonon processes.

  18. Measurement of the temperature dependence of pulse lengths in an n-type germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Liu, J.; Majorovits, B.; Volynets, O.

    2011-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the pulse length was measured for an 18-fold segmented n-type germanium detector in the temperature range of 77-120 K. The interactions of 122 keV photons originating from a 152Eu source were selected and pulses as observed on the core and segment electrodes were studied. In both cases, the temperature dependence can be well described by a Boltzmann-like ansatz.

  19. Temperature dependence of optically dumped far-infrared (FIR) laser output power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1978-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the small signal gain and saturation power are derived using temperature-dependent rates in a four-level model. An expression is developed for the output power of a far-infrared oscillator as a function of temperature for both fixed pressure and fixed density. The results are valid in the regime of homogeneous broadening of the rotational transition and Doppler broadening of the pump transition. It is shown that, for most lasers, both the small signal gain and the saturation power decrease with increasing temperature. These effects have the overall result of increasing output power with decreasing temperatures.

  20. Analytical model of the temperature dependent properties of microresonators immersed in a gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ilin, E. A.; Kehrbusch, J.; Radzio, B.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive theoretical model of microresonators immersed in a viscous gas of varying temperature is presented and verified by experiments. Analytical expressions for both the temperature dependent resonant frequency and quality factor of the first flexural eigenmode were derived extending Sader's theory of viscous damping to small temperature variations. The model provides useful implications for the thermal stabilization of microresonators immersed in a gas as well as for the reduction in the influence of the temperature dependent gas properties on the resonant frequency. Finally, an analytical expression is deduced for the mass detection capability of a microresonator that undergoes temperature variations.

  1. Hartmann flow with temperature-dependent physical properties. [magnetohydrodynamics of liquid metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linn, G. T.; Walker, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Attention is given to the steady, fully developed, one-dimensional flow of a liquid metal in which thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and viscosity are functions of temperature. It is found that the properties are decreasing functions of temperature and the first differences between temperature-dependent and constant properties are discussed.

  2. Temperature dependence of electronic heat capacity in Holstein model of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialko, N.; Sobolev, E.; Lakhno, V.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of charge migration was modeled to calculate temperature dependencies of its thermodynamic equilibrium values such as energy and electronic heat capacity in homogeneous adenine fragments. The energy varies from nearly polaron one at T ∼ 0 to midpoint of the conductivity band at high temperatures. The peak on the graph of electronic heat capacity is observed at the polaron decay temperature.

  3. Temperature Dependence of Photodegradation of Dissolved Organic Matter to Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Particulate Organic Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Porcal, Petr; Dillon, Peter J.; Molot, Lewis A.

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been studied for more than two decades. Usually, laboratory or “in-situ” experiments are used to determine photodegradation variables. A common problem with these experiments is that the photodegradation experiments are done at higher than ambient temperature. Five laboratory experiments were done to determine the effect of temperature on photochemical degradation of DOM. Experimental results showed strong dependence of photodegradation on temperature. Mathematical modeling of processes revealed that two different pathways engaged in photochemical transformation of DOM to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) strongly depend on temperature. Direct oxidation of DOM to DIC dominated at low temperatures while conversion of DOM to intermediate particulate organic carbon (POC) prior to oxidation to DIC dominated at high temperatures. It is necessary to consider this strong dependence when the results of laboratory experiments are interpreted in regard to natural processes. Photodegradation experiments done at higher than ambient temperature will necessitate correction of rate constants. PMID:26106898

  4. Mechanisms of time-dependent crack growth at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Stock, S.R.

    1990-04-15

    Objective of this 3-y study was to conduct creep and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments and to characterize the crack tip damage mechanisms in a model material (Cu-1wt%Sb), which is known to cavitate at grain boundaries under creep deformation. Results were: In presence of large scale cavitation damage and crack branching, time rate of creep crack growth da/dt does not correlate with C[sub t] or C[sup *]. When cavitation damage is constrained, da/dt is characterized by C[sub t]. Area fraction of grain boundary cavitated is the single damage parameter for the extent of cavitation damage ahead of crack tips. C[sub t] is used for the creep-fatigue crack growth behavior. In materials prone to rapid cavity nucleation, creep cracks grow faster initially and then reach a steady state whose growth rate is determined by C[sub t]. Percent creep life exhausted correlates with average cavity diameter and fraction of grain boundary area occupied by cavities. Synchrotron x-ray tomographic microscopy was used to image individual cavities in Cu-1wt% Sb. A methodology was developed for predicting the remaining life of elevated temperature power plant components; (C[sub t])[sub avg] was used to correlate creep-fatigue crack growth in Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steel and weldments.

  5. Fluorescence imaging of cholesterol and temperature dependent cell membrane dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2007-07-01

    Cholesterol content is an important factor for membrane dynamics of living cells. With well defined protocols of depletion and enrichment the impact of cholesterol on membrane dynamics was examined by fluorescence microscopy. In addition, the intracellular cholesterol content was determined with biochemical methods. Changes of cholesterol amounts in cell membranes have previously been related to specific disease and may have some influence on the uptake of pharmaceutical agents. A combination of conventional and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy was applied to the fluorescence marker laurdan, a polarity-sensitive probe, whose electronic excitation energy is different in polar and non-polar environment. Once incorporated into cell membranes, the fluorescence of laurdan shows a spectral shift towards longer wavelength when its molecules get into contact with adjacent water molecules, e.g. when a phase transition from the tightly packed gel phase to the liquid crystalline phase of membrane lipids occurs. The generalized polarization (GP, characterizing this spectral shift) as well as the fluorescence lifetime (τ) of laurdan revealed to be appropriate measures for membrane stiffness and fluidity. GP generally decreased with increasing temperature and was always higher for the plasma membrane than for intracellular membranes. Enrichment of cholesterol caused a pronounced increase, whereas depletion of cholesterol caused a decrease of GP. In addition, pronounced changes of the fluorescence lifetime pattern occurred in the subnanosecond range. GP, and τ were determined as integral values of single cells or small cell collectives and were also displayed as microscopic images.

  6. Global strong solution to compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density dependent viscosity and temperature dependent heat conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ran; Guo, Ai; Zhu, Changjiang

    2017-04-01

    We obtain existence and uniqueness of global strong solution to one-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations for ideal polytropic gas flow, with density dependent viscosity and temperature dependent heat conductivity under stress-free and thermally insulated boundary conditions. Here we assume viscosity coefficient μ (ρ) = 1 +ρα and heat conductivity coefficient κ (θ) =θβ for all α ∈ [ 0 , ∞) and β ∈ (0 , + ∞).

  7. Effect of temperature-dependent energy-level shifts on a semiconductor's Peltier heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, David

    1984-11-01

    The Peltier heat of a charge carrier in a semiconductor is calculated for the situation in which the electronic energy levels are temperature dependent. The temperature dependences of the electronic energy levels, generally observed optically, arise from their dependences on the vibrational energy of the lattice (e.g., as caused by thermal expansion). It has been suggested that these temperature dependences will typically have a major effect on the Peltier heat. The Peltier heat associated with a given energy level is a thermodynamic quantity; it is the product of the temperature and the change of the entropy of the system when a carrier is added in that level. As such, the energy levels cannot be treated as explicitly temperature dependent. The electron-lattice interaction causing the temperature dependence must be expressly considered. It is found that the carrier's interaction with the atomic vibrations lowers its electronic energy. However, the interaction of the carrier with the atomic vibrations also causes an infinitesimal lowering (~1N) of each of the N vibrational frequencies. As a result, there is a finite carrier-induced increase in the average vibrational energy. Above the Debye temperature, this cancels the lowering of the carrier's electronic energy. Thus, the standard Peltier-heat formula, whose derivation generally ignores the temperature dependence of the electronic energy levels, is regained. This explains the apparent success of the standard formula in numerous analyses of electronic transport experiments.

  8. Temperature dependence of amino acid side chain IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Amide I' IR spectra are widely used for studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins as a function of temperature. Temperature dependent absorptions of amino acid side-chains that overlap the amide I' may significantly complicate the structural analyses. While the side-chain IR spectra have been investigated previously, thus far their dependence on temperature has not been reported. Here we present the study of the changes in the IR spectra with temperature for side-chain groups of aspartate, glutamate, asparagine, glutamine, arginine, and tyrosine in the amide I' region (in D2O). Band fitting analysis was employed to extract the temperature dependence of the individual spectral parameters, such as peak frequency, integrated intensity, band width, and shape. As expected, the side-chain IR bands exhibit significant changes with temperature. The majority of the spectral parameters, particularly the frequency and intensity, show linear dependence on temperature, but the direction and magnitude vary depending on the particular side-chain group. The exception is arginine, which exhibits a distinctly nonlinear frequency shift with temperature for its asymmetric CN3H5(+) bending signal, although a linear fit can account for this change to within ~1/3 cm(-1). The applicability of the determined spectral parameters for estimations of temperature-dependent side-chain absorptions in peptides and proteins are discussed.

  9. Global radiation damage: temperature dependence, time dependence and how to outrun it.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Matthew; Hopkins, Jesse B; Badeau, Ryan; Mulichak, Anne M; Keefe, Lisa J; Thorne, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    A series of studies that provide a consistent and illuminating picture of global radiation damage to protein crystals, especially at temperatures above ∼200 K, are described. The radiation sensitivity shows a transition near 200 K, above which it appears to be limited by solvent-coupled diffusive processes. Consistent with this interpretation, a component of global damage proceeds on timescales of several minutes at 180 K, decreasing to seconds near room temperature. As a result, data collection times of order 1 s allow up to half of global damage to be outrun at 260 K. Much larger damage reductions near room temperature should be feasible using larger dose rates delivered using microfocused beams, enabling a significant expansion of structural studies of proteins under more nearly native conditions.

  10. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  11. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  12. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  13. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  14. Review of temperature dependence of thermal properties, dielectric properties, and perfusion of biological tissues at hyperthermic and ablation temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, Christian; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The application of supraphysiological temperatures (>40°C) to biological tissues causes changes at the molecular, cellular, and structural level, with corresponding changes in tissue function and in thermal, mechanical and dielectric tissue properties. This is particularly relevant for image-guided thermal treatments (e.g. hyperthermia and thermal ablation) delivering heat via focused ultrasound (FUS), radiofrequency (RF), microwave (MW), or laser energy; temperature induced changes in tissue properties are of relevance in relation to predicting tissue temperature profile, monitoring during treatment, and evaluation of treatment results. This paper presents a literature survey of temperature dependence of electrical (electrical conductivity, resistivity, permittivity) and thermal tissue properties (thermal conductivity, specific heat, diffusivity). Data of soft tissues (liver, prostate, muscle, kidney, uterus, collagen, myocardium and spleen) for temperatures between 5 to 90°C, and dielectric properties in the frequency range between 460 kHz and 3 GHz are reported. Furthermore, perfusion changes in tumors including carcinomas, sarcomas, rhabdomyosarcoma, adenocarcinoma and ependymoblastoma in response to hyperthmic temperatures up to 46°C are presented. Where appropriate, mathematical models to describe temperature dependence of properties are presented. The presented data is valuable for mathematical models that predict tissue temperature during thermal therapies (e.g. hyperthermia or thermal ablation), as well as for applications related to prediction and monitoring of temperature induced tissue changes. PMID:25955712

  15. Temperature-dependent electronic structures, atomistic modelling and the negative thermal expansion of δ Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Z. P.; Deng, Xiaoyu; Basu, K.; Yin, Q.; Kotliar, G.

    2014-10-01

    Proximity to the localization-delocalization boundary results in strong temperature dependence of the electronic structures of strongly correlated materials. In this work, we incorporate this effect by introducing a phenomenological temperature-dependent parameterization of the modified embedded-atom method. We combine this model with molecular dynamics to simulate the diverse physical properties of the ? and ? phases of elemental plutonium. The new model improves upon earlier studies, it captures the negative thermal expansion and the strong temperature dependence of the bulk modulus in the ?-phase. We trace this improvement to a strong softening of phonons near the zone boundary and an increase of anharmonic effects induced by the temperature-dependent parameterization upon increasing temperature.

  16. Simultaneous retrieval of temperature-dependent absorption coefficient and conductivity of participating media

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yatao; Qi, Hong; Zhao, Fangzhou; Ruan, Liming; Tan, Heping

    2016-01-01

    A secondary optimization technique was proposed to estimate the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient. In the proposed method, the stochastic particle swarm optimization was applied to solve the inverse problem. The coupled radiation and conduction problem was solved in a 1D absorbing, emitting, but non-scattering slab exposed to a pulse laser. It is found that in the coupled radiation and conduction problem, the temperature response is highly sensitive to conductivity but slightly sensitive to the optical properties. On the contrary, the radiative intensity is highly sensitive to optical properties but slightly sensitive to thermal conductivity. Therefore, the optical and thermal signals should both be considered in the inverse problem to estimate the temperature-dependent properties of the transparent media. On this basis, the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient were both estimated accurately by measuring the time-dependent temperature, and radiative response at the boundary of the slab. PMID:26912418

  17. Effects of internal conductance on the temperature dependence of the photosynthetic rate in spinach leaves from contrasting growth temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yamori, Wataru; Noguchi, Ko; Hanba, Yuko T; Terashima, Ichiro

    2006-08-01

    The photosynthetic rate may be strongly limited by internal conductance from the intercellular airspace to the chloroplast stroma (g(i)). However, the effects of growth and leaf temperature on g(i) are still unclarified. In this work, we determined the temperature dependence of g(i) in spinach leaves grown at 30/25 degrees C (high temperature; HT) and 15/10 degrees C (low temperature; LT), using the concurrent measurements of the gas exchange rate and stable carbon isotope ratio. Moreover, we quantified the effects of g(i) on the temperature dependence of the photosynthetic rate. We measured g(i) and the photosynthetic rate at a CO(2) concentration of 360 microl l(-1) under saturating light (A(360)) at different leaf temperatures. The optimum temperature for A(360) was 28.5 degrees C in HT leaves and 22.9 degrees C in LT leaves. The optimum temperatures for g(i) were almost similar to those of A(360) in both HT and LT leaves. There was a strong linear relationship between A(360) and g(i). The photosynthetic rates predicted from the C(3) photosynthesis model taking account of g(i) agreed well with A(360) in both HT and LT leaves. The temperature coefficients (Q(10)) of g(i) between 10 and 20 degrees C were 2.0 and 1.8 in HT and LT leaves, respectively. This suggests that g(i) was determined not only by physical diffusion but by processes facilitated by protein(s). The limitation of the photosynthetic rate imposed by g(i) increased with leaf temperature and was greater than the limitation of the stomatal conductance at any temperature, in both HT and LT leaves. This study suggests that g(i) substantially limits the photosynthetic rate, especially at higher temperatures.

  18. The Hydrophobic Temperature Dependence of Amino Acids Directly Calculated from Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Erik; Hoogeveen, Arlo; Abeln, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    The hydrophobic effect is the main driving force in protein folding. One can estimate the relative strength of this hydrophobic effect for each amino acid by mining a large set of experimentally determined protein structures. However, the hydrophobic force is known to be strongly temperature dependent. This temperature dependence is thought to explain the denaturation of proteins at low temperatures. Here we investigate if it is possible to extract this temperature dependence directly from a large set of protein structures determined at different temperatures. Using NMR structures filtered for sequence identity, we were able to extract hydrophobicity propensities for all amino acids at five different temperature ranges (spanning 265-340 K). These propensities show that the hydrophobicity becomes weaker at lower temperatures, in line with current theory. Alternatively, one can conclude that the temperature dependence of the hydrophobic effect has a measurable influence on protein structures. Moreover, this work provides a method for probing the individual temperature dependence of the different amino acid types, which is difficult to obtain by direct experiment. PMID:26000449

  19. Determination of the temperature dependence of the up- and down-quark masses in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, C. A.; Hernandez, L. A.

    2016-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the sum of the QCD up- and down-quark masses, (mu+md) and the pion decay constant, fπ, are determined from two thermal finite energy QCD sum rules for the pseudoscalar-current correlator. This quark mass remains mostly constant for temperatures well below the critical temperature for deconfinement/chiral-symmetry restoration. As this critical temperature is approached, the quark mass increases sharply with increasing temperature. This increase is far more pronounced if the temperature dependence of the pion mass (determined independently from other methods) is taken into account. The behavior of fπ(T) is consistent with the expectation from chiral symmetry, i.e. that it should follow the thermal dependence of the quark condensate, independently of the quark mass.

  20. Electrostatic control over temperature-dependent tunnelling across a single-molecule junction

    PubMed Central

    Garrigues, Alvar R.; Wang, Lejia; del Barco, Enrique; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the mechanism of charge transport through molecular tunnel junctions depends on temperature is crucial to control electronic function in molecular electronic devices. With just a few systems investigated as a function of bias and temperature so far, thermal effects in molecular tunnel junctions remain poorly understood. Here we report a detailed charge transport study of an individual redox-active ferrocene-based molecule over a wide range of temperatures and applied potentials. The results show the temperature dependence of the current to vary strongly as a function of the gate voltage. Specifically, the current across the molecule exponentially increases in the Coulomb blockade regime and decreases at the charge degeneracy points, while remaining temperature-independent at resonance. Our observations can be well accounted for by a formal single-level tunnelling model where the temperature dependence relies on the thermal broadening of the Fermi distributions of the electrons in the leads. PMID:27211787

  1. INS, DFT and temperature dependent IR investigations of dynamical properties of low temperature phase of choline chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlukojć, A.; Hetmańczyk, Ł.

    2014-12-01

    Within the framework of the research the inelastic neutron scattering and temperature dependent infra-red spectroscopy investigations of the low temperature phase of choline chloride were performed. The infra-red spectra in wavenumber region 4000-80 cm-1 and in a temperature range 9-300 K were collected. The density functional theory calculations with the periodic boundary conditions for determination and description of the normal modes in the vibration spectra of choline chloride were applied. Bands assigned to the CH3 torsional vibration were observed at 288 and 249 cm-1. From the analysis of the temperature dependence of the full-width-at-half-maximum the activation energy for CH3 group reorientation is found to be equal to 1.6 ± 0.2 kcal/mol.

  2. Methanol Oxidation Using Ozone on Titania-Supported Vanadium Catalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone-enhanced catalytic oxidation of methanol has been conducted at mild temperatures of 100 to 250NC using V2O5/TiO2 catalyst prepared by the sol-gel method. The catalyst was characterized using XRD, surface area measurements, and temperature-programmed desorption of methanol. ...

  3. The dependence of surface temperature on IGBTs load and ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Čaja; Marek, Patsch

    2015-05-01

    Currently, older power electronics and electrotechnics are improvement and at the same time developing new and more efficient devices. These devices produce in their activities a significant part of the heat which, if not effectively drained, causing damage to these elements. In this case, it is important to develop new and more efficient cooling system. The most widespread of modern methods of cooling is the cooling by heat pipe. This contribution is aimed at cooling the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) elements by loop heat pipe (LHP). IGBTs are very prone to damage due to high temperatures, and therefore is the important that the surface temperature was below 100°C. It was therefore created a model that examined what impact of surface temperature on the IGBT element and heat removal at different load and constant ambient temperature.

  4. Hsp90-dependent regulatory circuitry controlling temperature-dependent fungal development and virulence.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Teresa R; Cowen, Leah E

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenic fungi Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Cryptococcus neoformans are an increasing cause of human mortality, especially in immunocompromised populations. During colonization and adaptation to various host environments, these fungi undergo morphogenetic alterations that allow for survival within the host. One key environmental cue driving morphological changes is external temperature. The Hsp90 chaperone protein provides one mechanism to link temperature with the signalling cascades that regulate morphogenesis, fungal development and virulence. Candida albicans is a model system for understanding the connections between morphogenesis and Hsp90. Due to the high degree of conservation in Hsp90, many of the connections in C. albicans may be extrapolated to other fungal pathogens or parasites. Examining the role of Hsp90 during development and morphogenesis in these three major fungal pathogens may provide insight into key aspects of adaptation to the host, leading to additional avenues for therapy.

  5. Temperature-dependent gelation process in colloidal dispersions by diffusing wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiaxue; Boyko, Volodymyr; Yi, Zhiyong; Men, Yongfeng

    2013-11-19

    Temperature-dependent microrheology of a concentrated charge-stabilized poly(methyl methacrylate) colloidal dispersion with different salt concentrations was investigated by diffusing wave spectroscopy in backscattering mode. The critical temperature where the system undergoes aggregation and gelation depends upon the particle volume fraction or salt concentration. The viscoelastic properties of the systems have been discussed using Maxwell and Kelvin-Voigt models. Temperature-dependent crossover (G' = G″) frequency has been used to calculate activation energies representing a critical energy of interaction of gel formation.

  6. temperature-dependent orientational dynamics of 1,n-dicyano n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qin; Zhu, Xiang; Fourkas, John T

    2008-03-13

    Ultrafast optical Kerr effect spectroscopy has been used to study the temperature-dependent orientational dynamics of 1,n-dicyano n-alkane liquids ranging from dicyanomethane to 1,8-dicyanooctane. The dependence of the reorientational times on temperature and viscosity is consistent with the molecules adopting a largely extended structure in the liquid state, with a preference for gauche conformations at the methylenes bonded to the cyanide groups. The data are also suggestive of temperature-dependent, collective structural rearrangements in these liquids.

  7. A compact low-temperature single crystal adsorption calorimetry setup for measuring coverage dependent heats of adsorption at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hörtz, Peter; Schäfer, Rolf

    2014-07-01

    Here we present the modification of an already existing Single Crystal Adsorption Calorimetry (SCAC) apparatus which has been extended by a compact cooling system to measure the coverage dependent heats of adsorption of gaseous compounds on thin metal substrates in a temperature range from 80 K to 430 K. The setup is characterized and its performance is tested by studying the adsorption of CO on Pt(111) at 150 K and 300 K. Coverage dependent sticking probabilities and heat of adsorption measurements are compared to previous experimental and theoretical studies proving the reliability of our compact low-temperature-SCAC setup.

  8. Dietary methanol and autism.

    PubMed

    Walton, Ralph G; Monte, Woodrow C

    2015-10-01

    The authors sought to establish whether maternal dietary methanol during pregnancy was a factor in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders. A seven item questionnaire was given to women who had given birth to at least one child after 1984. The subjects were solicited from a large primary care practice and several internet sites and separated into two groups - mothers who had given birth to a child with autism and those who had not. Average weekly methanol consumption was calculated based on questionnaire responses. 550 questionnaires were completed by women who gave birth to a non-autistic child. On average these women consumed 66.71mg. of methanol weekly. 161 questionnaires were completed by women who had given birth to an autistic child. The average estimated weekly methanol consumption for this group was 142.31mg. Based on the results of the Wilcoxon rank sum-test, we see a significant difference between the reported methanol consumption rates of the two groups. This study suggests that women who have given birth to an autistic child are likely to have had higher intake of dietary sources of methanol than women who have not. Further investigation of a possible link of dietary methanol to autism is clearly warranted.

  9. Temperature dependence of calcium-induced fusion of sonicated phosphatidylserine vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, S T; Day, E P; Ho, J T

    1978-01-01

    We have measured the temperature dependence calcium-induced fusion of sonicated phosphatidylserine vesicles. The vesicles were incubated in the presence of calcium at a specified temperature until the resulting aggregation or fusion process had gone to completion. EDTA was then added and the resulting final size of the vesicle population was measured by using dynamic light scattering. This final size was plotted against incubation temperature to show the temperature dependence of calcium-induced fusion. This curve has a peak near 11 degrees C which may be associated with the phase transition of the sonicated phosphatidylserine vesicles in the presence of calcium prior to the aggregation or fusion process. PMID:279918

  10. Temperature dependence of properties of Mn-doped nanocrystals with different binding symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Boping; Zhao, Qing; Zhang, Jiayu

    2016-02-01

    We report the temperature dependence of photoluminescent properties of Mn-doped nanocrystals (NCs) with different binding symmetry. The photoluminescence peaks of Mn2+ ions shift to shorter wavelength with increasing temperatures, resulting from the reduction of crystal field. Further evidence for temperature-dependent crystal field variety is demonstrated by electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra. Additionally, the inflexion temperature of the excited state lifetimes increases from 170 K (Sample I) to 220 K (Sample IV), which is speculated to be resulted from the easily affected wave function overlap due to thermal lattice expansion in more symmetrical binding Mn-doped NCs.

  11. Negative temperature dependence of recrystallized grain size: analytical formulation and experimental confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmasry, M.; Liu, F.; Jiang, Y.; Mao, Z. N.; Liu, Y.; Wang, J. T.

    2017-01-01

    The catalyzing effect on nucleation of recrystallization from pre-existing grains is analyzed, analogy to the foreign nucleus size effect in heterogeneous nucleation. Analytical formulation of the effective nucleation site for recrystallization leads to a negative temperature dependence of recrystallized grain size. Non-isochronal annealing, where annealing time is set just enough for the completion of recrystallization at different temperature, is conducted on pure copper after severe plastic deformation. More homogeneous and smaller grains are obtained at higher annealing temperature. The good fitting between analytical and experimental results unveils the intrinsic feature of this negative temperature dependence of recrystallized grain size.

  12. The temperature dependence of luminescence from a long-lasting phosphor exposed to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowatari, Munehiko; Koyama, Daisuke; Satoh, Yoshiyuki; Iinuma, Kouichi; Uchida, Shunsuke

    2002-03-01

    The temperature dependence of luminescence from a long-lasting phosphor (LLP), SrAl 2O 4 : Eu 2+,Dy 3+, exposed to ionizing radiation has been measured to understand the LLP luminescence mechanism. Evaluation of the decay constants of the LLP exposed to α-, β- or γ-rays at temperatures from 200 to 390 K showed that the decay constant is divided into four components ranging from 10 -4 to 10 -1 s -1 with activation energies of 0.02-0.35 eV. Total luminous intensity from the LLP with changing irradiation temperature has its maximum value around the room temperature. Irradiation at elevated temperature (390 K) has the total luminescence pattern with monotonous decrease as temperature rises. As a result of evaluating the temperature dependence of luminescence, the luminescence mechanism is considered as follows:

  13. Constrained Monte Carlo method and calculation of the temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselin, P.; Evans, R. F. L.; Barker, J.; Chantrell, R. W.; Yanes, R.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.; Hinzke, D.; Nowak, U.

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a constrained Monte Carlo method which allows us to traverse the phase space of a classical spin system while fixing the magnetization direction. Subsequently we show the method’s capability to model the temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy, and for bulk uniaxial and cubic anisotropies we recover the low-temperature Callen-Callen power laws in M . We also calculate the temperature scaling of the two-ion anisotropy in L10 FePt, and recover the experimentally observed M2.1 scaling. The method is newly applied to evaluate the temperature-dependent effective anisotropy in the presence of the Néel surface anisotropy in thin films with different easy-axis configurations. In systems having different surface and bulk easy axes, we show the capability to model the temperature-induced reorientation transition. The intrinsic surface anisotropy is found to follow a linear temperature behavior in a large range of temperatures.

  14. Yolk-albumen testosterone in a lizard with temperature-dependent sex determination: relation with development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Victoria; Bowden, Rachel M; Crews, David

    2013-06-01

    The leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius) exhibits temperature-dependent sex determination as well as temperature-influenced polymorphisms. Research suggests that in oviparous reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination, steroid hormones in the yolk might influence sex determination and sexual differentiation. From captive leopard geckos that were all from the same incubation temperature regime, we gathered freshly laid eggs, incubated them at one of two female-biased incubation temperatures (26 or 34°C), and measured testosterone content in the yolk-albumen at early or late development. No differences in the concentration of testosterone were detected in eggs from different incubation temperatures. We report testosterone concentrations in the yolk-albumen were higher in eggs of late development than early development at 26°C incubation temperatures, a finding opposite that reported in other TSD reptiles studied to date.

  15. Synthesis Dependent Core Level Binding Energy Shift in the Oxidation State of Platinum Coated on Ceria–Titania and its Effect on Catalytic Decomposition of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Karakoti, A. S.; King, Jessica; Vincent, Abhilash; Seal, Sudipta

    2010-11-20

    Synergistic interaction of catalyst and support has attracted the interest of the catalytic community for several decades. The decomposition/oxidation of alcohols for the production of hydrogen as a source of fuel requires such support catalyst interaction. Recent studies have suggested the active role of oxide based supports on the catalytic ability of noble metals such as gold, platinum and palladium. Herein, we report the effect of synthesis technique on the catalytic activity of platinum coated on mixed ceria-titania support system. Wet impregnation technique followed by calcination was compared with the chemical reduction of platinum during the coating over oxide support. Methanol decomposition studied using an in-house built catalytic reactor coupled to a mass spectrometer showed that catalyst prepared by thermal reduction of platinum demonstrated better catalytic ability than the catalyst prepared by chemical reduction of platinum. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the size of both platinum and ceria-titania particles remained unchanged, while the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the oxidation state of platinum was modified by different coating procedures. A shift in the core level binding energy of the Pt 4f towards lower binding energy was observed with chemical reduction. Based on the XPS data it was found that platinum (on ceria-titania supports) in mixed oxidation state outperformed the Pt in reduced metallic state. Results from catalysis and in situ Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy are presented and discussed.

  16. Deformation microstructure and positive temperature dependence of flow stress in Ni{sub 3}Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Solov’eva, Yulia Starenchenko, Vladimir Starenchenko, Svetlana Solov’ev, Artem

    2016-01-15

    Single crystalline specimens of Ni{sub 3}Ge were compressed along [0 0 1] at different temperatures. Temperature dependence of the critical resolved shear stress (τ{sub 0}(T)) has been obtained. Detailed measurements at cryogen temperatures (4.2-77 K temperature interval) showed that the increase of the yield stress with temperature starts at liquid helium temperature. The values of the apparent activation volume (V*) have been obtained as a result of stress relaxation tests repeated along the stress-strain curve at different stress levels at seven temperatures (77, 293, 373, 473, 573, 673, 773 K). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods were used to analyze the evolution of dislocation structure with temperature and strain. The measurements of the straight dislocations fraction determined as δ = ρ{sub sd} / ρ, (ρ{sub sd} is the straight dislocation density, ρ is a total dislocation density) have been performed. The experimental data obtained in different tests in Ni{sub 3}Ge confirm two-stage nature of the positive temperature dependence of the flow stress of alloys with the L1{sub 2} structure. The model of thermal strengthening considering two different types of mechanisms, first acting at low temperatures and second at high has been proposed. Using this model the temperature dependence of the critical resolved shear stress has been approximated and the activation parameters of thermal strengthening of Ni{sub 3}Ge have been obtained.

  17. Temperature dependent photoluminescence and micromapping of multiple stacks InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ming Jaffré, Alexandre Alvarez, José Kleider, Jean-Paul Boutchich, Mohamed; Jittrong, Apichat; Chokamnuai, Thitipong; Panyakeow, Somsak; Kanjanachuchai, Songphol

    2015-02-27

    We utilized temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) techniques to investigate 1, 3 and 5 stack InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on cross-hatch patterns. PL mapping can well reproduce the QDs distribution as AFM and position dependency of QD growth. It is possible to observe crystallographic dependent PL. The temperature dependent spectra exhibit the QDs energy distribution which reflects the size and shape. The inter-dot carrier coupling effect is observed and translated as a red shift of 120mV on the [1–10] direction peak is observed at 30K on 1 stack with regards to 3 stacks samples, which is assigned to lateral coupling.

  18. Fight versus flight: physiological basis for temperature-dependent behavioral shifts in lizards.

    PubMed

    Herrel, A; James, R S; Van Damme, R

    2007-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a behavioral shift from flight to aggressive behavior occurs at low temperatures in some lizards. Our data for the agamid lizard Trapelus pallida demonstrate how the effect of temperature on whole organism performance traits such as sprint speed (much lower performance at lower temperature) and bite force (largely independent of temperature) may explain the shift from flight to fight behavior with decreasing temperature. Moreover, our data hint at the physiological basis for this effect as isolated muscle power output, twitch and tetanus time traits, relevant to sprinting, appear to be strongly temperature-dependent muscle properties. Maximal muscle force production, on the other hand, appears largely independent of temperature. Unexpectedly, differences in the physiological properties of jaw versus limb muscle were observed that enhance the ability of the jaw muscle to generate maximal force at all temperatures tested. Thus our data show how behavioral responses may be determined by the limitations set by temperature on physiological processes.

  19. Temperature-dependent stress response in oysters, Crassostrea virginica: pollution reduces temperature tolerance in oysters.

    PubMed

    Lannig, Gisela; Flores, Jason F; Sokolova, Inna M

    2006-09-12

    Combined effects of temperature and a toxic metal, cadmium (Cd), on energy metabolism were studied in a model marine bivalve, the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, acclimated at 20, 24 and 28 degrees C and exposed to 50microgl(-1) of Cd. Both increasing temperature and Cd exposure led to a rise in standard metabolic rates, and combined stressors appeared to override the capability for aerobic energy production resulting in impaired stress tolerance. Oysters exposed to elevated temperature but not Cd showed no significant change in condition, survival rate and lipid peroxidation, whereas those exposed to both Cd and temperature stress suffered high mortality accompanied by low condition index and elevated lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, RNA/DNA ratios indicative of protein synthesis rate, and levels of glutathione, which is involved in metal detoxification, increased in Cd-exposed oysters at 20 degrees C but not at 28 degrees C. Implications of the synergism between elevated temperatures and cadmium stress on energy metabolism of oysters are discussed in the light of the potential effects of climate change on oyster populations in polluted areas.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Temperature Dependence of Raman shift of monolayer WS2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoting; Gao, Yang; Yang, Tianqi; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Lai, Tianshu

    2016-01-01

    We report the temperature-dependent evolution of Raman spectra of monolayer WS2 directly CVD-grown on a gold foil and then transferred onto quartz substrates over a wide temperature range from 84 to 543 K. The nonlinear temperature dependence of Raman shifts for both and A1g modes has been observed. The first-order temperature coefficients of Raman shifts are obtained to be −0.0093 (cm−1/K) and −0.0122 (cm−1/K) for and A1g peaks, respectively. A physical model, including thermal expansion and three- and four-phonon anharmonic effects, is used quantitatively to analyze the observed nonlinear temperature dependence. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of monolayer WS2 is extracted from the experimental data for the first time. It is found that thermal expansion coefficient of out-plane mode is larger than one of in-plane mode, and TECs of and A1g modes are temperature-dependent weakly and strongly, respectively. It is also found that the nonlinear temperature dependence of Raman shift of mode mainly originates from the anharmonic effect of three-phonon process, whereas one of A1g mode is mainly contributed by thermal expansion effect in high temperature region, revealing that thermal expansion effect cannot be ignored. PMID:27576751

  1. Sex reversal triggers the rapid transition from genetic to temperature-dependent sex.

    PubMed

    Holleley, Clare E; O'Meally, Denis; Sarre, Stephen D; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Ezaz, Tariq; Matsubara, Kazumi; Azad, Bhumika; Zhang, Xiuwen; Georges, Arthur

    2015-07-02

    Sex determination in animals is amazingly plastic. Vertebrates display contrasting strategies ranging from complete genetic control of sex (genotypic sex determination) to environmentally determined sex (for example, temperature-dependent sex determination). Phylogenetic analyses suggest frequent evolutionary transitions between genotypic and temperature-dependent sex determination in environmentally sensitive lineages, including reptiles. These transitions are thought to involve a genotypic system becoming sensitive to temperature, with sex determined by gene-environment interactions. Most mechanistic models of transitions invoke a role for sex reversal. Sex reversal has not yet been demonstrated in nature for any amniote, although it occurs in fish and rarely in amphibians. Here we make the first report of reptile sex reversal in the wild, in the Australian bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and use sex-reversed animals to experimentally induce a rapid transition from genotypic to temperature-dependent sex determination. Controlled mating of normal males to sex-reversed females produces viable and fertile offspring whose phenotypic sex is determined solely by temperature (temperature-dependent sex determination). The W sex chromosome is eliminated from this lineage in the first generation. The instantaneous creation of a lineage of ZZ temperature-sensitive animals reveals a novel, climate-induced pathway for the rapid transition between genetic and temperature-dependent sex determination, and adds to concern about adaptation to rapid global climate change.

  2. Temperature dependence of spectral induced polarization data: experimental results and membrane polarization theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairlein, Katharina; Bücker, Matthias; Hördt, Andreas; Hinze, Björn

    2016-04-01

    Spectral induced polarization measurements are affected by temperature variations due to a variety of temperature-dependent parameters that control the complex electrical conductivity. Most important is the influence of the ion mobility, which increases with increasing temperature. It is responsible for the increase of the conductivity of the fluid in the pores with temperature and influences the electrical double layer on the mineral surface. This work is based on laboratory measurements of 13 sandstone samples from different sources with different geological and petrophysical characteristics. We measured the complex impedance in a frequency range from 0.01 to 100 Hz and a temperature range from 0 to 40 °C. The main observation is a decrease of the characteristic time (defined by the inverse of the frequency, at which the phase shift is maximum) with increasing temperature. The strength of this decrease differs from one sample to another. The temperature dependence of the phase shift magnitude cannot easily be generalized, as it depends on the particular sample. The experimental findings suggest that neglecting the influence of temperature on complex conductivity may lead to significant errors when estimating hydraulic conductivity from relaxation time. We also simulate the temperature dependence with a theoretical model of membrane polarization and review some of the model properties, with an emphasis on the temperature dependence of the parameters. The model reproduces several features characterizing the measured data, including the temperature dependence of the characteristic times. Computed tomography and microscope images of the pore structure of three samples also allow us to associate differences in the geometrical parameters used in the modelling with pore scale parameters of the actual samples.

  3. Stepwise Internal Energy Change of Protonated Methanol Clusters By Using the Inert Gas Tagging.

    PubMed

    Shimamori, Takuto; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Fujii, Asuka

    2016-11-23

    Structural isomer population of a hydrogen-bonded cluster generally depends on temperature. Therefore, determination of an isomer population profile in a wide temperature range is important to understand the nature of hydrogen bond networks of the cluster. To explore an isomer population profile, stepwise changes of internal vibrational energy of a protonated hydrogen-bonded cluster are performed by inert gas tagging. We observe infrared spectra of the protonated methanol pentamer with various tag species. The bare protonated methanol pentamer practically has only two possible isomer types. With the tagging, the relative population of the two isomer types changes according to the binding energy with the tag species. The observed relative population follows its theoretically predicted temperature dependence.

  4. Temperature-dependent innate defense against the common cold virus limits viral replication at warm temperature in mouse airway cells.

    PubMed

    Foxman, Ellen F; Storer, James A; Fitzgerald, Megan E; Wasik, Bethany R; Hou, Lin; Zhao, Hongyu; Turner, Paul E; Pyle, Anna Marie; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2015-01-20

    Most isolates of human rhinovirus, the common cold virus, replicate more robustly at the cool temperatures found in the nasal cavity (33-35 °C) than at core body temperature (37 °C). To gain insight into the mechanism of temperature-dependent growth, we compared the transcriptional response of primary mouse airway epithelial cells infected with rhinovirus at 33 °C vs. 37 °C. Mouse airway cells infected with mouse-adapted rhinovirus 1B exhibited a striking enrichment in expression of antiviral defense response genes at 37 °C relative to 33 °C, which correlated with significantly higher expression levels of type I and type III IFN genes and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) at 37 °C. Temperature-dependent IFN induction in response to rhinovirus was dependent on the MAVS protein, a key signaling adaptor of the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs). Stimulation of primary airway cells with the synthetic RLR ligand poly I:C led to greater IFN induction at 37 °C relative to 33 °C at early time points poststimulation and to a sustained increase in the induction of ISGs at 37 °C relative to 33 °C. Recombinant type I IFN also stimulated more robust induction of ISGs at 37 °C than at 33 °C. Genetic deficiency of MAVS or the type I IFN receptor in infected airway cells permitted higher levels of viral replication, particularly at 37 °C, and partially rescued the temperature-dependent growth phenotype. These findings demonstrate that in mouse airway cells, rhinovirus replicates preferentially at nasal cavity temperature due, in part, to a less efficient antiviral defense response of infected cells at cool temperature.

  5. Temperature dependence of elastic and strength properties of T300/5208 graphite-epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milkovich, S. M.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the elastic and strength properties of T300/5208 graphite-epoxy at room temperature, 116K (-250 F), and 394K (+250 F). Results are presented for unidirectional 0, 90, and 45 degree laminates, and + or - 30, + or - 45, and + or - 60 degree angle-ply laminates. The stress-strain behavior of the 0 and 90 degree laminates is essentially linear for all three temperatures and that the stress-strain behavior of all other laminates is linear at 116K. A second-order curve provides the best fit for the temperature is linear at 116K. A second-order curve provides the best fit for the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus of all laminates and for the principal shear modulus. Poisson's ratio appears to vary linearly with temperature. all moduli decrease with increasing temperature except for E (sub 1) which exhibits a small increase. The strength temperature dependence is also quadratic for all laminates except the 0 degree - laminate which exhibits linear temperature dependence. In many cases the temperature dependence of properties is nearly linear.

  6. Accelerated life testing and temperature dependence of device characteristics in GaAs CHFET devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallegos, M.; Leon, R.; Vu, D. T.; Okuno, J.; Johnson, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Accelerated life testing of GaAs complementary heterojunction field effect transistors (CHFET) was carried out. Temperature dependence of single and synchronous rectifier CHFET device characteristics were also obtained.

  7. Temperature dependence of the switching field in all-perpendicular spin-valve nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopman, D. B.; Bedau, D.; Wolf, G.; Mangin, S.; Fullerton, E. E.; Katine, J. A.; Kent, A. D.

    2013-09-01

    We present temperature dependent switching measurements of the Co/Ni multilayered free element of 75-nm-diameter spin-valve nanopillars. Angular dependent hysteresis measurements as well as switching field measurements taken at low temperature are in agreement with a model of thermal activation over a perpendicular anisotropy barrier. However, the statistics of switching (i.e. the mean switching field and the variance of the switching field distribution) from 20 up to 400 K are in disagreement with a Néel-Brown model that assumes a temperature independent barrier height and anisotropy field. We introduce a modified Néel-Brown model that fits the experimental data in which we attribute a T3/2 dependence to the barrier height and the anisotropy field due to the temperature dependent magnetization and anisotropy energy.

  8. Extending the nonequilibrium square-gradient model with temperature-dependent influence parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnanelli, Elisa; Wilhelmsen, Øivind; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2014-09-01

    Nonequilibrium interface phenomena play a key role in crystallization, hydrate formation, pipeline depressurization, and a multitude of other examples. Square gradient theory extended to the nonequilibrium domain is a powerful tool for understanding these processes. The theory gives an accurate prediction of surface tension at equilibrium, only with temperature-dependent influence parameters. We extend in this work the nonequilibrium square gradient model to have temperature-dependent influence parameters. The extension leads to thermodynamic quantities which depend on temperature gradients. Remarkably the Gibbs relation proposed in earlier work is still valid. Also for the extended framework, the "Gibbs surface" described by excess variables is found to be in local equilibrium. The temperature-dependent influence parameters give significantly different interface resistivities (˜9%-50%), due to changed density gradients and additional terms in the enthalpy. The presented framework facilitates a more accurate description of transport across interfaces with square gradient theory.

  9. Temperature dependence of the spin relaxation in highly degenerate ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Prestgard, M. C.; Siegel, G.; Tiwari, A.; Roundy, R.; Raikh, M.

    2015-02-28

    Zinc oxide is considered a potential candidate for fabricating next-generation transparent spintronic devices. However, before this can be achieved, a thorough scientific understanding of the various spin transport and relaxation processes undergone in this material is essential. In the present paper, we are reporting our investigations into these processes via temperature dependent Hanle experiments. ZnO thin films were deposited on c-axis sapphire substrates using a pulsed laser deposition technique. Careful structural, optical, and electrical characterizations of the films were performed. Temperature dependent non-local Hanle measurements were carried out using an all-electrical scheme for spin injection and detection over the temperature range of 20–300 K. From the Hanle data, spin relaxation time in the films was determined at different temperatures. A detailed analysis of the data showed that the temperature dependence of spin relaxation time follows the linear-in-momentum Dyakonov-Perel mechanism.

  10. Dependence of Curie temperature on Pt layer thickness in Co/Pt system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Obinata, A.; Hibino, Y.; Hirohata, A.; Kuerbanjiang, B.; Lazarov, V. K.; Chiba, D.

    2015-03-01

    The Pt thickness dependence of the Curie temperature of perpendicularly magnetized ultra-thin (Pt/)Co/Pt films has been investigated by magnetization measurements. The Curie temperature and the saturation magnetic moment increase with the Co layer thickness and even with the Pt layer thickness. The Curie temperature is found to have linear dependence on the total magnetic moment of the system and the coefficients of the linear fits are almost identical, regardless of whether the thicknesses of the ferromagnetic Co layer or the Pt layer are varied. The Curie temperature also increases with the magnetic anisotropy, but no systematic dependence is observed. These results suggest that the magnetic moment induced in the Pt layer by the ferromagnetic proximity effect plays a significant role in determining the Curie temperatures of such two-dimensional ferromagnetic systems.

  11. Temperature dependence and mechanism of the reaction between O(3P) and chlorine dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colussi, A. J.; Sander, S. P.; Fiedl, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Second-order rate constants for the decay of O(3P) in excess chlorine dioxide, k(II), were measured as a function of total pressure (20-600 Torr argon) and temperature (248-312 K), using flash photolysis-atomic resonance fluorescence. Results indicate that k(II) is pressure dependent with a value, K(b), that is nonzero at zero pressure, and both the third-order rate constant and k(b) have negative temperature dependences.

  12. Dependence of Expansion of a Salt-Saturated Concrete on Temperature and Mixing and Handling Procedures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    experiments with an expansive salt -saturated concrete (ESC), time of setting was controlled by amount of sodium citrate used. ’The rheological and physical...A-Alas 6 DEPENDENCE OF EXPANSION OF R SALT -SATURATED CONCRETE ON l1𔃻 TEMPERATURE AND N.. (U) ARMY ENGINEER IIATERWRYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG...TECHNICAL REPORT SL-87-20 DEPENDENCE OF EXPANSION OF A -- SALT -SATURATED CONCRETE ON TEMPERATURE AND MIXING AND HANDLING PROCEDURES by cc = Lillian D

  13. Irradiance and Temperature Dependence of Photo-Induced Orientation in Two Azobenzene-Based Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-23

    and Almeria Natansohn* Department of Chemistry, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 Paul Rochon Department of Physics, Royal Military...1. IRRADIANCE AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF PHOTO-INDUCED ORIENTATION IN TWO AZOBENZENE-BASED POLYMERS Dennis Hore and Almeria Natansohn...IRRADIANCE AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF PHOTO-INDUCED ORIENTATION IN TWO AZOBENZENE-BASED POLYMERS Dennis Hore and Almeria Natansohn Department of

  14. Temperature dependent coercivity crossover in pseudo-spin-valve magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, G.; Wu, H. C.; Feng, J. F.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2011-07-01

    We report the temperature dependent collapse of tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in perpendicular anisotropy magnetic tunnel junctions (pMTJs) with AlOx barriers and (Co/Pt)3 multilayer electrodes, due to the coercivity crossover of the top and bottom (Co/Pt)3 stacks. The different temperature dependence of two (Co/Pt)3 stacks in pMTJs is mainly caused by the additional perpendicular anisotropy created at interface between the ferromagnetic electrode and the AlOx barrier.

  15. Temperature-dependent nonlinear Hall effect in macroscopic Si-MOS antidot array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntsevich, A. Yu.; Shupletsov, A. V.; Nunuparov, M. S.

    2016-05-01

    By measuring magnetoresistance and the Hall effect in a classically moderate perpendicular magnetic field in a Si-MOSFET-type macroscopic antidot array, we found a nonlinear with field, temperature- and density-dependent Hall resistivity. We argue that this nonlinearity originates from low mobility shells of the antidots with a strong temperature dependence of the resistivity and suggest a qualitative explanation of the phenomenon.

  16. Dependence of the brillouin frequency shift on strain and temperature in a photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lufan; Bao, Xiaoyi; Afshar V, Shahraam; Chen, Liang

    2004-07-01

    The dependence of the Brillouin frequency shift on strain in a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) was measured at a wavelength of 1320 nm for the first time to the authors' knowledge. Together with measurements of the dependence of the Brillouin frequency shift on temperature in the PCF, we demonstrate the feasibility of the highly precise simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain by use of the PCF in a distributed Brillouin sensing system with a spatial resolution of 15 cm.

  17. The Methanol Multibeam Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James A.; Cohen, R. J.; Caswell, J. L.; Fuller, G. A.; Brooks, K.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.; Diamond, P. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Hoare, M. G.; Masheder, M. R. W.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Phillips, C.; Quinn, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M.; Walsh, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Wong-McSweeney, D.; Yates, J. A.; Cox, J.

    2007-03-01

    A new 7-beam methanol multibeam receiver is being used to survey the Galaxy for newly forming massive stars, that are pinpointed by strong methanol maser emission at 6.668 GHz. The receiver, jointly constructed by Jodrell Bank Observatory (JBO) and the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), was successfully commissioned at Parkes in January 2006. The Parkes-Jodrell survey of the Milky Way for methanol masers is two orders of magnitude faster than previous systematic surveys using 30-m class dishes, and is the first systematic survey of the entire Galactic plane. The first 53 days of observations with the Parkes telescope have yielded 518 methanol sources, of which 218 are new discoveries. We present the survey methodology as well as preliminary results and analysis.

  18. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  19. Low-temperature conversion of methane to methanol on CeOx/Cu2O catalysts: Water controlled activation of the C–H Bond

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Zhijun; Ramírez, Pedro J.; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Liu, Ping; Rodriguez, Jose A.

    2016-10-10

    Here, an inverse CeO2/Cu2O/Cu(111) catalyst is able to activate methane at room temperature producing C, CHx fragments and COx species on the oxide surface. The addition of water to the system leads to a drastic change in the selectivity of methane activation yielding only adsorbed CHx fragments. At a temperature of 450 K, in the presence of water, a CH4 → CH3OH catalytic transformation occurs with a high selectivity. OH groups formed by the dissociation of water saturate the catalyst surface, removing sites that could decompose CHx fragments, and generating centers on which methane can directly interact to yield methanol.

  20. Temperature-dependent isovector pairing gap equations using a path integral approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fellah, M.; Allal, N. H.; Belabbas, M.; Oudih, M. R.; Benhamouda, N.

    2007-10-15

    Temperature-dependent isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing gap equations have been established by means of the path integral approach. These equations generalize the BCS ones for the pairing between like particles at finite temperature. The method has been numerically tested using the one-level model. It has been shown that the gap parameter {delta}{sub np} has a behavior analogous to that of {delta}{sub nn} and {delta}{sub pp} as a function of the temperature: one notes the presence of a critical temperature. Moreover, it has been shown that the isovector pairing effects remain beyond the critical temperature that corresponds to the pairing between like particles.

  1. Temperature dependence of a diode-pumped cryogenic Er:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Ter-Gabrielyan, Nikolay; Dubinskii, Mark; Newburgh, G Alex; Michael, Arockiasamy; Merkle, Larry D

    2009-04-27

    We report the laser performance of resonantly diode-pumped Er:YAG from liquid nitrogen temperature to above room temperature. Relative to incident pump power, the best performance was observed at approximately 160 K. Spectroscopy and modeling show that this is due primarily to the changing efficiency of diode pump absorption as the absorption lines broaden with temperature. However, the physics of the Er:YAG system indicates that even with arbitrarily narrow pump linewidth the most efficient laser performance should occur at a temperature somewhat above 77 K. The causes of the temperature dependence are at least qualitatively understood.

  2. Temperature Dependence of Rheology and Polymer Diffusion in Silica/Polystyrene Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Wei-Shao; Clarke, Nigel; Composto, Russell; Meth, Jeffrey; Winey, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Time-temperature superposition using the WLF equation is well-established for both the zero shear viscosity and the polymer diffusion coefficient in homopolymer melts. This talk will present the temperature-dependence of polymer dynamics in polymer nanocomposites comprised of polystyrene and phenyl-capped silica nanoparticles (0 - 50 vol%). The WLF equation fits the temperature dependence of the tracer polymer diffusion coefficient and the fitting parameter (B/fo) decreases smoothly with nanoparticle concentration suggesting an increase in the thermal expansion coefficient for the free volume. The WLF equation also fits the temperature dependence of the zero shear viscosity from oscillatory shear experiments, although the fitting parameter (B/fo) increases substantially with nanoparticle concentration. This discrepancy between the diffusion and rheology will be discussed with respect to the reptation model, which predicts that the temperature dependence of polymer diffusion depends predominately on the temperature dependence of local viscosity, and the elastic response in nanocomposites. National Science Foundation DMR-12-10379.

  3. Thermodynamic properties of direct methanol polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Ji Yun; Bae, Young Chan; Sun, Yang Kook

    A new semi-empirical model is established to describe the cell voltage of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) as a function of current density. The model equation is validated experimental data over a wide range of a methanol concentration and temperatures. A number of existing models are semi-empirical. They, however, have a serious mathematical defect. When the current density, j, becomes zero, the equation should reduce to the open circuit voltage, E0. These models, however, do not meet the mathematical boundary condition. The proposed model focuses on very unfavorable conditions for the cell operation, i.e. low methanol solution concentrations and relatively low cell temperatures. A newly developed semi-empirical equation with reasonable boundary conditions includes the methanol crossover effect that plays a major role in determining the cell voltage of DMFC. Also, it contains methanol activity based on thermodynamic functions to represent methanol crossover effect.

  4. ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta4 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library.

    SciTech Connect

    CULLEN, D. E.

    2011-07-22

    Version 00 As distributed, the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature at 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures—1, 10, and 100 eV; and 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy.

  5. ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta4 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library.

    SciTech Connect

    DERMOTT,; CULLEN, E.

    2008-12-03

    Version 00 As distributed, the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature at 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures—1, 10, and 100 eV; and 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy.

  6. ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta4 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library.

    SciTech Connect

    CULLEN, D. E.

    2011-11-13

    Version 01 As distributed, the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature at 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures—1, 10, and 100 eV; and 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy.

  7. Temperature Dependence of Brillouin Light Scattering Spectra of Acoustic Phonons in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, Kevin; Klimovich, Nikita; An, Kyongmo; Sullivan, Sean; Weathers, Annie; Shi, Li; Li, Xiaoqin

    2015-03-01

    Thermal management represents an outstanding challenge in many areas of technology. Electrons, optical phonons, and acoustic phonons are often driven out of local equilibrium in electronic devices or during laser-material interaction processes. Interest in non-equilibrium transport processes has motivated the development of Raman spectroscopy as a local temperature sensor of optical phonons and intermediate frequency acoustic phonons, whereas Brillouin light scattering (BLS) has recently been explored as a temperature sensor of low-frequency acoustic phonons. Here, we report temperature dependent BLS spectra of silicon, with Raman spectra taken simultaneously for comparison. The origins of the observed temperature dependence of the BLS peak position, linewidth, and intensity are examined in order to evaluate their potential use as temperature sensors for acoustic phonons. We determine that the integrated BLS intensity can be used measure the temperature of specific acoustic phonon modes. This work is supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) Thermal Transport Processes Program under Grant CBET-1336968.

  8. Evidence for quantum tunneling of vortices in superconductors. [Temperature dependence in low magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Haviland, D.B.; Glazman, L.I.; Goldman, A.M. )

    1992-10-01

    Flux creep in disordered superconductors may be governed by quantum tunneling of Abrikosov vortices rather than by thermal activation processes. The expectation is that in the quantum tunneling regime the creep rate would be temperature independent. This assumes that the parameters describing the pinning potential and other aspects of the superconducting films are temperature independent. In the case of extremely thin superconducting films the coherence length retains its temperature dependence well into the quantum tunneling regime, leading to an unusual temperature dependence of the electrical resistance in this regime. This was observed in ultrathin superconducting films of Pb, Al, and Bi. In low magnetic fields, at low temperatures, sheet resistances vary with temperature as R [approx] R[sub 0] exp(T/T[sub 0]), where T[sub 0] and R[sub 0] are constants.

  9. Temperature-dependent magnetostriction as the key factor for martensite reorientation in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'vov, Victor A.; Kosogor, Anna

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic field application leads to spatially inhomogeneous magnetostriction of twinned ferromagnetic martensite. When the increasing field and magnetostrictive strain reach certain threshold values, the motion of twin boundaries and magnetically induced reorientation (MIR) of twinned martensite start. The MIR leads to giant magnetically induced deformation of twinned martensite. In the present article, the threshold field (TF) and temperature range of observability of MIR were calculated for the Ni-Mn-Ga martensite assuming that the threshold strain (TS) is temperature-independent. The calculations show that if the TS is of the order of 10-4, the TF strongly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed only above the limiting temperature (~220 K). If the TS is of the order of 10-6, the TF weakly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed at extremely low temperatures. The obtained theoretical results are in agreement with available experimental data.

  10. In-vitro study of the temperature dependence of the optoacoustic conversion efficiency in biological tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, S M; Khokhlova, Tanya D; Pelivanov, Ivan M

    2012-03-31

    The applicability of the optoacoustic (OA) method for monitoring temperature during thermal impact on biological tissues is studied experimentally. Tissues under study were chicken breast (as a model of muscle), porcine lard (as a model of fatty tissue) and porcine liver (as a model of richly perfused tissue). The temperature dependences of the amplitude of the OA signals excited in biological tissues were measured in-vitro in the temperature range of 20 - 80 Degree-Sign C under the narrow laser beam conditions. Measurements were performed in two regimes: during heating and cooling. Similarities and differences in the behaviour of the dependences in different temperature ranges associated with different structural composition of the samples were obtained. The accuracy of temperature reconstruction from experimental data for the investigated tissue types was evaluated. It is shown that during tissue coagulation its temperature can be determined with an accuracy of about 1 Degree-Sign C.

  11. [On peculiarities of temperature dependences of water spectra in the terahertz frequency domain].

    PubMed

    Penkov, N V; Yashin, V A; Shvirst, N E; Fesenko, E E; Fesenko, E E

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed spectra of light and heavy water at temperatures from 4 up to 50 degrees C in a frequency range of 0.15 to 6.5 THz. It was shown that the amplitude of high-frequency relaxation absorption band with its maximum at 0.5 THz extends with increasing, temperature and this temperature dependence for light water has a marked feature at 35-40 degrees C as a sharp growth. This fact is noteworthy because this range corresponds to physiological values of a body temperature of the warm-blooded organisms. At the same time, the analogous temperature dependence for heavy water in the considered temperature range lacks this particular feature. Thus, the water with its properties differs significantly not only from other fluids, but also from its own isotopologues.

  12. Experimental investigation of the factors influencing temperature dependence of radiation-induced attenuation in optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jing; Xu, Raomei; Liu, Jixun; Song, Ningfang

    2014-03-01

    The effects of transmission wavelength, total dose and light source power on temperature dependence of radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) in Ge-P co-doped fibers were investigated. Three fibers irradiated up to total dose of 100 Gy and 10,000 Gy were used as test samples. A test system for temperature dependence of RIA was built up. The influence of transmission wavelength, total dose and light power on temperature sensitivity and linearity of RIA in three irradiated fibers were researched. The test results show that temperature sensitivity and linearity of RIA in optical fibers could be improved by adjusting total dose and selecting transmission wavelength. The light source power does not have obvious influence on temperature sensitivity and linearity. The Ge-P co-doped fiber at 850 nm transmission wavelength with higher total dose is a very promising candidate for fiber-optic temperature sensor.

  13. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties of individual glass spherules, Apollo 11, 12, and 14 lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, A. N.; Sullivan, S.; Alexander, C. C.; Senftle, F. E.; Dwornik, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility of 11 glass spherules from the Apollo 14 lunar fines have been measured from room temperature to 4 K. Data taken at room temperature, 77 K, and 4.2 K, show that the soft saturation magnetization was temperature independent. In the temperature range 300 to 77 K the temperature-dependent component of the magnetic susceptibility obeys the Curie law. Susceptibility measurements on these same specimens and in addition 14 similar spherules from the Apollo 11 and 12 mission show a Curie-Weiss relation at temperatures less than 77 K with a Weiss temperature of 3-7 degrees in contrast to 2-3 degrees found for tektites and synthetic glasses of tektite composition. A proposed model and a theoretical expression closely predict the variation of the susceptibility of the glass spherules with temperature.

  14. New precise determination of the high temperature unusual temperature dependent thermopower of liquid divalent cadmium and zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordanengo, B.; Ben Moussa, A.; Makradi, A.; Chaaba, H.; Gasser, J.-G.

    2000-04-01

    We do not know any precise measurement of the absolute thermopower (ATP) of liquid cadmium and zinc at high temperatures. For liquid cadmium, there are, in the literature, apparent contradictory results. Bath and Kliem and North and Wagner observed that the ATP increases with temperature between 350 °C and 650 °C, but Bradley observed the opposite behaviour between 600 °C and 750 °C. In this work we measured accurately the absolute thermopower of liquid cadmium from the melting point up to 900 °C. We find a maximum around 520 °C, and then the thermopower decreases down to a surprising negative value. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such an unusual behaviour is reported. Nevertheless, it is qualitatively consistent with all the authors mentioned and the apparent contradictory results should only be due to the different temperature ranges of measurements. Using the ATP expression from the Faber-Ziman formalism, we can fit very well the experimental absolute thermopower versus temperature curve with only one adjustable parameter. For this, we have considered that the temperature dependence of the ATP is dominated by the resistivity, and we have introduced the experimental resistivity temperature dependence in the ATP expression. The very good fitting quality demonstrates that our hypothesis is consistent. In contrast, the liquid zinc ATP only increases with temperature. Nevertheless, near 1100 °C, the highest temperature achieved, it shows saturation that may be an indication of a decrease at higher temperature. The same type of fitting gives also quite good results.

  15. The Asian methanol market

    SciTech Connect

    Nagase, Hideki

    1995-12-31

    For the purpose of this presentation, Asia has been broadly defined as a total of 15 countries, namely Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Myanmar, India, Vietnam, Australia and New Zealand. In 1994 and the first half of 1995, the methanol industry and its derivative industries experienced hard time, because of extraordinarily high methanol prices. In spite of this circumstance, methanol demand in Asian countries has been growing steadily and remarkably, following Asian high economic growth. Most of this growth in demand has been and will continue to be met by outside supply. However, even with increased import of methanol from outside of Asia, as a result of this growth, Asian trade volume will be much larger in the coming years. Asian countries must turn their collective attention to making logistics and transportation for methanol and its derivatives more efficient in the Asian region to make better use of existing supply resources. The author reviews current economic growth as his main topic, and explains the forecast of the growth of methanol demand and supply in Asian countries in the near future.

  16. THE TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE EMISSION OF PERCHLORO- ETHYLENE FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to evaluate the emission of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from freshly dry cleaned fabrics using small environmental test chambers. The temperature dependence of the release of perchloroethylene was evaluated over a temperature range of 20 to 45°C....

  17. Universality of temperature-dependent effects in finite many-fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civitarese, O.; Dussel, G. G.; Zuker, A. P.

    1989-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the specific heat for a finite system of fermions is investigated for some simple models. It is found that finite-size effects produce a maximum in the specific heat at a temperature Tc that has a universal value when scaled by the appropriate characteristic energy.

  18. Temperature Dependence of the Radio-Frequency Dielectric Properties of Chicken Meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric properties of chicken breast meat were measured with an open-ended coaxial-line probe between 200 MHz and 20 GHz at temperature ranging from -20 oC to +25 oC. At a given frequency, the temperature dependence reveals a sharp increase of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss factor a...

  19. Temperature Dependence of Attenuation of Coplanar Waveguide on 4H High Resistivity SIC Through 540C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G. E.; Schwartz, Z.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Downey, A. N.; Freeman, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    For the first time, the temperature and frequency dependence of the attenuation of a Coplanar Waveguide (CPW) on 4H, High Resistivity Sic substrate is reported. The low frequency attenuation increases by 2 dB/cm at 500 C and the high frequency attenuation increases by 3.3 dB/cm at 500 C compared to room temperature.

  20. Temperature dependence of magnetically induced deformation of Ni-Mn-Ga martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Vov, V. A.; Glavatska, N.; Aaltio, I.; Söderberg, O.; Glavatskiy, I.; Hannula, S.-P.

    2008-05-01

    In the present work the contributions of the temperature-dependent (i) crystal lattice parameters (related to the magnetic anisotropy energy), (ii) Young's modulus, (iii) saturation magnetization and (iv) thermal fluctuations of the microstress to the temperature dependence of the magnetic field induced strain (MFIS) in Ni-Mn-Ga martensite are considered in the framework of a statistical model. Both individual and cooperative effects of these factors on the achievable MFIS value and on the characteristic values of the magnetic fields, which trigger and saturate MFIS, are estimated. It is shown that all the factors affect both the achievable MFIS value and characteristic fields under the real experimental conditions, and none of them can be neglected in the quantitative theoretical analysis of the experimental strain-field dependencies obtained for different temperature values. In addition, the influence of specimen shape on the characteristic fields is illustrated for different temperature values. For the available experimental dependencies (i) (iii) and the reasonable set of model parameters the switching magnetic field proved to be equal to 160 kA/m when the temperature was by 15 K below the martensite start temperature and raised to 320 kA/m when the temperature was by 45 K below the martensite start temperature. Obtained results agree with the experimental data reported by O. Heczko and L. Straka, in J. Appl. Phys. 94, 7139 (2003).