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Sample records for methionine adenosyltransferase 1a

  1. Molecular genetics of hepatic methionine adenosyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chou, J Y

    2000-01-01

    Hepatic methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) deficiency is caused by mutations in the human MAT1A gene that abolish or reduce hepatic MAT activity that catalyzes the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine from methionine and ATP. This genetic disorder is characterized by isolated persistent hypermethioninemia in the absence of cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency, tyrosinemia, or liver disease. Depending on the nature of the genetic defect, hepatic MAT deficiency can be transmitted either as an autosomal recessive or dominant trait. Genetic analyses have revealed that mutations identified in the MAT1A gene only partially inactivate enzymatic activity, which is consistent with the fact that most hepatic MAT-deficient individuals are clinically well. Two hypermethioninemic individuals with null MAT1A mutations have developed neurological problems, including brain demyelination, although this correlation is by no means absolute. Presently, it is recommended that a DNA-based diagnosis should be performed for isolated hypermethioninemic individuals with unusually high plasma methionine levels to assess if therapy aimed at the prevention of neurological manifestations is warranted.

  2. Transsulfuration in an adult with hepatic methionine adenosyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Gahl, W A; Bernardini, I; Finkelstein, J D; Tangerman, A; Martin, J J; Blom, H J; Mullen, K D; Mudd, S H

    1988-01-01

    We investigated sulfur and methyl group metabolism in a 31-yr-old man with partial hepatic methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) deficiency. The patient's cultured fibroblasts and erythrocytes had normal MAT activity. Hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) was slightly decreased. This clinically normal individual lives with a 20-30-fold elevation of plasma methionine (0.72 mM). He excretes in his urine methionine and L-methionine-d-sulfoxide (2.7 mmol/d), a mixed disulfide of methanethiol and a thiol bound to an unidentified group X, which we abbreviate CH3S-SX (2.1 mmol/d), and smaller quantities of 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyrate and 3-methylthiopropionate. His breath contains 17-fold normal concentrations of dimethylsulfide. He converts only 6-7 mmol/d of methionine sulfur to inorganic sulfate. This abnormally low rate is due not to a decreased flux through the primarily defective enzyme, MAT, since SAM is produced at an essentially normal rate of 18 mmol/d, but rather to a rate of homocysteine methylation which is abnormally high in the face of the very elevated methionine concentrations demonstrated in this patient. These findings support the view that SAM (which is marginally low in this patient) is an important regulator that helps to determine the partitioning of homocysteine between degradation via cystathionine and conservation by reformation of methionine. In addition, these studies demonstrate that the methionine transamination pathway operates in the presence of an elevated body load of that amino acid in human beings, but is not sufficient to maintain methionine levels in a normal range. PMID:3339126

  3. Refolding and characterization of methionine adenosyltransferase from Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Francisco; Estrela, Sylvie; Alves, Claudia; Sánchez-Pérez, Gabino F; Sillero, Antonio; Pajares, María A

    2011-09-01

    Methionine adenosyltransferase from Euglena gracilis (MATX) is a recently discovered member of the MAT family of proteins that synthesize S-adenosylmethionine. Heterologous overexpression of MATX in Escherichia coli rendered the protein mostly in inclusion bodies under all conditions tested. Therefore, a refolding and purification procedure from these aggregates was developed to characterize the enzyme. Maximal recovery was obtained using inclusion bodies devoid of extraneous proteins by washing under mild urea (2M) and detergent (5%) concentrations. Refolding was achieved in two steps following solubilization in the presence of Mg(2+); chaotrope dilution to <1M and dialysis under reducing conditions. Purified MATX is a homodimer that exhibits Michaelis kinetics with a V(max) of 1.46 μmol/min/mg and K(m) values of approximately 85 and 260 μM for methionine and ATP, respectively. The activity is dependent on Mg(2+) and K(+) ions, but is not stimulated by dimethylsulfoxide. MATX exhibits tripolyphosphatase activity that is stimulated in the presence of S-adenosylmethionine. Far-UV circular dichroism revealed β-sheet and random coil as the main secondary structure elements of the protein. The high level of sequence conservation allowed construction of a structural model that preserved the main features of the MAT family, the major changes involving the N-terminal domain.

  4. The Oncogene PDRG1 Is an Interaction Target of Methionine Adenosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Francisco; Reytor, Edel; Portillo, Francisco; Pajares, María A.

    2016-01-01

    Methionine adenosyltransferases MAT I and MAT III (encoded by Mat1a) catalyze S-adenosylmethionine synthesis in normal liver. Major hepatic diseases concur with reduced levels of this essential methyl donor, which are primarily due to an expression switch from Mat1a towards Mat2a. Additional changes in the association state and even in subcellular localization of these isoenzymes are also detected. All these alterations result in a reduced content of the moderate (MAT I) and high Vmax (MAT III) isoenzymes, whereas the low Vmax (MAT II) isoenzyme increases and nuclear accumulation of MAT I is observed. These changes derive in a reduced availability of cytoplasmic S-adenosylmethionine, together with an effort to meet its needs in the nucleus of damaged cells, rendering enhanced levels of certain epigenetic modifications. In this context, the putative role of protein-protein interactions in the control of S-adenosylmethionine synthesis has been scarcely studied. Using yeast two hybrid and a rat liver library we identified PDRG1 as an interaction target for MATα1 (catalytic subunit of MAT I and MAT III), further confirmation being obtained by immunoprecipitation and pull-down assays. Nuclear MATα interacts physically and functionally with the PDRG1 oncogene, resulting in reduced DNA methylation levels. Increased Pdrg1 expression is detected in acute liver injury and hepatoma cells, together with decreased Mat1a expression and nuclear accumulation of MATα1. Silencing of Pdrg1 expression in hepatoma cells alters their steady-state expression profile on microarrays, downregulating genes associated with tumor progression according to GO pathway analysis. Altogether, the results unveil the role of PDRG1 in the control of the nuclear methylation status through methionine adenosyltransferase binding and its putative collaboration in the progression of hepatic diseases. PMID:27548429

  5. The Oncogene PDRG1 Is an Interaction Target of Methionine Adenosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Claudia; Pérez-Zúñiga, Francisco J; Garrido, Francisco; Reytor, Edel; Portillo, Francisco; Pajares, María A

    2016-01-01

    Methionine adenosyltransferases MAT I and MAT III (encoded by Mat1a) catalyze S-adenosylmethionine synthesis in normal liver. Major hepatic diseases concur with reduced levels of this essential methyl donor, which are primarily due to an expression switch from Mat1a towards Mat2a. Additional changes in the association state and even in subcellular localization of these isoenzymes are also detected. All these alterations result in a reduced content of the moderate (MAT I) and high Vmax (MAT III) isoenzymes, whereas the low Vmax (MAT II) isoenzyme increases and nuclear accumulation of MAT I is observed. These changes derive in a reduced availability of cytoplasmic S-adenosylmethionine, together with an effort to meet its needs in the nucleus of damaged cells, rendering enhanced levels of certain epigenetic modifications. In this context, the putative role of protein-protein interactions in the control of S-adenosylmethionine synthesis has been scarcely studied. Using yeast two hybrid and a rat liver library we identified PDRG1 as an interaction target for MATα1 (catalytic subunit of MAT I and MAT III), further confirmation being obtained by immunoprecipitation and pull-down assays. Nuclear MATα interacts physically and functionally with the PDRG1 oncogene, resulting in reduced DNA methylation levels. Increased Pdrg1 expression is detected in acute liver injury and hepatoma cells, together with decreased Mat1a expression and nuclear accumulation of MATα1. Silencing of Pdrg1 expression in hepatoma cells alters their steady-state expression profile on microarrays, downregulating genes associated with tumor progression according to GO pathway analysis. Altogether, the results unveil the role of PDRG1 in the control of the nuclear methylation status through methionine adenosyltransferase binding and its putative collaboration in the progression of hepatic diseases. PMID:27548429

  6. Maternal methionine adenosyltransferase I/III deficiency: reproductive outcomes in a woman with four pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Mudd, S H; Tangerman, A; Stabler, S P; Allen, R H; Wagner, C; Zeisel, S H; Levy, H L

    2003-01-01

    Four pregnancies in a women with moderately severe deficiency of methionine adenosyltransferase I/III (MAT I/III) activity are reported. She is an apparent homozygote for a point mutation in MAT1A, the gene that encodes the catalytically active subunit of MAT I/III. This mutation reduces the activity of her expressed enzyme to some 11% of wild-type. She was the first such individual identified in the United States, and these are the first pregnancies known in anyone with this extent of MAT I/III deficiency. No adverse effects were noted in the mother. Three normal babies resulted, but fetal arrest was detected in one embryo at 10-11 weeks gestation. Plasma methionine concentrations remained virtually constant at their elevated levels of 300-350 micromol/L throughout the pregnancies. Plasma free choline was below the reference range. In view of the evidence that maternal choline delivery to the fetus is important for brain development, it was suggested the patient ingest two eggs daily from gestation week 17. Plasma choline and phosphatidylcholine tended to rise during such supplementation. Plasma cystathionine concentrations rose progressively to far above normal during these pregnancies, but not during pregnancies in control women. This may be explained by delivery of excessive methionine to the fetus, with consequent increased cystathionine synthesis by fetal tissues. Because fetal tissues lack gamma-cystathionase, presumably cystathionine accumulated abnormally in the fetus and was transferred in abnormal amounts back to the mother. Plasma and urinary concentrations of methionine transamination metabolites rose during pregnancy for reasons that remain obscure.

  7. Crystallography captures catalytic steps in human methionine adenosyltransferase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Murray, Ben; Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Marina, Alberto; Lu, Shelly C; Mato, Jose M; Hasnain, S Samar; Rojas, Adriana L

    2016-02-23

    The principal methyl donor of the cell, S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), is produced by the highly conserved family of methionine adenosyltranferases (MATs) via an ATP-driven process. These enzymes play an important role in the preservation of life, and their dysregulation has been tightly linked to liver and colon cancers. We present crystal structures of human MATα2 containing various bound ligands, providing a "structural movie" of the catalytic steps. High- to atomic-resolution structures reveal the structural elements of the enzyme involved in utilization of the substrates methionine and adenosine and in formation of the product SAMe. MAT enzymes are also able to produce S-adenosylethionine (SAE) from substrate ethionine. Ethionine, an S-ethyl analog of the amino acid methionine, is known to induce steatosis and pancreatitis. We show that SAE occupies the active site in a manner similar to SAMe, confirming that ethionine also uses the same catalytic site to form the product SAE.

  8. Crystallography captures catalytic steps in human methionine adenosyltransferase enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Ben; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Marina, Alberto; Lu, Shelly C.; Mato, Jose M.; Hasnain, S. Samar; Rojas, Adriana L.

    2016-01-01

    The principal methyl donor of the cell, S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), is produced by the highly conserved family of methionine adenosyltranferases (MATs) via an ATP-driven process. These enzymes play an important role in the preservation of life, and their dysregulation has been tightly linked to liver and colon cancers. We present crystal structures of human MATα2 containing various bound ligands, providing a “structural movie” of the catalytic steps. High- to atomic-resolution structures reveal the structural elements of the enzyme involved in utilization of the substrates methionine and adenosine and in formation of the product SAMe. MAT enzymes are also able to produce S-adenosylethionine (SAE) from substrate ethionine. Ethionine, an S-ethyl analog of the amino acid methionine, is known to induce steatosis and pancreatitis. We show that SAE occupies the active site in a manner similar to SAMe, confirming that ethionine also uses the same catalytic site to form the product SAE. PMID:26858410

  9. Polyamine and methionine adenosyltransferase 2A crosstalk in human colon and liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, Maria Lauda; Ryoo, Minjung; Skay, Anna; Tomasi, Ivan; Giordano, Pasquale; Mato, José M.; Lu, Shelly C.

    2013-07-15

    Methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) is an essential enzyme that is responsible for the biosynthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), the principal methyl donor and precursor of polyamines. MAT1A is expressed in normal liver and MAT2A is expressed in all extrahepatic tissues. MAT2A expression is increased in human colon cancer and in colon cancer cells treated with mitogens, whereas silencing MAT2A resulted in apoptosis. The aim of the current work was to examine the mechanism responsible for MAT2A-dependent growth and apoptosis. We found that in RKO (human adenocarcinoma cell line) cells, MAT2A siRNA treatment lowered cellular SAMe and putrescine levels by 70–75%, increased apoptosis and inhibited growth. Putrescine supplementation blunted significantly MAT2A siRNA-induced apoptosis and growth suppression. Putrescine treatment (100 pmol/L) raised MAT2A mRNA level to 4.3-fold of control, increased the expression of c-Jun and c-Fos and binding to an AP-1 site in the human MAT2A promoter and the promoter activity. In human colon cancer specimens, the expression levels of MAT2A, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), c-Jun and c-Fos are all elevated as compared to adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Overexpression of ODC in RKO cells also raised MAT2A mRNA level and MAT2A promoter activity. ODC and MAT2A are also overexpressed in liver cancer and consistently, similar MAT2A-ODC-putrescine interactions and effects on growth and apoptosis were observed in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, there is a crosstalk between polyamines and MAT2A. Increased MAT2A expression provides more SAMe for polyamines biosynthesis; increased polyamine (putrescine in this case) can activate MAT2A at the transcriptional level. This along with increased ODC expression in cancer all feed forward to further enhance the proliferative capacity of the cancer cell. -- Highlights: • MAT2A knockdown depletes putrescine and leads to apoptosis. • Putrescine attenuates MAT2A knockdown-induced apoptosis and growth

  10. Polyamine and methionine adenosyltransferase 2A crosstalk in human colon and liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, Maria Lauda; Ryoo, Minjung; Skay, Anna; Tomasi, Ivan; Giordano, Pasquale; Mato, José M; Lu, Shelly C

    2013-07-15

    Methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) is an essential enzyme that is responsible for the biosynthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), the principal methyl donor and precursor of polyamines. MAT1A is expressed in normal liver and MAT2A is expressed in all extrahepatic tissues. MAT2A expression is increased in human colon cancer and in colon cancer cells treated with mitogens, whereas silencing MAT2A resulted in apoptosis. The aim of the current work was to examine the mechanism responsible for MAT2A-dependent growth and apoptosis. We found that in RKO (human adenocarcinoma cell line) cells, MAT2A siRNA treatment lowered cellular SAMe and putrescine levels by 70-75%, increased apoptosis and inhibited growth. Putrescine supplementation blunted significantly MAT2A siRNA-induced apoptosis and growth suppression. Putrescine treatment (100pmol/L) raised MAT2A mRNA level to 4.3-fold of control, increased the expression of c-Jun and c-Fos and binding to an AP-1 site in the human MAT2A promoter and the promoter activity. In human colon cancer specimens, the expression levels of MAT2A, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), c-Jun and c-Fos are all elevated as compared to adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Overexpression of ODC in RKO cells also raised MAT2A mRNA level and MAT2A promoter activity. ODC and MAT2A are also overexpressed in liver cancer and consistently, similar MAT2A-ODC-putrescine interactions and effects on growth and apoptosis were observed in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, there is a crosstalk between polyamines and MAT2A. Increased MAT2A expression provides more SAMe for polyamines biosynthesis; increased polyamine (putrescine in this case) can activate MAT2A at the transcriptional level. This along with increased ODC expression in cancer all feed forward to further enhance the proliferative capacity of the cancer cell.

  11. Spectrum of mutations associated with methionine adenosyltransferase I/III deficiency among individuals identified during newborn screening in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Toju; Furujo, Mahoko

    2013-12-01

    Methionine adenosyltransferase I/III deficiency (MAT I/III deficiency) is an inborn error of metabolism that results in isolated persistent hypermethioninemia. Definitive diagnosis is now possible by molecular analyses of the MAT1A gene. Based on newborn screening (NBS) data collected between 2001 and 2012 in Hokkaido, Japan, the estimated incidence of MAT I/III deficiency was 1 in 107,850. 24 patients (13 males, 11 females) from 11 prefectures in Japan were referred to our laboratory for genetic diagnosis of MAT I/III deficiency. They were all found between 1992 and 2012 by the NBS program in each region. In these 24 individuals, we identified 12 distinct mutations; 14 patients were heterozygous for an R264H mutation; R264H caused an autosomal dominant and clinically benign phenotype in each case. The mutations in the other 10 patients showed autosomal recessive inheritance and included eight novel MAT1A mutations. Putative amino acid substitutions at R356 were observed with six alleles (three R356P, two R356Q, and one R356L). MAT I/III deficiency is not always benign because three of our cases involved brain demyelination or neurological complications. DNA testing early in life is recommended to prevent potential detrimental neurological manifestations.

  12. Determination of Autosomal Dominant or Recessive Methionine Adenosyltransferase I/III Deficiencies Based on Clinical and Molecular Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Mi; Kim, Ja Hye; Choi, Jin-Ho; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Min; Kang, Minji; Choi, In-Hee; Cheon, Chong Kun; Sohn, Young Bae; Maccarana, Marco; Yoo, Han-Wook; Lee, Beom Hee

    2016-01-01

    Methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) I/III deficiency can be inherited as autosomal dominant (AD) or as recessive (AR) traits in which mono- or biallelic MAT1A mutations have been identified, respectively. Although most patients have benign clinical outcomes, some with the AR form have neurological deficits. Here we describe 16 Korean patients with MAT I/III deficiency from 15 unrelated families identified by newborn screening. Ten probands had the AD MAT I/III deficiency, while six had AR MAT I/III deficiency. Plasma methionine (145.7 μmol/L versus 733.2 μmol/L, P < 0.05) and homocysteine levels (12.3 μmol/L versus 18.6 μmol/L, P < 0.05) were lower in the AD type than in AR type. In addition to the only reported AD MAT1A mutation, p.Arg264His, we identified two novel AD mutations, p.Arg249Gln and p.Gly280Arg. In the AR type, four previously reported and two novel mutations, p.Arg163Trp and p.Tyr335*, were identified. No exonic deletions were found by quantitative genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Three-dimensional structural prediction programs indicated that the AD-type mutations were located on the dimer interface or in the substrate binding site, hindering MAT I/III dimerization or substrate binding, respectively, whereas the AR mutations were distant from the interface or substrate binding site. These results indicate that the AD or AR MAT I/III deficiency is correlated with clinical findings, substrate levels and structural features of the mutant proteins, which is important for the neurological management and genetic counseling of the patients. PMID:26933843

  13. Equilibrium unfolding studies of the rat liver methionine adenosyltransferase III, a dimeric enzyme with intersubunit active sites.

    PubMed Central

    Gasset, María; Alfonso, Carlos; Neira, José L; Rivas, Germán; Pajares, María A

    2002-01-01

    The reversible unfolding of rat liver methionine adenosyltransferase dimer by urea under equilibrium conditions has been monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, CD, size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and enzyme activity measurements. The results obtained indicate that unfolding takes place through a three-state mechanism, involving an inactive monomeric intermediate. This intermediate has a 70% native secondary structure, binds less 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulphonic acid than the native dimer and has a sedimentation coefficient of 4.24+/-0.15. The variations of free energy in the absence of denaturant [DeltaG(H(2)O)] and its coefficients of urea dependence (m), calculated by the linear extrapolation model, were 36.15+/-2.3 kJ.mol(-1) and 19.87+/-0.71 kJ.mol(-1).M(-1) for the dissociation of the native dimer and 14.77+/-1.63 kJ.mol(-1) and 5.23+/-0.21 kJ.mol(-1).M(-1) for the unfolding of the monomeric intermediate respectively. Thus the global free energy change in the absence of denaturant and the m coefficient were calculated to be 65.69 kJ.mol(-1) and 30.33 kJ.mol(-1).M(-1) respectively. Analysis of the calculated thermodynamical parameters indicate the instability of the dimer in the presence of denaturant, and that the major exposure to the solvent is due to dimer dissociation. Finally, a minimum-folding mechanism for methionine adenosyltransferase III is established. PMID:11772402

  14. Cullin 3 targets methionine adenosyltransferase IIα for ubiquitylation-mediated degradation and regulates colorectal cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhu, Zi-Hua; Yang, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Ye; Zhao, Xiang-Ning; Zhang, Min; Liu, Ying-Bin; Xu, Ying-Ying; Lei, Qun-Ying

    2016-07-01

    Cullin 3 (CUL3) serves as a scaffold protein and assembles a large number of ubiquitin ligase complexes. It is involved in multiple cellular processes and plays a potential role in tumor development and progression. In this study, we demonstrate that CUL3 targets methionine adenosyltransferase IIα (MAT IIα) and promotes its proteasomal degradation through the ubiquitylation-mediated pathway. MAT IIα is a key enzyme in methionine metabolism and is associated with uncontrolled cell proliferation in cancer. We presently found that CUL3 down-regulation could rescue folate deprivation-induced MAT IIα exhaustion and growth arrest in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Further results from human CRC samples display an inverse correlation between CUL3 and MAT IIα protein levels. Our observations reveal a novel role of CUL3 in regulating cell proliferation by controlling the stability of MAT IIα. PMID:27213918

  15. Cullin 3 targets methionine adenosyltransferase IIα for ubiquitylation-mediated degradation and regulates colorectal cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhu, Zi-Hua; Yang, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Ye; Zhao, Xiang-Ning; Zhang, Min; Liu, Ying-Bin; Xu, Ying-Ying; Lei, Qun-Ying

    2016-07-01

    Cullin 3 (CUL3) serves as a scaffold protein and assembles a large number of ubiquitin ligase complexes. It is involved in multiple cellular processes and plays a potential role in tumor development and progression. In this study, we demonstrate that CUL3 targets methionine adenosyltransferase IIα (MAT IIα) and promotes its proteasomal degradation through the ubiquitylation-mediated pathway. MAT IIα is a key enzyme in methionine metabolism and is associated with uncontrolled cell proliferation in cancer. We presently found that CUL3 down-regulation could rescue folate deprivation-induced MAT IIα exhaustion and growth arrest in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Further results from human CRC samples display an inverse correlation between CUL3 and MAT IIα protein levels. Our observations reveal a novel role of CUL3 in regulating cell proliferation by controlling the stability of MAT IIα.

  16. S-adenosyl-L-methionine modifies antioxidant-enzymes, glutathione-biosynthesis and methionine adenosyltransferases-1/2 in hepatitis C virus-expressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Sepulveda, Sonia Amelia; Bautista-Osorio, Eduardo; Merino-Mascorro, Jose Angel; Varela-Rey, Marta; Muñoz-Espinosa, Linda Elsa; Cordero-Perez, Paula; Martinez-Chantar, María Luz; Rivas-Estilla, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) decreases hepatitis C virus (HCV) expression. METHODS: We examined the effects of SAM on viral expression using an HCV subgenomic replicon cell culture system. Huh7 HCV-replicon cells were treated with 1 mmol/L SAM for different times (24-72 h), then total RNA and proteins were isolated. cDNA was synthesized and real time-PCR was achieved to quantify HCV-RNA, superoxide dismutase 1 and 2 (SOD-1, SOD-2) catalase, thioredoxin 1, methionine adenosyltransferase 1A and 2A (MAT1A, MAT2A) expression, and GAPDH and RPS18 as endogenous genes. Expression of cellular and viral protein was evaluated by western-blot analysis using antibodies vs HCV-NS5A, SOD-1, SOD-2, catalase, thioredoxin-1, MAT1A, MAT2A, GAPDH and actin. Total glutathione levels were measured at different times by Ellman’s recycling method (0-24 h). Reactive oxidative species (ROS) levels were quantified by the dichlorofluorescein assay (0-48 h); Pyrrolidin dithiocarbamate (PDTC) was tested as an antioxidant control and H2O2 as a positive oxidant agent. RESULTS: SAM exposition decreased HCV-RNA levels 50%-70% compared to non-treated controls (24-72 h). SAM induced a synergic antiviral effect with standard IFN treatment but it was independent of IFN signaling. In addition, 1 mmol/L SAM exposition did not modify viral RNA stability, but it needs cellular translation machinery in order to decrease HCV expression. Total glutathione levels increased upon SAM treatment in HCV-replicon cells. Transcriptional antioxidant enzyme expression (SOD-1, SOD-2 and thioredoxin-1) was increased at different times but interestingly, there was no significant change in ROS levels upon SAM treatment, contrary to what was detected with PDTC treatment, where an average 40% reduction was observed in exposed cells. There was a turnover from MAT1A/MAT2A, since MAT1A expression was increased (2.5 fold-times at 48 h) and MAT2A was diminished (from 24 h) upon SAM

  17. Methionine Adenosyltransferase II-dependent Histone H3K9 Methylation at the COX-2 Gene Locus*

    PubMed Central

    Kera, Yohei; Katoh, Yasutake; Ohta, Mineto; Matsumoto, Mitsuyo; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) synthesizes S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), which is utilized as a methyl donor in transmethylation reactions involving histones. MATIIα, a MAT isozyme, serves as a transcriptional corepressor in the oxidative stress response and forms the AdoMet-integrating transcription regulation module, affecting histone methyltransferase activities. However, the identities of genes regulated by MATIIα or its associated methyltransferases are unclear. We show that MATIIα represses the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), encoded by Ptgs2, by specifically interacting with histone H3K9 methyltransferase SETDB1, thereby promoting the trimethylation of H3K9 at the COX-2 locus. We discuss both gene-specific and epigenome-wide functions of MATIIα. PMID:23539621

  18. NADP+ binding to the regulatory subunit of methionine adenosyltransferase II increases intersubunit binding affinity in the hetero-trimer.

    PubMed

    González, Beatriz; Garrido, Francisco; Ortega, Rebeca; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Revilla-Guarinos, Ainhoa; Pérez-Pertejo, Yolanda; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia; Pajares, María A

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian methionine adenosyltransferase II (MAT II) is the only hetero-oligomer in this family of enzymes that synthesize S-adenosylmethionine using methionine and ATP as substrates. Binding of regulatory β subunits and catalytic α2 dimers is known to increase the affinity for methionine, although scarce additional information about this interaction is available. This work reports the use of recombinant α2 and β subunits to produce oligomers showing kinetic parameters comparable to MAT II purified from several tissues. According to isothermal titration calorimetry data and densitometric scanning of the stained hetero-oligomer bands on denatured gels, the composition of these oligomers is that of a hetero-trimer with α2 dimers associated to single β subunits. Additionally, the regulatory subunit is able to bind NADP(+) with a 1:1 stoichiometry, the cofactor enhancing β to α2-dimer binding affinity. Mutants lacking residues involved in NADP(+) binding and N-terminal truncations of the β subunit were able to oligomerize with α2-dimers, although the kinetic properties appeared altered. These data together suggest a role for both parts of the sequence in the regulatory role exerted by the β subunit on catalysis. Moreover, preparation of a structural model for the hetero-oligomer, using the available crystal data, allowed prediction of the regions involved in β to α2-dimer interaction. Finally, the implications that the presence of different N-terminals in the β subunit could have on MAT II behavior are discussed in light of the recent identification of several splicing forms of this subunit in hepatoma cells.

  19. NADP+ Binding to the Regulatory Subunit of Methionine Adenosyltransferase II Increases Intersubunit Binding Affinity in the Hetero-Trimer

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Rebeca; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Revilla-Guarinos, Ainhoa; Pérez-Pertejo, Yolanda; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia; Pajares, María A.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian methionine adenosyltransferase II (MAT II) is the only hetero-oligomer in this family of enzymes that synthesize S-adenosylmethionine using methionine and ATP as substrates. Binding of regulatory β subunits and catalytic α2 dimers is known to increase the affinity for methionine, although scarce additional information about this interaction is available. This work reports the use of recombinant α2 and β subunits to produce oligomers showing kinetic parameters comparable to MAT II purified from several tissues. According to isothermal titration calorimetry data and densitometric scanning of the stained hetero-oligomer bands on denatured gels, the composition of these oligomers is that of a hetero-trimer with α2 dimers associated to single β subunits. Additionally, the regulatory subunit is able to bind NADP+ with a 1∶1 stoichiometry, the cofactor enhancing β to α2-dimer binding affinity. Mutants lacking residues involved in NADP+ binding and N-terminal truncations of the β subunit were able to oligomerize with α2-dimers, although the kinetic properties appeared altered. These data together suggest a role for both parts of the sequence in the regulatory role exerted by the β subunit on catalysis. Moreover, preparation of a structural model for the hetero-oligomer, using the available crystal data, allowed prediction of the regions involved in β to α2-dimer interaction. Finally, the implications that the presence of different N-terminals in the β subunit could have on MAT II behavior are discussed in light of the recent identification of several splicing forms of this subunit in hepatoma cells. PMID:23189196

  20. Proteomic analysis of human hepatoma cells expressing methionine adenosyltransferase I/III: Characterization of DDX3X as a target of S-adenosylmethionine.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Paul C; Fernández-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Bigaud, Emilie; Serna, Antonio; Renández-Alcoceba, Rubén; Lu, Shelly C; Mato, José M; Prieto, Jesús; Corrales, Fernando J

    2012-06-01

    Methionine adenosyltransferase I/III (MATI/III) synthesizes S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) in quiescent hepatocytes. Its activity is compromised in most liver diseases including liver cancer. Since SAM is a driver of hepatocytes fate we have studied the effect of re-expressing MAT1A in hepatoma Huh7 cells using proteomics. MAT1A expression leads to SAM levels close to those found in quiescent hepatocytes and induced apoptosis. Normalization of intracellular SAM induced alteration of 128 proteins identified by 2D-DIGE and gel-free methods, accounting for deregulation of central cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation and survival. Human Dead-box protein 3 (DDX3X), a RNA helicase regulating RNA splicing, export, transcription and translation was down-regulated upon MAT1A expression. Our data support the regulation of DDX3X levels by SAM in a concentration and time dependent manner. Consistently, DDX3X arises as a primary target of SAM and a principal intermediate of its antitumoral effect. Based on the parallelism between SAM and DDX3X along the progression of liver disorders, and the results reported here, it is tempting to suggest that reduced SAM in the liver may lead to DDX3X up-regulation contributing to the pathogenic process and that replenishment of SAM might prove to have beneficial effects, at least in part by reducing DDX3X levels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics: The clinical link.

  1. Role of methionine adenosyltransferase α2 and β phosphorylation and stabilization in human hepatic stellate cell trans-differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Komal; Donoyan, Shant; Tomasi, Maria Lauda; Park, Sunhee

    2015-05-01

    Myofibroblastic trans-differentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is an essential event in the development of liver fibrogenesis. These changes involve modulation of key regulators of the genome and the proteome. Methionine adenosyltransferases (MAT) catalyze the biosynthesis of the methyl donor, S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) from methionine. We have previously shown that two MAT genes, MAT2A and MAT2B (encoding MATα2 and MATβ proteins respectively), are required for HSC activation and loss of MAT2A transcriptional control favors its up-regulation during trans-differentiation. Hence MAT genes are intrinsically linked to the HSC machinery during activation. In the current study, we have identified for the first time, post-translational modifications in the MATα2 and MATβ proteins that stabilize them and favor human HSC trans-differentiation. Culture-activation of human HSCs induced the MATα2 and MATβ proteins. Using mass spectrometry, we identified phosphorylation sites in MATα2 and MATβ predicted to be phosphorylated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members (ERK1/2, V-Raf Murine Sarcoma Viral Oncogene Homolog B1 [B-Raf], MEK). Phosphorylation of both proteins was enhanced during HSC activation. Blocking MEK activation lowered the phosphorylation and stability of MAT proteins without influencing their mRNA levels. Silencing ERK1/2 or B-Raf lowered the phosphorylation and stability of MATβ but not MATα2. Reversal of the activated human HSC cell line, LX2 to quiescence lowered phosphorylation and destabilized MAT proteins. Mutagenesis of MATα2 and MATβ phospho-sites destabilized them and prevented HSC trans-differentiation. The data reveal that phosphorylation of MAT proteins during HSC activation stabilizes them thereby positively regulating trans-differentiation.

  2. Temporal study of acetaminophen (APAP) and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) effects on subcellular hepatic SAMe levels and methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) expression and activity

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. Michael; Ball, John G.; Hogsett, Amy; Williams, Tierra; Valentovic, Monica

    2010-08-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is the leading cause of drug induced liver failure in the United States. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe) is protective for APAP hepatic toxicity. SAMe is critical for glutathione synthesis and transmethylation of nucleic acids, proteins and phospholipids which would facilitate recovery from APAP toxicity. SAMe is synthesized in cells through the action of methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT). This study tested the hypothesis that total hepatic and subcellular SAMe levels are decreased by APAP toxicity. Studies further examined MAT expression and activity in response to APAP toxicity. Male C57BL/6 mice (16-22 g) were treated with vehicle (Veh; water 15 ml/kg ip injections), 250 mg/kg APAP (15 ml/kg, ip), SAMe (1.25 mmol/kg) or SAMe administered 1 h after APAP injection (SAMe and SAMe + APAP). Hepatic tissue was collected 2, 4, and 6 h after APAP administration. Levels of SAMe and its metabolite S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) were determined by HPLC analysis. MAT expression was examined by Western blot. MAT activity was determined by fluorescence assay. Total liver SAMe levels were depressed at 4 h by APAP overdose, but not at 2 or 6 h. APAP depressed mitochondrial SAMe levels at 4 and 6 h relative to the Veh group. In the nucleus, levels of SAMe were depressed below detectable limits 4 h following APAP administration. SAMe administration following APAP (SAMe + APAP) prevented APAP associated decline in mitochondrial and nuclear SAMe levels. In conclusion, the maintenance of SAMe may provide benefit in preventing damage associated with APAP toxicity.

  3. Methionine adenosyltransferase α2 sumoylation positively regulate Bcl-2 expression in human colon and liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Maria Lauda; Ryoo, Minjung; Ramani, Komal; Tomasi, Ivan; Giordano, Pasquale; Mato, José M.; Lu, Shelly C.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9) is required for sumoylation and inhibits apoptosis via Bcl-2 by unknown mechanism. Methionine adenosyltransferase 2A (MAT2A) encodes for MATα2, the catalytic subunit of the MATII isoenzyme that synthesizes S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe). Ubc9, Bcl-2 and MAT2A expression are up-regulated in several malignancies. Exogenous SAMe decreases Ubc9 and MAT2A expression and is pro-apoptotic in liver and colon cancer cells. Here we investigated whether there is interplay between Ubc9, MAT2A and Bcl-2. We used human colon and liver cancer cell lines RKO and HepG2, respectively, and confirmed key finding in colon cancer specimens. We found MATα2 can regulate Bcl-2 expression at multiple levels. MATα2 binds to Bcl-2 promoter to activate its transcription. This effect is independent of SAMe as MATα2 catalytic mutant was also effective. MATα2 also directly interacts with Bcl-2 to enhance its protein stability. MATα2's effect on Bcl-2 requires Ubc9 as MATα2's stability is influenced by sumoylation at K340, K372 and K394. Overexpressing wild type (but not less stable MATα2 sumoylation mutants) protected from 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis in both colon and liver cancer cells. Colon cancer have higher levels of sumoylated MATα2, total MATα2, Ubc9 and Bcl-2 and higher MATα2 binding to the Bcl-2 P2 promoter. Taken together, Ubc9's protective effect on apoptosis may be mediated at least in part by sumoylating and stabilizing MATα2 protein, which in turn positively maintains Bcl-2 expression. These interactions feed forward to further enhance growth and survival of the cancer cell. PMID:26416353

  4. Methionine adenosyltransferase α2 sumoylation positively regulate Bcl-2 expression in human colon and liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, Maria Lauda; Ryoo, Minjung; Ramani, Komal; Tomasi, Ivan; Giordano, Pasquale; Mato, José M; Lu, Shelly C

    2015-11-10

    Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9) is required for sumoylation and inhibits apoptosis via Bcl-2 by unknown mechanism. Methionine adenosyltransferase 2A (MAT2A) encodes for MATα2, the catalytic subunit of the MATII isoenzyme that synthesizes S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe). Ubc9, Bcl-2 and MAT2A expression are up-regulated in several malignancies. Exogenous SAMe decreases Ubc9 and MAT2A expression and is pro-apoptotic in liver and colon cancer cells. Here we investigated whether there is interplay between Ubc9, MAT2A and Bcl-2. We used human colon and liver cancer cell lines RKO and HepG2, respectively, and confirmed key finding in colon cancer specimens. We found MATα2 can regulate Bcl-2 expression at multiple levels. MATα2 binds to Bcl-2 promoter to activate its transcription. This effect is independent of SAMe as MATα2 catalytic mutant was also effective. MATα2 also directly interacts with Bcl-2 to enhance its protein stability. MATα2's effect on Bcl-2 requires Ubc9 as MATα2's stability is influenced by sumoylation at K340, K372 and K394. Overexpressing wild type (but not less stable MATα2 sumoylation mutants) protected from 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis in both colon and liver cancer cells. Colon cancer have higher levels of sumoylated MATα2, total MATα2, Ubc9 and Bcl-2 and higher MATα2 binding to the Bcl-2 P2 promoter. Taken together, Ubc9's protective effect on apoptosis may be mediated at least in part by sumoylating and stabilizing MATα2 protein, which in turn positively maintains Bcl-2 expression. These interactions feed forward to further enhance growth and survival of the cancer cell.

  5. Pleiotropic effects of methionine adenosyltransferases deregulation as determinants of liver cancer progression and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Frau, Maddalena; Feo, Francesco; Pascale, Rosa M

    2013-10-01

    Downregulation of liver-specific MAT1A gene, encoding S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthesizing isozymes MATI/III, and upregulation of widely expressed MAT2A, encoding MATII isozyme, known as MAT1A:MAT2A switch, occurs in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Being inhibited by its reaction product, MATII isoform upregulation cannot compensate for MATI/III decrease. Therefore, MAT1A:MAT2A switch contributes to decrease in SAM level in rodent and human hepatocarcinogenesis. SAM administration to carcinogen-treated rats prevents hepatocarcinogenesis, whereas MAT1A-KO mice, characterized by chronic SAM deficiency, exhibit macrovesicular steatosis, mononuclear cell infiltration in periportal areas, and HCC development. This review focuses upon the pleiotropic changes, induced by MAT1A/MAT2A switch, associated with HCC development. Epigenetic control of MATs expression occurs at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In HCC cells, MAT1A/MAT2A switch is associated with global DNA hypomethylation, decrease in DNA repair, genomic instability, and signaling deregulation including c-MYC overexpression, rise in polyamine synthesis, upregulation of RAS/ERK, IKK/NF-kB, PI3K/AKT, and LKB1/AMPK axis. Furthermore, decrease in MAT1A expression and SAM levels results in increased HCC cell proliferation, cell survival, and microvascularization. All of these changes are reversed by SAM treatment in vivo or forced MAT1A overexpression or MAT2A inhibition in cultured HCC cells. In human HCC, MAT1A:MAT2A and MATI/III:MATII ratios correlate negatively with cell proliferation and genomic instability, and positively with apoptosis and global DNA methylation. This suggests that SAM decrease and MATs deregulation represent potential therapeutic targets for HCC. Finally, MATI/III:MATII ratio strongly predicts patients' survival length suggesting that MAT1A:MAT2A expression ratio is a putative prognostic marker for human HCC.

  6. Isozyme-specific enzyme inhibitors. 14. 5'(R)-C-[(L-homocystein-S-yl)methyl]adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imidotriphosphate), a potent inhibitor of rat methionine adenosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Kappler, F; Vrudhula, V M; Hampton, A

    1987-09-01

    The title compound is a covalent adduct of L-methionine (Met) and beta,gamma-imido-ATP. In its synthesis the N-Boc derivative of 5'(R)-C-(aminomethyl)-N6-benzoyl-5'-O-tosyl-2',3'-O- isopropylidenadenosine was converted by the successive actions of CF3CO2H and HNO2 into the corresponding 5'(R)-C-hydroxymethyl derivative. Treatment of this with disodium L-homocysteinate led to attack of sulfur at C6', apparently via a 5',6'-epoxide, and to total stereoselective inversion at C5' to furnish, after debenzoylation, 5'(R)-C-(L-homocystein-S-ylmethyl)-2',3'-O-isopropylidene ade nosine. The 5' configuration was established by conversion of this into the known 5'(S)-C-methyl-2',3'-O-isopropylidene adenosine with Raney nickel. The alpha-amino acid residue was protected as an N-Boc methyl ester, after which the 5'-hydroxyl was phosphorylated with benzyl phosphate and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The phosphoanhydride bond with inorganic imidodiphosphate was then created by established methods. Finally, blocking groups were removed under conditions that gave the desired adduct with no racemization of its L-methionine residue. It was a potent inhibitor [KM(ATP)/Ki = 1080; KM(Met)/Ki = 7.7] of the M-2 (normal tissue) form of rat methionine adenosyltransferase and of the M-T (hepatoma tissue) form [KM(ATP)/Ki = 670; KM(Met)/Ki = 22]. Inhibitions were competitive with respect to ATP or to L-methionine, indicating a dual substrate site mode of binding to the enzyme forms.

  7. 2',6'-Dihalostyrylanilines, pyridines, and pyrimidines for the inhibition of the catalytic subunit of methionine S-adenosyltransferase-2.

    PubMed

    Sviripa, Vitaliy M; Zhang, Wen; Balia, Andrii G; Tsodikov, Oleg V; Nickell, Justin R; Gizard, Florence; Yu, Tianxin; Lee, Eun Y; Dwoskin, Linda P; Liu, Chunming; Watt, David S

    2014-07-24

    Inhibition of the catalytic subunit of the heterodimeric methionine S-adenosyl transferase-2 (MAT2A) with fluorinated N,N-dialkylaminostilbenes (FIDAS agents) offers a potential avenue for the treatment of liver and colorectal cancers where upregulation of this enzyme occurs. A study of structure-activity relationships led to the identification of the most active compounds as those with (1) either a 2,6-difluorostyryl or 2-chloro-6-fluorostyryl subunit, (2) either an N-methylamino or N,N-dimethylamino group attached in a para orientation relative to the 2,6-dihalostyryl subunit, and (3) either an N-methylaniline or a 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)pyridine ring. These modifications led to FIDAS agents that were active in the low nanomolar range, that formed water-soluble hydrochloride salts, and that possessed the desired property of not inhibiting the human hERG potassium ion channel at concentrations at which the FIDAS agents inhibit MAT2A. The active FIDAS agents may inhibit cancer cells through alterations of methylation reactions essential for cancer cell survival and growth.

  8. Methionine adenosyltransferase 2B-GIT1 complex serves as a scaffold to regulate Ras/Raf/MEK1/2 activity in human liver and colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Li, Tony W H; Yang, Heping; Moyer, Mary P; Mato, Jose M; Lu, Shelly C

    2015-04-01

    Methionine adenosyltransferase 2B (MAT2B) encodes for variant proteins V1 and V2 that interact with GIT1 to increase ERK activity and growth in human liver and colon cancer cells. MAT2B or GIT1 overexpression activates MEK. This study explores the mechanism for MEK activation. We examined protein-protein interactions by co-immunoprecipitation and verified by confocal microscopy and pull-down assay using recombinant or in vitro translated proteins. Results were confirmed in an orthotopic liver cancer model. We found that MAT2B and GIT1-mediated MEK1/2 activation was not mediated by PAK1 or Src in HepG2 or RKO cells. Instead, MAT2B and GIT1 interact with B-Raf and c-Raf and enhance recruitment of Raf proteins to MEK1/2. MAT2B-GIT1 activates c-Raf, which is the key mediator for MEK/12 activation, because this still occurred in RKO cells that express constitutively active B-Raf mutant. The mechanism lies with the ability of MAT2B-GIT1 to activate Ras and promote B-Raf/c-Raf heterodimerization. Interestingly, MAT2B but not GIT1 can directly interact with Ras, which increases protein stability. Finally, increased Ras-Raf-MEK signaling occurred in phenotypically more aggressive liver cancers overexpressing MAT2B variants and GIT1. In conclusion, interaction between MAT2B and GIT1 serves as a scaffold and facilitates signaling in multiple steps of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway, further emphasizing the importance of MAT2B/GIT1 interaction in cancer growth.

  9. 2′,6′-Dihalostyrylanilines, Pyridines, and Pyrimidines for the Inhibition of the Catalytic Subunit of Methionine S-Adenosyltransferase-2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of the catalytic subunit of the heterodimeric methionine S-adenosyl transferase-2 (MAT2A) with fluorinated N,N-dialkylaminostilbenes (FIDAS agents) offers a potential avenue for the treatment of liver and colorectal cancers where upregulation of this enzyme occurs. A study of structure–activity relationships led to the identification of the most active compounds as those with (1) either a 2,6-difluorostyryl or 2-chloro-6-fluorostyryl subunit, (2) either an N-methylamino or N,N-dimethylamino group attached in a para orientation relative to the 2,6-dihalostyryl subunit, and (3) either an N-methylaniline or a 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)pyridine ring. These modifications led to FIDAS agents that were active in the low nanomolar range, that formed water-soluble hydrochloride salts, and that possessed the desired property of not inhibiting the human hERG potassium ion channel at concentrations at which the FIDAS agents inhibit MAT2A. The active FIDAS agents may inhibit cancer cells through alterations of methylation reactions essential for cancer cell survival and growth. PMID:24950374

  10. Dysregulated Hepatic Methionine Metabolism Drives Homocysteine Elevation in Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Pacana, Tommy; Cazanave, Sophie; Verdianelli, Aurora; Patel, Vaishali; Min, Hae-Ki; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Quinlivan, Eoin; Sanyal, Arun J

    2015-01-01

    Methionine metabolism plays a central role in methylation reactions, production of glutathione and methylarginines, and modulating homocysteine levels. The mechanisms by which these are affected in NAFLD are not fully understood. The aim is to perform a metabolomic, molecular and epigenetic analyses of hepatic methionine metabolism in diet-induced NAFLD. Female 129S1/SvlmJ;C57Bl/6J mice were fed a chow (n = 6) or high-fat high-cholesterol (HFHC) diet (n = 8) for 52 weeks. Metabolomic study, enzymatic expression and DNA methylation analyses were performed. HFHC diet led to weight gain, marked steatosis and extensive fibrosis. In the methionine cycle, hepatic methionine was depleted (30%, p< 0.01) while s-adenosylmethionine (SAM)/methionine ratio (p< 0.05), s-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) (35%, p< 0.01) and homocysteine (25%, p< 0.01) were increased significantly. SAH hydrolase protein levels decreased significantly (p <0.01). Serine, a substrate for both homocysteine remethylation and transsulfuration, was depleted (45%, p< 0.01). In the transsulfuration pathway, cystathionine and cysteine trended upward while glutathione decreased significantly (p< 0.05). In the transmethylation pathway, levels of glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), the most abundant methyltransferase in the liver, decreased. The phosphatidylcholine (PC)/ phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) ratio increased significantly (p< 0.01), indicative of increased phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase (PEMT) activity. The protein levels of protein arginine methytransferase 1 (PRMT1) increased significantly, but its products, monomethylarginine (MMA) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), decreased significantly. Circulating ADMA increased and approached significance (p< 0.06). Protein expression of methionine adenosyltransferase 1A, cystathionine β-synthase, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, and methionine synthase remained unchanged. Although gene expression of the DNA

  11. Computational Analysis Reveals the Association of Threonine 118 Methionine Mutation in PMP22 Resulting in CMT-1A

    PubMed Central

    Swetha, Rayapadi G.

    2014-01-01

    The T118M mutation in PMP22 gene is associated with Charcot Marie Tooth, type 1A (CMT1A). CMT1A is a form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, the most common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Mutations in CMT related disorder are seen to increase the stability of the protein resulting in the diseased state. We performed SNP analysis for all the nsSNPs of PMP22 protein and carried out molecular dynamics simulation for T118M mutation to compare the stability difference between the wild type protein structure and the mutant protein structure. The mutation T118M resulted in the overall increase in the stability of the mutant protein. The superimposed structure shows marked structural variation between the wild type and the mutant protein structures. PMID:25400662

  12. Structure of ATP-Bound Human ATP:Cobalamin Adenosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert,H.; Hill, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding human ATP:cobalamin adenosyltransferase (hATR) can result in the metabolic disorder known as methylmalonic aciduria (MMA). This enzyme catalyzes the final step in the conversion of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B{sub 12}) to the essential human cofactor adenosylcobalamin. Here we present the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of ATP bound to hATR refined to an R{sub free} value of 25.2%. The enzyme forms a tightly associated trimer, where the monomer comprises a five-helix bundle and the active sites lie on the subunit interfaces. Only two of the three active sites within the trimer contain the bound ATP substrate, thereby providing examples of apo- and substrate-bound-active sites within the same crystal structure. Comparison of the empty and occupied sites indicates that twenty residues at the enzyme's N-terminus become ordered upon binding of ATP to form a novel ATP-binding site and an extended cleft that likely binds cobalamin. The structure explains the role of 20 invariant residues; six are involved in ATP binding, including Arg190, which hydrogen bonds to ATP atoms on both sides of the scissile bond. Ten of the hydrogen bonds are required for structural stability, and four are in positions to interact with cobalamin. The structure also reveals how the point mutations that cause MMA are deficient in these functions.

  13. Conserved methionines in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Sundby, Cecilia; Härndahl, Ulrika; Gustavsson, Niklas; Ahrman, Emma; Murphy, Denis J

    2005-01-17

    Heat shock proteins counteract heat and oxidative stress. In chloroplasts, a small heat shock protein (Hsp21) contains a set of conserved methionines, which date back to early in the emergence of terrestrial plants. Methionines M49, M52, M55, M59, M62, M67 are located on one side of an amphipathic helix, which may fold back over two other conserved methionines (M97 and M101), to form a binding groove lined with methionines, for sequence-independent recognition of peptides with an overall hydrophobic character. The sHsps protect other proteins from aggregation by binding to their hydrophobic surfaces, which become exposed under stress. Data are presented showing that keeping the conserved methionines in Hsp21 in a reduced form is a prerequisite to maintain such binding. The chloroplast generates reactive oxygen species under both stress and unstressed conditions, but this organelle is also a highly reducing cellular compartment. Chloroplasts contain a specialized isoform of the enzyme, peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, the expression of which is light-induced. Recombinant proteins were used to measure that this reductase can restore Hsp21 methionines after sulfoxidation. This paper also describes how methionine sulfoxidation-reduction can be directly assessed by mass spectrometry, how methionine-to-leucine substitution affects Hsp21, and discusses the possible role for an Hsp21 methionine sulfoxidation-reduction cycle in quenching reactive oxygen species. PMID:15680227

  14. Improving methionine and ATP availability by MET6 and SAM2 co-expression combined with sodium citrate feeding enhanced SAM accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hailong; Wang, Zhou; Wang, Zhilai; Dou, Jie; Zhou, Changlin

    2016-04-01

    S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), biosynthesized from methionine and ATP, exhibited diverse pharmaceutical applications. To enhance SAM accumulation in S. cerevisiae CGMCC 2842 (wild type), improvement of methionine and ATP availability through MET6 and SAM2 co-expression combined with sodium citrate feeding was investigated here. Feeding 6 g/L methionine at 12 h into medium was found to increase SAM accumulation by 38 % in wild type strain. Based on this result, MET6, encoding methionine synthase, was overexpressed, which caused a 59 % increase of SAM. To redirect intracellular methionine into SAM, MET6 and SAM2 (encoding methionine adenosyltransferase) were co-expressed to obtain the recombinant strain YGSPM in which the SAM accumulation was 2.34-fold of wild type strain. The data obtained showed that co-expression of MET6 and SAM2 improved intracellular methionine availability and redirected the methionine to SAM biosynthesis. To elevate intracellular ATP levels, 6 g/L sodium citrate, used as an auxiliary energy substrate, was fed into the batch fermentation medium, and an additional 19 % increase of SAM was observed after sodium citrate addition. Meanwhile, it was found that addition of sodium citrate improved the isocitrate dehydrogenase activity which was associated with the intracellular ATP levels. The results demonstrated that addition of sodium citrate improved intracellular ATP levels which promoted conversion of methionine into SAM. This study presented a feasible approach with considerable potential for developing highly SAM-productive strains based on improving methionine and ATP availability.

  15. PqqE from Methylobacterium extorquens AM1: a radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine enzyme with an unusual tolerance to oxygen.

    PubMed

    Saichana, Natsaran; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Pechoušek, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Toyama, Hirohide; Frébortová, Jitka

    2016-01-01

    Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 is an aerobic facultative methylotroph known to secrete pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a cofactor of a number of bacterial dehydrogenases, into the culture medium. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of PQQ biosynthesis, we are focusing on PqqE which is believed to be the enzyme catalysing the first reaction of the pathway. PqqE belongs to the radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) superfamily, in which most, if not all, enzymes are very sensitive to dissolved oxygen and rapidly inactivated under aerobic conditions. We here report that PqqE from M. extorquens AM1 is markedly oxygen-tolerant; it was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli cells grown aerobically and affinity-purified to near homogeneity. The purified and reconstituted PqqE contained multiple (likely three) iron-sulphur clusters and showed the reductive SAM cleavage activity that was ascribed to the consensus [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster bound at the N-terminus region. Mössbauer spectrometric analyses of the as-purified and reconstituted enzymes revealed the presence of [4Fe-4S](2+) and [2Fe-2S](2+) clusters as the major forms with the former being predominant in the reconstituted enzyme. PqqE from M.extorquens AM1 may serve as a convenient tool for studying the molecular mechanism of PQQ biosynthesis, avoiding the necessity of establishing strictly anaerobic conditions.

  16. Photooxidation of Methionine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine; Scouten, William H.

    1976-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the photooxidation of methionine using free methylene blue as the sensitizer is applied to the isolated amino acid or to the methionyl residues of a complex polypeptide. (MLH)

  17. Methionine Biosynthesis in Lemna

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Gregory A.; Datko, Anne H.; Mudd, S. Harvey; Giovanelli, John

    1982-01-01

    Regulation of enzymes of methionine biosynthesis was investigated by measuring the specific activities of O-phosphohomoserine-dependent cystathionine γ-synthase, O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase, and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase in Lemna paucicostata Hegelm. 6746 grown under various conditions. For cystathionine γ-synthase, it was observed that (a) adding external methionine (2 μm) decreased specific activity to 15% of control, (b) blocking methionine synthesis with 0.05 μml-aminoethoxyvinylglycine or with 36 μm lysine plus 4 μm threonine (Datko, Mudd 1981 Plant Physiol 69: 1070-1076) caused a 2- to 3-fold increase in specific activity, and (c) blocking methionine synthesis and adding external methionine led to the decreased specific activity characteristic of methionine addition alone. Activity in extracts from control cultures was unaffected by addition of methionine, lysine, threonine, lysine plus threonine, S-adenosylmethionine, or S-methylmethionine sulfonium to the assay mixture. Parallel studies of O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase showed that O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase activity responded to growth conditions identically to cystathionine γ-synthase activity, whereas O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase activity remained unaffected. Lemna extracts did not catalyze lanthionine formation from O-acetylserine and cysteine. Estimates of kinetic constants for the three enzyme activities indicate that O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase has much higher activity and affinity for sulfide than O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase. The results suggest that (a) methionine, or one of its products, regulates the amount of active cystathionine γ-synthase in Lemna, (b) O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase and cystathionine γ-synthase are probably activities of one enzyme that has low specificity for its sulfur-containing substrate, and (c) O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase is a separate enzyme. The relatively high activity and affinity for sulfide of

  18. Effect of methionine deprivation on S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Tisdale, M J

    1981-07-17

    Transference of Walker carcinoma and TLX5 lymphoma from normal L-methionine-containing medium to medium containing limiting amounts of L-methionine, or L-homocysteine only, caused a 2-fold increase of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activity. Kinetic analysis showed an increase in the V value of the enzyme from 22 to 53 pmol/min per mg protein in media containing only 0.1 mM L-homocysteine, without any alteration in the Km value (0.1 mM). The increase in enzyme activity does not result from (a) a reduction of the intracellular level of S-adenosylmethionine, since cycloleucine, an inhibitor of methionine adenosyltransferase, had no effect on enzyme activity; (b) an increase in intracellular adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cyclic AMP), since high extracellular concentrations of N6-monobutyryl cyclic AMP had no effect on enzyme activity; (c) an alteration of polyamine levels, since addition of micromolar concentrations of exogenous putrescine, spermidine and spermine did not prevent the induction of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activity in methionine-free media containing 0.1 mM L-homocysteine. The increased enzyme activity appears to be mainly due to enhanced stabilization, since the half-life was increased from 2.45 to 5.0 h in media containing only 0.1 mM L-homocysteine. Induction of enzyme activity is specific to the removal of L-methionine, since no increase occurred in the absence of L-serine or L-glycine, or both, or by reduction of the serum concentrations in the medium.

  19. Two patients with hepatic mtDNA depletion syndromes and marked elevations of S-adenosylmethionine and methionine

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, S. Harvey; Wagner, Conrad; Luka, Zigmund; Stabler, Sally P.; Allen, Robert H.; Schroer, Richard; Wood, Timothy; Wang, Jing; Wong, Lee-Jun

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports studies of two patients proven by a variety of studies to have mitochondrial depletion syndromes due to mutations in either their MPV17 or DGUOK genes. Each was initially investigated metabolically because of plasma methionine concentrations as high as 15–21-fold above the upper limit of the reference range, then found also to have plasma levels of S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) 4.4–8.6-fold above the upper limit of the reference range. Assays of S-adenosylhomocysteine, total homocysteine, cystathionine, sarcosine, and other relevant metabolites and studies of their gene encoding glycine N-methyltransferase produced evidence suggesting they had none of the known causes of elevated methionine with or without elevated AdoMet. Patient 1 grew slowly and intermittently, but was cognitively normal. At age 7 years he was found to have hepatocellular carcinoma, underwent a liver transplant and died of progressive liver and renal failure at age almost 9 years. Patient 2 had a clinical course typical of DGUOK deficiency and died at age 8 ½ months. Although each patient had liver abnormalities, evidence is presented that such abnormalities are very unlikely to explain their elevations of AdoMet or the extent of their hypermethioninemias. A working hypothesis is presented suggesting that with mitochondrial depletion the normal usage of AdoMet by mitochondria is impaired, AdoMet accumulates in the cytoplasm of affected cells poor in glycine N-methyltransferase activity, the accumulated AdoMet causes methionine to accumulate by inhibiting activity of methionine adenosyltransferase II, and that both AdoMet and methionine consequently leak abnormally into the plasma. PMID:22137549

  20. Effects of chronic dietary selenomethionine exposure on repeat swimming performance, aerobic metabolism and methionine catabolism in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jith K; Wiseman, Steve; Giesy, John P; Janz, David M

    2013-04-15

    swimming resulted in lesser concentrations of glycogen in the body, exposure to SeMet in the diet had no significant effect on glycogen content. Exposure to SeMet significantly down-regulated mRNA abundance of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP 1B) in muscle, and β-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (HOAD), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP 1) and methionine adenosyltransferase 1 alpha (MAT 1A) in liver of adult zebrafish. Overall the results of this study suggest chronic exposure of adult zebrafish to SeMet in the diet can cause both cellular and organismal effects that could affect fitness and survivability of fish.

  1. Selenium and Methionine Sulfoxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2014-10-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element because it is present in proteins in the form of selenocysteine residue. Functionally characterized selenoproteins are oxidoreductases. Selenoprotein methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase B1 (MsrB1) is a repair enzyme that reduces ROS-oxidized methionine residues in proteins. Here, we explored a possibility that reversible methionine oxidation is also a mechanism that regulates protein function. We found that MsrB1, together with Mical proteins, regulated mammalian actin assembly via stereospecific methionine oxidation and reduction in a reversible, site-specific manner. Two methionine residues in actin were specifically converted to methionine-R-sulfoxide by Mical1 and Mical2 and reduced back to methionine by MsrB1, supporting actin disassembly and assembly, respectively. Macrophages utilized this redox control during cellular activation by stimulating MsrB1 expression and activity. Thus, we identified the regulatory role of MsrB1 as a Mical antagonist in orchestrating actin dynamics and macrophage function. More generally, our study showed that proteins can be regulated by reversible site-specific methionine-R-sulfoxidation and that selenium is involved in this regulation by being a catalytic component of MsrB1. PMID:26461418

  2. Acute Liver Injury Induces Nucleocytoplasmic Redistribution of Hepatic Methionine Metabolism Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Miguel; Garrido, Francisco; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana; Pacheco, María; Partearroyo, Teresa; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The discovery of methionine metabolism enzymes in the cell nucleus, together with their association with key nuclear processes, suggested a putative relationship between alterations in their subcellular distribution and disease. Results: Using the rat model of d-galactosamine intoxication, severe changes in hepatic steady-state mRNA levels were found; the largest decreases corresponded to enzymes exhibiting the highest expression in normal tissue. Cytoplasmic protein levels, activities, and metabolite concentrations suffered more moderate changes following a similar trend. Interestingly, galactosamine treatment induced hepatic nuclear accumulation of methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) α1 and S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase tetramers, their active assemblies. In fact, galactosamine-treated livers showed enhanced nuclear MAT activity. Acetaminophen (APAP) intoxication mimicked most galactosamine effects on hepatic MATα1, including accumulation of nuclear tetramers. H35 cells that overexpress tagged-MATα1 reproduced the subcellular distribution observed in liver, and the changes induced by galactosamine and APAP that were also observed upon glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine. The H35 nuclear accumulation of tagged-MATα1 induced by these agents correlated with decreased glutathione reduced form/glutathione oxidized form ratios and was prevented by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione ethyl ester. However, the changes in epigenetic modifications associated with tagged-MATα1 nuclear accumulation were only prevented by NAC in galactosamine-treated cells. Innovation: Cytoplasmic and nuclear changes in proteins that regulate the methylation index follow opposite trends in acute liver injury, their nuclear accumulation showing potential as disease marker. Conclusion: Altogether these results demonstrate galactosamine- and APAP-induced nuclear accumulation of methionine metabolism enzymes as active oligomers and unveil the implication of

  3. Functional Genomic, Biochemical, and Genetic Characterization of the Salmonella pduO Gene, an ATP:Cob(I)alamin Adenosyltransferase Gene†

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Celeste L. V.; Pechonick, Edith; Park, Sanghee D.; Havemann, Gregory D.; Leal, Nicole A.; Bobik, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    Salmonella enterica degrades 1,2-propanediol by a pathway dependent on coenzyme B12 (adenosylcobalamin [AdoCb1]). Previous studies showed that 1,2-propanediol utilization (pdu) genes include those for the conversion of inactive cobalamins, such as vitamin B12, to AdoCbl. However, the specific genes involved were not identified. Here we show that the pduO gene encodes a protein with ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase activity. The main role of this protein is apparently the conversion of inactive cobalamins to AdoCbl for 1,2-propanediol degradation. Genetic tests showed that the function of the pduO gene was partially replaced by the cobA gene (a known ATP:corrinoid adenosyltransferase) but that optimal growth of S. enterica on 1,2-propanediol required a functional pduO gene. Growth studies showed that cobA pduO double mutants were unable to grow on 1,2-propanediol minimal medium supplemented with vitamin B12 but were capable of growth on similar medium supplemented with AdoCbl. The pduO gene was cloned into a T7 expression vector. The PduO protein was overexpressed, partially purified, and, using an improved assay procedure, shown to have cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase activity. Analysis of the genomic context of genes encoding PduO and related proteins indicated that particular adenosyltransferases tend to be specialized for particular AdoCbl-dependent enzymes or for the de novo synthesis of AdoCbl. Such analyses also indicated that PduO is a bifunctional enzyme. The possibility that genes of unknown function proximal to adenosyltransferase homologues represent previously unidentified AdoCbl-dependent enzymes is discussed. PMID:11160088

  4. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for methionine production by removing feedback inhibition and increasing NADPH level.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Cong, Hua; Liu, Bingnan; Song, Jinzhu; Sun, Xueying; Zhang, Junzheng; Yang, Qian

    2016-09-01

    Relieving the feedback inhibition of key enzymes in a metabolic pathway is frequently the first step of producer-strain construction by genetic engineering. However, the strict feedback regulation exercised by microorganisms in methionine biosynthesis often makes it difficult to produce methionine at a high level. In this study, Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was metabolically engineered for methionine production. First, the metD gene encoding the methionine uptake system was deleted to achieve extracellular accumulation of methionine. Then, random mutagenesis was performed to remove feedback inhibition by metabolic end-products. The resulting strain C. glutamicum ENM-16 was further engineered to block or decrease competitive branch pathways by deleting the thrB gene and changing the start codon of the dapA gene, followed by point mutations of lysC (C932T) and pyc (G1A, C1372T) to increase methionine precursor supply. To enrich the NADPH pool, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the pentose phosphate pathway were mutated to reduce their sensitivity to inhibition by intracellular metabolites. The resultant strain C. glutamicum LY-5 produced 6.85 ± 0.23 g methionine l(-1) with substrate-specific yield (Y P/S) of 0.08 mol per mol of glucose after 72 h fed-batch fermentation. The strategies described here will be useful for construction of methionine engineering strains. PMID:27255137

  5. Sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine oxidation and the methionine and folate cycles in female cystathionine gamma-lyase null mice: a serendipitous model of the methylfolate trap.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Hurt, K Joseph; Breen, Kelsey; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Orlicky, David J; Maclean, Kenneth N

    2015-08-14

    In addition to its role in the endogenous synthesis of cysteine, cystathionine gamma-lyase (CGL) is a major physiological source of the vasorelaxant hydrogen sulfide. Cgl null mice are potentially useful for studying the influence of this compound upon vascular tone and endothelial function. Here, we confirm a previous report that female Cgl null mice exhibit an approximate 45-fold increase in plasma total homocysteine compared to wild type controls. This level of homocysteine is approximately 3.5-fold higher than that observed in male Cgl null mice and is essentially equivalent to that observed in mouse models of cystathionine beta synthase deficient homocystinuria. Cgl null mice of both sexes exhibited decreased expression of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase compared to WT controls. Female Cgl null mice exhibited a sex-specific induction of betaine homocysteine S-methyltransferase and methionine adenosyltransferase 1, alpha and a 70% decrease in methionine synthase expression accompanied by significantly decreased plasma methionine. Decreased plasma cysteine levels in female Cgl null mice were associated with sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine dioxygenase expression. Comparative histological assessment between cystathionine beta-synthase and Cgl null mice indicated that the therapeutic potential of cystathionine against liver injury merits possible further investigation. Collectively, our data demonstrates the importance of considering sex when investigating mouse models of inborn errors of metabolism and indicate that while female Cgl null mice are of questionable utility for studying the physiological role of hydrogen sulfide, they could serve as a useful model for studying the consequences of methionine synthase deficiency and the methylfolate trap.

  6. Sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine oxidation and the methionine and folate cycles in female cystathionine gamma-lyase null mice: a serendipitous model of the methylfolate trap

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Hurt, K. Joseph; Breen, Kelsey; Stabler, Sally P.; Allen, Robert H.; Orlicky, David J.; Maclean, Kenneth N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In addition to its role in the endogenous synthesis of cysteine, cystathionine gamma-lyase (CGL) is a major physiological source of the vasorelaxant hydrogen sulfide. Cgl null mice are potentially useful for studying the influence of this compound upon vascular tone and endothelial function. Here, we confirm a previous report that female Cgl null mice exhibit an approximate 45-fold increase in plasma total homocysteine compared to wild type controls. This level of homocysteine is approximately 3.5-fold higher than that observed in male Cgl null mice and is essentially equivalent to that observed in mouse models of cystathionine beta synthase deficient homocystinuria. Cgl null mice of both sexes exhibited decreased expression of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase compared to WT controls. Female Cgl null mice exhibited a sex-specific induction of betaine homocysteine S-methyltransferase and methionine adenosyltransferase 1, alpha and a 70% decrease in methionine synthase expression accompanied by significantly decreased plasma methionine. Decreased plasma cysteine levels in female Cgl null mice were associated with sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine dioxygenase expression. Comparative histological assessment between cystathionine beta-synthase and Cgl null mice indicated that the therapeutic potential of cystathionine against liver injury merits possible further investigation. Collectively, our data demonstrates the importance of considering sex when investigating mouse models of inborn errors of metabolism and indicate that while female Cgl null mice are of questionable utility for studying the physiological role of hydrogen sulfide, they could serve as a useful model for studying the consequences of methionine synthase deficiency and the methylfolate trap. PMID:26276101

  7. Quantitation of cellular metabolic fluxes of methionine.

    PubMed

    Shlomi, Tomer; Fan, Jing; Tang, Baiqing; Kruger, Warren D; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2014-02-01

    Methionine is an essential proteogenic amino acid. In addition, it is a methyl donor for DNA and protein methylation and a propylamine donor for polyamine biosynthesis. Both the methyl and propylamine donation pathways involve metabolic cycles, and methods are needed to quantitate these cycles. Here, we describe an analytical approach for quantifying methionine metabolic fluxes that accounts for the mixing of intracellular and extracellular methionine pools. We observe that such mixing prevents isotope tracing experiments from reaching the steady state due to the large size of the media pools and hence precludes the use of standard stationary metabolic flux analysis. Our approach is based on feeding cells with (13)C methionine and measuring the isotope-labeling kinetics of both intracellular and extracellular methionine by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). We apply this method to quantify methionine metabolism in a human fibrosarcoma cell line and study how methionine salvage pathway enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), frequently deleted in cancer, affects methionine metabolism. We find that both transmethylation and propylamine transfer fluxes amount to roughly 15% of the net methionine uptake, with no major changes due to MTAP deletion. Our method further enables the quantification of flux through the pro-tumorigenic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase, and this flux increases 2-fold following MTAP deletion. The analytical approach used to quantify methionine metabolic fluxes is applicable for other metabolic systems affected by mixing of intracellular and extracellular metabolite pools.

  8. Methionine restriction and lifespan control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition is associated with longevity in various organisms. However, it has also been shown that reduced calorie intake is often ineffective in extending lifespan. Selecting optimal dietary regimens for DR studies is complicated, as the same regimen may lead to different outcomes depending on genotype and environmental factors. Recent studies suggested that interventions such as moderate protein restriction with/without adequate nutrition (e.g. particular amino acids or carbohydrates) may have additional beneficial effects mediated by certain metabolic and hormonal factors implicated in the biology of aging, regardless of total calorie intake. In particular, it was shown that restriction of a single amino acid, methionine, can mimic the effects of DR and extend lifespan in various model organisms. We discuss beneficial effects of methionine-restricted (MR) diet, the molecular pathways involved, and the use of this regimen in longevity interventions. PMID:26663138

  9. Methionine sulfoximine intensifies cancer anorexia.

    PubMed

    Chance, W T; Zhang, F S; Fischer, J E

    1991-05-01

    Consistent anorexia was first observed 33 days after inoculating Fischer 344 rats with methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma. Daily treatment of a similar group of rats with the glutamine synthetase inhibitor, methionine sulfoximine, elicited significant reductions of feeding by day 29 at a dose that had no effect on nontumor-bearing rats. Blood concentrations of ammonia were elevated in both groups of tumor-bearing rats and brain ammonia level was increased in the methionine sulfoximine-treated tumor-bearing rats. Forebrain concentrations of tyrosine, tryptophan, DOPAC and 5-HIAA were elevated in both groups of tumor-bearing rats. Since ammonia is detoxified through the glutamine synthetase reaction, these results suggest that blood and brain ammonia concentrations are more important than the neurochemical consequences of ammonia detoxification for the etiology of cancer anorexia.

  10. A dodecylamine derivative of cyanocobalamin potently inhibits the activities of cobalamin-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Bito, Tomohiro; Yabuta, Yukinori; Ichiyanagi, Tsuyoshi; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we showed that cyanocobalamin dodecylamine, a ribose 5'-carbamate derivative of cyanocobalamin, was absorbed and accumulated to significant levels by Caenorhabditis elegans and was not further metabolized. The levels of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine, which serve as indicators of cobalamin deficiency, were significantly increased in C. elegans treated with the dodecylamine derivative, indicating severe cobalamin deficiency. Kinetic studies show that the affinity of the cyanocobalamin dodecylamine derivative was greater for two cobalamin-dependent enzymes, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase, compared with their respective coenzymes, suggesting that the dodecylamine derivative inactivated these enzymes. The dodecylamine derivative did not affect the levels of mRNAs encoding these enzymes or those of other proteins involved in intercellular cobalamin metabolism, including methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (mmcm-1), methylmalonic acidemia cobalamin A complementation group (mmaa-1), methylmalonic aciduria cblC type (cblc-1), and methionine synthase reductase (mtrr-1). In contrast, the level of the mRNAs encoding cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (mmab-1) was increased significantly and identical to that of cobalamin-deficient C. elegans. These results indicate that the cyanocobalamin-dodecylamine derivative acts as a potent inhibitor of cobalamin-dependent enzymes and induces severe cobalamin deficiency in C. elegans.

  11. Increasing levels of dietary crystalline methionine affect plasma methionine profiles, ammonia excretion, and the expression of genes related to the hepatic intermediary metabolism in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Rolland, Marine; Skov, Peter V; Larsen, Bodil K; Holm, Jørgen; Gómez-Requeni, Pedro; Dalsgaard, Johanne

    2016-08-01

    Strictly carnivorous fish with high requirements for dietary protein, such as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are interesting models for studying the role of amino acids as key regulators of intermediary metabolism. Methionine is an essential amino acid for rainbow trout, and works as a signalling factor in different metabolic pathways. The study investigated the effect of increasing dietary methionine intake on the intermediary metabolism in the liver of juvenile rainbow trout. For this purpose, five diets were formulated with increasing methionine levels from 0.60 to 1.29% dry matter. The diets were fed in excess for six weeks before three sampling campaigns carried out successively to elucidate (i) the hepatic expression of selected genes involved in lipid, glucose and amino acid metabolism; (ii) the postprandial ammonia excretion; and (iii) the postprandial plasma methionine concentrations. The transcript levels of enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (fatty acid synthase, glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 a), gluconeogenesis (fructose-1,6-biphosphatase) and amino acid catabolism (alanine amino transferase and glutamate dehydrogenase) were significantly affected by the increase in dietary methionine. Changes in gene expression reflected to some extent the decrease in ammonia excretion (P=0.022) and in the hepatosomatic index (HSI; P<0.001) when dietary methionine increased. Postprandial plasma methionine concentrations correlated positively with the dietary level (P<0.001) at the different sampling points. The study shows that the expression of several genes related to the hepatic intermediary metabolism in rainbow trout responded in a dose-dependent manner to increasing levels of dietary methionine.

  12. Increasing levels of dietary crystalline methionine affect plasma methionine profiles, ammonia excretion, and the expression of genes related to the hepatic intermediary metabolism in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Rolland, Marine; Skov, Peter V; Larsen, Bodil K; Holm, Jørgen; Gómez-Requeni, Pedro; Dalsgaard, Johanne

    2016-08-01

    Strictly carnivorous fish with high requirements for dietary protein, such as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are interesting models for studying the role of amino acids as key regulators of intermediary metabolism. Methionine is an essential amino acid for rainbow trout, and works as a signalling factor in different metabolic pathways. The study investigated the effect of increasing dietary methionine intake on the intermediary metabolism in the liver of juvenile rainbow trout. For this purpose, five diets were formulated with increasing methionine levels from 0.60 to 1.29% dry matter. The diets were fed in excess for six weeks before three sampling campaigns carried out successively to elucidate (i) the hepatic expression of selected genes involved in lipid, glucose and amino acid metabolism; (ii) the postprandial ammonia excretion; and (iii) the postprandial plasma methionine concentrations. The transcript levels of enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (fatty acid synthase, glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 a), gluconeogenesis (fructose-1,6-biphosphatase) and amino acid catabolism (alanine amino transferase and glutamate dehydrogenase) were significantly affected by the increase in dietary methionine. Changes in gene expression reflected to some extent the decrease in ammonia excretion (P=0.022) and in the hepatosomatic index (HSI; P<0.001) when dietary methionine increased. Postprandial plasma methionine concentrations correlated positively with the dietary level (P<0.001) at the different sampling points. The study shows that the expression of several genes related to the hepatic intermediary metabolism in rainbow trout responded in a dose-dependent manner to increasing levels of dietary methionine. PMID:27105833

  13. Methionine-sensitive glycolysis in transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Boerner, P; Racker, E

    1985-10-01

    Glycolysis in several tumor cell lines grown in tissue culture was inhibited by methionine. Kirsten murine sarcoma virus-transformed rat kidney cells (K-NRK) were inhibited 60-75% by 10 mM methionine, whereas normal rat kidney (NRK-49F) cells showed little or no inhibition. Inhibition of glycolysis in K-NRK cells was manifest 2-4 hr after exposure to the amino acid. Glycolysis in a chemically transformed cell line of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells was also sensitive to methionine, but maximal inhibition (75%) required 18-24 hr of incubation with the amino acid. Under the same conditions glycolysis in the nontransformed canine cells was less than 20% inhibited by methionine. In Ehrlich ascites tumor cells grown in tissue culture, 10 mM methionine inhibited glycolysis by about 50%. Inhibition of glycolysis, even by 50 mM methionine, was rapidly reversible. Within 2 hr after removal of methionine the rate of glycolytic activity was restored to that observed in control cells. Furthermore, inhibition by methionine required a minimum level (7%) of serum in the growth medium and inhibition was not sensitive to cycloheximide. Only amino acids that are transported by system A (including the nonmetabolized analogue methylaminoisobutyric acid) specifically inhibited glycolysis in tumor cells. The only exception was phenylalanine, which was toxic to both transformed and normal cell lines.

  14. Methionine production--a critical review.

    PubMed

    Willke, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an updated critical review about several attempts to contribute methionine (Met) to the world market with an emphasis on fermentation processes, especially from natural biological sources. Analytical methods for the determination of methionine are reviewed as well as applications in feed, food, pharmacy, and medicine. Fermentation studies published within the last five decades are elucidated critically, mainly with respect to the sulfur balance, substrate yield, and the analytical validity. From all the published fermentation data, it can be concluded that up to now no more than 5 g/L methionine are achievable without using genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The highest L-methionine concentration from natural sources reached so far amounts to 35 g/L and is published as a patent using a GMO of Escherichia coli. The review closes with a comprehensive overview of the role and activities of global methionine manufacturers. Some current market data is also presented. PMID:25381187

  15. Methionine production--a critical review.

    PubMed

    Willke, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an updated critical review about several attempts to contribute methionine (Met) to the world market with an emphasis on fermentation processes, especially from natural biological sources. Analytical methods for the determination of methionine are reviewed as well as applications in feed, food, pharmacy, and medicine. Fermentation studies published within the last five decades are elucidated critically, mainly with respect to the sulfur balance, substrate yield, and the analytical validity. From all the published fermentation data, it can be concluded that up to now no more than 5 g/L methionine are achievable without using genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The highest L-methionine concentration from natural sources reached so far amounts to 35 g/L and is published as a patent using a GMO of Escherichia coli. The review closes with a comprehensive overview of the role and activities of global methionine manufacturers. Some current market data is also presented.

  16. Methionine metabolism in Yucatan miniature swine.

    PubMed

    McBreairty, Laura E

    2016-06-01

    Methionine is an essential amino acid which when not incorporated into protein, can be converted to S-adenosylmethionine, the universal methyl donor in over 200 transmethylation reactions, which include creatine and phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis, as well as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) methylation. Following transmethylation, homocysteine is formed, which can be converted to cysteine via transsulfuration or remethylated to methionine by receiving a methyl group from folate or betaine. Changes to methyl group availability in utero can lead to permanent changes in epigenetic patterns of DNA methylation, which has been implicated in "fetal programming", a phenomenon associated with poor nutrition during fetal development that results in low birth weight and disease in later life. It has been shown that programming can also occur in the neonate. Our global objective was to understand how the variability of nutrients involved in methionine metabolism can affect methionine and methyl group availability. We hypothesize that nutrients that converge on methionine metabolism can affect methionine availability for its various functions. In this thesis, we used intrauterine growth restricted (IUGR) piglets to investigate whether a global nutritional insult in utero can lead to a perturbed methionine metabolism. Our results demonstrate that IUGR piglets have a lower capacity to dispose of homocysteine via both transsulfuration and remethylation pathways, as well as a lower incorporation of methyl groups into PC. The second objective of this thesis was to determine whether variation in methionine supply and demand can affect methionine availability. We demonstrated that stimulating either acute or chronic creatine synthesis leads to lower methyl incorporation into protein and PC in pigs. Furthermore, when methionine is limiting, supplementation with either folate or betaine leads to higher methionine availability for protein synthesis. Finally, because creatine is

  17. Methionine metabolism in human pregnancy123

    PubMed Central

    Dasarathy, Jaividhya; Gruca, Lourdes L; Bennett, Carole; Parimi, Prabhu S; Duenas, Clarita; Marczewski, Susan; Fierro, Julie L

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hyperhomocysteinemia during pregnancy, which is a consequence of perturbations in methionine and/or folate metabolism, has been implicated in adverse outcomes such as neural tube defects, preeclampsia, spontaneous abortion, and premature delivery. The adaptive changes in methionine metabolism during pregnancy in humans have not been determined. Objective: Our objective was to examine the kinetics of methionine and its rate of transsulfuration and transmethylation in healthy women with advancing gestation. Design: The whole-body rate of appearance (Ra) of methionine and phenylalanine was measured in healthy pregnant women during the first (n = 10), second (n = 5), and third (n = 10) trimesters of pregnancy. These data were compared with those for nonpregnant women (n = 8). Tracers [1-13C]methionine, [C2H3]methionine, and [2H5]phenylalanine were administered as prime-constant rate infusions. The effect of enteral high-protein, mixed-nutrient load on tracer-determined variables was also examined. Results: In pregnant women, the Ra of phenylalanine was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the first trimester than in the second and third trimesters and was significantly lower than that in nonpregnant women. A linear positive correlation was evident between gestational age and phenylalanine Ra. The fractional rate and total rate of transsulfuration of methionine was significantly (P < 0.05) higher during the first trimester, whereas the rate of transmethylation was higher during the third trimester. Plasma concentrations of total cysteine and homocysteine were lower during pregnancy. Conclusions: Uncomplicated pregnancy in humans is associated with a higher rate of transsulfuration early in gestation and a higher rate of transmethylation of methionine in late gestation. These data may have implications for understanding the role of methionine and homocysteine in complications of pregnancy and for the nutritional care of pregnant women. PMID:19939983

  18. 21 CFR 172.399 - Zinc methionine sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc methionine sulfate. 172.399 Section 172.399... Additives § 172.399 Zinc methionine sulfate. Zinc methionine sulfate, CAS Reg. No. 56329-42-1, may be safely... reaction between equimolar amounts of zinc sulfate and DL-methionine in purified water. (b) The...

  19. Interaction of genetic mechanisms regulating methionine concentration in maize grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methionine is a limiting amino acid in poultry diets so methionine supplementation is typically required to meet nutritional demands. Maize varieties with increased methionine levels have been developed utilizing three different approaches: i.) increased levels of the methionine-rich 10 kDa zein, ii...

  20. Methionine depletion modulates the antitumor and antimetastatic efficacy of ethionine.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Tan, Y; Kubota, T; Moossa, A R; Hoffman, R M

    1996-01-01

    The elevated methionine requirement for the growth of tumors, termed methionine dependence, is a potentially highly effective therapeutic target. To attack this target we are developing anti-methionine chemotherapy. In this study of anti-methionine chemotherapy we have observed that the methionine analog ethionine is synergistic with methionine depletion in arresting the growth of the Yoshida sarcoma both in vitro and when transplanted to nude mice. In contrast, ethionine in vitro in a methionine-containing medium is not effective against Yoshida sarcoma cells. Similarly, ethionine administered along with a methionine-containing diet is ineffective against the Yoshida sarcoma growing in nude mice. A methionine-depleted diet alone is only partially effective against tumor growth. The Yoshida sarcoma gave rise to metastases in 75% of the- organs observed in the mice on the methionine-containing diet, and 43 % of the organs in the mice on the methionine-free diet. In striking contrast, no metastases were observed in the ethionine-treated animals on the methionine-free diet. Anti-methionine chemotherapy consisting of dietary methionine depletion and ethionine administration caused an initial weight loss but the animals weight stabilized resulting in no animal deaths. The synergism of ethionine and methionine depletion is markedly similar in vitro and in vivo suggesting the observed efficacy is due to the specific anti-methionine targeting. Thus methionine depletion highly potentiates the anti-tumor and anti-metastatic effectiveness of ethionine suggesting that anti-methionine chemotherapy consisting of methionine depletion as a modulator of methionine analogs holds great promise as a new, tumor-selective therapeutic approach.

  1. Acetylmethionine as a source of methionine for the rat.

    PubMed

    Boggs, R W; Rotruck, J T; Damico, R A

    1975-03-01

    A-Acetyl-L-methionine and N-acetyl-D-methionine were compared with L-methionine and D-methionine as sources of methionine. These derivatives were added to a sulfer amino acid-limited diet containing 10% soybean protein isolate. Weight gains, food intake, and protein efficiency ratios (PER) were determined in growing rats. N-Acetyl-L-methionine, L-methionine, and D-methionine produced an equivalent growth response and increase in PER above that of the basal diet. There was no response to supplementation with N-acetyl-D-methionine. An equivalent maximum growth response of rats fed-L-methionine or N-acetyl-D-methionine. An equivalent maximum growth response of rats fed L-methionine or N-acetyl-L-methionine was obtained when the total dietary sulfur amino acids compromised 0.36-0.41% of the diet. The nutritional similarities of methionine and N-acetyl-L-methionine suggest that the latter may be useful as a supplement to diets containing vegetable proteins that are deficient in sulfur amino acids.

  2. Methionine, pyridoxine and endothelial lesion in rats.

    PubMed

    Hladovec, J

    1980-01-01

    Methionine administered orally to rats produced a prolonged dose-dependent increase in endothelemia. The increase was observed after doses exceeding 100 mg/kg and was inhibited by a simultaneous administration of pyridoxine. The effect of methionine was also inhibited by trihydroxyethylrutoside and acetylsalicyclic acid. Endothelemia was increased furthermore by oral administration of cysteine and cystine and this increase was again inhibited by pyridoxine.

  3. Multiple Roles of ATP:Cob(I)alamin Adenosyltransferases in the Conversion of B12 to Coenzyme B12

    PubMed Central

    Mera, Paola E.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2010-01-01

    Our mechanistic understanding of the conversion of vitamin B12 into coenzyme B12 (a.k.a. adenosylcobalamin, AdoCbl) has been substantially advanced in recent years. Insights into the multiple roles played by ATP:Cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ACA) enzymes have emerged through the crystallographic, spectroscopic, biochemical, and mutational analyses of wild-type and variant proteins. ACA enzymes circumvent the thermodynamic barrier posed by the very low redox potential associated with the reduction of cob(II)alamin to cob(I)alamin by generating a unique four-coordinate cob(II)alamin intermediate that is readily converted to cob(I)alamin by physiological reductants. ACA enzymes not only synthesize AdoCbl, they deliver it to the enzymes that use it, and, in some cases, enzymes whose function is needed to maintain the fidelity of the AdoCbl delivery process have been identified. Advances in our understanding of ACA enzyme function have provided valuable insights into the role of specific residues, and into why substitutions of these residues have profound negative effects on human health. From an applied science standpoint, a better understanding of the adenosylation reaction may lead to more efficient ways of synthesizing AdoCbl. PMID:20677021

  4. Purification and initial characterization of the ATP:corrinoid adenosyltransferase encoded by the cobA gene of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Suh, S; Escalante-Semerena, J C

    1995-01-01

    The cobA gene of Salmonella typhimurium and its product were overexpressed to approximately 20% of the total cell protein. CobA was purified to 98% homogeneity; N-terminal sequence analysis (21 residues) of homogeneous protein confirmed the predicted amino acid sequence. ATP:corrinoid adenosyltransferase activity was demonstrated in vitro to be associated with CobA. This activity was optimal at pH 8 and 37 degrees C. A quantitative preference was determined for Mn(II) cations and ATP. The apparent Km of CobA for ATP was 2.8 microM, and that for cob(I)alamin was 5.2 microM. Vmax was measured at 0.43 nmol/min. Cobinamide served as the substrate for CobA to yield adenosylcobinamide. Activity was stable at 4 degrees C for several weeks but was lost rapidly at room temperature (50% overnight). Dithiothreitol was required to maintain the enzymatic activity of CobA. PMID:7860601

  5. Metabolism of 5-methylthioribose to methionine

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, J.H.; Yang, S.F.

    1987-06-01

    During ethylene biosynthesis, the H/sub 3/CS-group of S-adenosylmethionine is released as 5'-methylthioadenosine, which is recycled to methionine via 5-methylthioribose (MTR). In mungbean hypocotyls and cell-free extracts of avocado, (/sup 14/C)MTR was converted into labeled methionine via 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyric acid (KMB) and 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutyric acid (HMB), as intermediates. Incubation of (ribose-U-/sup 14/C)MTR with avocado extract resulted in the production of (/sup 14/C)formate, indicating the conversion of MTR to KMB involves a loss of formate, presumably from C-1 of MTR. Tracer studies showed that KMB was converted readily in vivo and in vitro to methionine, while HMB was converted much more slowly. The conversion of KMB to methionine by dialyzed avocado extract requires an amino donor. Among several potential donors examined, L-glutamine was the most efficient. Anaerobiosis inhibited only partially the oxidation of MTR to formate, KMB/HMB, and methionine by avocado extract. The role of O/sub 2/ in the conversion of MTR to methionine is discussed.

  6. l-Methionine Placental Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, João R.; Correia-Branco, Ana; Ramalho, Carla; Gonçalves, Pedro; Pinho, Maria J.; Keating, Elisa

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the influence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and GDM-associated conditions upon the placental uptake of 14C-l-methionine (14C-l-Met). The 14C-l-Met uptake by human trophoblasts (TBs) obtained from normal pregnancies (normal trophoblast [NTB] cells) is mainly system l-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1 [L])-mediated, although a small contribution of system y+LAT2 is also present. Comparison of 14C-l-Met uptake by NTB and by human TBs obtained from GDM pregnancies (diabetic trophoblast [DTB] cells) reveals similar kinetics, but a contribution of systems A, LAT2, and b0+ and a greater contribution of system y+LAT1 appears to exist in DTB cells. Short-term exposure to insulin and long-term exposure to high glucose, tumor necrosis factor-α, and leptin decrease 14C-l-Met uptake in a human TB (Bewo) cell line. The effect of leptin was dependent upon phosphoinositide 3-kinase, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK/MEK 1/2), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. In conclusion, GDM does not quantitatively alter 14C-l-Met placental uptake, although it changes the nature of transporters involved in that process. PMID:23653387

  7. The catabolic enzyme methionine gamma-lyase limits methionine accumulation in potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tengfang; Joshi, Vijay; Jander, Georg

    2014-09-01

    Increasing methionine in potato tubers is desirable, both to increase the availability of this limiting essential amino acid and to enhance the aroma of baked and fried potatoes. Previous attempts to elevate potato methionine content using transgenic approaches have focused on increasing methionine biosynthesis. Higher isoleucine accumulation in these transgenic tubers suggested that the potatoes compensate for increased methionine biosynthesis with enhanced catabolism via methionine gamma-lyase (MGL), thereby producing 2-ketybutyrate for isoleucine biosynthesis. In the current study, we show that potato StMGL1 encodes a functional MGL in potato tubers. In planta silencing of StMGL1 results in an increased methionine to isoleucine ratio in the free amino acid profile of potato tubers and, in some transgenic lines, elevated accumulation of free methionine. In both wild-type and transgenic tubers, the ratio of methionine to isoleucine is negatively correlated with the level of StMGL1 transcript. A three-dimensional distribution of free amino acids in potato tubers is also described.

  8. The dynamics of methionine supply and demand during early development.

    PubMed

    McBreairty, Laura E; Bertolo, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Methionine is an indispensable amino acid that, when not incorporated into protein, is converted into the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine as entry into the methionine cycle. Following transmethylation, homocysteine is either remethylated to reform methionine or irreversibly trans-sulfurated to form cysteine. Methionine flux to transmethylation and to protein synthesis are both high in the neonate and this review focuses on the dynamics of methionine supply and demand during early development, when growth requires expansion of pools of protein and transmethylation products such as creatine and phosphatidylcholine (PC). The nutrients folate and betaine (derived from choline) donate a methyl group during remethylation, providing an endogenous supply of methionine to meet the methionine demand. During early development, variability in the dietary supply of these methionine cycle-related nutrients can affect both the supply and the demand of methionine. For example, a greater need for creatine synthesis can limit methionine availability for protein and PC synthesis, whereas increased availability of remethylation nutrients can increase protein synthesis if dietary methionine is limiting. Moreover, changes to methyl group availability early in life can lead to permanent changes in epigenetic patterns of DNA methylation, which have been implicated in the early origins of adult disease phenomena. This review aims to summarize how changes in methyl supply and demand can affect the availability of methionine for various functions and highlights the importance of variability in methionine-related nutrients in the infant diet. PMID:27177124

  9. Characterization of methionine oxidation and methionine sulfoxide reduction using methionine-rich cysteine-free proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Methionine (Met) residues in proteins can be readily oxidized by reactive oxygen species to Met sulfoxide (MetO). MetO is a promising physiological marker of oxidative stress and its inefficient repair by MetO reductases (Msrs) has been linked to neurodegeneration and aging. Conventional methods of assaying MetO formation and reduction rely on chromatographic or mass spectrometry procedures, but the use of Met-rich proteins (MRPs) may offer a more streamlined alternative. Results We carried out a computational search of completely sequenced genomes for MRPs deficient in cysteine (Cys) residues and identified several proteins containing 20% or more Met residues. We used these MRPs to examine Met oxidation and MetO reduction by in-gel shift assays and immunoblot assays with antibodies generated against various oxidized MRPs. The oxidation of Cys-free MRPs by hydrogen peroxide could be conveniently monitored by SDS-PAGE and was specific for Met, as evidenced by quantitative reduction of these proteins with Msrs in DTT- and thioredoxin-dependent assays. We found that hypochlorite was especially efficient in oxidizing MRPs. Finally, we further developed a procedure wherein antibodies made against oxidized MRPs were isolated on affinity resins containing same or other oxidized or reduced MRPs. This procedure yielded reagents specific for MetO in these proteins, but proved to be ineffective in developing antibodies with broad MetO specificity. Conclusion Our data show that MRPs provide a convenient tool for characterization of Met oxidation, MetO reduction and Msr activities, and could be used for various aspects of redox biology involving reversible Met oxidation. PMID:23088625

  10. A review of methionine dependency and the role of methionine restriction in cancer growth control and life-span extension.

    PubMed

    Cavuoto, Paul; Fenech, Michael F

    2012-10-01

    Methionine is an essential amino acid with many key roles in mammalian metabolism such as protein synthesis, methylation of DNA and polyamine synthesis. Restriction of methionine may be an important strategy in cancer growth control particularly in cancers that exhibit dependence on methionine for survival and proliferation. Methionine dependence in cancer may be due to one or a combination of deletions, polymorphisms or alterations in expression of genes in the methionine de novo and salvage pathways. Cancer cells with these defects are unable to regenerate methionine via these pathways. Defects in the metabolism of folate may also contribute to the methionine dependence phenotype in cancer. Selective killing of methionine dependent cancer cells in co-culture with normal cells has been demonstrated using culture media deficient in methionine. Several animal studies utilizing a methionine restricted diet have reported inhibition of cancer growth and extension of a healthy life-span. In humans, vegan diets, which can be low in methionine, may prove to be a useful nutritional strategy in cancer growth control. The development of methioninase which depletes circulating levels of methionine may be another useful strategy in limiting cancer growth. The application of nutritional methionine restriction and methioninase in combination with chemotherapeutic regimens is the current focus of clinical studies.

  11. 21 CFR 172.399 - Zinc methionine sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc methionine sulfate. 172.399 Section 172.399... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.399 Zinc methionine sulfate. Zinc methionine... conditions: (a) The additive is the product of the reaction between equimolar amounts of zinc sulfate and...

  12. 21 CFR 172.399 - Zinc methionine sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc methionine sulfate. 172.399 Section 172.399... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.399 Zinc methionine sulfate. Zinc methionine... conditions: (a) The additive is the product of the reaction between equimolar amounts of zinc sulfate and...

  13. 21 CFR 172.399 - Zinc methionine sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc methionine sulfate. 172.399 Section 172.399... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.399 Zinc methionine sulfate. Zinc methionine... conditions: (a) The additive is the product of the reaction between equimolar amounts of zinc sulfate and...

  14. 21 CFR 172.399 - Zinc methionine sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc methionine sulfate. 172.399 Section 172.399... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.399 Zinc methionine sulfate. Zinc methionine... conditions: (a) The additive is the product of the reaction between equimolar amounts of zinc sulfate and...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5475 - Methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methionine. 582.5475 Section 582.5475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5475 - Methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Methionine. 582.5475 Section 582.5475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5475 - Methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methionine. 582.5475 Section 582.5475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5475 - Methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Methionine. 582.5475 Section 582.5475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5475 - Methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methionine. 582.5475 Section 582.5475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  20. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of (36)S Isotopologues of Methionine and S-Adenosyl-L-methionine.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Myles B; Du, Quan; Schramm, Vern L

    2015-05-15

    Substrates containing isotope labels at specific atoms are required for transition-state analysis based on the measurement of multiple kinetic isotope effects.(36)S-labeled l-methionine and S-adenosyl-l-methionine were synthesized from elemental sulfur using a chemoenzymatic approach with >98% (36)S enrichment. This method provides access to previously inaccessible sulfur isotope-labeled substrates for sulfur kinetic isotope effect studies.

  1. Rat bioassays for methionine availability in 16 food sources.

    PubMed

    McDonough, F E; Bodwell, C E; Staples, R S; Wells, P A

    1989-01-01

    Methionine availabilities of 16 test proteins were assessed by comparing ten day rat growth response to the test diets and reference (casein) diets. In a preliminary study, various concentrations of methionine and cystine were fed to determine methionine requirements and effect of excess cystine. Results indicated a methionine requirement of about 550 mg per 100 g diet. Cystine had a sparing affect of 50-55%, i.e., about 300 mg could be used to meet methionine requirements. Further additions of cystine (up to 2.6 times methionine) did not affect rat growth. Methionine availabilities were excellent (88-100%) for 15 of the 16 test foods; only pinto beans (58%) were low, but prior evidence indicates that the poor growth response was due to some factor other than availability. PMID:2710754

  2. Factors influencing methionine toxicity in young bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Young Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) were fed low and adequate protein purified diets with and without excess methionine to evaluate factors affecting methionine toxicity. Growth of quail fed an adequate protein (27%) diet, without supplemental glycine, was depressed by 1.75% and 2.25% excess methionine. Supplemental glycine (.3%) alleviated growth depression caused by 2.25% excess methionine. Quail fed 1.75% and 2.25% excess methionine developed signs of toxicity characterized by weakness, a lowered, outstretched neck when moving, and ataxia. In addition, quail would fall on their sides when disturbed and spin with their heads retracted. These conditions were transient in nature. Growth of quail fed a low protein (18.9%) diet was depressed by 1% and 1.5% excess methionine and DL-homocystine. Quail fed 1% and 1.5% excess methionine in this diet also developed signs of toxicity, the incidence of which was greater and the duration longer than occurred with quail fed adequate protein. Supplementing a low protein (20.15%) diet with .3% or .6% glycine or threonine or a combination of these amino acids did not alleviate growth depression caused by 1.5% excess methionine; however, 2% and 3% supplemental glycine were somewhat effective. Supplements of glycine (2%, 3%) and threonine (1%) completely reversed growth depression from 1% excess methionine but did not influence growth of controls, indicating that both amino acids counteract methionine toxicity. Both glycine and threonine alone improved growth by about the same extent in diets with 1% or 1.5% excess methionine; however, these amino acids alleviated less than 30% of the growth depression resulting from 1.5% excess methionine. The effectiveness of glycine in alleviating methionine toxicity in a low protein diet was decreased, and hemoglobin levels were depressed with 1.5% excess methionine compared to less amounts.

  3. Experimental and theoretical proton affinities of methionine, methionine sulfoxide and their N- and C-terminal derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioe, Hadi; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; Gronert, Scott; Austin, Allen; Reid, Gavin E.

    2007-11-01

    The proton affinities of methionine, methionine sulfoxide and their derivatives (methionine methyl ester, methionine sulfoxide methyl ester, methionine methyl amide, methionine sulfoxide methyl amide, N-acetyl methionine, N-acetyl methionine sulfoxide, N-acetyl methionine methyl ester, N-acetyl methionine sulfoxide methyl ester, N-acetyl methionine methyl amide and N-acetyl methionine sulfoxide methyl amide) were experimentally determined using the kinetic method, in which proton bound dimers formed via electrospray ionization (ESI) were subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID) in a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In addition, theoretical calculations carried out at the MP2/6-311 + G(2d,p)//B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) level of theory to determine the global minima of the neutral and protonated species of all derivatives studied, were used to predict theoretical proton affinities. The density function theory calculations not only support the experimental proton affinities, but also provide structural insights into the types of hydrogen bonding that stabilize the neutral and protonated methionine or methionine sulfoxide derivatives. Comparison of the proton affinities of the various methionine and methionine sulfoxide derivatives reveals that: (i) oxidation of methionine derivatives to methionine sulfoxide derivatives results in an increase in proton affinity due to higher intrinsic proton affinity and an increase in the ring size formed through charge complexation of the sulfoxide group, which allows more efficient hydrogen bonding compared to the sulfide group; (ii) C-terminal modification by methyl esterification or methyl amidation increases the proton affinity in the order of methyl amide > methyl ester > carboxylic acid due to improved charge stabilization; (iii) N-terminal modification by N-acetylation decreases proton affinity of the derivatives due to lower intrinsic proton affinity of the N-acetyl group as well as due to stabilization of the attached

  4. Characterization of isolated yeast growth response to methionine analogs.

    PubMed

    Saengkerdsub, Suwat; Lingbeck, Jody M; Wilkinson, Heather H; O'Bryan, Corliss A; Crandall, Philip G; Muthaiyan, Arunachalam; Biswas, Debabrata; Ricke, Steven C

    2013-01-01

    Methionine is one of the first limiting amino acids in poultry nutrition. The use of methionine-rich natural feed ingredients, such as soybean meal or rapeseed meal may lead to negative environmental consequences. Amino acid supplementation leads to reduced use of protein-rich ingredients. The objectives of this study were isolation of potentially high content methionine-containing yeasts, quantification of methionine content in yeasts and their respective growth response to methionine analogs. Minimal medium was used as the selection medium and the isolation medium of methionine-producing yeasts from yeast collection and environmental samples, respectively. Two yeasts previously collected along with six additional strains isolated from Caucasian kefir grains, air-trapped, cantaloupe, and three soil samples could grow on minimal medium. Only two of the newly isolated strains, K1 and C1, grew in minimal medium supplied with either methionine analogs ethionine or norleucine at 0.5% (w/v). Based on large subunit rRNA sequences, these isolated strains were identified as Pichia udriavzevii/Issatchenkia orientalis. P. kudriavzevii/I. orentalis is a generally recognized as a safe organism. In addition, methionine produced by K1 and C1 yeast hydrolysate yielded 1.3 ± 0.01 and 1.1 ± 0.01 mg g(-1) dry cell. Yeast strain K1 may be suitable as a potential source of methionine for dietary supplements in organic poultry feed but may require growth conditions to further increase their methionine content. PMID:24007489

  5. l-Methionine inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Maximo A.; Bosland, Maarten C.; da Silva, Cássio P.; Sares, Claudia T. Gomes; de Oliveira, Alana M. Cerqueira; Kemp, Rafael; dos Reis, Rodolfo B.; Martins, Vilma R.; Sampaio, Suely V.; Bland, Kirby I.; Grizzle, William E.; dos Santos, José S.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that l-methionine inhibits proliferation of breast, prostate, and colon cancer cells. This study extends these findings to BXPC-3 (mutated p53) and HPAC (wild-type p53) pancreatic cancer cells and explores the reversibility of these effects. Cells were exposed to l-methionine (5 mg/ml) for 7 days or for 3 days, followed by 4 days of culture without l-methionine (recovery). Cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle effects were assessed by flow cytometry after staining for Ki-67 or annexin V/propidium iodide. Cell proliferation was reduced by 31–35% after 7 days of methionine exposure; the effect persisted in BXPC-3 and HPAC cells after 4 days of recovery. Methionine increased apoptosis by 40–75% in HPAC cells, but not in BXPC-3 cells. Continuous exposure to methionine caused accumulation of BXPC-3 cells in the S phase and HPAC cells in both the G0/G1 and S phases; however, after 4 days of recovery, these effects disappeared. In conclusion, l-methionine inhibits proliferation and interferes with the cell cycle of BXPC-3 and HPAC pancreatic cancer cells; the effects on apoptosis remarkably persisted after methionine withdrawal. Apoptosis was induced only in BXPC-3 cells. Some of the differences in the effects of methionine between cell lines may be related to disparate p53 status. These findings warrant further studies on the potential therapeutic benefit of l-methionine against pancreatic cancer. PMID:24126240

  6. L-Methionine inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Maximo A; Bosland, Maarten C; da Silva, Cássio P; Gomes Sares, Claudia T; de Oliveira, Alana M Cerqueira; Kemp, Rafael; dos Reis, Rodolfo B; Martins, Vilma R; Sampaio, Suely V; Bland, Kirby I; Grizzle, William E; dos Santos, José S

    2014-02-01

    We have previously shown that L-methionine inhibits proliferation of breast, prostate, and colon cancer cells. This study extends these findings to BXPC-3 (mutated p53) and HPAC (wild-type p53) pancreatic cancer cells and explores the reversibility of these effects. Cells were exposed to L-methionine (5 mg/ml) for 7 days or for 3 days, followed by 4 days of culture without L-methionine (recovery). Cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle effects were assessed by flow cytometry after staining for Ki-67 or annexin V/propidium iodide. Cell proliferation was reduced by 31-35% after 7 days of methionine exposure; the effect persisted in BXPC-3 and HPAC cells after 4 days of recovery. Methionine increased apoptosis by 40-75% in HPAC cells, but not in BXPC-3 cells. Continuous exposure to methionine caused accumulation of BXPC-3 cells in the S phase and HPAC cells in both the G0/G1 and S phases; however, after 4 days of recovery, these effects disappeared. In conclusion, L-methionine inhibits proliferation and interferes with the cell cycle of BXPC-3 and HPAC pancreatic cancer cells; the effects on apoptosis remarkably persisted after methionine withdrawal. Apoptosis was induced only in BXPC-3 cells. Some of the differences in the effects of methionine between cell lines may be related to disparate p53 status. These findings warrant further studies on the potential therapeutic benefit of L-methionine against pancreatic cancer.

  7. Methionine restriction and life-span control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition is associated with longevity in various organisms. However, it has also been shown that reduced calorie intake is often ineffective in extending life span. Selecting optimal dietary regimens for DR studies is complicated, as the same regimen may lead to different outcomes depending on genotype and environmental factors. Recent studies suggested that interventions such as moderate protein restriction with or without adequate nutrition (e.g., particular amino acids or carbohydrates) may have additional beneficial effects mediated by certain metabolic and hormonal factors implicated in the biology of aging, regardless of total calorie intake. In particular, it was shown that restriction of a single amino acid, methionine, can mimic the effects of DR and extend life span in various model organisms. We discuss the beneficial effects of a methionine-restricted diet, the molecular pathways involved, and the use of this regimen in longevity interventions.

  8. Role of methionine in biosynthesis of prodigiosin by Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Qadri, S M; Williams, R P

    1973-12-01

    Methionine alone did not allow biosynthesis of prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-amyl-6-methoxyprodigiosene) in nonproliferating cells (NPC) of Serratia marcescens strain Nima. However, when methionine was added to NPC synthesizing prodigiosin in the presence of other amino acids, the lag period for synthesis of prodigiosin was shortened, an increased amount of the pigment was formed, and the optimal concentrations of the other amino acids were reduced. Less prodigiosin was synthesized when addition of methionine was delayed beyond 4 h. The specific activity of prodigiosin synthesized by addition of (14)CH(3)-methionine was 40 to 50 times greater than that synthesized from methionine-2-(14)C or (14)COOH-methionine. NPC of mutant OF of S. marcescens synthesized norprodigiosin (2-methyl-3-amyl-6-hydroxyprodigiosene), and the specific activity of this pigment synthesized in the presence of (14)CH(3)-methionine was only 5 to 13 times greater than that synthesized from methionine-2-(14)C or (14)COOH-methionine. A particulate, cell-free extract of mutant WF of S. marcescens methylated norprodigiosin to form prodigiosin. When the extract was added to NPC of mutant OF synthesizing norprodigiosin in the presence of (14)CH(3)-methionine, the prodigiosin formed had 80% greater specific activity than the norprodigiosin synthesized in the absence of the extract. The C6 hydroxyl group of norprodigiosin was methylated in the presence of the extract and methionine. Biosynthesis of prodigiosin by NPC of strain Nima also was augmented by addition of S-adenosylmethionine. Various analogues of methionine such as norleucine, norvaline, ethionine, and alpha-methylmethionine did not affect biosynthesis of prodigiosin by NPC either in the presence or absence of methionine.

  9. Redox regulation of methionine aminopeptidase 2 activity.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Joyce; Wong, Jason W H; Hogg, Philip J

    2014-05-23

    Protein translation is initiated with methionine in eukaryotes, and the majority of proteins have their N-terminal methionine removed by methionine aminopeptidases (MetAP1 and MetAP2) prior to action. Methionine removal can be important for protein function, localization, or stability. No mechanism of regulation of MetAP activity has been identified. MetAP2, but not MetAP1, contains a single Cys(228)-Cys(448) disulfide bond that has an -RHStaple configuration and links two β-loop structures, which are hallmarks of allosteric disulfide bonds. From analysis of crystal structures and using mass spectrometry and activity assays, we found that the disulfide bond exists in oxidized and reduced states in the recombinant enzyme. The disulfide has a standard redox potential of -261 mV and is efficiently reduced by the protein reductant, thioredoxin, with a rate constant of 16,180 m(-1) s(-1). The MetAP2 disulfide bond also exists in oxidized and reduced states in glioblastoma tumor cells, and stressing the cells by oxygen or glucose deprivation results in more oxidized enzyme. The Cys(228)-Cys(448) disulfide is at the rim of the active site and is only three residues distant from the catalytic His(231), which suggested that cleavage of the bond would influence substrate hydrolysis. Indeed, oxidized and reduced isoforms have different catalytic efficiencies for hydrolysis of MetAP2 peptide substrates. These findings indicate that MetAP2 is post-translationally regulated by an allosteric disulfide bond, which controls substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency.

  10. Methionine restriction beyond life-span extension.

    PubMed

    Ables, Gene P; Hens, Julie R; Nichenametla, Sailendra N

    2016-01-01

    Dietary methionine restriction (MR) extends life span across species via various intracellular regulatory mechanisms. In rodents, MR induces resistance against adiposity, improves hepatic glucose metabolism, preserves cardiac function, and reduces body size, all of which can affect the onset of age-related diseases. Recent studies have shown that MR-affected biomarkers, such as fibroblast growth factor 21, adiponectin, leptin, cystathionine β synthase, and insulin-like growth factor 1, can potentially alter physiology. The beneficial effects of MR could be explained in part by its ability to reduce mitochondrial oxidative stress. Studies have revealed that MR can reduce reactive oxygen species that damage cells and promote cancer progression. It has been demonstrated that either MR or the targeting of specific genes in the methionine cycle could induce cell apoptosis while decreasing proliferation in several cancer models. The complete mechanism underlying the actions of MR on the cell cycle during cancer has not been fully elucidated. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as methylation and noncoding RNAs, are also possible downstream effectors of MR; future studies should help to elucidate some of these mechanisms. Despite evidence that changes in dietary methionine can affect epigenetics, it remains unknown whether epigenetics is a mechanism in MR. This review summarizes research on MR and its involvement in metabolism, cancer, and epigenetics.

  11. Comparison of the effects of seleno-l-methionine, seleno-dl-methionine, and selenized yeast on reproduction of mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    The toxicities of seleno-L-methionine, seleno-DL-methionine, and selenized yeast were compared. Ten pairs of mallards were fed a control diet and 15 pairs were fed diets containing 10 ppm selenium as seleno-DL-methionine, seleno-L-methionine, or selenized yeast. Hatching of fertile eggs was significantly lower for females fed 10 ppm selenium as seleno-DL-methionine (7.6%) and seleno-L-methionine (6.4%) than for controls (41.3%). Survival of ducklings was lower when their parents had been fed 10 ppm selenium as seleno-L-methionine (20.0%) than for controls (98.4%). The number of 6-day-old ducklings produced per female was significantly lower for mallards fed 10 ppm selenium as seleno-DL-methionine (0.47) or selenized yeast (2.67) than for controls (6.10), and was significantly lower for mallards fed seleno-L-methionine (0.13) than for mallards fed selenized yeast. The eighth eggs of females fed the DL or L forms of selenomethionine contained means of 9.2 and 8.9 ppm selenium, wet weight; these means were higher than the mean (6.6 ppm) for females fed selenized yeast. Among embryos that died at 7 days of age or older, the percentage of embryos that were deformed was 1.3% for controls, 24.6% for seleno-DL-methionine, 28.2% for seleno-L-methionine, and 11.0% for selenized yeast. The results suggested that seleno-DL-methionine and seleno-L-methionine were of similar toxicity and were both more toxic than selenium from selenized yeast.

  12. A Methionine Residue Promotes Hyperoxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine of Mouse Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geumsoo; Levine, Rodney L

    2016-06-28

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (msrA) reduces methionine sulfoxide in proteins back to methionine. Its catalytic cysteine (Cys72-SH) has a low pKa that facilitates oxidation by methionine sulfoxide to cysteine sulfenic acid. If the catalytic cycle proceeds efficiently, the sulfenic acid is reduced back to cysteine at the expense of thioredoxin. However, the sulfenic acid is vulnerable to "irreversible" oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid that inactivates msrA (hyperoxidation). We observed that human msrA is resistant to hyperoxidation while mouse msrA is readily hyperoxidized by micromolar concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. We investigated the basis of this difference in susceptibility to hyperoxidation and established that it is controlled by the presence or absence of a Met residue in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the enzyme, Met229. This residue is Val in human msrA, and when it was mutated to Met, human msrA became sensitive to hyperoxidation. Conversely, mouse msrA was rendered insensitive to hyperoxidation when Met229 was mutated to Val or one of five other residues. Positioning of the methionine at residue 229 is not critical, as hyperoxidation occurred as long as the methionine was located within the group of 14 carboxyl-terminal residues. The carboxyl domain of msrA is known to be flexible and to have access to the active site, and Met residues are known to form stable, noncovalent bonds with aromatic residues through interaction of the sulfur atom with the aromatic ring. We propose that Met229 forms such a bond with Trp74 at the active site, preventing formation of a protective sulfenylamide with Cys72 sulfenic acid. As a consequence, the sulfenic acid is available for facile, irreversible oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid. PMID:27259041

  13. Effects of D-methionine or L-methionine on root hair of Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Nobuharu; Yamaji, Yohei; Minoda, Masashi; Kubo, Motoki

    2003-01-01

    We examined the effects of D- or L-amino acids on the stimulation of Brassica rapa roots. When 6.7 microM of D-methionine (D-Met) or L-methionine (L-Met) was applied, root hair numbers increased. L-Met (above concentration of 67.0 microM) caused the tip of roots to spiral. When CoCl2 (ethylene synthesis inhibitor) was added into the medium, L-Met lost its activity but COCl2 did not inhibit the bioactivity of D-Met.

  14. Comparison of methionine sources around requirement levels using a methionine efficacy method in 0 to 28 day old broilers.

    PubMed

    Agostini, P S; Dalibard, P; Mercier, Y; Van der Aar, P; Van der Klis, J D

    2016-03-01

    The addition of methionine in the poultry feed industry is still facing the relative efficacy dilemma between DL-methionine (DLM) and hydroxy-methionine (HMTBA). The aim of this study was to compare the effect of dietary DLM and HMTBA on broiler performance at different levels of total sulfur amino acids (TSAA). The treatments consisted of a basal diet without methionine addition, and 4 increasing methionine doses for both sources resulting in TSAA/Lysine ratios from 0.62 to 0.73 in the starter phase and 0.59 to 0.82 in the grower phase. The comparison of product performance was performed by three-way ANOVA analysis and by methionine efficacy calculation as an alternative method of comparison. Growth results obtained during the starter phase with the different methionine supplementations did not show significant growth responses to TSAA levels, indicating a lower methionine requirement in the starter phase than currently assumed. However, a significant methionine dose effect was obtained for the period 10 to 28 day of age and for the entire growth period of 0 to 28 day of age. Excepting a significant gender effect, the statistical analysis did not allow for the discrimination of methionine sources, and no interaction between source and dose level was observed up to 28 days of age. A significant interaction between source and dose level was observed for methionine efficacy for the grower phase, and the total growth period showed better HMTBA efficacy at higher TSAA value. The exponential model fitted to each methionine source for body weight response depending on methionine intake or for feed conversion ratio (FCR) depending on methionine doses did not allow the methionine sources to be distinguished. Altogether, these results conclude that methionine sources lead to similar performances response when compared at TSAA values around the broiler requirement level. These results also showed that at TSAA values above requirement, HMTBA had a better methionine efficacy

  15. Regulation of thrombosis and vascular function by protein methionine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Sean X; Stevens, Jeff W; Lentz, Steven R

    2015-06-18

    Redox biology is fundamental to both normal cellular homeostasis and pathological states associated with excessive oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species function not only as signaling molecules but also as redox regulators of protein function. In the vascular system, redox reactions help regulate key physiologic responses such as cell adhesion, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, angiogenesis, inflammatory gene expression, and apoptosis. During pathologic states, altered redox balance can cause vascular cell dysfunction and affect the equilibrium between procoagulant and anticoagulant systems, contributing to thrombotic vascular disease. This review focuses on the emerging role of a specific reversible redox reaction, protein methionine oxidation, in vascular disease and thrombosis. A growing number of cardiovascular and hemostatic proteins are recognized to undergo reversible methionine oxidation, in which methionine residues are posttranslationally oxidized to methionine sulfoxide. Protein methionine oxidation can be reversed by the action of stereospecific enzymes known as methionine sulfoxide reductases. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is a prototypical methionine redox sensor that responds to changes in the intracellular redox state via reversible oxidation of tandem methionine residues in its regulatory domain. Several other proteins with oxidation-sensitive methionine residues, including apolipoprotein A-I, thrombomodulin, and von Willebrand factor, may contribute to vascular disease and thrombosis.

  16. A 4-week toxicity study of methionine in male rats.

    PubMed

    Chin, Keigi; Toue, Sakino; Kawamata, Yasuko; Watanabe, Akiko; Miwa, Tadashi; Smriga, Miro; Sakai, Ryosei

    2015-01-01

    To examine 4-week toxicity of l-methionine (methionine), 5-week-old Fisher strain male rats were fed on diets containing 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.9, 2.7 (w/w) of added methionine. Although no deaths were recorded, the highest dose of methionine (2.7% [w/w] of diet) reduced food intake and significantly suppressed growth rate. Growth suppression was characterized by an increase in hemolysis, splenic, and hepatic accumulation of hemosiderin, hemolytic anemia, and promotion of hematopoiesis. Other changes observed in the highest methionine intake group were a decrease in white blood cell count, thymus atrophy, and histological abnormalities in the adrenal gland and testis. Small, but significant, growth suppression, accompanied by some minor changes in plasma biochemical parameters, was also seen in rats fed on a test diet containing 0.9% (w/w) of additional methionine. Thus, no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) and lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) of diet-added methionine were determined at 0.3% and 0.9% (w/w), corresponding to 236 and 705 mg/kg/d body weight, respectively. Since the basal diet contained protein-bound methionine at 0.5% (w/w), NOAEL and LOAEL of total dietary methionine were estimated at 0.8% and 1.4% (w/w) of diet.

  17. Identification of Methionine Sulfoxide Diastereomers in Immunoglobulin Gamma Antibodies Using Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Khor, Hui K.; Jacoby, Michael E.; Squier, Thomas C.; Chu, Grace C.; Chelius, Dirk

    2010-06-01

    During prolonged periods of storage methionines in antibodies and other proteins are known to become oxidized to form methionine sulfoxides and sulfones. While these post-translational modifications are commonly identified by peptide mapping, it is currently problematic to identify the relative abundances of the S- and R-diastereomers of methionine sulfoxide (Met(O)) due to their identical polarities and masses. Accordingly, we have developed a separation methodology for the rapid and quantitative determination of the relative abundances of Met(O) diastereomers. Identification of these diastereomers takes advantage of the complementary stereospecificities of methionine sulfoxide reductase (Msr) enzymes MsrA and MsrB, which respectively promote the selective reduction of S- and R-diastereomers of Met(O). In addition, an MsrBA fusion protein that contained both Msr enzyme activities permitted the quantitative reduction of all Met(O). Using these Msr enzymes in combination with peptide mapping we are able to detect and differentiate Met-diastereomers in a monoclonal IgG2 and IgG1 antibody. We also monitored the formation of sulfones and studied the rate of oxidation in the different Met residues in our IgG2 antibody. The reported ability to separate and identify diastereomers of Met(O) permits a more complete characterization of Met oxidation products. All the affected Met residues (M251, M427, M396) in this study are conserved in human IgG sequences and therefore offer predictive potential in characterizing oxidative modification.

  18. Pyridinylpyrimidines selectively inhibit human methionine aminopeptidase-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengtao; Yang, Xinye; Zhang, Feiran; Gabelli, Sandra B; Wang, Renxiao; Zhang, Yihua; Bhat, Shridhar; Chen, Xiaochun; Furlani, Manuel; Amzel, L Mario; Liu, Jun O; Ma, Dawei

    2013-05-01

    Cellular protein synthesis is initiated with methionine in eukaryotes with few exceptions. Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) which catalyze the process of N-terminal methionine excision are essential for all organisms. In mammals, type 2 MetAP (MetAP2) is known to be important for angiogenesis, while type 1 MetAP (MetAP1) has been shown to play a pivotal role in cell proliferation. Our previous high-throughput screening of a commercial compound library uncovered a novel class of inhibitors for both human MetAP1 (HsMetAP1) and human MetAP2 (HsMetAP2). This class of inhibitors contains a pyridinylpyrimidine core. To understand the structure-activity relationship (SAR) and to search for analogues of 2 with greater potency and higher HsMetAP1-selectivity, a total of 58 analogues were acquired through either commercial source or by in-house synthesis and their inhibitory activities against HsMetAP1 and HsMetAP2 were determined. Through this systematic medicinal chemistry analysis, we have identified (1) 5-chloro-6-methyl-2-pyridin-2-ylpyrimidine as the minimum element for the inhibition of HsMetAP1; (2) 5'-chloro as the favored substituent on the pyridine ring for the enhanced potency against HsMetAP1; and (3) long C4 side chains as the essentials for higher HsMetAP1-selectivity. At the end of our SAR campaign, 25b, 25c, 26d and 30a-30c are among the most selective and potent inhibitors of purified HsMetAP1 reported to date. In addition, we also performed crystallographic analysis of one representative inhibitor (26d) in complex with N-terminally truncated HsMetAP1.

  19. L-methionine degradation potentialities of cheese-ripening microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bonnarme, P; Lapadatescu, C; Yvon, M; Spinnler, H E

    2001-11-01

    Volatile sulphur compounds are major flavouring compounds in many traditional fermented foods including cheeses. These compounds are products of the catabolism of L-methionine by cheese-ripening microorganisms. The diversity of L-methionine degradation by such microorganisms, however, remains to be characterized. The objective of this work was to compare the capacities to produce volatile sulphur compounds by five yeasts, Geotrichum candidum, Yarrowia lipolytica, Kluyveromyces lactis, Debaryomyces hansenii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and five bacteria, Brevibacterium linens, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Arthrobacter sp., Micrococcus lutens and Staphylococcus equorum of technological interest for cheese-ripening. The ability of whole cells of these microorganisms to generate volatile sulphur compounds from L-methionine was compared. The microorganisms produced a wide spectrum of sulphur compounds including methanethiol, dimethylsulfide, dimethyldisulfide, dimethyltrisulfide and also S-methylthioesters, which varied in amount and type according to strain. Most of the yeasts produced methanethiol, dimethylsulfide, dimethyldisulfide and dimethyltrisulfide but did not produce S-methylthioesters, apart from G. candidum that produced S-methyl thioacetate. Bacteria, especially Arth. sp. and Brevi. linens, produced the highest amounts and the greatest variety of volatile sulphur compounds includling methanethiol, sulfides and S-methylthioesters, e.g. S-methyl thioacetate, S-methyl thiobutyrate, S-methyl thiopropionate and S-methyl thioisovalerate. Cell-free extracts of all the yeasts and bacteria were examined for the activity of enzymes possibly involved in L-methionine catabolism, i.e. L-methionine demethiolase, L-methionine aminotransferase and L-methionine deaminase. They all possessed L-methionine demethiolase activity, while some (K. lactis, Deb. hansenii, Arth. sp., Staph. equorum) were deficient in L-methionine aminotransferase, and none produced L-methionine deaminase

  20. Dependence on exogenous methionine of rat sarcoma and murine leukemia cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Koziorowska, J; Pieńkowska, K; Tautt, J

    1980-01-01

    A comparative study was performed on methionine auxotrophy of rat sarcoma and murine leukemia cells taken directly from the organism and grown in culture in media lacking methionine or in which methionine was substituted by homocysteine. Methionine auxotrophy was observed in both kinds of cells. At low levels of methionine in the media containing homocysteine rat sarcoma cells showed an increase in growth. Addition of homocysteine to the media with low levels of methionine did not influence the survival of murine leukemia cells.

  1. Pig performance increases with the addition of DL-methionine and L-lysine to ensiled cassava leaf protein diets.

    PubMed

    Ly, Nguyen Thi Hoa; Ngoan, Le Duc; Verstegen, Martin Wilhelmus Antonius; Hendriks, Wouter Hendrikus

    2012-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to determine the impact of supplementation of diets containing ensiled cassava leaves as the main protein source with synthetic amino acids, DL-methionine alone or with L-lysine. In study 1, a total of 40 pigs in five units, all cross-breds between Large White and Mong Cai, with an average initial body weight of 20.5 kg were randomly assigned to four treatments consisting of a basal diet containing 45% of dry matter (DM) from ensiled cassava leaves (ECL) and ensiled cassava root supplemented with 0%, 0.05%, 0.1% and 0.15% DL-methionine (as DM). Results showed a significantly improved performance and protein gain by extra methionine. This reduced the feed cost by 2.6%, 7.2% and 7.5%, respectively. In study 2, there were three units and in each unit eight cross-bred (Large White × Mong Cai) pigs with an initial body weight of 20.1 kg were randomly assigned to the four treatments. The four diets were as follows: a basal diet containing 15% ECL (as DM) supplemented with different amounts of amino acids L-lysine and DL-methionine to the control diet. The results showed that diets with 15% of DM as ECL with supplementation of 0.2% lysine +0.1% DL-methionine and 0.1% lysine +0.05% DL-methionine at the 20-50 kg and above 50 kg, respectively, resulted in the best performance, protein gain and lowest costs for cross-bred (Large White × Mong Cai) pigs. Ensiled cassava leaves can be used as a protein supplement for feeding pigs provided the diets contain additional amounts of synthetic lysine and methionine.

  2. Methionine as a Precursor of Ethylene—Commentary

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lieberman et al. showed in a 1966 publication of Plant Physiology that methionine is a precursor of ethylene. It was the first paper that showed ethylene carbons are derived from carbons 3 and 4 of methionine. This paper catalyzed remarkable interest among plant biologists to elucidate the biosynth...

  3. High Methionine Diet Poses Cardiac Threat: A Molecular Insight.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Kamat, Pradip K; Kalani, Anuradha; Familtseva, Anastasia; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2016-07-01

    High methionine diet (HMD) for example red meat which includes lamb, beef, pork can pose cardiac threat and vascular dysfunction but the mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that a diet rich in methionine can malfunction the cardiovascular system in three ways: (1) by augmenting oxidative stress; (2) by inflammatory manifestations; and (3) by matrix/vascular remodeling. To test this hypothesis we used four groups of mice: (1) WT; (2) WT + methionine; (3) CBS(+/-) ; (4) CBS(+/-) +methionine. We observed high oxidative stress in mice fed with methionine which was even higher in CBS(+/-) and CBS(+/-) +methionine. Higher oxidative stress was indicated by high levels of SOD-1 in methionine fed mouse hearts whereas IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and TLR4 showed high inflammatory manifestations. The upregulated levels of eNOS/iNOS and upregulated levels of MMP2/MMP9 along with high collagen deposition indicated vascular and matrix remodeling in methionine fed mouse. We evaluated the cardiac function which was dysregulated in the mice fed with HMD. These mice had decreased ejection fraction and left ventricular dysfunction which subsequently leads to adverse cardiac remodeling. In conclusion, our study clearly shows that HMD poses a cardiac threat by increasing oxidative stress, inflammatory manifestations, matrix/vascular remodeling, and decreased cardiac function.

  4. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... amino acid methionine formed by addition of an acetyl group to the alpha-amino group of methionine. It... amino acid) by weight of the total protein of the finished food, including the amount naturally present... of the additive contained therein. (2) The amounts of additive and each amino acid contained in...

  5. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Abstracts Service Registry No. 65-82-7) is the derivative of the amino acid methionine formed by addition of... percent L- and DL-methionine (expressed as the free amino acid) by weight of the total protein of the...) The amounts of additive and each amino acid contained in any mixture. (3) Adequate directions for...

  6. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... amino acid methionine formed by addition of an acetyl group to the alpha-amino group of methionine. It... amino acid) by weight of the total protein of the finished food, including the amount naturally present... of the additive contained therein. (2) The amounts of additive and each amino acid contained in...

  7. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... amino acid methionine formed by addition of an acetyl group to the alpha-amino group of methionine. It... amino acid) by weight of the total protein of the finished food, including the amount naturally present... of the additive contained therein. (2) The amounts of additive and each amino acid contained in...

  8. Advances in Bacterial Methionine Aminopeptidase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Helgren, Travis R; Wangtrakuldee, Phumvadee; Staker, Bart L; Hagen, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) are metalloenzymes that cleave the N-terminal methionine from newly synthesized peptides and proteins. These MetAP enzymes are present in bacteria, and knockout experiments have shown that MetAP activity is essential for cell life, suggesting that MetAPs are good antibacterial drug targets. MetAP enzymes are also present in the human host and selectivity is essential. There have been significant structural biology efforts and over 65 protein crystal structures of bacterial MetAPs are deposited into the PDB. This review highlights the available crystallographic data for bacterial MetAPs. Structural comparison of bacterial MetAPs with human MetAPs highlights differences that can lead to selectivity. In addition, this review includes the chemical diversity of molecules that bind and inhibit the bacterial MetAP enzymes. Analysis of the structural biology and chemical space of known bacterial MetAP inhibitors leads to a greater understanding of this antibacterial target and the likely development of potential antibacterial agents.

  9. Structure and function of the methionine aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Lowther, W T; Matthews, B W

    2000-03-01

    The removal of the N-terminal methionine from proteins and peptides is dependent upon a novel class of proteases typified by the dinuclear metalloenzyme methionine aminopeptidase from Escherichia coli (eMetAP). Substantial progress has recently been made in determining the structures of several members of this family. The identification of human MetAP as the target of putative anti-cancer drugs reiterates the importance of this family of enzymes. Determination of the modes of binding to E. coli MetAP of a substrate-like bestatin-based inhibitor, as well as phosphorus-containing transition-state analogs and reaction products has led to a rationalization of the substrate specificity and suggested the presumed catalytic mechanism. The conservation of key active site residues and ligand interactions between the MetAPs and other enzyme of the same fold suggest that avoidance of cross-reactivity may be an important consideration in the design of inhibitors directed toward a single member of the family. PMID:10708856

  10. Protein-borne methionine residues as structural antioxidants in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schindeldecker, Mario; Moosmann, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    Methionine is an oxidant-labile amino acid whose major oxidation products, methionine sulfoxides, can be readily repaired by various NADPH-dependent methionine sulfoxide reductases. Formally, the methionine oxidation-reduction circuit could act as a cellular antioxidant system, by providing a safe sink for oxidants that might cause much more damage if reacting otherwise. This concept is supported by focal experimental evidence; however, the global importance, scope and biochemical role of protein-borne methionine as an inbuilt macromolecular antioxidant have remained incompletely defined. In analyzing proteomic methionine usage on different levels of comparison, we find that protein methionine (i) is primarily an antioxidant of mitochondria, especially of the inner mitochondrial membrane, (ii) responds strongly to respiratory demands on an evolutionary timescale, (iii) acts locally, by selectively protecting its carrier protein, and (iv) might be utilized as a molecular predictor of aerobic metabolic rate in animals, to complement traditional markers like the presence of a respiratory pigment. Our data support the idea that proteins in need of a long lifespan or acting in dangerous environments may acquire massive structural alterations aimed at increasing their resistance to oxidation. Counterintuitively though, they sometimes do so by accumulating particularly labile rather than particularly stable building blocks, illustrating that the technical concept of cathodic protection is also employed by the animate nature.

  11. Bioavailability of different dietary supplemental methionine sources in animals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Wong, Eric A; Gilbert, Elizabeth R

    2015-01-01

    Dietary methionine is indispensable for animal maintenance, growth and development. L-methionine (L-Met), and its synthetic forms DL-methionine (DL-Met) and 2-hydroxy-4 (methylthio) butanoic acid (HMTBA) are common supplemental methionine sources in animal diets. There are different characteristics for cellular absorption, transport, metabolism and bio-efficiency between these three dietary methionine sources. Moreover, there are differences in their utilization among various species such as chickens, pigs and ruminants. As a methionine precursor, HMTBA is efficacious in the promotion of growth in animals. It is absorbed mainly by monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), coupled with the activity of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE3), while DL-Met uptake occurs via multiple carrier-mediated systems. Liver, kidney and small intestine can metabolize D-Met and HMTBA to L-Met through oxidation and transamination. In ruminants, the non-hepatic tissues act as major sites of HMTBA conversion, which are different from that in chickens and pigs. HMTBA also has additional benefits in anti-oxidation. Understanding the characteristics of uptake and metabolism of different methionine sources will greatly benefit the industry and bioscience research.

  12. Excess dietary methionine does not affect fracture healing in mice

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Joerg H.; Schmalenbach, Julia; Herrmann, Markus; Ölkü, Ilona; Garcia, Patric; Histing, Tina; Herrmann, Wolfgang; Menger, Michael D.; Pohlemann, Tim; Claes, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background An elevated serum concentration of homocysteine (hyperhomocysteinemia) has been shown to disturb fracture healing. As the essential amino acid, methionine, is a precursor of homocysteine, we aimed to investigate whether excess methionine intake affects bone repair. Material/Methods We analyzed bone repair in 2 groups of mice. One group was fed a methionine-rich diet (n=13), and the second group received an equicaloric control diet without methionine supplementation (n=12). Using a closed femoral fracture model, bone repair was analyzed by histomorphometry and biomechanical testing at 4 weeks after fracture. Blood was sampled to measure serum concentrations of homocysteine, the bone formation marker osteocalcin, and the bone resorption marker collagen I C-terminal crosslaps Results Serum concentrations of homocysteine were significantly higher in the methionine group than in the control group, while serum markers of bone turnover did not differ significantly between the 2 groups. Histomorphometry revealed no significant differences in size and tissue composition of the callus between animals fed the methionine-enriched diet and those receiving the control diet. Accordingly, animals of the 2 groups showed a comparable bending stiffness of the healing bones. Conclusions We conclude that excess methionine intake causes hyperhomocysteinemia, but does not affect fracture healing in mice. PMID:23197225

  13. The Methionine Sulfoxide Reduction System: Selenium Utilization and Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase Enzymes and Their Functions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Selenium is utilized in the methionine sulfoxide reduction system that occurs in most organisms. Methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs), MsrA and MsrB, are the enzymes responsible for this system. Msrs repair oxidatively damaged proteins, protect against oxidative stress, and regulate protein function, and have also been implicated in the aging process. Selenoprotein forms of Msrs containing selenocysteine (Sec) at the catalytic site are found in bacteria, algae, and animals. Recent Advances: A selenoprotein MsrB1 knockout mouse has been developed. Significant progress in the biochemistry of Msrs has been made, which includes findings of a novel reducing system for Msrs and of an interesting reason for the use of Sec in the Msr system. The effects of mammalian MsrBs, including selenoprotein MsrB1 on fruit fly aging, have been investigated. Furthermore, it is evident that Msrs are involved in methionine metabolism and regulation of the trans-sulfuration pathway. Critical Issues: This article presents recent progress in the Msr field while focusing on the physiological roles of mammalian Msrs, functions of selenoprotein forms of Msrs, and their biochemistry. Future Directions: A deeper understanding of the roles of Msrs in redox signaling, the aging process, and metabolism will be achieved. The identity of selenoproteome of Msrs will be sought along with characterization of the identified selenoprotein forms. Exploring new cellular targets and new functions of Msrs is also warranted. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 958–969. PMID:23198996

  14. Structural Characterization of a Human-Type Corrinoid Adenosyltransferase Confirms That Coenzyme B[subscript 12] Is Synthesized through a Four-Coordinate Intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    St. Maurice, Martin; Mera, Paola; Park, Kiyoung; Brunold, Thomas C.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.; Rayment, Ivan

    2008-11-18

    ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferases (ACAs) catalyze the transfer of the 5{prime}-deoxyadenosyl moiety from ATP to the upper axial ligand position of cobalamin in the synthesis of coenzyme B{sub 12}. For the ACA-catalyzed reaction to proceed, cob(II)alamin must be reduced to cob(I)alamin in the enzyme active site. This reduction is facilitated through the generation of a four-coordinate cob(II)alamin intermediate on the enzyme. We have determined the high-resolution crystal structure of a human-type ACA from Lactobacillus reuteri with a four-coordinate cob(II)alamin bound in the enzyme active site and with the product, adenosylcobalamin, partially occupied in the active site. The assembled structures represent snapshots of the steps in the ACA-catalyzed formation of the cobalt-carbon bond of coenzyme B{sub 12}. The structures define the corrinoid binding site and provide visual evidence for a base-off, four-coordinate cob(II)alamin intermediate. The complete structural description of ACA-mediated catalysis reveals the molecular features of four-coordinate cob(II)alamin stabilization and provides additional insights into the molecular basis for dysfunction in human patients suffering from methylmalonic aciduria.

  15. Electrochemical assembling of methionine-gold nanoparticles and catalysis on the surface of glassy carbon electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. Z.; Wang, J. H.; Zhang, X. M.; Cao, W.; Ge, A.; Zhou, L.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper cyclic voltammetry was used for the synthesis of linear array spherical gold nanoparticles on the surface of glassy carbon electrode using methionine as a stable reagent. The methionine-gold nanoparticles on the surface of glassy electrode were obtained. The methionine-gold nanoparticles were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry and powder X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical behavior of methionine at methionine-gold nanoparticle modified electrode was investigated. It was demonstrated that the methionine-gold nanoparticles can catalyze electrochemical transformations of methionine.

  16. Selective solid-phase isolation of methionine-containing peptides and subsequent matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometric detection of methionine- and of methionine-sulfoxide-containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Grunert, Tom; Pock, Katharina; Buchacher, Andrea; Allmaier, Günter

    2003-01-01

    Methionine residues and the oxidised forms in proteins are becoming more and more important in view of their biological function. In particular, methionine sulfoxide seems to have a regulatory function. This paper presents a fast strategy for simultaneous determination of methionine- and methionine-sulfoxide-containing peptides, involving application of methionine-specific solid-phase reagent chemistry combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). In the first step, methionine-containing peptides are covalently bound as sulfonium salts to glass beads, whereas methionine-sulfoxide-containing peptides and other methionine-free peptides are not bound and are washed out. The wash solution is used for MALDI-MS analysis to determine the molecular masses of these peptides and to perform, if necessary, seamless post-source decay (PSD) fragment ion analysis. Methionine-sulfoxide-containing peptides can be identified due to the characteristic metastable loss of methanesulfenic acid from the protonated molecules. In the second step, the bound peptides are cleaved from the matrix of the beads by addition of 2-mercaptoethanol at pH 8.5-8.8. The resulting peptides, mainly methionine-containing peptides, are analysed in a straightforward manner by MALDI-MS and seamless PSD. The strategy allows the fast identification of methionine- and methionine-sulfoxide-containing peptides even in complex tryptic digests, as demonstrated here for the glycoprotein antithrombin. These results show that sometimes methionine-containing tryptic peptides are not detected due to steric restrictions (e.g. glycosylation near the methionine residue) on the binding reaction, and that, on the other hand, some methionine-free peptides can be quite strongly bound non-covalently to the matrix of the beads. The latter observation indicates the necessity of seamless PSD fragment ion analysis for unambiguous identification. Furthermore, there are indications that

  17. Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Methionine Aminopeptidases by Bengamide Derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jing-Ping; Yuan, Xiu-Hua; Yuan, Hai; Wang, Wen-Long; Wan, Baojie; Franzblau, Scott G.; Ye, Qi-Zhuang

    2012-05-29

    Methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) carries out an essential function of protein N-terminal processing in many bacteria and is a promising target for the development of novel antitubercular agents. Natural bengamides potently inhibit the proliferation of mammalian cells by targeting MetAP enzymes, and the X-ray crystal structure of human type 2 MetAP in complex with a bengamide derivative reveals the key interactions at the active site. By preserving the interactions with the conserved residues inside the binding pocket while exploring the differences between bacterial and human MetAPs around the binding pocket, seven bengamide derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for inhibition of MtMetAP1a and MtMetAP1c in different metalloforms, inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth in replicating and non-replicating states, and inhibition of human K562 cell growth. Potent inhibition of MtMetAP1a and MtMetAP1c and modest growth inhibition of M. tuberculosis were observed for some of these derivatives. Crystal structures of MtMetAP1c in complex with two of the derivatives provided valuable structural information for improvement of these inhibitors for potency and selectivity.

  18. Vitamin-Dependent Methionine Metabolism and Alcoholic Liver Disease1

    PubMed Central

    Halsted, Charles H.; Medici, Valentina

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that ethanol-induced alterations in hepatic methionine metabolism play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Because malnutrition is a universal clinical finding in this disease and hepatic methionine metabolism is dependent upon dietary folate and vitamins B-6 and B-12, ALD can be considered an induced nutritional disorder that is conditioned by alcohol abuse. The present review describes the etiologies of these 3 vitamin deficiencies in ALD and how they interact with chronic ethanol exposure to alter hepatic methionine metabolism. Subsequent sections focus on molecular mechanisms for the interactions of aberrant methionine metabolism with ethanol in the pathogenesis of ALD, in particular the role of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) in regulating the epigenetic expressions of genes relevant to pathways of liver injury. The review will conclude with descriptions of studies on the efficacy of SAM in the treatment of ALD and with discussion of potentially fruitful future avenues of research. PMID:22332083

  19. Loss of conformational stability in calmodulin upon methionine oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J; Yin, D H; Yao, Y; Sun, H; Qin, Z; Schöneich, C; Williams, T D; Squier, T C

    1998-01-01

    We have used electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the secondary and tertiary structural consequences that result from oxidative modification of methionine residues in wheat germ calmodulin (CaM), and prevent activation of the plasma membrane Ca-ATPase. Using ESI-MS, we have measured rates of modification and molecular mass distributions of oxidatively modified CaM species (CaMox) resulting from exposure to H2O2. From these rates, we find that oxidative modification of methionine to the corresponding methionine sulfoxide does not predispose CaM to further oxidative modification. These results indicate that methionine oxidation results in no large-scale alterations in the tertiary structure of CaMox, because the rates of oxidative modification of individual methionines are directly related to their solvent exposure. Likewise, CD measurements indicate that methionine oxidation results in little change in the apparent alpha-helical content at 28 degrees C, and only a small (0.3 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1)) decrease in thermal stability, suggesting the disruption of a limited number of specific noncovalent interactions. Fluorescence lifetime, anisotropy, and quenching measurements of N-(1-pyrenyl)-maleimide (PMal) covalently bound to Cys26 indicate local structural changes around PMal in the amino-terminal domain in response to oxidative modification of methionine residues in the carboxyl-terminal domain. Because the opposing globular domains remain spatially distant in both native and oxidatively modified CaM, the oxidative modification of methionines in the carboxyl-terminal domain are suggested to modify the conformation of the amino-terminal domain through alterations in the structural features involving the interdomain central helix. The structural basis for the linkage between oxidative modification and these global conformational changes is discussed in terms of possible alterations in

  20. Interrelationship between methionine and cystine of early Peking ducklings.

    PubMed

    Xie, M; Hou, S S; Huang, W; Zhao, L; Yu, J Y; Li, W Y; Wu, Y Y

    2004-10-01

    A 4 x 5 factorial experiment containing 4 cystine levels (0.325, 0.406, 0.487, or 0.568%) and 5 methionine levels (0.285, 0.385, 0.485, 0.585, or 0.685%) was conducted to evaluate the interrelationship between methionine and cystine in corn-peanut meal diet for Peking ducklings from hatch to 21 d of age. Eight hundred 1-d-old male white Peking ducklings were assigned to 20 experimental treatments. All treatments were replicated 4 times using 10 ducklings per pen. As dietary methionine level increased, weight gain and feed intake increased and then decreased; the quadratic response of weight gain was significant (P < 0.05). The methionine requirement for maximum efficiency of feed utilization (0.585%) was higher than for maximum weight gain (0.485%). According to the quadratic model, the optimal methionine requirement of Peking ducklings from hatch to 21 d of age was 0.481% (95% of the level at maximum response). The plasma uric acid concentration was very low (P < 0.05) when dietary methionine was 0.485%. When dietary methionine was excessive (0.685%), the plasma homocysteine concentration increased (P < 0.05). On the other hand, the cystine requirement of ducklings from hatch to 21 d of age was not more than 0.325%. A high level of cystine (0.568%) depressed weight gain and feed intake (P < 0.05), but cystine supplementation in the diets lowered the plasma homocysteine concentration (P < 0.05). There were no significant interactions between methionine and cystine on growth performance, plasma uric acid, and plasma homocysteine.

  1. Methionine salvage pathway in relation to ethylene biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The recycling of methionine during ethylene biosynthesis (the methionine cycle) was studied. During ethylene biosynthesis, the H/sub 3/CS-group of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is released at 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), which is recycled to methionine via 5'-methylthioribose (MTS). In mungbean hypocotyls and cell-free extracts of avocado fruit, (/sup 14/C)MTR was converted to labeled methionine via 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyric acid (KMB) and 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutyric acid (HMB) as intermediates. Radioactive tracer studies showed that KMB was converted readily in vivo and in vitro to methionine, while HMB was converted much more slowly. The conversion of KMB to methionine by dialyzed avocado extract required an amino group donor. Among several potential donors tested, L-glutamine was the most efficient. Incubation of (ribose-U-/sup 14/C)MTR with avocado extract resulted in the production of (/sup 14/C)formate, with little evolution of other /sup 14/C-labeled one-carbon compounds, indicating that the conversion of MTR to KMB involves a loss of formate, presumably from C-1 of MTR.

  2. Protein Methionine Sulfoxide Dynamics in Arabidopsis thaliana under Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Silke; Ghesquière, Bart; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Demol, Hans; Wahni, Khadija; Willems, Patrick; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank; Gevaert, Kris

    2015-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide can modify proteins via direct oxidation of their sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Methionine oxidation, studied here, is a reversible posttranslational modification that is emerging as a mechanism by which proteins perceive oxidative stress and function in redox signaling. Identification of proteins with oxidized methionines is the first prerequisite toward understanding the functional effect of methionine oxidation on proteins and the biological processes in which they are involved. Here, we describe a proteome-wide study of in vivo protein-bound methionine oxidation in plants upon oxidative stress using Arabidopsis thaliana catalase 2 knock-out plants as a model system. We identified over 500 sites of oxidation in about 400 proteins and quantified the differences in oxidation between wild-type and catalase 2 knock-out plants. We show that the activity of two plant-specific glutathione S-transferases, GSTF9 and GSTT23, is significantly reduced upon oxidation. And, by sampling over time, we mapped the dynamics of methionine oxidation and gained new insights into this complex and dynamic landscape of a part of the plant proteome that is sculpted by oxidative stress.

  3. Modeling the oxidation of methionine residues by peroxides in proteins.

    PubMed

    Chennamsetty, Naresh; Quan, Yong; Nashine, Vishal; Sadineni, Vikram; Lyngberg, Olav; Krystek, Stanley

    2015-04-01

    We report the use of molecular modeling to predict the oxidation propensity of methionine residues in proteins. Oxidation of methionine to the sulfoxide form is one of the major degradation pathways for therapeutic proteins. Oxidation can occur during production, formulation, or storage of pharmaceuticals and it often reduces or eliminates biological activity. We use a molecular model based on atomistic simulations called 2-shell water coordination number to predict the oxidation rates for several model proteins and therapeutic candidates. In addition, we implement models that are based on static and simulation average of the solvent-accessible area (SAA) for either the side chain or the sulfur atom in the methionine residue. We then compare the results from the different models against the experimentally measured relative rates of methionine oxidation. We find that both the 2-shell model and the simulation-averaged SAA models are accurate in predicting the oxidation propensity of methionine residues for the proteins tested. We also find the appropriate parameter ranges where the models are most accurate. These models have significant predictive power and can be used to enable further protein engineering or to guide formulation approaches in stabilizing the unstable methionine residues.

  4. L-methionine antagonism of cis-platinum nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Basinger, M A; Jones, M M; Holscher, M A

    1990-03-15

    L-Methionine administered simultaneously with cis-platinum (CDDP) iv results in a significant reduction of the nephrotoxicity normally associated with CDDP without any apparent effect on the antineoplastic activity for rats bearing the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma. CDDP given with L-methionine at a 1:20 mole ratio can be administered to rats at doses up to 35 mg/kg iv with the survival of all treated animals (3/3) and up to 56 mg/kg iv (bolus injection) with the survival of 3/6 animals, while CDDP administered alone at these levels is lethal. A reduced level of protection against the nephrotoxicity was also achieved at lower mole ratios of L-methionine to CDDP. Renal function was monitored using BUN and serum creatinine levels, and gastrointestinal toxicity by weight changes during the course of the experiments. A histopathological examination of the kidneys was also performed to evaluate the protection provided by L-methionine. Under the conditions used, the reaction between L-methionine and CDDP does not appear to proceed so rapidly as to interfere with the antitumor activity of the CDDP. The examination of structural analogs as agents for the control of CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity revealed that the C-S-C-group is the essential group for the protective action in these structures. Although L-methionine can provide renal protection in rats given high doses of CDDP, it does not prevent the accumulation of platinum in the kidney.

  5. [NMR screening of potential inhibitors of Citrobacter freundii methionine].

    PubMed

    Batuev, E A; Lizunov, A Iu; Morozova, E A; Klochkov, V V; Anufrieva, N V; Demidkina, T V; Pol'shakov, V I

    2014-01-01

    Methionine γ-lyase [EC 4.4.1.11] participates in a methionine catabolism at a number of bacteria and protozoa eukaryotes, including pathogenic microorganisms. Lack of this enzyme at mammals allows consider it as a perspective target for rational antibacterial drug design. Currently in medical practice there are no the preparations based on an inhibition of methionine γ-lyase activity. We present results of the search of potential inhibitors of the enzyme using the NMR screening techniques based on identification of compounds, which able to bind specifically to their biological target. Study included a stage of in silico virtual screening of the library of commercially available compounds and subsequent experimental selection of the leading compounds, capable to interact with enzyme. Identification of binding was carried out by means of saturation transfer difference (STD) spectroscopy and WaterLOGSY technique. At the final stage the experimental assessment of inhibiting ability of the selected compounds in the reaction of γ-elimination of L-methionine catalyzed by methionine γ-lyase was carried out. Binding constants of two leading compounds were determined using the WaterLOGSY method. The research expands structural group of potential inhibitors of methionine γ-lyase and allows approach to the design of the inhibitors with higher efficacy.

  6. A sulfonium cation intermediate in the mechanism of methionine sulfoxide reductase B: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Robinet, Jesse J; Dokainish, Hisham M; Paterson, David J; Gauld, James W

    2011-07-28

    The hybrid density functional theory method B3LYP in combination with three systematically larger active site models has been used to investigate the substrate binding and catalytic mechanism by which Neisseria gonorrhoeae methionine sulfoxide reductase B (MsrB) reduces methionine-R-sulfoxide (Met-R-SO) to methionine. The first step in the overall mechanism is nucleophilic attack of an active site thiolate at the sulfur of Met-R-SO to form an enzyme-substrate sulfurane. This occurs with concomitant proton transfer from an active site histidine (His480) residue to the substrates oxygen center. The barrier for this step, calculated using our largest most complete active site model, is 17.2 kJ mol(-1). A subsequent conformational rearrangement and intramolecular -OH transfer to form an enzyme-derived sulfenic acid ((Cys495)S-OH) is not enzymatically feasible. Instead, transfer of a second proton from a second histidyl active site residue (His477) to the sulfurane's oxygen center to give water and a sulfonium cation intermediate is found to be greatly preferred, occurring with a quite low barrier of just 1.2 kJ mol(-1). Formation of the final product complex in which an intraprotein disulfide bond is formed with generation of methionine preferably occurs in one step via nucleophilic attack of the sulfur of a second enzyme thiolate ((Cys440)S(-)) at the S(Cys495) center of the sulfonium intermediate with a barrier of 23.8 kJ mol(-1). An alternate pathway for formation of the products via a sulfenic acid intermediate involves enzymatically feasible, but higher energy barriers. The role and impact of hydrogen bonding and active site residues on the properties and stability of substrate and mechanism intermediates and the affects of mutating His477 are also examined and discussed. PMID:21721538

  7. Tissue methionine cycle activity and homocysteine metabolism in female rats: impact of dietary methionine and folate plus choline.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Fiona A; van den Borne, Joost J G C; Calder, A Graham; O'Kennedy, Niamh; Holtrop, Grietje; Rees, William D; Lobley, Gerald E

    2009-04-01

    Impaired transfer of methyl groups via the methionine cycle leads to plasma hyperhomocysteinemia. The tissue sources of plasma homocysteine in vivo have not been quantified nor whether hyperhomocysteinemia is due to increased entry or decreased removal. These issues were addressed in female rats offered diets with either adequate or excess methionine (additional methyl groups) with or without folate and choline (impaired methyl group transfer) for 5 wk. Whole body and tissue metabolism was measured based on isotopomer analysis following infusion with either [1-(13)C,methyl-(2)H3]methionine or [U-(13)C]methionine plus [1-(13)C]homocysteine. Although the fraction of intracellular methionine derived from methylation of homocysteine was highest in liver (0.18-0.21), most was retained. In contrast, the pancreas exported to plasma more of methionine synthesized de novo. The pancreas also exported homocysteine to plasma, and this matched the contribution from liver. Synthesis of methionine from homocysteine was reduced in most tissues with excess methionine supply and was also lowered in liver (P<0.01) with diets devoid of folate and choline. Plasma homocysteine concentration (P<0.001) and flux (P=0.001) increased with folate plus choline deficiency, although the latter still represented <12% of estimated tissue production. Hyperhomocysteinemia also increased (P<0.01) the inflow of homocysteine into most tissues, including heart. These findings indicate that a full understanding of hyperhomocysteinemia needs to include metabolism in a variety of organs, rather than an exclusive focus on the liver. Furthermore, the high influx of homocysteine into cardiac tissue may relate to the known association between homocysteinemia and hypertension.

  8. Toxicity of seleno-l-methionine, seleno-dl-methionine, high selenium wheat, and selenized yeast to mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; LeCaptain, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    The toxicity of four chemical forms of selenium (seleno-L-methionine, seleno-DL-methionine, selenized yeast, and high selenium wheat) was compared in day-old mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos). In the first experiment, in which the basal diet was 75% wheat, survival after 2 weeks was lower for ducklings fed 30 ?g/g selenium as seleno-L-methionine (36%) than for ducklings fed 30 ?g/g selenium as seleno-DL-methionine (100%) or 30 ?g/g selenium from high selenium yeast (88%). In a second experiment, in which the basal diet was a commercial duck feed, survival after 2 weeks was 100% in ducklings fed 30 ?g/g selenium as seleno-DL-methionine, seleno-L-methionine, or selenized yeast. The greater toxicity of the L form of selenomethionine was probably related to the palatability or nutritional nature of the wheat-based diet used in experiment 1, but the exact reason for the difference between the DL and L forms is unknown. Biologically incorporated selenium, derived from high selenium wheat was no more toxic than selenium derived from the two purified forms of selenomethionine, and the selenium in selenized yeast was not as toxic as that in the two forms of selenomethionine.

  9. The low-methionine content of vegan diets may make methionine restriction feasible as a life extension strategy.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Contreras, Francisco

    2009-02-01

    Recent studies confirm that dietary methionine restriction increases both mean and maximal lifespan in rats and mice, achieving "aging retardant" effects very similar to those of caloric restriction, including a suppression of mitochondrial superoxide generation. Although voluntary caloric restriction is never likely to gain much popularity as a pro-longevity strategy for humans, it may be more feasible to achieve moderate methionine restriction, in light of the fact that vegan diets tend to be relatively low in this amino acid. Plant proteins - especially those derived from legumes or nuts - tend to be lower in methionine than animal proteins. Furthermore, the total protein content of vegan diets, as a function of calorie content, tends to be lower than that of omnivore diets, and plant protein has somewhat lower bioavailability than animal protein. Whole-food vegan diets that moderate bean and soy intake, while including ample amounts of fruit and wine or beer, can be quite low in methionine, while supplying abundant nutrition for health (assuming concurrent B12 supplementation). Furthermore, low-fat vegan diets, coupled with exercise training, can be expected to promote longevity by decreasing systemic levels of insulin and free IGF-I; the latter effect would be amplified by methionine restriction - though it is not clear whether IGF-I down-regulation is the sole basis for the impact of low-methionine diets on longevity in rodents.

  10. Quercetin Increases Hepatic Homocysteine Remethylation and Transsulfuration in Rats Fed a Methionine-Enriched Diet.

    PubMed

    Meng, Bin; Gao, Weina; Wei, Jingyu; Pu, Lingling; Tang, Zhenchuang; Guo, Changjiang

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the effects of quercetin on mRNA expression and activity of critical enzymes in homocysteine metabolism in rats fed a methionine-enriched diet. Rats were fed for 6 weeks the following diets, that is, control, 0.5% quercetin, 1.0% methionine, and 1.0% methionine plus 0.5% quercetin diets. Serum homocysteine was significantly increased after methionine treatment and decreased after the addition of quercetin. The mRNA expression of methionine synthase was significantly increased after methionine or methionine plus quercetin supplementation, while its enzymatic activity was significantly increased after methionine plus quercetin supplementation. The mRNA expression and enzymatic activity of cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase were upregulated after quercetin, methionine, or quercetin plus methionine treatment and a more significant increase was observed for hepatic cystathionine β-synthase in the methionine plus quercetin treated rats, suggesting an interaction between methionine and quercetin. Meanwhile, hepatic ratio of S-adenosylmethionine to S-adenosylhomocysteine was significantly decreased in response to methionine supplementation and normalized after the addition of quercetin. It is concluded that quercetin reduces serum homocysteine by increasing remethylation and transsulfuration of homocysteine in rats exposed to a methionine-enriched diet.

  11. The EutT Enzyme of Salmonella enterica Is a Unique ATP:Cob(I)alamin Adenosyltransferase Metalloprotein That Requires Ferrous Ions for Maximal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Theodore C.; Mera, Paola E.

    2014-01-01

    ATP:co(I)rrinoid adenosyltransferase (ACAT) enzymes convert vitamin B12 to coenzyme B12. EutT is the least understood ACAT. We report the purification of EutT to homogeneity and show that, in vitro, free dihydroflavins drive the adenosylation of cob(II)alamin bound to EutT. Results of chromatography analyses indicate that EutT is dimeric in solution, and unlike other ACATs, EutT catalyzes the reaction with sigmoidal kinetics indicative of positive cooperativity for cob(II)alamin. Maximal EutT activity was obtained after metalation with ferrous ions. EutT/Fe(II) protein lost all activity upon exposure to air and H2O2, consistent with previously reported results indicating that EutT was an oxygen-labile metalloprotein containing a redox-active metal. Results of in vivo and in vitro analyses of single-amino-acid variants affecting a HX11CCXXC83 motif conserved in EutT proteins showed that residues His67, Cys80, and Cys83 were required for EutT function in vivo, while Cys79 was not. Unlike that of other variants, the activity of the EutTC80A variant was undetectable in vitro, suggesting that Cys80 was critical to EutT function. Results of circular dichroism studies indicate that the presence or absence of a metal ion does not affect protein folding. EutT can now be purified in the presence of oxygen and reactivated with ferrous ions for maximal activity. PMID:24336938

  12. the Eutt enzyme of Salmonella enterica is a unique ATP:Cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase metalloprotein that requires ferrous ions for maximal activity.

    PubMed

    Moore, Theodore C; Mera, Paola E; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2014-02-01

    ATP:co(I)rrinoid adenosyltransferase (ACAT) enzymes convert vitamin B12 to coenzyme B12. EutT is the least understood ACAT. We report the purification of EutT to homogeneity and show that, in vitro, free dihydroflavins drive the adenosylation of cob(II)alamin bound to EutT. Results of chromatography analyses indicate that EutT is dimeric in solution, and unlike other ACATs, EutT catalyzes the reaction with sigmoidal kinetics indicative of positive cooperativity for cob(II)alamin. Maximal EutT activity was obtained after metalation with ferrous ions. EutT/Fe(II) protein lost all activity upon exposure to air and H2O2, consistent with previously reported results indicating that EutT was an oxygen-labile metalloprotein containing a redox-active metal. Results of in vivo and in vitro analyses of single-amino-acid variants affecting a HX11CCXXC(83) motif conserved in EutT proteins showed that residues His67, Cys80, and Cys83 were required for EutT function in vivo, while Cys79 was not. Unlike that of other variants, the activity of the EutT(C80A) variant was undetectable in vitro, suggesting that Cys80 was critical to EutT function. Results of circular dichroism studies indicate that the presence or absence of a metal ion does not affect protein folding. EutT can now be purified in the presence of oxygen and reactivated with ferrous ions for maximal activity.

  13. Resonance Raman spectroscopic study of the interaction between Co(II)rrinoids and the ATP:corrinoid adenosyltransferase PduO from Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Park, Kiyoung; Mera, Paola E; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C; Brunold, Thomas C

    2016-09-01

    The human-type ATP:corrinoid adenosyltransferase PduO from Lactobacillus reuteri (LrPduO) catalyzes the adenosylation of Co(II)rrinoids to generate adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) or adenosylcobinamide (AdoCbi(+)). This process requires the formation of "supernucleophilic" Co(I)rrinoid intermediates in the enzyme active site which are properly positioned to abstract the adeonsyl moiety from co-substrate ATP. Previous magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic analyses revealed that LrPduO achieves the thermodynamically challenging reduction of Co(II)rrinoids by displacing the axial ligand with a non-coordinating phenylalanine residue to produce a four-coordinate species. However, relatively little is currently known about the interaction between the tetradentate equatorial ligand of Co(II)rrinoids (the corrin ring) and the enzyme active site. To address this issue, we have collected resonance Raman (rR) data of Co(II)rrinoids free in solution and bound to the LrPduO active site. The relevant resonance-enhanced vibrational features of the free Co(II)rrinoids are assigned on the basis of rR intensity calculations using density functional theory to establish a suitable framework for interpreting rR spectral changes that occur upon Co(II)rrinoid binding to the LrPduO/ATP complex in terms of structural perturbations of the corrin ring. To complement our rR data, we have also obtained MCD spectra of Co(II)rrinoids bound to LrPduO complexed with the ATP analogue UTP. Collectively, our results provide compelling evidence that in the LrPduO active site, the corrin ring of Co(II)rrinoids is firmly locked in place by several amino acid side chains so as to facilitate the dissociation of the axial ligand. PMID:27383231

  14. Genetic engineering for high methionine grain legumes.

    PubMed

    Müntz, K; Christov, V; Saalbach, G; Saalbach, I; Waddell, D; Pickardt, T; Schieder, O; Wüstenhagen, T

    1998-08-01

    Methionine (Met) is the primary limiting essential amino acid in grain legumes. The imbalance in amino acid composition restricts their biological value (BV) to 55 to 75% of that of animal protein. So far improvement of the BV could not be achieved by conventional breeding. Therefore, genetic engineering was employed by several laboratories to resolve the problem. Three strategies have been followed. A) Engineering for increased free Met levels; B) engineering of endogenous storage proteins with increased numbers of Met residues; C) transfer of foreign genes encoding Met-rich proteins, e.g. the Brazil nut 2S albumin (BNA) and its homologue from sunflower, into grain legumes. The latter strategy turned out to be most promising. In all cases the gene was put under the control of a developmentally regulated seed specific promoter and transferred into grain legumes using the bacterial Agrobacterium tumefaciens-system. Integration into and copy numbers in the plant genome as well as Mendelian inheritance and gene dosage effects were verified. After correct precursor processing the mature 2S albumin was intracellularly deposited in protein bodies which are part of the vacuolar compartment. The foreign protein amounted to 5 to 10% of the total seed protein in the best transgenic lines of narbon bean (Vicia narbonensis L., used in the authors' laboratories), lupins (Lupinus angustifolius L., used in CSIRO, Australia), and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr., used by Pioneer Hi-Bred, Inc., USA). In the narbon bean the increase of Met was directly related to the amount of 2S albumin in the transgenic seeds, but in soybean it remained below the theoretically expected value. Nevertheless, trangenic soybean reached 100%, whereas narbon bean and lupins reached approximately 80% of the FAO-standard for nutritionally balanced food proteins. These results document that the Met problem of grain legumes can be resolved by genetic engineering.

  15. Effect of excess methionine and methionine hydroxy analogue on growth performance and plasma homocysteine of growing Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Xie, M; Hou, S S; Huang, W; Fan, H P

    2007-09-01

    One experiment was conducted to study the effect of excess dl-methionine (DLM) and dl-2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutanoic acid free acid (dl-HMB-FA) on duck growth. One-day-old male white Pekin ducklings were fed common starter diets from hatch to 21 d of age and then fed the experimental diets from 21 to 42 d of age. Three hundred twenty 21-d-old birds were allotted to 40 raised wire-floor pens with 8 birds per pen according to similar pen weight. There were 5 dietary treatments that included a methionine-adequate control diet and control diets supplemented with 2 levels of dry DLM (1 or 2%) or 2 equimolar levels of liquid dl-HMB-FA (1.13 or 2.26%). Each dietary treatment was replicated 8 times. At 42 d of age, weight gain, feed intake, and gain/feed were measured and plasma was collected to analyze homocysteine. Compared with ducks fed control diets, excess DLM or dl-HMB-FA supplementation reduced weight gain and feed intake of birds significantly. However, on the equimolar basis, at 1 or 2% supplemental methionine activity, dl-HMB-FA was less growth-depressing than DLM. According to the growth response to excess methionine, the tolerable upper limit of dietary methionine for growing ducks may be less than 1.38% when the methionine level of the control diet (0.38%) was considered. On the other hand, plasma homocysteine was elevated markedly when 2% DLM or 2.26% dl-HMB-FA was added to control diets, but plasma homocysteine of ducks fed 2.26% dl-HMB-FA supplemented diets was lower significantly than birds fed equimolar DLM-supplemented diets, which indicated the toxicity of excess methionine sources and less toxicity of dl-HMB-FA relative to DLM.

  16. Oxidation increases the strength of the methionine-aromatic interaction.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Andrew K; Dunleavy, Katie M; Senkow, Tiffany L; Her, Cheng; Horn, Benjamin T; Jersett, Mark A; Mahling, Ryan; McCarthy, Megan R; Perell, Gabriella T; Valley, Christopher C; Karim, Christine B; Gao, Jiali; Pomerantz, William C K; Thomas, David D; Cembran, Alessandro; Hinderliter, Anne; Sachs, Jonathan N

    2016-10-01

    Oxidation of methionine disrupts the structure and function of a range of proteins, but little is understood about the chemistry that underlies these perturbations. Using quantum mechanical calculations, we found that oxidation increased the strength of the methionine-aromatic interaction motif, a driving force for protein folding and protein-protein interaction, by 0.5-1.4 kcal/mol. We found that non-hydrogen-bonded interactions between dimethyl sulfoxide (a methionine analog) and aromatic groups were enriched in both the Protein Data Bank and Cambridge Structural Database. Thermal denaturation and NMR spectroscopy experiments on model peptides demonstrated that oxidation of methionine stabilized the interaction by 0.5-0.6 kcal/mol. We confirmed the biological relevance of these findings through a combination of cell biology, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations on (i) calmodulin structure and dynamics, and (ii) lymphotoxin-α binding toTNFR1. Thus, the methionine-aromatic motif was a determinant of protein structural and functional sensitivity to oxidative stress. PMID:27547920

  17. Engineering of methionine chain elongation part of glucoraphanin pathway in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Nadia; Crocoll, Christoph; Erik Olsen, Carl; Ann Halkier, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    The methionine-derived glucosinolate glucoraphanin is associated with the health-promoting properties of broccoli. This has developed a strong interest in producing this compound in high amounts from a microbial source. Glucoraphanin synthesis starts with a five-gene chain elongation pathway that converts methionine to dihomo-methionine, which is subsequently converted to glucoraphanin by the seven-gene glucosinolate core structure pathway. As dihomo-methionine is the precursor amino acid for glucoraphanin production, a first challenge is to establish an expression system for production of dihomo-methionine. In planta, the methionine chain elongation enzymes are physically separated within the cell with the first enzyme in the cytosol while the rest are located in the chloroplast. A de-compartmentalization approach was applied to produce dihomo-methionine by expression of the respective plant genes in Escherichia coli cytosol. Introduction of two plasmids encoding the methionine chain elongation pathway into E. coli resulted in production of 25mgL(-1) of dihomo-methionine. In addition to chain-elongated methionine products, side-products from chain elongation of leucine were produced. Methionine supplementation enhanced dihomo-methionine production to 57mgL(-1), while keeping a steady level of the chain-elongated leucine products. Engineering of the de-compartmentalized pathway of dihomo-methionine in E. coli cytosol provides an important first step for microbial production of the health-promoting glucoraphanin.

  18. Enhanced anticancer effect of vincristine with methionine infusion after methionine-depleting total parenteral nutrition in tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Goseki, N; Nagahama, T; Maruyama, M; Endo, M

    1996-02-01

    Methionine-depleting total parenteral nutrition (Met(-) TPN), in which an amino acid solution devoid of L-methionine and L-cysteine is infused, is thought to reduce tumor cell growth through acting as a partial late S-G2 (i.e., late-S and G2 phases) blocker. The antitumor effect of vincristine (VCR), which acts on mitotic phase cells, was examined with methionine infusion immediately after Met(-) TPN in Yoshida sarcoma (YS)-bearing rats. Rats were given Met(-) TPN for 8 days immediately after inoculation with YS cells (days 0 to 8), which was followed by methionine-containing (Met(+)) regular TPN for 3 days (days 9-11) along with intraperitoneal administration of 0.05 mg/kg/day VCR. All rats were then fed solid food and water ad libitum until they died, with 0.1 mg/kg VCR administration on days 12 and 13. As controls, a Met(-) TPN only group, Met(+) TPN groups with and without VCR, and freely fed groups with and without VCR were studied. The progression of YS was markedly suppressed by Met(-) TPN with VCR. The median survival time in days was 25 days, significantly longer (P<0.001) (generalized Wilcoxon's tests) by 11 to 14 days than that of any of the other groups. In conclusion, VCR appears to have greater efficacy as an anticancer agent when administered together with methionine after Met(-) TPN.

  19. Monitoring methionine sulfoxide with stereospecific mechanism-based fluorescent sensors.

    PubMed

    Tarrago, Lionel; Péterfi, Zalán; Lee, Byung Cheon; Michel, Thomas; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-05-01

    Methionine can be reversibly oxidized to methionine sulfoxide (MetO) under physiological and pathophysiological conditions, but its use as a redox marker suffers from the lack of tools to detect and quantify MetO within cells. In this work, we created a pair of complementary stereospecific genetically encoded mechanism-based ratiometric fluorescent sensors of MetO by inserting a circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein between yeast methionine sulfoxide reductases and thioredoxins. The two sensors, respectively named MetSOx and MetROx for their ability to detect S and R forms of MetO, were used for targeted analysis of protein oxidation, regulation and repair as well as for monitoring MetO in bacterial and mammalian cells, analyzing compartment-specific changes in MetO and examining responses to physiological stimuli.

  20. A comparative study of two novel nanosized radiolabeled analogues of methionine for SPECT tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Khosroshahi, A G; Amanlou, M; Sabzevari, O; Daha, F J; Aghasadeghi, M R; Ghorbani, M; Ardestani, M S; Alavidjeh, M S; Sadat, S M; Pouriayevali, M H; Mousavi, L; Ebrahimi, S E S

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that most tumor cells show an increased uptake of variety of amino acids specially methionine when compared with normal cells and amino acid transport is generally increased in malignant transformation. Based on the evidences, two novel nanosized analogues of methionine (Anionic Linear Globular Dendrimer G(2), a biodigredabale anionic linear globular-Methionin, and DTPA-Methionine(1) conjugates) were synthesized and labeled with (99m)Tc and used in tumor imaging/ therapy in vitro and in vivo. The results showed marked tumor SPECT molecular imaging liabilities for both compounds but with a better performance by administration of (99m)Tc-Dendrimer G(2)-Methionin. The results also showed a good anticancer activity for 99mTc-DTPA-Methionine. Based on the present study (99m)Tc-Dendrimer G(2)-Methionin or 99mTc-DTPA-(Methionine)(1) have potentials to be used in tumor molecular imaging as well as cancer therapy in future.

  1. Maternal obesity disrupts the methionine cycle in baboon pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nathanielsz, Peter W; Yan, Jian; Green, Ralph; Nijland, Mark; Miller, Joshua W; Wu, Guoyao; McDonald, Thomas J; Caudill, Marie A

    2015-11-01

    Maternal intake of dietary methyl-micronutrients (e.g. folate, choline, betaine and vitamin B-12) during pregnancy is essential for normal maternal and fetal methionine metabolism, and is critical for important metabolic processes including those involved in developmental programming. Maternal obesity and nutrient excess during pregnancy influence developmental programming potentially predisposing adult offspring to a variety of chronic health problems. In the present study, we hypothesized that maternal obesity would dysregulate the maternal and fetal methionine cycle. To test this hypothesis, we developed a nulliparous baboon obesity model fed a high fat, high energy diet (HF-HED) prior to and during gestation, and examined methionine cycle biomarkers (e.g., circulating concentrations of homocysteine, methionine, choline, betaine, key amino acids, folate, and vitamin B-12). Animals were group housed allowing full physical activity and social interaction. Maternal prepregnancy percent body fat was 5% in controls and 19% in HF-HED mothers, while fetal weight was 16% lower in offspring of HF-HED mothers at term. Maternal and fetal homocysteine were higher, while maternal and fetal vitamin B-12 and betaine were lower in the HF-HED group. Elevations in circulating maternal folate were evident in the HF-HED group indicating impaired folate metabolism (methyl-trap) as a consequence of maternal vitamin B-12 depletion. Finally, fetal methionine, glycine, serine, and taurine were lower in the HF-HED fetuses. These data show that maternal obesity disturbs the methionine cycle in primate pregnancy, providing a mechanism for the epigenetic changes observed among obese pregnant women and suggesting diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities in human pregnancies complicated by obesity.

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury Alters Methionine Metabolism: Implications for Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Pramod K.; Hergenroeder, Georgene W.; Jeter, Cameron B.; Choi, H. Alex; Kobori, Nobuhide; Moore, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Methionine is an essential proteinogenic amino acid that is obtained from the diet. In addition to its requirement for protein biosynthesis, methionine is metabolized to generate metabolites that play key roles in a number of cellular functions. Metabolism of methionine via the transmethylation pathway generates S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) that serves as the principal methyl (−CH3) donor for DNA and histone methyltransferases (MTs) to regulate epigenetic changes in gene expression. SAM is also required for methylation of other cellular proteins that serve various functions and phosphatidylcholine synthesis that participate in cellular signaling. Under conditions of oxidative stress, homocysteine (which is derived from SAM) enters the transsulfuration pathway to generate glutathione, an important cytoprotective molecule against oxidative damage. As both experimental and clinical studies have shown that traumatic brain injury (TBI) alters DNA and histone methylation and causes oxidative stress, we examined if TBI alters the plasma levels of methionine and its metabolites in human patients. Blood samples were collected from healthy volunteers (HV; n = 20) and patients with mild TBI (mTBI; GCS > 12; n = 20) or severe TBI (sTBI; GCS < 8; n = 20) within the first 24 h of injury. The levels of methionine and its metabolites in the plasma samples were analyzed by either liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS or GC-MS). sTBI decreased the levels of methionine, SAM, betaine and 2-methylglycine as compared to HV, indicating a decrease in metabolism through the transmethylation cycle. In addition, precursors for the generation of glutathione, cysteine and glycine were also found to be decreased as were intermediate metabolites of the gamma-glutamyl cycle (gamma-glutamyl amino acids and 5-oxoproline). mTBI also decreased the levels of methionine, α-ketobutyrate, 2 hydroxybutyrate and glycine, albeit to lesser degrees than

  3. High in vivo rates of methionine biosynthesis in transformed human and malignant rat cells auxotrophic for methionine.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, R M; Erbe, R W

    1976-05-01

    Unlike normal cells, malignant rat and two simian virus 40-transformed human cell lines can neither grow nor survive in B12-and folate-supplemented media in which methionine is replaced by homocysteine. Yet three lines of evidence indicate that the malignant and transformed cells synthesize large amounts of methionine endogenously through the reaction catalyzed by 5-methyltetrahydropteroyl-L-glutamate; L-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.13). (1) The activities of this methyltransferase were comparable in extracts of malignant and normal cells. (2) The uptake of radioactive label from [5-14C]methyltetrahydropteroyl-L-glutamic acid (5-Me-H4PteGlu) was at least as great in the malignant cells as in the normals and was nearly totally dependent on the addition of homocysteine, the methyl acceptor; furthermore, 59-84% of the label incorporated by cells was recovered as methionine.

  4. 21 CFR 582.5477 - Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts... Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5477 Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts. (a) Product. Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5477 - Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts... Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5477 Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts. (a) Product. Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  6. Determination of the specific activities of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and B by capillary electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for the determination of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and methionine sulfoxide reductase B activities in mouse liver is described. The method is based on detection of the 4-(dimethylamino)azobenzene-4’-sulfonyl derivative of L-methionine (dabsyl Met), the ...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5477 - Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts... Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5477 Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts. (a) Product. Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5477 - Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts... Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5477 Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts. (a) Product. Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5477 - Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts... Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5477 Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts. (a) Product. Methionine hydroxy analog and its calcium salts. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  10. Spectroscopic Studies of the EutT Adenosyltransferase from Salmonella enterica: Mechanism of Four-Coordinate Co(II)Cbl Formation.

    PubMed

    Pallares, Ivan G; Moore, Theodore C; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C; Brunold, Thomas C

    2016-03-23

    EutT from Salmonella enterica is a member of a class of enzymes termed ATP:Co(I)rrinoid adenosyltransferases (ACATs), implicated in the biosynthesis of adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl). In the presence of cosubstrate ATP, ACATs raise the Co(II)/Co(I) reduction potential of their cob(II)alamin [Co(II)Cbl] substrate by >250 mV via the formation of a unique four-coordinate (4c) Co(II)Cbl species, thereby facilitating the formation of a "supernucleophilic" cob(I)alamin intermediate required for the formation of the AdoCbl product. Previous kinetic studies of EutT revealed the importance of a HX11CCX2C(83) motif for catalytic activity and have led to the proposal that residues in this motif serve as the binding site for a divalent transition metal cofactor [e.g., Fe(II) or Zn(II)]. This motif is absent in other ACAT families, suggesting that EutT employs a distinct mechanism for AdoCbl formation. To assess how metal ion binding to the HX11CCX2C(83) motif affects the relative yield of 4c Co(II)Cbl generated in the EutT active site, we have characterized several enzyme variants by using electronic absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies. Our results indicate that Fe(II) or Zn(II) binding to the HX11CCX2C(83) motif of EutT is required for promoting the formation of 4c Co(II)Cbl. Intriguingly, our spectroscopic data also reveal the presence of an equilibrium between five-coordinate "base-on" and "base-off" Co(II)Cbl species bound to the EutT active site at low ATP concentrations, which shifts in favor of "base-off" Co(II)Cbl in the presence of excess ATP, suggesting that the base-off species serves as a precursor to 4c Co(II)Cbl. PMID:26886077

  11. Identification of the human and bovine ATP:Cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase cDNAs based on complementation of a bacterial mutant.

    PubMed

    Leal, Nicole A; Park, Sanghee D; Kima, Peter E; Bobik, Thomas A

    2003-03-14

    In humans, deficiencies in coenzyme B12-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) lead to methylmalonyl aciduria, a rare disease that is often fatal in newborns. Such deficiencies can result from inborn errors in the MCM structural gene or from mutations that impair the assimilation of dietary cobalamins into coenzyme B12 (Ado-B12), the required cofactor for MCM. ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ATR) catalyzes the terminal step in the conversion of cobalamins into Ado-B12. Substantial evidence indicates that inherited defects in this enzyme lead to methylmalonyl aciduria, but the corresponding ATR gene has not been identified. Here we report the identification of the bovine and human ATR cDNAs as well as the corresponding human gene. A bovine liver cDNA expression library was screened for clones that complemented an ATR-deficient bacterial strain for color formation on aldehyde indicator medium, and four positive clones were isolated. The DNA sequences of two clones were determined and found to be identical. Sequence similarity searching was then used to identify a homologous human cDNA (89% identity) and its corresponding gene that is located on chromosome XII. The bovine and human cDNAs were independently cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Enzyme assays showed that expression strains produced 87 and 98 nmol/min/mg ATR activity, respectively. These specific activities are in line with values reported previously for bacterial ATR enzymes. Subsequent studies showed that the human cDNA clone complemented an ATR-deficient bacterial mutant for Ado-B12-dependent growth on 1,2-propanediol. This demonstrated that the human ATR is active under physiological conditions albeit in a heterologous host. In addition, Western blots were used to show that ATR expression is altered in cell lines derived from cblB methylmalonyl aciduria patients compared with cell lines from normal individuals. We propose that inborn errors in the human ATR gene identified here result in

  12. Methionine restriction improves renal insulin signalling in aged kidneys.

    PubMed

    Grant, Louise; Lees, Emma K; Forney, Laura A; Mody, Nimesh; Gettys, Thomas; Brown, Paul A J; Wilson, Heather M; Delibegovic, Mirela

    2016-07-01

    Dietary methionine restriction (MR) leads to loss of adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity and lifespan extension. The possibility that dietary MR can protect the kidney from age-associated deterioration has not been addressed. Aged (10-month old) male and female mice were placed on a MR (0.172% methionine) or control diet (0.86% methionine) for 8-weeks and blood glucose, renal insulin signalling, and gene expression were assessed. Methionine restriction lead to decreased blood glucose levels compared to control-fed mice, and enhanced insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and S6 in kidneys, indicative of improved glucose homeostasis. Increased expression of lipogenic genes and downregulation of PEPCK were observed, suggesting that kidneys from MR-fed animals are more insulin sensitive. Interestingly, renal gene expression of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP1 was upregulated in MR-fed animals, as were the anti-ageing and renoprotective genes Sirt1, FGF21, klotho, and β-klotho. This was associated with alterations in renal histology trending towards reduced frequency of proximal tubule intersections containing vacuoles in mice that had been on dietary MR for 190days compared to control-fed mice, which exhibited a pre-diabetic status. Our results indicate that dietary MR may offer therapeutic potential in ameliorating the renal functional decline related to ageing and other disorders associated with metabolic dysfunction by enhancing renal insulin sensitivity and renoprotective gene expression. PMID:27453066

  13. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.372 N-Acetyl-L-methionine. The food additive N-acetyl-L... section. The minimum amount of the additive to achieve the desired effect must be used, and the...

  14. The role of methionine metabolism in inflammatory bowel disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methionine (Met) cycle activity is critical for normal cell functions. Met metabolites S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and methylthioadenosine (MTA) are anti-inflammatory, yet their role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is poorly understood. We hypothesize that active IBD leads to changes in Met metab...

  15. Technical Note: Methionine, a precursor of methane in living plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhart, K.; Althoff, F.; Greule, M.; Keppler, F.

    2015-03-01

    When terrestrial plants were identified as producers of the greenhouse gas methane, much discussion and debate ensued not only about their contribution to the global methane budget but also with regard to the validity of the observation itself. Although the phenomenon has now become more accepted for both living and dead plants, the mechanism of methane formation in living plants remains to be elucidated and its precursor compounds to be identified. We made use of stable isotope techniques to verify the in vivo formation of methane, and, in order to identify the carbon precursor, 13C positionally labeled organic compounds were employed. Here we show that the amino acid L-methionine acts as a methane precursor in living plants. Employing 13C-labeled methionine clearly identified the sulfur-bound methyl group of methionine as a carbon precursor of methane released from lavender (Lavandula angustifolia). Furthermore, when lavender plants were stressed physically, methane release rates and the stable carbon isotope values of the emitted methane greatly increased. Our results provide additional support that plants possess a mechanism for methane production and suggest that methionine might play an important role in the formation of methane in living plants, particularly under stress conditions.

  16. Oxidized methionine is not a prion-specific covalent modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The oxidation of methionine residues in the '-helical region of PrPC has been proposed to be important for prion formation. This proposal has been supported by structural studies, model systems and antibody-based experimental evidence. We developed a sensitive mass spectrometry-based method to stu...

  17. Technical note: Methionine, a precursor of methane in living plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhart, K.; Althoff, F.; Greule, M.; Keppler, F.

    2014-11-01

    When terrestrial plants were identified as producers of the greenhouse gas methane, much discussion and debate ensued, not only about their contribution to the global methane budget, but also with regard to the validity of the observation itself. Although the phenomenon has now become more accepted for both living and dead plants, the mechanism of methane formation in living plants remains to be elucidated and its precursor compounds identified. We made use of stable isotope techniques to verify in vivo formation of methane and, in order to identify the carbon precursor, 13C-positionally labelled organic compounds were employed. Here we show that the amino acid L-methionine acts as a methane precursor in living plants. Employing 13C-labelled methionine clearly identified the sulphur-bound methyl group of methionine as a carbon precursor of methane released from lavender (Lavandula angustifolia). Furthermore, when lavender plants were stressed physically, methane release rates and the stable carbon isotope values of the emitted methane greatly increased. Our results provide additional support that plants possess a mechanism for methane production and suggest that methionine might play an important role in the formation of methane in living plants, particularly under stress conditions.

  18. Enhancing S-adenosyl-methionine catabolism extends Drosophila lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Fumiaki; Miura, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Methionine restriction extends the lifespan of various model organisms. Limiting S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) synthesis, the first metabolic reaction of dietary methionine, extends longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans but accelerates pathology in mammals. Here, we show that, as an alternative to inhibiting SAM synthesis, enhancement of SAM catabolism by glycine N-methyltransferase (Gnmt) extends the lifespan in Drosophila. Gnmt strongly buffers systemic SAM levels by producing sarcosine in either high-methionine or low-sams conditions. During ageing, systemic SAM levels in flies are increased. Gnmt is transcriptionally induced in a dFoxO-dependent manner; however, this is insufficient to suppress SAM elevation completely in old flies. Overexpression of gnmt suppresses this age-dependent SAM increase and extends longevity. Pro-longevity regimens, such as dietary restriction or reduced insulin signalling, attenuate the age-dependent SAM increase, and rely at least partially on Gnmt function to exert their lifespan-extending effect in Drosophila. Our study suggests that regulation of SAM levels by Gnmt is a key component of lifespan extension. PMID:26383889

  19. (11)C-Methionine uptake in secondary brain epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lopci, E; Bello, L; Chiti, A

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-11 methionine ((11)C-Methionine) is a radio-labeled amino acid currently utilized in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for imaging primary and metastatic brain tumors. Its clinical use relies mostly on oncologic applications, but the tracer has the potential to investigate other non-malignant conditions. So far, very limited evidence concerns the use of (11)C-Methionine in patients suffering from seizure; however, the tracer can find a proper utilization in this setting especially as a diagnostic complement to (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). Herein we report the case of a 57-year-old patient presenting with epileptic crises secondary to a brain metastasis from bladder carcinoma, who was investigated in our institution with (11)C-Methionine PET. The scan documented the disease recurrence in the left parietal lobe associated with a diffused tracer uptake in the surrounding cerebral circumvolutions, derived from the comitial status. After surgical removal of the metastatic lesion, the patient experienced a complete recovery of symptoms and no further onset of secondary seizure.

  20. Correlation of carnitine levels to methionine and lysine intake.

    PubMed

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Simoncic, R; Béderová, A; Babinská, K; Béder, I

    2000-01-01

    Plasma carnitine levels were measured in two alternative nutrition groups--strict vegetarians (vegans) and lactoovovegetarians (vegetarians consuming limited amounts of animal products such as milk products and eggs). The results were compared to an average sample of probands on mixed nutrition (omnivores). Carnitine levels were correlated with the intake of essential amino acids, methionine and lysine (as substrates of its endogenous synthesis), since the intake of carnitine in food is negligible in the alternative nutrition groups (the highest carnitine content is in meat, lower is in milk products, while fruit, cereals and vegetables contain low or no carnitine at all). An average carnitine level in vegans was significantly reduced with hypocarnitinemia present in 52.9% of probands. Similarly, the intake of methionine and lysine was significantly lower in this group due to the exclusive consumption of plant proteins with reduced content of these amino acids. Carnitine level in lactoovovegetarians was also significantly reduced, but the incidence of values below 30 micromol/l was lower than in vegans representing 17.8% vs. 3.3% in omnivores. Intake of methionine and lysine was also significantly reduced in this group, but still higher compared to vegans (73% of protein intake covered by plant proteins). Significant positive correlation of carnitine levels with methionine and lysine intake in alternative nutrition groups indicates that a significant portion of carnitine requirement is covered by endogenous synthesis. Approximately two thirds of carnitine requirement in omnivores comes from exogenous sources. The results demonstrate the risks of alternative nutrition with respect to the intake of essential amino acids, methionine and lysine, and with respect to the intake and biosynthesis of carnitine. PMID:11043928

  1. Correlation of carnitine levels to methionine and lysine intake.

    PubMed

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Simoncic, R; Béderová, A; Babinská, K; Béder, I

    2000-01-01

    Plasma carnitine levels were measured in two alternative nutrition groups--strict vegetarians (vegans) and lactoovovegetarians (vegetarians consuming limited amounts of animal products such as milk products and eggs). The results were compared to an average sample of probands on mixed nutrition (omnivores). Carnitine levels were correlated with the intake of essential amino acids, methionine and lysine (as substrates of its endogenous synthesis), since the intake of carnitine in food is negligible in the alternative nutrition groups (the highest carnitine content is in meat, lower is in milk products, while fruit, cereals and vegetables contain low or no carnitine at all). An average carnitine level in vegans was significantly reduced with hypocarnitinemia present in 52.9% of probands. Similarly, the intake of methionine and lysine was significantly lower in this group due to the exclusive consumption of plant proteins with reduced content of these amino acids. Carnitine level in lactoovovegetarians was also significantly reduced, but the incidence of values below 30 micromol/l was lower than in vegans representing 17.8% vs. 3.3% in omnivores. Intake of methionine and lysine was also significantly reduced in this group, but still higher compared to vegans (73% of protein intake covered by plant proteins). Significant positive correlation of carnitine levels with methionine and lysine intake in alternative nutrition groups indicates that a significant portion of carnitine requirement is covered by endogenous synthesis. Approximately two thirds of carnitine requirement in omnivores comes from exogenous sources. The results demonstrate the risks of alternative nutrition with respect to the intake of essential amino acids, methionine and lysine, and with respect to the intake and biosynthesis of carnitine.

  2. Restriction of dietary methyl donors limits methionine availability and affects the partitioning of dietary methionine for creatine and phosphatidylcholine synthesis in the neonatal piglet.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jason L; McBreairty, Laura E; Randell, Edward W; Brunton, Janet A; Bertolo, Robert F

    2016-09-01

    Methionine is required for protein synthesis and provides a methyl group for >50 critical transmethylation reactions including creatine and phosphatidylcholine synthesis as well as DNA and protein methylation. However, the availability of methionine depends on dietary sources as well as remethylation of demethylated methionine (i.e., homocysteine) by the dietary methyl donors folate and choline (via betaine). By restricting dietary methyl supply, we aimed to determine the extent that dietary methyl donors contribute to methionine availability for protein synthesis and transmethylation reactions in neonatal piglets. Piglets 4-8 days of age were fed a diet deficient (MD-) (n=8) or sufficient (MS+) (n=7) in folate, choline and betaine. After 5 days, dietary methionine was reduced to 80% of requirement in both groups to elicit a response. On day 8, animals were fed [(3)H-methyl]methionine for 6h to measure methionine partitioning into hepatic protein, phosphatidylcholine, creatine and DNA. MD- feeding reduced plasma choline, betaine and folate (P<.05) and increased homocysteine ~3-fold (P<.05). With MD- feeding, hepatic phosphatidylcholine synthesis was 60% higher (P<.05) at the expense of creatine synthesis, which was 30% lower during MD- feeding (P<.05); protein synthesis as well as DNA and protein methylation were unchanged. In the liver, ~30% of dietary label was traced to phosphatidylcholine and creatine together, with ~50% traced to methylation of proteins and ~20% incorporated in synthesized protein. Dietary methyl donors are integral to neonatal methionine requirements and can affect methionine availability for transmethylation pathways. PMID:27469995

  3. Removal of N-terminal methionine from recombinant proteins by engineered E. coli methionine aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Liao, You-Di; Jeng, Jen-Chong; Wang, Chiu-Feng; Wang, Sui-Chi; Chang, Shu-Ting

    2004-01-01

    The removal of N-terminal translation initiator Met by methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) is often crucial for the function and stability of proteins. On the basis of crystal structure and sequence alignment of MetAPs, we have engineered Escherichia coli MetAP by the mutation of three residues, Y168G, M206T, Q233G, in the substrate-binding pocket. Our engineered MetAPs are able to remove the Met from bulky or acidic penultimate residues, such as Met, His, Asp, Asn, Glu, Gln, Leu, Ile, Tyr, and Trp, as well as from small residues. The penultimate residue, the second residue after Met, was further removed if the antepenultimate residue, the third residue after Met, was small. By the coexpression of engineered MetAP in E. coli through the same or a separate vector, we have successfully produced recombinant proteins possessing an innate N terminus, such as onconase, an antitumor ribonuclease from the frog Rana pipiens. The N-terminal pyroglutamate of recombinant onconase is critical for its structural integrity, catalytic activity, and cyto-toxicity. On the basis of N-terminal sequence information in the protein database, 85%–90% of recombinant proteins should be produced in authentic form by our engineered MetAPs. PMID:15215523

  4. Efficacy of DL-methionine hydroxy analogue-free acid in comparison to DL-methionine in growing male white Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Kluge, H; Gessner, D K; Herzog, E; Eder, K

    2016-03-01

    The present study was performed to assess the bioefficacy of DL-methionine hydroxy analogue-free acid (MHA) in comparison to DL-methionine (DLM) as sources of methionine for growing male white Pekin ducks in the first 3 wk of life. For this aim, 580 1-day-old male ducks were allocated into 12 treatment groups and received a basal diet that contained 0.29% of methionine, 0.34% of cysteine and 0.63% of total sulphur containing amino acids or the same diet supplemented with either DLM or MHA in amounts to supply 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25% of methionine equivalents. Ducks fed the control diet without methionine supplement had the lowest final body weights, daily body weight gains and feed intake among all groups. Supplementation of methionine improved final body weights and daily body weight gains in a dose dependent-manner. There was, however, no significant effect of the source of methionine on all of the performance responses. Evaluation of the data of daily body weight gains with an exponential model of regression revealed a nearly identical efficacy (slope of the curves) of both compounds for growth (DLM = 100%, MHA = 101%). According to the exponential model of regression, 95% of the maximum values of daily body weight gain were reached at methionine supplementary levels of 0.080% and 0.079% for DLM and MHA, respectively. Overall, the present study indicates that MHA and DLM have a similar efficacy as sources of methionine for growing ducks. It is moreover shown that dietary methionine concentrations of 0.37% are required to reach 95% of the maximum of daily body weight gains in ducks during the first 3 wk of life.

  5. Availability to lactating dairy cows of methionine added to soy lecithins and mixed with a mechanically extracted soybean meal.

    PubMed

    Brake, D W; Titgemeyer, E C; Brouk, M J; Macgregor, C A; Smith, J F; Bradford, B J

    2013-05-01

    We evaluated a product containing methionine mixed with soy lecithins and added to a mechanically extracted soybean meal (meSBM-Met). Lactational responses of cows, plasma methionine concentrations, and in vitro degradation of methionine were measured. Twenty-five Holstein cows were used in a replicated 5 × 5 Latin square design and fed a diet designed to be deficient in methionine or the same diet supplemented either with 4.2 or 8.3g/d of supplemental methionine from a ruminally protected source or with 2.7 or 5.3g/d of supplemental methionine from meSBM-Met. All diets were formulated to provide adequate amounts of metabolizable lysine. Concentration of milk true protein was greater when methionine was provided by the ruminally protected methionine than by meSBM-Met, but milk protein yield was not affected by treatment. Milk yields and concentrations and yields of fat, lactose, solids-not-fat, and milk urea nitrogen were not affected by supplemental methionine. Body condition scores increased linearly when methionine from meSBM-Met was supplemented, but responses were quadratic when methionine was provided from a ruminally protected source. Nitrogen retention was not affected by supplemental methionine. Plasma methionine increased linearly when methionine was supplemented from a ruminally protected source, but plasma methionine concentrations did not differ from the control when supplemental methionine from meSBM-Met was provided. In vitro degradation of supplemental methionine from meSBM-Met was complete within 3h. Data suggest that meSBM-Met provides negligible amounts of metabolizable methionine to dairy cows, and this is likely related to extensive ruminal destruction of methionine; however, cow body condition may be improved by ruminally available methionine provided by meSBM-Met.

  6. Potential for Development of an Escherichia coli—Based Biosensor for Assessing Bioavailable Methionine: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chalova, Vesela I.; Froelich, Clifford A.; Ricke, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    Methionine is an essential amino acid for animals and is typically considered one of the first limiting amino acids in animal feed formulations. Methionine deficiency or excess in animal diets can lead to sub-optimal animal performance and increased environmental pollution, which necessitates its accurate quantification and proper dosage in animal rations. Animal bioassays are the current industry standard to quantify methionine bioavailability. However, animal-based assays are not only time consuming, but expensive and are becoming more scrutinized by governmental regulations. In addition, a variety of artifacts can hinder the variability and time efficacy of these assays. Microbiological assays, which are based on a microbial response to external supplementation of a particular nutrient such as methionine, appear to be attractive potential alternatives to the already established standards. They are rapid and inexpensive in vitro assays which are characterized with relatively accurate and consistent estimation of digestible methionine in feeds and feed ingredients. The current review discusses the potential to develop Escherichia coli-based microbial biosensors for methionine bioavailability quantification. Methionine biosynthesis and regulation pathways are overviewed in relation to genetic manipulation required for the generation of a respective methionine auxotroph that could be practical for a routine bioassay. A prospective utilization of Escherichia coli methionine biosensor would allow for inexpensive and rapid methionine quantification and ultimately enable timely assessment of nutritional profiles of feedstuffs. PMID:22319312

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Pathways of Methionine Metabolism and Their Regulation in Lemna

    PubMed Central

    Giovanelli, John; Mudd, S. Harvey; Datko, Anne H.

    1985-01-01

    Individual rates of metabolism of the sulfur, methyl, and 4-carbon moieties of methionine were estimated in Lemna paucicostata Hegelm. 6746 growing under standard conditions, and used to quantitate pathways of methionine metabolism. Synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) is the major pathway for methionine metabolism, with over 4 times as much methionine metabolized by this route as accumulates in protein. More than 90% of AdoMet is used for transmethylation. Methyl groups of choline, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphorylcholine are major end products of this pathway. Flux through methylthio recycling is about one-third the amount of methionine accumulating in protein. Spermidine synthesis accounts for at least 60% of the flux through methylthio recycling. The results obtained here, together with those reported for methionine-supplemented plants (Giovanelli, Mudd, Datko 1981 Biochem Biophys Res Commun 100: 831-839), indicate that methionine supplementation reduced methylneogenesis by no more than the small amount expected from the reduced entry of sulfate sulfur into methionine (Giovanelli, Mudd, Datko, 1985 Plant Physiol 77: 450-455). Methionine supplementation had no significant effect on transmethylation or methylthio recycling. The combined data provide the first comprehensive estimates of the quantitative relationships of major pathways for methionine metabolism and their control in plants. PMID:16664282

  8. Changes in tRNA methyltransferase activity and cellular S-adenosylmethionine content following methionine deprivation.

    PubMed

    Tisdale, M J

    1980-09-19

    Although homocysteine was unable to support growth of Walker carcinoma in media lacking methionine it did enable some proliferation of TLX5 lymphoma. In both cell lines there was an increase in growth rate in the presence of homocysteine at limiting methionine concentrations. The proliferation rate of Walker carcinoma was proportional to the methionine concentraion of the medium down to 0.5 microgram/ml, whereas growth of TLX5 lymphoma was only slightly reduced at such methionine concentrations. The difference in proliferative ability between the two cell lines was reflected in the level of S-adenosyl-L-methionine under conditions of methionine deprivation. In both cases transferance to a media in which methionine was growth limiting caused a rapid increase in the activity of tRNA methyltransferases to levels six to seven-fold greater than the control. The initial increase in methylase activity was not prevented by cycloheximide, although after 4 h there was a progressive decrease in activity which approached control values within 24 h. The increase in tRNA methyltransferase activity on removal of the normal level of methionine in the medium was also seen with human embryonic fibroblasts, which are able to proliferate normally in methionine-deficient, homocysteine-supplemented media. These results suggest that methyltransferase activity may be regulated in part by the S-adenosyl-methionine content of the cell.

  9. Novel mechanism for scavenging of hypochlorite involving a periplasmic methionine-rich peptide and methionine sulfoxide reductase

    DOE PAGES

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Lavarone, Anthony T.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.; Coates, John D.

    2015-05-12

    Reactive chlorine species (RCS) defense mechanisms are important for bacterial fitness in diverse environments. In addition to the anthropogenic use of RCS in the form of bleach, these compounds are also produced naturally through photochemical reactions of natural organic matter and in vivo by the mammalian immune system in response to invading microorganisms. To gain insight into bacterial RCS defense mechanisms, we investigated Azospira suillum strain PS, which produces periplasmic RCS as an intermediate of perchlorate respiration. Our studies identified an RCS response involving an RCS stress-sensing sigma/anti-sigma factor system (SigF/NrsF), a soluble hypochlorite-scavenging methionine-rich periplasmic protein (MrpX), and amore » putative periplasmic methionine sulfoxide reductase (YedY1). We investigated the underlying mechanism by phenotypic characterization of appropriate gene deletions, chemogenomic profiling of barcoded transposon pools, transcriptome sequencing, and biochemical assessment of methionine oxidation. Our results demonstrated that SigF was specifically activated by RCS and initiated the transcription of a small regulon centering around yedY1 and mrpX. A yedY1 paralog (yedY2) was found to have a similar fitness to yedY1 despite not being regulated by SigF. Markerless deletions of yedY2 confirmed its synergy with the SigF regulon. MrpX was strongly induced and rapidly oxidized by RCS, especially hypochlorite. Our results suggest a mechanism involving hypochlorite scavenging by sacrificial oxidation of the MrpX in the periplasm. Reduced MrpX is regenerated by the YedY methionine sulfoxide reductase activity. The phylogenomic distribution of this system revealed conservation in several Proteobacteria of clinical importance, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Brucella spp., implying a putative role in immune response evasion in vivo. In addition, bacteria are often stressed in the environment by reactive chlorine species (RCS) of

  10. Novel mechanism for scavenging of hypochlorite involving a periplasmic methionine-rich peptide and methionine sulfoxide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Lavarone, Anthony T.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.; Coates, John D.

    2015-05-12

    Reactive chlorine species (RCS) defense mechanisms are important for bacterial fitness in diverse environments. In addition to the anthropogenic use of RCS in the form of bleach, these compounds are also produced naturally through photochemical reactions of natural organic matter and in vivo by the mammalian immune system in response to invading microorganisms. To gain insight into bacterial RCS defense mechanisms, we investigated Azospira suillum strain PS, which produces periplasmic RCS as an intermediate of perchlorate respiration. Our studies identified an RCS response involving an RCS stress-sensing sigma/anti-sigma factor system (SigF/NrsF), a soluble hypochlorite-scavenging methionine-rich periplasmic protein (MrpX), and a putative periplasmic methionine sulfoxide reductase (YedY1). We investigated the underlying mechanism by phenotypic characterization of appropriate gene deletions, chemogenomic profiling of barcoded transposon pools, transcriptome sequencing, and biochemical assessment of methionine oxidation. Our results demonstrated that SigF was specifically activated by RCS and initiated the transcription of a small regulon centering around yedY1 and mrpX. A yedY1 paralog (yedY2) was found to have a similar fitness to yedY1 despite not being regulated by SigF. Markerless deletions of yedY2 confirmed its synergy with the SigF regulon. MrpX was strongly induced and rapidly oxidized by RCS, especially hypochlorite. Our results suggest a mechanism involving hypochlorite scavenging by sacrificial oxidation of the MrpX in the periplasm. Reduced MrpX is regenerated by the YedY methionine sulfoxide reductase activity. The phylogenomic distribution of this system revealed conservation in several Proteobacteria of clinical importance, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Brucella spp., implying a putative role in immune response evasion in vivo. In addition, bacteria are often

  11. Ontogeny of methionine utilization and splanchnic uptake in critically ill children

    PubMed Central

    Verbruggen, Sascha; Sy, Jama; Gordon, William E.; Hsu, Jean; Wu, Manhong; Chacko, Shaji; Zurakowski, David; Burrin, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    To determine the rates of methionine splanchnic uptake and utilization in critically ill pediatric patients we used two kinetic models: the plasma methionine enrichment and the “intracellular” homocysteine enrichment. Twenty four patients, eight infants, eight children, and eight adolescents, were studied. They received simultaneous, primed, constant, intravenous infusions of l-[2H3]methylmethionine and enteral l-[1-13C]methionine. The ratio of [13C]homocysteine to [13C]methionine enrichment was 1.0 ± 0.15, 0.80 ± 0.20, and 0.66 ± 0.10, respectively, for the infants, children, and adolescents, and it was different between the infants and adolescents (P < 0.01). Methionine splanchnic uptake was 63, 45, and 36%, respectively, in the infants, children, and adolescents, and it was higher (P < 0.01) in the infants compared with the adolescents. The infants utilized 73% of methionine flux for nonoxidative disposal, while 27% was used for transulfuration (P < 0.001). Conversely, in the adolescents, 40% was utilized for nonoxidative disposal, while 60% was used for transulfuration. There is ontogeny on the rates of methionine splanchnic uptake and on the fate of methionine utilization in critically ill children, with greater methionine utilization for synthesis of proteins and methionine-derived compounds (P < 0.01) and decreased transulfuration rates in the infants (P < 0.01), while the opposite was observed in the adolescents. The plasma model underestimated methionine kinetics in children and adolescents but not in the infants, suggesting lesser dilution and greater compartmentation of methionine metabolism in the infant population. All patients were in negative methionine balance, indicating that the current enteral nutritional support is inadequate in these patients. PMID:19724018

  12. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for leucine and methionine enkephalins

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, G.; Jones, C.A.; Hughes, J.

    1983-04-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for enkephalins was developed by coupling the peptides to a carrier molecule (bovine serum albumin) in order to allow the antibody-antigen reaction to take place in the solid phase. The assay was shown to be highly reproducible. Its sensitivity was 14 nmol/liter for leucine enkephalin and 27 nmol/liter for methionine enkephalin, which is similar to that obtained when the same antibodies were used in radioimmunoassay.

  13. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in Proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leyn, Semen A; Suvorova, Inna A; Kholina, Tatiana D; Sherstneva, Sofia S; Novichkov, Pavel S; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2014-01-01

    Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ∼ 200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific and genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria. PMID:25411846

  14. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in proteobacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Leyn, Semen A.; Suvorova, Inna A.; Kholina, Tatiana D.; Sherstneva, Sofia S.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2014-11-20

    Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ~200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific andmore » genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria.« less

  15. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in proteobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Leyn, Semen A.; Suvorova, Inna A.; Kholina, Tatiana D.; Sherstneva, Sofia S.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2014-11-20

    Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ~200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific and genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria.

  16. Dynamics of methionine ligand rebinding in cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Małolepsza, Edyta; Straub, John E

    2012-06-14

    Geminate recombination of the methionine ligand to the heme iron in ferrous cytochrome c protein following photodissociation displays rich kinetics. It is of particular interest to develop an understanding of fast and slow rebinding time scales, observed in experimental studies, in terms of features of the underlying complex energy landscape. The classical empirical force field in the heme pocket has been extended by incorporating ab initio potential energy surface calculations representing the ground singlet state and quintet state associated with methionine bond breaking and rebinding. An algorithm based on the Landau-Zener nonadiabatic transition theory has been employed to model the electronic surface hopping between two spin states during the process of ligand dissociation and recombination. Multiple conformational substates of the dissociated methionine ligand are found to participate in the reaction dynamics. Varying time scales for interconversion between substates lead to a mechanism elucidating the fast and slow rebinding time scales. The reaction system may be understood in terms of a two-dimensional reaction coordinate distinctly separated from the coupled bath of surrounding protein and solvent degrees of freedom. Insights into the reaction dynamics provided by this study lead to suggestions for future experiments to further probe the role of dynamic heterogeneity in the kinetics of ligand-protein binding. PMID:22432601

  17. Comparison of L-[1-11C]methionine and L-methyl-[11C]methionine for measuring in vivo protein synthesis rates with PET.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, K; Vaalburg, W; Elsinga, P H; Paans, A M; Woldring, M G

    1988-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using either L-[1-11C]-methionine or L-[methyl-11C]methionine for measuring protein synthesis rates by positron emission tomography (PET) in normal and neoplastic tissues, distribution and metabolic studies with 14C- and 11C-labeled methionines were carried out in rats bearing Walker 256 carcinosarcoma. The tissue distributions of the two 14C-labeled methionines were similar except for liver tissue. Similar distribution patterns were observed in vivo by PET using 11C-labeled methionines. The highest 14C incorporation rate into the protein-bound fraction was found in the liver followed by tumor, brain, and pancreas. The incorporation rates in liver and pancreas were different for the two methionines. By chloroform-methanol fractionation of these four tissues, in liver significantly different amounts of 14C were observed in macromolecules. Also in brain tissue slight differences were found. By HPLC analyses of the protein-free fractions of plasma, tumor, and brain tissue at 60 min after injection, for both methionines several 14C-labeled metabolites in different amounts, were detected. About half of the 14C-labeled material in the protein-free fraction was found to be methionine. In these three tissues the amount of nonprotein metabolites and [14C]bicarbonate amount ranged from 10% to 17% and 12% to 15% for L-[1-14C]methionine and L-[methyl-14C]methionine, respectively. From these results it can be concluded that the minor metabolic pathways have to be investigated in order to quantitatively model the protein synthesis by PET.

  18. Novel Mechanism for Scavenging of Hypochlorite Involving a Periplasmic Methionine-Rich Peptide and Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reactive chlorine species (RCS) defense mechanisms are important for bacterial fitness in diverse environments. In addition to the anthropogenic use of RCS in the form of bleach, these compounds are also produced naturally through photochemical reactions of natural organic matter and in vivo by the mammalian immune system in response to invading microorganisms. To gain insight into bacterial RCS defense mechanisms, we investigated Azospira suillum strain PS, which produces periplasmic RCS as an intermediate of perchlorate respiration. Our studies identified an RCS response involving an RCS stress-sensing sigma/anti-sigma factor system (SigF/NrsF), a soluble hypochlorite-scavenging methionine-rich periplasmic protein (MrpX), and a putative periplasmic methionine sulfoxide reductase (YedY1). We investigated the underlying mechanism by phenotypic characterization of appropriate gene deletions, chemogenomic profiling of barcoded transposon pools, transcriptome sequencing, and biochemical assessment of methionine oxidation. Our results demonstrated that SigF was specifically activated by RCS and initiated the transcription of a small regulon centering around yedY1 and mrpX. A yedY1 paralog (yedY2) was found to have a similar fitness to yedY1 despite not being regulated by SigF. Markerless deletions of yedY2 confirmed its synergy with the SigF regulon. MrpX was strongly induced and rapidly oxidized by RCS, especially hypochlorite. Our results suggest a mechanism involving hypochlorite scavenging by sacrificial oxidation of the MrpX in the periplasm. Reduced MrpX is regenerated by the YedY methionine sulfoxide reductase activity. The phylogenomic distribution of this system revealed conservation in several Proteobacteria of clinical importance, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Brucella spp., implying a putative role in immune response evasion in vivo. PMID:25968643

  19. Kinetics of microbial methionine metabolism in continuous cultures administered different methionine sources.

    PubMed

    Firkins, J L; Fowler, C M; Devillard, E; Bequette, B J

    2015-02-01

    The Met precursor 2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio) butanoic acid (HMB) is expected to be more extensively degraded in the rumen than its isopropyl ester (HMBi). A control and 3 isomolar treatments-0.097% dl-methionine, 0.11% HMBi (HMBi), and 0.055% HMBi plus 0.048% Met (Met + HMBi)-were dosed every 8h simultaneously with 3-times-daily feeding into continuous cultures. Starting on d 9, for 6 consecutive doses, both [1-(13)C]-l-Met and [methyl-(2)H3]-l-Met replaced part of the unlabeled dl-Met, [(13)C5]-dl-HMBi replaced a portion of the unlabeled dl-HMBi, and [1-(13)C]-l-Met plus [(13)C5]-dl-HMBi replaced a portion of the respective unlabeled doses for the Met + HMBi treatment. After the sixth dose (d 11), unlabeled Met or HMBi provided 100% of the doses to follow elimination kinetics of the labels in HMBi, free Met, and bacterial Met compartments. The free [1-(13)C]-l-Met recycled more and was recovered in bacterial Met to a lesser extent than was the free [methyl-(2)H3]-l-Met recycling and that was recovered in bacterial Met. Increasing HMBi inclusion (0, 50, and 100% substitution of the exogenously dosed Met on a molar equivalent basis) tended to increase HMBi escape from 54.7 to 71.3% for the 50 and 100% HMBi treatments, respectively. Despite HMBi substituting for and decreasing the dosage of Met, increasing HMBi increased accumulation of free Met in fermenter fluid. The HMBi (after de-esterification of the isopropyl group) presumably produces Met through the intermediate α-ketomethylthyiobutyrate with an aminotransferase that also has high affinity for branched-chain AA. We provide evidence that the HMBi-derived Met is likely released from bacterial cells and accumulates rather than being degraded, potentially as a result of lagging d-stereoisomer metabolism. More research is needed to evaluate racemization and metabolism of stereoisomers of HMBi, Met, and other AA in ruminal microbes.

  20. Influence of protein level and supplemental methionine in practical rations for young endangered masked bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the protein requirement of young endangered masked Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus ridgwayi). Five practical starting rations containing 24 to 32% protein were fed alone and supplemented with methionine for 5 weeks. Supplemental methionine significantly improved growth of quail fed diets containing 24 and 26% protein. Increasing the protein level improved growth of quail fed unsupplemented diets but did not do so when diets contained supplemental methionine. A methionine-supplemented ration containing 24% protein appeared adequate for supporting rapid growth of masked Bobwhite quail.

  1. Oxidation of methionine residues in polypeptide ions via gas-phase ion/ion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Alice L; McLuckey, Scott A

    2014-06-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of methionine residues is demonstrated here using ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. Periodate anions are observed to attach in varying degrees to all polypeptide ions irrespective of amino acid composition. Direct proton transfer yielding a charge-reduced peptide ion is also observed. In the case of methionine and, to a much lesser degree, tryptophan-containing peptide ions, collisional activation of the complex ion generated by periodate attachment yields an oxidized peptide product (i.e., [M + H + O](+)), in addition to periodic acid detachment. Detachment of periodic acid takes place exclusively for peptides that do not contain either a methionine or tryptophan side chain. In the case of methionine-containing peptides, the [M + H + O](+) product is observed at a much greater abundance than the proton transfer product (viz., [M + H](+)). Collisional activation of oxidized Met-containing peptides yields a signature loss of 64 Da from the precursor and/or product ions. This unique loss corresponds to the ejection of methanesulfenic acid from the oxidized methionine side chain and is commonly used in solution-phase proteomics studies to determine the presence of oxidized methionine residues. The present work shows that periodate anions can be used to 'label' methionine residues in polypeptides in the gas phase. The selectivity of the periodate anion for the methionine side chain suggests several applications including identification and location of methionine residues in sequencing applications.

  2. Methionine Metabolism Alters Oxidative Stress Resistance via the Pentose Phosphate Pathway.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kate; Vowinckel, Jakob; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient uptake and metabolism have a significant impact on the way cells respond to stress. The amino acid methionine is, in particular, a key player in the oxidative stress response, and acting as a reactive oxygen species scavenger, methionine is implicated in caloric restriction phenotypes and aging. We here provide evidence that some effects of methionine in stress situations are indirect and caused by altered activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) producing oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, both methionine prototrophic (MET15) and auxotrophic (met15Δ) cells supplemented with methionine showed an increase in PPP metabolite concentrations downstream of the NADPH producing enzyme, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Proteomics revealed this enzyme to also increase in expression compared to methionine self-synthesizing cells. Oxidant tolerance was increased in cells preincubated with methionine; however, this effect was abolished when flux through the oxidative PPP was prevented by deletion of its rate limiting enzyme, ZWF1. Stress resistance phenotypes that follow methionine supplementation hence involve the oxidative PPP. Effects of methionine on oxidative metabolism, stress signaling, and aging have thus to be seen in the context of an altered activity of this NADP reducing pathway.

  3. Oxidation of Methionine Residues in Polypeptide Ions Via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, Alice L.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2014-06-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of methionine residues is demonstrated here using ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. Periodate anions are observed to attach in varying degrees to all polypeptide ions irrespective of amino acid composition. Direct proton transfer yielding a charge-reduced peptide ion is also observed. In the case of methionine and, to a much lesser degree, tryptophan-containing peptide ions, collisional activation of the complex ion generated by periodate attachment yields an oxidized peptide product (i.e., [M + H + O]+), in addition to periodic acid detachment. Detachment of periodic acid takes place exclusively for peptides that do not contain either a methionine or tryptophan side chain. In the case of methionine-containing peptides, the [M + H + O]+ product is observed at a much greater abundance than the proton transfer product (viz., [M + H]+). Collisional activation of oxidized Met-containing peptides yields a signature loss of 64 Da from the precursor and/or product ions. This unique loss corresponds to the ejection of methanesulfenic acid from the oxidized methionine side chain and is commonly used in solution-phase proteomics studies to determine the presence of oxidized methionine residues. The present work shows that periodate anions can be used to `label' methionine residues in polypeptides in the gas phase. The selectivity of the periodate anion for the methionine side chain suggests several applications including identification and location of methionine residues in sequencing applications.

  4. Methionine Metabolism Alters Oxidative Stress Resistance via the Pentose Phosphate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kate; Vowinckel, Jakob; Keller, Markus A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nutrient uptake and metabolism have a significant impact on the way cells respond to stress. The amino acid methionine is, in particular, a key player in the oxidative stress response, and acting as a reactive oxygen species scavenger, methionine is implicated in caloric restriction phenotypes and aging. We here provide evidence that some effects of methionine in stress situations are indirect and caused by altered activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) producing oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, both methionine prototrophic (MET15) and auxotrophic (met15Δ) cells supplemented with methionine showed an increase in PPP metabolite concentrations downstream of the NADPH producing enzyme, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Proteomics revealed this enzyme to also increase in expression compared to methionine self-synthesizing cells. Oxidant tolerance was increased in cells preincubated with methionine; however, this effect was abolished when flux through the oxidative PPP was prevented by deletion of its rate limiting enzyme, ZWF1. Stress resistance phenotypes that follow methionine supplementation hence involve the oxidative PPP. Effects of methionine on oxidative metabolism, stress signaling, and aging have thus to be seen in the context of an altered activity of this NADP reducing pathway. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 543–547. PMID:26596469

  5. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase: a key player connecting purine, folate and methionine metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Saint-Marc, Christelle; Hürlimann, Hans C; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Pinson, Benoît

    2015-11-01

    Previous genetic analyses showed phenotypic interactions between 5-amino-4-imidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide 5'-phosphate (AICAR) produced from the purine and histidine pathways and methionine biosynthesis. Here, we revisited the effect of AICAR on methionine requirement due to AICAR accumulation in the presence of the fau1 mutation invalidating folinic acid remobilization. We found that this methionine auxotrophy could be suppressed by overexpression of the methionine synthase Met6 or by deletion of the serine hydroxymethyltransferase gene SHM2. We propose that in a fau1 background, AICAR, by stimulating the transcriptional expression of SHM2, leads to a folinic acid accumulation inhibiting methionine synthesis by Met6. In addition, we uncovered a new methionine auxotrophy for the ade3 bas1 double mutant that can be rescued by overexpressing the SHM2 gene. We propose that methionine auxotrophy in this mutant is the result of a competition for 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate between methionine and deoxythymidine monophosphate synthesis. Altogether, our data show intricate genetic interactions between one-carbon units, purine and methionine metabolism through fine-tuning of serine hydroxymethyltransferase by AICAR and the transcription factor Bas1.

  6. An unusual peptide deformylase features in the human mitochondrial N-terminal methionine excision pathway.

    PubMed

    Serero, Alexandre; Giglione, Carmela; Sardini, Alessandro; Martinez-Sanz, Juan; Meinnel, Thierry

    2003-12-26

    Dedicated machinery for N-terminal methionine excision (NME) was recently identified in plant organelles and shown to be essential in plastids. We report here the existence of mitochondrial NME in mammals, as shown by the identification of cDNAs encoding specific peptide deformylases (PDFs) and new methionine aminopeptidases (MAP1D). We cloned the two full-length human cDNAs and showed that the N-terminal domains of the encoded enzymes were specifically involved in targeting to mitochondria. In contrast to mitochondrial MAP1D, the human PDF sequence differed from that of known PDFs in several key features. We characterized the human PDF fully in vivo and in vitro. Comparison of the processed human enzyme with the plant mitochondrial PDF1A, to which it is phylogenetically related, showed that the human enzyme had an extra N-terminal domain involved in both mitochondrial targeting and enzyme stability. Mammalian PDFs also display non-random substitutions in the conserved motifs important for activity. Human PDF site-directed mutagenesis variants were studied and compared with the corresponding plant PDF1A variants. We found that amino acid substitutions in human PDF specifically altered its catalytic site, resulting in an enzyme intermediate between bacterial PDF1Bs and plant PDF1As. Because (i) human PDF was found to be active both in vitro and in vivo, (ii) the entire machinery is conserved and expressed in most animals, (iii) the mitochondrial genome expresses substrates for these enzymes, and (iv) mRNA synthesis is regulated, we conclude that animal mitochondria have a functional NME machinery that can be regulated. PMID:14532271

  7. Insights into the reactivation of cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Datta, Supratim; Pattridge, Katherine A.; Smith, Janet L.; Matthews, Rowena G.

    2009-12-10

    Cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH) is a modular protein that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine to produce methionine and tetrahydrofolate. The cobalamin cofactor, which serves as both acceptor and donor of the methyl group, is oxidized once every {approx}2,000 catalytic cycles and must be reactivated by the uptake of an electron from reduced flavodoxin and a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet). Previous structures of a C-terminal fragment of MetH (MetH{sup CT}) revealed a reactivation conformation that juxtaposes the cobalamin- and AdoMet-binding domains. Here we describe 2 structures of a disulfide stabilized MetH{sup CT} ({sub s-s}MetH{sup CT}) that offer further insight into the reactivation of MetH. The structure of {sub s-s}MetH{sup CT} with cob(II)alamin and S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine represents the enzyme in the reactivation step preceding electron transfer from flavodoxin. The structure supports earlier suggestions that the enzyme acts to lower the reduction potential of the Co(II)/Co(I) couple by elongating the bond between the cobalt and its upper axial water ligand, effectively making the cobalt 4-coordinate, and illuminates the role of Tyr-1139 in the stabilization of this 4-coordinate state. The structure of {sub s-s}MetH{sub CT} with aquocobalamin may represent a transient state at the end of reactivation as the newly remethylated 5-coordinate methylcobalamin returns to the 6-coordinate state, triggering the rearrangement to a catalytic conformation.

  8. Expression of the biochemical defect of methionine dependence in fresh patient tumors in primary histoculture.

    PubMed

    Guo, H Y; Herrera, H; Groce, A; Hoffman, R M

    1993-06-01

    Methionine dependence is a metabolic defect that occurs in many human tumor cell lines but not normal in unestablished cell strains. Methionine-dependent tumor cell lines are unable to proliferate and arrest in the late S/G2 phase of the cell cycle when methionine is replaced by its immediate precursor homocysteine in the culture medium (MET-HCY+ medium). However, it is not known whether methionine dependence occurs in fresh patient tumors as it does in cell lines. In order to determine whether methionine dependence occurs in fresh patient tumors as well as whether methionine dependence occurs in fresh patient tumors as well as in cell lines we took advantage of the technique of sponge-gel-supported histoculture to grow tumors directly from surgery. We then measured nuclear DNA content by image analysis to determine the cell cycle position in MET-HCY+ compared to MET+HCY- medium in 21 human patient tumors. Human tumor cell lines found to be methionine dependent by cell count were used as positive controls and were found to have marked reduction of cells in G1 compared to total cells in the cell cycle in MET-HCY+ medium with respect to the G1: total cell ratio in MET+HCY- medium. Therefore late cell cycle arrest was used as a marker of methionine dependence for histocultured patient tumors. We found that 5 human tumors of 21, including tumors of the colon, breast, ovary, prostate, and a melanoma, were methionine dependent based on cell cycle analysis. These data on fresh human tumors indicate that methionine dependence may frequently occur in the cancer patient population. Implications for potential therapy based on methionine dependence are discussed. PMID:8495409

  9. Thermodynamics of the dissolution of crystalline L-methionine in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernikov, V. V.; Krutova, O. N.; Damrina, K. V.; Skvortsov, I. A.

    2016-05-01

    The enthalpies of dissolution of crystalline L-methionine in water and aqueous solutions of potasium hydroxide at 298.15 K are measured by means of direct calorimetry. The standard enthalpies of formation are calculated for L-methionine and products of its dissociation in aqueous solution.

  10. Degradation of platinum based anticancer drugs by methionine: An EXAFS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, K.; Bouvet-Muller, D.; Crauste-Manciet, S.; Olivi, L.; Vlaic, G.; Michalowicz, A.

    2009-11-01

    We characterized the structures in solution of carboplatin and oxaliplatin degradation products in presence of a large excess of methionine (Met). The reaction of carboplatin leads to the formation of cis-Pt(Met)2 while, in the case of oxaliplatin, methionine displaces only the oxalate ligand to form Pt(diaminocyclohexane)(Met).

  11. Influence of dietary methionine on the metabolism of selenomethionine in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.A.; Beilstein, M.A.; Whanger, P.D. )

    1989-07-01

    To determine the influence of methionine on selenomethionine (SeMet) metabolism, weanling male rats were fed for 8 wk a basal diet marginally deficient in sulfur amino acids, containing 2.0 micrograms selenium (Se)/g as DL-SeMet and supplemented with 0, 0.3, 0.6 or 1.2% DL-methionine. Increased dietary methionine caused decreased selenium deposition in all tissues examined but increased glutathione peroxidase activity in testes, liver and lungs. A positive correlation was found between dietary methionine and the calculated percentage of selenium associated with GSHPx. In a second experiment, {sup 75}SeMet was injected into weanling male rats which had been fed the basal diet containing 2.0 micrograms selenium as DL-SeMet with or without the addition of 1.0% methionine. The selenoamino acid content of tissues and the distribution of {sup 75}Se in erythrocyte proteins were determined. In comparison to the rats fed the basal diet without added methionine, significantly more {sup 75}Se-selenocysteine was found in liver and muscle, more {sup 75}Se was found in erythrocyte GSHPx and less {sup 75}Se was found in erythrocyte hemoglobin of rats fed 1.0% methionine. These data suggest that methionine diverts SeMet from incorporation into general proteins and enhances its conversion to selenocysteine for specific selenium-requiring proteins, such as GSHPx.

  12. From yeast to human: exploring the comparative biology of methionine restriction in extending eukaryotic life span.

    PubMed

    McIsaac, R Scott; Lewis, Kaitlyn N; Gibney, Patrick A; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    Methionine restriction is a widely reported intervention for increasing life span in several model organisms. Low circulating levels of methionine are evident in the long-lived naked mole-rat, suggesting that it naturally presents with a life-extending phenotype akin to that observed in methionine-restricted animals. Similarly, long-lived dwarf mice also appear to have altered methionine metabolism. The mechanisms underlying methionine-restriction effects on life-span extension, however, remain unknown, as do their potential connections with caloric restriction, another well-established intervention for prolonging life span. Paradoxically, methionine is enriched in proteins expressed in mitochondria and may itself serve an important role in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and may thereby contribute to delayed aging. Collectively, we highlight the evidence that modulation of the methionine metabolic network can extend life span-from yeast to humans-and explore the evidence that sulfur amino acids and the concomitant transsulfuration pathway play a privileged role in this regard. However, systematic studies in single organisms (particularly those that exhibit extreme longevity) are still required to distinguish the fundamental principles concerning the role of methionine and other amino acids in regulating life span. PMID:26995762

  13. A NOVEL S-ADENOSYL-L-METHIONINE: ARSENIC (III) METHYLTRANSFERASE FROM RAT LIVER CYTOSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Novel S-Adenosyl-L-methionine: Arsenic(III) Methyltransferase from Rat Liver Cytosol
    Shan Lin, Qing Shi, F. Brent Nix, Miroslav Styblo, Melinda A. Beck, Karen M. Herbin-Davis, Larry L. Hall, Josef B. Simeonsson, and David J. Thomas
    S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet): ar...

  14. From yeast to human: exploring the comparative biology of methionine restriction in extending eukaryotic life span.

    PubMed

    McIsaac, R Scott; Lewis, Kaitlyn N; Gibney, Patrick A; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    Methionine restriction is a widely reported intervention for increasing life span in several model organisms. Low circulating levels of methionine are evident in the long-lived naked mole-rat, suggesting that it naturally presents with a life-extending phenotype akin to that observed in methionine-restricted animals. Similarly, long-lived dwarf mice also appear to have altered methionine metabolism. The mechanisms underlying methionine-restriction effects on life-span extension, however, remain unknown, as do their potential connections with caloric restriction, another well-established intervention for prolonging life span. Paradoxically, methionine is enriched in proteins expressed in mitochondria and may itself serve an important role in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and may thereby contribute to delayed aging. Collectively, we highlight the evidence that modulation of the methionine metabolic network can extend life span-from yeast to humans-and explore the evidence that sulfur amino acids and the concomitant transsulfuration pathway play a privileged role in this regard. However, systematic studies in single organisms (particularly those that exhibit extreme longevity) are still required to distinguish the fundamental principles concerning the role of methionine and other amino acids in regulating life span.

  15. Interactive effects of selenium, methionine, and dietary protein on survival, growth, and physiology in mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Sanderson, C.J.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Cromartie, E.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1992-01-01

    Concentrations of over 100 ppm (100 mg/kg) selenium (Se) have been found in aquatic food chains associated with irrigation drainwater. Both quantity and composition of dietary protein for wild ducklings may vary in selenium-contaminated environments. Day-old mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings received one of the following diets containing 22% protein: unsupplemented (controls), 15 ppm Se (as selenomethionine), 60 ppm Se, methionine supplemented, 15 ppm Se with methionine supplement, or 60 ppm Se with methionine supplement. In a second concurrent experiment the above sequence was repeated with a protein-restricted (11%) but isocaloric diet. In a third concurrent experiment all ducklings received 44% protein with 0, 15, or 60 ppm Se added. After 4 weeks, blood and tissue samples were collected for biochemical and histological examination. With 22% protein and 60 ppm Se in the diet, duckling survival and growth was reduced and histopathological lesions of the liver occurred. Antagonistic interactive effects occurred between supplementary methionine and Se, including complete to partial alleviation of the following Se effects by methionine: mortality, hepatic lesions, and altered glutathione and thiol status. With 11% protein, growth of controls was less than that with 22% protein, Se (60 ppm) caused 100% mortality, and methionine supplementation, although protective afforded less protection than it did with 22% protein. With 44% protein, ducklings experienced physiological stress, and Se was more toxic than with methionine-supplemented 22% protein. These findings suggest the potential for antagonistic effects of Se, methionine, and protein on duckling survival and physiology.

  16. Genetic and biochemical differences in populations bred for extremes in maize grain methionine concentration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Methionine is an important nutrient in animal feed and several approaches have been developed to increase methionine concentration in maize (Zea mays L.) grain. One approach is through traditional breeding using recurrent selection. Using divergent selection, genetically related populations with extreme differences in grain methionine content were produced. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms controlling grain methionine content, we examined seed proteins, transcript levels of candidate genes, and genotypes of these populations. Results Two populations were selected for high or low methionine concentration for eight generations and 40 and 56% differences between the high and low populations in grain methionine concentration were observed. Mean values between the high and low methionine populations differed by greater than 1.5 standard deviations in some cycles of selection. Other amino acids and total protein concentration exhibited much smaller changes. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms that contribute to these differences, we compared transcript levels of candidate genes encoding high methionine seed storage proteins involved in sulfur assimilation or methionine biosynthesis. In combination, we also explored the genetic mechanisms at the SNP level through implementation of an association analysis. Significant differences in methionine-rich seed storage protein genes were observed in comparisons of high and low methionine populations, while transcripts of seed storage proteins lacking high levels of methionine were unchanged. Seed storage protein levels were consistent with transcript levels. Two genes involved in sulfur assimilation, Cys2 and CgS1 showed substantial differences in allele frequencies when two selected populations were compared to the starting populations. Major genes identified across cycles of selection by a high-stringency association analysis included dzs18, wx, dzs10, and zp27. Conclusions We

  17. Thioredoxin-dependent Redox Regulation of Cellular Signaling and Stress Response through Reversible Oxidation of Methionines

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-06-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a common feature of many forms of stress to which plants are exposed. Successful adaptation to changing environmental conditions requires sensitive sensors of ROS such as protein-bound methionines that are converted to their corresponding methionine sulfoxides, which in turn can influence cellular signaling pathways. Such a signaling protein is calmodulin, which represents an early and central point in calcium signaling pathways important to stress response in plants. We describe recent work elucidating fundamental mechanisms of reversible methionine oxidation within calmodulin, including the sensitivity of individual methionines within plant and animal calmodulin to ROS, the structural and functional consequences of their oxidation, and the interactions of oxidized calmodulin with methionine sulfoxide reductase enzymes.

  18. Therapeutic tumor-specific cell cycle block induced by methionine starvation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Lishko, V K; Herrera, H; Groce, A; Kubota, T; Hoffman, R M

    1993-12-01

    The ability to induce a specific cell cycle block selectively in the tumor could have many uses in chemotherapy. In the present study we have achieved this goal of inducing a tumor-specific cell cycle block in vivo by depriving Yoshida sarcoma-bearing nude mice of dietary methionine. Further, we demonstrate that methionine depletion also causes the tumor to eventually regress. The antitumor effect of methionine depletion resulted in the extended survival of the tumor-bearing mice. The mice on the methionine-deprived diets maintained their body weight for the time period studied, indicating that tumor regression was not a function of body weight loss. The data reported here support future experiments utilizing methionine depletion as a target for tumor-selective cell cycle-dependent therapy.

  19. Mutagenicity of methionine or its metabolic products in RSV-transformed Chinese hamster fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hill, M; Hillova, J; Brada, Z; Mariage-Samson, R

    1987-01-01

    Methionine has been successfully used to control tumor progression in vivo and to induce reversions of transformed cells in vitro. In the present study, we measured mutations at the HGPRT locus of RSV-transformed cells serially propagated in methionine-supplemented medium and assayed at each passage for thioguanine resistance. The frequency of spontaneous mutants at this locus was 7.2 X 10(-5); this value gradually increased during the methionine treatment to as much as 9.2 X 10(-4), and returned to initial values when the methionine treatment was withdrawn. It is proposed that the mutants were induced by the methionine derivative, S-adenosylmethionine, and the resulting mutant frequency determined by equilibrium between mutagenic action of this metabolite and DNA repair.

  20. Methionine uptake in Corynebacterium glutamicum by MetQNI and by MetPS, a novel methionine and alanine importer of the NSS neurotransmitter transporter family.

    PubMed

    Trötschel, Christian; Follmann, Martin; Nettekoven, Jeannine A; Mohrbach, Tobias; Forrest, Lucy R; Burkovski, Andreas; Marin, Kay; Krämer, Reinhard

    2008-12-01

    The soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum is a model organism in amino acid biotechnology. Here we present the identification of two different L-methionine uptake systems including the first characterization of a bacterial secondary methionine carrier. The primary carrier MetQNI is a high affinity ABC-type transporter specific for l-methionine. Its expression is under the control of the transcription factor McbR, the global regulator of sulfur metabolism in C. glutamicum. Besides MetQNI, a novel secondary methionine uptake system of the NSS (neurotransmitter:sodium symporter) family was identified and named MetP. The MetP system is characterized by a lower affinity for methionine and uses Na(+) ions for energetic coupling. It is also the main alanine transporter in C. glutamicum and is expressed constitutively. These observations are consistent with models of methionine, alanine, and leucine bound to MetP, derived from the X-ray crystal structure of the LeuT transporter from Aquifex aeolicus. Complementation studies show that MetP consists of two components, a large subunit with 12 predicted transmembrane segments and, surprisingly, an additional subunit with one predicted transmembrane segment only. Thus, this new member of the NSS transporter family adds a novel feature to this class of carriers, namely, the functional dependence on an additional small subunit.

  1. In Salmonella enterica, the Gcn5-related acetyltransferase MddA (formerly YncA) acetylates methionine sulfoximine and methionine sulfone, blocking their toxic effects.

    PubMed

    Hentchel, Kristy L; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2015-01-01

    Protein and small-molecule acylation reactions are widespread in nature. Many of the enzymes catalyzing acylation reactions belong to the Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT; PF00583) family, named after the yeast Gcn5 protein. The genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 encodes 26 GNATs, 11 of which have no known physiological role. Here, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the role of the MddA (methionine derivative detoxifier; formerly YncA) GNAT in the detoxification of oxidized forms of methionine, including methionine sulfoximine (MSX) and methionine sulfone (MSO). MSX and MSO inhibited the growth of an S. enterica ΔmddA strain unless glutamine or methionine was present in the medium. We used an in vitro spectrophotometric assay and mass spectrometry to show that MddA acetylated MSX and MSO. An mddA(+) strain displayed biphasic growth kinetics in the presence of MSX and glutamine. Deletion of two amino acid transporters (GlnHPQ and MetNIQ) in a ΔmddA strain restored growth in the presence of MSX. Notably, MSO was transported by GlnHPQ but not by MetNIQ. In summary, MddA is the mechanism used by S. enterica to respond to oxidized forms of methionine, which MddA detoxifies by acetyl coenzyme A-dependent acetylation.

  2. In Salmonella enterica, the Gcn5-related acetyltransferase MddA (formerly YncA) acetylates methionine sulfoximine and methionine sulfone, blocking their toxic effects.

    PubMed

    Hentchel, Kristy L; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2015-01-01

    Protein and small-molecule acylation reactions are widespread in nature. Many of the enzymes catalyzing acylation reactions belong to the Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT; PF00583) family, named after the yeast Gcn5 protein. The genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 encodes 26 GNATs, 11 of which have no known physiological role. Here, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the role of the MddA (methionine derivative detoxifier; formerly YncA) GNAT in the detoxification of oxidized forms of methionine, including methionine sulfoximine (MSX) and methionine sulfone (MSO). MSX and MSO inhibited the growth of an S. enterica ΔmddA strain unless glutamine or methionine was present in the medium. We used an in vitro spectrophotometric assay and mass spectrometry to show that MddA acetylated MSX and MSO. An mddA(+) strain displayed biphasic growth kinetics in the presence of MSX and glutamine. Deletion of two amino acid transporters (GlnHPQ and MetNIQ) in a ΔmddA strain restored growth in the presence of MSX. Notably, MSO was transported by GlnHPQ but not by MetNIQ. In summary, MddA is the mechanism used by S. enterica to respond to oxidized forms of methionine, which MddA detoxifies by acetyl coenzyme A-dependent acetylation. PMID:25368301

  3. The role of methionine in the intracellular accumulation and function of folates

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.M.; McKenna, B.; McGing, P.; Molloy, A.; Dinn, J.; Weir, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    It is suggested that mammalian cells have evolved to respond to methionine deficiency since in such circumstances vital methylation reactions are put at risk, due to decreased levels of S-adenosyl-methionine. Decreased cellular homocysteine, as a result of decreased methionine, would also restrict cell division by decreased conversion of plasma 5-CH3-H/sub 4/PteGlu into intracellular polyglutamates. Cobalamin deficiency, either nutritional or due to exposure to the Co(I)cobalamin inactivating agent nitrous oxide, prevents the demethylation of 5-CH3-H/sub 4/PteGlu, which even in the presence of adequate amounts of homocysteine and methionine prevents rapidly proliferating cells from converting enough of the plasma 5-CH3-H/sub 4/ PteGlu into folylpolyglutamate forms to permit normal DNA biosynthesis and cell replication. This, together with the trapping of the cellular folate cofactors in the 5-CH3-H/sub 4/PteGlu form, results in megaloblastic changes occurring in tissues such as the marrow. The vital role of the methylation reactions was demonstrated by exposing monkeys to nitrous oxide which inactivated their methionine synthetase. The resultant ataxia and severe demyelination was prevented and diminished by methionine supplementation. When methionine synthetase was similarly inactivated in mice it was shown that while 5-CH3-H/sub 4/PteGlu enters mammalian cells, it is not converted into a polyglutamyl form and subsequently leaves the cell unmetabolised. In similar experiments in rats methionine was found to have only a small effect in restoring folylpolyglutamate biosynthesis. It was found that a decrease in the deoxythymidine salvage pathway by methionine has led others to the mistaken conclusion that methionine has an 'anti-folate' effect in bone marrow, i.e. that it decreases folate availability for thymidylate synthetase.

  4. [Effects of L-methionine on nitrification and N2O emission in subtropical forest soil].

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Pei, Guang-ting; Ma, Hong-liang; Gao, Ren; Yin, Yun-feng; Peng, Yuan-zhen

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of L-methionine on nitrification and nitrous oxide emission in a red soil under laboratory incubation experiments. A subtropical broad-leaved forest soil sample was collected from Wanmulin natural reserve in Fujian Province, Southeast China. Five treatments were carried out with three replications, i. e., control (CK), L- methionine addition (M), L-methionine and NH(4+)-N addition (MA), L-methionine and NO(2-)-N addition (MN), L-methionine and glucose addition (MC). The soil moisture was maintained at 60% WHC or 90% WHC. The results indicated that the soil NH(4+)-N content in the M treatment significantly increased by 0.8%-61.3%, while the soil NO(3-)-N content reduced by 13.2%-40.7% compared with CK. Under 60% WHC condition, soil NO(2-)-N content in the MC treatment was higher than in the M treatment, soil NO(3-)-N content in the MA and MN treatments were greater than that in the M treatment, and greater in the MN treatment than in the MA treatment. The soil NO(3-)-N content was lowest in the M treatment after incubation. These results suggested that L-methionine could inhibit nitrosation process of autotrophic nitrification. To some extent, carbon addition as glucose with L-methionine decreased the NH(4+)-N content, inhibited the autotrophic nitrification and their effects were dependent on water level. Under 90% WHC condition, carbon addition improved denitrification more obviously, but the decrease of NO(3-)-N content was not sufficient to prove the inhibition of hetero-nitrification due to carbon addition in the presence of L-methionine. The nitrous oxide emission from soil was increased by L-methionine addition. Compared with 60% WHC condition, the nitrous oxide emission was higher under 90% WHC condition, and the promotion of L-methionine addition on N2O was greater when glucose added.

  5. Peptide backbone cleavage by α-amidation is enhanced at methionine residues.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Michael; Löbmann, Katja; Orywol, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Cleavage reactions at backbone loci are one of the consequences of oxidation of proteins and peptides. During α-amidation, the Cα -N bond in the backbone is cleaved under formation of an N-terminal peptide amide and a C-terminal keto acyl peptide. On the basis of earlier works, a facilitation of α-amidation by the thioether group of adjacent methionine side chains was proposed. This reaction was characterized by using benzoyl methionine and benzoyl alanyl methionine as peptide models. The decomposition of benzoylated amino acids (benzoyl-methionine, benzoyl-alanine, and benzoyl-methionine sulfoxide) to benzamide in the presence of different carbohydrate compounds (reducing sugars, Amadori products, and reductones) was studied during incubation for up to 48 h at 80 °C in acetate-buffered solution (pH 6.0). Small amounts of benzamide (0.3-1.5 mol%) were formed in the presence of all sugars and from all benzoylated species. However, benzamide formation was strongly enhanced, when benzoyl methionine was incubated in the presence of reductones and Amadori compounds (3.5-4.2 mol%). The reaction was found to be intramolecular, because α-amidation of a similar 4-methylbenzoylated amino acid was not enhanced in the presence of benzoyl-methionine and carbohydrate compounds. In the peptide benzoyl-alanyl-methionine, α-amidation at the methionine residue is preferred over α-amidation at the benzoyl peptide bond. We propose here a mechanism for the enhancement of α-amidation at methionine residues.

  6. Methionine deficiency does not increase polyamine turnover through depletion of hepatic S-adenosylmethionine in juvenile Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Espe, Marit; Andersen, Synne Marte; Holen, Elisabeth; Rønnestad, Ivar; Veiseth-Kent, Eva; Zerrahn, Jens-Erik; Aksnes, Anders

    2014-10-28

    During the last few decades, plant protein ingredients such as soya proteins have replaced fishmeal in the diets of aquacultured species. This may affect the requirement and metabolism of methionine as soya contains less methionine compared with fishmeal. To assess whether methionine limitation affects decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine availability and polyamine status, in the present study, juvenile Atlantic salmon were fed a methionine-deficient plant protein-based diet or the same diet supplemented with dl-methionine for 8 weeks. The test diets were compared with a fishmeal-based control diet to assess their effects on the growth performance of fish. Methionine limitation reduced growth and protein accretion, but when fish were fed the dl-methionine-supplemented diet their growth and protein accretion equalled those of fish fed the fishmeal-based control diet. Methionine limitation reduced free methionine concentrations in the plasma and muscle, while those in the liver were not affected. S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) concentrations were higher in the liver of fish fed the methionine-deficient diet, while S-adenosylhomocysteine concentrations were not affected. Putrescine concentrations were higher and spermine concentrations were lower in the liver of fish fed the methionine-deficient diet, while the gene expression of SAM decarboxylase (SAMdc) and the rate-limiting enzyme of polyamine synthesis ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) was not affected. Polyamine turnover, as assessed by spermine/spermidine acetyltransferase (SSAT) abundance, activity and gene expression, was not affected by treatment. However, the gene expression of the cytokine TNF-α increased in fish fed the methionine-deficient diet, indicative of stressful conditions in the liver. Even though taurine concentrations in the liver were not affected by treatment, methionine and taurine concentrations in muscle decreased due to methionine deficiency. Concomitantly, liver phospholipid and cholesterol

  7. Growth hormone signaling is necessary for lifespan extension by dietary methionine.

    PubMed

    Brown-Borg, Holly M; Rakoczy, Sharlene G; Wonderlich, Joseph A; Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Kopchick, John J; Armstrong, Vanessa; Raasakka, Debbie

    2014-12-01

    Growth hormone significantly impacts lifespan in mammals. Mouse longevity is extended when growth hormone (GH) signaling is interrupted but markedly shortened with high-plasma hormone levels. Methionine metabolism is enhanced in growth hormone deficiency, for example, in the Ames dwarf, but suppressed in GH transgenic mice. Methionine intake affects also lifespan, and thus, GH mutant mice and respective wild-type littermates were fed 0.16%, 0.43%, or 1.3% methionine to evaluate the interaction between hormone status and methionine. All wild-type and GH transgenic mice lived longer when fed 0.16% methionine but not when fed higher levels. In contrast, animals without growth hormone signaling due to hormone deficiency or resistance did not respond to altered levels of methionine in terms of lifespan, body weight, or food consumption. Taken together, our results suggest that the presence of growth hormone is necessary to sense dietary methionine changes, thus strongly linking growth and lifespan to amino acid availability.

  8. Methionine protects against hyperthermia-induced cell injury in cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhao-Yu; Mu, Tian; Yang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of methionine on cell proliferation, antioxidant activity, apoptosis, the expression levels of related genes (HSF-1, HSP70, Bax and Bcl-2) and the expression levels of protein (HSP70) in mammary epithelial cells, after heat treatment. Methionine (60 mg/L) increased the viability and attenuated morphological damage in hyperthermia-treated bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs). Additionally, methionine significantly reduced lactate dehydrogenase leakage, malondialdehyde formation, nitric oxide, and nitric oxide synthase activity. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase enzymatic activity was increased significantly in the presence of methionine. Bovine mammary epithelial cells also exhibited a certain amount of HSP70 reserve after methionine pretreatment for 24 h, and the expression level of the HSP70 gene and protein further increased with incubation at 42 °C for 30 min. Compared to the control, the expression of HSF-1 mRNA increased, and there was a significantly reduced expression of Bax/Bcl-2 mRNA and a reduced activity of caspase-3 against heat stress. Methionine also increased survival and decreased early apoptosis of hyperthermia-treated BMECs. Thus, methionine has cytoprotective effects on hyperthermia-induced damage in BMECs.

  9. Sulfur amino acids and atherosclerosis: a role for excess dietary methionine.

    PubMed

    Selhub, Jacob; Troen, Aron M

    2016-01-01

    The homocysteine theory of arteriosclerosis received credence when it was shown that after a methionine load, circulating homocysteine-cysteine concentrations were higher in cardiovascular disease patients than in healthy controls. Subsequent studies showing associations between homocysteine and coronary artery disease, stroke and cognitive impairment, relied on small increases in homocysteine concentration unlike the very high homocysteine seen in the rare genetic disorders that lead to homocystinuria and much higher homocysteine levels. Subsequent studies in cell culture, animals, and humans showed that a variety of cardiovascular adverse effects of "high homocysteine" introduced either as a nonphysiological bolus or as a methionine load led to high homocysteine. We fed apolipoprotein E-deficient mice diets designed to achieve three conditions: (1) high methionine intake with normal blood homocysteine, (2) high methionine intake with B vitamin deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia, and (3) normal methionine intake with both B vitamin deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia. We found that the mice fed methionine-rich diets had significant atheromatous pathology in the aortic arch even with normal plasma homocysteine levels. Mice fed B vitamin-deficient diets developed severe hyperhomocysteinemia but without any increase in vascular pathology. Our findings suggest that even moderate increases in methionine intake are atherogenic in susceptible mice while high plasma homocysteine is not.

  10. Sulphur Atoms from Methionines Interacting with Aromatic Residues Are Less Prone to Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Aledo, Juan C; Cantón, Francisco R; Veredas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Methionine residues exhibit different degrees of susceptibility to oxidation. Although solvent accessibility is a relevant factor, oxidation at particular sites cannot be unequivocally explained by accessibility alone. To explore other possible structural determinants, we assembled different sets of oxidation-sensitive and oxidation-resistant methionines contained in human proteins. Comparisons of the proteins containing oxidized methionines with all proteins in the human proteome led to the conclusion that the former exhibit a significantly higher mean value of methionine content than the latter. Within a given protein, an examination of the sequence surrounding the non-oxidized methionine revealed a preference for neighbouring tyrosine and tryptophan residues, but not for phenylalanine residues. However, because the interaction between sulphur atoms and aromatic residues has been reported to be important for the stabilization of protein structure, we carried out an analysis of the spatial interatomic distances between methionines and aromatic residues, including phenylalanine. The results of these analyses uncovered a new determinant for methionine oxidation: the S-aromatic motif, which decreases the reactivity of the involved sulphur towards oxidants. PMID:26597773

  11. Sulphur Atoms from Methionines Interacting with Aromatic Residues Are Less Prone to Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aledo, Juan C.; Cantón, Francisco R.; Veredas, Francisco J.

    2015-11-01

    Methionine residues exhibit different degrees of susceptibility to oxidation. Although solvent accessibility is a relevant factor, oxidation at particular sites cannot be unequivocally explained by accessibility alone. To explore other possible structural determinants, we assembled different sets of oxidation-sensitive and oxidation-resistant methionines contained in human proteins. Comparisons of the proteins containing oxidized methionines with all proteins in the human proteome led to the conclusion that the former exhibit a significantly higher mean value of methionine content than the latter. Within a given protein, an examination of the sequence surrounding the non-oxidized methionine revealed a preference for neighbouring tyrosine and tryptophan residues, but not for phenylalanine residues. However, because the interaction between sulphur atoms and aromatic residues has been reported to be important for the stabilization of protein structure, we carried out an analysis of the spatial interatomic distances between methionines and aromatic residues, including phenylalanine. The results of these analyses uncovered a new determinant for methionine oxidation: the S-aromatic motif, which decreases the reactivity of the involved sulphur towards oxidants.

  12. Model studies on the oxidation of benzoyl methionine in a carbohydrate degradation system.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Michael; Löbmann, Katja; Orywol, Tom; Voigt, Annegrit

    2014-05-14

    The stability of benzoyl methionine was analyzed during incubation with carbohydrate compounds such as reducing sugars, dicarbonyl compounds, reductones, and Amadori rearrangement products (ARPs). The reaction products were identified and quantified by HPLC-UV and HPLC-MS. In the presence of ARPs, >40% of benzoyl methionine was oxidized to benzoyl methionine sulfoxide after 48 h at 80 °C in acetate-buffered solution (pH 6.0), whereas <10% was oxidized in the presence of mono- and disaccharides. As an important side reaction, peptide bond cleavage through α-amidation was verified. The influence of benzoyl methionine on carbohydrate degradation reactions was assessed through analysis of vicinal dicarbonyl compounds by HPLC-UV. Glyoxal, methylglyoxal, diacetyl, and 3-deoxyglucosone were quantified as the most important derivatives. The thioether group of methionine strongly influenced carbohydrate degradation pathways: Less glyoxal was formed from reducing carbohydrates, showing that benzoyl methionine can act as a radical scavenger. However, more diacetyl was formed from ARPs and reductones, indicating that also radical-dependent pathways could be influenced by benzoyl methionine. The degradation of reducing carbohydrates should thus be an important contributor to protein oxidation in food items with low fat content.

  13. Design, synthesis, and enzyme kinetics of novel benzimidazole and quinoxaline derivatives as methionine synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Elshihawy, Hosam; Helal, Mohamed A; Said, Mohamed; Hammad, Mohamed A

    2014-01-01

    Methionine synthase catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from 5-methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine, producing methionine and tetrahydrofolate. Benzimidazole and deazatetrahydrofolates derivatives have been shown to inhibit methionine synthase by competing with the substrate 5-methyltetrahydrofolate. In this study, a novel series of substituted benzimidazoles and quinoxalines were designed and assessed for inhibitory activity against purified rat liver methionine synthase using a radiometric enzyme assay. Compounds 3g, 3j, and 5c showed the highest activity against methionine synthase (IC₅₀: 20 μM, 18 μM, 9 μM, respectively). Kinetic analysis of these compounds using Lineweaver-Burk plots revealed characteristics of mixed inhibition for 3g and 5c; and uncompetitive inhibition for 3j. Docking study into a homology model of the rat methionine synthase gave insights into the molecular determinants of the activity of this class of compounds. The identification of these drug-like inhibitors could lead the design of the next generation modulators of methionine synthase.

  14. L-methionine suppresses pathological sequelae of cis-platinum in the rat.

    PubMed

    Basinger, M A; Jones, M M; Holscher, M A

    1990-04-01

    The pathological changes characteristically observed in the kidney, bone marrow, thymus, spleen, and duodenum of the rat given 12.2 mg/kg of cis-platinum (CDDP) ip are reduced or eliminated when a CDDP solution containing a 20-fold excess of L-methionine to cis-platinum is administered. L-Methionine was also effective in reducing the renal toxicity induced by CDDP when given orally 20 min before the iv administration of 7.5 mg CDDP/kg. L-Methionine did not compromise the efficacy of CDDP when the antitumor activity of the combination of L-methionine and CDDP was measured against the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma in the rat. No significant reduction in the antitumor activity of the CDDP resulted from the parenteral administration of L-Methionine when evaluated against the L1210 murine leukemia. The oral administration of L-methionine (500 mg/kg) 30 min after the administration of CDDP has no significant effect on the antitumor activity of CDDP in mice bearing the L1210 murine leukemia. The results suggest that L-methionine may have some practical utility in the control of certain aspects of CDDP toxicity.

  15. Compartmentalization and Regulation of Mitochondrial Function by Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Alaattin; Koc, Ahmet; Lee, Byung Cheon; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Rederstorff, Mathieu; Krol, Alain; Lescure, Alain; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species can damage proteins. Sulfur-containing amino acid residues, cysteine and methionine, are particularly susceptible to such damage. Various enzymes evolved to protect proteins or repair oxidized residues, including methionine sulfoxide reductases MsrA and MsrB, which reduce methionine-S-sulfoxide (Met-SO), and methionine-R-sulfoxide (Met-RO) residues, respectively, back to methionine. Here, we show that MsrA and MsrB are involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant cells lacking MsrA, MsrB or both proteins, had normal levels of mitochondria, but lower levels of cytochrome c and fewer respiration-competent mitochondria. The growth of single MsrA or MsrB mutants on respiratory carbon sources was inhibited, and that of the double mutant was severely compromised, indicating impairment of mitochondrial function. Although MsrA and MsrB are thought to have similar roles in oxidative protein repair each targeting a diastereomer of methionine sulfoxide, their deletion resulted in different phenotypes. GFP fusions of MsrA and MsrB showed different localization patterns and primarily localized to cytoplasm and mitochondria, respectively. This finding agreed with compartment-specific enrichment of MsrA and MsrB activities. These results show that oxidative stress contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction through oxidation of methionine residues in proteins located in different cellular compartments. PMID:20799725

  16. Sulphur Atoms from Methionines Interacting with Aromatic Residues Are Less Prone to Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Aledo, Juan C.; Cantón, Francisco R.; Veredas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Methionine residues exhibit different degrees of susceptibility to oxidation. Although solvent accessibility is a relevant factor, oxidation at particular sites cannot be unequivocally explained by accessibility alone. To explore other possible structural determinants, we assembled different sets of oxidation-sensitive and oxidation-resistant methionines contained in human proteins. Comparisons of the proteins containing oxidized methionines with all proteins in the human proteome led to the conclusion that the former exhibit a significantly higher mean value of methionine content than the latter. Within a given protein, an examination of the sequence surrounding the non-oxidized methionine revealed a preference for neighbouring tyrosine and tryptophan residues, but not for phenylalanine residues. However, because the interaction between sulphur atoms and aromatic residues has been reported to be important for the stabilization of protein structure, we carried out an analysis of the spatial interatomic distances between methionines and aromatic residues, including phenylalanine. The results of these analyses uncovered a new determinant for methionine oxidation: the S-aromatic motif, which decreases the reactivity of the involved sulphur towards oxidants. PMID:26597773

  17. Sulphur Atoms from Methionines Interacting with Aromatic Residues Are Less Prone to Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Aledo, Juan C; Cantón, Francisco R; Veredas, Francisco J

    2015-11-24

    Methionine residues exhibit different degrees of susceptibility to oxidation. Although solvent accessibility is a relevant factor, oxidation at particular sites cannot be unequivocally explained by accessibility alone. To explore other possible structural determinants, we assembled different sets of oxidation-sensitive and oxidation-resistant methionines contained in human proteins. Comparisons of the proteins containing oxidized methionines with all proteins in the human proteome led to the conclusion that the former exhibit a significantly higher mean value of methionine content than the latter. Within a given protein, an examination of the sequence surrounding the non-oxidized methionine revealed a preference for neighbouring tyrosine and tryptophan residues, but not for phenylalanine residues. However, because the interaction between sulphur atoms and aromatic residues has been reported to be important for the stabilization of protein structure, we carried out an analysis of the spatial interatomic distances between methionines and aromatic residues, including phenylalanine. The results of these analyses uncovered a new determinant for methionine oxidation: the S-aromatic motif, which decreases the reactivity of the involved sulphur towards oxidants.

  18. Reinventing cell penetrating peptides using glycosylated methionine sulfonium ion sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Jessica R.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Mayle, Kristine M.; Kamei, Daniel T.; Wong, Gerard C.L.; Deming, Timothy J.

    2015-04-15

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are intriguing molecules that have received much attention, both in terms of mechanistic analysis and as transporters for intracellular therapeutic delivery. Most CPPs contain an abundance of cationic charged residues, typically arginine, where the amino acid compositions, rather than specific sequences, tend to determine their ability to enter cells. Hydrophobic residues are often added to cationic sequences to create efficient CPPs, but typically at the penalty of increased cytotoxicity. Here, we examined polypeptides containing glycosylated, cationic derivatives of methionine, where we found these hydrophilic polypeptides to be surprisingly effective as CPPs and to also possess low cytotoxicity. X-ray analysis of how these new polypeptides interact with lipid membranes revealed that the incorporation of sterically demanding hydrophilic cationic groups in polypeptides is an unprecedented new concept for design of potent CPPs.

  19. Reinventing cell penetrating peptides using glycosylated methionine sulfonium ion sequences

    DOE PAGES

    Kramer, Jessica R.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Mayle, Kristine M.; Kamei, Daniel T.; Wong, Gerard C.L.; Deming, Timothy J.

    2015-04-15

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are intriguing molecules that have received much attention, both in terms of mechanistic analysis and as transporters for intracellular therapeutic delivery. Most CPPs contain an abundance of cationic charged residues, typically arginine, where the amino acid compositions, rather than specific sequences, tend to determine their ability to enter cells. Hydrophobic residues are often added to cationic sequences to create efficient CPPs, but typically at the penalty of increased cytotoxicity. Here, we examined polypeptides containing glycosylated, cationic derivatives of methionine, where we found these hydrophilic polypeptides to be surprisingly effective as CPPs and to also possess lowmore » cytotoxicity. X-ray analysis of how these new polypeptides interact with lipid membranes revealed that the incorporation of sterically demanding hydrophilic cationic groups in polypeptides is an unprecedented new concept for design of potent CPPs.« less

  20. Methionine restriction fundamentally supports health by tightening epithelial barriers.

    PubMed

    Mullin, James M; Skrovanek, Sonja M; Ramalingam, Arivudainambi; DiGuilio, Katherine M; Valenzano, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Dietary methionine restriction (MR) has been found to affect one of the most primary tissue-level functions of an organism: the efficiency with which the epithelial linings of major organs separate the fluid compartments that they border. This process, epithelial barrier function, is basic for proper function of all organs, including the lung, liver, gastrointestinal tract, reproductive tract, blood-brain barrier, and kidney. Specifically, MR has been found to modify the protein composition of tight junctional complexes surrounding individual epithelial cells in a manner that renders the complexes less leaky. This has been observed in both a renal epithelial cell culture model and in gastrointestinal tissue. In both cases, MR increased the transepithelial electrical resistance across the epithelium, while decreasing passive leak of small nonelectrolytes. However, the specific target protein modifications involved were unique to each case. Overall, this provides an example of the primary level on which MR functions to modify, and improve, an organism.

  1. Methionine enkephalin, its role in immunoregulation and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dingliang; Plotnikoff, Nicolas; Griffin, Noreen; Song, Tao; Shan, Fengping

    2016-08-01

    Methionine enkephalin (MENK), an endogenous neuropeptide has a crucial role in both neuroendocrine and immune systems. MENK is believed to have an immunoregulatory activity to have cancer biotherapy activity by binding to the opioid receptors on immune and cancer cells. Clinical trial studies in cancer patients have shown that MENK activates immune cells directly and by inhibiting regulatory T-cells (Tregs). MENK may also change the tumor microenvironment by binding to opioid receptor on or in cancer cells. All of these mechanisms of action have biologic significance and potential for use in cancer immunotherapy. Furthermore, they reveal a relationship between the endocrine and immune systems. Due to the apparent role of MENK in cancer therapy we reviewed herein, the research undertaken with MENK in recent years; which has advanced our understanding of the role MENK has in cancer progression and its relationship to immunity, supporting MENK as a new strategy for cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Catalysis and Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Methionine Aminopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jing-Ping; Chai, Sergio C.; Ye, Qi-Zhuang

    2010-09-07

    Methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) carries out an important cotranslational N-terminal methionine excision of nascent proteins and represents a potential target to develop antibacterial and antitubercular drugs. We cloned one of the two MetAPs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtMetAP1c from the mapB gene) and purified it to homogeneity as an apoenzyme. Its activity required a divalent metal ion, and Co(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), and Fe(II) were among activators of the enzyme. Co(II) and Fe(II) had the tightest binding, while Ni(II) was the most efficient cofactor for the catalysis. MtMetAP1c was also functional in E. coli cells because a plasmid-expressed MtMetAP1c complemented the essential function of MetAP in E. coli and supported the cell growth. A set of potent MtMetAP1c inhibitors were identified, and they showed high selectivity toward the Fe(II)-form, the Mn(II)-form, or the Co(II) and Ni(II) forms of the enzyme, respectively. These metalloform selective inhibitors were used to assign the metalloform of the cellular MtMetAP1c. The fact that only the Fe(II)-form selective inhibitors inhibited the cellular MtMetAP1c activity and inhibited the MtMetAP1c-complemented cell growth suggests that Fe(II) is the native metal used by MtMetAP1c in an E. coli cellular environment. Finally, X-ray structures of MtMetAP1c in complex with three metalloform-selective inhibitors were analyzed, which showed different binding modes and different interactions with metal ions and active site residues.

  3. Effects of Glycine, Water, Ammonia, and Ammonium Bicarbonate on the Oligomerization of Methionine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rui; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Otake, Tsubasa; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    The abiotic oligomerization of amino acids may have created primordial, protein-like biological catalysts on the early Earth. Previous studies have proposed and evaluated the potential of diagenesis for the amino acid oligomerization, simulating the formation of peptides that include glycine, alanine, and valine, separately. However, whether such conditions can promote the formation of peptides composed of multiple amino acids remains unclear. Furthermore, the chemistry of pore water in sediments should affect the oligomerization and degradation of amino acids and oligomers, but these effects have not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the effects of water, ammonia, ammonium bicarbonate, pH, and glycine on the oligomerization and degradation of methionine under high pressure (150 MPa) and high temperature conditions (175 °C) for 96 h. Methionine is more difficult to oligomerize than glycine and methionine dimer was formed in the incubation of dry powder of methionine. Methionine oligomers as long as trimers, as well as methionylglycine and glycylmethionine, were formed under every condition with these additional compounds. Among the compounds tested, the oligomerization reaction rate was accelerated by the presence of water and by an increase in pH. Ammonia also increased the oligomerization rate but consumed methionine by side reactions and resulted in the rapid degradation of methionine and its peptides. Similarly, glycine accelerated the oligomerization rate of methionine and the degradation of methionine, producing water, ammonia, and bicarbonate through its decomposition. With Gly, heterogeneous dimers (methionylglycine and glycylmethionine) were formed in greater amounts than with other additional compounds although smaller amount of these heterogeneous dimers were formed with other additional compounds. These results suggest that accelerated reaction rates induced by water and co-existing reactive compounds promote the oligomerization

  4. Formation of methionine sulfoxide during glycoxidation and lipoxidation of ribonuclease A.

    PubMed

    Brock, Jonathan W C; Ames, Jennifer M; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2007-01-15

    Chemical modification of proteins by reactive oxygen species affects protein structure, function and turnover during aging and chronic disease. Some of this damage is direct, for example by oxidation of amino acids in protein by peroxide or other reactive oxygen species, but autoxidation of ambient carbohydrates and lipids amplifies both the oxidative and chemical damage to protein and leads to formation of advanced glycoxidation and lipoxidation end-products (AGE/ALEs). In previous work, we have observed the oxidation of methionine during glycoxidation and lipoxidation reactions, and in the present work we set out to determine if methionine sulfoxide (MetSO) in protein was a more sensitive indicator of glycoxidative and lipoxidative damage than AGE/ALEs. We also investigated the sites of methionine oxidation in a model protein, ribonuclease A (RNase), in order to determine whether analysis of the site specificity of methionine oxidation in proteins could be used to indicate the source of the oxidative damage, i.e. carbohydrate or lipid. We describe here the development of an LC/MS/MS for quantification of methionine oxidation at specific sites in RNase during glycoxidation or lipoxidation by glucose or arachidonate, respectively. Glycoxidized and lipoxidized RNase were analyzed by tryptic digestion, followed by reversed phase HPLC and mass spectrometric analysis to quantify methionine and methionine sulfoxide containing peptides. We observed that: (1) compared to AGE/ALEs, methionine sulfoxide was a more sensitive biomarker of glycoxidative or lipoxidative damage to proteins; (2) regardless of oxidizable substrate, the relative rate of oxidation of methionine residues in RNase was Met29>Met30>Met13, with Met79 being resistant to oxidation; and (3) arachidonate produced a significantly greater yield of MetSO, compared to glucose. The methods developed here should be useful for assessing a protein's overall exposure to oxidative stress from a variety of sources in

  5. The effects of dietary supplementation of methionine on genomic stability and p53 gene promoter methylation in rats.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cátia Lira Do; Bueno, Rafaela de Barros E Lima; Burim, Regislaine Valéria; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Bianchi, Maria de Lourdes Pires; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi

    2011-05-18

    Methionine is a component of one-carbon metabolism and a precursor of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the methyl donor for DNA methylation. When methionine intake is high, an increase of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is expected. DNA methyltransferases convert SAM to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). A high intracellular SAH concentration could inhibit the activity of DNA methyltransferases. Therefore, high methionine ingestion could induce DNA damage and change the methylation pattern of tumor suppressor genes. This study investigated the genotoxicity of a methionine-supplemented diet. It also investigated the diet's effects on glutathione levels, SAM and SAH concentrations and the gene methylation pattern of p53. Wistar rats received either a methionine-supplemented diet (2% methionine) or a control diet (0.3% methionine) for six weeks. The methionine-supplemented diet was neither genotoxic nor antigenotoxic to kidney cells, as assessed by the comet assay. However, the methionine-supplemented diet restored the renal glutathione depletion induced by doxorubicin. This fact may be explained by the transsulfuration pathway, which converts methionine to glutathione in the kidney. Methionine supplementation increased the renal concentration of SAH without changing the SAM/SAH ratio. This unchanged profile was also observed for DNA methylation at the promoter region of the p53 gene. Further studies are necessary to elucidate this diet's effects on genomic stability and DNA methylation.

  6. Serine Metabolism Supports the Methionine Cycle and DNA/RNA Methylation through De Novo ATP Synthesis in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Oliver D.K.; Labuschagne, Christiaan F.; Adams, Peter D.; Vousden, Karen H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Crosstalk between cellular metabolism and the epigenome regulates epigenetic and metabolic homeostasis and normal cell behavior. Changes in cancer cell metabolism can directly impact epigenetic regulation and promote transformation. Here we analyzed the contribution of methionine and serine metabolism to methylation of DNA and RNA. Serine can contribute to this pathway by providing one-carbon units to regenerate methionine from homocysteine. While we observed this contribution under methionine-depleted conditions, unexpectedly, we found that serine supported the methionine cycle in the presence and absence of methionine through de novo ATP synthesis. Serine starvation increased the methionine/S-adenosyl methionine ratio, decreasing the transfer of methyl groups to DNA and RNA. While serine starvation dramatically decreased ATP levels, this was accompanied by lower AMP and did not activate AMPK. This work highlights the difference between ATP turnover and new ATP synthesis and defines a vital function of nucleotide synthesis beyond making nucleic acids. PMID:26774282

  7. Serine Metabolism Supports the Methionine Cycle and DNA/RNA Methylation through De Novo ATP Synthesis in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, Oliver D K; Labuschagne, Christiaan F; Adams, Peter D; Vousden, Karen H

    2016-01-21

    Crosstalk between cellular metabolism and the epigenome regulates epigenetic and metabolic homeostasis and normal cell behavior. Changes in cancer cell metabolism can directly impact epigenetic regulation and promote transformation. Here we analyzed the contribution of methionine and serine metabolism to methylation of DNA and RNA. Serine can contribute to this pathway by providing one-carbon units to regenerate methionine from homocysteine. While we observed this contribution under methionine-depleted conditions, unexpectedly, we found that serine supported the methionine cycle in the presence and absence of methionine through de novo ATP synthesis. Serine starvation increased the methionine/S-adenosyl methionine ratio, decreasing the transfer of methyl groups to DNA and RNA. While serine starvation dramatically decreased ATP levels, this was accompanied by lower AMP and did not activate AMPK. This work highlights the difference between ATP turnover and new ATP synthesis and defines a vital function of nucleotide synthesis beyond making nucleic acids.

  8. Enzymatic lesions in methionine mutants of Aspergillus nidulans: role and regulation of an alternative pathway for cysteine and methionine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Paszewski, A; Grabski, J

    1975-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans the pathway involving cystathionine formation is the main one for homocysteine synthesis. Mutants lacking cystathionine gamma-synthase or beta-cystathionase are auxotrophs suppressible by: (i) mutations in the main pathway of cysteine synthesis (cysA1, cysB1, and cysC1), (ii) mutations causing stimulation of cysteine catabolism (su101), and (iii) mutations in a presumed regulatory gene (suAmeth). A relative shortage of cysteine in the first group of suppressors causes a derepression of homocysteine synthase, the enzyme involved in the alternative pathway of homocysteine synthesis. A similar derepression is observed in the suAmeth strain. Homocysteine synthesized by this pathway serves as precursor for cysteine and methionine synthesis. A mutant with altered homocysteine synthase is a prototroph, indicating that this enzyme is not essential for the fungus. Images PMID:1102536

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of l-methionine γ-lyase 1 from Entamoeba histolytica

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Dan; Karaki, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Akira; Kamei, Kaeko; Harada, Shigeharu; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2008-08-01

    l-Methionine γ-lyase 1, a key enzyme in sulfur-containing amino-acid degradation, from the protozoan parasite E. histolytica was crystallized in a form suitable for X-ray structure analysis. l-Methionine γ-lyase (MGL) is a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme that is involved in the degradation of sulfur-containing amino acids. MGL is an attractive drug target against amoebiasis because the mammalian host of its causative agent Entamoeba histolytica lacks MGL. For the development of anti-amoebic agents based on the structure of MGL, one of two MGL isoenzymes (EhMGL1) was crystallized in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 99.12, b = 85.38, c = 115.37 Å, β = 101.82°. The crystals diffract to beyond 2.0 Å resolution. The presence of a tetramer in the asymmetric unit (4 × 42.4 kDa) gives a Matthews coefficient of 2.8 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 56%. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method and structure refinement is now in progress.

  10. Residue Phe112 of the Human-Type Corrinoid Adenosyltransferase (PduO) Enzyme of Lactobacillus reuteri Is Critical to the Formation of the Four-Coordinate Co(II) Corrinoid Substrate and to the Activity of the Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Mera, Paola E.; St. Maurice, Martin; Rayment, Ivan; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.; UW

    2009-06-08

    ATP:Corrinoid adenosyltransferases (ACAs) catalyze the transfer of the adenosyl moiety from ATP to cob(I)alamin via a four-coordinate cob(II)alamin intermediate. At present, it is unknown how ACAs promote the formation of the four-coordinate corrinoid species needed for activity. The published high-resolution crystal structure of the ACA from Lactobacillus reuteri (LrPduO) in complex with ATP and cob(II)alamin shows that the environment around the alpha face of the corrin ring consists of bulky hydrophobic residues. To understand how these residues promote the generation of the four-coordinate cob(II)alamin, variants of the human-type ACA enzyme from L. reuteri (LrPduO) were kinetically and structurally characterized. These studies revealed that residue Phe112 is critical in the displacement of 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) from its coordination bond with the Co ion of the ring, resulting in the formation of the four-coordinate species. An F112A substitution resulted in a 80% drop in the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. The explanation for this loss of activity was obtained from the crystal structure of the mutant protein, which showed cob(II)alamin bound in the active site with DMB coordinated to the cobalt ion. The crystal structure of an LrPduO(F112H) variant showed a DMB-off/His-on interaction between the corrinoid and the enzyme, whose catalytic efficiency was 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of the wild-type protein. The analysis of the kinetic parameters of LrPduO(F112H) suggests that the F112H substitution negatively impacts product release. Substitutions of other hydrophobic residues in the Cbl binding pocket did not result in significant defects in catalytic efficiency in vitro; however, none of the variant enzymes analyzed in this work supported AdoCbl biosynthesis in vivo.

  11. Production of methionine γ- lyase in recombinant Citrobacter freundii bearing the hemoglobin gene.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Huseyin; Aytan, Emel; Kurt, Ash Giray

    2011-09-01

    The production of antileukemic enzyme methionine γ-lyase (MGL) in distinctly related bacteria, Citrobacter freundii and in their recombinants expressing the Vitresocilla hemoglobin (VHb) has been studied. This study concerns the potential of Citrobacter freundii expressing the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene (vgb) for the methionine γ- liyase production. Methionine γ- liyase production by Citrobacter freundii and its vgb(-) and vgb(+) bearing recombinant strain was studied in shake-flasks under 200 rpm agitation, culture medium and 30 °C in a time-course manner. The vgb(+) and especially the carbon type had a dramatic effect on methionine γ- liyase production. The vgb(+) strain of C. freundii had about 2-fold and 3.1-fold higher levels of MGL than the host and vgb(-) strain, respectively.

  12. The relation between L-methionine uptake and sodium in rat small intestine in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Newey, H.; Rampone, A. J.; Smyth, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    1. Uptakes of L-methionine and mannitol by rat jejunum in vitro were measured over test periods from 5 to 120 sec after 30 min pre-test periods in the presence or absence of Na. 2. The initial stage in methionine uptake was dependent on the presence of Na+ and to a lesser extent on the K+ concentration. In contrast mannitol uptake was independent of Na and K. 3. The initial stage in methionine uptake can be reactivated 30-60% within 5 sec by replacing an Na-deficient intestine into an Na-containing medium. 4. Initial methionine uptake was greater with a normal intracellular and low medium Na concentration than with a high medium and low intracellular Na concentration. It is suggested that the intracellular Na concentration is a critical factor, more important than the Na gradient, in determining the rate of amino acid transfer across the luminal membrane. PMID:5501050

  13. Tetracene confinement in L-methionine gratings on the Ag(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urgel, José I.; Vijayaraghavan, S.; Ecija, D.; Auwärter, W.; Barth, J. V.

    2016-01-01

    We present a direct study on the positioning and mobility of tetracene molecules in self-assembled methionine nanogratings on the Ag(111) surface. Our scanning tunneling microscopy observations reveal the preferential arrangement of isolated tetracene units within substrate stripes framed by one-dimensional methionine supramolecular rows, under the influence of long-range indirect interactions. However, the orientational order of the rod-like tetracene species is induced by the epitaxial fit to the underlying surface atomic lattice; and preferential alignment with the tetracene axes along the direction of the methionine grating could not be achieved. In scanning tunneling microscopy measurements under perturbative conditions, we find a one-dimensional diffusion of the confined tetracene along the direction of the molecular axis and restricted by the methionine gratings for non-parallel orientations.

  14. Palm tocotrienol-rich fraction inhibits methionine-induced cystathionine β-synthase in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Kamisah, Yusof; Norsidah, Ku-Zaifah; Azizi, Ayob; Faizah, Othman; Nonan, Mohd Rizal; Asmadi, Ahmad Yusof

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases. The study investigated the effects of dietary palm tocotrienol-rich fraction on homocysteine metabolism in rats fed a high-methionine diet. Forty-two male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to six groups. Five groups were fed with high-methionine diet (1%) for 10 weeks. Groups 2 to 5 were also given dietary folate (8 mg/kg) and three doses of palm tocotrienol-rich fraction (30, 60 and 150 mg/kg) from week 6 to week 10. The last group was only given basal rat chow. High-methionine diet increased plasma homocysteine after 10 weeks, which was prevented by the supplementations of folate and high-dose palm tocotrienol-rich fraction. Hepatic S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) content was unaffected in all groups but S-adenosyl homocysteine (SAH) content was reduced in the folate group. Folate supplementation increased the SAM/SAH ratio, while in the palm tocotrienol-rich fraction groups, the ratio was lower compared with the folate. Augmented activity of hepatic cystathionine β-synthase and lipid peroxidation content by high-methionine diet was inhibited by palm tocotrienol-rich fraction supplementations (moderate and high doses), but not by folate. The supplemented groups had lower hepatic lipid peroxidation than the high-methionine diet. In conclusion, palm tocotrienol-rich fraction reduced high-methionine-induced hyperhomocysteinaemia possibly by reducing hepatic oxidative stress in high-methionine-fed rats. It may also exert a direct inhibitory effect on hepatic cystathionine β-synthase.

  15. Effect of methionine hydroxy analog supplementation on dairy cattle hoof growth and composition.

    PubMed

    Clark, A K; Rakes, A H

    1982-08-01

    Fifty lactating Holstein cows were assigned randomly to one of two treatments, control and control plus approximately 30 g methionine hydroxy analog, and confined on concrete for 11 mo. The control diet consisted of sorghum silage and concentrate fed as a blended ration. Sulfur contents of dry matter were .12% and .16% for control and methionine hydroxy analog rations. Hoof growth and hardness were measured on front and rear right abaxial claws in the dorsal and lateral regions. Hoof growth rates were measured for four periods; summer-fall, fall-winter, winter-spring, and spring-summer, each 70 to 90 days. Hooves of cows fed methionine hydroxy analog grew faster than those of control cows during spring-summer in all regions. Variations of growth rates of hooves were seasonal and tended to follow variations in daily photoperiod. Wear rates were not affected significantly by treatment. Hooves of cows fed methionine hydroxy analog were softer in the top dorsal region at the end of winter-spring and in the dorsal toe region at the end of spring-summer. All other locations were not affected significantly by treatment. The toe region was harder than the top of the hoof. Cows fed methionine hydroxy analog had less cysteine and proline in hoof than control cows and greater percentages of methionine lysine, tyrosine, and glutamic acid. These results suggest that a decrease of disulfide bonding occurred in the hoof tissue of cows fed methionine hydroxy analog. Cows fed methionine hydroxy analog produced more actual milk, milk fat, and 4% fat-corrected milk during 180 days than did control cows. PMID:6183300

  16. Effect of methionine hydroxy analog supplementation on dairy cattle hoof growth and composition.

    PubMed

    Clark, A K; Rakes, A H

    1982-08-01

    Fifty lactating Holstein cows were assigned randomly to one of two treatments, control and control plus approximately 30 g methionine hydroxy analog, and confined on concrete for 11 mo. The control diet consisted of sorghum silage and concentrate fed as a blended ration. Sulfur contents of dry matter were .12% and .16% for control and methionine hydroxy analog rations. Hoof growth and hardness were measured on front and rear right abaxial claws in the dorsal and lateral regions. Hoof growth rates were measured for four periods; summer-fall, fall-winter, winter-spring, and spring-summer, each 70 to 90 days. Hooves of cows fed methionine hydroxy analog grew faster than those of control cows during spring-summer in all regions. Variations of growth rates of hooves were seasonal and tended to follow variations in daily photoperiod. Wear rates were not affected significantly by treatment. Hooves of cows fed methionine hydroxy analog were softer in the top dorsal region at the end of winter-spring and in the dorsal toe region at the end of spring-summer. All other locations were not affected significantly by treatment. The toe region was harder than the top of the hoof. Cows fed methionine hydroxy analog had less cysteine and proline in hoof than control cows and greater percentages of methionine lysine, tyrosine, and glutamic acid. These results suggest that a decrease of disulfide bonding occurred in the hoof tissue of cows fed methionine hydroxy analog. Cows fed methionine hydroxy analog produced more actual milk, milk fat, and 4% fat-corrected milk during 180 days than did control cows.

  17. Methionine biosynthesis is essential for infection in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Saint-Macary, Marie Emmanuelle; Barbisan, Crystel; Gagey, Marie Josèphe; Frelin, Océane; Beffa, Roland; Lebrun, Marc Henri; Droux, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Methionine is a sulfur amino acid standing at the crossroads of several biosynthetic pathways. In fungi, the last step of methionine biosynthesis is catalyzed by a cobalamine-independent methionine synthase (Met6, EC 2.1.1.14). In the present work, we studied the role of Met6 in the infection process of the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. To this end MET6 null mutants were obtained by targeted gene replacement. On minimum medium, MET6 null mutants were auxotrophic for methionine. Even when grown in presence of excess methionine, these mutants displayed developmental defects, such as reduced mycelium pigmentation, aerial hypha formation and sporulation. They also displayed characteristic metabolic signatures such as increased levels of cysteine, cystathionine, homocysteine, S-adenosylmethionine, S-adenosylhomocysteine while methionine and glutathione levels remained unchanged. These metabolic perturbations were associated with the over-expression of MgCBS1 involved in the reversed transsulfuration pathway that metabolizes homocysteine into cysteine and MgSAM1 and MgSAHH1 involved in the methyl cycle. This suggests a physiological adaptation of M. oryzae to metabolic defects induced by the loss of Met6, in particular an increase in homocysteine levels. Pathogenicity assays showed that MET6 null mutants were non-pathogenic on both barley and rice leaves. These mutants were defective in appressorium-mediated penetration and invasive infectious growth. These pathogenicity defects were rescued by addition of exogenous methionine and S-methylmethionine. These results show that M. oryzae cannot assimilate sufficient methionine from plant tissues and must synthesize this amino acid de novo to fulfill its sulfur amino acid requirement during infection.

  18. Impact of methionine oxidation on calmodulin structural dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Megan R.; Thompson, Andrew R.; Nitu, Florentin; Moen, Rebecca J.; Olenek, Michael J.; Klein, Jennifer C.; Thomas, David D.

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • We measured the distance distribution between two spin labels on calmodulin by DEER. • Two structural states, open and closed, were resolved at both low and high Ca. • Ca shifted the equilibrium toward the open state by a factor of 13. • Methionine oxidation, simulated by glutamine substitution, decreased the Ca effect. • These results have important implications for aging in muscle and other tissues. - Abstract: We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the structural impact of oxidizing specific methionine (M) side chains in calmodulin (CaM). It has been shown that oxidation of either M109 or M124 in CaM diminishes CaM regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), and that mutation of M to Q (glutamine) in either case produces functional effects identical to those of oxidation. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and double electron–electron resonance (DEER), a pulsed EPR technique that measures distances between spin labels, to characterize the structural changes resulting from these mutations. Spin labels were attached to a pair of introduced cysteine residues, one in the C-lobe (T117C) and one in the N-lobe (T34C) of CaM, and DEER was used to determine the distribution of interspin distances. Ca binding induced a large increase in the mean distance, in concert with previous X-ray crystallography and NMR data, showing a closed structure in the absence of Ca and an open structure in the presence of Ca. DEER revealed additional information about CaM’s structural heterogeneity in solution: in both the presence and absence of Ca, CaM populates both structural states, one with probes separated by ∼4 nm (closed) and another at ∼6 nm (open). Ca shifts the structural equilibrium constant toward the open state by a factor of 13. DEER reveals the distribution of interprobe distances, showing that each of these states is itself partially disordered, with the width of each

  19. Influence of dietary protein and excess methionine on choline needs for young bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with young Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) to investigate the effect of differing dietary protein levels and nondetrimental amounts of excess methionine on choline needs. Growth and feed consumption of quail fed an adequate (27.3%) protein purified diet supplemented with 2000 mg/kg of choline were unaffected by increasing the level of excess methionine to 1.75%; however, greater amounts (2.0%, 2.25%) of excess methionine depressed growth (P less than .01), reduced feed consumption (P less than .01), and decreased feed utilization (P less than .05). Quail fed a purified diet containing 13.85% protein and 515 mg/kg of choline grew poorly. Growth was unaffected by additional choline in this diet. Growth was suboptimal among quail fed purified diets containing adequate or high (41.55%) levels of protein in which choline was limiting; however, a high level of protein did not in itself affect performance. Growth was improved by supplemental choline in these diets. Growth of quail fed purified diets with up to 1.35% excess methionine which were limiting (531 mg/kg) in choline was less than that of groups fed 2000 mg/kg of added dietary choline (P less than .01); however, excess methionine did not significantly influence growth of quail fed choline-deficient diets. These experiments indicate that neither high dietary protein nor excess methionine, fed at non-growth-depressing levels, increases dietary choline needs for young Bobwhite quail.

  20. Metabolism of methionine in the newborn infant: response to the parenteral and enteral administration of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Biju; Gruca, Lourdes L; Bennett, Carole; Parimi, Prabhu S; Hanson, Richard W; Kalhan, Satish C

    2008-10-01

    The rates of transmethylation and transsulfuration of methionine were quantified using [1-(13)C]methionine and [C2H3]methionine tracers in newborn infants born at term gestation and in prematurely born low birth weight infants. Whole body rate of protein breakdown was also measured using [2H5]phenylalanine. The response to enteral formula feeding and parenteral nutrition was examined in full term and prematurely born babies, respectively. The relative rates of appearance of methionine and phenylalanine were comparable to the amino acid composition of mixed body proteins. Rates of transmethylation were high, both in full term infants (fast 32 +/- 14 micromol kg(-1) x h(-1); fed 21.7 +/- 3.2) and in preterm infants (57.2 +/- 14.8). Significant flux through the transsulfuration pathway was evident (full term: fast 6.0 +/- 4.4, fed 4.1 +/- 2.1; preterm: 24.9 +/- 9.9 micromol kg(-1) x h(-1)). Transsulfuration of methionine is evident in the human newborn in the immediate neonatal period, suggesting that cysteine may not be considered a "conditionally" essential amino acid for the neonate. The high rate of transmethylation may reflect the high methylation demand, whereas high rates of transsulfuration in premature babies may be related to high demands for glutathione and to the amounts of methionine in parenteral amino acid mixtures.

  1. Infantile hypermethioninemia and hyperhomocysteinemia due to high methionine intake: a diagnostic trap.

    PubMed

    Harvey Mudd, S; Braverman, Nancy; Pomper, Martin; Tezcan, Kamer; Kronick, Jonathan; Jayakar, Parul; Garganta, Cheryl; Ampola, Mary G; Levy, Harvey L; McCandless, Shawn E; Wiltse, Hobart; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Wagner, Conrad; Borschel, Marlene W

    2003-05-01

    Studies were carried out to identify the cause of combined severe hypermethioninemia and moderate hyperhomocysteinemia in a cluster of 10 infants ascertained between 1999 and early 2001. Although several were thought initially to have cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) deficiency and treated accordingly, CBS deficiency and other known genetic causes of hypermethioninemia were ruled out by assay of CBS activity in fibroblasts of four patients and by assays of plasma cystathionine and S-adenosylmethionine. Retrospective data on dietary methionine intakes and plasma concentrations of methionine and related metabolites established that the hypermethioninemia in nine of the 10 babies was related to ingestion of an infant protein hydrolysate formula, the methionine content of which had been increased from May 1998 to February 2001. The formula in question has now been reformulated and is no longer available. The 10th infant manifested similar metabolic abnormalities while receiving TPN containing excessive methionine. Brain MRI abnormalities indicative of cerebral edema, most marked in the cerebral cortex and posterior brainstem, occurred in two patients near times of extreme hypermethioninemia. Metabolic and MRI abnormalities resolved when the methionine intake decreased. A third infant had a normal MRI 1 day after the formula was changed. The possible relationship between extreme hypermethioninemia and cerebral edema is discussed and a working hypothesis offered to explain the relative sensitivity of the inferior colliculi, based upon the facts that this is the region most active in glucose utilization and that Na(+),K(+)-ATPase is inhibited by methionine and related metabolites. PMID:12765841

  2. Disruption of Methionine Metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster Impacts Histone Methylation and Results in Loss of Viability

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengying; Barnes, Valerie L.; Pile, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Histone methylation levels, which are determined by the action of both histone demethylases and methyltransferases, impact multiple biological processes by affecting gene expression activity. Methionine metabolism generates the major methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) for histone methylation. The functions of methionine metabolic enzymes in regulating biological processes as well as the interaction between the methionine pathway and histone methylation, however, are still not fully understood. Here, we report that reduced levels of some enzymes involved in methionine metabolism and histone demethylases lead to lethality as well as wing development and cell proliferation defects in Drosophila melanogaster. Additionally, disruption of methionine metabolism can directly affect histone methylation levels. Reduction of little imaginal discs (LID) histone demethylase, but not lysine-specific demethylase 2 (KDM2) demethylase, is able to counter the effects on histone methylation due to reduction of SAM synthetase (SAM-S). Taken together, these results reveal an essential role of key enzymes that control methionine metabolism and histone methylation. Additionally, these findings are an indication of a strong connection between metabolism and epigenetics. PMID:26546310

  3. Selective Oxidation of Methionine and Tryptophan Residues in a Therapeutic IgG1 Molecule.

    PubMed

    Folzer, Emilien; Diepold, Katharina; Bomans, Katrin; Finkler, Christof; Schmidt, Roland; Bulau, Patrick; Huwyler, Jörg; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Koulov, Atanas V

    2015-09-01

    Oxidation of methionine and tryptophan are common degradation pathways for monoclonal antibodies and present major analytical challenges in biotechnology. Generally, protein oxidation is detectable in stability and/or stressed samples (e.g., exposed to hydrogen peroxide, UV light, or metal ions). The induced chemical modifications may impact the biological activity of antibodies and may have biological consequences. However, these effects and the contribution of individual protein modifications are difficult to delineate as different amino acids are often oxidized simultaneously and accompanied by other degradants such as aggregates, especially in forced degradation studies. Here, we report a new method to obtain selective oxidation of methionine or tryptophan by using oxidation reagents combined with large excess of free tryptophan or methionine, correspondingly. More specifically, using hydrogen peroxide or tert-butyl hydroperoxide in combination with addition of free tryptophan allowed for selective oxidation of methionine. Conversely, the use of 2,2-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride in combination with free methionine resulted in selective tryptophan oxidation, whereas methionine oxidation was not significantly altered. This novel stress model system may prove to be valuable tool in future mechanistic studies of oxidative degradation of protein therapeutics.

  4. D-methionine protects against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity in the hippocampus of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Hinduja, Sneha; Kraus, Kari Suzanne; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Salvi, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    The hippocampus plays an important role in memory, mood, and spatial navigation. In the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus, in the subgranular zone (SGZ), new cells are generated, which differentiate and mature into new neurons. Cisplatin, a highly effective antineoplastic drug with nephrotoxic and ototoxic side effects, induces apoptosis and suppresses neurogenesis in the hippocampus leading to memory impairment. Previous studies have shown that the antioxidant D-methionine protects against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity suggesting that it might also prevent neurogenesis from being suppressed by cisplatin treatment. To test this hypothesis, rats were treated with cisplatin, D-methionine, cisplatin plus D-methionine, or saline (controls). Seven days after treatment, the rats were sacrificed, and hippocampal sections immunolabeled for doublecortin (DCX) to identify neuronal precursor cells and maturing neurons in the SGZ. Cisplatin significantly reduced the number of DCX-labeled cells (~80 %) relative to controls. In contrast, DCX cell counts in rats treated with D-methionine prior to cisplatin were similar to controls. The treatment with D-methionine alone did not affect the number of DCX cells. These results indicate that D-methionine prevents the dramatic cisplatin-induced decrease of neurogenesis.

  5. Imaging of human tumors and organs with N-13-labeled L-methionine.

    PubMed

    Sordillo, P P; Benua, R S; Gelbard, A S; Bading, J; Reiman, R E; Magill, G B; Laughlin, J S

    1986-01-01

    The work described herein is the first reported use of nitrogen-13-labeled L-methionine in human subjects. Three volunteers and 14 patients with a variety of solid tumors were scanned after intravenous administration of L-(N-13) methionine. In both volunteers and cancer patients, uptake of label was seen in the liver and pancreas, with smaller amounts of label detected in the heart, urinary bladder, and salivary glands. Concentration of N-13 in tumor was seen in 12 of the 14 cancer patients. Five had repeat studies after chemotherapy; in each case, the change in tumor uptake of N-13 after N-13 methionine injection paralleled the clinical response to chemotherapy. Three patients had L-(N-13) glutamate scans the same day that they were studied with N-13 methionine. Concentration of the radiolabel in the tumor was very similar for the two compounds in each case. The systemic distribution of N-13 from methionine is similar to that from glutamate, except for a much smaller myocardial uptake and a prominent accumulation in the intestinal region. It is concluded that L-(N-13) methionine is potentially useful as a biologically significant agent for tumor visualization and assessment of therapeutic response.

  6. Changes in plasma methionine and total homocysteine levels in patients receiving methotrexate infusions.

    PubMed

    Broxson, E H; Stork, L C; Allen, R H; Stabler, S P; Kolhouse, J F

    1989-11-01

    Methotrexate reduces intracellular pools of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate and could result in reduced conversion of homocysteine to methionine by methionine synthetase. This study was designed to investigate the effects of moderate dose to very high dose methotrexate on methionine and total homocysteine as reflections of methotrexate induced intracellular events. Methionine and total homocysteine were measured prior to, during, and following twenty-six 24-h i.v. infusions of 33.6 g/m2 methotrexate (very high dose methotrexate) in 16 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia and seven 4-h i.v. infusions of 8 g/m2 methotrexate (high dose methotrexate) in 5 children with osteogenic sarcoma. Amino acids were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrophotometry. Mean methionine levels decreased by 70.0 +/- 3.1% (SE) with very high dose methotrexate and 72.6 +/- 5.9% with high dose methotrexate at 24 and 4.5 h, respectively, after beginning methotrexate infusions. Mean total homocysteine levels increased by 61.7 +/- 3.1% with very high dose methotrexate and 55.6 +/- 17.5% with high dose methotrexate at 36 and 24 h, respectively, after beginning methotrexate infusions. No consistent or significant changes were noted in levels of total cysteine, leucine, isoleucine, or valine. Similar changes did not occur in patients receiving prednisone, vincristine, daunomycin, and intrathecal methotrexate as therapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia. These changes in homocysteine and methionine may reflect biological effects of methotrexate that may predict cytotoxicity of methotrexate.

  7. Methionine ligand lability of homologous monoheme cytochromes c.

    PubMed

    Levin, Benjamin D; Walsh, Kelly A; Sullivan, Kristal K; Bren, Kara L; Elliott, Sean J

    2015-01-01

    Direct electrochemical analysis of adsorbed bacterial monoheme cytochromes c has revealed a phenomenological loss of the axial methionine when examined using pyrolytic "edge-plane" graphite (EPG) electrodes. While prior findings have reported that the Met-loss state may be quantitatively understood using the cytochrome c from Hydrogenobacter thermophilus as a model system, here we demonstrate that the formation of the Met-loss state upon EPG electrodes can be observed for a range of cytochrome orthologs. Through an electrochemical comparison of the wild-type proteins from organisms of varying growth temperature optima, we establish that Met-ligand losses at graphite surfaces have similar energetics to the "foldons" for known protein folding pathways. Furthermore, a downward shift in reduction potential to approximately -100 mV vs standard hydrogen electrode was observed, similar to that of the alkaline transition found in mitochondrial cytochromes c. Pourbaix diagrams for the Met-loss forms of each cytochrome, considered here in comparison to mutants where the Met-ligand has been substituted to His or Ala, suggest that the nature of the Met-loss state is distinct from either a His-/aquo- or a bis-His-ligated heme center, yet more closely matches the pKa values found for bis-His-ligated hemes., We find the propensity for adoption of the Met-loss state in bacterial monoheme cytochromes c scales with their overall thermal stability, though not with the specific stability of the Fe-Met bond.

  8. Fragmentation network of doubly charged methionine: Interpretation using graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, D. T.; Yamazaki, K.; Wang, Y.; Alcamí, M.; Maeda, S.; Kono, H.; Martín, F.; Kukk, E.

    2016-09-01

    The fragmentation of doubly charged gas-phase methionine (HO2CCH(NH2)CH2CH2SCH3) is systematically studied using the self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. We applied graph theory to analyze the large number of the calculated MD trajectories, which appears to be a highly effective and convenient means of extracting versatile information from the large data. The present theoretical results strongly concur with the earlier studied experimental ones. Essentially, the dication dissociates into acidic group CO2H and basic group C4NSH10. The former may carry a single or no charge and stays intact in most cases, whereas the latter may hold either a single or a double charge and tends to dissociate into smaller fragments. The decay of the basic group is observed to follow the Arrhenius law. The dissociation pathways to CO2H and C4NSH10 and subsequent fragmentations are also supported by ab initio calculations.

  9. Methionine AminoPeptidase Type-2 Inhibitors Targeting Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Tedman; Furness, Scott; Robinson, Thomas Philip; Zhong, Haizhen A; Goldsmith, David; Aribser, Jack; Bowen, J Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis has been identified as a crucial process in the development and spread of cancers. There are many regulators of angiogenesis which are not yet fully understood. Methionine aminiopeptidase is a metalloenzyme with two structurally distinct forms in humans, Type-1 (MetAP-1) and Type-2 (MetAP-2). It has been shown that small molecule inhibitors of MetAP-2 suppress endothelial cell proliferation. The initial discovery by Donald Ingber of MetAP-2 inhibition as a potential target in angiogenesis began with a fortuitous observation similar to the discovery of penicillin activity by Sir Alexander Fleming. From a drug design perspective, MetAP-2 is an attractive target. Fumagillin and ovalicin, known natural products, bind with IC50 values in low nanomolar concentrations. Crystal structures of the bound complexes provide 3-dimensional coordinates for advanced computational studies. More recent discoveries have shown other biological activities for MetAP-2 inhibition, which has generated new interests in the design of novel inhibitors. Semisynthetic fumagillin derivatives such as AGM-1470 (TNP-470) have been shown to have better drug properties, but have not been very successful in clinical trials. The rationale and development of novel multicyclic analogs of fumagillin are reviewed.

  10. Methionine AminoPeptidase Type-2 Inhibitors Targeting Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Tedman; Furness, Scott; Robinson, Thomas Philip; Zhong, Haizhen A; Goldsmith, David; Aribser, Jack; Bowen, J Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis has been identified as a crucial process in the development and spread of cancers. There are many regulators of angiogenesis which are not yet fully understood. Methionine aminiopeptidase is a metalloenzyme with two structurally distinct forms in humans, Type-1 (MetAP-1) and Type-2 (MetAP-2). It has been shown that small molecule inhibitors of MetAP-2 suppress endothelial cell proliferation. The initial discovery by Donald Ingber of MetAP-2 inhibition as a potential target in angiogenesis began with a fortuitous observation similar to the discovery of penicillin activity by Sir Alexander Fleming. From a drug design perspective, MetAP-2 is an attractive target. Fumagillin and ovalicin, known natural products, bind with IC50 values in low nanomolar concentrations. Crystal structures of the bound complexes provide 3-dimensional coordinates for advanced computational studies. More recent discoveries have shown other biological activities for MetAP-2 inhibition, which has generated new interests in the design of novel inhibitors. Semisynthetic fumagillin derivatives such as AGM-1470 (TNP-470) have been shown to have better drug properties, but have not been very successful in clinical trials. The rationale and development of novel multicyclic analogs of fumagillin are reviewed. PMID:26369821

  11. Methionine Uptake and Required Radiation Dose to Control Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Iuchi, Toshihiko; Hatano, Kazuo; Uchino, Yoshio; Itami, Makiko; Hasegawa, Yuzo; Kawasaki, Koichiro; Sakaida, Tsukasa; Hara, Ryusuke

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess the feasibility of radiation therapy planning for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) based on the use of methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET), and the correlation among MET uptake, radiation dose, and tumor control. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GBM who underwent MET-PET prior to radiation therapy were enrolled. MET uptake in 30 regions of interest (ROIs) from 22 GBMs, biologically effective doses (BEDs) for the ROIs and their ratios (MET uptake:BED) were compared in terms of whether the ROIs were controlled for >12 months. Results: MET uptake was significantly correlated with tumor control (odds ratio [OR], 10.0; P=.005); however, there was a higher level of correlation between MET uptake:BED ratio and tumor control (OR, 40.0; P<.0001). These data indicated that the required BEDs for controlling the ROIs could be predicted in terms of MET uptake; BED could be calculated as [34.0 × MET uptake] Gy from the optimal threshold of the MET uptake:BED ratio for tumor control. Conclusions: Target delineation based on MET-PET was demonstrated to be feasible for radiation therapy treatment planning. MET-PET could not only provide precise visualization of infiltrating tumor cells but also predict the required radiation doses to control target regions.

  12. Methionine restriction on lipid metabolism and its possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xihong; He, Liuqin; Wan, Dan; Yang, Huansheng; Yao, Kang; Wu, Guoyao; Wu, Xin; Yin, Yulong

    2016-07-01

    Methionine restriction (MR) exerts many beneficial effects, such as increasing longevity, decreasing oxidative damage and alleviating inflammatory responses. Much attention has been recently focused on the effects of MR on metabolic health, especially lipid metabolism, since the increasing incidence of obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes causes a worldwide health problem. In general, MR is considered to increase de novo lipogenesis, lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation, with a result of reduced fat accumulation. However, different responses in lipid metabolism between adipose tissue and liver are declared. Therefore, in this review, we will focus on the changes of lipid metabolism responses to dietary MR. Moreover, the comparison of alterations of fat metabolism responses to dietary MR between adipose tissue and liver, and the comparison of changes between rodents and pigs is made to illustrate the tissue- and species-specific responses. In addition, the possible mechanisms that might be engaged in the regulation of MR diet on lipid metabolism are also discussed. PMID:27156065

  13. Fragmentation network of doubly charged methionine: Interpretation using graph theory.

    PubMed

    Ha, D T; Yamazaki, K; Wang, Y; Alcamí, M; Maeda, S; Kono, H; Martín, F; Kukk, E

    2016-09-01

    The fragmentation of doubly charged gas-phase methionine (HO2CCH(NH2)CH2CH2SCH3) is systematically studied using the self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. We applied graph theory to analyze the large number of the calculated MD trajectories, which appears to be a highly effective and convenient means of extracting versatile information from the large data. The present theoretical results strongly concur with the earlier studied experimental ones. Essentially, the dication dissociates into acidic group CO2H and basic group C4NSH10. The former may carry a single or no charge and stays intact in most cases, whereas the latter may hold either a single or a double charge and tends to dissociate into smaller fragments. The decay of the basic group is observed to follow the Arrhenius law. The dissociation pathways to CO2H and C4NSH10 and subsequent fragmentations are also supported by ab initio calculations. PMID:27608997

  14. The Cus efflux system removes toxic ions via a methionine shuttle.

    PubMed

    Su, Chih-Chia; Long, Feng; Yu, Edward W

    2011-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, frequently utilize tripartite efflux complexes in the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) family to expel diverse toxic compounds from the cell. These efflux systems span the entire cell envelope to mediate the phenomenon of bacterial multidrug resistance. The three parts of the efflux complexes are: (1) a membrane fusion protein (MFP) connecting (2) a substrate-binding inner membrane transporter to (3) an outer membrane-anchored channel in the periplasmic space. One such efflux system CusCBA is responsible for extruding biocidal Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions. We recently determined the crystal structures of both the inner membrane transporter CusA and MFP CusB of the CusCBA tripartite efflux system from E. coli. These are the first structures of the heavy-metal efflux (HME) subfamily of the RND efflux pumps. Here, we summarize the structural information of these two efflux proteins and present the accumulated evidence that this efflux system utilizes methionine residues to bind and export Cu(I)/Ag(I). Genetic and structural analyses suggest that the CusA pump is capable of picking up the metal ions from both the periplasm and cytoplasm. We propose a stepwise shuttle mechanism for this pump to extrude metal ions from the cell.

  15. Cysteine dietary supplementation reverses the decrease in mitochondrial ROS production at complex I induced by methionine restriction.

    PubMed

    Gomez, A; Gomez, J; Lopez Torres, M; Naudi, A; Mota-Martorell, N; Pamplona, R; Barja, G

    2015-06-01

    It has been described that dietary cysteine reverses many of the beneficial changes induced by methionine restriction in aging rodents. In this investigation male Wistar rats were subjected to diets low in methionine, supplemented with cysteine, or simultaneously low in methionine and supplemented with cysteine. The results obtained in liver showed that cysteine supplementation reverses the decrease in mitochondrial ROS generation induced by methionine restriction at complex I. Methionine restriction also decreased various markers of oxidative and non-oxidative stress on mitochondrial proteins which were not reversed by cysteine. Instead, cysteine supplementation also lowered protein damage in association with decreases in mTOR activation. The results of the present study add the decrease in mitochondrial ROS production to the various beneficial changes induced by methionine restriction that are reversed by cysteine dietary supplementation.

  16. Production of synthetic methionine-free and synthetic methionine-limited alpha casein: protein foodstuff for patients with homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Goda, Sayed K; Abu Aqel, Yasmin W; Al-Aswad, Mai R; Rashedy, Fatma A B; Mohamed, Amr S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility that synthetic forms of methionine-free alpha-casein and methionine-limited alpha casein could be produced by recombinant means to form the basis for developing an industrial-scale process for the provision of a foodstuff suitable for patients with homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) deficiency. As a first step, two forms of alpha casein gene, encoding methionine-free alpha casein (Fcas) or a methionine-limited alpha casein (Mcas), were synthesised and expressed in Escherichia coli. Using the overexpression vector pET28a, both genes were highly expressed in E. coli in soluble form as well as in inclusion bodies. The two recombinant proteins were purified by the one step methods using the fused His-tag and the Ni(2+)column and validated by Western blot analysis. This work paves the way for industrial-scale production of proteins suitable for patients with homocystinuria due to CBS deficiency.

  17. Hepatic Effects of a Methionine-Choline-Deficient Diet in Hepatocyte RXRα-null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gyamfi, Maxwell Afari; Tanaka, Yuji; He, Lin; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2009-01-01

    Retinoid X receptor-α (RXRα) is an obligate partner for several nuclear hormone receptors that regulate important physiological processes in the liver. In this study the impact of hepatocyte RXRα deficiency on methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced steatosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, and hepatic transporters gene expression were examined. The mRNA of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-regulated genes, important for lipid synthesis, were not altered in wild type (WT) mice, but were increased 2.0- to 5.4-fold in hepatocyte RXRα-null (H-RXRα-null) mice fed a MCD diet for 14 days. Furthermore, hepatic mRNAs and proteins essential for fatty acid β-oxidation were not altered in WT mice, but were decreased in the MCD diet-fed H-RXRα-null mice, resulting in increased hepatic free fatty acid levels. Cyp2e1 enzyme activity and lipid peroxide levels were induced only in MCD-fed WT mice. In contrast, hepatic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory factors were increased only in H-RXRα-null mice fed the MCD diet. Hepatic uptake transporters Oatp1a1 and Oatp1b2 mRNA levels were decreased in WT mice fed the MCD diet, whereas the efflux transporter Mrp4 was increased. However, in the H-RXRα-null mice, the MCD diet only moderately decreased Oatp1a1 and induced both Oatp1a4 and Mrp4 gene expression. Whereas the MCD diet increased serum bile acid levels and alkaline phosphatase activity in both WT and H-RXRα-null mice, serum ALT levels were induced (2.9-fold) only in the H-RXRα-null mice. In conclusion, these data suggest a critical role for RXRα in hepatic fatty acid homeostasis and protection against MCD-induced hepatocyte injury. PMID:18952117

  18. Hepatic effects of a methionine-choline-deficient diet in hepatocyte RXR{alpha}-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gyamfi, Maxwell Afari; Tanaka, Yuji; He Lin; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Wan, Y.-J.Y.

    2009-01-15

    Retinoid X receptor-{alpha} (RXR{alpha}) is an obligate partner for several nuclear hormone receptors that regulate important physiological processes in the liver. In this study the impact of hepatocyte RXR{alpha} deficiency on methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced steatosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, and hepatic transporters gene expression were examined. The mRNA of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-regulated genes, important for lipid synthesis, were not altered in wild type (WT) mice, but were increased 2.0- to 5.4-fold in hepatocyte RXR{alpha}-null (H-RXR{alpha}-null) mice fed a MCD diet for 14 days. Furthermore, hepatic mRNAs and proteins essential for fatty acid {beta}-oxidation were not altered in WT mice, but were decreased in the MCD diet-fed H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, resulting in increased hepatic free fatty acid levels. Cyp2e1 enzyme activity and lipid peroxide levels were induced only in MCD-fed WT mice. In contrast, hepatic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory factors were increased only in H-RXR{alpha}-null mice fed the MCD diet. Hepatic uptake transporters Oatp1a1 and Oatp1b2 mRNA levels were decreased in WT mice fed the MCD diet, whereas the efflux transporter Mrp4 was increased. However, in the H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, the MCD diet only moderately decreased Oatp1a1 and induced both Oatp1a4 and Mrp4 gene expression. Whereas the MCD diet increased serum bile acid levels and alkaline phosphatase activity in both WT and H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, serum ALT levels were induced (2.9-fold) only in the H-RXR{alpha}-null mice. In conclusion, these data suggest a critical role for RXR{alpha} in hepatic fatty acid homeostasis and protection against MCD-induced hepatocyte injury.

  19. Modulation of cell cycle and gene expression in pancreatic tumor cell lines by methionine deprivation (methionine stress): implications to the therapy of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kokkinakis, Demetrius M; Liu, Xiaoyan; Neuner, Russell D

    2005-09-01

    The effect of methionine deprivation (methionine stress) on the proliferation, survival, resistance to chemotherapy, and regulation of gene and protein expression in pancreatic tumor lines is examined. Methionine stress prevents successful mitosis and promotes cell cycle arrest and accumulation of cells with multiple micronuclei with decondensed chromatin. Inhibition of mitosis correlates with CDK1 down-regulation and/or inhibition of its function by Tyr(15) phosphorylation or Thr(161) dephosphorylation. Inhibition of cell cycle progression correlates with loss of hyperphosphorylated Rb and up-regulation of p21 via p53 and/or transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) activation depending on p53 status. Although methionine stress-induced toxicity is not solely dependent on p53, the gain in p21 and loss in CDK1 transcription are more enhanced in wild-type p53 tumors. Up-regulation of SMAD7, a TGF-beta signaling inhibitor, suggests that SMAD7 does not restrict the TGF-beta-mediated induction of p21, although it may prevent up-regulation of p27. cDNA oligoarray analysis indicated a pleiotropic response to methionine stress. Cell cycle and mitotic arrest is in agreement with up-regulation of NF2, ETS2, CLU, GADD45alpha, GADD45beta, and GADD45gamma and down-regulation of AURKB, TOP2A, CCNA, CCNB, PRC1, BUB1, NuSAP, IFI16, and BRCA1. Down-regulation of AREG, AGTR1, M-CSF, and EGF, IGF, and VEGF receptors and up-regulation of GNA11 and IGFBP4 signify loss of growth factor support. PIN1, FEN1, and cABL up-regulation and LMNB1, AREG, RhoB, CCNG, TYMS, F3, and MGMT down-regulation suggest that methionine stress sensitizes the tumor cells to DNA-alkylating drugs, 5-fluorouracil, and radiation. Increased sensitivity of pancreatic tumor cell lines to temozolomide is shown under methionine stress conditions and is attributed in part to diminished O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase and possibly to inhibition of the cell cycle progression.

  20. Acute Administration of Methionine Affects Performance of Swiss Mice in Learning and Memory Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Abi, I; Magaji, R A; Magaji, M G

    2015-12-20

    Methionine, an essential amino acid, plays an essential role in the central nervous system CNS development. It serves as a crucial intermediate in the methylation, trans-sulfuration and amino- phosphorylationpathways,necessary for the synthesis of nucleic acids, phospholipids, hormones, neurotransmitters, antioxidants, polyamines, catecholamines and other biogenic amines. The effect of methionine on learning and memory in mice was investigated using Morris water maze (MWM), Elevated plus maze(EPM) and Y maze (YM). Animals were administered with distilled water (control), methionine (1,700mg/kg); folate (3mg/kg) or methionine (1700mg/kg) plus folate (3mg/kg) for 14 days. Escape latency and time spent in target quadrants; transfer latency and percentage spontaneous alternations were measured in the MWM, EPM and YM respectively. The animals were anaesthetized with inhalational chloroform and their brains subsequently harvested, homogenized and assayed for acetylcholinesterase24 hours after the experiment.Folate significantly(p<0.05) increased transfer latency (53.33 ± 12.62) as compared to control (20.1 ± 5.01) and reduced spontaneous alternations significantly (25.0 ± 8.9) when compared to control (44.33 ± 3.07). When folate was combined with methionine there was also a significant increase in transfer latency (43.0 ± 14.39) when compared with control (20.1 ± 5.01). Folate-methionine combination also significantly reduced spontaneous alternations (20.4 ± 8.4) as compared to the control (44.33 ± 3.07) much more than folate alone. Acetylcholinesterase activities in all groups were not statistically significant. It can be concluded that acute methionine administration has some benefits in memory enhancement. However, a short course folate supplementation impairslearning and working memory especially when combined with methioninewhich may be as a result of sudden overwhelming of the methylation cycle, leading to homocysteinemia which is pro-dementia.

  1. Acute Administration of Methionine Affects Performance of Swiss Mice in Learning and Memory Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Abi, I; Magaji, R A; Magaji, M G

    2015-01-01

    Methionine, an essential amino acid, plays an essential role in the central nervous system CNS development. It serves as a crucial intermediate in the methylation, trans-sulfuration and amino- phosphorylationpathways,necessary for the synthesis of nucleic acids, phospholipids, hormones, neurotransmitters, antioxidants, polyamines, catecholamines and other biogenic amines. The effect of methionine on learning and memory in mice was investigated using Morris water maze (MWM), Elevated plus maze(EPM) and Y maze (YM). Animals were administered with distilled water (control), methionine (1,700mg/kg); folate (3mg/kg) or methionine (1700mg/kg) plus folate (3mg/kg) for 14 days. Escape latency and time spent in target quadrants; transfer latency and percentage spontaneous alternations were measured in the MWM, EPM and YM respectively. The animals were anaesthetized with inhalational chloroform and their brains subsequently harvested, homogenized and assayed for acetylcholinesterase24 hours after the experiment.Folate significantly(p<0.05) increased transfer latency (53.33 ± 12.62) as compared to control (20.1 ± 5.01) and reduced spontaneous alternations significantly (25.0 ± 8.9) when compared to control (44.33 ± 3.07). When folate was combined with methionine there was also a significant increase in transfer latency (43.0 ± 14.39) when compared with control (20.1 ± 5.01). Folate-methionine combination also significantly reduced spontaneous alternations (20.4 ± 8.4) as compared to the control (44.33 ± 3.07) much more than folate alone. Acetylcholinesterase activities in all groups were not statistically significant. It can be concluded that acute methionine administration has some benefits in memory enhancement. However, a short course folate supplementation impairslearning and working memory especially when combined with methioninewhich may be as a result of sudden overwhelming of the methylation cycle, leading to homocysteinemia which is pro-dementia. PMID

  2. Decreased rat rhabdomyosarcoma pulmonary metastases in response to a low methionine diet.

    PubMed

    Breillout, F; Hadida, F; Echinard-Garin, P; Lascaux, V; Poupon, M F

    1987-01-01

    Many Experimental and human tumor cell lines have been previously described as being dependent upon exogenous methionine for their in vitro proliferation. The rationale of the experiments described herein was to decrease the in vivo growth of malignant tumors by reducing the exogenous methionine available in diets fed to Wistar AG rats bearing the highly metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma, RMS-J1. The methionine content in the diet was reduced either by replacing casein (diet 1) with soybean protein (diet 4), or by lowering the amount of soybean protein in the diet (from 23 g/100 g to 12 g/100g) (diet 5), or by using a crystalline amino acid-defined mixture as the source of protein (diet 7). In the latter diet homocysteine replaced methionine and allowed the survival of the animals. Diet 4 significantly reduced the mean number of lung metastases without affecting the primary tumor growth. Treatment of RMS-J1 bearing rats with diet 5 led to the decrease of pulmonary invasion (78 and 21 median lung metastases, respectively, in control and treated groups). This diminished metastatic dissemination resulted from the reduced methionine consumption: the lowered casein content in diet 3 (10 g/100 g) as compared to diet 1 (23 g) did not alter primary tumor growth or the amplitude of lung invasion. Moreover, the addition of methionine to diet 5 prevented the diminution of the median number of lung metastases. Replacement of methionine with homocysteine in the crystalline amino acid-defined mixture (diet 7) fed to RMS-J1 bearing rats led to a limited retardation of primary tumor growth (less than 10%) and to a significant decrease in pulmonary invasion: the median number of pulmonary metastases was 28 and 9 for control and treated rats respectively.

  3. Effect of maternal methionine pre-treatment on alcohol-induced exencephaly and axial skeletal dysmorphogenesis in mouse fetuses.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, R; Ibrahim, Ahmad; Bener, Abulbari

    2002-02-01

    Alcohol is known to induce folate deficiency and impair methionine synthase activity. Exogenous folic acid (FA) administered periconceptionally has been shown to prevent the first occurrence and recurrence of neural tube defects (NTD) in humans. Since folate, vitamin B(12) and methionine are metabolically interrelated, it was decided to determine the effect of methionine pre-treatment on alcohol-induced NTD and axial skeletal defects in mouse embryos. Following administration of a single dose of 70 or 150 mg/kg of methionine, 0.03 ml/g body weight of ethanol solution (25% v/v of absolute alcohol in saline) was injected intraperitoneally into pregnant mice at critical stages of neural tube development. The controls were either non-treated or saline treated and pair-fed and pair-watered. Fetuses were collected on gestation day 18. Alcohol and methionine plus alcohol numerically enhanced embryonic resorption and induced a significant reduction in fetal body weight. Alcohol alone caused a 3-fold increase in the background frequency of exencephaly in gestation days 7 and 8 treatment groups. The low dose of methionine only numerically reduced the spontaneous exencephaly. Pre-treatment with methionine only produced a numerical but not statistically significant reduction in alcohol-induced exencephaly. The higher dose of methionine did not produce a particularly beneficial effect on embryonic survival, fetal body weight and occurrence of exencephaly. Alcohol-induced cleft palate and limb malformations were ameliorated by methionine pre-treatment. Craniofacial skeleton, vertebrae and ribs were extensively malformed both in the alcohol and methionine plus alcohol groups indicating a lack of rescue effects of methionine. Whereas supernumerary ribs and extra sternal ribs were augmented by methionine, occipitalization of the atlas vertebra was a malformation unique to the pre-treatment group. Plasma levels of several amino acids including that of methionine were significantly

  4. Impact of food supplementation and methionine on high densities of cotton rats: Support of the amino-acid-quality hypothesis?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, R.E.; Leslie, David M.; Lochmiller, R.L.; Masters, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    Considerable research supports the tenet that quantity and quality of food limit vertebrate populations. We evaluated predictions that increased availabilities of food and the essential amino acid methionine were related to population limitation of the hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus). Effects of supplemental food and methionine on density, survival, and reproductive parameters of wild cotton rats were assessed in north-central Oklahoma in 1998-1999. Twelve enclosed groups of 16 adult cotton rats each (8 male, 8 female) were randomly assigned to either no supplementation (control), supplementation with a mixed ration that had methionine at slightly below maintenance levels (0.20%), or a methionine-enhanced mixed ration (1.20%). In general, densities of cotton rats were twice as high and were sustained longer with dietary supplementation, and methionine-supplemented populations maintained the highest densities. Treatment effects on survival depended on time of year, with higher survival in supplemented enclosures in October and November. Per capita recruitment was highest with methionine-enhanced food. Treatment effects on proportions of overall and female cotton rats in reproductive condition depended on sampling date, but males were most reproductively active with methionine supplementation. Methionine supplementation resulted in an earlier and longer reproductive season. Density-dependent and density-independent factors no doubt interplay to determine population dynamics of cotton rats, but our results suggest that methionine plays a role in the population dynamics of wild cotton rats, apparently by enhancing overall density, recruitment, and reproductive activity of males.

  5. Methionine restriction inhibits chemically-induced malignant transformation in the BALB/c 3T3 cell transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Nicken, Petra; Empl, Michael T; Gerhard, Daniel; Hausmann, Julia; Steinberg, Pablo

    2016-09-01

    High consumption of red meat entails a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. Methionine, which is more frequently a component of animal proteins, and folic acid are members of the one carbon cycle and as such important players in DNA methylation and cancer development. Therefore, dietary modifications involving altered methionine and folic acid content might inhibit colon cancer development. In the present study, the BALB/c 3T3 cell transformation assay was used to investigate whether methionine and folic acid are able to influence the malignant transformation of mouse fibroblasts after treatment with the known tumour initiator 3-methylcholanthrene. Three different methionine concentrations (representing a -40%, a "normal" and a +40% cell culture medium concentration, respectively) and two different folic acid concentrations (6 and 20 μM) were thereby investigated. Methionine restriction led to a decrease of type III foci, while enhancement of both methionine and folic acid did not significantly increase the cell transformation rate. Interestingly, the focus-lowering effect of methionine was only significant in conjunction with an elevated folic acid concentration. In summary, we conclude that the malignant transformation of mouse fibroblasts is influenced by methionine levels and that methionine restriction could be a possible approach to reduce cancer development. PMID:27427305

  6. Downregulation of Cdc6 and pre-replication complexes in response to methionine stress in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Booher, Keith; Lin, Da-Wei; Borrego, Stacey L; Kaiser, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Methionine and homocysteine are metabolites in the transmethylation pathway leading to synthesis of the methyl-donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Most cancer cells stop proliferating during methionine stress conditions, when methionine is replaced in the growth media by its immediate metabolic precursor homocysteine (Met-Hcy+). Non-transformed cells proliferate in Met-Hcy+ media, making the methionine metabolic requirement of cancer cells an attractive target for therapy, yet there is relatively little known about the molecular mechanisms governing the methionine stress response in cancer cells. To study this phenomenon in breast cancer cells, we selected methionine-independent-resistant cell lines derived from MDAMB468 breast cancer cells. Resistant cells grew normally in Met-Hcy+ media, whereas their parental MDAMB468 cells rapidly arrest in the G 1 phase. Remarkably, supplementing Met-Hcy+ growth media with S-adenosylmethionine suppressed the cell proliferation defects, indicating that methionine stress is a consequence of SAM limitation rather than low amino acid concentrations. Accordingly, mTORC1 activity, the primary effector responding to amino acid limitation, remained high. However, we found that levels of the replication factor Cdc6 decreased and pre-replication complexes were destabilized in methionine-stressed MDAMB468 but not resistant cells. Our study characterizes metabolite requirements and cell cycle responses that occur during methionine stress in breast cancer cells and helps explain the metabolic uniqueness of cancer cells.

  7. Methionine restriction inhibits chemically-induced malignant transformation in the BALB/c 3T3 cell transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Nicken, Petra; Empl, Michael T; Gerhard, Daniel; Hausmann, Julia; Steinberg, Pablo

    2016-09-01

    High consumption of red meat entails a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. Methionine, which is more frequently a component of animal proteins, and folic acid are members of the one carbon cycle and as such important players in DNA methylation and cancer development. Therefore, dietary modifications involving altered methionine and folic acid content might inhibit colon cancer development. In the present study, the BALB/c 3T3 cell transformation assay was used to investigate whether methionine and folic acid are able to influence the malignant transformation of mouse fibroblasts after treatment with the known tumour initiator 3-methylcholanthrene. Three different methionine concentrations (representing a -40%, a "normal" and a +40% cell culture medium concentration, respectively) and two different folic acid concentrations (6 and 20 μM) were thereby investigated. Methionine restriction led to a decrease of type III foci, while enhancement of both methionine and folic acid did not significantly increase the cell transformation rate. Interestingly, the focus-lowering effect of methionine was only significant in conjunction with an elevated folic acid concentration. In summary, we conclude that the malignant transformation of mouse fibroblasts is influenced by methionine levels and that methionine restriction could be a possible approach to reduce cancer development.

  8. Definitive Endoderm Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Combined with Selective Elimination of Undifferentiated Cells by Methionine Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Tsuyama, Tomonori; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) show a characteristic feature in that they are highly dependent on methionine metabolism. Undifferentiated human ESCs cannot survive under condition that methionine is deprived from culture medium. We describe here a procedure for definitive endoderm differentiation from human ESCs, in which human ESCs are subject to 10 days' (d) differentiation combined with methionine deprivation between differentiation days (d) 8 to (d) 10. Methionine deprivation results in elimination of undifferentiated cells from the culture with no significant loss of definitive endoderm cells, as compared to those cultured under complete condition throughout the whole culture period.

  9. Definitive Endoderm Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Combined with Selective Elimination of Undifferentiated Cells by Methionine Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Tsuyama, Tomonori; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) show a characteristic feature in that they are highly dependent on methionine metabolism. Undifferentiated human ESCs cannot survive under the condition that methionine is deprived from culture medium. We describe here a procedure for definitive endoderm differentiation from human ESCs, in which human ESCs are subject to 10 days (d) differentiation combined with methionine deprivation between differentiation day (d) 8 to d10. Methionine deprivation results in elimination of undifferentiated cells from the culture with no significant loss of definitive endoderm cells, as compared to those cultured under complete condition throughout the whole culture period.

  10. Methionine increases BDNF DNA methylation and improves memory in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, R Ryley; Buckingham, Susan C; Mascia, Katherine L; Johnson, Jarvis J; Matyjasik, Michal M; Lockhart, Roxanne M; Lubin, Farah D

    2015-01-01

    Objective Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients exhibit signs of memory impairments even when seizures are pharmacologically controlled. Surprisingly, the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in TLE-associated memory impairments remain elusive. Memory consolidation requires epigenetic transcriptional regulation of genes in the hippocampus; therefore, we aimed to determine how epigenetic DNA methylation mechanisms affect learning-induced transcription of memory-permissive genes in the epileptic hippocampus. Methods Using the kainate rodent model of TLE and focusing on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) gene as a candidate of DNA methylation-mediated transcription, we analyzed DNA methylation levels in epileptic rats following learning. After detection of aberrant DNA methylation at the Bdnf gene, we investigated functional effects of altered DNA methylation on hippocampus-dependent memory formation in our TLE rodent model. Results We found that behaviorally driven BdnfDNA methylation was associated with hippocampus-dependent memory deficits. Bisulfite sequencing revealed that decreased BdnfDNA methylation levels strongly correlated with abnormally high levels of BdnfmRNA in the epileptic hippocampus during memory consolidation. Methyl supplementation via methionine (Met) increased BdnfDNA methylation and reduced BdnfmRNA levels in the epileptic hippocampus during memory consolidation. Met administration reduced interictal spike activity, increased theta rhythm power, and reversed memory deficits in epileptic animals. The rescue effect of Met treatment on learning-induced BdnfDNA methylation, Bdnf gene expression, and hippocampus-dependent memory, were attenuated by DNA methyltransferase blockade. Interpretation Our findings suggest that manipulation of DNA methylation in the epileptic hippocampus should be considered as a viable treatment option to ameliorate memory impairments associated with TLE. PMID:25909085

  11. Rumen degradation and availability of various amounts of liquid methionine hydroxy analog in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Koenig, K M; Rode, L M; Knight, C D; Vázquez-Añón, M

    2002-04-01

    Ruminal escape of various amounts of methionine hydroxy analog [D,L-2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio)-butanoic acid (HMB)] was measured in an experiment designed as a 4 x 4 Latin square using four lactating dairy cows with cannula in the rumen and duodenum. The cows were fed a diet composed of corn silage, alfalfa haylage, rolled barley grain, canola meal, and blood meal, three times per day. The cows were fed the liquid analog each day for 1 wk before the experiment was started. On the day of the experiment, each cow received an intraruminal bolus dose of 0, 25, or 50 g of the liquid analog (Alimet feed supplement, 88% HMB) or 51.2 g of a dry calcium salt of the analog (86% HMB; MHA) mixed with 0.5 kg of ground barley grain. A liquid phase marker (Co-EDTA) was administered as a bolus dose into the rumen at the time of administration of the methionine hydroxy analogs. Rumen and duodenal contents, and blood serum were collected at 0, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 h relative to the time of dosing. Rumen and duodenal samples were analyzed for Co and HMB, and serum was analyzed for free methionine. Fractional rate constants for the passage of the liquid marker (k(p)) and the decline of HMB concentration in the rumen (k(rHMB)) were determined by nonlinear regression. Liquid passage from the rumen was similar among the four analog treatments (0.136 +/- 0.012/h; mean +/- SEM). Ruminal escape of HMB as a percentage of the dose (100% x k(p)/k(rHMB)) did not differ between cows receiving 25, 50, and 51.2 g of the methionine analogs (42.5, 41.0, and 34.9 +/- 9.0%, respectively) and averaged 39.5%. Duodenal appearance of HMB as a percentage also did not differ between cows receiving 25, 50, and 51.2 g of the methionine analogs (16.2, 26.8, and 22.7%, respectively) and averaged 22%. Omasal absorption of HMB was variable ranging from 12.3 to 26.3% and averaged 17.6%. Serum methionine concentration peaked at 3 and 6 h after dosing and increased in proportion to the amount of the analog

  12. Parasites suppress immune-enhancing effect of methionine in nestling great tits.

    PubMed

    Wegmann, Michèle; Voegeli, Beatrice; Richner, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    After birth, an organism needs to invest both in somatic growth and in the development of efficient immune functions to counter the effects of pathogens, and hence an investment trade-off is predicted. To explore this trade-off, we simultaneously exposed nestling great tits (Parus major) to a common ectoparasite, while stimulating immune function. Using a 2 × 2 experimental design, we first infested half of the nests with hen fleas (Ceratophyllus gallinae) on day 3 post-hatch and later, on day 9-13 post-hatch, and then supplemented half of the nestlings within each nest with an immuno-enhancing amino acid (methionine). We then assessed the non-specific immune response by measuring both the inflammatory response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and assessing the levels of acute phase proteins (APP). In parasite-infested nestlings, methionine had a negative effect on body mass close to fledging. Methionine had an immune-enhancing effect in the absence of ectoparasites only. The inflammatory response to LPS was significantly lower in nestlings infested with fleas and was also lower in nestlings supplemented with methionine. These patterns of immune responses suggest an immunosuppressive effect of ectoparasites that could neutralise the immune-enhancing effect of methionine. Our study thus suggests that the trade-off between investment in life history traits and immune function is only partly dependent on available resources, but shows that parasites may influence this trade-off in a more complex way, by also inhibiting important physiological functions.

  13. Effects of methionine supplementation on the incidence of dietary fat induced myocardial lesions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Clandinin, M T; Yamashiro, S

    1980-06-01

    Purified diets were prepared to evaluate the effect of methionine supplementation on the incidence and severity of vegetable oil-induced myocardial lesions in the rat. The unsupplemented basal diet fed was similar in nutrient composition to typical semipurified diets currently utilized for cardiopathogenic evaluation of dietary rapeseed oils and contained 1.276 mg of S-amino acid per kilocalorie. The methionine-supplemented diet contained an additional 0.25% (w/w) L-methionine or a total of 1.815 mg of S-amino acid per kilocalorie. Feeding trials were conducted in which weanling rats were fed either a diet containing 20% (w/w) soybean oil (SBO), low erucic acid rapeseed oil (LER) or high urucic acid rapeseed oil (HER) for 16 or 28 weeks. Dietary supplementation with methionine was found to reduce the incidence of focal myocardial lesions in SBO-fed animals to zero. These results suggest that marginal deficiencies in methionine may interact with the frequency and severity of myocardial changes reported for Sprague-Dawley rats fed various dietary oils. The results indicate that levels of essential nutrients should be adjusted when the energy level of the diet is increased.

  14. Spectroscopic characterization of cysteine and methionine using density functional theory method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naganathappa, Mahadevappa; Chaudhari, Ajay

    2015-05-01

    The present study reports theoretical infrared and electronic absorption spectra of neutral cysteine and methionine molecules in gas phase, their ions and in water ice. We also report infrared and electronic absorption spectra of nitrogen-substituted (in place of sulfur atom) cysteine and methionine. The geometrical parameters, dipole moments, rotational and centrifugal distortional constants for these molecules are reported at B3LYP/6-311++g(d,p) level of theory. A large change in vibrational and electronic absorption spectra has been observed upon ionization of cysteine and methionine. Calculated vibrational frequencies are compared with the available experimental frequencies for the neutral cysteine and methionine in gas phase. An influence of water ice on vibrational frequencies of neutral cysteine and methionine is studied using integral equation formalism polarizable continuum model (IEFPCM) at the same level of theory. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) approach has been adapted to calculate the electronic absorption spectra of these molecules. The intense lines are suggested in order to detect these molecules in space.

  15. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum strain ATCC13032 to produce L-methionine.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tianyu; Hu, Xiaoqing; Hu, Jinyu; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    L-Methionine-producing strain QW102/pJYW-4-hom(m) -lysC(m) -brnFE was developed from Corynebacterium glutamicum strain ATCC13032, using metabolic engineering strategies. These strategies involved (i) deletion of the gene thrB encoding homoserine kinase to increase the precursor supply, (ii) deletion of the gene mcbR encoding the regulator McbR to release the transcriptional repression to various genes in the l-methionine biosynthetic pathway, (iii) overexpression of the gene lysC(m) encoding feedback-resistant aspartate kinase and the gene hom(m) encoding feedback-resistant homoserine dehydrogenase to further increase the precursor supply, and (iv) overexpression of the gene cluster brnF and brnE encoding the export protein complex BrnFE to increase extracellular l-methionine concentration. QW102/pJYW-4-hom(m) -lysC(m) -brnFE produced 42.2 mM (6.3 g/L) l-methionine after 64-H fed-batch fermentation. These results suggest that l-methionine-producing strains can be developed from wild-type C. glutamicum strains by rationally metabolic engineering.

  16. Suppression of Methionine Oxidation of a Pharmaceutical Antibody Stored in a Polymer-Based Syringe.

    PubMed

    Masato, Amano; Kiichi, Fukui; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2016-02-01

    Oxidation of methionine residues is one of the well-known deteriorations in monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics. Because methionine oxidation may affect their efficacy and pharmacokinetic profile, oxidation levels should be strictly controlled during their storage period. In this study, we revealed that when a therapeutic antibody was filled into a cyclo olefin polymer-based syringe and stored in a blister pack with an oxygen absorber, the methionine oxidation production under thermal or light stress was suppressed because of the reduction in the concentration of dissolved oxygen. Also unexpectedly, fewer amounts of the high-molecular-weight species and the acidic variants of the antibody were generated under thermal or light stress. Although the high-molecular-weight species contains methionine oxidants at similar levels to those in a monomer species, they were likely to be constituted from a higher amount of the oxidative species of internal disulfide linkage, tyrosine, or histidine. Because the dissolved oxygen could be readily removed from the mAb solution in the polymer-based syringe owing to its high gas permeability, this study shows the advantages of the polymer-based syringe with an oxygen absorber over glass syringes in terms of the suppression of the methionine oxidation and oxidative high molecular species. PMID:26462145

  17. A Methionine-Induced Animal Model of Schizophrenia: Face and Predictive Validity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lien; Alachkar, Amal; Sanathara, Nayna; Belluzzi, James D.; Wang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Modulating the methylation process induces broad biochemical changes, some of which may be involved in schizophrenia. Methylation is in particular central to epigenesis, which is also recognized as a factor in the etiology of schizophrenia. Because methionine administration to patients with schizophrenia has been reported to exacerbate their psychotic symptoms and because mice treated with methionine exhibited social deficits and prepulse inhibition impairment, we investigated whether methionine administration could lead to behavioral changes that reflect schizophrenic symptoms in mice. Methods: l-Methionine was administered to mice twice a day for 7 days. Results: We found that this treatment induces behavioral responses that reflect the 3 types of schizophrenia-like symptoms (positive, negative, or cognitive deficits) as monitored in a battery of behavioral assays (locomotion, stereotypy, social interaction, forced swimming, prepulse inhibition, novel object recognition, and inhibitory avoidance). Moreover, these responses were differentially reversed by typical haloperidol and atypical clozapine antipsychotics in ways that parallel their effects in schizophrenics. Conclusion: We thus propose the l-methionine treatment as an animal model recapitulating several symptoms of schizophrenia. We have established the face and predictive validity for this model. Our model relies on an essential natural amino acid and on an intervention that is relatively simple and time effective and may offer an additional tool for assessing novel antipsychotics. PMID:25991655

  18. Intermediates in the recycling of 5-methylthioribose to methionine in fruits.

    PubMed

    Kushad, M M; Richardson, D G; Ferro, A J

    1983-10-01

    The recycling of 5-methylthioribose (MTR) to methionine in avocado (Persea americana Mill, cv Hass) and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill, cv unknown) was examined. [(14)CH(3)]MTR was not metabolized in cell free extract from avocado fruit. Either [(14)CH(3)]MTR plus ATP or [(14)CH(3)]5-methylthioribose-1-phosphate (MTR-1-P) alone, however, were metabolized to two new products by these extracts. MTR kinase activity has previously been detected in these fruit extracts. These data indicate that MTR must be converted to MTR-1-P by MTR kinase before further metabolism can occur. The products of MTR-1-P metabolism were tentatively identified as alpha-keto-gamma-methylthiobutyric acid (alpha-KMB) and alpha-hydroxy-gamma-methylthiobutyric acid (alpha-HMB) by chromatography in several solvent systems. [(35)S]alpha-KMB was found to be further metabolized to methionine and alpha-HMB by these extracts, whereas alpha-HMB was not. However, alpha-HMB inhibited the conversion of alpha-KMB to methionine. Both [U-(14)C]alpha-KMB and [U-(14)C]methionine, but not [U-(14)C]alpha-HMB, were converted to ethylene in tomato pericarp tissue. In addition, aminoethoxyvinylglycine inhibited the conversion of alpha-KMB to ethylene. These data suggest that the recycling pathway leading to ethylene is MTR --> MTR-1-P --> alpha-KMB --> methionine --> S-adenosylmethionine --> 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid --> ethylene.

  19. Tumor therapy by deprivation of L-methionine: rationale and results.

    PubMed

    Kreis, W

    1979-06-01

    Published reports indicate that normal rodent cells can grow in medium containing either L-methionine or L-homocysteine, whereas malignant rodent cells have an absolute requirement for L-methionine. Our studies with two normal human cell lines (fetal lung fibroblasts and bladder epithelial cells) exhibit equal growth in media containing either L-methionine or L-homocysteine. The same is true for five malignant human cell lines (carcinoma of the cervix [HeLa], adenocarcinoma of the breast [AlAb], acute lymphoblastic leukemia [MOLT-3], Wilms' tumor [SK-NEP-1], and reticulum cell sarcoma [T-77], whereas four other malignant cell lines (adenocarcinoma of the breast [SK-BR-2-III], the two lymphoblastic leukemias [CCRF-HSB-2 and CCRF-SB], and a neuroblastoma [SK-N-MC]) have absolute requirements for L-methionine. Two malignant cell lines, an adenocarcinoma of the lung (A549) and an adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (Capan-1), showed restricted growth under the experimental conditions used. L-Methionlinase (L-methionine-alpha-deamino-gamma-mercaptomethane-lyase, EC 4.4.1.11) at a concentration of 0.1 unit/ml leads to complete growth inhibition of cell cultures of both the normal human fetal lung fibroblasts (F-136-35-56) and the acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CCRF-HSB-2). L-Homocysteine-thiolactone in medium containing L-methioninase could partly "rescue" the normal but not the malignant cells.

  20. Cytotoxic effects of methionine alkyl esters and amides in normal and neoplastic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Clement, M A; Chapman, J M; Roberts, J

    1989-06-01

    Homologous series of L-methionine alkyl ester hydrochlorides and tosylates were synthesized and evaluated for in vitro growth inhibitory activity in Meth A sarcoma. Cytotoxicity, as determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation, was found to be directly proportional to alkyl chain length and surface tension lowering activity. L-Methionine decyl and dodecyl ester hydrochlorides possessed optimum cytotoxic activity (IC50 = 29, 28 microM) which was not reversible by the addition of L-methionine. Surface tension of a 50 microM solution of the decyl and dodecyl ester hydrochlorides were 35.4 and 32.7 dyn/cm, respectively. The corresponding decyl and dodecyl ester tosylates and amide hydrochlorides were less active. The N-t-butoxycarbonyl analogues were essentially inactive, demonstrating the necessity of an unsubstituted and/or potentially cationic amino group. Methionine dependence characteristics and cytotoxicity were also determined for three human (IMR-90, LX-1, MCF7) and four additional murine (L1210, L5178Y, 3T3, SV-T2) cell lines. The human cell lines Meth A, LX-1, and SV-T2 were found to be methionine independent. The LX-1 tumor cell line and the SV-T2 transformed line exhibited two to four times more sensitivity to the cytotoxic and cytolytic properties of the decyl and dodecyl ester hydrochlorides than their normal counterparts. The dodecyl amide hydrochloride derivative demonstrated enhanced cytotoxic activity in vivo relative to the corresponding ester, possibly due to decreased metabolic hydrolysis.

  1. Methionine derivatives diminish sulphide damage to colonocytes--implications for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Roediger, W E; Babidge, W; Millard, S

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacterial production of anionic sulphide is increased in the colon of ulcerative colitis and sulphides can cause metabolic damage to colonocytes. AIMS: To assess the reversal of the damaging effect of sulphide to isolated colonocytes by methionine and methionine derivatives. METHODS AND SUBJECTS: Isolated colonocytes were prepared from rat colons and 12 human colectomy specimens. In cell suspensions 14CO2/acetoacetate generation was measured from [1-14C]-butyrate (5.0 mmol/l) in the presence of 0-2.0 mmol/l sodium hydrogen sulphide. The effect of 5.0 mmol/l L-methionine, S-adenosylmethionine 1,4 butane disulphonate and DL-methionine-S-methylsulphonium chloride on sulphide inhibited oxidation was observed. RESULTS: In rat colonocytes sodium hydrogen sulphide dose dependently reduced oxidative metabolite formation from n-butyrate, an action reversed in order of efficacy by S-adenosylmethionine 1,4 butane disulphonate > DLmethionine-S-methyl-sulphonium chloride > L-methionine. In human colonocytes S-adenosylmethionine 1,4 butane disulphonate most significantly improved 14CO2 production (p = < 0.005) suppressed by sodium hydrogen sulphide. CONCLUSION: Sulphide toxicity in colonocytes is reversible by methyl donors. The efficiency of sulphide detoxification may be an important factor in the pathogenesis and treatment of ulcerative colitis for which S-adenosylmethionine 1,4 butane disulphonate may be of therapeutic value. PMID:8881814

  2. Conserved methionine dictates substrate preference in Nramp-family divalent metal transporters.

    PubMed

    Bozzi, Aaron T; Bane, Lukas B; Weihofen, Wilhelm A; McCabe, Anne L; Singharoy, Abhishek; Chipot, Christophe J; Schulten, Klaus; Gaudet, Rachelle

    2016-09-13

    Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (Nramp) family transporters catalyze uptake of essential divalent transition metals like iron and manganese. To discriminate against abundant competitors, the Nramp metal-binding site should favor softer transition metals, which interact either covalently or ionically with coordinating molecules, over hard calcium and magnesium, which interact mainly ionically. The metal-binding site contains an unusual, but conserved, methionine, and its sulfur coordinates transition metal substrates, suggesting a vital role in their transport. Using a bacterial Nramp model system, we show that, surprisingly, this conserved methionine is dispensable for transport of the physiological manganese substrate and similar divalents iron and cobalt, with several small amino acid replacements still enabling robust uptake. Moreover, the methionine sulfur's presence makes the toxic metal cadmium a preferred substrate. However, a methionine-to-alanine substitution enables transport of calcium and magnesium. Thus, the putative evolutionary pressure to maintain the Nramp metal-binding methionine likely exists because it-more effectively than any other amino acid-increases selectivity for low-abundance transition metal transport in the presence of high-abundance divalents like calcium and magnesium. PMID:27573840

  3. Dietary crude protein has minimal effect on the activity of selected enzymes of methionine catabolism in kittens fed diets near-limiting in methionine.

    PubMed

    Strieker, M J; Morris, J G; Avery, E H; Freedland, R A; Rogers, Q R

    2008-04-01

    Previous experiments have shown that increasing the dietary crude protein (CP) of cats does not increase urea cycle enzymes or alanine amino transferase as occurs in rats. Also when an essential amino acid (EAA) is limiting in a diet for growing kittens, the kittens do not exhibit an amino acid imbalance when other EAAs are added to the diet. To study the metabolic basis for these observations which are different from that found in omnivores and herbivores, the hypothesis that increased dietary CP decreases methionine catabolism, so more is spared for growth, was tested. Fifteen male kittens were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments. Each diet contained 2.5 g l-methionine/kg diet and 200, 300 or 500 g CP/kg diet. The livers and kidneys were removed and assayed for methionine transaminase (MTA), cystathionase (CASE) and cystathionine synthase (CS). Free amino acid concentrations were determined in liver, kidney and plasma. The 300 and 500 g CP/kg groups had significantly greater kidney weights and body weight gains than the 200 g CP/kg group. Hepatic MTA activity was lower in the 300 than the 200 or 500 g CP/kg groups (p < 0.05). Renal MTA and CASE activities were 35% and 50% greater, respectively, for the 500 g CP/kg group than for the 200 g CP/kg diet group (p < 0.05). Renal CS activities for the 300 and 500 g CP/kg groups were 29% (p > 0.05) and 38% (p < 0.05) greater, respectively, than the 200 g CP/kg group. Cyst(e)ine concentrations were lower in the livers of the 500 g CP/kg group than the 200 g CP/kg group (p < 0.05). Cystathionine was lower in plasma and kidney from the 500 g CP/kg diet group than from the 200 g CP/kg diet group (p < 0.05). It was concluded that the metabolic basis for the increased growth of kittens fed diets marginally limiting in methionine, with increasing concentrations of dietary CP, was not mediated through decreased enzyme activity associated with the catabolism of methionine, but was the result of an increase in

  4. Utilization of supplemental methionine sources by primary cultures of chick hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dibner, J.J.

    1983-10-01

    Utilization of 2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio) butanoic acid (HMB) as a substrate for protein synthesis was studied by using primary cultures of chick liver cells. Cultures were prepared by enzymatic dissociation of livers from week old Hubbard broiler chicks and were maintained for 4 days under nonproliferative conditions. Hepatocyte differentiation was verified by using dexamethasone induction of tyrosine aminotransferase activity. Conversion of (14C)HMB to L-methionine was shown by chromatographic analysis of hepatocyte protein hydrolysate and incorporation into protein was proven by cycloheximide inhibition of synthesis. When incorporation of HMB was compared to that of DL-methionine (DLM) equimolar quantities of the two sources were found in liver cell protein. These results support, at a cellular level, the conclusion that HMB and DLM are biochemically equivalent sources of methionine for protein synthesis.

  5. Metformin retards aging in C. elegans by altering microbial folate and methionine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cabreiro, Filipe; Au, Catherine; Leung, Kit-Yi; Vergara-Irigaray, Nuria; Cochemé, Helena M; Noori, Tahereh; Weinkove, David; Schuster, Eugene; Greene, Nicholas D E; Gems, David

    2013-03-28

    The biguanide drug metformin is widely prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, but its mode of action remains uncertain. Metformin also increases lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans cocultured with Escherichia coli. This bacterium exerts complex nutritional and pathogenic effects on its nematode predator/host that impact health and aging. We report that metformin increases lifespan by altering microbial folate and methionine metabolism. Alterations in metformin-induced longevity by mutation of worm methionine synthase (metr-1) and S-adenosylmethionine synthase (sams-1) imply metformin-induced methionine restriction in the host, consistent with action of this drug as a dietary restriction mimetic. Metformin increases or decreases worm lifespan, depending on E. coli strain metformin sensitivity and glucose concentration. In mammals, the intestinal microbiome influences host metabolism, including development of metabolic disease. Thus, metformin-induced alteration of microbial metabolism could contribute to therapeutic efficacy-and also to its side effects, which include folate deficiency and gastrointestinal upset.

  6. Characterization of MRNP34, a novel methionine-rich nacre protein from the pearl oysters.

    PubMed

    Marie, Benjamin; Joubert, Caroline; Belliard, Corinne; Tayale, Alexandre; Zanella-Cléon, Isabelle; Marin, Frédéric; Gueguen, Yannick; Montagnani, Caroline

    2012-05-01

    Nacre of the Pinctada pearl oyster shells is composed of 98% CaCO3 and 2% organic matrix. The relationship between the organic matrix and the mechanism of nacre formation currently constitutes the main focus regarding the biomineralization process. In this study, we isolated a new nacre matrix protein in P. margaritifera and P. maxima, we called Pmarg- and Pmax-MRNP34 (methionine-rich nacre protein). MRNP34 is a secreted hydrophobic protein, which is remarkably rich in methionine, and which is specifically localised in mineralizing the epithelium cells of the mantle and in the nacre matrix. The structure of this protein is drastically different from those of the other nacre proteins already described. This unusual methionine-rich protein is a new member in the growing list of low complexity domain containing proteins that are associated with biocalcifications. These observations offer new insights to the molecular mechanisms of biomineralization.

  7. The use of Streptococcus zymogenes for estimating tryptophan and methionine bioavailability in 17 foods.

    PubMed

    Wells, P; McDonough, F; Bodwell, C E; Hitchens, A

    1989-01-01

    As part of a cooperative study assessing amino acid bioavailability and/or protein quality, the provisional method of Boyne et al. (Brit J Nutr 21: 181-206) was used to assay 17 protein sources for methionine and tryptophan availability with S. zymogenes. Pronase was used as the predigesting enzyme. Product composition was found to affect reproducibility. The microbial assay results correlated positively with results from rat growth studies on the same foods (p = 0.05), and were generally accurate in identifying products of lower protein quality. Defatting four high-fat products increased microbial values in the methionine assay, but only the chicken franks and the sausage values in the tryptophan assay. Heating non-fat milk increased methionine values slightly. Low values for rolled oats were further reduced by finer grinding.

  8. Evolution of initiator tRNAs and selection of methionine as the initiating amino acid.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Souvik; Varshney, Umesh

    2016-09-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) have been important in shaping biomolecular evolution. Initiator tRNAs (tRNAi), a special class of tRNAs, carry methionine (or its derivative, formyl-methionine) to ribosomes to start an enormously energy consuming but a highly regulated process of protein synthesis. The processes of tRNAi evolution, and selection of methionine as the universal initiating amino acid remain an enigmatic problem. We constructed phylogenetic trees using the whole sequence, the acceptor-TψC arm ('minihelix'), and the anticodon-dihydrouridine arm regions of tRNAi from 158 species belonging to all 3 domains of life. All the trees distinctly assembled into 3 domains of life. Large trees, generated using data for all the tRNAs of a vast number of species, fail to reveal the major evolutionary events and identity of the probable elongator tRNA sequences that could be ancestor of tRNAi. Therefore, we constructed trees using the minihelix or the whole sequence of species specific tRNAs, and iterated our analysis on 50 eubacterial species. We identified tRNA(Pro), tRNA(Glu), or tRNA(Thr) (but surprisingly not elongator tRNA(Met)) as probable ancestors of tRNAi. We then determined the factors imposing selection of methionine as the initiating amino acid. Overall frequency of occurrence of methionine, whose metabolic cost of synthesis is the highest among all amino acids, remains almost unchanged across the 3 domains of life. Our correlation analysis shows that its high metabolic cost is independent of many physicochemical properties of the side chain. Our results indicate that selection of methionine, as the initiating amino acid was possibly a consequence of the evolution of one-carbon metabolism, which plays an important role in regulating translation initiation. PMID:27322343

  9. Identification of methionine as a possible precursor to the selenocysteine catalytic site of glutathione peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.K.

    1985-01-01

    The selenium (Se) moiety of glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) occurs as selenocysteine and is present at the catalytic active site of the enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of hydrogen peroxides and lipid peroxides. The presence of this unusual amino acid at the active site raises the question as to the origin of the carbon skeleton of Se-cysteine. ICR Swiss mice were fed a Se deficient diet for 50 days and then were fed a Se adequate diet (1 ppm Se as SeO/sub 3/). Mice were i.p. injected with either (U-/sup 14/C) methionine, serine, or alanine (0.5 ..mu..Ci/0.1 ml/mouse/day) for 25 days. Recovered GSHPx activity in liver and blood was carboxymethylated (CM) with iodoacetic acid. CM-GSHPx was partially purified by column chromatography. /sup 14/C-GSHPx fractions were collected, lyophilized, and hydrolyzed. /sup 14/C-amino acids were separated by TLC and ion-exchange chromatography. TLC (phenol, cyclohexane, acetic acid, and water (90;6.5;3.5;8)) revealed a GSHPx /sup 14/C-amino acid derived from U-/sup 14/C-methionine, but not from serine or alanine corresponding to CM-selenocysteine (R/sub f/; 0.16). Ion-exchange chromatography of U-/sup 14/C-methionine labeled GSHPx hydrolyzate revealed two radio carbon ninhydrin positive peaks corresponding to /sup 14/C-CM-selenocysteine and /sup 14/C-methionine. No corresponding /sup 14/C-labeled peaks were observed for CM-selenocysteine derived from U-/sup 14/C serine or alanine. The results suggest that methionine may contribute a portion of the carbon skeleton to selenocysteine which may include an alternative metabolic pathway. Animal studies demonstrated that GSHPx activity is increased by methionine supplementation may be due to its contribution of carbon source to the catalytic site of the enzyme.

  10. Dietary zinc methionine effect on eggshell quality of hens drinking saline water.

    PubMed

    Moreng, R E; Balnave, D; Zhang, D

    1992-07-01

    In two experiments individually caged 60-wk-old laying hens were exposed to daily temperatures ranging between 18 and 35 C and given various dietary and drinking water treatments. In Experiment 1 these were: 1) basal diet and town water; 2) basal diet and town water supplemented with 2 g NaCl/L; 3) basal diet supplemented with .2 g zinc methionine (Zinpro-200)/kg diet and town water; or 4) basal diet supplemented with .2 g zinc methionine/kg and town water supplemented with 2 g NaCl/L. In Experiment 2, Treatments 1 and 2 were the same as in Experiment 1. Birds on Treatments 3 and 4 received the town water supplemented with 2 g NaCl/L and the basal diet supplemented with either .5 g zinc methionine/kg (Treatment 3) or .28 g ZnSO4H2O/kg to approximate the same dietary zinc concentration in Treatment 3 (Treatment 4). In both experiments, dietary zinc methionine plus 2 g NaCl/L in the drinking water significantly improved shell breaking strength over those birds on the 2 g NaCl/L with no zinc methionine supplementation. This same pattern occurred for shell weight, shell weight per unit of surface area, and percentage of shell defects. There were no improvements in the parameters measured from the supplementation of ZnSO4. The zinc methionine compound apparently was effective in overcoming the negative influence of the added 2 g NaCl/L of town water.

  11. Betaine supplementation is less effective than methionine restriction in correcting phenotypes of CBS deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sapna; Wang, Liqun; Kruger, Warren D

    2016-01-01

    Cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) deficiency is a recessive inborn error of metabolism characterized by elevated serum total homocysteine (tHcy). Betaine supplementation, which can lower tHcy by stimulating homocysteine remethylation to methionine, is often given to CBS deficient patients in combination with other treatments such as methionine restriction and supplemental B-vitamins. However, the effectiveness of betaine supplementation by itself in the treatment of CBS deficiency has not been well explored. Here, we have examined the effect of a betaine supplemented diet on the Tg-I278T Cbs (-/-) mouse model of CBS deficiency and compared its effectiveness to our previously published data using a methionine restricted diet. Tg-I278T Cbs (-/-) mice on betaine, from the time of weaning until for 240 days of age, had a 40 % decrease in mean tHcy level and a 137 % increase in serum methionine levels. Betaine-treated Tg-I278T Cbs (-/-) mice also exhibited increased levels of betaine-dependent homocysteine methyl transferase (BHMT), increased levels of the lipogenic enzyme stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD-1), and increased lipid droplet accumulation in the liver. Betaine supplementation largely reversed the hair loss phenotype in Tg-I278T Cbs (-/-) animals, but was far less effective than methionine restriction in reversing the weight-loss, fat-loss, and osteoporosis phenotypes. Surprisingly, betaine supplementation had several negative effects in control Tg-I278T Cbs (+/-) mice including decreased weight gain, lean mass, and bone mineral density. Our findings indicate that while betaine supplementation does have some beneficial effects, it is not as effective as methionine restriction for reversing the phenotypes associated with severe CBS deficiency in mice.

  12. Impact of methionine oxidation on calmodulin structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Megan R; Thompson, Andrew R; Nitu, Florentin; Moen, Rebecca J; Olenek, Michael J; Klein, Jennifer C; Thomas, David D

    2015-01-01

    We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the structural impact of oxidizing specific methionine (M) side chains in calmodulin (CaM). It has been shown that oxidation of either M109 or M124 in CaM diminishes CaM regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), and that mutation of M to Q (glutamine) in either case produces functional effects identical to those of oxidation. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), a pulsed EPR technique that measures distances between spin labels, to characterize the structural changes resulting from these mutations. Spin labels were attached to a pair of introduced cysteine residues, one in the C-lobe (T117C) and one in the N-lobe (T34C) of CaM, and DEER was used to determine the distribution of interspin distances. Ca binding induced a large increase in the mean distance, in concert with previous X-ray crystallography and NMR data, showing a closed structure in the absence of Ca and an open structure in the presence of Ca. DEER revealed additional information about CaM's structural heterogeneity in solution: in both the presence and absence of Ca, CaM populates both structural states, one with probes separated by ∼4nm (closed) and another at ∼6nm (open). Ca shifts the structural equilibrium constant toward the open state by a factor of 13. DEER reveals the distribution of interprobe distances, showing that each of these states is itself partially disordered, with the width of each population ranging from 1 to 3nm. Both mutations (M109Q and M124Q) decrease the effect of Ca on the structure of CaM, primarily by decreasing the closed-to-open equilibrium constant in the presence of Ca. We propose that Met oxidation alters CaM's functional interaction with its target proteins by perturbing this Ca-dependent structural shift. PMID:25478640

  13. Methionine dependency of malignant tumors: a possible approach for therapy.

    PubMed

    Breillout, F; Antoine, E; Poupon, M F

    1990-10-17

    When methionine (Met), an essential amino acid, was substituted for by its precursor homocysteine (Hcy) in the culture medium, normal cells such as fibroblasts proliferated normally. In contrast, many tumor cells failed to grow or grew at a lower rate. Met dependency is acquired simultaneously with cell transformation, as observed with HBL 100, a human mammary epithelial cell line that acquired increased malignancy as a function of in vitro passage number, and NIH/3T3 (J10), a mouse fibroblast line transformed by transfection with the human HRAS oncogene. A relationship was observed between Met dependency and metastatic potential of the RMS-21, RMS-S4T, and RMS-J1 sublines derived from RMS-0, a rat rhabdomyosarcoma cell line: the higher the metastatic potential of the cell line, the higher the concentration of Met required to maintain its proliferation. Met-independent cells derived from the RMS-0 line, obtained by a progressive decrease of Met in the culture medium lost their tumorigenicity when injected into rats fed with Met-deprived diets. In addition, the in vitro motility of RMS-S4T tumor cells, a marker of metastatic capability, decreased in Met-free Hcy-complemented (Met- Hcy+) medium. Similarly, RMS-0 tumor cells, preincubated in a Met- Hcy+ culture medium for 24 hours, evidenced a decreased capacity to form lung colonies when injected into syngeneic rats: the median number of lung colonies was 27 and 3 (P less than .05) for cells cultivated in Met+ Hcy- and Met- Hcy+ media, respectively. An amino acid-defined mixture reproducing casein composition was used as a protein source in the diets fed to RMS-J1 tumor-bearing rats. Dietary substitution of Hcy for Met (i.e., met deprivation) resulted in decreased tumor growth (from 44.4 +/- 1.0 to 40.6 +/- 1.4; P less than .05) and prevention of metastatic spread (from 37 to 0; P less than .05). In conclusion, exogenous Met can be substituted for Hcy to maintain the survival of normal cells but is essential for

  14. Metabolism of excess methionine in the liver of intact rat: an in vivo /sup 2/H NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.E.; Gabel, S.A.; Funk, A.

    1987-11-03

    L-Methionine is the most toxic amino acid if supplied in excess, and the metabolic basis for this toxicity has been extensively studied, with varying conclusions. It is demonstrated here that in vivo /sup 2/H NMR spectroscopy provides a useful approach to the study of the hepatic metabolism of methionine in the anesthetized rat. Resonances corresponding to administered L-(methyl-/sup 2/H/sub 3/)methionine, and to the transmethylation product sarcosine, are observed during the first 10-min period after an intravenous injection of the labeled methionine, and the time dependence has been followed for a period of 5 h. A third resonance, assigned to the N-trimethyl groups of carnitine, phosphorylcholine, and other metabolites, becomes observable several hours after administration of the deuteriated methionine. In addition, there is a small increase in the intensity of the HDO resonance over the period of the study, which is interpreted to reflect the ultimate oxidation of the labeled sarcosine methyl group via mitochondrial sarcosine dehydrogenase. Additional small /sup 2/H resonances assigned to N/sup 1/-methylhistidine and creatine could be observed in perchloric acid extracts of the livers of rats treated with the deuteriated methionine. Inhibition of the flux through the transmethylation pathway is observed in the rat pretreated with the S-ethyl analogue of methionine, ethionine. These data provide strong support for the importance of glycine transmethylation in the catabolism of excess methionine.

  15. Modified bean seed protein phaseolin did not accumulate stably in transgenic tobacco seeds after methionine enhancement mutations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major seed storage protein phaseolin of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is deficient in methionine, an essential amino acid for human and animal health. To improve the nutritional quality of common bean, we designed methionine enhancement of phaseolin based on the three dimensional structure...

  16. Increased synthesis of eicosanoids by human monocytes following leucine and methionine enkephalin administration

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederhold, M.D.; Ou, D.W.

    1986-03-05

    Regulation of eicosanoid biosynthesis by neuropeptides was investigated in human peripheral blood monocytes from normal donors. Metabolites of /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid (/sup 3/H-AA) were analyzed by thin layer and high pressure liquid chromatography following exposure to 0.2 ..mu..gm/ml and 2.0 ..mu..gm/ml of leucine (L-ENK) and methionine (M-ENK) enkephalin. Supernatants of cultured cells were analyzed. The data indicate that both leucine and methionine enkephalin can stimulate eicosanoid biosynthesis in human monocytes, and may indicate a possible regulatory mechanism between the central nervous system and the reticuloendothelial system.

  17. Genetic basis of neural tube defects. II. Genes correlated with folate and methionine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gos, Monika; Szpecht-Potocka, Agnieszka

    2002-01-01

    Effective supplementation with folate, which prevents neural tube defect (NTD) occurrence, and high homocysteine levels in the blood of NTD children's mothers suggest that genes involved in folate and homocysteine metabolism can be involved in NTD aetiology. Genes encoding methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) or methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) belong to the first group. Genes encoding methionine synthase (MTR), its regulator - methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) and also cystathionine synthase (CBS) can be included in the second group. We present a current list of the folate and homocysteine metabolism genes that are known to be involved in NTD and pay special attention to primary and secondary NTD prevention.

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of l-methionine γ-lyase from Streptomyces avermitilis.

    PubMed

    Kudou, Daizou; Yasuda, Eri; Hirai, Yoshiyuki; Tamura, Takashi; Inagaki, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    A pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent methionine γ-lyase (MGL) was cloned from Streptomyces avermitilis catalyzed the degradation of methionine to α-ketobutyrate, methanethiol, and ammonia. The sav7062 gene (1,242 bp) was corresponded to 413 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 42,994 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a high degree of similarity to those of other MGL enzymes. The sav7062 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity and exhibited the MGL catalytic activities. We cloned the enzyme that has the MGL activity in Streptomyces for the first time.

  19. Effect of troxerutin and methionine on spin trapping of free oxy-radicals.

    PubMed

    Blasig, I E; Loewe, H; Ebert, B

    1988-01-01

    The cardioprotective agents troxerutin and methionine are radical scavengers and compete with the DMPO adduct formation of .OH generated by the Fenton reaction. The concentration of trapped .O2- generated by the xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine reaction is lowered in the presence of troxerutin. The decay of DMPO-OH is decreased by troxerutin compared to the control. In the presence of methionine a carbon-centered radical is produced. The investigations support the opinion that the scavenging of oxygen derived free radicals is of importance for the cardioprotective action of these agents.

  20. Isotopic Dilution GC/MS Method for Methionine Determination in Biological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horj, Elena; Iordache, Andreea; Culea, Monica

    2011-10-01

    The isotopic dilution mass spectrometry technique is the method of choice for sensitive and accurate determination of analytes in biological samples. The aim of this work was to establish a sensitive analytical method for the determination of methionine in different biological media. Quantitation of methionine from the resultant tracer spectrum requires deconvolution of the enrichment of the isotopomers. Deconvolution of the ion abundance ratios to yield tracer-to-tracee ratio for the isotopomer was done using Brauman's least squares approach. Comparison with regression curve calculation method is presented. The method was applied for amino-acids determination in beef, pork and fish meat.

  1. [Comparison of the digestive utilization of methionine, of its hydroxylated analog, and of sodium sulfate in goats using 35s compounds].

    PubMed

    Champredon, C; Pion, R; Basson, W D

    1976-02-23

    35S and 35S free and protein bound amino acids were estimated in goats' abomasal contents and blood after ruminal injections of sulfer labelled compounds: methionine, methionine hydroxy analog (M.H.A.) and sodium sulfate. 35S incorporation into microbial and plasma proteins was higher with methionine than with M.H.A. or sulfate. 35S.M.H.A. utilisation seems to be less different from Na2 35SO4 utilisation than from 35S methionine utilisation.

  2. Oxidation of methionine-containing peptides by rad OH radicals: Is sulfoxide the only product? Study by mass spectrometry and IRMPD spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignasiak, Marta; de Oliveira, Pedro; Levin, Chantal Houée; Scuderi, Debora

    2013-12-01

    Although the first steps of the oxidation of methionine containing peptides by rad OH radicals have been very well documented, not much is known about the final products. They have been characterized and unraveled by mass spectrometry and IR Multiple Photon Dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy carried out with model dipeptides and methionine enkephalin, often involving the transformation of residues other than methionine. Several products were found, in addition to methionine sulfoxide, which is omnipresent. Thus IRMPD proved to be very useful in oxidative proteomics.

  3. Differences in plasma metabolomics between sows fed DL-methionine and its hydroxy analogue reveal a strong association of milk composition and neonatal growth with maternal methionine nutrition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Li, Hao; Liu, Guangmang; Wan, Haifeng; Mercier, Yves; Wu, Caimei; Wu, Xiuqun; Che, Lianqiang; Lin, Yan; Xu, Shengyu; Tian, Gang; Chen, Daiwen; Wu, De; Fang, Zhengfeng

    2015-02-28

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether increased consumption of methionine as DL-methionine (DLM) or its hydroxy analogue DL-2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutanoic acid (HMTBA) could benefit milk synthesis and neonatal growth. For this purpose, eighteen cross-bred (Landrace × Yorkshire) primiparous sows were fed a control (CON), DLM or HMTBA diet (n 6 per diet) from 0 to 14 d post-partum. At postnatal day 14, piglets in the HMTBA group had higher body weight (P= 0·02) than those in the CON group, tended (P= 0·07) to be higher than those in the DLM group, and had higher (P< 0·05) mRNA abundance of jejunal fatty acid-binding protein 2, intestinal than those in the CON and DLM groups. Compared with the CON diet-fed sows, milk protein, non-fat solid, and lysine, histidine and ornithine concentrations decreased in the DLM diet-fed sows (P< 0·05), and milk fat, lactose, and cysteine and taurine concentrations increased in the HMTBA diet-fed sows (P< 0·05). Plasma homocysteine and urea N concentrations that averaged across time were increased (P< 0·05) in sows fed the DLM diet compared with those fed the CON diet. Metabolomic results based on ¹H NMR spectroscopy revealed that consumption of the HMTBA and DLM diets increased (P< 0·05) both sow plasma methionine and valine levels; however, consumption of the DLM diet led to lower (P< 0·05) plasma levels of lysine, tyrosine, glucose and acetate and higher (P< 0·05) plasma levels of citrate, lactate, formate, glycerol, myo-inositol and N-acetyl glycoprotein in sows. Collectively, neonatal growth and milk synthesis were regulated by dietary methionine levels and sources, which resulted in marked alterations in amino acid, lipid and glycogen metabolism.

  4. Chemoprotection by D-methionine against cisplatin-induced side-effects: insight from in vitro studies using human plasma.

    PubMed

    Sooriyaarachchi, Melani; White, Wade M; Narendran, Aru; Gailer, Jürgen

    2014-03-01

    Animal studies have shown that the nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity of the anti-cancer drug cisplatin (CP) can be ameliorated by the co-administration with D-methionine. The molecular mechanisms of this activity, however, are not well understood. Since CP is intravenously administered, the underlying chemistry may involve the interaction of CP-derived Pt-species with D-methionine in the bloodstream. Our previous studies have shown that the chemoprotective agents N-acetyl-l-cysteine and sodium thiosulfate modulate the metabolism of CP in human plasma in vitro, albeit in a different manner. Using a metallomics approach, we show that the incubation of human plasma with D-methionine and CP (molar ratio of 20 : 1) leads to the formation of a Pt-D-methionine complex independent of the order of addition. These results were corroborated by analogous experiments that were carried out using PBS-buffer instead of plasma. In addition, CP and D-methionine were added simultaneously to PBS-buffer and samples were analyzed at certain time intervals by the same metallomics method and LC-ESI-MS over a ∼21 h time period. Whereas the intermediate [Pt(NH3)Cl(D-methionine)](+) species was detected between 1-4 h, only the terminal [Pt(D-methionine)2](+) complex was present 21 h later. Combined, these studies demonstrate that in plasma and at the 20 : 1 D-methionine : CP molar ratio, an early CP hydrolysis product reacts with D-methionine to form a 1 : 1 complex that is followed by the formation of a 2 : 1 compound at a later time point. The formation of these Pt-D-methionine species may therefore play an important role in the processes by which D-methionine protects mammalian organisms against CP-induced toxicities.

  5. Bioavailability of D-methionine relative to L-methionine for nursery pigs using the slope-ratio assay

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Changsu; Ahn, Jong Young

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the bioavailability of D-methionine (Met) relative to L-Met for nursery pigs using the slope-ratio assay. A total of 50 crossbred barrows with an initial BW of 13.5 kg (SD = 1.0) were used in an N balance study. A Met-deficient basal diet (BD) was formulated to contain an adequate amount of all amino acids (AA) for 10–20 kg pigs except for Met. The two reference diets were prepared by supplementing the BD with 0.4 or 0.8 g L-Met/kg at the expense of corn starch, and an equivalent concentration of D-Met was added to the BD for the two test diets. The pigs were adapted to the experimental diets for 5 d and then total but separated collection of feces and urine was conducted for 4 d according to the marker-to-marker procedure. Nitrogen intakes were similar across the treatments. Fecal N output was not affected by Met supplementation regardless of source and consequently apparent N digestibility did not change. Conversely, there was a negative linear response (P < 0.01) to Met supplementation with both Met isomers in urinary N output, which resulted in increased retained N (g/4 d) and N retention (% of intake). No quadratic response was observed in any of the N balance criteria. The estimated bioavailability of D-Met relative to L-Met from urinary N output (g/4 d) and N retention (% of intake) as dependent variables using supplemental Met intake (g/4 d) as an independent variable were 87.6% and 89.6%, respectively; however, approximately 95% of the fiducial limits for the relative bioavailability estimates included 100%. In conclusion, with an absence of statistical significance, the present study indicated that the mean relative bioequivalence of D- to L-Met was 87.6% based on urinary N output or 89.6% based on N retention.

  6. Bioavailability of D-methionine relative to L-methionine for nursery pigs using the slope-ratio assay.

    PubMed

    Kong, Changsu; Ahn, Jong Young; Kim, Beob G

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the bioavailability of D-methionine (Met) relative to L-Met for nursery pigs using the slope-ratio assay. A total of 50 crossbred barrows with an initial BW of 13.5 kg (SD = 1.0) were used in an N balance study. A Met-deficient basal diet (BD) was formulated to contain an adequate amount of all amino acids (AA) for 10-20 kg pigs except for Met. The two reference diets were prepared by supplementing the BD with 0.4 or 0.8 g L-Met/kg at the expense of corn starch, and an equivalent concentration of D-Met was added to the BD for the two test diets. The pigs were adapted to the experimental diets for 5 d and then total but separated collection of feces and urine was conducted for 4 d according to the marker-to-marker procedure. Nitrogen intakes were similar across the treatments. Fecal N output was not affected by Met supplementation regardless of source and consequently apparent N digestibility did not change. Conversely, there was a negative linear response (P < 0.01) to Met supplementation with both Met isomers in urinary N output, which resulted in increased retained N (g/4 d) and N retention (% of intake). No quadratic response was observed in any of the N balance criteria. The estimated bioavailability of D-Met relative to L-Met from urinary N output (g/4 d) and N retention (% of intake) as dependent variables using supplemental Met intake (g/4 d) as an independent variable were 87.6% and 89.6%, respectively; however, approximately 95% of the fiducial limits for the relative bioavailability estimates included 100%. In conclusion, with an absence of statistical significance, the present study indicated that the mean relative bioequivalence of D- to L-Met was 87.6% based on urinary N output or 89.6% based on N retention. PMID:27651987

  7. Bioavailability of D-methionine relative to L-methionine for nursery pigs using the slope-ratio assay

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Changsu; Ahn, Jong Young

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the bioavailability of D-methionine (Met) relative to L-Met for nursery pigs using the slope-ratio assay. A total of 50 crossbred barrows with an initial BW of 13.5 kg (SD = 1.0) were used in an N balance study. A Met-deficient basal diet (BD) was formulated to contain an adequate amount of all amino acids (AA) for 10–20 kg pigs except for Met. The two reference diets were prepared by supplementing the BD with 0.4 or 0.8 g L-Met/kg at the expense of corn starch, and an equivalent concentration of D-Met was added to the BD for the two test diets. The pigs were adapted to the experimental diets for 5 d and then total but separated collection of feces and urine was conducted for 4 d according to the marker-to-marker procedure. Nitrogen intakes were similar across the treatments. Fecal N output was not affected by Met supplementation regardless of source and consequently apparent N digestibility did not change. Conversely, there was a negative linear response (P < 0.01) to Met supplementation with both Met isomers in urinary N output, which resulted in increased retained N (g/4 d) and N retention (% of intake). No quadratic response was observed in any of the N balance criteria. The estimated bioavailability of D-Met relative to L-Met from urinary N output (g/4 d) and N retention (% of intake) as dependent variables using supplemental Met intake (g/4 d) as an independent variable were 87.6% and 89.6%, respectively; however, approximately 95% of the fiducial limits for the relative bioavailability estimates included 100%. In conclusion, with an absence of statistical significance, the present study indicated that the mean relative bioequivalence of D- to L-Met was 87.6% based on urinary N output or 89.6% based on N retention. PMID:27651987

  8. Carbon-11-methionine and PET in evaluation of treatment response of breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Huovinen, R.; Leskinen-Kallio, S.; Någren, K.; Lehikoinen, P.; Ruotsalainen, U.; Teräs, M.

    1993-01-01

    Uptake of L-methyl-11C-methionine (11C-methionine) in breast cancer metastases was studied with positron emission tomography (PET). Eight patients with soft tissue metastases were studied twice: before the onset of chemotherapy (4), hormonal therapy (3) or radiotherapy (1) and 3-14 weeks later. The radioactivity concentration of the low molecular weight fraction of venous plasma samples separated by fast gel filtration was used as input function. The input corrected uptake rate of 11C-methionine (Ki) in breast cancer metastases before the treatment ranged between 0.035 and 0.186 1 min-1 and the standardised uptake value (SUV) between 2.0 and 11.4. The uptake of 11C-methionine into the metastases decreased when clinical objective stability or regression of the metastases was later obtained and increased in cases where progressive disease was seen during treatment. We conclude that metabolic changes in the amino acid metabolism detected by PET precede the clinical response, and may be of clinical value in predicting the treatment response. Images Figure 1 PMID:8471437

  9. CLONING, EXPRESSION, AND CHARACTERIZATION OF RAT S-ADENOSYL-L-METHIONINE: ARSENIC (III) METHYLTRANSFERASE (CYT19)

    EPA Science Inventory

    CLONING, EXPRESSION, AND CHARACTERIZATION OF RAT S-ADENOSYL-L-METHIONINE: ARSENIC(III) METHYLTRANSFERASE (cyt19)

    Stephen B. Waters1 , Felicia Walton1 , Miroslav Styblo1 , Karen Herbin-Davis2, and David J. Thomas2 1 School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chape...

  10. CLONING, EXPRESSION, AND MUTATIONAL ANALYSIS OF RAT S-ADENOSYL-1-METHIONINE: ARSENIC (III) METHYLTRANSFERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    CLONING, EXPRESSION, AND MUTATIONAL ANALYSIS OF RAT
    S-ADENOSYL-L-METHIONINE: ARSENIC(III) METHYLTRANSFERASE

    Stephen B. Waters, Ph.D., Miroslav Styblo, Ph.D., Melinda A. Beck, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; David J. Thomas, Ph.D., U.S. Environmental...

  11. Coupling Oxidative Signals to Protein Phosphorylation via Methionine Oxidation in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms involved in sensing oxidative signaling molecules such as H2O2 in plant and animal cells are not completely understood. In the present study, we tested the postulate that oxidation of methionine (Met) to Met sulfoxide (MetSO) can couple oxidative signals to changes in protein phosphor...

  12. Modulatory effect of curcumin on methionine-induced hyperlipidemia and hyperhomocysteinemia in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Puneet; Ansari, M Nazam; Bhandari, Uma

    2008-07-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the antioxidant effect of curcumin on methionine-induced hyperlipidemia and hyperhomocysteinemia in Wistar rats (200-250 g) of either sex. The vehicle control rats were treated with 1% Tween 80 in normal saline (2 ml/kg, po) for 30 days. Hyperlipidemia and hyperhomocysteinemia was induced by methionine administration (1 g/kg, po) for 30 days. A significant increase in total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and homocysteine levels in serum and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels in heart homogenates were observed with a concomitant decrease in serum high density lipoprotein (HDL-C) levels in pathogenic control (i.e. group II) rats, as compared to vehicle control (i.e. group I) rats. Further, curcumin (200 mg/kg, p.o.) treatment in methionine treated rats for 30 days significantly decreased the total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-C and homocysteine levels in serum and TBARS levels in heart homogenates and increased serum HDL-C levels, as compared to pathogenic control (i.e. group II) rats. The results of biochemical observations were supplemented by histopathological examination of rat's aortic section. The results of test drug were comparable to that obtained with folic acid (100 mg/kg, p.o.). The results suggest that curcumin has significant antihyperlipidemic and antihyperhomocysteinemic effect against methionine-induced hyperlipidemia and hyperhomocysteinemia in rats.

  13. Tissue nonautonomous effects of fat body methionine metabolism on imaginal disc repair in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kashio, Soshiro; Obata, Fumiaki; Zhang, Liu; Katsuyama, Tomonori; Chihara, Takahiro; Miura, Masayuki

    2016-02-16

    Regulatory mechanisms for tissue repair and regeneration within damaged tissue have been extensively studied. However, the systemic regulation of tissue repair remains poorly understood. To elucidate tissue nonautonomous control of repair process, it is essential to induce local damage, independent of genetic manipulations in uninjured parts of the body. Herein, we develop a system in Drosophila for spatiotemporal tissue injury using a temperature-sensitive form of diphtheria toxin A domain driven by the Q system to study factors contributing to imaginal disc repair. Using this technique, we demonstrate that methionine metabolism in the fat body, a counterpart of mammalian liver and adipose tissue, supports the repair processes of wing discs. Local injury to wing discs decreases methionine and S-adenosylmethionine, whereas it increases S-adenosylhomocysteine in the fat body. Fat body-specific genetic manipulation of methionine metabolism results in defective disc repair but does not affect normal wing development. Our data indicate the contribution of tissue interactions to tissue repair in Drosophila, as local damage to wing discs influences fat body metabolism, and proper control of methionine metabolism in the fat body, in turn, affects wing regeneration.

  14. Cu**I Recognition Via Cation-Pi And Methionine Interactions in CusF

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.; Davis, A.V.; Balakrishnan, G.; Stasser, J.P.; Staehlin, B.M.; Focia, P.; Spiro, T.G.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; O'Halloran, T.V.

    2009-05-28

    Methionine-rich motifs have an important role in copper trafficking factors, including the CusF protein. Here we show that CusF uses a new metal recognition site wherein Cu(I) is tetragonally displaced from a Met2His ligand plane toward a conserved tryptophan.

  15. Tissue nonautonomous effects of fat body methionine metabolism on imaginal disc repair in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kashio, Soshiro; Obata, Fumiaki; Zhang, Liu; Katsuyama, Tomonori; Chihara, Takahiro; Miura, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory mechanisms for tissue repair and regeneration within damaged tissue have been extensively studied. However, the systemic regulation of tissue repair remains poorly understood. To elucidate tissue nonautonomous control of repair process, it is essential to induce local damage, independent of genetic manipulations in uninjured parts of the body. Herein, we develop a system in Drosophila for spatiotemporal tissue injury using a temperature-sensitive form of diphtheria toxin A domain driven by the Q system to study factors contributing to imaginal disc repair. Using this technique, we demonstrate that methionine metabolism in the fat body, a counterpart of mammalian liver and adipose tissue, supports the repair processes of wing discs. Local injury to wing discs decreases methionine and S-adenosylmethionine, whereas it increases S-adenosylhomocysteine in the fat body. Fat body-specific genetic manipulation of methionine metabolism results in defective disc repair but does not affect normal wing development. Our data indicate the contribution of tissue interactions to tissue repair in Drosophila, as local damage to wing discs influences fat body metabolism, and proper control of methionine metabolism in the fat body, in turn, affects wing regeneration. PMID:26831070

  16. Convergent signaling pathways – interaction between methionine oxidation and serine/threonine/tyrosine O-phosphorylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidation of Methionine (Met) to Met sulfoxide (MetSO) is a frequently found reversible post-translational modification. It has been presumed that the major functional role for oxidation-labile Met residues is to protect proteins/cells from oxidative stress. However, Met oxidation has been establi...

  17. Toward an era of utilizing methionine overproducing hosts for recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Veeravalli, Karthik; Laird, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid sequence variants, especially variants containing non-canonical amino acids such as norleucine and norvaline, are a concern during therapeutic protein production in microbial systems. Substitution of methionine residues with norleucine in recombinant proteins produced in Escherichia coli is well known. Continuous feeding of amino acids such as methionine is commonly used in E. coli fermentation processes to control incorporation of norleucine in the recombinant protein. There are several disadvantages associated with continuous feeding during a fermentation process. For example, a continuous feed increases the operational complexity and cost of a manufacturing process and results in dilution of culture medium which could result in lower cell densities and product yields. To overcome the limitations of existing approaches to prevent norleucine incorporation during E. coli fermentations, a new approach using an engineered host was developed that overproduces methionine in the cell to prevent norleucine incorporation without negatively impacting fermentation process performance and product yields. In this commentary, the results on using methionine overproducing hosts for recombinant protein production in E. coli and some "watch outs" when using these hosts for recombinant protein production are discussed.

  18. Methionine-choline deprivation alters liver and brain acetylcholinesterase activity in C57BL6 mice.

    PubMed

    Vučević, Danijela B; Cerović, Ivana B; Mladenović, Dušan R; Vesković, Milena N; Stevanović, Ivana; Jorgačević, Bojan Z; Ješić Vukićević, Rada; Radosavljević, Tatjana S

    2016-07-01

    Choline and methionine are precursors of acetylcholine, whose hydrolysis is catalyzed by acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Considering the possibility of their common deficiency, we investigated the influence of methionine-choline deprivation on AChE activity in liver and various brain regions (hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebral cortex and striatum) in mice fed with methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet. Male C57BL/6 mice (n = 28) were randomly and equally divided into following groups: control group fed with standard diet for 6 weeks (C) and groups fed with MCD diet for 2 weeks (MCD2), 4 weeks (MCD4) and for 6 weeks (MCD6). After the diet, mice were sacrificied and AChE activity in liver and brain was determined spectrophotometrically. Hepatic AChE activity was higher in MCD2, MCD4 and MCD6 compared to control (p < 0.01), with most prominent increase in MCD6. AChE activity in hypothalamus was higher in MCD4 and MCD6 vs. control (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively), as well as in MCD6 compared to MCD4 (p < 0.01). In hippocampus, increase in AChE activity was shown in MCD6 compared to control (p < 0.01). In cortex and striatum, increase in AChE activity was noted in MCD6 compared to control (p < 0.05). Our findings indicate the increase of hepatic and brain AChE activity in mice caused by methionine-choline deprivation.

  19. Toward an era of utilizing methionine overproducing hosts for recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Veeravalli, Karthik; Laird, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid sequence variants, especially variants containing non-canonical amino acids such as norleucine and norvaline, are a concern during therapeutic protein production in microbial systems. Substitution of methionine residues with norleucine in recombinant proteins produced in Escherichia coli is well known. Continuous feeding of amino acids such as methionine is commonly used in E. coli fermentation processes to control incorporation of norleucine in the recombinant protein. There are several disadvantages associated with continuous feeding during a fermentation process. For example, a continuous feed increases the operational complexity and cost of a manufacturing process and results in dilution of culture medium which could result in lower cell densities and product yields. To overcome the limitations of existing approaches to prevent norleucine incorporation during E. coli fermentations, a new approach using an engineered host was developed that overproduces methionine in the cell to prevent norleucine incorporation without negatively impacting fermentation process performance and product yields. In this commentary, the results on using methionine overproducing hosts for recombinant protein production in E. coli and some “watch outs” when using these hosts for recombinant protein production are discussed. PMID:25801611

  20. The Protein Oxidation Repair Enzyme Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A Modulates Aβ Aggregation and Toxicity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Minniti, Alicia N.; Arrazola, Macarena S.; Bravo-Zehnder, Marcela; Ramos, Francisca; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: To examine the role of the enzyme methionine sulfoxide reductase A-1 (MSRA-1) in amyloid-β peptide (Aβ)-peptide aggregation and toxicity in vivo, using a Caenorhabditis elegans model of the human amyloidogenic disease inclusion body myositis. Results: MSRA-1 specifically reduces oxidized methionines in proteins. Therefore, a deletion of the msra-1 gene was introduced into transgenic C. elegans worms that express the Aβ-peptide in muscle cells to prevent the reduction of oxidized methionines in proteins. In a constitutive transgenic Aβ strain that lacks MSRA-1, the number of amyloid aggregates decreases while the number of oligomeric Aβ species increases. These results correlate with enhanced synaptic dysfunction and mislocalization of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ACR-16 at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Innovation: This approach aims at modulating the oxidation of Aβ in vivo indirectly by dismantling the methionine sulfoxide repair system. The evidence presented here shows that the absence of MSRA-1 influences Aβ aggregation and aggravates locomotor behavior and NMJ dysfunction. The results suggest that therapies which boost the activity of the Msr system could have a beneficial effect in managing amyloidogenic pathologies. Conclusion: The absence of MSRA-1 modulates Aβ-peptide aggregation and increments its deleterious effects in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 48–62. PMID:24988428

  1. Protective effect of methionine supplementation on arsenic-induced alteration of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sudipta; Chatterjee, Ajay K

    2004-05-01

    Short term exposure of arsenic produces carbohydrate depletion and hypoglycemia. Dietary deficiency of methionine causes impaired biotransformation of arsenic which has been attributed to the pathogenesis of different diseases induced by arsenic. Accordingly, the effects of methionine supplementation on the altered glucose homeostasis induced by arsenic were studied. Arsenic (as sodium arsenite) treatment (i.p) of male Wistar rats (weighing 80-100 g) at a dose of 5.55 mg kg(-1) body weight (equivalent to 35% LD50) per day for a period of 21 days caused a significant diminution in blood glucose level and fall in liver glycogen and pyruvic acid contents. The free amino acid nitrogen content of liver was elevated while that of kidney was decreased after arsenic treatment. Transaminase activities in liver and kidney were not significantly altered except that glutamate-pyruvate transaminase activity of kidney decreased significantly after arsenic treatment. Methionine supplementation reversed the above changes except decreased liver glycogen due to arsenic treatment. It may be suggested that hypoglycemia with associated decreased glycolytic activity induced by arsenic treatment at the present dose and duration can be partially counteracted by dietary methionine supplementation.

  2. Acceleration of Selenium Volatilization in Seleniferous Agricultural Drainage Sediments Amended With Methionine and Casein.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytoremediation is a potential tool for the management of excessive Se in drainage sediment residing in the San Luis Drain in central California via plant extraction or biological volatilization of Se. This two-year field study in 2004/2005 examined the ability of organic amendments-methionine and ...

  3. Dietary intake of B vitamins and methionine and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Julie K; Severi, Gianluca; Hodge, Allison M; Baglietto, Laura; Hopper, John L; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G

    2013-01-01

    B vitamins are involved in 1-carbon metabolism, which is necessary for DNA replication, DNA repair, and regulation of gene expression. Recent studies suggest inverse associations between folate and vitamin B6 intakes and colorectal cancer risk but associations with other B vitamins and methionine have not been widely studied. After following 14,645 men and 22,467 women for 15 yr on average, we ascertained 910 incident colorectal cancers. Dietary intakes were estimated using a 121-item food frequency questionnaire. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using Cox regression. We found some evidence of a U-shaped relationship between colon cancer risk and vitamin B6 and an inverse U-shaped relationship between rectal cancer risk and B12 (test for the quadratic trend, P = 0.005 and P = 0.0005 respectively). For colon cancer, we observed a reduced risk associated with low methionine/high folate, HR = 0.63 (0.49, 0.80) and an increased risk associated with high methionine/high folate, HR = 1.36 (1.06, 1.74) (P interaction < 0.0001). Our study suggests a U-shaped association between colon cancer risk and vitamin B6 intake and an inverse U-shaped association between rectal cancer risk and vitamin B12. Adequate folate intake might protect against colon cancer risk in those with low methionine intake.

  4. Corynebacterium diphtheriae methionine sulfoxide reductase a exploits a unique mycothiol redox relay mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tossounian, Maria-Armineh; Pedre, Brandán; Wahni, Khadija; Erdogan, Huriye; Vertommen, Didier; Van Molle, Inge; Messens, Joris

    2015-05-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductases are conserved enzymes that reduce oxidized methionines in proteins and play a pivotal role in cellular redox signaling. We have unraveled the redox relay mechanisms of methionine sulfoxide reductase A of the pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae (Cd-MsrA) and shown that this enzyme is coupled to two independent redox relay pathways. Steady-state kinetics combined with mass spectrometry of Cd-MsrA mutants give a view of the essential cysteine residues for catalysis. Cd-MsrA combines a nucleophilic cysteine sulfenylation reaction with an intramolecular disulfide bond cascade linked to the thioredoxin pathway. Within this cascade, the oxidative equivalents are transferred to the surface of the protein while releasing the reduced substrate. Alternatively, MsrA catalyzes methionine sulfoxide reduction linked to the mycothiol/mycoredoxin-1 pathway. After the nucleophilic cysteine sulfenylation reaction, MsrA forms a mixed disulfide with mycothiol, which is transferred via a thiol disulfide relay mechanism to a second cysteine for reduction by mycoredoxin-1. With x-ray crystallography, we visualize two essential intermediates of the thioredoxin relay mechanism and a cacodylate molecule mimicking the substrate interactions in the active site. The interplay of both redox pathways in redox signaling regulation forms the basis for further research into the oxidative stress response of this pathogen.

  5. Overexpression of methionine-R-sulfoxide reductases has no influence on fruit fly aging

    PubMed Central

    Shchedrina, Valentina A.; Vorbrüggen, Gerd; Cheon Lee, Byung; Kim, Hwa-Young; Kabil, Hadise; Harshman, Lawrence G.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2009-01-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) are enzymes that repair oxidized methionine residues in proteins. This function implicated Msrs in antioxidant defense and the regulation of aging. There are two known Msr types in animals: MsrA specific for the reduction of methionine-S-sulfoxide, and MsrB that catalyzes the reduction of methionine-R-sulfoxide. In a previous study, overexpression of MsrA in the nervous system of Drosophila was found to extend lifespan by 70%. Overexpression of MsrA in yeast also extended lifespan, whereas MsrB overexpression did so only under calorie restriction conditions. The effect of MsrB overexpression on lifespan has not yet been characterized in any animal model systems. Here, the GAL4-UAS binary system was used to drive overexpression of cytosolic Drosophila MsrB and mitochondrial mouse MsrB2 in whole body, fatbody, and the nervous system of flies. In contrast to MsrA, MsrB overexpression had no consistent effect on the lifespan of fruit flies on both corn meal and sugar yeast diets. Physical activity, fecundity, and stress resistance were also similar in MsrB-overexpressing and control flies. Thus, MsrA and MsrB, the two proteins with identical function in antioxidant protein repair, have different effects on aging in fruit flies. PMID:19409408

  6. Methionine as a potential precursor for halogenated compounds by the reaction with iron minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubbesing, C.; Krause, T.; Mulder, I.; Kotte, K.; Schöler, H. F.

    2012-04-01

    Volatile halogenated compounds (VOX) play an important role in different photochemical reactions within the troposphere and the stratosphere. Soils and sediments seem to act as a major natural source for VOX, but investigations of the reaction mechanisms are rather scarce. To get further information on potential intermediates the reaction of the amino acid methionine with the ferrous and ferric iron minerals pyrite and ferrihydrite as well as solute ferrous sulfate was studied using a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Methionine is an important amino acid in the biosynthesis of plants used as a starting compound for the messenger ethene with aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid as an intermediate product. This pathway may also occur under abiotic conditions. Ethene is assumed as precursor for various halogenated C2-compounds like vinyl chloride and dichloroethene. Due to its ubiquity by an average concentration of 10 to 290 ng/g soil and its potential to regenerate in soils and organic litter by microorganisms, methionine may be an important educt for both abiotic and biotic terrestrial halogenation processes. In laboratory tests methionine was exposed to different iron species like pyrite, iron sulfate or ferrihydrite. The oxidant H2O2 was used to start the reaction. Production values of methyl chloride and other halogenated compounds are discussed in the context of methionine as their potential precursor and several Fe-minerals as soil-borne catalysers. Several possible intermediates for the production of VOX have been detected e.g. methane, ethene or propane. A formation of isobutylene is noteworthy for some cases. In addition to VOC the production of methyl chloride and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was observed. Only the DMS bears upon a specific mineral. The samples containing pyrite reveal the highest concentrations. To get a better assessment of methionine, respectively VOC released from methionine as precursors for halogenated compounds

  7. Influence of methionine oxidation on the aggregation of recombinant human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Mulinacci, Filippo; Poirier, Emilie; Capelle, Martinus A H; Gurny, Robert; Arvinte, Tudor

    2013-09-01

    Oxidation of methionine (Met) residues is one of the major chemical degradations of therapeutic proteins. This chemical degradation can occur at various stages during production and storage of a biotherapeutic drug. During the oxidation process, the side chain of methionine residue undergoes a chemical modification, with the thioether group substituted by a sulfoxide group. In previous papers, we showed that oxidation of the two most accessible methionine residues of recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH), Met¹⁴ and Met¹²⁵, has no influence on the conformation of the protein [1]. However, the oxidized r-hGH is less thermally stable than the native protein [2]. In the current work, the consequences of the oxidation of these two methionine residues on the aggregation of r-hGH were investigated. The aggregation properties and kinetics of the native and oxidized r-hGH were measured in different buffers with both spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. Stabilities of oxidized and non-oxidized r-hGH were studied after storage at 37°C and freeze/thawing cycles. Methionine oxidation influenced the aggregation properties of r-hGH. In accelerated stability studies at 37°C, oxidized hormone aggregated more and faster than non-oxidized hormone. In freezing/thawing stability studies, it was found that oxidized r-hGH was less stable than its non-oxidized counterpart. In case of hGH, we have shown that chemical degradations such as oxidation can affect its physical stability and can induce aggregation.

  8. [PET using 11C-methionine in recognition of pseudoprogression in cerebral glioma after combined treatment].

    PubMed

    Skvortsova, T Yu; Brodskaya, Z L; Gurchin, A F

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the value of PET using 11C-methionine (PET-Met) for distinction between true glioma progression and pseudoprogression (PsPr). 72 patients with treated cerebral glioma investigated by PET-Met were identified from prospective database. Entry criteria included new or progressive MR imaging enhancing lesions within first 6 months after irradiation and definite final diagnosis on the basis of the pathological study (n=17) or clinical-radiological follow-up on an average 16 months. PET examinations were assessed by visual inspection and calculating 11C-methionine uptake index (UI). Results. Pseudoprogression was defined as early radiological progression with subsequent regress or stabilization, without salvage therapy. 42 patients were considered to exhibit PsPr and 30 patients had true glioma progression. In PsPr group PET scans were either negative (n=6) or slightly increased tracer uptake (UI range 1.2-2.14) was seen in the site of contrast-enhanced lesion. The UI was 1.48±0.39 (mean±SD). In comparison with pretreatment PET 15 patients showed decrease 11C-methionine uptake on an average by 26%. In recurrence group PET-Met showed abnormal high focal 11C-methionine uptake in the lesion. The UI was 2.54±0.84 (range 1.54-5.4). An UI threshold value of greater than 1.9 optimized differentiation between glioma progression and PsPr with sensitivity of 83.5% and specificity of 97.0%. Conclusion. Metabolic characteristics of PsPr included negative tracer accumulation or slightly increased 11C-methionine uptake in the contrast-enhancing lesion with UI less than 1.9.

  9. Gender differences in methionine accumulation and metabolism in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes: Potential roles in toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Dever, Joseph T.; Elfarra, Adnan A.

    2009-05-01

    L-Methionine (Met) is hepatotoxic at high concentrations. Because Met toxicity in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes is gender-dependent, the goal of this study was to assess the roles of Met accumulation and metabolism in the increased sensitivity of male hepatocytes to Met toxicity compared with female hepatocytes. Male hepatocytes incubated with Met (30 mM) at 37 {sup o}C exhibited higher levels of intracellular Met at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 h, respectively, compared to female hepatocytes. Conversely, female hepatocytes had higher levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine compared to male hepatocytes. Female hepatocytes also exhibited higher L-methionine-L-sulfoxide levels relative to control hepatocytes, whereas the increases in L-methionine-D-sulfoxide (Met-D-O) levels were similar in hepatocytes of both genders. Addition of aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), an inhibitor of Met transamination, significantly increased Met levels at 1.5 h and increased Met-D-O levels at 1.0 and 1.5 h only in Met-exposed male hepatocytes. No gender differences in cytosolic Met transamination activity by glutamine transaminase K were detected. However, female mouse liver cytosol exhibited higher methionine-DL-sulfoxide (MetO) reductase activity than male mouse liver cytosol at low (0.25 and 0.5 mM) MetO concentrations. Collectively, these results suggest that increased cellular Met accumulation, decreased Met transmethylation, and increased Met and MetO transamination in male mouse hepatocytes may be contributing to the higher sensitivity of the male mouse hepatocytes to Met toxicity in comparison with female mouse hepatocytes.

  10. Kinetic evidence for separate systems in transport of D- and L-methionine by rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Brachet, P.; Alvarado, F.; Puigserver, A.

    1987-03-01

    The kinetics of D- and L-methionine uptake by rings of everted intestine in vitro are consistent with a saturable Michaelis-Menten component plus a linear, diffusional one. All the data could be fit with a diffusion constant, which was essentially the same, independent of whether it was estimated by iteration or by using the extracellular marker, (/sup 3/H), inulin. Similar results were obtained from in vivo perfusion experiments, except that the diffusional term was negligible. D-(3,4-/sup 14/C)Methionine was found to inhibit L-methionine uptake by intestinal rings according to fully noncompetitive kinetics. Another set of experiments with jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles showed that D-methionine uptake is dependent on a Na/sup +/ gradient and is significantly inhibited by L-(/sup 35/S) methionine and L-prolie, but not by ..beta..-alanine and ..cap alpha..-methylaminoisobutyric acid. The results indicate that, in rat jejunum, D-methionine is taken up through a Na/sup +/-dependent pathway distinct from the neutral amino acid (L-methionine) carrier and from the amino acid (L-proline,..cap alpha..-methylaminoisobutyric acid, ..beta..-alanine) carrier.

  11. Antitumor effect of methionine-depleting total parenteral nutrition with doxorubicin administration on Yoshida sarcoma-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Goseki, N; Yamazaki, S; Endo, M; Onodera, T; Kosaki, G; Hibino, Y; Kuwahata, T

    1992-04-01

    Methionine-depleting total parenteral nutrition (methionine-depleting TPN), which infuses an amino acid solution devoid of L-methionine and L-cysteine as the sole protein source, showed enhancement of the effect of several anti-cancer agents. In this study, the combined effect of the methionine-depleting TPN with the administration of doxorubicin was examined in Yoshida sarcoma (YS)-bearing rats with regard to effects on the primary tumor growth, the extension of metastasis, and the host animal's life span. In the first experiment, immediately after receiving methionine-depleting TPN for 8 days, the animals were killed. Pathologic findings evaluated tumor growth in the implanted site and extension of the metastasis. In the second experiment, the survival period was determined after animals received methionine-depleting TPN for 10 days, with subsequent oral feeding until they died naturally. Proliferation of YS was markedly suppressed. In particular, hematogenous metastasis, which is a characteristic of YS, was suppressed, and a longer survival period (42.7 +/- 15.6 days, mean +/- SD) was attained in rats in the group treated with the methionine-depleting TPN combined with the administration of doxorubicin.

  12. Methionine sulfoxide profiling of milk proteins to assess the influence of lipids on protein oxidation in milk.

    PubMed

    Wüst, Johannes; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2016-06-15

    Thermal treatment of milk and milk products leads to protein oxidation, mainly the formation of methionine sulfoxide. Reactive oxygen species, responsible for the oxidation, can be generated by Maillard reaction, autoxidation of sugars, or lipid peroxidation. The present study investigated the influence of milk fat on methionine oxidation in milk. For this purpose, quantitative methionine sulfoxide profiling of all ten methionine residues of β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, and αs1-casein was carried out by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry with scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS-sMRM). Analysis of defatted and regular raw milk samples after heating for up to 8 min at 120 °C and analysis of ultrahigh-temperature milk samples with 0.1%, 1.5%, and 3.5% fat revealed that methionine oxidation of the five residues of the whey proteins and of residues M 123, M 135, and M 196 of αs1-casein was not affected or even suppressed in the presence of milk fat. Only the oxidation of residues M 54 and M 60 of αs1-casein was promoted by lipids. In evaporated milk samples, formation of methionine sulfoxide was hardly influenced by the fat content of the samples. Thus, it can be concluded that lipid oxidation products are not the major cause of methionine oxidation in milk.

  13. Comprehensive Profiling of Amino Acid Response Uncovers Unique Methionine-Deprived Response Dependent on Intact Creatine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaohu; Keenan, Melissa M.; Wu, Jianli; Lin, Chih-An; Dubois, Laura; Thompson, J. Will; Freedland, Stephen J.; Murphy, Susan K.; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2015-01-01

    Besides being building blocks for protein synthesis, amino acids serve a wide variety of cellular functions, including acting as metabolic intermediates for ATP generation and for redox homeostasis. Upon amino acid deprivation, free uncharged tRNAs trigger GCN2-ATF4 to mediate the well-characterized transcriptional amino acid response (AAR). However, it is not clear whether the deprivation of different individual amino acids triggers identical or distinct AARs. Here, we characterized the global transcriptional response upon deprivation of one amino acid at a time. With the exception of glycine, which was not required for the proliferation of MCF7 cells, we found that the deprivation of most amino acids triggered a shared transcriptional response that included the activation of ATF4, p53 and TXNIP. However, there was also significant heterogeneity among different individual AARs. The most dramatic transcriptional response was triggered by methionine deprivation, which activated an extensive and unique response in different cell types. We uncovered that the specific methionine-deprived transcriptional response required creatine biosynthesis. This dependency on creatine biosynthesis was caused by the consumption of S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) during creatine biosynthesis that helps to deplete SAM under methionine deprivation and reduces histone methylations. As such, the simultaneous deprivation of methionine and sources of creatine biosynthesis (either arginine or glycine) abolished the reduction of histone methylation and the methionine-specific transcriptional response. Arginine-derived ornithine was also required for the complete induction of the methionine-deprived specific gene response. Collectively, our data identify a previously unknown set of heterogeneous amino acid responses and reveal a distinct methionine-deprived transcriptional response that results from the crosstalk of arginine, glycine and methionine metabolism via arginine

  14. Comprehensive profiling of amino acid response uncovers unique methionine-deprived response dependent on intact creatine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaohu; Keenan, Melissa M; Wu, Jianli; Lin, Chih-An; Dubois, Laura; Thompson, J Will; Freedland, Stephen J; Murphy, Susan K; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2015-04-01

    Besides being building blocks for protein synthesis, amino acids serve a wide variety of cellular functions, including acting as metabolic intermediates for ATP generation and for redox homeostasis. Upon amino acid deprivation, free uncharged tRNAs trigger GCN2-ATF4 to mediate the well-characterized transcriptional amino acid response (AAR). However, it is not clear whether the deprivation of different individual amino acids triggers identical or distinct AARs. Here, we characterized the global transcriptional response upon deprivation of one amino acid at a time. With the exception of glycine, which was not required for the proliferation of MCF7 cells, we found that the deprivation of most amino acids triggered a shared transcriptional response that included the activation of ATF4, p53 and TXNIP. However, there was also significant heterogeneity among different individual AARs. The most dramatic transcriptional response was triggered by methionine deprivation, which activated an extensive and unique response in different cell types. We uncovered that the specific methionine-deprived transcriptional response required creatine biosynthesis. This dependency on creatine biosynthesis was caused by the consumption of S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) during creatine biosynthesis that helps to deplete SAM under methionine deprivation and reduces histone methylations. As such, the simultaneous deprivation of methionine and sources of creatine biosynthesis (either arginine or glycine) abolished the reduction of histone methylation and the methionine-specific transcriptional response. Arginine-derived ornithine was also required for the complete induction of the methionine-deprived specific gene response. Collectively, our data identify a previously unknown set of heterogeneous amino acid responses and reveal a distinct methionine-deprived transcriptional response that results from the crosstalk of arginine, glycine and methionine metabolism via arginine

  15. The Methionine Transamination Pathway Controls Hepatic Glucose Metabolism through Regulation of the GCN5 Acetyltransferase and the PGC-1α Transcriptional Coactivator.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Clint D J; Sharabi, Kfir; Dominy, John E; Lee, Yoonjin; Isasa, Marta; Orozco, Jose M; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Griffin, Patrick R; Gygi, Steven P; Puigserver, Pere

    2016-05-13

    Methionine is an essential sulfur amino acid that is engaged in key cellular functions such as protein synthesis and is a precursor for critical metabolites involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis. In mammals, in response to nutrient conditions, the liver plays a significant role in regulating methionine concentrations by altering its flux through the transmethylation, transsulfuration, and transamination metabolic pathways. A comprehensive understanding of how hepatic methionine metabolism intersects with other regulatory nutrient signaling and transcriptional events is, however, lacking. Here, we show that methionine and derived-sulfur metabolites in the transamination pathway activate the GCN5 acetyltransferase promoting acetylation of the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α to control hepatic gluconeogenesis. Methionine was the only essential amino acid that rapidly induced PGC-1α acetylation through activating the GCN5 acetyltransferase. Experiments employing metabolic pathway intermediates revealed that methionine transamination, and not the transmethylation or transsulfuration pathways, contributed to methionine-induced PGC-1α acetylation. Moreover, aminooxyacetic acid, a transaminase inhibitor, was able to potently suppress PGC-1α acetylation stimulated by methionine, which was accompanied by predicted alterations in PGC-1α-mediated gluconeogenic gene expression and glucose production in primary murine hepatocytes. Methionine administration in mice likewise induced hepatic PGC-1α acetylation, suppressed the gluconeogenic gene program, and lowered glycemia, indicating that a similar phenomenon occurs in vivo These results highlight a communication between methionine metabolism and PGC-1α-mediated hepatic gluconeogenesis, suggesting that influencing methionine metabolic flux has the potential to be therapeutically exploited for diabetes treatment.

  16. The importance of transmethylation reactions to methionine metabolism in sheep: effects of supplementation with creatine and choline.

    PubMed

    Lobley, G E; Connell, A; Revell, D

    1996-01-01

    The influence of administering the methylated products choline and creatine on methionine irreversible-loss rate (ILR) and recycling from homocysteine has been investigated in sheep fed close to energy and N equilibrium. Two methods to estimate methionine recycling were compared. The first involved [U-13C]methionine infused as part of a labelled amino acid mixture obtained from hydrolysed algal protein. In this approach the isotope dilution of methionine with all five C atoms labelled (m + 5) will represent the ILR which does not recycle through homocysteine, while that which includes molecules with C-1-C-4 labelled will allow for loss of the labelled methyl (5)-C atom and replacement by an unlabelled moiety in the remethylation of homocysteine. The second method involved a combined infusion of [1-13C]- and [S-methyl-2H3]methionine. These two approaches gave similar data for methionine ILR which does not include label recycled to the amino acid from homocysteine but differed for recycled methionine fluxes. Consequently the two procedures differed in the calculated extent of homocysteine methylation under control conditions (6 v. 28%). These extents of remethylation are within the range observed for the fed human subject, despite the fact that fewer dietary methyl groups are available for the ruminant. Using combined data from the infusions, significant depression of methionine recycling occurred in blood (P < 0.05), with a similar trend for plasma (P = 0.077), when choline plus creatine were infused. Wool growth, assessed by intradermal injection of [35S]cysteine, was not altered by supplementation with the methylated products. From changes in the label pattern of free methionine in aortal, hepatic portal and hepatic venous blood during U-13C-labelled algal hydrolysate infusion, the major sites of homocysteine remethylation appear to be the portal-drained viscera and the liver. This was confirmed by analysis of free methionine enrichments in various tissues

  17. Bio-efficacy comparison of herbal-methionine and DL-methionine based on performance and blood parameters of broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Hadinia, Sheila; Shivazad, Mahmood; Moravej, Hossein; Alahyari-Shahrasb, Majid; Nabi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the bio-efficacy of herbal methionine (H-Met) relative to DL-methionine (DL-Met) on 160 “Ross 308” broiler chickens. DL-Met and H-Met were added to the basal diet in eight experimental treatments with three and four concentrations respectively in starter, grower and finisher period. Blood parameters which were measured at 24 and 42 days of age consisted of: serum proteins (total protein, albumin and globulin), serum uric acid, serum fats (low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein, triglyceride and cholesterol) and serum enzymes (alanine amino transaminase and aspartate amino transaminase). Completely randomized design, multi-exponential and multilinear regressions were used to determine bio-efficacy of H-Met in terms of performance and blood parameters of broilers. The results showed that supplemented methionine (Met) sources had no significant effect on blood parameters at 24 day of age. At 42 day of age the amounts of globulin and serum high density lipoprotein (HDL) increased with supplemented Met, (p < 0.05). Regression analysis revealed that H-Met was 55.00, 71.00, 78.00, 47.00, 58.00 and 73.00% as efficacious as DL-Met for body weight gain, feed intake, feed conversion ratio, albumin, globulin and high density lipoprotein criteria, respectively. The average of bio-efficacy of H-Met compared to DL-Met was 67.00% and 59.00% on average across performance criteria and blood criteria respectively and was 63.00% across these two criteria tested. The results of the present study indicated that H-Met can be administered as a new and a natural source of Met in poultry industry. PMID:25568699

  18. A Methionine Deficient Diet Enhances Adipose Tissue Lipid Metabolism and Alters Anti-Oxidant Pathways in Young Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Rosa; Perruchot, Marie-Hélène; Conde-Aguilera, José Alberto; van Milgen, Jaap; Collin, Anne; Tesseraud, Sophie; Mercier, Yves; Gondret, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Methionine is a rate-limiting amino-acid for protein synthesis but non-proteinogenic roles on lipid metabolism and oxidative stress have been demonstrated. Contrary to rodents where a dietary methionine deficiency led to a lower adiposity, an increased lipid accretion rate has been reported in growing pigs fed a methionine deficient diet. This study aimed to clarify the effects of a dietary methionine deficiency on different aspects of tissue lipid metabolism and anti-oxidant pathways in young pigs. Post-weaned pigs (9.8 kg initial body weight) were restrictively-fed diets providing either an adequate (CTRL) or a deficient methionine supply (MD) during 10 days (n=6 per group). At the end of the feeding trial, pigs fed the MD diet had higher lipid content in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Expression levels of genes involved in glucose uptake, lipogenesis but also lipolysis, and activities of NADPH enzyme suppliers were generally higher in subcutaneous and perirenal adipose tissues of MD pigs, suggesting an increased lipid turnover in those pigs. Activities of the anti-oxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase were increased in adipose tissues and muscle of MD pigs. Expression level and activity of the glutathione peroxidase were also higher in liver of MD pigs, but hepatic contents in the reduced and oxidized forms of glutathione and glutathione reductase activity were lower compared with control pigs. In plasma, superoxide dismutase activity was higher but total anti-oxidant power was lower in MD pigs. These results show that a dietary methionine deficiency resulted in increased levels of lipogenesis and lipolytic indicators in porcine adipose tissues. Decreased glutathione content in the liver and coordinated increase of enzymatic antioxidant activities in adipose tissues altered the cellular redox status of young pigs fed a methionine-deficient diet. These findings illustrate that a rapidly growing animal differently adapts tissue

  19. A Methionine Deficient Diet Enhances Adipose Tissue Lipid Metabolism and Alters Anti-Oxidant Pathways in Young Growing Pigs.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Rosa; Perruchot, Marie-Hélène; Conde-Aguilera, José Alberto; van Milgen, Jaap; Collin, Anne; Tesseraud, Sophie; Mercier, Yves; Gondret, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Methionine is a rate-limiting amino-acid for protein synthesis but non-proteinogenic roles on lipid metabolism and oxidative stress have been demonstrated. Contrary to rodents where a dietary methionine deficiency led to a lower adiposity, an increased lipid accretion rate has been reported in growing pigs fed a methionine deficient diet. This study aimed to clarify the effects of a dietary methionine deficiency on different aspects of tissue lipid metabolism and anti-oxidant pathways in young pigs. Post-weaned pigs (9.8 kg initial body weight) were restrictively-fed diets providing either an adequate (CTRL) or a deficient methionine supply (MD) during 10 days (n=6 per group). At the end of the feeding trial, pigs fed the MD diet had higher lipid content in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Expression levels of genes involved in glucose uptake, lipogenesis but also lipolysis, and activities of NADPH enzyme suppliers were generally higher in subcutaneous and perirenal adipose tissues of MD pigs, suggesting an increased lipid turnover in those pigs. Activities of the anti-oxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase were increased in adipose tissues and muscle of MD pigs. Expression level and activity of the glutathione peroxidase were also higher in liver of MD pigs, but hepatic contents in the reduced and oxidized forms of glutathione and glutathione reductase activity were lower compared with control pigs. In plasma, superoxide dismutase activity was higher but total anti-oxidant power was lower in MD pigs. These results show that a dietary methionine deficiency resulted in increased levels of lipogenesis and lipolytic indicators in porcine adipose tissues. Decreased glutathione content in the liver and coordinated increase of enzymatic antioxidant activities in adipose tissues altered the cellular redox status of young pigs fed a methionine-deficient diet. These findings illustrate that a rapidly growing animal differently adapts tissue

  20. Effects of methionine supplementation on the expression of oxidative stress-related genes in acute heat stress-exposed broilers.

    PubMed

    Del Vesco, Ana Paula; Gasparino, Eliane; Grieser, Daiane de Oliveira; Zancanela, Vittor; Soares, Maria Amélia Menck; Neto, Adhemar Rodrigues de Oliveira

    2015-02-28

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of heat stress (HS) and methionine supplementation on the markers of stress and on the gene expression levels of uncoupling proteins (UCP), betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), glutathione synthetase (GSS) and glutathione peroxidase 7 (GPx7). Broilers from 1 to 21 d and from 22 to 42 d of age were divided into three treatment groups related to methionine supplementation: without methionine supplementation (MD); recommended level of methionine supplementation (DL1); excess methionine supplementation (DL2). The broilers were either kept at a comfortable thermal temperature or exposed to HS (38°C for 24 h). During the starter period, we observed the effects of the interaction between diet and environment on the gene expression levels of UCP, BHMT and GSS. Higher gene expression levels of UCP and BHMT were observed in broilers that were maintained at thermal comfort conditions and received the MD diet. HS broilers fed the DL1 and DL2 diets had the highest expression level of GSS. The expression levels of the CBS and GPx7 genes were influenced by both the environment and methionine supplementation. During the grower period, the gene expression levels of BHMT, CBS, GSS and GPx7 were affected by the diet × environment interaction. A higher expression level of BHMT was observed in broilers maintained at thermal comfort conditions and on the MD diet. HS induced higher expression levels of CBS, GSS and GPx7 in broilers that received the DL1 and DL2 diets. The present results suggest that under HS conditions, methionine supplementation could mitigate the effects of stress, since methionine contributed to the increased expression levels of genes related to antioxidant activity.

  1. Anti-tumor effect of L-methionine-deprived total parenteral nutrition with 5-fluorouracil administration on Yoshida sarcoma-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Goseki, N; Endo, M; Onodera, T; Kosaki, G

    1991-07-01

    L-methionine-deprived total parenteral nutrition (methionine-deprived TPN), infusing amino acid solution devoid of L-methionine and L-cysteine by the method of TPN as an only protein source, showed enhancement of the effect of several anti-cancer agents. In this study the combined effect of the methionine-deprived TPN with administration of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was examined in Yoshida Sarcoma (YS)-bearing rats, from aspects of effects on the tumor metastasis and the host animal's life span, in the following four groups treated with: methionine-deprived TPN with administration of 5-FU, methionine-deprived TPN without administration of 5-FU, L-methionine-contained TPN plus 5-FU, and L-methionine-contained TPN without 5-FU. In the first experiment, TPN was continued for 8 days in the four groups, and the anti-cancer effect of methionine-deprived TPN and administration of 5-FU based on both the growth of the primary tumor at the implanted site and the tumor metastasis was studied from the view point of pathologic findings of animals killed immediately after these treatments. In experiment 2 the survival period was examined after these treatments for 10 days with subsequent oral feeding until death. The results were as follows: proliferation of YS, transplanted subcutaneously, was markedly suppressed; particularly hematogenous metastasis, characteristic in YS, was prominently blunted then obtained an apparent longer survival period in rats treated with the methionine-deprived TPN with administration of 5-FU.

  2. [Optimization of high-cell-density fermentation process for S-adenosyl-L-methionine production].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiepeng; Han, Jinjun; Li, Xiaonan; Liu, Peiyi; Tan, Tianwei

    2009-04-01

    Poor stability existed in the anaphase of the high-cell-density fermentation of Saccharomyces crevisiae for S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) production in 5 L fermentor. To improve the fermentation stability, we studied the addition of diammonium hydrogen phosphate, sodium glutamate and adenosine disodium triphosphate into glucose feeding solution. Study of four fed-batch cultures showed that, after 34 h fermentation, when dry cell weight reached 100 g/L, the addition of 50 g pre-L-methionine and glucose feeding with 10 g/L adenosine disodium triphosphate was optimal for SAM production. Under this condition, after 65.7 h fermentation, both the dry cell weight and the yield of SAM reached the maximum, 180 g/L and 17.1 g/L respectively. PMID:19637627

  3. Aberrant Hepatic Methionine Metabolism and Gene Methylation in the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Alcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Halsted, Charles H.; Medici, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) involves ethanol-induced aberrations in hepatic methionine metabolism that decrease levels of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a compound which regulates the synthesis of the antioxidant glutathione and is the principal methyl donor in the epigenetic regulation of genes relevant to liver injury. The present paper describes the effects of ethanol on the hepatic methionine cycle, followed by evidence for the central role of reduced SAM in the pathogenesis of ASH according to clinical data and experiments in ethanol-fed animals and in cell models. The efficacy of supplemental SAM in the prevention of ASH in animal models and in the clinical treatment of ASH will be discussed. PMID:22007317

  4. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A protects neuronal cells against brief hypoxia/reoxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaieva, Olena; Xu, Rong; Schinstock, Carrie; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2004-02-01

    Hypoxia/reoxygenation induces cellular injury by promoting oxidative stress. Reversible oxidation of methionine in proteins involving the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase type A (MSRA) is postulated to serve a general antioxidant role. Therefore, we examined whether overexpression of MSRA protected cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. Brief hypoxia increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in PC12 cells and promoted apoptotic cell death. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of MSRA significantly diminished the hypoxia-induced increase in ROS and facilitated cell survival. Measurements of the membrane potentials of intact mitochondria in PC12 cells and of isolated rat liver mitochondria showed that hypoxia induced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane. The results demonstrate that MSRA plays a protective role against hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced cell injury and suggest the therapeutic potential of MSRA in ischemic heart and brain disease.

  5. Isolation and primary structure of a methionine- and cystine-rich seed protein of Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Odani, S; Odani, S

    1998-04-01

    A 10-kDa protein was isolated from resting seeds of hemp (Cannabis sativa) by buffer extraction, gel filtration, ion-exchange chromatography, and reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. The protein did not inhibit bovine trypsin. It consisted of subunits composed of 27 and 61 residues and was held together by two disulfide bonds. The complete amino acid sequence was identified by protein analysis, and had 20 mole% of amino acids containing sulfur. The protein was most similar to a methionine-rich protein of Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) and to Mabinlin IV, a sweetness-inducing protein of Capparis masaikai. The high methionine content and the absence of trypsin inhibitory activity suggested that the seed protein can be used to improve the nutritional quality of plant food-stuffs.

  6. Quantitative analysis of the interaction between l-methionine derivative and oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Mota, Élia; Sousa, Fani; Queiroz, João A; Cruz, Carla

    2015-04-01

    This study explores the use of l-methionine derivative as a potential affinity ligand for nucleic acids purification. The l-methionine derivative is synthesized by activation of the carboxylic acid group with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide follow by immobilization on amine sensor surface, previously activated and treated with ethylenediamine. Their affinity towards oligonucleotides has been determined by surface plasmon resonance biosensor. The highest affinity is found for cytosine and thymine, followed by adenine, whereas the lowest affinity is found for guanine. For hetero-oligonucleotides the affinity order is CCCTTT > CCCAAA ≈ AAATTT > GGGTTT, showing that nucleotides with cytosine have the highest affinity, and the presence of guanine reduces the affinity, corroborating with the results obtained with homo-oligonucleotides.

  7. One-pot modification of 5'-capped RNA based on methionine analogs.

    PubMed

    Muttach, Fabian; Rentmeister, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    This paper outlines chemically and enzymatically synthesized S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) analogs and their use in the site-specific modification of RNA by methyltransferases, enabling the facile attachment of clickable moieties to the nucleic acid. We then focus on methodological aspects of setting up a methyltransferase-based enzymatic cascade reaction starting from methionine analogs. This strategy is applied to the one-pot modification of the mRNA cap which is subsequently derivatized in copper-free and copper-catalyzed click reactions. We show that high transfer efficiencies to the cap are obtained using Se-propargyl-, hexenynyl- and azido-bearing methionine analogs. By switching to other methyltransferases our one-pot modification approach should be directly applicable to the regiospecific modification of other target molecules including nucleic acids, proteins and small molecules.

  8. Dietary B vitamin and methionine intakes and lung cancer risk among female never smokers in China

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Yumie; Cai, Qiuyin; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Li, Honglan; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Ji, Bu-Tian; Yang, Gong; Chow, Wong-Ho; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2012-01-01

    Purpose B vitamins and methionine have been postulated to have potential effects on carcinogenesis; however, findings from previous epidemiologic studies on B vitamins, methionine, and lung cancer risk are inconsistent. We investigated associations of dietary intakes of B vitamins (i.e., riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin B12) and methionine with lung cancer risk among female never smokers. Methods The Shanghai Women’s Health Study, a population-based, prospective cohort study, included 74,941 women. During a median follow-up of 11.2 years, 428 incident lung cancer cases accrued among 71,267 women with no history of smoking or cancer at baseline. Baseline dietary intakes were derived from a validated, interviewer-administered food frequency questionnaire. Cancer incidence and vital status were ascertained through annual linkage to the Shanghai Cancer Registry and Shanghai Vital Statistics Registry databases and through biennial in-person follow-ups with participants. Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox regression. Results Dietary riboflavin intake was inversely associated with lung cancer risk (HR = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.43–0.89; P-trend = 0.03 for the highest quartile compared with the lowest). A higher than median intake of methionine was associated with lower risk of lung cancer (HR = 0.78; 95% CI = 0.60–0.99), however, there was no dose-response relation. Intakes of other B vitamins were not associated with lung cancer risk. Conclusions Our study suggests that dietary riboflavin intake may be inversely associated with lung cancer risk among female never smokers, which warrants further investigation. PMID:23065072

  9. Methionine enkephalin is hydrolyzed by aminopeptidase N on CD4+ and CD8+ spleen T cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, B C; Thiele, D L; Hersh, L B; Cottam, G L

    1994-05-15

    Exogenous methionine enkephalin incubated with CD4+ or CD8+ T cells purified from murine spleen is metabolized primarily, if not exclusively, by aminopeptidase N (aminopeptidase M, EC 3.4.11.2), a membrane-anchored ectopeptidase. The enzyme activity is identified by its substrate specificity, sensitivity to inhibition by amastatin, and immunoreactivity with antibody to rat kidney aminopeptidase N. Activation of CD4+ T cells results in a small increase per cell in aminopeptidase N activity.

  10. Genetic Studies of Sulfadiazine-resistant and Methionine-requiring Neisseria Isolated From Clinical Material

    PubMed Central

    Catlin, B. Wesley

    1967-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleate (DNA) preparations were extracted from Neisseria meningitidis (four isolates from spinal fluid and blood) and N. gonorrhoeae strains, all of which were resistant to sulfadiazine upon primary isolation. These DNA preparations, together with others from in vitro mutants of N. meningitidis and N. perflava, were examined in transformation tests by using as recipient a drug-susceptible strain of N. meningitidis (Ne 15 Sul-s Met+) which was able to grow in a methionine-free defined medium. The sulfadiazine resistance typical of each donor was introduced into the uniform constitution of this recipient. Production of p-aminobenzoic acid was not significantly altered thereby. Transformants elicited by DNA from the N. meningitidis clinical isolates were resistant to at least 200 μg of sulfadiazine/ml, and did not show a requirement for methionine (Sul-r Met+). DNA from six strains of N. gonorrhoeae, which were isolated during the period of therapeutic use of sulfonamides, conveyed lower degrees of resistance and, invariably, a concurrent methionine requirement (Sul-r/Met−). The requirement of these transformants, and that of in vitro mutants selected on sulfadiazine-agar, was satisfied by methionine, but not by vitamin B12, homocysteine, cystathionine, homoserine, or cysteine. Sul-r Met+ and Sul-r/Met− loci could coexist in the same genome, but were segregated during transformation. On the other hand, the dual Sul-r/Met− properties were not separated by recombination, but were eliminated together. DNA from various Sul-r/Met− clones tested against recipients having nonidentical Sul-r/Met− mutant sites yielded Sul-s Met+ transformants. The met locus involved is genetically complex, and will be a valuable tool for studies of genetic fine structure of members of Neisseria, and of genetic homology between species. Images PMID:4962305

  11. Reconstruction of Cysteine Biosynthesis Using Engineered Cysteine-Free and Methionine-Free Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Kendrick; Fujishima, Kosuke; Abe, Nozomi; Nakahigashi, Kenji; Endy, Drew; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Ten of the proteinogenic amino acids can be generated abiotically while the remaining thirteen require biology for their synthesis. Paradoxically, the biosynthesis pathways observed in nature require enzymes that are made with the amino acids they produce. For example, Escherichia coli produces cysteine from serine via two enzymes that contain cysteine. Here, we substituted alternate amino acids for cysteine and also methionine, which is biosynthesized from cysteine, in serine acetyl transferase (CysE) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (CysM). CysE function was rescued by cysteine-and-methionine-free enzymes and CysM function was rescued by cysteine-free enzymes. Structural modeling suggests that methionine stabilizes CysM and is present in the active site of CysM. Cysteine is not conserved among CysE and CysM protein orthologs, suggesting that cysteine is not functionally important for its own synthesis. Engineering biosynthetic enzymes that lack the amino acids being synthesized provides insights into the evolution of amino acid biosynthesis and pathways for bioengineering.

  12. Kinetic and spectral parameters of interaction of Citrobacter freundii methionine γ-lyase with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Morozova, E A; Bazhulina, N P; Anufrieva, N V; Mamaeva, D V; Tkachev, Y V; Streltsov, S A; Timofeev, V P; Faleev, N G; Demidkina, T V

    2010-10-01

    Kinetic parameters of Citrobacter freundii methionine γ-lyase were determined with substrates in γ-elimination reactions as well as the inhibition of the enzyme in the γ-elimination of L-methionine by amino acids with different structure. The data indicate an important contribution of the sulfur atom and methylene groups to the efficiency of binding of substrates and inhibitors. The rate constants of the enzyme-catalyzed exchange of C-α- and C-β-protons with deuterium were determined, as well as the kinetic isotope effect of the deuterium label in the C-α-position of inhibitors on the rate of exchange of their β-protons. Neither stereoselectivity in the β-proton exchange nor noticeable α-isotope effect on the exchange rates of β-protons was found. The ionic and tautomeric composition of the external Schiff base of methionine γ-lyase was determined. Spectral characteristics (absorption and circular dichroism spectra) of complexes with substrates and inhibitors were determined. The spectral and kinetic data indicate that deamination of aminocrotonate should be the rate-determining stage of the enzymatic reaction.

  13. Evidence for participation of the methionine sulfoxide reductase repair system in plant seed longevity

    PubMed Central

    Châtelain, Emilie; Satour, Pascale; Laugier, Edith; Ly Vu, Benoit; Payet, Nicole; Rey, Pascal; Montrichard, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Seeds are in a natural oxidative context leading to protein oxidation. Although inevitable for proper progression from maturation to germination, protein oxidation at high levels is detrimental and associated with seed aging. Oxidation of methionine to methionine sulfoxide is a common form of damage observed during aging in all organisms. This damage is reversible through the action of methionine sulfoxide reductases (MSRs), which play key roles in lifespan control in yeast and animal cells. To investigate the relationship between MSR capacity and longevity in plant seeds, we first used two Medicago truncatula genotypes with contrasting seed quality. After characterizing the MSR family in this species, we analyzed gene expression and enzymatic activity in immature and mature seeds exhibiting distinct quality levels. We found a very strong correlation between the initial MSR capacities in different lots of mature seeds of the two genotypes and the time to a drop in viability to 50% after controlled deterioration. We then analyzed seed longevity in Arabidopsis thaliana lines, in which MSR gene expression has been genetically altered, and observed a positive correlation between MSR capacity and longevity in these seeds as well. Based on our data, we propose that the MSR repair system plays a decisive role in the establishment and preservation of longevity in plant seeds. PMID:23401556

  14. Dietary methionine can sustain cytosolic redox homeostasis in the mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Sofi; Prigge, Justin R.; Talago, Emily A.; Arnér, Elias S. J.; Schmidt, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    Across phyla, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) transfers intracellular reducing power to thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) and glutathione reductase (GR), thereby supporting fundamental housekeeping and antioxidant pathways. Here we show that a third, NADPH-independent, pathway can bypass the need for TrxR1 and GR in mammalian liver. Most mice genetically engineered to lack both TrxR1 and GR in all hepatocytes (“TR/GR-null livers”) remain long-term viable. TR/GR-null livers cannot reduce oxidized glutathione disulfide but still require continuous glutathione synthesis. Inhibition of cystathionine gamma-lyase causes rapid necrosis of TR/GR-null livers, indicating that methionine-fueled trans-sulfuration supplies the necessary cysteine precursor for glutathione synthesis via an NADPH-independent pathway. We further show that dietary methionine provides the cytosolic disulfide reducing power and all sulfur amino acids in TR/GR-null livers. Although NADPH is generally considered an essential reducing currency, these results indicate that hepatocytes can adequately sustain cytosolic redox homeostasis pathways using either NADPH or methionine. PMID:25790857

  15. Essential roles of methionine and S-adenosylmethionine in the autarkic lifestyle of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Berney, Michael; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Wong, Ka-Wing; Chen, Bing; Chen, Mei; Kim, John; Wang, Jingxin; Harris, David; Parkhill, Julian; Chan, John; Wang, Feng; Jacobs, William R

    2015-08-11

    Multidrug resistance, strong side effects, and compliance problems in TB chemotherapy mandate new ways to kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here we show that deletion of the gene encoding homoserine transacetylase (metA) inactivates methionine and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) biosynthesis in Mtb and renders this pathogen exquisitely sensitive to killing in immunocompetent or immunocompromised mice, leading to rapid clearance from host tissues. Mtb ΔmetA is unable to proliferate in primary human macrophages, and in vitro starvation leads to extraordinarily rapid killing with no appearance of suppressor mutants. Cell death of Mtb ΔmetA is faster than that of other auxotrophic mutants (i.e., tryptophan, pantothenate, leucine, biotin), suggesting a particularly potent mechanism of killing. Time-course metabolomics showed complete depletion of intracellular methionine and SAM. SAM depletion was consistent with a significant decrease in methylation at the DNA level (measured by single-molecule real-time sequencing) and with the induction of several essential methyltransferases involved in biotin and menaquinone biosynthesis, both of which are vital biological processes and validated targets of antimycobacterial drugs. Mtb ΔmetA could be partially rescued by biotin supplementation, confirming a multitarget cell death mechanism. The work presented here uncovers a previously unidentified vulnerability of Mtb-the incapacity to scavenge intermediates of SAM and methionine biosynthesis from the host. This vulnerability unveils an entirely new drug target space with the promise of rapid killing of the tubercle bacillus by a new mechanism of action.

  16. Nonsense mutation in the regulatory gene ETH2 involved in methionine biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cervisiae.

    PubMed

    Masselot, M; Robichon-Szulmajster, H

    1972-08-01

    Ethionine-resistant mutants, mapping at the locus eth2-the product of which is involved in pleiotropic regulation of methionine biosynthesis-have been isolated in a strain carrying five ochre nonsense mutations. Selection for nonsense suppressors in such a strain led to characterization of several allele-specific but gene non-specific suppressors which are active on the recessive heteroallele eth2-2 (resulting in partial recovery of sensitivity toward ethionine) as well as on the five other suppressible alleles. Two of these suppressors are unlinked to the eth2 gene and either dominant or semi-dominant. It is concluded that the mutation eth2-2 resulted in a nonsense codon. Enzyme studies indicate that this mutation results in a complete absence of an active product of gene eth2, in contrast with the effect of a former mutation eth2-1 which was interpreted as leading to a modified product of this gene (Cherest, Surdin-Kerjan and de Robichon-Szulmajster 1971). This conclusion is based on the absence of repressibility of methionine group I enzymes and the observation that in a heteroallelic diploid, eth2-1 expression is not masked by eth2-2. The nonsense suppressors studied lead to at least partial recovery of repressibility of methionine group I enzymes. All these results support the idea that the product of gene ETH2 is an aporepressor protein. PMID:4560067

  17. Regulation of Hematopoiesis and Methionine Homeostasis by mTORC1 Inhibitor NPRL2.

    PubMed

    Dutchak, Paul A; Laxman, Sunil; Estill, Sandi Jo; Wang, Chensu; Wang, Yun; Wang, Yiguang; Bulut, Gamze B; Gao, Jinming; Huang, Lily J; Tu, Benjamin P

    2015-07-21

    Nitrogen permease regulator-like 2 (NPRL2) is a component of a conserved complex that inhibits mTORC1 (mammalian Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1) in response to amino acid insufficiency. Here, we show that NPRL2 is required for mouse viability and that its absence significantly compromises fetal liver hematopoiesis in developing embryos. Moreover, NPRL2 KO embryos have significantly reduced methionine levels and exhibit phenotypes reminiscent of cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency. Consistent with this idea, NPRL2 KO liver and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) show defective processing of the cobalamin-transport protein transcobalamin 2, along with impaired lysosomal acidification and lysosomal gene expression. NPRL2 KO MEFs exhibit a significant defect in the cobalamin-dependent synthesis of methionine from homocysteine, which can be rescued by supplementation with cyanocobalamin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a role for NPRL2 and mTORC1 in the regulation of lysosomal-dependent cobalamin processing, methionine synthesis, and maintenance of cellular re-methylation potential, which are important during hematopoiesis.

  18. Doxorubicin and vincristine with methionine depletion contributed to survival in the Yoshida sarcoma bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, T; Goseki, N; Endo, M

    1998-01-01

    Several anti-cancer agents show increased toxicity if administered with methionine-depleting total parenteral nutrition (Met-deplete TPN). Changes in the cell cycle due to Met-deplete TPN were investigated, and then the enhancement of the anti-tumor effects of serial combinations of doxorubicin (ADM), a drug acting on late S-G2 phase and vincristine (VCR), an antimitotic drug, under Met-deplete TPN was also examined in the tumor-bearing rats. According to the fraction of labeled mitosis, within 3 to 4 days after the introduction of Met-deplete TPN in the ascites type Yoshida sarcoma (YS) -bearing rats, the cell cycle of the tumor cells showed marked delay and the fraction of labeled mitosis decreased to less than 70%. However, this delay was recovered immediately after methionine infusion, with on increase in the labeled mitotic cell population. In the experiment using solid type YS-bearing rats, ADM was administered intraperitoneally under Met-deplete TPN for 8 days, followed by intraperitoneal VCR administration with methionine-containing TPN for 3 days, and then fed on solid food and water ad libitum until death. This serial combination of Met-deplete TPN with ADM and VCR resulted in marked suppression of the tumor and prolonged survival in comparison to the control groups with a significant difference (p < 0.001) (generalized Wilcoxon test).

  19. Predicting side-chain conformations of methionine using a hard-sphere model with stereochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virrueta, A.; Gaines, J.; O'Hern, C. S.; Regan, L.

    2015-03-01

    Current research in the O'Hern and Regan laboratories focuses on the development of hard-sphere models with stereochemical constraints for protein structure prediction as an alternative to molecular dynamics methods that utilize knowledge-based corrections in their force-fields. Beginning with simple hydrophobic dipeptides like valine, leucine, and isoleucine, we have shown that our model is able to reproduce the side-chain dihedral angle distributions derived from sets of high-resolution protein crystal structures. However, methionine remains an exception - our model yields a chi-3 side-chain dihedral angle distribution that is relatively uniform from 60 to 300 degrees, while the observed distribution displays peaks at 60, 180, and 300 degrees. Our goal is to resolve this discrepancy by considering clashes with neighboring residues, and averaging the reduced distribution of allowable methionine structures taken from a set of crystallized proteins. We will also re-evaluate the electron density maps from which these protein structures are derived to ensure that the methionines and their local environments are correctly modeled. This work will ultimately serve as a tool for computing side-chain entropy and protein stability. A. V. is supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and a Ford Foundation Fellowship. J. G. is supported by NIH training Grant NIH-5T15LM007056-28.

  20. Essential roles of methionine and S-adenosylmethionine in the autarkic lifestyle of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Berney, Michael; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Wong, Ka-Wing; Chen, Bing; Chen, Mei; Kim, John; Wang, Jingxin; Harris, David; Parkhill, Julian; Chan, John; Wang, Feng; Jacobs, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance, strong side effects, and compliance problems in TB chemotherapy mandate new ways to kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here we show that deletion of the gene encoding homoserine transacetylase (metA) inactivates methionine and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) biosynthesis in Mtb and renders this pathogen exquisitely sensitive to killing in immunocompetent or immunocompromised mice, leading to rapid clearance from host tissues. Mtb ΔmetA is unable to proliferate in primary human macrophages, and in vitro starvation leads to extraordinarily rapid killing with no appearance of suppressor mutants. Cell death of Mtb ΔmetA is faster than that of other auxotrophic mutants (i.e., tryptophan, pantothenate, leucine, biotin), suggesting a particularly potent mechanism of killing. Time-course metabolomics showed complete depletion of intracellular methionine and SAM. SAM depletion was consistent with a significant decrease in methylation at the DNA level (measured by single-molecule real-time sequencing) and with the induction of several essential methyltransferases involved in biotin and menaquinone biosynthesis, both of which are vital biological processes and validated targets of antimycobacterial drugs. Mtb ΔmetA could be partially rescued by biotin supplementation, confirming a multitarget cell death mechanism. The work presented here uncovers a previously unidentified vulnerability of Mtb—the incapacity to scavenge intermediates of SAM and methionine biosynthesis from the host. This vulnerability unveils an entirely new drug target space with the promise of rapid killing of the tubercle bacillus by a new mechanism of action. PMID:26221021

  1. The performance of laying hens as affected by copper sulfate and methionine level.

    PubMed

    Christmas, R B; Harms, R H

    1983-02-01

    Two strains of White Leghorn hens were subjected to seven copper treatments that included a negative control for the first week of each of five 28-day periods. The hens were approximately 500 days of age when the experiment began. Copper treatments were assigned to simulate the different levels of copper intake that might result from differences in daily feed intake similar to the practice followed with commercial industry. In order to simulate daily dietary intake ranging from a low of 73 to a high of 136 g per bird, levels of 76, 91, 100, 114, 129, and 143 mg of copper sulfate per kilogram were added to each of the basal diets. Treatments were administered across two methionine levels in a corn-soy basal diet. Hen-day egg production, egg weight, daily feed intake, and feed efficiency values were not affected by dietary levels of copper or methionine. Hens fed diets containing low methionine laid eggs with significantly poorer specific gravity.

  2. New insights on the role of epigenetic alterations in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Frau, Maddalena; Feo, Claudio F; Feo, Francesco; Pascale, Rosa M

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence assigns to epigenetic mechanisms heritable differences in gene function that come into being during cell development or via the effect of environmental factors. Epigenetic deregulation is strongly involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It includes changes in methionine metabolism, promoter hypermethylation, or increased proteasomal degradation of oncosuppressors, as well as posttranscriptional deregulation by microRNA or messenger RNA (mRNA) binding proteins. Alterations in the methylation of the promoter of methyl adenosyltransferase MAT1A and MAT2A genes in HCC result in decreased S-adenosylmethionine levels, global DNA hypomethylation, and deregulation of signal transduction pathways linked to methionine metabolism and methyl adenosyltransferases activity. Changes in S-adenosylmethionine levels may also depend on MAT1A mRNA destabilization associated with MAT2A mRNA stabilization by specific proteins. Decrease in MAT1A expression has also been attributed to miRNA upregulation in HCC. A complex deregulation of miRNAs is also strongly involved in hepatocarcinogenesis, with up-regulation of different miRNAs targeting oncosuppressor genes and down-regulation of miRNAs targeting genes involved in cell-cycle and signal transduction control. Oncosuppressor gene down-regulation in HCC is also induced by promoter hypermethylation or posttranslational deregulation, leading to proteasomal degradation. The role of epigenetic changes in hepatocarcinogenesis has recently suggested new promising therapeutic approaches for HCC on the basis of the administration of methylating agents, inhibition of methyl adenosyltransferases, and restoration of the expression of tumor-suppressor miRNAs. PMID:27508177

  3. Effects of methionine supplementation on the expression of protein deposition-related genes in acute heat stress-exposed broilers.

    PubMed

    Del Vesco, Ana Paula; Gasparino, Eliane; Grieser, Daiane Oliveira; Zancanela, Vittor; Voltolini, Débora Marques; Khatlab, Angélica Souza; Guimarães, Simone Eliza Facioni; Soares, Maria Amélia Menck; Oliveira Neto, Adhemar Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat stress and methionine supplementation on the gene expression of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), growth hormone receptor (GHR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and regulatory 1 (PI3KR1) in the liver, as well as the expression of the atrogin 1 and cathepsin L2 (CTSL2) genes in the breast muscle of broilers. Broilers from 1-21 and 22-42 days of age were divided into three treatments related to methionine supplementation as follows: without methionine supplementation (MD), recommended level of methionine (DL1), and excess supplementation of methionine (DL2). The animals were either maintained at a thermal comfort temperature or exposed to heat stress (HS) (38°C for 24 hours, starting on day 20 or day 41 for experiments 1 and 2, respectively). The heat stress increased the body temperature at both ages. Starter period: The HS animals presented increased plasma creatinine content (P<0.0001) and the highest CTSL2 gene expression (P<0.0001). The methionine supplementation increased the IGF-I (P = 0.0144) and GHR (P = 0.0011) gene expression and decreased the CTSL2 (P = 0.0004) and atrogin 1 (P = 0.0012) gene expression. Grower period: Significant effects for the interaction between supplementation and environment were observed for GHR (P = 0.0252) and CTSL2 (P = 0.0011) gene expression. The highest GHR expression was observed in animals that remained in thermal comfort on the DL2 diet, and the lowest expression occurred in the HS animals fed the MD diet. For CTSL2, the HS animals fed the MD diet presented the highest CTSL2 gene expression, and the lowest expression was observed in the animals maintained at thermal comfort on DL1 and DL2 diets. Only methionine supplementation had effect on atrogin-1 gene expression (P<0.0001), with higher methionine content in the diet lower atrogin-1 gene expression was observed. Our results suggest that heat stress induces greater protein degradation and that methionine

  4. Evaluation of Methionine Content in a High-Fat and Choline-Deficient Diet on Body Weight Gain and the Development of Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Sachina; Sato, Yoko; Itoh, Tatsuki; Umegaki, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    Aim Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a globally recognized liver disease. A methionine- and choline-deficient diet is used to induce NASH in mice; however, this diet also causes severe body weight loss. To resolve this issue, we examined the effects of methionine content in a high-fat and choline-deficient (HFCD) diet on body weight and the development of NASH in mice. Methods C57BL/6J mice (male, 10 weeks of age) were fed an L-amino acid rodent (control) diet, high-fat (HF) diet, or HFCD diet containing various amounts of methionine (0.1–0.6% (w/w)) for 12 weeks. Plasma lipid levels, hepatic lipid content and inflammatory marker gene expression were measured, and a pathological analysis was conducted to evaluate NASH. Results The 0.1% methionine in HFCD diet suppressed body weight gain, which was lower than that with control diet. On the other hand, the 0.2% methionine in HFCD diet yielded similar body weight gains as the control diet, while more than 0.4% methionine showed the same body weight gains as the HF diet. Liver weights and hepatic lipid contents were the greatest with 0.1% methionine and decreased in a methionine dose-dependent manner. Pathological analysis, NAFLD activity scores and gene expression levels in the liver revealed that 0.1% and 0.2% methionine for 12 weeks induced NASH, whereas 0.4% and 0.6% methionine attenuated the induction of NASH by HFCD diet. However, the 0.2% methionine in HFCD diet did not induce insulin resistance, despite the body weight gain. Conclusions The 0.2% methionine in HFCD diet for 12 weeks was able to induce NASH without weight loss. PMID:27723801

  5. Methionine oxidation reduces lag-times for amyloid-β(1-40) fiber formation but generates highly fragmented fibers.

    PubMed

    Gu, Miao; Viles, John H

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress and the formation of amyloid plaques containing amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are two key hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. A proportion of methionine (Met) at position 35 within Aβ is oxidized to methionine sulphoxide (Met(OX)) within the Alzheimer's plaques. These oxidative processes may be the key to understanding the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. In vitro oxidation of Aβ, by the physiological oxidant H2O2, was monitored using (1)H NMR and mass spectrometry. Here we investigate the effect of Aβ methionine oxidation on fiber formation kinetics and morphology using the amyloid specific fluorescence dye Thioflavin T (ThT) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Methionine oxidation reduces the total amount of fibers generated for both dominant forms of Aβ, however there are marked differences in the effect of Met(OX) between Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42). Surprisingly the presence of Met(OX) reduces lag-times for Aβ(1-40) fiber formation but extends lag-times for Aβ(1-42). TEM indicates a change in fiber morphology with a pronounced reduction in fiber length for both methionine oxidized Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42). In contrast, the morphology of preformed amyloid fibers is largely unaffected by the presence of H2O2. Our studies suggest that methionine oxidation promotes highly fragmented fiber assemblies of Aβ. Oxidative stress associated with Alzheimer's disease can cause oxidation of methionine within Aβ and this in turn will influence the complex assembly of Aβ monomer into amyloid fibers, which is likely to impact Aβ toxicity.

  6. Mechanistic and Kinetic Study of Singlet O2 Oxidation of Methionine by On-Line Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangwei; Lu, Wenchao; Yin, Xunlong; Liu, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    We report a reaction apparatus developed to monitor singlet oxygen (1O2) reactions in solution using on-line ESI mass spectrometry and spectroscopy measurements. 1O2 was generated in the gas phase by the reaction of H2O2 with Cl2, detected by its emission at 1270 nm, and bubbled into aqueous solution continuously. 1O2 concentrations in solution were linearly related to the emission intensities of airborne 1O2, and their absolute scales were established based on a calibration using 9,10-anthracene dipropionate dianion as an 1O2 trapping agent. Products from 1O2 oxidation were monitored by UV-Vis absorption and positive/negative ESI mass spectra, and product structures were elucidated using collision-induced dissociation-tandem mass spectrometry. To suppress electrical discharge in negative ESI of aqueous solution, methanol was added to electrospray via in-spray solution mixing using theta-glass ESI emitters. Capitalizing on this apparatus, the reaction of 1O2 with methionine was investigated. We have identified methionine oxidation intermediates and products at different pH, and measured reaction rate constants. 1O2 oxidation of methionine is mediated by persulfoxide in both acidic and basic solutions. Persulfoxide continues to react with another methionine, yielding methionine sulfoxide as end-product albeit with a much lower reaction rate in basic solution. Density functional theory was used to explore reaction potential energy surfaces and establish kinetic models, with solvation effects simulated using the polarized continuum model. Combined with our previous study of gas-phase methionine ions with 1O2, evolution of methionine oxidation pathways at different ionization states and in different media is described.

  7. Regulation of Protein Function by Reversible Methionine Oxidation and the Role of Selenoprotein MsrB1

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Alaattin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Protein structure and function can be regulated via post-translational modifications by numerous enzymatic and nonenzymatic mechanisms. Regulation involving oxidation of sulfur-containing residues emerged as a key mechanism of redox control. Unraveling the participants and principles of such regulation is necessary for understanding the biological significance of redox control of cellular processes. Recent Advances: Reversible oxidation of methionine residues by monooxygenases of the Mical family and subsequent reduction of methionine sulfoxides by a selenocysteine-containing methionine sulfoxide reductase B1 (MsrB1) was found to control the assembly and disassembly of actin in mammals, and the Mical/MsrB pair similarly regulates actin in fruit flies. This finding has opened up new avenues for understanding the use of stereospecific methionine oxidation in regulating cellular processes and the roles of MsrB1 and Micals in regulation of actin dynamics. Critical Issues: So far, Micals have been the only known partners of MsrB1, and actin is the only target. It is important to identify additional substrates of Micals and characterize other Mical-like enzymes. Future Directions: Oxidation of methionine, reviewed here, is an emerging but not well-established mechanism. Studies suggest that methionine oxidation is a form of oxidative damage of proteins, a modification that alters protein structure or function, a tool in redox signaling, and a mechanism that controls protein function. Understanding the functional impact of reversible oxidation of methionine will require identification of targets, substrates, and regulators of Micals and Msrs. Linking the biological processes, in which these proteins participate, might also lead to insights into disease conditions, which involve regulation of actin by Micals and Msrs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 814–822. PMID:26181576

  8. Mechanistic and Kinetic Study of Singlet O2 Oxidation of Methionine by On-Line Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangwei; Lu, Wenchao; Yin, Xunlong; Liu, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    We report a reaction apparatus developed to monitor singlet oxygen ((1)O2) reactions in solution using on-line ESI mass spectrometry and spectroscopy measurements. (1)O2 was generated in the gas phase by the reaction of H2O2 with Cl2, detected by its emission at 1270 nm, and bubbled into aqueous solution continuously. (1)O2 concentrations in solution were linearly related to the emission intensities of airborne (1)O2, and their absolute scales were established based on a calibration using 9,10-anthracene dipropionate dianion as an (1)O2 trapping agent. Products from (1)O2 oxidation were monitored by UV-Vis absorption and positive/negative ESI mass spectra, and product structures were elucidated using collision-induced dissociation-tandem mass spectrometry. To suppress electrical discharge in negative ESI of aqueous solution, methanol was added to electrospray via in-spray solution mixing using theta-glass ESI emitters. Capitalizing on this apparatus, the reaction of (1)O2 with methionine was investigated. We have identified methionine oxidation intermediates and products at different pH, and measured reaction rate constants. (1)O2 oxidation of methionine is mediated by persulfoxide in both acidic and basic solutions. Persulfoxide continues to react with another methionine, yielding methionine sulfoxide as end-product albeit with a much lower reaction rate in basic solution. Density functional theory was used to explore reaction potential energy surfaces and establish kinetic models, with solvation effects simulated using the polarized continuum model. Combined with our previous study of gas-phase methionine ions with (1)O2, evolution of methionine oxidation pathways at different ionization states and in different media is described.

  9. S-adenosyl methionine is necessary for inhibition of the methyltransferase G9a by the lysine 9 to methionine mutation on histone H3

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, Hariharan; Hoelper, Dominik; Jain, Siddhant U.; Cantone, Nico; Lundgren, Stefan M.; Poy, Florence; Allis, C. David; Cummings, Richard; Bellon, Steven; Lewis, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Lysine to methionine (K-to-M) mutations in genes encoding histone H3 are thought to drive a subset of pediatric brain and bone cancers. These high-frequency K-to-M mutations occur at sites of methylation on histone H3, and tumors containing the mutant histones exhibit a global loss of specific histone methylation marks. Previous studies showed that K-to-M mutant histones, also known as oncohistones, are potent orthosteric inhibitors of specific Su(var)3-9, Enhancer-of-zeste, Trithorax (SET) domain methyltransferases. However, the biochemical and biophysical details of the interaction between K-to-M mutant histones and the respective SET domain methyltransferases are currently unknown. Here, we use the histone H3K9-directed methyltransferase G9a as a model to explore the mechanism of inhibition by K-to-M oncohistones. X-ray cocrystal structures revealed that the K9M residue of histone H3 occupies the active site cavity of G9a, and kinetic analysis indicates competitive inhibition of G9a by histone H3K9M. Additionally, we find that the cofactor S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) is necessary for stable interaction between G9a and H3K9M histone. Consistent with the formation of a ternary complex, we find that the inhibitory peptide is uncompetitive with regard to SAM. These data and others indicate that K-to-M oncohistones promote global loss of specific lysine methylation through sequestration and inhibition of SAM-bound SET domain methyltransferases. PMID:27185940

  10. Functioning methionine sulfoxide reductases A and B are present in human epidermal melanocytes in the cytosol and in the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, Karin U.; Chavan, Bhaven; Gillbro, Johanna M.

    2006-03-31

    Oxidation of methionine residues by reactive oxygen (ROS) in protein structures leads to the formation of methionine sulfoxide which can consequently lead to a plethora of impaired functionality. The generation of methionine sulfoxide yields ultimately a diastereomeric mixture of the S and R sulfoxides. So far two distinct enzyme families have been identified. MSRA reduces methionine S-sulfoxide, while MSRB reduces the R-diastereomer. It has been shown that these enzymes are involved in regulation of protein function and in elimination of ROS via reversible methionine formation besides protein repair. Importantly, both enzymes require coupling to the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin electron donor system. In this report, we show for First time the expression and function of both sulfoxide reductases together with thioredoxin reductase in the cytosol as well as in the nucleus of epidermal melanocytes which are especially sensitive to ROS. Since this cell resides in the basal layer of the epidermis and its numbers and functions are reduced upon ageing and for instance also in depigmentation processes, we believe that this discovery adds an intricate repair mechanism to melanocyte homeostasis and survival.

  11. The contribution of methionine to the stability of the Escherichia coli MetNIQ ABC transporter - substrate binding protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phong T.; Li, Qi Wen; Kadaba, Neena S.; Lai, Jeffrey Y.; Yang, Janet G.; Rees, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquitous role of ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) importers in nutrient uptake, only the E. coli maltose and vitamin B12 ABC transporters have been structurally characterized in multiple conformations relevant to the alternating access transport mechanism. To complement our previous structure determination of the E. coli MetNI methionine importer in the inward facing conformation (Kadaba et al. (2008) Science 321, 250–253), we have explored conditions stabilizing the outward facing conformation. Using two variants, the Walker B E166Q mutation with ATP+EDTA to stabilize MetNI in the ATP-bound conformation and the N229A variant of the binding protein MetQ, shown in this work to disrupt methionine binding, a high affinity MetNIQ complex was formed with a dissociation constant measured to be 27 nM. Using wild type MetQ containing a co-purified methionine (for which the crystal structure is reported at 1.6 Å resolution), the dissociation constant for complex formation with MetNI is measured to be ~40-fold weaker, indicating that complex formation lowers the affinity of MetQ for methionine by this amount. Preparation of a stable MetNIQ complex is an essential step towards the crystallographic analysis of the outward facing conformation, a key intermediate in the uptake of methionine by this transport system. PMID:25803078

  12. Effects of calcium soaps of rapeseed fatty acids and protected methionine on milk yield and composition in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Z M; Pisulewski, P M; Spanghero, M

    1999-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of supplementing the diets of dairy cows with Ca soaps of rapeseed fatty acids (CSRFA) and rumen-protected (RP) methionine on their milk yield and composition, including milk protein fractions and fatty acids. Twelve Polish Red Lowland cows were used in a complete balanced two period changeover experiment. The four treatment diets were a control consisting of a total mixed ration of grass silage and concentrates, and the total mixed ration supplemented with RP methionine, CSRFA or RP methionine plus CSRFA. Dry matter intake was not affected by diet. Milk yield increased when cows were given the diet with CSRFA, but supplementation of diets with RP methionine did not affect milk yield. Milk protein content, but not milk protein yield, decreased when CSRFA was given. The addition of RP methionine to the control diet and the CSRFA diet produced similar increases in the milk protein content. Supplementation of the diet with CSRFA significantly changed the milk fatty acid profile: the proportions of 10:0, 12:0, 14:0, 15:0 and 16:0 in milk fat decreased, but those of 18:0 and cis-18:1 increased. We conclude that CSRFA can be used in practical dairy diets to increase milk yield and manipulate its fatty acid composition.

  13. Immune function and hematology of male cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) in response to food supplementation and methionine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, R.E.; Leslie, David M.; Lochmiller, R.L.; Masters, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    We examined effects of supplementation of food quantity and quality (=enhanced methionine) on hematologic and immunologic parameters of wild, but enclosed, adult male cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) in north-central Oklahoma. Sheet metal enclosures were stocked with a high density of wild-caught cotton rats (160 animals/ha) and randomly assigned a treatment of no supplementation, mixed-ration supplementation or methionine-enhanced supplementation. Aside from small increases in counts of red blood cells and hematocrit levels, most indices of erythrocytic characteristics were not affected by supplementation with the mixed-ration or enhanced methionine. In contrast, platelet counts were highest in mixed-ration and methionine treatments and counts of total white blood cells were highest with methionine supplementation, albeit relative proportions of different leukocytes did not differ among treatments. Immunologically, neither delayed-type hypersensitivity response nor hemolytic-complement activity differed among treatments. Supplementation of food quantity and quality did not broadly affect hematologic parameters and immune function of male cotton rats, but enhanced platelet and leukocyte counts may confer advantages to overall health. Clarification of the role of such effects on population limitation or regulation requires additional research. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Endosperm protein synthesis and L-(/sup 35/S)methionine incorporation in maize kernels cultured in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Cully, D.E.; Gengenbach, B.G.; Smith, J.A.; Rubenstein, I.; Connely, J.A.; Park, W.D.

    1984-02-01

    This study was conducted to examine protein synthesis and L-(/sup 35/S)methionine incorporation into the endosperm of Zea mays L. kernels developing in vitro. Two-day-old kernels of the inbred line W64A were placed in culture on a defined medium containing 10 microCuries L-(/sup 35/S)methionine per milliliter (13 milliCuries per millimole) and harvested at 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 days after pollination. Cultured kernels attained a final endosperm mass of 120 milligrams compared to 175 milligrams for field-grown controls. Field and cultured kernels had similar concentrations (microgram per milligram endosperm for total protein, albumin plus globulin, zein, and glutelin fractions at most kernel ages. Sodium, dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing patterns for endosperm proteins were similar for field and cultured kernels throughout development. By 15 days, over 70% of the L-(/sup 35/S)methionine taken up was present in endosperm proteins. Label incorporation visualized by fluorography generally followed the protein intensity of the stained gels. The high methionine content, low molecular weight zeins (i.e. 15 and 9 kilodaltons) were highly labeled. All of the radioactivity in hydrolyzed zein samples was recovered in the methionine peak indicating minimal conversion to L-(/sup 35/S)cysteine. The procedure described here is suitable for long term culture and labeling experiments in which continued kernel development is required.

  15. Chromatographic behavior of peptides containing oxidized methionine residues in proteomic LC-MS experiments: Complex tale of a simple modification.

    PubMed

    Lao, Ying W; Gungormusler-Yilmaz, Mine; Shuvo, Sabbir; Verbeke, Tobin; Spicer, Vic; Krokhin, Oleg V

    2015-07-01

    On average, the oxidation of a single Met residue to Mso (methionine S-oxide, methionine sulfoxide) and Msn (methionine S,S-dioxide, methionine sulfone) decreases peptide retention in RP HPLC by 2.37 and 1.95 Hydrophobicity Index units (% acetonitrile), respectively. At the same time, the magnitude of the retention shift varies greatly (-9.1 to +0.4% acetonitrile for Mso) depending on peptide sequence. The latter effects are mostly associated with the stabilization of secondary structures upon peptide interaction with the hydrophobic stationary phase: when an oxidized residue is located in the hydrophobic face of an amphipathic helix, the decrease in retention is profound. The same amino acid positioning leads to complete or partial resolution of pairs of peptides containing diastereomeric Mso residues. Contrary to all previously reported observations, and the nature of this modification, we also demonstrate for the first time that methionine oxidation may increase peptide hydrophobicity. This behavior is characteristic for Met residues in the N3 position of an N-capping box stabilization motif prior to the amphipathic helix. All these findings indicate that the prediction of peptide secondary structures upon interaction with hydrophobic surfaces must become an integral part of peptide retention modeling in proteomic applications going forward.

  16. Regulation of Selenoproteins and Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases A and B1 by Age, Calorie Restriction, and Dietary Selenium in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Novoselov, Sergey V.; Kim, Hwa-Young; Hua, Deame; Lee, Byung Cheon; Astle, Clinton M.; Harrison, David E.; Friguet, Bertrand; Moustafa, Mohamed E.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Methionine residues are susceptible to oxidation, but this damage may be reversed by methionine sulfoxide reductases MsrA and MsrB. Mammals contain one MsrA and three MsrBs, including a selenoprotein MsrB1. Here, we show that MsrB1 is the major methionine sulfoxide reductase in liver of mice and it is among the proteins that are most easily regulated by dietary selenium. MsrB1, but not MsrA activities, were reduced with age, and the selenium regulation of MsrB1 was preserved in the aging liver, suggesting that MsrB1 could account for the impaired methionine sulfoxide reduction in aging animals. We also examined regulation of Msr and selenoprotein expression by a combination of dietary selenium and calorie restriction and found that, under calorie restriction conditions, selenium regulation was preserved. In addition, mice overexpressing a mutant form of selenocysteine tRNA reduced MsrB1 activity to the level observed in selenium deficiency, whereas MsrA activity was elevated in these animals. Finally, we show that selenium regulation in inbred mouse strains is preserved in an outbred aging model. Taken together, these findings better define dietary regulation of methionine sulfoxide reduction and selenoprotein expression in mice with regard to age, calorie restriction, dietary Se, and a combination of these factors. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12, 829–838. PMID:19769460

  17. Effects of diet supplementation with white tea and methionine on lipid metabolism of gilthead sea bream juveniles (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jiménez, Amalia; Peres, Helena; Rubio, Vera Cruz; Oliva-Teles, Aires

    2013-06-01

    A growth trial was performed with gilthead sea bream juveniles (Sparus aurata) to evaluate the effect of diet supplementation with white tea and methionine on fish performance and lipid metabolism. For that purpose, four diets were formulated: a fish meal-based diet (Control) and diets identical to the control diet but supplemented with 2.9 % white tea (Tea), 0.3 % methionine (Met) or 2.9 % white tea plus 0.3 % methionine (Tea + Met). Growth performance and feed efficiency parameters, whole-body and liver composition, plasma metabolites concentration and liver glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), malic enzyme (ME) and fatty acid synthetase (FAS) activities were determined. Feed intake was higher in fish fed methionine-supplemented diets, whereas this parameter and growth was decreased in fish fed white tea supplementation. Feed efficiency and protein efficiency ratio were not affected by diet composition. Plasma HDL cholesterol and total lipids concentration were higher in fish fed white tea-supplemented diets. Whole-body lipid, plasma glucose, liver glycogen concentration and liver G6PDH, ME and FAS activities were lower in fish fed white tea-supplemented diets. Results of the present study indicate that methionine seems to act as a feed attractant in diets for sea bream juveniles. Additionally, white tea is an important modulator of lipid metabolism in sea bream juveniles.

  18. The methionine-homocysteine cycle and its effects on cognitive diseases.

    PubMed

    Miller, Alan L

    2003-02-01

    Homocysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, is a metabolite of the essential amino acid methionine, and exists at a critical biochemical intersection in the methionine cycle - between S-adenosylmethionine, the indispensable ubiquitous methyl donor, and vitamins B12 and folic acid. High blood levels of homocysteine signal a breakdown in this vital process, resulting in far-reaching biochemical and life consequences. The link between homocysteine and cardiovascular disease is well established, and decreasing plasma total homocysteine by providing nutritional cofactors for its metabolism has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events. Information has been emerging regarding a connection between homocysteine metabolism and cognitive function, from mild cognitive decline (age-related memory loss) to vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Significant deficiencies in the homocysteine re-methylation cofactors cobalamin (B12) and folate, as well as the trans-sulfuration cofactor vitamin B6, are commonly seen in the elderly population, with a resultant increase in homocysteine with advancing age. Hyperhomocysteinemia has been shown to be an independent risk factor for cognitive dysfunction. Indirect and direct vascular damage can be caused by homocysteine, which has been implicated in vascular dementia, with an increased risk of multiple brain infarcts and dementia as homocysteine levels rise. A significant correlation has been found between risk of Alzheimer's disease and high plasma levels of homocysteine, as well as low levels of folic acid, and vitamins B6 and B12. All of these disease associations are thought to be interrelated via increased homocysteine and S-adenosylhomocysteine and subsequent hypomethylation of numerous substances, including DNA and proteins, that render vascular structures and neurons more susceptible to damage and apoptosis. Providing the nutritional cofactors for proper functioning of the methionine cycle may improve methylation

  19. Enzymes of creatine biosynthesis, arginine and methionine metabolism in normal and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Bera, Soumen; Wallimann, Theo; Ray, Subhankar; Ray, Manju

    2008-12-01

    The creatine/creatine kinase system decreases drastically in sarcoma. In the present study, an investigation of catalytic activities, western blot and mRNA expression unambiguously demonstrates the prominent expression of the creatine-synthesizing enzymes l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase and N-guanidinoacetate methyltransferase in sarcoma, Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells, whereas both enzymes were virtually undetectable in normal muscle. Compared to that of normal animals, these enzymes remained unaffected in the kidney or liver of sarcoma-bearing mice. High activity and expression of mitochondrial arginase II in sarcoma indicated increased ornithine formation. Slightly or moderately higher levels of ornithine, guanidinoacetate and creatinine were observed in sarcoma compared to muscle. Despite the intrinsically low level of creatine in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells, these cells could significantly take up and release creatine, suggesting a functional creatine transport, as verified by measuring mRNA levels of creatine transporter. Transcript levels of arginase II, ornithine-decarboxylase, S-adenosyl-homocysteine hydrolase and methionine-synthase were significantly upregulated in sarcoma and in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells. Overall, the enzymes related to creatine and arginine/methionine metabolism were found to be significantly upregulated in malignant cells. However, the low levels of creatine kinase in the same malignant cells do not appear to be sufficient for the building up of an effective creatine/phosphocreatine pool. Instead of supporting creatine biosynthesis, l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase and N-guanidinoacetate methyltransferase appear to be geared to support cancer cell metabolism in the direction of polyamine and methionine synthesis because both these compounds are in high demand in proliferating cancer cells.

  20. Impact of methionine oxidation as an initial event on the pathway of human prion protein conversion

    PubMed Central

    Elmallah, Mohammed IY; Borgmeyer, Uwe; Betzel, Christian; Redecke, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases comprise a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the autocatalytic conversion of the cellular prion protein PrPC into the infectious misfolded isoform PrPSc. Increasing evidence supports a specific role of oxidative stress in the onset of pathogenesis. Although the associated molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated in detail, several studies currently suggest that methionine oxidation already detected in misfolded PrPSc destabilizes the native PrP fold as an early event in the conversion pathway. To obtain more insights about the specific impact of surface-exposed methionine residues on the oxidative-induced conversion of human PrP we designed, produced, and comparatively investigated two new pseudosulfoxidation mutants of human PrP 121–231 that comprises the well-folded C-terminal domain. Applying circular dichroism spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering techniques we showed that pseudosulfoxidation of all surface exposed Met residues formed a monomeric molten globule-like species with striking similarities to misfolding intermediates recently reported by other groups. However, individual pseudosulfoxidation at the polymorphic M129 site did not significantly contribute to the structural destabilization. Further metal-induced oxidation of the partly unfolded pseudosulfoxidation mutant resulted in the formation of an oligomeric state that shares a comparable size and stability with PrP oligomers detected after the application of different other triggers for structural conversion, indicating a generic misfolding pathway of PrP. The obtained results highlight the specific importance of methionine oxidation at surface exposed residues for PrP misfolding, strongly supporting the hypothesis that increased oxidative stress could be one causative event for sporadic prion diseases and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24121542

  1. Nutritional and technological evaluation of an enzymatically methionine-enriched soy protein for infant enteral formulas.

    PubMed

    de Regil, Luz María; de la Barca, Ana María Calderón

    2004-03-01

    Enzymatically modified soy proteins have the amino acid profile and functional properties required for dietary support. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nutritional and technological properties of an enzymatically modified soy protein ultrafiltered fraction with bound methionine (F(1-10)E) to be used as a protein ingredient for infant enteral formulas. F(1-10)E was chemically characterized and biologically evaluated. Thirty-six weaning Wistar rats were fed during 3 weeks with a 4% casein-containing diet. Rats were divided into three groups and recovered for 3 weeks with 18% protein-containing diets based on: (1) F(1-10)E, (2) casein or (3) soy isolate+methionine. Nutritional indicators were weight gain, protein efficiency ratio, plasma proteins, apparent digestibility and protein in the carcass. Additionally, F(1-10)E was added as a protein ingredient of an enteral formula, and its sensory and rheological properties were compared with a hydrolyzed-whey protein commercial formula. F(1-10)E contained 68% protein and 5% sulphur amino acids, with 60% of peptides 0.05) in weight gain (108 g and 118 g, respectively), protein efficiency ratio (2.7), apparent digestibility (93% and 95%), plasma proteins (5.7 mg/100 ml) and carcass protein (61%), and better than soy isolate-based+methionine diet (P<0.05). Viscosity of the commercial formula and our formula was similar during a 24-h period. Sensory acceptability was 8 for our formula and 3.5 for the commercial one, on a scale of 1-10 (P<0.05). Due to its nutritional, sensorial and rheological properties, F(1-10)E could be used as a protein source in infant enteral formulas.

  2. Methionine restriction affects oxidative stress and glutathione-related redox pathways in the rat.

    PubMed

    Maddineni, Sreenivasa; Nichenametla, Sailendra; Sinha, Raghu; Wilson, Ronald P; Richie, John P

    2013-04-01

    Lifelong dietary methionine restriction (MR) is associated with increased longevity and decreased incidence of age-related disorders and diseases in rats and mice. A reduction in the levels of oxidative stress may be a contributing mechanistic factor for the beneficial effects of MR. To examine this, we determined the effects of an 80% dietary restriction of Met on different biomarkers of oxidative stress and antioxidant pathways in blood, liver, kidney and brain in the rat. Male F-344 rats were fed control (0.86% methionine) or MR (0.17% methionine) diets for up to six months. Blood and tissues were analyzed for glutathione (GSH) concentrations, related enzyme activities and biomarkers of oxidative stress. MR was associated with reductions in oxidative stress biomarkers including plasma 8-hydoxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-isoprostane and erythrocyte protein-bound glutathione after one month with levels remaining low for at least six months (P < 0.05). Levels of free GSH in blood were increased after 1-6 months of MR feeding whereas liver GSH levels were reduced over this time (P < 0.05). In MR rats, GSH peroxidase activity was decreased in liver and increased in kidney compared with controls. No changes in the activities of GSH reductase in liver and kidney and superoxide dismutase in liver were observed as a result of MR feeding. Altogether, these findings indicate that oxidative stress is reduced by MR feeding in rats, but this effect cannot be explained by changes in the activity of antioxidant enzymes.

  3. Structural Basis for the Differential Regulation of DNA by the Methionine Repressor MetJ

    SciTech Connect

    Augustus, Anne; Reardon, Patrick; Heller, William T; Spicer, Leonard D.

    2006-01-01

    The Met regulon in Escherichia coli encodes several proteins responsible for the biosynthesis of methionine. Regulation of the expression of most of these proteins is governed by the methionine repressor protein MetJ and its co-repressor, the methionine derivative S-adenosylmethionine. Genes controlled by MetJ contain from two to five sequential copies of a homologous 8-bp sequence called the metbox. A crystal structure for one of the complexes, the repressor tetramer bound to two metboxes, has been reported (Somers, W. S., and S. E. Phillips (1992) Nature 359, 387-393), but little structural work on the larger assemblies has been done presumably because of the difficulties in crystallization and the variability in the number and sequences of metboxes for the various genes. Small angle neutron scattering was used to study complexes of MetJ and S-adenosylmethionine with double-stranded DNA containing two, three, and five metboxes. Our results demonstrate that the crystal structure of the two-metbox complex is not the native solution conformation of the complex. Instead, the system adopts a less compact conformation in which there is decreased interaction between the adjacent MetJ dimers. Models built of the higher order complexes from the scattering data show that the three-metbox complex is organized much like the two-metbox complex. However, the five-metbox complex differs significantly from the smaller complexes, providing much closer packing of the adjacent MetJ dimers and allowing additional contacts not available in the crystal structure. The results suggest that there is a structural basis for the differences observed in the regulatory effectiveness of MetJ for the various genes of the Met regulon.

  4. Impact of methionine oxidation as an initial event on the pathway of human prion protein conversion.

    PubMed

    Elmallah, Mohammed I Y; Borgmeyer, Uwe; Betzel, Christian; Redecke, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases comprise a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the autocatalytic conversion of the cellular prion protein PrP(C) into the infectious misfolded isoform PrP(Sc). Increasing evidence supports a specific role of oxidative stress in the onset of pathogenesis. Although the associated molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated in detail, several studies currently suggest that methionine oxidation already detected in misfolded PrP(Sc) destabilizes the native PrP fold as an early event in the conversion pathway. To obtain more insights about the specific impact of surface-exposed methionine residues on the oxidative-induced conversion of human PrP we designed, produced, and comparatively investigated two new pseudosulfoxidation mutants of human PrP 121-231 that comprises the well-folded C-terminal domain. Applying circular dichroism spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering techniques we showed that pseudosulfoxidation of all surface exposed Met residues formed a monomeric molten globule-like species with striking similarities to misfolding intermediates recently reported by other groups. However, individual pseudosulfoxidation at the polymorphic M129 site did not significantly contribute to the structural destabilization. Further metal-induced oxidation of the partly unfolded pseudosulfoxidation mutant resulted in the formation of an oligomeric state that shares a comparable size and stability with PrP oligomers detected after the application of different other triggers for structural conversion, indicating a generic misfolding pathway of PrP. The obtained results highlight the specific importance of methionine oxidation at surface exposed residues for PrP misfolding, strongly supporting the hypothesis that increased oxidative stress could be one causative event for sporadic prion diseases and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Effect of increased methionine level on performance and apparent ileal digestibility of amino acids in ducks.

    PubMed

    Jamroz, D; Wiliczkiewicz, A; Lemme, A; Orda, J; Skorupińska, J; Wertelecki, T

    2009-10-01

    The experiment was conducted with 960 one-day-old ducklings fed mixtures (I control - 0.28% methionine) additionally supplemented with DL-methionine (DL-Met) at amounts: 0.03% (group II), 0.07% (III), 0.12% (IV) and 0.18% (V). The performance, carcass quality and apparent ileal digestibility of amino acids as the criterions of methionine (Met) effectivity were considered. The analysis of growth and development of ducks as an effect of diversified DL-Met supplements indicate that increased content of this amino acid in the diets has not affected clearly the performance parameters. The body weight of 21-day-old ducklings was significantly affected only by the level of 0.12% of added Met in comparison to control group. On day 42, the differences among groups were negligible; only the addition of 0.12% DL-Met has increased the body weight by 2.4% when compared with control (p > 0.05). Feed conversion estimated for a period of 1-42 days has not been influenced by Met supplementation. The indistinct, however, visible tendency of better ileal amino acids' apparent digestibility (for Asp.a.,Thr, Ser, Glu, Lys) was noted in the groups fed supplemented diets. Application of 0.07% and 0.18% of DL-met, has significantly (p < 0.05) improved the coefficient of cysteine (Cys) apparent ileal digestibility; however, the improvement of Met apparent ileal digestibility has been achieved by the addition of 0.18% Met. The mortality of ducklings in the experiment was very low and varied between 3.15% (II) and 0.0% (groups I and III). In general, application of 0.12% of DL-Met to mixture containing 0.28% Met had positive effect on the productive output of birds and also improved the apparent ileal digestibility of Cys and Met.

  6. Effect of methionine on glycolysis in tumor cells: in vivo and in vitro NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Collet, V; Carrez, D; Croisy, A; Dimicoli, J L

    1996-04-01

    Inhibition of glycolysis by methionine is a phenomenon previously shown in transformed cells growing in culture. In a recent paper, [Collet V. et al., Q. Magn. Res. Biol. Med. 11, 127-134 (1995)] we investigated this effect in vivo by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, but the results did not clearly support this hypothesis. In this work, in vivo 13C NMR spectroscopy has been performed on tumors developing in nude mice following the injection of two types of cells established in culture: (1) rat kidney cells transformed by Kirsten murine sarcoma virus, (NRK-K), i.e. the same tumor cell line as that used in the original paper; and (2) a well dedifferentiated human prostate adenocarcinoma cell line (PC3). Furthermore, in vitro experiments were performed with the same tumor cell lines. The effect of methionine on glycolysis was assayed by biochemical monitoring of lactate production in the supernatant of these cells grown in vitro. Lastly, 1H in vitro NMR spectroscopy of the PC3 line performed on perchloric extracts of both supernatants and cells growing in the presence of (1-13C) glucose, allowed simultaneous detection of glucose and lactate as well as estimation of the lactate-specific enrichment. The in vitro experiments confirmed the inhibiting effect of methionine on glycolysis and demonstrated the absence of a significant modification of the pentose phosphate pathway activity by this aminoacid. In contrast, none of the in vivo experimental results were compatible with this phenomenon, which is probably affected by more general physiological events.

  7. Methionine-enkephalin as immunomodulator therapy in human immunodeficiency virus infections: clinical and immunological effects.

    PubMed

    Zunich, K M; Kirkpatrick, C H

    1988-03-01

    Enkephalins have been shown to enhance T cell-mediated immune responses and natural killer-cell activity in vitro. We have studied the effects of infusions of methionine-enkephalin on immune functions and clinical courses in seven patients with various stages of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). All patients were clinically stable at the time of entry into the study. Each received 10 micrograms/kg of methionine-enkephalin in an intravenous infusion three times weekly for up to 12 weeks. Evaluation of cellular immunity (T-cell subsets, in vitro interleukin-2 production and interleukin-2 receptor expression, T-cell responses to mitogens and antigens, and delayed-hypersensitivity skin tests) as well as clinical and toxicity monitoring was performed prior to treatment, at 2-week intervals during treatment, and after the cessation of treatment. Increases in interleukin-2 receptor expression were seen on lymphocytes collected on one occasion from each of two patients 30 min postinfusion. Studies done 24 hr after infusions revealed increases in interleukin-2 production in one patient, but when pre- and posttreatment values were compared there were no significant changes in numbers of circulating T cells of any phenotype or in T-cell responses to mitogens or antigens. None of the patients with Kaposi's sarcoma had regression of tumor; one patient dropped out of the study at week 5 because of deteriorating clinical status and progression of tumor. There were no adverse reactions or evidence of toxicity. We conclude that methionine-enkephalin appears to enhance temporarily selected immune responses in patients with HIV infection, however, in the schedule used in this study it was not clinically efficacious.

  8. Impact of methionine oxidation as an initial event on the pathway of human prion protein conversion.

    PubMed

    Elmallah, Mohammed I Y; Borgmeyer, Uwe; Betzel, Christian; Redecke, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases comprise a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the autocatalytic conversion of the cellular prion protein PrP(C) into the infectious misfolded isoform PrP(Sc). Increasing evidence supports a specific role of oxidative stress in the onset of pathogenesis. Although the associated molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated in detail, several studies currently suggest that methionine oxidation already detected in misfolded PrP(Sc) destabilizes the native PrP fold as an early event in the conversion pathway. To obtain more insights about the specific impact of surface-exposed methionine residues on the oxidative-induced conversion of human PrP we designed, produced, and comparatively investigated two new pseudosulfoxidation mutants of human PrP 121-231 that comprises the well-folded C-terminal domain. Applying circular dichroism spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering techniques we showed that pseudosulfoxidation of all surface exposed Met residues formed a monomeric molten globule-like species with striking similarities to misfolding intermediates recently reported by other groups. However, individual pseudosulfoxidation at the polymorphic M129 site did not significantly contribute to the structural destabilization. Further metal-induced oxidation of the partly unfolded pseudosulfoxidation mutant resulted in the formation of an oligomeric state that shares a comparable size and stability with PrP oligomers detected after the application of different other triggers for structural conversion, indicating a generic misfolding pathway of PrP. The obtained results highlight the specific importance of methionine oxidation at surface exposed residues for PrP misfolding, strongly supporting the hypothesis that increased oxidative stress could be one causative event for sporadic prion diseases and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24121542

  9. Fern L-methionine decarboxylase: Kinetics and mechanism of decarboxylation and abortive transamination

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, M.; Stevenson, D.E.; Gani, D. )

    1990-08-21

    L-Methionine decarboxylase from Dryopteris filix-mas catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-methionine and a range of straight- and branched-chain L-amino acids to give the corresponding amine products. The deuterium solvent isotope effects for the decarboxylation of (2S)-methionine are {sup D}(V/K) = 6.5 and {sup D}V = 2.3, for (2S)-valine are {sup D}(V/K) = 1.9 and {sup D}V = 2.6, and for (2S)-lecuine are {sup D}(V/K) = 2.5 and {sup D}V = 1.0 at pL 5.5. At pL 6.0 and above, where the value of k{sub cat} for all of the substrates is low, the solvent isotope effects on V{sub max} for methionine are 1.1-1.2 whereas the effects on V/K remain unchanged, indicating that the solvent-sensitive transition state occurs before the first irreversible step, carbon dioxide desorption. At very high concentration, the product amine can promote transamination of the coenzyme. However, the reaction occurs infrequently and does not influence the partitioning between decarboxylation and substrate-mediated abortive transamination under steady-state turnover conditions. The partition ratio, normal catalytic versus abortive events, can be determined from the amount of substrate consumed by a known amount of enzyme at infinite time, and the rate of inactivation can be determined by measuring the decrease in enzyme activity with respect to time. Experiments conducted in deuterium oxide allowed the solvent isotope effects for the partition ratio and the abortive reaction to be determined. {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic analysis of 3-(methylthio)-1-aminopropane isolated from incubations conducted in 50 molar % deuterium oxide at pL 4.8 and at pL 6.5 indicated that the proton donor was monoprotic and, therefore, is probably the imidazolium side chain of a histidine residue.

  10. Catalytic Promiscuity of the Radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine Enzyme NosL

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wei; Ji, Xinjian; Li, Yongzhen; Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic promiscuity plays a key role in enzyme evolution and the acquisition of novel biological functions. Because of the high reactivity of radical species, in our view enzymes involving radical-mediated mechanisms could intrinsically be more prone to catalytic promiscuity. This mini-review summarizes the recent advances in the study of NosL, a radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent L-tryptophan (L-Trp) lyase. We demonstrate here the interesting chemistry and remarkable catalytic promiscuity of NosL, and attempt to highlight the high evolvability of radical SAM enzymes and the potential to engineer these enzymes for novel and improved activities. PMID:27446906

  11. Effects of methionine and Cu2+ on the expression of tyrosinase activity in Streptomyces castaneoglobisporus.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, K; Masujima, T; Sugiyama, M

    1996-12-01

    Streptomyces castaneoglobisporus HUT6202 expresses an enzyme, tyrosinase, responsible for the production of melanin-like pigments. The present study revealed that the tyrosinase synthesis by the microorganism was induced about 80-fold, when young cells cultured for 6 h were incubated with methionine (Met) to the mid-log phase of growth, in comparison to without this amino acid. The Met-induced tyrosinase synthesis was inhibited by the addition of rifampicin and chloramphenicol, suggesting that transcriptional and translational events are necessary for the induction. We found that the addition of Cu2+ to the culture medium brings forward the period of expression of Met-induced tyrosinase activity. PMID:9010762

  12. Growth Rate of Escherichia coli at Elevated Temperatures: Limitation by Methionine

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Eliora Z.; Davis, Bernard D.

    1971-01-01

    When Escherichia coli growing in minimal medium is shifted from 37 C to any temperature in the range 40 to 45 C, the growth rate immediately assumes a new, lower value, characteristic of that temperature. The decrease is shown to be due, in several strains, to decreased activity of the first enzyme of the methionine pathway, homoserine trans-succinylase, which thus appears to be more heat-sensitive than any other essential enzyme in the cell. This sensitivity does not involve progressive denaturation of the enzyme; rather, the response to a shift of temperature, in either direction, is immediate and reversible. PMID:4939758

  13. Growth of bulk single crystal of N-acetyl DL-methionine and its spectral characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moovendaran, K.; Natarajan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Bulk size single crystal of N-acetyl DL-methionine (C7H13NO3S) (1) was grown using a home-made crystal growth setup (MKN setup). The identity of the grown crystal was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The modes of vibrations of the functional groups present were assigned using the infrared (IR) spectrum. UV-vis-NIR spectra showed that the crystals have excellent transparency in the visible and infrared regions. The thermal stability and decomposition of the sample was studied by using thermal analysis (TGA/DTA). Photoluminescence excitation studies showed that the emission occurred at 350 nm for the compound.

  14. Optical and dielectric properties of L-methionine L-methioninium hydrogen maleate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, P.; Sankar, S.; Gokulraj, S.

    2013-02-01

    An organic nonlinear optical single crystal L-methionine L-methioninium hydrogen maleate has been grown by solution growth technique. It is confirmed from XRD data that the crystal belongs to monoclinic system with non-centrosymmetric space group P21. Photoluminescence study was carried out for the grown crystal and maximum emission occurs at 395 nm. Dielectric measurements were made for the frequency range from 100 Hz to 5 MHz. The lower value of dielectric constant and dielectric loss at higher frequencies reveal that the material possesses enhanced optical quality with lesser defects. Nonlinear optical property was confirmed by Kurtz and Perry technique.

  15. Reduced growth hormone signaling and methionine restriction: interventions that improve metabolic health and extend life span.

    PubMed

    Brown-Borg, Holly M

    2016-01-01

    Interventions that improve health are often associated with longevity. Reduced growth hormone signaling has been shown to increase life span in mice by over 50%. Similarly, reductions in dietary intake of methionine, in rats and mice, result in life-span extension. Many factors affect metabolic health, mitochondrial function, and resistance to stressors, each of which influence aging and life span. This paper presents a comparison of these two interventions, as well as the results of a study combining these interventions, to understand potential mechanisms underlying their effectiveness in enhancing healthy aging.

  16. Does the clinical phenotype of fatal familial insomnia depend on PRNP codon 129 methionine-valine polymorphism?

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Sven; Grimm, Alexander; Schultze, Torsten; Zinke, Jan; Karvouniari, Panagiota; Axer, Hubertus; Witte, Otto W; Schwab, Matthias

    2013-12-15

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a rare, hereditary prion-protein disease. Methionine-valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the prion-protein gene (PRNP) determines the phenotype in other hereditary prion-protein diseases, but association with the clinical phenotype in FFI remains uncertain. Early clinical findings in FFI comprise disturbances of the sleep-wake cycle and mild neuropsychiatric changes which typically emerge during middle to late adulthood. Here we describe an unusually early onset and rapid progression of FFI associated with dorsal midbrain involvement in a female patient with PRNP mutation at codon 178 and homozygote methionine polymorphism at codon 129. Early dorsal midbrain involvement became apparent by total loss of REM sleep and isolated bilateral trochlear nerve palsy. Early onset and rapid progression disease type associated with dorsal midbrain involvement may indicate a different spatiotemporal distribution of the neurodegenerative process in FFI patients with PRNP mutation and codon 129 methionine homozygosity compared to methioninevaline heterozygosity.

  17. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the methionine synthase (MetE) from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Tian-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Lan-Fen; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2006-10-01

    Methionine synthase (MetE) from S. mutans was expressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 Å resolution. The Streptococcus mutans metE gene encodes methionine synthase (MetE), which catalyzes the direct transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine in the last step of methionine synthesis. metE was cloned into pET28a and the gene product was expressed at high levels in the Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). MetE was purified to homogeneity using Ni{sup 2+}-chelating chromatography followed by size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals of the protein were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.85, b = 99.48, c = 77.88 Å, β = 94.55°.

  18. Identification of the molecular basis of inhibitor selectivity between the human and streptococcal type I methionine aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Arya, Tarun; Reddi, Ravikumar; Kishor, Chandan; Ganji, Roopa Jones; Bhukya, Supriya; Gumpena, Rajesh; McGowan, Sheena; Drag, Marcin; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2015-03-12

    The methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) family is responsible for the cleavage of the initiator methionine from newly synthesized proteins. Currently, there are no small molecule inhibitors that show selectivity toward the bacterial MetAPs compared to the human enzyme. In our current study, we have screened 20 α-aminophosphonate derivatives and identified a molecule (compound 15) that selectively inhibits the S. pneumonia MetAP in low micromolar range but not the human enzyme. Further bioinformatics, biochemical, and structural analyses suggested that phenylalanine (F309) in the human enzyme and methionine (M205) in the S. pneumonia MetAP at the analogous position render them with different susceptibilities against the identified inhibitor. X-ray crystal structures of various inhibitors in complex with wild type and F309M enzyme further established the molecular basis for the inhibitor selectivity.

  19. Cobalamin inactivation by nitrous oxide produces severe neurological impairment in fruit bats: protection by methionine and aggravation by folates

    SciTech Connect

    van der Westhuyzen, J.; Fernandes-Costa, F.; Metz, J.

    1982-11-01

    Nitrous oxide, which inactivates cobalamin when administered to fruit bats, results in severe neurological impairment leading to ataxia, paralysis and death. This occurs after about 6 weeks in animals depleted of cobalamin by dietary restriction, and after about 10 weeks in cobalamin replete bats. Supplementation of the diet with pteroylglutamic acid caused acceleration of the neurological impairment--the first unequivocal demonstration of aggravation of the neurological lesion in cobalamin deficiency by pteroylglutamic acid. The administration of formyltetrahydropteroylglutamic acid produced similar aggravation of the neurological lesion. Supplementation of the diet with methionine protected the bats from neurological impairment, but failed to prevent death. Methionine supplementation protected against the exacerbating effect of folate, preventing the development of neurological changes. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that the neurological lesion in cobalamin deficiency may be related to a deficiency in the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine which follows diminished synthesis of methionine.

  20. YjeH Is a Novel Exporter of l-Methionine and Branched-Chain Amino Acids in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Liang, Yong; Zhang, Yun; Shang, Xiuling; Liu, Shuwen; Wen, Jifu; Wen, Tingyi

    2015-11-01

    Amino acid efflux transport systems have important physiological functions and play vital roles in the fermentative production of amino acids. However, no methionine exporter has yet been identified in Escherichia coli. In this study, we identified a novel amino acid exporter, YjeH, in E. coli. The yjeH overexpression strain exhibited high tolerance to the structural analogues of l-methionine and branched-chain amino acids, decreased intracellular amino acid levels, and enhanced export rates in the presence of a Met-Met, Leu-Leu, Ile-Ile, or Val-Val dipeptide, suggesting that YjeH functions as an exporter of l-methionine and the three branched-chain amino acids. The export of the four amino acids in the yjeH overexpression strain was competitively inhibited in relation to each other. The expression of yjeH was strongly induced by increasing cytoplasmic concentrations of substrate amino acids. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged YjeH was visualized by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to confirm the plasma membrane localization of YjeH. Phylogenetic analysis of transporters indicated that YjeH belongs to the amino acid efflux family of the amino acid/polyamine/organocation (APC) superfamily. Structural modeling revealed that YjeH has the typical "5 + 5" transmembrane α-helical segment (TMS) inverted-repeat fold of APC superfamily transporters, and its binding sites are strictly conserved. The enhanced capacity of l-methionine export by the overexpression of yjeH in an l-methionine-producing strain resulted in a 70% improvement in titer. This study supplements the transporter classification and provides a substantial basis for the application of the methionine exporter in metabolic engineering.

  1. Methionine restriction restores a younger metabolic phenotype in adult mice with alterations in fibroblast growth factor 21.

    PubMed

    Lees, Emma K; Król, Elżbieta; Grant, Louise; Shearer, Kirsty; Wyse, Cathy; Moncur, Eleanor; Bykowska, Aleksandra S; Mody, Nimesh; Gettys, Thomas W; Delibegovic, Mirela

    2014-10-01

    Methionine restriction (MR) decreases body weight and adiposity and improves glucose homeostasis in rodents. Similar to caloric restriction, MR extends lifespan, but is accompanied by increased food intake and energy expenditure. Most studies have examined MR in young animals; therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the ability of MR to reverse age-induced obesity and insulin resistance in adult animals. Male C57BL/6J mice aged 2 and 12 months old were fed MR (0.172% methionine) or control diet (0.86% methionine) for 8 weeks or 48 h. Food intake and whole-body physiology were assessed and serum/tissues analyzed biochemically. Methionine restriction in 12-month-old mice completely reversed age-induced alterations in body weight, adiposity, physical activity, and glucose tolerance to the levels measured in healthy 2-month-old control-fed mice. This was despite a significant increase in food intake in 12-month-old MR-fed mice. Methionine restriction decreased hepatic lipogenic gene expression and caused a remodeling of lipid metabolism in white adipose tissue, alongside increased insulin-induced phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR) and Akt in peripheral tissues. Mice restricted of methionine exhibited increased circulating and hepatic gene expression levels of FGF21, phosphorylation of eIF2a, and expression of ATF4, with a concomitant decrease in IRE1α phosphorylation. Short-term 48-h MR treatment increased hepatic FGF21 expression/secretion and insulin signaling and improved whole-body glucose homeostasis without affecting body weight. Our findings suggest that MR feeding can reverse the negative effects of aging on body mass, adiposity, and insulin resistance through an FGF21 mechanism. These findings implicate MR dietary intervention as a viable therapy for age-induced metabolic syndrome in adult humans. PMID:24935677

  2. Analyses of Fruit Flies That Do Not Express Selenoproteins or Express the Mouse Selenoprotein, Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase B1, Reveal a Role of Selenoproteins in Stress Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Shchedrina, Valentina A.; Kabil, Hadise; Vorbruggen, Gerd; Lee, Byung Cheon; Turanov, Anton A.; Hirosawa-Takamori, Mitsuko; Kim, Hwa-Young; Harshman, Lawrence G.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Selenoproteins are essential in vertebrates because of their crucial role in cellular redox homeostasis, but some invertebrates that lack selenoproteins have recently been identified. Genetic disruption of selenoprotein biosynthesis had no effect on lifespan and oxidative stress resistance of Drosophila melanogaster. In the current study, fruit flies with knock-out of the selenocysteine-specific elongation factor were metabolically labeled with 75Se; they did not incorporate selenium into proteins and had the same lifespan on a chemically defined diet with or without selenium supplementation. These flies were, however, more susceptible to starvation than controls, and this effect could be ascribed to the function of selenoprotein K. We further expressed mouse methionine sulfoxide reductase B1 (MsrB1), a selenoenzyme that catalyzes the reduction of oxidized methionine residues and has protein repair function, in the whole body or the nervous system of fruit flies. This exogenous selenoprotein could only be expressed when the Drosophila selenocysteine insertion sequence element was used, whereas the corresponding mouse element did not support selenoprotein synthesis. Ectopic expression of MsrB1 in the nervous system led to an increase in the resistance against oxidative stress and starvation, but did not affect lifespan and reproduction, whereas ubiquitous MsrB1 expression had no effect. Dietary selenium did not influence lifespan of MsrB1-expressing flies. Thus, in contrast to vertebrates, fruit flies preserve only three selenoproteins, which are not essential and play a role only under certain stress conditions, thereby limiting the use of the micronutrient selenium by these organisms. PMID:21622567

  3. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A regulates cell growth through the p53-p21 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seung Hee; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down-regulation of MsrA inhibits normal cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MsrA deficiency leads to an increase in p21 by enhanced p53 acetylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down-regulation of MsrA causes cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 2}/M stage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MsrA is a regulator of cell growth that mediates the p53-p21 pathway. -- Abstract: MsrA is an oxidoreductase that catalyzes the stereospecific reduction of methionine-S-sulfoxide to methionine. Although MsrA is well-characterized as an antioxidant and has been implicated in the aging process and cellular senescence, its roles in cell proliferation are poorly understood. Here, we report a critical role of MsrA in normal cell proliferation and describe the regulation mechanism of cell growth by this protein. Down-regulation of MsrA inhibited cell proliferation, but MsrA overexpression did not promote it. MsrA deficiency led to an increase in p21, a major cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, thereby causing cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 2}/M stage. While protein levels of p53 were not altered upon MsrA deficiency, its acetylation level was significantly elevated, which subsequently activated p21 transcription. The data suggest that MsrA is a regulator of cell growth that mediates the p53-p21 pathway.

  4. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A deficiency exacerbates progression of kidney fibrosis induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee In; Noh, Mi Ra; Kim, Ki Young; Jang, Hee-Seong; Kim, Hwa-Young; Park, Kwon Moo

    2015-12-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA), which stereospecifically catalyzes the reduction of methionine-S-sulfoxide, is an important reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. Tissue fibrosis is a maladaptive repair process following injury, associated with oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the role of MsrA in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced kidney fibrosis and its underlying mechanisms by using MsrA gene-deleted mice (MsrA(-/-)). MsrA deletion increased collagen deposition in the interstitium and the expression of collagen III and α-smooth muscle actin in the UUO kidneys, indicating that MsrA deficiency exacerbated the progression of UUO-induced kidney fibrosis. UUO reduced the kidney expression of MsrA, MsrB1, and MsrB2, thereby decreasing MsrA and MsrB activity. UUO increased hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation levels and the ratio of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to total glutathione (GSH) in the kidneys. The UUO-induced elevations in the levels of these oxidative stress markers and leukocyte markers were much higher in the MsrA(-/-) than in the MsrA(+/+) kidneys, the latter suggesting that the exacerbated kidney fibrosis in MsrA(-/-) mice was associated with enhanced inflammatory responses. Collectively, our data suggest that MsrA plays a protective role in the progression of UUO-induced kidney fibrosis via suppression of fibrotic responses caused by oxidative stress and inflammation.

  5. Amino acid metabolism in the human fetus at term: leucine, valine, and methionine kinetics.

    PubMed

    van den Akker, Chris H P; Schierbeek, Henk; Minderman, Gardi; Vermes, Andras; Schoonderwaldt, Ernst M; Duvekot, Johannes J; Steegers, Eric A P; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2011-12-01

    Human fetal metabolism is largely unexplored. Understanding how a healthy fetus achieves its fast growth rates could eventually play a pivotal role in improving future nutritional strategies for premature infants. To quantify specific fetal amino acid kinetics, eight healthy pregnant women received before elective cesarean section at term, continuous stable isotope infusions of the essential amino acids [1-13C,15N]leucine, [U-13C5]valine, and [1-13C]methionine. Umbilical blood was collected after birth and analyzed for enrichments and concentrations using mass spectrometry techniques. Fetuses showed considerable leucine, valine, and methionine uptake and high turnover rates. α-Ketoisocaproate, but not α-ketoisovalerate (the leucine and valine ketoacids, respectively), was transported at net rate from the fetus to the placenta. Especially, leucine and valine data suggested high oxidation rates, up to half of net uptake. This was supported by relatively low α-ketoisocaproate reamination rates to leucine. Our data suggest high protein breakdown and synthesis rates, comparable with, or even slightly higher than in premature infants. The relatively large uptakes of total leucine and valine carbon also suggest high fetal oxidation rates of these essential branched chain amino acids.

  6. Milk production in dairy goats supplemented with different levels of ruminally protected methionine.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Mélendez, Erick; Mendoza, Germán D; Castrejón-Pineda, Francisco A; Ducoing-Watty, Andrés E

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the study reported in this Research Communication was to evaluate graded levels of ruminally protected methionine (RPM) in dairy goat rations on milk production and live weight changes during 155 d of lactation. Twenty-five primiparous dairy goats (crosses of Toggenburg, French Alpine and Saanen; 45·4 ± 1·0 kg BW) were fed a basal diet (10·10% CP, 6·13 DP and 2·34 Mcal/kg ME) of corn silage, oat hay, alfalfa hay and concentrate (80% forage, 20% concentrate). After kidding, the treatments, which consisted of four oral doses of ruminally protected methionine (RPM) at 0, 1, 2 and 3 g/d, were randomly assigned to the goats. The experiment was conducted for 110 d with measurements of milk production and composition, body weight and dry matter intake. No treatment effects were detected in milk production and composition. However, goats with RPM showed a positive live weight changes during lactation which were improved as dose was increased (linear P < 0·01) whereas goats without RPM showed weight loss during the experiment. PMID:27048778

  7. Expression and biochemical characterization of a type I methionine aminopeptidase of Plasmodium vivax.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Mi; Ju, Jung-Won; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Ju, Hye-Lim; Lee, Jinyoung; Lee, Kon Ho; Lee, Won-Ja; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Kim, Tong-Soo; Na, Byoung-Kuk

    2015-04-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs), ubiquitous enzymes that play an important role in nascent protein maturation, have been recognized as attractive targets for the development of drugs against pathogenic protozoa including Plasmodium spp. Here, we characterized partial biochemical properties of a type I MetAP of Plasmodium vivax (PvMetAP1). PvMetAP1 had the typical amino acid residues essential for metal binding and substrate binding sites, which are well conserved in the type I MetAP family enzymes. Recombinant PvMetAP1 showed activity in a broad range of neutral pHs, with optimum activity at pH 7.5. PvMetAP1 was stable under neutral and alkaline pHs, but was relatively unstable under acidic conditions. PvMetAP1 activity was highly increased in the presence of Mn(2+), and was effectively inhibited by a metal chelator, EDTA. Fumagillin and aminopeptidase inhibitors, amastatin and bestatin, also showed an inhibitory effect on PvMetAP1. The enzyme had a highly specific hydrolytic activity for N-terminal methionine. These results collectively suggest that PvMetAP1 belongs to the family of type I MetAPs and may play a pivotal role for the maintenance of P. vivax physiology by mediating protein maturation and processing of the parasite.

  8. The Methionine-aromatic Motif Plays a Unique Role in Stabilizing Protein Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Christopher C.; Cembran, Alessandro; Perlmutter, Jason D.; Lewis, Andrew K.; Labello, Nicholas P.; Gao, Jiali; Sachs, Jonathan N.

    2012-01-01

    Of the 20 amino acids, the precise function of methionine (Met) remains among the least well understood. To establish a determining characteristic of methionine that fundamentally differentiates it from purely hydrophobic residues, we have used in vitro cellular experiments, molecular simulations, quantum calculations, and a bioinformatics screen of the Protein Data Bank. We show that approximately one-third of all known protein structures contain an energetically stabilizing Met-aromatic motif and, remarkably, that greater than 10,000 structures contain this motif more than 10 times. Critically, we show that as compared with a purely hydrophobic interaction, the Met-aromatic motif yields an additional stabilization of 1–1.5 kcal/mol. To highlight its importance and to dissect the energetic underpinnings of this motif, we have studied two clinically relevant TNF ligand-receptor complexes, namely TRAIL-DR5 and LTα-TNFR1. In both cases, we show that the motif is necessary for high affinity ligand binding as well as function. Additionally, we highlight previously overlooked instances of the motif in several disease-related Met mutations. Our results strongly suggest that the Met-aromatic motif should be exploited in the rational design of therapeutics targeting a range of proteins. PMID:22859300

  9. Protective roles of methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase against stresses in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hannah; Cho, Young-Wook; Ji, Sun-Young; Kang, Ga-Young; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe msrB(+) gene encoding methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase (MsrB) was cloned into the shuttle vector pRS316 to generate the recombinant plasmid pFMetSO. The msrB(+) mRNA level was significantly increased in the S. pombe cells harboring pFMetSO, indicating that the cloned msrB(+) gene is functioning. In the presence of 0.1 mM L-methionine-(R,S)-sulfoxide, the S. pombe cells harboring pFMetSO could grow normally but the growth of the vector control cells was almost arrested. The S. pombe cells harboring pFMetSO exhibited the enhanced growth on the minimal medium plates with stress-inducing agents, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide radical-generating menadione (MD), nitric oxide (NO)-generating sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and cadmium (Cd), when compared with the vector control cells. They also gave rise to the enhanced growth at the high incubation temperature of 37 °C than the vector control cells. The S. pombe cells harboring pFMetSO contained lower reactive oxygen species (ROS) and higher total glutathione (GSH) levels than the vector control cells. In brief, the S. pombe MsrB plays a protective role against oxidative, nitrosative, and thermal stresses, and is involved in diminishing intracellular ROS level.

  10. Expression, purification and crystallization of l-methionine γ-lyase 2 from Entamoeba histolytica

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Dan; Yamagata, Wataru; Kamei, Kaeko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Harada, Shigeharu

    2006-10-01

    l-Methionine γ-lyase 2 from E. histolytica, a key enzyme in sulfur-containing amino-acid degradation in this protozoan parasite, has been crystallized in a form suitable for X-ray structure analysis. l-Methionine γ-lyase (MGL) is considered to be an attractive target for rational drug development because the enzyme is absent in mammalian hosts. To enable structure-based design of drugs targeting MGL, one of the two MGL isoenzymes (EhMGL2) was crystallized in the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.89, b = 102.68, c = 169.87 Å. The crystal diffracted to a resolution of 2.0 Å. The presence of a tetramer in the asymmetric unit (4 × 43.1 kDa) gives a Matthews coefficient of 2.2 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method and structure refinement is now in progress.

  11. Structural Insights into Interaction between Mammalian Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase B1 and Thioredoxin

    PubMed Central

    Dobrovolska, Olena; Rychkov, Georgy; Shumilina, Elena; Nerinovski, Kirill; Schmidt, Alexander; Shabalin, Konstantin; Yakimov, Alexander; Dikiy, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of the cellular redox balance has vital importance for correcting organism functioning. Methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) are among the key members of the cellular antioxidant defence system. To work properly, methionine sulfoxide reductases need to be reduced by their biological partner, thioredoxin (Trx). This process, according to the available kinetic data, represents the slowest step in the Msrs catalytic cycle. In the present paper, we investigated structural aspects of the intermolecular complex formation between mammalian MsrB1 and Trx. NMR spectroscopy and biocomputing were the two mostly used through the research approaches. The formation of NMR detectable MsrB1/Trx complex was monitored and studied in attempt to understand MsrB1 reduction mechanism. Using NMR data, molecular mechanics, protein docking, and molecular dynamics simulations, it was found that intermediate MsrB1/Trx complex is stabilized by interprotein β-layer. The complex formation accompanied by distortion of disulfide bond within MsrB1 facilitates the reduction of oxidized MsrB1 as it is evidenced by the obtained data. PMID:22505815

  12. Calorie restriction and methionine restriction in control of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production by the transsulfuration pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hine, Christopher; Mitchell, James R.

    2015-01-01

    H2S is a gas easily identified by its distinctive odor. Although environmental exposure to H2S has been viewed alternately as therapeutic or toxic through the centuries, H2S has recently regained recognition for its numerous beneficial biological effects. Most experiments documenting such benefits, including improved glucose tolerance, increased stress resistance, and even lifespan extension, are based on exposure of experimental organisms to exogenous sources of H2S. However, appreciation is growing for the importance of H2S produced endogenously by the evolutionary conserved transsulfuration pathway (TSP) in health and longevity. Recent data implicate H2S produced by the TSP in pleiotropic benefits of dietary restriction (DR), or reduced nutrient/energy intake without malnutrition. DR, best known as the most reliable way to extend lifespan in a wide range of experimental organisms, includes various regimens aimed at either reducing overall calorie intake (calorie restriction, intermittent/ every-other-day fasting) or reducing particular nutrients such as protein or the essential amino acid, methionine (methionine restriction), with overlapping functional benefits on stress resistance, metabolic fitness and lifespan. Here we will review the small but growing body of literature linking the TSP to the functional benefits of DR in part through the production of endogenous H2S, with an emphasis on regulation of the TSP and H2S production by diet and mechanisms of beneficial H2S action. PMID:25523462

  13. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  14. l-Methionine, a Precursor of Trace Methane in Some Proteolytic Clostridia

    PubMed Central

    Rimbault, Alain; Niel, Philippe; Virelizier, Henri; Darbord, Jacques Christian; Leluan, Georges

    1988-01-01

    The in vivo formation of methane and of several S-methyl volatile compounds from the terminal S-methyl group of l-methionine is reported for growing cultures of four Clostridium strains (C. hastiforme, C. histolyticum, C. subterminale, and Clostridium sp. strain DSM 1786). After growth in 5 ml of unamended medium, C. hastiforme formed the highest amount of methane (408 nmol per tube in the headspace). When the culture medium was amended with 100 mM l-[S-methyl-2H3]methionine, the four strains formed [2H3]methane (proportion in the methane peak, >85%) as well as methanethiol, dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, and S-methyl thioacetate labeled on the methyl moiety. Methanethiol is also a precursor of methane for Clostridium sp. strain DSM 1786. The trace methane formation observed for these four proteolytic, nonglucidolytic Clostridium strains can be of ecological interest, particularly in aquatic sediments and in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals. It can explain in part the trace methane formation which cannot be ascribed to methanogens sensu stricto. Images PMID:16347668

  15. Histone H3 lysine-to-methionine mutants as a paradigm to study chromatin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Hans-Martin; Morgan, Marc; Gao, Xin; Jackson, Jessica; Rickels, Ryan; Swanson, Selene K.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Eissenberg, Joel C.; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Histone H3 lysine27-to-methionine (H3K27M) gain-of-function mutations occur in highly aggressive pediatric gliomas. Here, we establish a Drosophila animal model for the pathogenic histone H3K27M mutation and show that its overexpression resembles Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) loss-of-function phenotypes, causing de-repression of PRC2 target genes and developmental perturbations. Similarly, a H3K9M mutant depletes H3K9 methylation levels and suppresses position-effect variegation in various Drosophila tissues. The histone H3K9 demethylase KDM3B/JHDM2 associates with H3K9M nucleosomes and its overexpression in Drosophila results in loss of H3K9 methylation levels and heterochromatic silencing defects. Here we establish histone lysine-to-methionine mutants as robust in vivo tools for inhibiting methylation pathways that also function as biochemical reagents for capturing site-specific histone-modifying enzymes, thus providing molecular insight into chromatin-signaling pathways. PMID:25170156

  16. The High-Affinity E. Coli Methionine ABC Transporter: Structure And Allosteric Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kadaba, N.S.; Kaiser, J.T.; Johnson, E.; Lee, A.; Rees, D.C.

    2009-05-18

    The crystal structure of the high-affinity Escherichia coli MetNI methionine uptake transporter, a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) family, has been solved to 3.7 angstrom resolution. The overall architecture of MetNI reveals two copies of the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) MetN in complex with two copies of the transmembrane domain MetI, with the transporter adopting an inward-facing conformation exhibiting widely separated nucleotide binding domains. Each MetI subunit is organized around a core of five transmembrane helices that correspond to a subset of the helices observed in the larger membrane-spanning subunits of the molybdate (ModBC) and maltose (MalFGK) ABC transporters. In addition to the conserved nucleotide binding domain of the ABC family, MetN contains a carboxyl-terminal extension with a ferredoxin-like fold previously assigned to a conserved family of regulatory ligand-binding domains. These domains separate the nucleotide binding domains and would interfere with their association required for ATP binding and hydrolysis. Methionine binds to the dimerized carboxyl-terminal domain and is shown to inhibit ATPase activity. These observations are consistent with an allosteric regulatory mechanism operating at the level of transport activity, where increased intracellular levels of the transported ligand stabilize an inward-facing, ATPase-inactive state of MetNI to inhibit further ligand translocation into the cell.

  17. Methionine oxidation of amyloid peptides by peroxovanadium complexes: inhibition of fibril formation through a distinct mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; Du, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Fibril formation of amyloid peptides is linked to a number of pathological states. The prion protein (PrP) and amyloid-β (Aβ) are two remarkable examples that are correlated with prion disorders and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. Metal complexes, such as those formed by platinum and ruthenium compounds, can act as inhibitors against peptide aggregation primarily through metal coordination. This study revealed the inhibitory effect of two peroxovanadium complexes, (NH4)[VO(O2)2(bipy)]·4H2O (1) and (NH4)[VO(O2)2(phen)]·2H2O (2), on amyloid fibril formation of PrP106-126 and Aβ1-42via site-specific oxidation of methionine residues, besides direct binding of the complexes with the peptides. Complexes 1 and 2 showed higher anti-amyloidogenic activity on PrP106-126 aggregation than on Aβ1-42, though their regulation on the cytotoxicity induced by the two peptides could not be differentiated. The action efficacy may be attributed to the different molecular structures of the vanadium complex and the peptide sequence. Results reflected that methionine oxidation may be a crucial action mode in inhibiting amyloid fibril formation. This study offers a possible application value for peroxovanadium complexes against amyloid proteins. PMID:26444976

  18. A dual fluorescent reporter for the investigation of methionine mistranslation in live cells.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana Cristina; Kordala, Anna J; Strack, Rita; Wang, Xiaoyun; Geslain, Renaud; Delaney, Kamila; Clark, Wesley C; Keenan, Robert; Pan, Tao

    2016-03-01

    In mammalian cells under oxidative stress, the methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) misacylates noncognate tRNAs at frequencies as high as 10% distributed among up to 28 tRNA species. Instead of being detrimental for the cell, misincorporation of methionine residues in the proteome reduces the risk of oxidative damage to proteins, which aids the oxidative stress response. tRNA microarrays have been essential for the detection of the full pattern of misacylated tRNAs, but have limited capacity to investigate the misacylation and mistranslation mechanisms in live cells. Here we develop a dual-fluorescence reporter to specifically measure methionine misincorporation at glutamic acid codons GAA and GAG via tRNA(Glu) mismethionylation in human cells. Our method relies on mutating a specific Met codon in the active site of the fluorescent protein mCherry to a Glu codon that renders mCherry nonfluorescent when translation follows the genetic code. Mistranslation utilizing mismethionylated tRNA(Glu) restores fluorescence in proportion to the amount of misacylated tRNA(Glu). This cellular approach works well for both transient transfection and established stable HEK293 lines. It is rapid, straightforward, and well suited for high-throughput activity analysis under a wide range of physiological conditions. As a proof of concept, we apply this method to characterize the effect of human tRNA(Glu) isodecoders on mistranslation and discuss the implications of our findings.

  19. Methionine oxidation of amyloid peptides by peroxovanadium complexes: inhibition of fibril formation through a distinct mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; Du, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Fibril formation of amyloid peptides is linked to a number of pathological states. The prion protein (PrP) and amyloid-β (Aβ) are two remarkable examples that are correlated with prion disorders and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. Metal complexes, such as those formed by platinum and ruthenium compounds, can act as inhibitors against peptide aggregation primarily through metal coordination. This study revealed the inhibitory effect of two peroxovanadium complexes, (NH4)[VO(O2)2(bipy)]·4H2O (1) and (NH4)[VO(O2)2(phen)]·2H2O (2), on amyloid fibril formation of PrP106-126 and Aβ1-42via site-specific oxidation of methionine residues, besides direct binding of the complexes with the peptides. Complexes 1 and 2 showed higher anti-amyloidogenic activity on PrP106-126 aggregation than on Aβ1-42, though their regulation on the cytotoxicity induced by the two peptides could not be differentiated. The action efficacy may be attributed to the different molecular structures of the vanadium complex and the peptide sequence. Results reflected that methionine oxidation may be a crucial action mode in inhibiting amyloid fibril formation. This study offers a possible application value for peroxovanadium complexes against amyloid proteins.

  20. Calorie restriction and methionine restriction in control of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production by the transsulfuration pathway.

    PubMed

    Hine, Christopher; Mitchell, James R

    2015-08-01

    H2S is a gas easily identified by its distinctive odor. Although environmental exposure to H2S has been viewed alternately as therapeutic or toxic through the centuries, H2S has recently regained recognition for its numerous beneficial biological effects. Most experiments documenting such benefits, including improved glucose tolerance, increased stress resistance, and even lifespan extension, are based on exposure of experimental organisms to exogenous sources of H2S. However, appreciation is growing for the importance of H2S produced endogenously by the evolutionary conserved transsulfuration pathway (TSP) in health and longevity. Recent data implicate H2S produced by the TSP in pleiotropic benefits of dietary restriction (DR), or reduced nutrient/energy intake without malnutrition. DR, best known as the most reliable way to extend lifespan in a wide range of experimental organisms, includes various regimens aimed at either reducing overall calorie intake (calorie restriction, intermittent/every-other-day fasting) or reducing particular nutrients such as protein or the essential amino acid, methionine (methionine restriction), with overlapping functional benefits on stress resistance, metabolic fitness and lifespan. Here we will review the small but growing body of literature linking the TSP to the functional benefits of DR in part through the production of endogenous H2S, with an emphasis on regulation of the TSP and H2S production by diet and mechanisms of beneficial H2S action.

  1. Capture of an electron by ions in methionine and norleucine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrosimov, V. V.; Basalaev, A. A.; Morozov, Yu. G.; Panov, M. N.; Smirnov, O. V.; Tropp, E. A.

    2013-09-01

    The relative cross sections of processes taking place when H+ and He2+ ions with an energy of 6 z keV ( z is the ionic charge) capture an electron from molecules of C5H11NO2S methionine (proteogenic amino acid) and C6H13NO2 norleucine (nonproteogenic amino acid) are measured by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (a methionine molecule transforms into a norleucine molecule by substituting the CH2 group for the S heteroatom). The fragmentation pattern of resulting molecular ions is established from correlation analysis of the detection times of all fragment ions. The results are compared with experimental data for fragmentation of the same molecules ionized by electrons and photons. In these amino acids, the pattern of molecular ion fragmentation is found to depend on the type of molecule ionization. However, the detachment cross section of the COOH neutral group or residue (neutral or charged) R of a side chain of the amino acid is invariably among the largest. The relative cross sections of capture with single and double ionization of molecules are measured.

  2. Whey protein supplementation increases methionine intake but not homocysteine plasma concentration in rats.

    PubMed

    Deminice, Rafael; Comparotto, Hugo; Jordao, Alceu Afonso

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of whey protein supplementation on homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism and liver oxidative stress in rats. Twenty-four rats were divided into 3 groups (n = 8) to receive one of the following diets for 4 weeks: control diet (C), whey protein-composed diet (WP), and whey protein-supplemented diet (WPS). The C and WP diets consisted of AIN-93 with 20% casein and 20% whey protein as protein source, respectively. WPS was AIN-93 (20% casein) supplemented by the addition of 20% (w/w) whey protein. Four weeks of ingesting a WPS diet resulted in a significantly higher (P < 0.05) total protein and methionine intakes. Although a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the hepatic S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels occurred in WPS group compared with C and WP, no significant change was observed in plasma Hcy concentration between groups. Furthermore, the levels of lipid hydroperoxides and advanced oxidation protein products, known liver oxidative stress markers, were increased in the WPS group compared with the C group. In addition, no change in glutathione liver concentration was observed in any of the groups studied. In conclusion, whey protein supplementation increases methionine intake substantially; however, it does not change plasma Hcy concentrations. On the other hand, increased hepatic oxidative stress markers were observed in whey protein supplemented rats were probably due to high protein intake.

  3. Progress in the microbial production of S-adenosyl-L-methionine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hailong; Wang, Zhilai; Cai, Haibo; Zhou, Changlin

    2016-09-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), which exists in all living organisms, serves as an activated group donor in a range of metabolic reactions, including trans-methylation, trans-sulfuration and trans-propylamine. Compared with its chemical synthesis and enzyme catalysis production, the microbial production of SAM is feasible for industrial applications. The current clinical demand for SAM is constantly increasing. Therefore, vast interest exists in engineering the SAM metabolism in cells for increasing product titers. Here, we provided an overview of updates on SAM microbial productivity improvements with an emphasis on various strategies that have been used to enhance SAM production based on increasing the precursor and co-factor availabilities in microbes. These strategies included the sections of SAM-producing microbes and their mutant screening, optimization of the fermentation process, and the metabolic engineering. The SAM-producing strains that were used extensively were Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, Candida utilis, Scheffersomyces stipitis, Kluyveromyces lactis, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Escherichia coli, in addition to others. The optimization of the fermentation process mainly focused on the enhancement of the methionine, ATP, and other co-factor levels through pulsed feeding as well as the optimization of nitrogen and carbon sources. Various metabolic engineering strategies using precise control of gene expression in engineered strains were also highlighted in the present review. In addition, some prospects on SAM microbial production were discussed. PMID:27465853

  4. Calorie restriction and methionine restriction in control of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production by the transsulfuration pathway.

    PubMed

    Hine, Christopher; Mitchell, James R

    2015-08-01

    H2S is a gas easily identified by its distinctive odor. Although environmental exposure to H2S has been viewed alternately as therapeutic or toxic through the centuries, H2S has recently regained recognition for its numerous beneficial biological effects. Most experiments documenting such benefits, including improved glucose tolerance, increased stress resistance, and even lifespan extension, are based on exposure of experimental organisms to exogenous sources of H2S. However, appreciation is growing for the importance of H2S produced endogenously by the evolutionary conserved transsulfuration pathway (TSP) in health and longevity. Recent data implicate H2S produced by the TSP in pleiotropic benefits of dietary restriction (DR), or reduced nutrient/energy intake without malnutrition. DR, best known as the most reliable way to extend lifespan in a wide range of experimental organisms, includes various regimens aimed at either reducing overall calorie intake (calorie restriction, intermittent/every-other-day fasting) or reducing particular nutrients such as protein or the essential amino acid, methionine (methionine restriction), with overlapping functional benefits on stress resistance, metabolic fitness and lifespan. Here we will review the small but growing body of literature linking the TSP to the functional benefits of DR in part through the production of endogenous H2S, with an emphasis on regulation of the TSP and H2S production by diet and mechanisms of beneficial H2S action. PMID:25523462

  5. Engineered Citrobacter freundii methionine γ-lyase effectively produces antimicrobial thiosulfinates.

    PubMed

    Morozova, Elena A; Kulikova, Vitalia V; Rodionov, Alexei N; Revtovich, Svetlana V; Anufrieva, Natalya V; Demidkina, Tatyana V

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity of thiosulfinates in situ produced by mixtures of Citrobacter freundii methionine γ-lyase (MGL) with new substrates, l-methionine and S-(alkyl/allyl)-l-cysteine sulfoxides has been recently demonstrated (Anufrieva et al., 2015). This opens a way to the rational design of a new biotechnologically relevant antimicrobial drug producer. To increase the efficiency of the enzyme toward sulfoxides, the mutant forms of MGL, with the replacements of active site cysteine 115 with alanine (C115A MGL) and histidine (C115H MGL) were obtained. The replacement of cysteine 115 by histidine results in the loss of activity of the mutant enzyme in the γ-elimination reaction of physiological substrate, whereas the activity in the β-elimination reaction of characteristic substrates persists. However, the catalytic efficiency of C115H MGL in the β-elimination reaction of S-substituted l-cysteine sulfoxides is increased by about an order of magnitude compared to the wild type MGL. The antibacterial activity of C115H MGL mixtures with a number of sulfoxides was assessed against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The bacteriostatic effect was more pronounced against Gram-positive than against Gram-negative bacteria, while antibacterial potential proved to be quite similar. Thus, the mutant enzyme C115H MGL is an effective catalyst, in particular, for decomposition of sulfoxides and the pharmacological couples of the mutant form with sulfoxides might be new antimicrobial agents.

  6. Evidence for the dimerization-mediated catalysis of methionine sulfoxide reductase A from Clostridium oremlandii.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Hye; Lee, Kitaik; Kwak, Geun-Hee; Park, Yeon Seung; Lee, Kong-Joo; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium oremlandii MsrA (CoMsrA) is a natively selenocysteine-containing methionine-S-sulfoxide reductase and classified into a 1-Cys type MsrA. CoMsrA exists as a monomer in solution. Herein, we report evidence that CoMsrA can undergo homodimerization during catalysis. The monomeric CoMsrA dimerizes in the presence of its substrate methionine sulfoxide via an intermolecular disulfide bond between catalytic Cys16 residues. The dimeric CoMsrA is resolved by the reductant glutaredoxin, suggesting the relevance of dimerization in catalysis. The dimerization reaction occurs in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the occurrence of homodimer formation in the native selenoprotein CoMsrA is confirmed. We also determine the crystal structure of the dimeric CoMsrA, having the dimer interface around the two catalytic Cys16 residues. A central cone-shaped hole is present in the surface model of dimeric structure, and the two Cys16 residues constitute the base of the hole. Collectively, our biochemical and structural analyses suggest a novel dimerization-mediated mechanism for CoMsrA catalysis that is additionally involved in CoMsrA regeneration by glutaredoxin.

  7. MAT1A variants are associated with hypertension, stroke, and DNA damage and are modulated by vlasma vitamin B6 and folate concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated plasma homocysteine is a cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor. However, the mechanism underlying this relationship is not understood. S-adenosylmethionine synthetase isoform type-1 (MAT1A) is a key enzyme in the metabolism of homocysteine, converting dietary methionine into S-adenosyl m...

  8. The effect of dietary methionine and white tea on oxidative status of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jiménez, Amalia; Peres, Helena; Cruz Rubio, Vera; Oliva-Teles, Aires

    2012-10-01

    Free radicals are continuously generated during an organism's lifetime. In order to understand the involvement in the oxidative status of fish, methionine and white tea were assayed as antioxidant supplements in diets for gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata). For the purpose of this study, four isonitrogenous and isolipidic diets were formulated to contain 45 % of protein and 18 % lipid and 0·3 % methionine (Met diet), 2·9 % white tea dry leaves (Tea diet) and 2·9 % of white tea dry leaves + 0·3 % methionine (Tea + Met diet). An unsupplemented diet was used as the control. Key enzymatic antioxidant defences, superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoenzyme profile, total, reduced and oxidised glutathione and oxidative damage markers were determined. The results showed that dietary methionine supplementation increased liver SOD activity, while white tea induced higher hepatic catalase activity. Dietary white tea induced a notable increase in Mn-SOD isoenzyme. This is the first study to provide evidence that dietary tea inclusion in fish feeding could be an important source of Mn with metabolic repercussions on antioxidant mechanisms.

  9. Analysis of Methionine Oxidation in Myosin Isoforms in Porcine Skeletal Muscle by LC-MS/MS Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin-Yeon; Jung, Eun-Young; Jeong, Tae-Chul; Yang, Han-Sul; Kim, Gap-Don

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze oxidized methionines in the myosin isoforms of porcine longissimus thoracis, psoas major, and semimembranosus muscles by liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS). A total of 836 queries matched to four myosin isoforms (myosin-1, -2, -4, and -7) were analyzed and each myosin isoform was identified by its unique peptides (7.3-13.3). Forty-four peptides were observed from all three muscles. Seventeen peptides were unique to the myosin isoform and the others were common peptides expressed in two or more myosin isoforms. Five were identified as oxidized peptides with one or two methionine sulfoxides with 16 amu of mass modification. Methionines on residues 215 (215), 438 (438), 853 (851), 856 (854), 1071 (1069), and 1106 (1104) of myosin-1 (myosin-4) were oxidized by the addition of oxygen. Myosin-2 had two oxidized methionines on residues 215 and 438. No queries matched to myosin-7 were observed as oxidized peptides. LC-MS/MS allows analysis of the oxidation of specific amino acids on specific residue sites, as well as in specific proteins in the food system. PMID:27194935

  10. Mice fed a lipogenic methionine-choline-deficient diet develop hypermetabolism coincident with hepatic suppression of SCD-1.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipogenic diets that are completely devoid of methionine and choline (MCD) induce hepatic steatosis. MCD feeding also provokes systemic weight loss, for unclear reasons. In this study, we found that MCD feeding causes profound hepatic suppression of the gene encoding stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase-1...

  11. Zinc Methionine Supplementation Impacts Gene and Protein Expression in Calf-fed Holstein Steers with Miniaml Impact on Feedlot Performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calf-fed Holstein steers were supplemented with a zinc (Zn) methionine supplement (ZnMet; ZINPRO®; Zinpro Corporation, Eden Prairie, MN) for 115±5 days prior to harvest along with zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; Zilmax®; Merck Animal Health, Summit, NJ) for the last 20 days with a 3 day withdrawal to ...

  12. Comparative toxicity of selenate, selenite, seleno-DL-methionine and seleno-DL-cystine to Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, K.J.; Foe, C.G.; Knight, A.W. )

    1993-04-01

    Elevated concentrations of the trace element selenium (Se) have resulted in the degradation of several aquatic ecosystems. This study evaluated the comparative toxicity of several aqueous chemical species of selenium to an aquatic cladoceran, Daphnia magna. Responses to mixtures of these selenium forms, varying the sulfate concentration, were also examined. Initial experiments compared the toxicity of aqueous forms of selenate, selenite, seleno-DL-methionine, and seleno-DL-cystine to neonate Daphnia magna, resulting in 4-h LC50 values of 2.84, 0.55, 0.31, and 2.01 mg Se per liter, respectively. Immobilization was an acute sublethal response observed during exposure to the organic selenium forms only. The 48-h IC50 values were 0.045 and 0.52 mg Se per liter for seleno-DL-methionine and seleno-DL-cystine, respectively. Evaluation of the invertebrate response to various combinations of selenate, selenite, and seleno-DL-methionine demonstrated that the toxicities of these forms of selenium are additive. Increasing the concentration of sulfate decreased, varied, and left unaffected the toxicities of selenate, selenite, and seleno-DL-methionine, respectively. These results indicate that both the chemical form of selenium and the sulfate concentration can influence the toxicity of selenium.

  13. Comparison of methionine chelated versus sulfate trace minerals on rate and efficiency of gain and pregnancy rates in beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives of this experiment were to compare rate and efficiency of gain, and conception rates of yearling heifers supplemented with Cu, Zn, and Mn as either metal methionine hydroxy analogue chelated trace minerals (CTM; provided as MINTREX) or the same trace minerals in SO4 form. The experimental...

  14. Oxidation of methionine in PrP is dependent upon the oxidant and the amino acid two positions removed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background/Introduction. Methionine oxidation has been shown both to be associated with prion formation and implicated in the inhibition of amyloid formation in model systems. This work is based on model systems where hydrogen peroxide was used as an oxidant. Materials and Methods. We developed...

  15. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A affects β-amyloid solubility and mitochondrial function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Jackob; Du, Fang; Bowman, Connor F; Yan, Shirley S

    2016-03-15

    Accumulation of oxidized proteins, and especially β-amyloid (Aβ), is thought to be one of the common causes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The current studies determine the effect of an in vivo methionine sulfoxidation of Aβ through ablation of the methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) in a mouse model of AD, a mouse that overexpresses amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Aβ in neurons. Lack of MsrA fosters the formation of methionine sulfoxide in proteins, and thus its ablation in the AD-mouse model will increase the formation of methionine sulfoxide in Aβ. Indeed, the novel MsrA-deficient APP mice (APP(+)/MsrAKO) exhibited higher levels of soluble Aβ in brain compared with APP(+) mice. Furthermore, mitochondrial respiration and the activity of cytochrome c oxidase were compromised in the APP(+)/MsrAKO compared with control mice. These results suggest that lower MsrA activity modifies Aβ solubility properties and causes mitochondrial dysfunction, and augmenting its activity may be beneficial in delaying AD progression.

  16. HPLC Separation of the (S,S)- and (R,S)- forms of S-Adenosyl-L-methionine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianyu; Klinman, Judith P.

    2015-01-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine, an important biological cofactor, exists in two chiral forms, (S,S)- and (R,S)-, only the former of which is biologically active. Herein, we develop a chromatographic method to obtain pure (S,S)-AdoMet using a single C18 column. PMID:25681113

  17. Boron doped diamond and glassy carbon electrodes comparative study of the oxidation behaviour of cysteine and methionine.

    PubMed

    Enache, T A; Oliveira-Brett, A M

    2011-04-01

    The electrochemical oxidation behaviour at boron doped diamond and glassy carbon electrodes of the sulphur-containing amino acids cysteine and methionine, using cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry over a wide pH range, was compared. The oxidation reactions of these amino acids are irreversible, diffusion-controlled pH dependent processes, and occur in a complex cascade mechanism. The amino acid cysteine undergoes similar three consecutive oxidation reactions at both electrodes. The first step involves the oxidation of the sulfhydryl group with radical formation, that undergoes nucleophilic attack by water to give an intermediate species that is oxidized in the second step to cysteic acid. The oxidation of the sulfhydryl group leads to a disulfide bridge between two similar cysteine moieties forming cysteine. The subsequent oxidation of cystine occurs at a higher potential, due to the strong disulfide bridge covalent bond. The electro-oxidation of methionine at a glassy carbon electrode occurs in two steps, corresponding to the formation of sulfoxide and sulfone, involving the adsorption and protonation/deprotonation of the thiol group, followed by electrochemical oxidation. Methionine undergoes a one-step oxidation reaction at boron doped diamond electrodes due to the negligible adsorption, and the oxidation also leads to the formation of methionine sulfone. PMID:21377428

  18. The effect of replacement of methionine by homocystine on survival of malignant and normal adult mammalian cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Halpern, B C; Clark, B R; Hardy, D N; Halpern, R M; Smith, R A

    1974-04-01

    In tissue cultures of normal adult and malignant mammalian cells, homocystine has been substituted for methionine in a medium rich in folic acid and cyanocobalamin. Normal adult cells thrive. Three highly malignant cell types from three different species, including man, die.

  19. [Studies on milk from different species. I. The content of methionine in cow, water buffalo and sheep caseines].

    PubMed

    Mincione, B; Spagna Musso, S; Ke Matteo, M; Di Fiore, R

    1976-01-01

    The present paper reports the content of methionine in cow, water buffalo and sheep casein measured according to Maugenet and Coauthors. The following values were obtained: 3,25% in cow; 3,15% in water buffalo; 3,16% in sheep.

  20. Toward an Understanding of the Oxidation Process of Methionine Enkephalin: A Combined Electrochemistry, Quantum Chemistry and Quantum Chemical Topology Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergès, Jacqueline; Kamar, Amanda; de Oliveira, Pedro; Pilmé, Julien; Luppi, Eleonora; Houée-Levin, Chantal

    2015-06-11

    Recent experimental results about the oxidation of methionine enkephalin by ·OH radicals indicated an intramolecular electron transfer between the C-terminal methionine radical cation and the tyrosine N-terminus too fast to be observed. We have investigated the thermodynamic possibility of this intramolecular electron transfer by calculating the one-electron redox potentials of both residues for several conformations of the peptide, extracted from the experimental data of the Protein Data Bank (1PLW). Using a QM/MM approach, we show that the redox potential of the Met(•+)/Met couple is higher than that of the TyrOH(•+)/TyrOH one (tyrosine is denoted as TyrOH) for all conformations. The intramolecular electron transfer between both residues (from TyrOH to Met(•+)) is thus always thermodynamically allowed. Previously, we had performed topological studies on the intramolecular electron transfer which predicted this charge transfer. A study by cyclic voltammetry pointed out that the wave belonging to methionine is not present when methionine enkephalin is oxidized and only the direct involvement of the tyrosine residue is observed.

  1. Molecular imaging of 1p/19q deletion in oligodendroglial tumours with 11C-methionine positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Iwadate, Yasuo; Shinozaki, Natsuki; Matsutani, Tomoo; Uchino, Yoshio; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chromosome 1p/19q deletion is an established prognostic and predictive marker in the WHO grade III oligodendroglial tumours (OT). To estimate the genetic status preoperatively, the authors investigated the correlation between the uptake of 11C-methionine in positron emission tomography (PET) and the 1p/19q status in grades II and III OT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 144 patients with gliomas who received 11C-methionine PET. 66 cases with grades II–III oligodendrogliomas or oligoastrocytomas underwent fluorescence in situ hybridisation to determine the 1p/19q status. The tissue uptake of 11C-methionine was expressed as the ratio of the maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) in tumour areas to the mean SUV (SUVmean) in the contralateral normal brain (tumour-to-normal tissue (T/N) ratio). Results The T/N ratio in 11C-methionine PET was significantly higher in grade III OT than in grade II tumours. The mean T/N ratio of the grade II tumours without 1p/19q deletion was significantly higher than that of the grade II tumours with 1p/19q deletion (mean 2.67 vs 1.94, respectively; p=0.0457). In grade III tumours, the mean T/N ratio of the tumours without 1p/19q deletion was also significantly higher than that of the tumours with 1p/19q deletion (mean 4.83 vs 3.49, respectively; p=0.0261). The rate of IDH1 mutation was lower and the rate of contrast enhancement on MRIs was higher in the 1p/19q non-deleted OT than those with 1p/19q deletion, which may contribute to the high T/N ratio. Conclusions Among suspected OT, 11C-methionine PET may help us preoperatively discriminate tumours with and without 1p/19q deletion. PMID:26848169

  2. Dietary methionine availability affects the main factors involved in muscle protein turnover in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Belghit, Ikram; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine; Geurden, Inge; Dias, Karine; Surget, Anne; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Panserat, Stéphane; Seiliez, Iban

    2014-08-28

    Methionine is a limiting essential amino acid in most plant-based ingredients of fish feed. In the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of dietary methionine concentrations on several main factors involved in the regulation of mRNA translation and the two major proteolytic pathways (ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosomal) in the white muscle of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The fish were fed for 6 weeks one of the three isonitrogenous diets providing three different methionine concentrations (deficient (DEF), adequate (ADQ) and excess (EXC)). At the end of the experiment, the fish fed the DEF diet had a significantly lower body weight and feed efficiency compared with those fed the EXC and ADQ diets. This reduction in the growth of fish fed the DEF diet was accompanied by a decrease in the activation of the translation initiation factors ribosomal protein S6 and eIF2α. The levels of the main autophagy-related markers (LC3-II and beclin 1) as well as the expression of several autophagy genes (atg4b, atg12 l, Uvrag, SQSTM1, Mul1 and Bnip3) were higher in the white muscle of fish fed the DEF diet. Similarly, the mRNA levels of several proteasome-related genes (Fbx32, MuRF2, MuRF3, ZNF216 and Trim32) were significantly up-regulated by methionine limitation. Together, these results extend our understanding of mechanisms regulating the reduction of muscle growth induced by dietary methionine deficiency, providing valuable information on the biomarkers of the effects of low-fishmeal diets.

  3. Structure-Functional Study of Tyrosine and Methionine Dipeptides: An Approach to Antioxidant Activity Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Torkova, Anna; Koroleva, Olga; Khrameeva, Ekaterina; Fedorova, Tatyana; Tsentalovich, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Quantum chemical methods allow screening and prediction of peptide antioxidant activity on the basis of known experimental data. It can be used to design the selective proteolysis of protein sources in order to obtain products with antioxidant activity. Molecular geometry and electronic descriptors of redox-active amino acids, as well as tyrosine and methionine-containing dipeptides, were studied by Density Functional Theory method. The calculated data was used to reveal several descriptors responsible for the antioxidant capacities of the model compounds based on their experimentally obtained antioxidant capacities against ABTS (2,2′-Azino-bis-(3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonate)) and peroxyl radical. A formula to predict antioxidant activity of peptides was proposed. PMID:26512651

  4. Radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine chemistry in the synthesis of hydrogenase and nitrogenase metal cofactors.

    PubMed

    Byer, Amanda S; Shepard, Eric M; Peters, John W; Broderick, Joan B

    2015-02-13

    Nitrogenase, [FeFe]-hydrogenase, and [Fe]-hydrogenase enzymes perform catalysis at metal cofactors with biologically unusual non-protein ligands. The FeMo cofactor of nitrogenase has a MoFe7S9 cluster with a central carbon, whereas the H-cluster of [FeFe]-hydrogenase contains a 2Fe subcluster coordinated by cyanide and CO ligands as well as dithiomethylamine; the [Fe]-hydrogenase cofactor has CO and guanylylpyridinol ligands at a mononuclear iron site. Intriguingly, radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine enzymes are vital for the assembly of all three of these diverse cofactors. This minireview presents and discusses the current state of knowledge of the radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes required for synthesis of these remarkable metal cofactors.

  5. A protective role of methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase against cadmium in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chang-Jin; Jo, Hannah; Kim, Kyunghoon

    2014-11-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells harboring the methionine- R-sulfoxide reductase (MsrB)-overexpressing recombinant plasmid pFMetSO exhibited better growth than vector control cells, when shifted into fresh medium containing cadmium chloride (abbreviated as Cd). Although both groups of cells contained enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) levels in the presence of Cd, ROS and NO levels were significantly lower in the S. pombe cells harboring pFMetSO than in vector control cells. Conversely, the S. pombe cells harboring pFMetSO possessed higher total glutathione (GSH) levels and a greater reduced/oxidized GSH ratio than vector control cells under the same conditions.

  6. Chemoenzymatic synthesis and in situ application of S-adenosyl-L-methionine analogs

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Marie; Vogensen, Stine B.; Buchardt, Jens; Burkart, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Analogs of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) are increasingly applied to the methyltransferase (MT) catalysed modification of biomolecules including proteins, nucleic acids, and small molecules. However, SAM and analogs suffer from an inherent instability, and their chemical synthesis is challenged by low yields and difficulties in stereoisomer isolation and inhibition. Here we report the chemoenzymatic synthesis of a series of SAM analogs using wild-type (wt) and point mutants of two recently identified halogenases, SalL and FDAS. Molecular modelling studies are used to guide the rational design of mutants, and the enzymatic conversion of L-Met and other analogs into SAM analogs is demonstrated. We also apply this in situ enzymatic synthesis to the modification of a small peptide substrate by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1). This technique offers an attractive alternative to chemical synthesis and can be applied in situ to overcome stability and activity issues. PMID:24100405

  7. Activation of the lipoxygenase pathway in the methionine enkephalin induced respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, J.T.; Foris, G.; Fulop, T. Jr.; Paragh, G.; Plotnikoff, N.P.

    1988-01-01

    In comparative studies of f-met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) and methionine enkephalin (ME) induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) stimulation the following results were obtained: (i) both FMLP and ME increased the intracellular killing (IK) capability of human PMNLs probably through NADPH oxidase activation, (ii) the ME-induced respiratory burst (RB) differed from the chemotactic peptide FMLP-triggered superoxide generation because the former was not accompanied by the activation of the glutathione system and the duration of the superoxide production was prolonged. The reaction was dependent on lipoxygenation, was potentiated by indomethacin (IM) and was inhibited by nordihidro-guairetic acid (NDGA), (iii) both /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid release and leukotriene B/sub 4/ (LTB/sub 4/) synthesis of ME-treated PMNLs were elevated as compared to those of FMLP triggered cells. Their results suggest that lipoxygenation and even an increased LTB/sub 4/ synthesis are involved in the ME-induced RB of leukocytes.

  8. EPR study of gamma irradiated DL-methionine sulfone single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, Bünyamin; Yıldırım, İlkay

    2015-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of gamma irradiated dl-2-amino-4-(Methylsulfonyl) butyric acid (dl-methionine sulfone, hereafter dl-ABA) single crystals and powder was performed at room temperature. It has been found that this compound indicates the existence of C. O2- and N. H2 radicals after γ-irradiation. While g and hyperfine splitting values for the N. H2 radical were observed, for the C. O2- radical, only the g factor was measured. The EPR spectra have shown that N. H2 radical has two groups each having two distinct sites and C. O2- radical has one site. The principal g and hyperfine values for all sites were analyzed.

  9. Methionine and cystine double deprivation stress suppresses glioma proliferation via inducing ROS/autophagy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huailei; Zhang, Weiguang; Wang, Kaikai; Wang, Xiaoxiong; Yin, Fei; Li, Chenguang; Wang, Chunlei; Zhao, Boxian; Zhong, Chen; Zhang, Jiakang; Peng, Fei; Bi, Yunke; Shen, Chen; Hou, Xu; Zhang, Daming; Liu, Yaohua; Ai, Jing; Zhao, Shiguang

    2015-01-22

    Cancer cells are highly dependent on methionine and cystine (Met-Cys) for survival and proliferation. However, the molecular mechanism is not fully clear. The present study is to investigate the effects of Met-Cys deprivation on glioma cells proliferation. The results showed that Met-Cys double deprivation had synergistic action on elevating ROS level, decreased GSH level and inhibition of glioma cell proliferation. Moreover, both of them deprivation triggered autophagy of glioma cells both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, Met-Cys double restriction diet inhibited growth of glioma. These results provided a new regulation mechanism of Met-Cys metabolism on affecting glioma cell proliferation, suggesting that targeting Met-Cys metabolism may be a potential strategy for glioma therapy.

  10. Metal promiscuity and metal-dependent substrate preferences of Trypanosoma brucei methionine aminopeptidase 1.

    PubMed

    Marschner, Aline; Klein, Christian D

    2015-08-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases play a major role in posttranslational protein processing and are therefore promising targets for the discovery of novel therapeutical agents. We here describe the heterologous expression, purification, and characterization of recombinant Trypanosoma brucei methionine aminopeptidase, type 1 (TbMetAP1). We investigated the dependency of TbMetAP1 activity on pH and metal cofactor (type and concentration) using in particular the substrates Met-Gly-Met-Met and Met-AMC along with related compounds, and determined kinetic values (Km, vmax, kcat). The optimal pH for TbMetAP1 activity is between 7.0 and 8.0. Surprisingly, the two substrates have different cofactor requirements: Both substrates are processed by the cobalt-activated TbMetAP1, but only the Met-Gly-Met-Met substrate is processed with nearly identical catalytical properties by the zinc-activated enzyme. Depending on the substrate, various other metal ions (iron(II), manganese, nickel) were also accepted as cofactors. Two aspects of this work are relevant for the biochemistry of MetAPs and further drug discovery efforts: 1. Zinc, and not cobalt ions are probably the physiological cofactor of TbMetAP1 and possibly other MetAPs. 2. In MetAP assays for compound screening, the combination of the Met-AMC substrate with cobalt, manganese or iron ions may not represent the physiological reality, thereby leading to results that can not be extrapolated towards a phenotypic effect.

  11. Further studies on the interactions among dietary aluminum, boron, magnesium, and methionine in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, F.H.

    1986-03-01

    An experiment was done to confirm findings that dietary B affects the response of rats to Mg deprivation and/or high dietary Al and that the response is influenced by methionine status. Weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 49 days a diet based on 70% acid-washed ground corn - 16% casein with the following supplements factorially arranged as variables: B, 0 and 3 ..mu..g/g; Al, 0 and 1000 ..mu..g/g; Mg, 100 and 400 ..mu..g/g; and amino acids, none, 2.5 methionine (Met)/g and 5 mg arginine (Arg)/g. When compared to an earlier experiment, the low Mg was lower, the high Al was higher, and Arg was an addition to exacerbate low Met status. Mg deficiency depressed growth and elevated the spleen wt/body wt, liver wt/body wt, and kidney wt/body wt ratios. The changes were more marked in B-deprived than B-supplemented rats. Also, the differences due to dietary B were most marked when Met was marginal or possibly deficient. High dietary Al depressed growth. The depression was most marked when the diet was Mg-deficient for B-supplemented rats, but was most marked when the diet was Mg-adequate for B-deprived rats. Apparently, the growth depression caused by Mg deficiency in the B-deprived rats prevented any further significant growth depression by high dietary Al. The findings indicate that B might be beneficial in conditions that can cause a hyperparathyroid state in the rat.

  12. Increased methionine sulfoxide content of apoA-I in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Brock, Jonathan W C; Jenkins, Alicia J; Lyons, Timothy J; Klein, Richard L; Yim, Eunsil; Lopes-Virella, Maria; Carter, Rickey E; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2008-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of morbidity and premature mortality in diabetes. HDL plays an important role in limiting vascular damage by removing cholesterol and cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides from oxidized low density lipoprotein and foam cells. Methionine (Met) residues in apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), the major apolipoprotein of HDL, reduce peroxides in HDL lipids, forming methionine sulfoxide [Met(O)]. We examined the extent and sites of Met(O) formation in apoA-I of HDL isolated from plasma of healthy control and type 1 diabetic subjects to assess apoA-I exposure to lipid peroxides and the status of oxidative stress in the vascular compartment in diabetes. Three tryptic peptides of apoA-I contain Met residues: Q(84)-M(86)-K(88), W(108)-M(112)-R(116), and L(144)-M(148)-R(149). These peptides and their Met(O) analogs were identified and quantified by mass spectrometry. Relative to controls, Met(O) formation was significantly increased at all three locations (Met(86), Met(112), and Met(148)) in diabetic patients. The increase in Met(O) in the diabetic group did not correlate with other biomarkers of oxidative stress, such as N(epsilon)-malondialdehyde-lysine or N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine, in plasma or lipoproteins. The higher Met(O) content in apoA-I from diabetic patients is consistent with increased levels of lipid peroxidation products in plasma in diabetes. Using the methods developed here, future studies can address the relationship between Met(O) in apoA-I and the risk, development, or progression of the vascular complications of diabetes.

  13. A Single Amino Acid Change Is Responsible for Evolution of Acyltransferase Specificity in Bacterial Methionine Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zubieta, C.; Arkus, K.A.J.; Cahoon, R.E.; Jez, J.M.

    2009-05-28

    Bacteria and yeast rely on either homoserine transsuccinylase (HTS, metA) or homoserine transacetylase (HTA; met2) for the biosynthesis of methionine. Although HTS and HTA catalyze similar chemical reactions, these proteins are typically unrelated in both sequence and three-dimensional structure. Here we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution x-ray crystal structure of the Bacillus cereus metA protein in complex with homoserine, which provides the first view of a ligand bound to either HTA or HTS. Surprisingly, functional analysis of the B. cereus metA protein shows that it does not use succinyl-CoA as a substrate. Instead, the protein catalyzes the transacetylation of homoserine using acetyl-CoA. Therefore, the B. cereus metA protein functions as an HTA despite greater than 50% sequence identity with bona fide HTS proteins. This result emphasizes the need for functional confirmation of annotations of enzyme function based on either sequence or structural comparisons. Kinetic analysis of site-directed mutants reveals that the B. cereus metA protein and the E. coli HTS share a common catalytic mechanism. Structural and functional examination of the B. cereus metA protein reveals that a single amino acid in the active site determines acetyl-CoA (Glu-111) versus succinyl-CoA (Gly-111) specificity in the metA-like of acyltransferases. Switching of this residue provides a mechanism for evolving substrate specificity in bacterial methionine biosynthesis. Within this enzyme family, HTS and HTA activity likely arises from divergent evolution in a common structural scaffold with conserved catalytic machinery and homoserine binding sites.

  14. Taurine chloramine-induced inactivation of cofilin protein through methionine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shen; Uehara, Hiroshi; Shacter, Emily

    2014-10-01

    Cofilin regulates reorganization of actin filaments (F-actin) in eukaryotes. A recent finding has demonstrated that oxidation of cofilin by taurine chloramine (TnCl), a physiological oxidant derived from neutrophils, causes cofilin to translocate to the mitochondria inducing apoptosis (F. Klamt et al. Nat. Cell Biol.11:1241-1246; 2009). Here we investigated the effect of TnCl on biological activities of cofilin in vitro. Our data show that TnCl-induced oxidation of recombinant human cofilin-1 inhibits its F-actin-binding and depolymerization activities. Native cofilin contains four free Cys and three Met residues. Incubation of oxidized cofilin with DTT does not lead to its reactivation. A double Cys to Ala mutation on the two C-terminal Cys shows similar biological activities as the wild type, but does not prevent the TnCl-induced inactivation. In contrast, incubation of oxidized cofilin with methionine sulfoxide reductases results in its reactivation. Phosphorylation is known to inhibit cofilin activities. We found that Met oxidation also prevents phosphorylation of cofilin, which is reversed by incubating oxidized cofilin with methionine sulfoxide reductases. Interestingly, intact protein mass spectrometry of the oxidized mutant indicated one major oxidation product with an additional mass of 16 Da, consistent with oxidation of one specific Met residue. This residue was identified as Met-115 by peptide mapping and tandem mass spectrometry. It is adjacent to Lys-114, a known residue on globular-actin-binding site, implying that oxidation of Met-115 disrupts the globular-actin-binding site of cofilin, which causes TnCl-induced inactivation. The findings identify Met-115 as a redox switch on cofilin that regulates its biological activity.

  15. Reaction of the N-terminal methionine residues in cyanase with diethylpyrocarbonate.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P M; Korte, J J; Holcomb, T A

    1994-11-29

    Cyanase is an inducible enzyme in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give ammonia and carbon dioxide. The enzyme is a decamer of identical subunits (M(r) = 17,000). Previous studies have shown that modification of either the single cysteine residue or the single histidine residue in each subunit gives an active decameric derivative that dissociates reversibly to inactive dimer derivative, indicating that decameric structure is required for activity and that the SH and imidazole groups are not required for catalytic activity [Anderson, P. M., Korte, J. J., Holcomb, T. A., Cho, Y.-G., Son, C.-M., & Sung, Y.-C. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 15036-15045]. Here the effects of reaction of the reagent diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) with cyanase or mutant cyanases are reported. DEPC reacts stoichiometrically with the histidine residue and at one additional site in each subunit when the enzyme is in the inactive dimer form, preventing reactivation. DEPC reacts stoichiometrically (with the same result on reactivation) at only one site per subunit with the inactive dimer form of cyanase mutants in which the single histidine residue has been replaced by one of several different amino acids by site-directed mutagenesis; the site of the reaction was identified as the amino group of the N-terminal methionine. DEPC does not react with the histidine residue of the active decameric form of wild-type cyanase and does not affect activity of the active decameric form of wild-type or mutant cyanases. Reaction with the N-terminal amino group of methionine apparently prevents reactivation of the mutant enzymes by blocking association to decamer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Impacts of feeding selenium-methionine and chromium-methionine on performance, serum components, antioxidant status, and physiological responses to transportation stress of Baluchi ewe lambs.

    PubMed

    Mousaie, Amir; Valizadeh, Reza; Naserian, Abbas Ali; Heidarpour, Mohammad; Mehrjerdi, Hossein Kazemi

    2014-12-01

    The effects of selenium-methionine (Se-Met) and chromium-methionine (Cr-Met) supplementation on performance and response to transportation stress were studied on 24 Baluchi ewe lambs (18-20 weeks of age) for 9 weeks. The lambs were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments: (1) control; (2) 1.5 mg supplemental Se-Met/kg dry matter (DM) of diet; (3) 0.8 mg supplemental Cr-Met/kg DM of diet; and (4) 1.5 mg Se-Met plus 0.8 mg Cr-Met/kg DM of diet (Se-Cr-Met). At the commencement of week 8, a road transportation stress (TS) was carried out for 30 min. Lambs fed Cr-Met and Se-Cr-Met diets had higher feed intake than the control and Se-Met animals (P < 0.0001). Lambs on Cr-Met diet showed higher average daily gain (ADG) compared to the control group (P = 0.007). Se-Met and Cr-Met supplementation alone or in combination significantly (P < 0.05) reduced feed conversion ratio (FCR). The animals that received Se-Met (P = 0.014), Cr-Met (P = 0.005), and Se-Cr-Met (P = 0.003) supplemented diets had lower glucose concentration than the control. Lambs on Cr-Met had higher blood T3 concentration than control animals (P = 0.040), while Cr-Met (P = 0.039) and Se-Cr-Met (P = 0.032) supplementation increased triiodothyronine (T3) to thyroxin (T4) ratio. Animals fed Se-Met and/or Cr-Met supplements had lower blood malondialdehyde (MDA) in week 9 of the experiment (P < 0.05). Blood ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) tended to be higher in the Se-Met- and Se-Cr-Met-supplemented groups (P < 0.1).TS reduced feed intake in lambs fed the control diet in week 8 of the experiment (P = 0.003). The lambs given with supplemental Cr-Met exhibited lower glucose concentration before transportation (BT) (P = 0.029) and after transportation (AT) (P = 0.016) compared to the control. Lambs fed Se-Cr-Met had the lowest cortisol concentration BT (P < 0.05). It was concluded that feeding Se-Met and/or Cr-Met supplements could improve

  17. The Semiquinone at the Qi Site of the bc1 Complex Explored Using HYSCORE Spectroscopy and Specific Isotopic Labeling of Ubiquinone in Rhodobacter sphaeroides via 13C Methionine and Construction of a Methionine Auxotroph

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Specific isotopic labeling at the residue or substituent level extends the scope of different spectroscopic approaches to the atomistic level. Here we describe 13C isotopic labeling of the methyl and methoxy ring substituents of ubiquinone, achieved through construction of a methionine auxotroph in Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain BC17 supplemented with l-methionine with the side chain methyl group 13C-labeled. Two-dimensional electron spin echo envelope modulation (HYSCORE) was applied to study the 13C methyl and methoxy hyperfine couplings in the semiquinone generated in situ at the Qi site of the bc1 complex in its membrane environment. The data were used to characterize the distribution of unpaired spin density and the conformations of the methoxy substituents based on density functional theory calculations of 13C hyperfine tensors in the semiquinone of the geometry-optimized X-ray structure of the bc1 complex (Protein Data Bank entry 1PP9) with the highest available resolution. Comparison with other proteins indicates individual orientations of the methoxy groups in each particular case are always different from the methoxy conformations in the anion radical prepared in a frozen alcohol solution. The protocol used in the generation of the methionine auxotroph is more generally applicable and, because it introduces a gene deletion using a suicide plasmid, can be applied repeatedly. PMID:25184535

  18. Chemical shift assignments of zinc finger domain of methionine aminopeptidase 1 (MetAP1) from Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Rachineni, Kavitha; Arya, Tarun; Singarapu, Kiran Kumar; Addlagatta, Anthony; Bharatam, Jagadeesh

    2015-10-01

    Methionine aminopeptidase Type I (MetAP1) cleaves the initiator methionine from about 70 % of all newly synthesized proteins in almost every living cell. Human MetAP1 is a two domain protein with a zinc finger on the N-terminus and a catalytic domain on the C-terminus. Here, we report the chemical shift assignments of the amino terminal zinc binding domain (ZBD) (1-83 residues) of the human MetAP1 derived by using advanced NMR spectroscopic methods. We were able to assign the chemical shifts of ZBD of MetAP1 nearly complete, which reveal two helical fragments involving residues P44-L49 (α1) and Q59-K82 (α2). The protein structure unfolds upon complex formation with the addition of 2 M excess EDTA, indicated by the appearance of amide resonances in the random coil chemical shift region of (15)NHSQC spectrum.

  19. Application of an eremomycin-chiral stationary phase for the separation of DL-methionine using simulated moving bed technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Gedicke, K; Kuznetsov, M A; Staroverov, S M; Seidel-Morgenstern, A

    2007-08-24

    Recently a new chiral stationary phase (CSP) was introduced, based on the immobilization of the macrocyclic glycopeptide eremomycin to epoxy-activated silica. The application of this new CSP to preparative enantioseparation using simulated moving bed (SMB) chromatography will be presented. MeOH-H(2)O (0.1M NaH(2)PO(4))=20/80 (v/v) was used as the mobile phase to separate the enantiomers of methionine. Successful separation was realized providing productivities around 15 g(product)/l(stat)/h for both l and d-methionine under nonlinear conditions. In such delicate continuous chromatographic separation processes, besides productivity, the long-term stability of the applied stationary phases is of importance. Column to column fluctuations were negligible and long-term stability of the preparative stationary phase was satisfactory according to the results of perturbation experiments performed before and after long-term SMB runs. PMID:17482626

  20. Enzymatic preparation of. cap alpha. - and. beta. -deuterated or tritiated amino acids with l-methionine. gamma. -lyase

    SciTech Connect

    Esaki, N.; Sawada, S.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, K.

    1982-01-15

    L-Methionine ..gamma..-lyase catalyzes the exchange of ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-hydrogens of L-methionine and S-methyl-L-cysteine with deuterium or tritium of solvents. The rate of ..cap alpha..-hydrogen exchange with deuterium was about 40 times faster than that of the elimination reactions. The deuterium and tritium were exchanged also with the ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-hydrogens of the straight-chain amino acids which do not undergo the elimination: L-alanine, L-..cap alpha..-aminobutyrate, L-norvaline, and L-norleucine. No exchange occurs for the D-isomers, acidic L-amino acids, basic L-amino acids, and branched-chain L-amino acids, although ..cap alpha..-hydrogen of glycine, L-trypotophan, and L-phenylalanine is exchanged slowly. These enzymatic hydrogen-exchange reactions facilitate specific labeling of the L-amino acids with deuterium and tritium.

  1. Apparent absorption of methionine and 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutanoic acid from gastrointestinal tract of conventional and gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Malik, G; Hoehler, D; Rademacher, M; Drew, M D; Van Kessel, A G

    2009-10-01

    The effect of commensal microbiota and feeding corn or wheat/barley-based diets on the apparent gastrointestinal absorption of dl-methionine (MET) and 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutanoic acid (MHA-FA) was studied in conventional (n = 32) and gnotobiotic pigs (n = 24). Conventional pigs (CON) were vaginally delivered and sow-reared until weaning at 14 days of age. Gnotobiotic pigs were derived by caesarian section and reared in HEPA (high efficiency particulate air)-filtered isolator units with ad libitum access to a milk-based formula. Corn or wheat/barley-based diets were fed to all pigs from 14 to 24 days of age. At 24 days of age, after an overnight fast, pigs were fed 20 g/kg BW of experimental diet supplemented with 107 Bq of either 3H-l-MET or 3H-l-MHA-FA per kg of feed and chromic oxide (0.5% wt/wt). Pigs were killed for sample collection 3 h after consuming the meal. Residual 3H-MET and 3H-MHA-FA were estimated in gastrointestinal contents as the ratio of 3H : chromic oxide in digesta samples to the ratio of 3H : chromic oxide in feed. In CON pigs, feeding a wheat/barley-based diet increased (P < 0.05) total aerobes, whereas supplementation with MHA-FA increased (P < 0.05) total aerobes and lactobacilli populations in proximal small intestine (SI). Among the gnotobiotic pigs, bacterial contamination occurred such that eight pigs (two isolators) were monoassociated with a Gram-negative bacteria closely related to Providencia spp. and 16 pigs (four isolators) were monoassociated with Gram positive Enterococcus faecium. Species of monoassociated bacterial contaminant and diet composition did not affect residual methionine or MHA-FA in digesta. In both CON and monoassociated (MA) pigs, methionine and MHA-FA were retained in stomach (92%) but disappeared rapidly from proximal SI. Residual methionine and MHA-FA in digesta was not different in MA pigs; however, in CON pigs, less (P < 0.01) apparent residual methionine was found in digesta recovered at 25% (from cranial

  2. Comparison of the rhizosphere bacterial communities of Zigongdongdou soybean and a high-methionine transgenic line of this cultivar.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jingang; Sun, Shi; Ji, Jun; Wu, Haiying; Meng, Fang; Zhang, Mingrong; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wu, Cunxiang; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that methionine from root exudates affects the rhizosphere bacterial population involved in soil nitrogen fixation. A transgenic line of Zigongdongdou soybean cultivar (ZD91) that expresses Arabidopsis cystathionine γ-synthase resulting in an increased methionine production was examined for its influence to the rhizosphere bacterial population. Using 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing analysis of the V4 region and DNA extracted from bacterial consortia collected from the rhizosphere of soybean plants grown in an agricultural field at the pod-setting stage, we characterized the populational structure of the bacterial community involved. In total, 87,267 sequences (approximately 10,908 per sample) were analyzed. We found that Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, Gemmatimonadetes, Firmicutes, and Verrucomicrobia constitute the dominant taxonomic groups in either the ZD91 transgenic line or parental cultivar ZD, and that there was no statistically significant difference in the rhizosphere bacterial community structure between the two cultivars.

  3. L-Methionine adsorption on Cu(110), binding and geometry of the amino acid as a function of coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méthivier, Christophe; Humblot, Vincent; Pradier, Claire-Marie

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption of L-methionine on Cu(110) has been characterized by combining in situ Polarization Modulation Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Both the chemical state of the molecule, and its anchoring points were determined at various coverage values. Adsorbed methionine is anionic and first interacts with the copper surface via its sulfur and/or oxygen atoms, likely lying flat on the surface; at higher coverage, a stronger interaction of oxygen and nitrogen atoms with copper, evidenced by slight shifts of the XPS peaks, together with an angular dependence of the peak ratios, suggests that the molecule stands up on the surface, interacting with the surface via the N and O atoms but almost not anymore via its S atom. Last but not least, no multilayers were evidenced, and this was explained by the geometry of the molecules which leaves no groups accessible for intermolecular interactions.

  4. Increase in S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase activity during the transformation of chick embroy fibroblasts by Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, U; Weiner, H

    1980-07-15

    The increase in S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase activity in chick embryo fibroblasts after infection with Rous sarcoma virus has been studied. It has been shown that enzyme levels in transformed cells were two or three times higher than those of the non-infected controls. The activity of this enzyme was not elevated in chick embryo fibroblasts infected with a temperature sensitive mutant of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV-T5) at 42 degrees C, the non-permissive temperature. When the temperature of these infected cultures was shifted from 42 degrees C to 37 degrees C a two- or three-fold increase in decarboxlase activity was detected after 10 to 12 h. The half-live of S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase was practically identical in normal and RSV-transformed fibroblasts.

  5. Pre-steady-state kinetic and structural analysis of interaction of methionine γ-lyase from Citrobacter freundii with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Faleev, Nicolai G; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Morozova, Elena A; Revtovich, Svetlana V; Anufrieva, Natalya V; Nikulin, Alexei D; Fedorova, Olga S; Demidkina, Tatyana V

    2015-01-01

    Methionine γ-lyase (MGL) catalyzes the γ-elimination of l-methionine and its derivatives as well as the β-elimination of l-cysteine and its analogs. These reactions yield α-keto acids and thiols. The mechanism of chemical conversion of amino acids includes numerous reaction intermediates. The detailed analysis of MGL interaction with glycine, l-alanine, l-norvaline, and l-cycloserine was performed by pre-steady-state stopped-flow kinetics. The structure of side chains of the amino acids is important both for their binding with enzyme and for the stability of the external aldimine and ketimine intermediates. X-ray structure of the MGL·l-cycloserine complex has been solved at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure models the ketimine intermediate of physiological reaction. The results elucidate the mechanisms of the intermediate interconversion at the stages of external aldimine and ketimine formation.

  6. EPR and NMR spectroscopies provide input on the coordination of Cu(I) and Ag(I) to a disordered methionine segment.

    PubMed

    Shenberger, Yulia; Gottlieb, Hugo E; Ruthstein, Sharon

    2015-06-01

    Methionine motifs are methionine-rich metal-binding segments found in many human, yeast, and bacterial proteins involved in the transportation of copper ion to other cellular pathways, and in protecting copper from oxidation. Methionine motifs are found to bind Ag(I) and Cu(I) ions. Proteins or peptides that can bind different metal ions should have the ability to differentiate between them, to be able to shuttle them to various pathways in the cell. This study utilizes electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy together with circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance to probe structural changes in the methionine segment upon coordinating Cu(I) and Ag(I) metal ions. The data collected here indicate that methionine segments experience structural changes while coordinating Cu(I) and Ag(I), however, the differences between the coordination of Cu(I) vs. Ag(I) to the methionine segment are mild. Since Cu(I) and Ag(I) metal ions are pretty similar in their nature and charge, the minor structural changes reported here are significant towards the understanding of the differences in the transport mechanism of these two metal ions in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  7. Relative bioavailability of zinc-methionine chelate for broilers fed a conventional corn-soybean meal diet.

    PubMed

    Suo, Haiqing; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Liyang; Zhang, Xueyuan; Li, Hua; Lu, Yufei; Luo, Xugang

    2015-06-01

    An experiment was carried out to determine the bioavailability of the organic Zn-methionine chelate relative to inorganic Zn source (ZnSO4•7H2O) for broiler chicks fed a conventional corn-soybean meal diet. A total of 504 1-day-old Arbor Acres commercial male broiler chicks were randomly allotted to one of seven treatments in a completely randomized design involving a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement with three levels of added Zn (30, 60, or 90 mg of Zn/kg) and two Zn sources (Zn-methionine chelate and Zn sulfate) plus a Zn-unsupplemented control diet containing 29.2 mg of Zn/kg by analysis for an experimental phase of 21 days. Bone and pancreas were collected for testing Zn concentrations and pancreas metallothionein (MT) messenger RNA (mRNA) level at 7 or 21 days of age. The results showed that bone and pancreas Zn concentrations and MT mRNA level in pancreas increased linearly (P < 0.0001) at 7 or 21 days of age as added Zn level increased. Based on slope ratios from multiple linear regressions of the pancreas, MT mRNA level at 7 days and pancreas Zn concentration at 21 days on added Zn level and the bioavailability values of the Zn-methionine chelate relative to ZnSO4•7H2O (100%) were 120 and 115%, respectively (P > 0.22). The results indicated that the Zn from the Zn-methionine chelate was just as bioavailable as the Zn from Zn sulfate for broilers.

  8. D-Methionine attenuated cisplatin-induced vestibulotoxicity through altering ATPase activities and oxidative stress in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, P.-W.; Liu, S.-H.; Young, Y.-H.; Lin-Shiau, Shoei-Yn . E-mail: syl@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2006-09-01

    Cisplatin has been used as a chemotherapeutic agent to treat many kinds of malignancies. Its damage to the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) system has been reported. However, the underlying biochemical change in the inner ear or central vestibular nervous system is not fully understood. In this study, we attempted to examine whether cisplatin-induced vestibulotoxicity and D-methionine protection were correlated with the changes of ATPase activities and oxidative stress of ampullary tissue of vestibules as well as cerebellar cortex (the inhibitory center of VOR system) of guinea pigs. By means of a caloric test coupled with electronystagmographic recordings, we found that cisplatin exposure caused a dose-dependent (1, 3, or 5 mg/kg) vestibular dysfunction as revealed by a decrease of slow phase velocity (SPV). In addition, cisplatin significantly inhibited the Na{sup +}, K{sup +}-ATPase and Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activities in the ampullary tissue with a good dose-response relationship but not those of cerebellar cortex. Regression analysis indicated that a decrease of SPV was well correlated with the reduction of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}-ATPase and Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activities of the ampullary tissue. D-Methionine (300 mg/kg) reduced both abnormalities of SPV and ATPase activities in a correlated manner. Moreover, cisplatin exposure led to a significant dose-dependent increase of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide concentrations of the vestibules, which could be significantly suppressed by D-methionine. However, cisplatin did not alter the levels of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide of the cerebellum. In conclusion, cisplatin inhibited ATPase activities and increased oxidative stress in guinea pig vestibular labyrinths. D-Methionine attenuated cisplatin-induced vestibulotoxicity associated with ionic disturbance through its antioxidative property.

  9. Method for the typing of Clostridium difficile based on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tabaqchali, S.; O'Farrell, S.; Holland, D.; Silman, R.

    1986-01-01

    A typing method for Clostridium difficile based on the incorporation of (/sup 35/S)methionine into cellular proteins, their separation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and their visualization by autoradiography is described. On analysis of the radiolabeled-protein profiles, nine distinct groups were observed (A to E and W to Z). The method, which is simple, reproducible, and readily expandable, has been applied in epidemiological studies to demonstrate cross-infection and hospital acquisition of C. difficile.

  10. Effects of methionine restriction and endurance exercise on bones of ovariectomized rats: a study of histomorphometry, densitometry, and biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsang-Hai; Su, I-Hsiu; Lewis, Jack L; Chang, Ming-Shi; Hsu, Ar-Tyan; Perrone, Carmen E; Ables, Gene P

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the effects of dietary methionine restriction (MetR) and endurance exercise on bone quality under a condition of estrogen deficiency, female Sprague-Dawley rats (36-wk-old) were assigned to a sham surgery group or one of five ovariectomized groups subjected to interventions of no treatment (Ovx), endurance exercise (Exe), methionine restriction (MetR), methionine restriction plus endurance exercise (MetR + Exe), and estrogen treatment (Est). Rats in the exercise groups were subjected to a treadmill running regimen. MetR and control diets contained 0.172 and 0.86% methionine, respectively. After the 12-wk intervention, all animals were killed, and serum and bone tissues were collected for analyses. Compared with estrogen treatment, MetR diet and endurance exercise showed better or equivalent efficiency in reducing body weight gain caused by ovariectomy (P < 0.05). Whereas only the Est group showed evidence for reduced bone turnover compared with the Ovx group, MetR diet and/or endurance exercise demonstrated efficiencies in downregulating serum insulin, leptin, triglyceride, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (P < 0.05). Both the Exe and MetR groups showed higher femoral cortical and total volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), but only the Exe and Est groups preserved cancellous bone volume and/or vBMD of distal femora (P < 0.05) compared with the Ovx group. After being normalized to body mass, femora of the MetR and MetR + Exe groups had relatively higher bending strength and dimension values followed by the Sham, Exe, and Est groups (P < 0.05). In conclusion, both MetR diet and endurance exercise improved cortical bone properties, but only endurance exercise preserved cancellous bone under estrogen deficiency.

  11. Comparative effects of zinc-nano complexes, zinc-sulphate and zinc-methionine on performance in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, V; Ghazanfari, S; Mohammadi-Sangcheshmeh, A; Nazaran, M H

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients, especially zinc, have an important role in normal metabolism and growth of broilers. Using novel technologies helps to synthesise novel zinc complexes to deliver this micronutrient more efficiently. In the present study, the effects of different zinc complexes and nano complexes on broiler performance were compared. Broilers in 6 groups were given basal diet (without zinc) and basal diet supplemented with zinc-sulphate, zinc-methionine, zinc-nano-sulphate, zinc-nano-methionine and zinc-nano-max (that was synthesised based on nanochelating technology) at a concentration of 80 mg/kg of diet. At 1-42 d of age, dietary zinc-nano-sulphate supplementation decreased weight gain and feed intake. However, feed conversion ratio was not influenced by treatments. Carcass yield (%) of birds in the zinc-nano-sulphate and control groups were dramatically reduced at 42 d of age and abdominal fat (%) increased in these groups. Relative to the control group, the antibody titre, spleen and bursa of Fabricius (%) were significantly higher in groups supplemented with zinc. Heterophil (%) was also significantly higher in the zinc-nano-methionine group in blood on d 42 compared to the control, zinc-sulphate and zinc-nano-sulphate. Compared to the controls, the mean malondialdehyde content in thigh tissue was significantly reduced in groups supplemented with zinc at the time 0, 50, 100 and 150 min after oxidation. Tibia zinc concentration in nanoparticle zinc samples was significantly higher relative to the control and zinc-sulphate groups. Taken together, our data indicate that delivery of zinc in the structure of zinc-nano-methionine and zinc-nano-max at concentrations of 80 mg/kg of diet improves growth performance. However, dietary zinc-nano-sulphate decreased growth performance in broilers.

  12. Folate, vitamin B(6) , vitamin B(12) , methionine and alcohol intake in relation to ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Harris, Holly R; Cramer, Daniel W; Vitonis, Allison F; DePari, Mary; Terry, Kathryn L

    2012-08-15

    Folate, methionine, vitamin B(6) and vitamin B(12) may influence carcinogenesis due to their roles in the one-carbon metabolism pathway, which is critical for DNA synthesis, methylation and repair. Low intake of these nutrients has been associated with an increased risk of breast, colon and endometrial cancers. Previous studies that have examined the relation between these nutrients and ovarian cancer risk have been inconsistent and have had limited power to examine the relation by histologic subtype. We investigated the association between folate, methionine, vitamin B(6) , vitamin B(12) and alcohol among 1910 women with ovarian cancer and 1989 controls from a case-control study conducted in eastern Massachusetts and New Hampshire from 1992 to 2008. Diet was assessed via food frequency questionnaire. Participants were asked to recall diet one-year before diagnosis or interview. Logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). We also examined whether the associations varied by ovarian cancer histologies using polytomous logistic regression. We observed an inverse association between dietary vitamin B(6) (covariate-adjusted OR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.64-0.92; p(trend) = 0.002) and methionine intake (covariate-adjusted OR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.60-0.87; p(trend) < 0.001) and ovarian cancer risk comparing the highest to lowest quartile. The association with dietary vitamin B(6) was strongest for serous borderline (covariate-adjusted OR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.32-0.77; p(trend) = 0.001) and serous invasive (covariate-adjusted OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.58-0.94; p(trend) = 0.012) subtypes. Overall, we observed no significant association between folate and ovarian cancer risk. One-carbon metabolism related nutrients, especially vitamin B(6) and methionine, may lower ovarian cancer risk.

  13. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding a cobalamin-independent methionine synthase from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Zeh, Michaela; Leggewie, Georg; Hoefgen, Rainer; Hesse, Holger

    2002-02-01

    A potato cDNA clone, StMS1, that encodes a methionine synthase was isolated. This protein was identified on the basis of both structural and functional evidence. The predicted sequence of the protein encoded by StMS1 shows a high degree of similarity to methionine synthases from other organisms and the expression of StMS1 in bacterial mutant strains restored the mutant's ability to synthesize methionine. Genomic organization and expression analyses suggest that StMS1 is a low-copy gene and is differentially expressed in potato organs. StMS1 expression was found in all tissues, but at elevated levels in flowers, basal levels in sink and source leaves, roots and stolons, and low levels in stems and tubers. RNA expression data were confirmed by western blot analysis except that the protein content in leaves was less than expected from the RNA data. Western blot analysis of subcellular fractions revealed that the protein is located in the cytosol. However, the changing pattern of gene expression during the day/night period implied a light-dependent control of MS transcription normally seen for enzymes localized in plastids. The expression of MS was shown to be light-inducible with its highest expression at midday. These RNA data were not confirmed at the protein level since protein content levels remained constant over the whole day. Feeding experiments of detached leaves revealed that sucrose or sucrose-derived products are responsible for StMS1 induction. This induction can be blocked by treatment with DCMU during the light period. Western analysis revealed that the amount of StMS1 is not affected by either treatment. This experiment confirmed the presence of a day/night rhythm. Methionine synthase expression is regulated by photoassimilates but this seems not to detectably alter protein levels. PMID:11855727

  14. Methionine, folic acid and vitamin B12 in growing-finishing pigs: impact on growth performance and meat quality.

    PubMed

    Giguére, Alain; Girard, Christiane L; Matte, J Jacques

    2008-06-01

    Growth performance, metabolic variables, and meat quality were measured in 78 growing-finishing pigs using supplements of 0 (C), or 0.2% of DL-methionine (M), and three combinations of folic acid [mg/kg] and cyanocobalamin [microg/kg], respectively 0 and 0 (V0), 10 and 25 (V1), and 10 and 150 (V2) in a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement. Feed conversion was lower (p = 0.05) in M than in C pigs during the growing period (0-4 weeks). Both V1 and V2 treatments increased plasma vitamin B12 (p < 0.01) and decreased plasma homocysteine (p < 0.01). Plasma 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolates were the lowest, highest and intermediate in V0, V1 and V2 pigs (p < 0.04), respectively. In V2 meat, folates were 32% higher, vitamin B12, 55% higher and homocysteine, 28% lower than in V0 (p < 0.01). Oxidative stability of the fresh meat was similar among treatments during a storage period of 42 days. Therefore, methionine supplements improved growth performance during the growing period. Vitamin supplements interacted with the methionine cycle pathway, increased vitamin content of pork meat but did not improve oxidative stability of the fresh meat during storage.

  15. Gene expression and biochemical analysis of cheese-ripening yeasts: focus on catabolism of L-methionine, lactate, and lactose.

    PubMed

    Cholet, Orianne; Hénaut, Alain; Casaregola, Serge; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2007-04-01

    DNA microarrays of 86 genes from the yeasts Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica were developed to determine which genes were expressed in a medium mimicking a cheese-ripening environment. These genes were selected for potential involvement in lactose/lactate catabolism and the biosynthesis of sulfur-flavored compounds. Hybridization conditions to follow specifically the expression of homologous genes belonging to different species were set up. The microarray was first validated on pure cultures of each yeast; no interspecies cross-hybridization was observed. Expression patterns of targeted genes were studied in pure cultures of each yeast, as well as in coculture, and compared to biochemical data. As expected, a high expression of the LAC genes of K. marxianus was observed. This is a yeast that efficiently degrades lactose. Several lactate dehydrogenase-encoding genes were also expressed essentially in D. hansenii and K. marxianus, which are two efficient deacidifying yeasts in cheese ripening. A set of genes possibly involved in l-methionine catabolism was also used on the array. Y. lipolytica, which efficiently assimilates l-methionine, also exhibited a high expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae orthologs BAT2 and ARO8, which are involved in the l-methionine degradation pathway. Our data provide the first evidence that the use of a multispecies microarray could be a powerful tool to investigate targeted metabolism and possible metabolic interactions between species within microbial cocultures. PMID:17308183

  16. Estimation of available methionine and cysteine in proteins of food products by in vivo and in vitro methods.

    PubMed

    Pieniaźek, D; Rakowska, M; Szkilladziowa, W; Grabarek, Z

    1975-09-01

    1. The available methionine and cysteine of proteins were determined by chemical methods after preliminary enzymic hydrolysis. 2. The values for the available methionine and cysteine contents of pure proteins (casein and bovine serum albumin) estimated by chemical methods were similar to those for the total content determined by the method of Moore, Spackman & Stein (1958). 3. Reductions of 15 and 11% respectively, when compared with unprocessed samples, were found in the available methionine contents of sweetened and unsweetened, condensed milks; of roller-dried milk and whey powders, and of mackerel sterilized at 126 degrees, the reductions were 22, 14 and 19% respectively. 4. The available cysteine content of sweetened, condensed milk was reduced by about 32%, whereas for mackerel sterilized at 115 and 126 degrees it was reduced by 64 and 75% respectively. 5. The contents of total sulphur amino acids for these food products did not differ from those for the unprocessed samples. 6. Values obtained for available S amino acid contents by rat bioassay confirmed the results of the in vitro estimations.

  17. Metabolome analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and optimization of culture medium for S-adenosyl-L-methionine production.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kenshi; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) is a fine chemical used as a nutritional supplement and a prescription drug. It is industrially produced using Saccharomyces cerevisiae owing to its high SAM content. To investigate the optimization of culture medium components for higher SAM production, metabolome analysis was conducted to compare the intracellular metabolite concentrations between Kyokai no. 6 (high SAM-producing) and laboratory yeast S288C (control) under different SAM production conditions. Metabolome analysis and the result of principal component analysis showed that the rate-limiting step for SAM production was ATP supply and the levels of degradation products of adenosine nucleotides were higher in Kyokai 6 strain than in the S288C strain under the L-methionine supplemented condition. Analysis of ATP accumulation showed that the levels of intracellular ATP in the Kyokai 6 strain were also higher compared to those in the S288C strain. Furthermore, as expected from metabolome analysis, the SAM content of Kyokai 6 strain cultivated in the medium without yeast extract increased by 2.5-fold compared to that in the additional condition, by increasing intracellular ATP level with inhibited cell growth. These results suggest that high SAM production is attributed to the enhanced ATP supply with L-methionine condition and high efficiency of intracellular ATP consumption.

  18. The role of amino acid residues in the active site of L-methionine γ-lyase from Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Mitsuki; Kudou, Daizou; Murano, Shouko; Shiba, Tomoo; Sato, Dan; Tamura, Takashi; Harada, Shigeharu; Inagaki, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Cys116, Lys240*, and Asp241* (asterisks indicate residues from the second subunit of the active dimer) at the active site of L-methionine γ-lyase of Pseudomonas putida (MGL_Pp) are highly conserved among heterologous MGLs. In a previous study, we found that substitution of Cys116 for His led to a drastic increase in activity toward L-cysteine and a decrease in that toward L-methionine. In this study, we examined some properties of the C116H mutant by kinetic analysis and 3D structural analysis. We assumed that substitution of Cys116 for His broke the original hydrogen-bond network and that this induced a significant effect of Tyr114 as a general acid catalyst, possibly due to the narrow space in the active site. The C116H mutant acquired a novel β-elimination activity and lead a drastic conformation change in the histidine residue at position 116 by binding the substrate, suggesting that this His residue affects the reaction specificity of C116H. Furthermore, we suggest that Lys240* is important for substrate recognition and structural stability and that Asp241* is also involved in substrate specificity in the elimination reaction. Based on this, we suggest that the hydrogen-bond network among Cys116, Lys240*, and Asp241* contributes to substrate specificity that is, to L-methionine recognition at the active site in MGL_Pp.

  19. Molecular characterization and expression profile of methionine sulfoxide reductase gene family in maize (Zea mays) under abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiantang; Ding, Pengcheng; Li, Qingqing; Gao, YanKun; Chen, Fanguo; Xia, Guangmin

    2015-05-15

    Methionine (Met) oxidation to methionine sulfoxide (MetSO) is a common form of damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation via various environmental stresses. Methionine sulfoxide reductase (MSR) repairs oxidized Met and protects organisms from oxidative damage. Two types of MSR, A and B, have been identified based on substrate stereo specificity; they share no sequence similarity. In the present study, we characterized six genes encoding the putative MSR from two public databases. We compared them with MSRs from 6 species, and evaluated molecular characterization, phylogenetic analysis, tertiary structure and conserved motifs. On the basis of in silico and the qRT-PCR experimental data, we analyzed cDNA sequences and expression patterns of ZmMSR genes in different organs in maize. We found that ZmMSR genes were induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and NaCl, both known to generate oxidative stress. The results show that MSRs are conserved in different species, suggesting that MSRs across different species share common mechanisms related to diverse defense responses.

  20. Methionine hydroxy analogue enhanced fish immunity via modulation of NF-κB, TOR, MLCK, MAPKs and Nrf2 signaling in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Pan, Fei-Yu; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    Our study investigated the effect of dietary methionine hydroxy analogue (MHA) on growth and immunity (head kidney, spleen and skin) of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 630 grass carp (259.70 ± 0.47 g) were fed graded levels of MHA (0, 2.4, 4.4, 6.4, 8.5 and 10.5 g/kg diet) and one dl-methionine (DLM) group (6.4 g/kg diet) for 8 weeks. At the end of the feeding trial, fish were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila for 14 days. The results indicated that optimal MHA increased lysozyme (LZ) and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities, complement 3 (C3), C4 and immunoglobulin M (IgM) contents and up-regulated mRNA levels of liver expressed antimicrobial peptide 2, hepcidin (head kidney), β-defensin-1 in the immune organs (P < 0.05), suggesting that MHA could enhance antimicrobial ability of fish. Meanwhile, optimal MHA enhanced the immune function of immune organs via down-regulating pro-inflammatory cytokines mRNA levels and up-regulated anti-inflammatory cytokines mRNA levels, which might be attributed to the down-regulation of nuclear factor κB p65, c-Rel, IκB kinase β, p38 mitogen activated protein kinase, eIF4E-binding protein1 (4E-BP1) and 4E-BP2 mRNA levels and up-regulation of inhibitor of κBα, ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 and target of rapamycin mRNA levels (P < 0.05). In addition, optimal MHA improved cellular structure integrity of immune organs via repressing death receptor and mitochondria pathways induced apoptosis, which might be related to the down-regulation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase mRNA levels (P < 0.05). Simultaneously, optimal MHA improved cellular structure integrity of immune organs via elevating glutathione contents, antioxidant enzymes activities and corresponding isoforms mRNA levels to attenuate oxidative damage, which might be to the up-regulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 mRNA levels and down-regulation of Kelch-like ECH-associating protein 1a mRNA levels (P < 0.05). Besides, optimal MHA improved

  1. Methionine hydroxy analogue enhanced fish immunity via modulation of NF-κB, TOR, MLCK, MAPKs and Nrf2 signaling in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Pan, Fei-Yu; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    Our study investigated the effect of dietary methionine hydroxy analogue (MHA) on growth and immunity (head kidney, spleen and skin) of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 630 grass carp (259.70 ± 0.47 g) were fed graded levels of MHA (0, 2.4, 4.4, 6.4, 8.5 and 10.5 g/kg diet) and one dl-methionine (DLM) group (6.4 g/kg diet) for 8 weeks. At the end of the feeding trial, fish were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila for 14 days. The results indicated that optimal MHA increased lysozyme (LZ) and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities, complement 3 (C3), C4 and immunoglobulin M (IgM) contents and up-regulated mRNA levels of liver expressed antimicrobial peptide 2, hepcidin (head kidney), β-defensin-1 in the immune organs (P < 0.05), suggesting that MHA could enhance antimicrobial ability of fish. Meanwhile, optimal MHA enhanced the immune function of immune organs via down-regulating pro-inflammatory cytokines mRNA levels and up-regulated anti-inflammatory cytokines mRNA levels, which might be attributed to the down-regulation of nuclear factor κB p65, c-Rel, IκB kinase β, p38 mitogen activated protein kinase, eIF4E-binding protein1 (4E-BP1) and 4E-BP2 mRNA levels and up-regulation of inhibitor of κBα, ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 and target of rapamycin mRNA levels (P < 0.05). In addition, optimal MHA improved cellular structure integrity of immune organs via repressing death receptor and mitochondria pathways induced apoptosis, which might be related to the down-regulation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase mRNA levels (P < 0.05). Simultaneously, optimal MHA improved cellular structure integrity of immune organs via elevating glutathione contents, antioxidant enzymes activities and corresponding isoforms mRNA levels to attenuate oxidative damage, which might be to the up-regulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 mRNA levels and down-regulation of Kelch-like ECH-associating protein 1a mRNA levels (P < 0.05). Besides, optimal MHA improved

  2. Recombinant methionine aminopeptidase protein of Babesia microti: immunobiochemical characterization as a vaccine candidate against human babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Munkhjargal, Tserendorj; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2016-09-01

    Human babesiosis is the most important zoonotic protozoan infection in the world. This is the first report of the cloning, expression, purification, and immunobiochemical characterization of a methionine aminopeptidase 1 (MetAP1) protein from Babesia microti (B. microti). The gene encodes a MetAP1 protein of B. microti (BmMetAP1) of approximately 66.8 kDa that includes glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag and shows MetAP activity. BmMetAP1 was detected in a lysate of B. microti and further localized in cytoplasm of the B. microti merozoite. rBmMetAP1 was found to be immunogenic, eliciting a high antibody titer in mice. Moreover, rBmMetAP1 stimulated the production of IFN-γ and IL-12 but not IL-4. Finally, rBmMetAP1 was able to provide considerable protection to mice against a B. microti challenge infection based on a reduction in peak parasitemia levels and earlier clearance of the parasite as compared with control mice. Taken together, these results suggest that rBmMetAP1 confers significant protection against experimental B. microti infection and might be considered a potential vaccine target against human babesiosis. PMID:27306898

  3. Dietary methionine restriction in mice elicits an adaptive cardiovascular response to hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Ables, Gene P; Ouattara, Amadou; Hampton, Thomas G; Cooke, Diana; Perodin, Frantz; Augie, Ines; Orentreich, David S

    2015-03-06

    Dietary methionine restriction (MR) in rodents increased lifespan despite higher heart-to-body weight ratio (w/w) and hyperhomocysteinemia, which are symptoms associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease. We investigated this paradoxical effect of MR on cardiac function using young, old, and apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-KO) mice. Indeed, MR animals exhibited higher heart-to-body weight ratio (w/w) and hyperhomocysteinemia with a molecular pattern consistent with cardiac stress while maintaining the integrity of cardiac structure. Baseline cardiac function, which was measured by non-invasive electrocardiography (ECG), showed that young MR mice had prolonged QRS intervals compared with control-fed (CF) mice, whereas old and ApoE-KO mice showed similar results for both groups. Following β-adrenergic challenge, responses of MR mice were either similar or attenuated compared with CF mice. Cardiac contractility, which was measured by isolated heart retrograde perfusion, was similar in both groups of old mice. Finally, the MR diet induced secretion of cardioprotective hormones, adiponectin and fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), in MR mice with concomitant alterations in cardiac metabolic molecular signatures. Our findings demonstrate that MR diet does not alter cardiac function in mice despite the presence of hyperhomocysteinemia because of the adaptive responses of increased adiponectin and FGF21 levels.

  4. Clonostachys rosea demethiolase STR3 controls the conversion of methionine into methanethiol

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Kai-Zhi; Zhang, Quan; Sun, Lin-Yang; Xu, Yang-Hua; Li, Hong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryote-derived methioninase, catalyzing the one-step degradation of methionine (Met) to methanethiol (MTL), has received much attention for its low immunogenic potential and use as a therapeutic agent against Met-dependent tumors. Although biological and chemical degradation pathways for Met-MTL conversion are proposed, the concrete molecular mechanism for Met-MTL conversion in eukaryotes is still unclear. Previous studies demonstrated that α-keto-methylthiobutyric acid (KMBA), the intermediate for Met-MTL conversion, was located extracellularly and the demethiolase STR3 possessed no activities towards Met, which rule out the possibility of intracellular Met-MTL conversion pathway inside eukaryotes. We report here that degradation of Met resulted in intracellular accumulation of KMBA in Clonostachys rosea. Addition of Met to culture media led to the production of MTL and downregulation of STR3, while incubation of Met with surrogate substrate α-ketoglutaric acid enhanced the synthesis of MTL and triggered the upregulation of STR3. Subsequent biochemical analysis with recombinant STR3 showed that STR3 directly converted both Met and its transamination product KMBA to MTL. These results indicated that STR3 as rate-limiting enzyme degrades Met and KMBA into MTL. Our findings suggest STR3 is a potential target for therapeutic agents against Met-dependent tumors and aging. PMID:26902928

  5. Does the Naked Neck Meat Type Chicken Yield Lower Methionine Requirement Data?

    PubMed

    Khan, Daulat R; Wecke, Christian; Liebert, Frank

    2015-03-25

    Methionine (Met) requirement studies with homozygous (Na/Na) and heterozygous (Na/na) naked neck meat type chicken utilized 144 birds of average weight (50% each genotype and sex) within two N balance experiments involving both the starter (d10-20) and grower period (d25-35). The birds were randomly allotted to five experimental diets with graded protein supply and Met as the limiting amino acid. The proportion of native feed protein sources (soy protein concentrate, maize, wheat, fishmeal and wheat gluten) was kept constant to ensure a uniform protein quality in all diets. The Met requirement depending on genotype, sex, age period and growth performance (protein deposition) was estimated using a non-linear modeling procedure of N utilization in monogastric animals. On average, 0.47% (Na/Na) and 0.45% (Na/na) dietary Met was established as adequate in the starter diet, as well as 0.37% (Na/Na) and 0.36% (Na/na) Met in the grower diet for both of the sexes. In conclusion, the Met requirement of the naked neck chicken is not significantly different from its normally-feathered counterparts. In addition, the low feather production was not reflected by reduced requirement for Met in naked neck birds. However, these conclusions are valid only at the given Met:Cys ratio (1:1) in the experimental diets.

  6. Hypoglycemic activity and acute oral toxicity of chromium methionine complexes in mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hai-yan; Xiao, Qing-gui; Xu, Hon