Science.gov

Sample records for methods mass spectrometry

  1. Counting Molecules by Desorption Ionization and Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooks, R. G.; Busch, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses two newer methods in mass spectrometry and shows how they can increase signal and signal-to-noise ratios, respectively. The first method, desorption ionization (DI), increases sensitivity while the second method, mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), increases specificity. Together, the two methods offer improved analytical…

  2. MPAI (mass probes aided ionization) method for total analysis of biomolecules by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Honda, Aki; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Hifumi, Hiroki; Honma, Yuya; Tanji, Noriyuki; Iwasawa, Naoko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Suzuki, Koji

    2007-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized various mass probes, which enable us to effectively ionize various molecules to be detected with mass spectrometry. We call the ionization method using mass probes the "MPAI (mass probes aided ionization)" method. We aim at the sensitive detection of various biological molecules, and also the detection of bio-molecules by a single mass spectrometry serially without changing the mechanical settings. Here, we review mass probes for small molecules with various functional groups and mass probes for proteins. Further, we introduce newly developed mass probes for proteins for highly sensitive detection.

  3. Methods for recalibration of mass spectrometry data

    DOEpatents

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2009-03-03

    Disclosed are methods for recalibrating mass spectrometry data that provide improvement in both mass accuracy and precision by adjusting for experimental variance in parameters that have a substantial impact on mass measurement accuracy. Optimal coefficients are determined using correlated pairs of mass values compiled by matching sets of measured and putative mass values that minimize overall effective mass error and mass error spread. Coefficients are subsequently used to correct mass values for peaks detected in the measured dataset, providing recalibration thereof. Sub-ppm mass measurement accuracy has been demonstrated on a complex fungal proteome after recalibration, providing improved confidence for peptide identifications.

  4. Laser Ablation-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry-Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Ambient Surface Imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Berry, Jennifer L.; Day, Douglas A.; Elseberg, Tim; ...

    2018-02-20

    Mass spectrometry imaging is becoming an increasingly common analytical technique due to its ability to provide spatially resolved chemical information. In this paper, we report a novel imaging approach combining laser ablation with two mass spectrometric techniques, aerosol mass spectrometry and chemical ionization mass spectrometry, separately and in parallel. Both mass spectrometric methods provide the fast response, rapid data acquisition, low detection limits, and high-resolution peak separation desirable for imaging complex samples. Additionally, the two techniques provide complementary information with aerosol mass spectrometry providing near universal detection of all aerosol molecules and chemical ionization mass spectrometry with a heated inletmore » providing molecular-level detail of both gases and aerosols. The two techniques operate with atmospheric pressure interfaces and require no matrix addition for ionization, allowing for samples to be investigated in their native state under ambient pressure conditions. We demonstrate the ability of laser ablation-aerosol mass spectrometry-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (LA-AMS-CIMS) to create 2D images of both standard compounds and complex mixtures. Finally, the results suggest that LA-AMS-CIMS, particularly when combined with advanced data analysis methods, could have broad applications in mass spectrometry imaging applications.« less

  5. Laser Ablation-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry-Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Ambient Surface Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Jennifer L.; Day, Douglas A.; Elseberg, Tim

    Mass spectrometry imaging is becoming an increasingly common analytical technique due to its ability to provide spatially resolved chemical information. In this paper, we report a novel imaging approach combining laser ablation with two mass spectrometric techniques, aerosol mass spectrometry and chemical ionization mass spectrometry, separately and in parallel. Both mass spectrometric methods provide the fast response, rapid data acquisition, low detection limits, and high-resolution peak separation desirable for imaging complex samples. Additionally, the two techniques provide complementary information with aerosol mass spectrometry providing near universal detection of all aerosol molecules and chemical ionization mass spectrometry with a heated inletmore » providing molecular-level detail of both gases and aerosols. The two techniques operate with atmospheric pressure interfaces and require no matrix addition for ionization, allowing for samples to be investigated in their native state under ambient pressure conditions. We demonstrate the ability of laser ablation-aerosol mass spectrometry-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (LA-AMS-CIMS) to create 2D images of both standard compounds and complex mixtures. Finally, the results suggest that LA-AMS-CIMS, particularly when combined with advanced data analysis methods, could have broad applications in mass spectrometry imaging applications.« less

  6. Optimization of Whole-Body Zebrafish Sectioning Methods for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectrometry imaging methods and protocols have become widely adapted to a variety of tissues and species. However, the mass spectrometry imaging literature contains minimal information on whole-body cryosection preparation for the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model organism ...

  7. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  8. Mass spectrometry methods for the analysis of biodegradable hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alalwiat, Ahlam

    This dissertation focuses on the characterization of hybrid materials and surfactant blends by using mass spectrometry (MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), liquid chromatography (LC), and ion mobility (IM) spectrometry combined with measurement and simulation of molecular collision cross sections. Chapter II describes the principles and the history of mass spectrometry (MS) and liquid chromatography (LC). Chapter III introduces the materials and instrumentation used to complete this dissertation. In chapter IV, two hybrid materials containing poly(t-butyl acrylate) (PtBA) or poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) blocks attached to a hydrophobic peptide rich in valine and glycine (VG2), as well as the poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and VG2 peptide precursor materials, are characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS). Collision cross-sections and molecular modeling have been used to determine the final architecture of both hybrid materials. Chapter V investigates a different hybrid material, [BMP-2(HA)2 ], comprised of a dendron with two polyethylene glycol (PEG) branches terminated by a hydroxyapatite binding peptide (HA), and a focal point substituted with a bone morphogenic protein mimicking peptide (BMP-2). MALDI-MS, ESI-MS and IM-MS have been used to characterize the HA and BMP-2 peptides. Collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) have been employed in double stage (i.e. tandem) mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments to confirm the sequences of the two peptides HA and BMP-2. The MALDI-MS, ESI-MS and IM-MS methods were also applied to characterize the [BMP-2(HA)2] hybrid material. Collision cross-section measurements and molecular modeling indicated that [BMP-2(HA)2] can attain folded or extended conformation, depending on its degree of protonation (charge state). Chapter VI focuses on the analysis of

  9. Inorganic trace analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Johanna Sabine; Dietze, Hans-Joachim

    1998-10-01

    Mass spectrometric methods for the trace analysis of inorganic materials with their ability to provide a very sensitive multielemental analysis have been established for the determination of trace and ultratrace elements in high-purity materials (metals, semiconductors and insulators), in different technical samples (e.g. alloys, pure chemicals, ceramics, thin films, ion-implanted semiconductors), in environmental samples (waters, soils, biological and medical materials) and geological samples. Whereas such techniques as spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS), laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) have multielemental capability, other methods such as thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) have been used for sensitive mono- or oligoelemental ultratrace analysis (and precise determination of isotopic ratios) in solid samples. The limits of detection for chemical elements using these mass spectrometric techniques are in the low ng g -1 concentration range. The quantification of the analytical results of mass spectrometric methods is sometimes difficult due to a lack of matrix-fitted multielement standard reference materials (SRMs) for many solid samples. Therefore, owing to the simple quantification procedure of the aqueous solution, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is being increasingly used for the characterization of solid samples after sample dissolution. ICP-MS is often combined with special sample introduction equipment (e.g. flow injection, hydride generation, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or electrothermal vaporization) or an off-line matrix separation and enrichment of trace impurities (especially for characterization of

  10. A mass spectrometry primer for mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), a rapidly growing subfield of chemical imaging, employs mass spectrometry (MS) technologies to create single- and multi-dimensional localization maps for a variety of atoms and molecules. Complimentary to other imaging approaches, MSI provides high chemical specificity and broad analyte coverage. This powerful analytical toolset is capable of measuring the distribution of many classes of inorganics, metabolites, proteins and pharmaceuticals in chemically and structurally complex biological specimens in vivo, in vitro, and in situ. The MSI approaches highlighted in this Methods in Molecular Biology volume provide flexibility of detection, characterization, and identification of multiple known and unknown analytes. The goal of this chapter is to introduce investigators who may be unfamiliar with MS to the basic principles of the mass spectrometric approaches as used in MSI. In addition to guidelines for choosing the most suitable MSI method for specific investigations, cross-references are provided to the chapters in this volume that describe the appropriate experimental protocols. PMID:20680583

  11. Advanced mass spectrometry-based methods for the analysis of conformational integrity of biopharmaceutical products

    PubMed Central

    Bobst, Cedric E.; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has already become an indispensable tool in the analytical armamentarium of the biopharmaceutical industry, although its current uses are limited to characterization of covalent structure of recombinant protein drugs. However, the scope of applications of mass spectrometry-based methods is beginning to expand to include characterization of the higher order structure and dynamics of biopharmaceutical products, a development which is catalyzed by the recent progress in mass spectrometry-based methods to study higher order protein structure. The two particularly promising methods that are likely to have the most significant and lasting impact in many areas of biopharmaceutical analysis, direct ESI MS and hydrogen/deuterium exchange, are focus of this article. PMID:21542797

  12. Method for predicting peptide detection in mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, Lars [West Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA; Petritis, Konstantinos [Richland, WA

    2010-07-13

    A method of predicting whether a peptide present in a biological sample will be detected by analysis with a mass spectrometer. The method uses at least one mass spectrometer to perform repeated analysis of a sample containing peptides from proteins with known amino acids. The method then generates a data set of peptides identified as contained within the sample by the repeated analysis. The method then calculates the probability that a specific peptide in the data set was detected in the repeated analysis. The method then creates a plurality of vectors, where each vector has a plurality of dimensions, and each dimension represents a property of one or more of the amino acids present in each peptide and adjacent peptides in the data set. Using these vectors, the method then generates an algorithm from the plurality of vectors and the calculated probabilities that specific peptides in the data set were detected in the repeated analysis. The algorithm is thus capable of calculating the probability that a hypothetical peptide represented as a vector will be detected by a mass spectrometry based proteomic platform, given that the peptide is present in a sample introduced into a mass spectrometer.

  13. Direct olive oil analysis by mass spectrometry: A comparison of different ambient ionization methods.

    PubMed

    Lara-Ortega, Felipe J; Beneito-Cambra, Miriam; Robles-Molina, José; García-Reyes, Juan F; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2018-04-01

    Analytical methods based on ambient ionization mass spectrometry (AIMS) combine the classic outstanding performance of mass spectrometry in terms of sensitivity and selectivity along with convenient features related to the lack of sample workup required. In this work, the performance of different mass spectrometry-based methods has been assessed for the direct analyses of virgin olive oil for quality purposes. Two sets of experiments have been setup: (1) direct analysis of untreated olive oil using AIMS methods such as Low-Temperature Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LTP-MS) or paper spray mass spectrometry (PS-MS); or alternatively (2) the use of atmospheric pressure ionization (API) mass spectrometry by direct infusion of a diluted sample through either atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) or electrospray (ESI) ionization sources. The second strategy involved a minimum sample work-up consisting of a simple olive oil dilution (from 1:10 to 1:1000) with appropriate solvents, which originated critical carry over effects in ESI, making unreliable its use in routine; thus, ESI required the use of a liquid-liquid extraction to shift the measurement towards a specific part of the composition of the edible oil (i.e. polyphenol rich fraction or lipid/fatty acid profile). On the other hand, LTP-MS enabled direct undiluted mass analysis of olive oil. The use of PS-MS provided additional advantages such as an extended ionization coverage/molecular weight range (compared to LTP-MS) and the possibility to increase the ionization efficiency towards nonpolar compounds such as squalene through the formation of Ag + adducts with carbon-carbon double bounds, an attractive feature to discriminate between oils with different degree of unsaturation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative mass spectrometry methods for pharmaceutical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Loos, Glenn; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative pharmaceutical analysis is nowadays frequently executed using mass spectrometry. Electrospray ionization coupled to a (hybrid) triple quadrupole mass spectrometer is generally used in combination with solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography. Furthermore, isotopically labelled standards are often used to correct for ion suppression. The challenges in producing sensitive but reliable quantitative data depend on the instrumentation, sample preparation and hyphenated techniques. In this contribution, different approaches to enhance the ionization efficiencies using modified source geometries and improved ion guidance are provided. Furthermore, possibilities to minimize, assess and correct for matrix interferences caused by co-eluting substances are described. With the focus on pharmaceuticals in the environment and bioanalysis, different separation techniques, trends in liquid chromatography and sample preparation methods to minimize matrix effects and increase sensitivity are discussed. Although highly sensitive methods are generally aimed for to provide automated multi-residue analysis, (less sensitive) miniaturized set-ups have a great potential due to their ability for in-field usage. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644982

  15. A general method for targeted quantitative cross-linking mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) provides protein structural information by identifying covalently linked proximal amino acid residues on protein surfaces. The information gained by this technique is complementary to other structural biology methods such as x-ray crystallography, NM...

  16. Stable isotope labelling methods in mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Chahrour, Osama; Cobice, Diego; Malone, John

    2015-09-10

    Mass-spectrometry based proteomics has evolved as a promising technology over the last decade and is undergoing a dramatic development in a number of different areas, such as; mass spectrometric instrumentation, peptide identification algorithms and bioinformatic computational data analysis. The improved methodology allows quantitative measurement of relative or absolute protein amounts, which is essential for gaining insights into their functions and dynamics in biological systems. Several different strategies involving stable isotopes label (ICAT, ICPL, IDBEST, iTRAQ, TMT, IPTL, SILAC), label-free statistical assessment approaches (MRM, SWATH) and absolute quantification methods (AQUA) are possible, each having specific strengths and weaknesses. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), which is still widely recognised as elemental detector, has recently emerged as a complementary technique to the previous methods. The new application area for ICP-MS is targeting the fast growing field of proteomics related research, allowing absolute protein quantification using suitable elemental based tags. This document describes the different stable isotope labelling methods which incorporate metabolic labelling in live cells, ICP-MS based detection and post-harvest chemical label tagging for protein quantification, in addition to summarising their pros and cons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry of citrus limonoids.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qingguo; Schwartz, Steven J

    2003-10-15

    Methods for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) of citrus limonoid aglycones and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) of limonoid glucosides are reported. The fragmentation patterns of four citrus limonoid aglycones (limonin, nomilin, obacunone, and deacetylnomilin) and six limonoid glucosides, that is, limonin 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (LG), nomilin 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (NG), nomilinic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (NAG), deacetyl nomilinic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (DNAG), obacunone 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OG), and obacunoic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OAG) were investigated using a quadruple mass spectrometer in low-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD). The four limonoid aglycones and four limonoid glucosides (LG, OG, NAG, and DNAG) were purified from citrus seeds; the other two limonoid glucosides (NG and OAG) were tentatively identified in the crude extract of grapefruit seeds by ESI mass spectrometry in both positive and negative ion analysis. Ammonium hydroxide or acetic acid was added to the mobile phase to facilitate ionization. During positive ion APCI analysis of limonoid aglycones, protonated molecular ion, [M + H]+, or adduct ion, [M + NH3 + H]-, was formed as base peaks when ammonium hydroxide was added to the mobile phase. Molecular anions or adduct ions with acetic acid ([M + HOAc - H] and [M + HOAc]-) or a deprotonated molecular ion were produced during negative ion APCI analysis of limonoid aglycones, depending on the mobile-phase modifier used. Positive ion ESI-MS of limonoid glucosides produced adduct ions of [M + H + NH3]+, [M + Na]+, and [M + K]+ when ammonium hydroxide was added to the mobile phase. After collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) of the limonoid aglycone molecular ions in negative ion APCI analysis, fragment ions indicated structural information of the precursor ions, showing the presence of methyl, carboxyl, and oxygenated ring

  18. Data Analysis Methods for Synthetic Polymer Mass Spectrometry: Autocorrelation

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, William E.; Guttman, Charles M.

    2002-01-01

    Autocorrelation is shown to be useful in describing the periodic patterns found in high- resolution mass spectra of synthetic polymers. Examples of this usefulness are described for a simple linear homopolymer to demonstrate the method fundamentals, a condensation polymer to demonstrate its utility in understanding complex spectra with multiple repeating patterns on different mass scales, and a condensation copolymer to demonstrate how it can elegantly and efficiently reveal unexpected phenomena. It is shown that using autocorrelation to determine where the signal devolves into noise can be useful in determining molecular mass distributions of synthetic polymers, a primary focus of the NIST synthetic polymer mass spectrometry effort. The appendices describe some of the effects of transformation from time to mass space when time-of-flight mass separation is used, as well as the effects of non-trivial baselines on the autocorrelation function. PMID:27446716

  19. Testing and Validation of Computational Methods for Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Laurent; Hansen, Kasper D; Hoopmann, Michael R; Hermjakob, Henning; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Beyer, Andreas

    2016-03-04

    High-throughput methods based on mass spectrometry (proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics, etc.) produce a wealth of data that cannot be analyzed without computational methods. The impact of the choice of method on the overall result of a biological study is often underappreciated, but different methods can result in very different biological findings. It is thus essential to evaluate and compare the correctness and relative performance of computational methods. The volume of the data as well as the complexity of the algorithms render unbiased comparisons challenging. This paper discusses some problems and challenges in testing and validation of computational methods. We discuss the different types of data (simulated and experimental validation data) as well as different metrics to compare methods. We also introduce a new public repository for mass spectrometric reference data sets ( http://compms.org/RefData ) that contains a collection of publicly available data sets for performance evaluation for a wide range of different methods.

  20. Direct antigen detection from immunoprecipitated beads using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry; a new method for immunobeads-mass spectrometry (iMS).

    PubMed

    Shimada, Takashi; Toyama, Atsuhiko; Aoki, Chikage; Aoki, Yutaka; Tanaka, Koichi; Sato, Taka-Aki

    2011-12-15

    One-step detection of biological molecules is one of the principal techniques for clinical diagnosis, and the potential of mass spectrometry for biomarker detection has been a promising new approach in the field of medical sciences. We demonstrate here a new and high-sensitivity method that we termed immunobeads-mass spectrometry (iMS), which combines conventional immunoprecipitation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The key feature of iMS is the MS-compatible condition of immunoprecipitation using detergents with a monosaccaride-C8 alkyl chain or a disaccharide-C10 alkyl chain, and the minimized number of steps required for high-sensitivity detection of target peptides in serum or biological fluid. This was achieved by optimizing the wash buffer and subjecting the immunobeads directly to MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Using this method, we showed that 1 fmol of amyloid beta peptide spiked in serum was readily detectable, demonstrating the powerful tool of iMS as a biomarker detection method. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Optimization of Whole-body Zebrafish Sectioning Methods for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) methods and protocols have become widely adapted to a variety of tissues and species. However, the MSI literature lacks information on whole-body cryosection preparation for the zebrafish (ZF; Danio rerio), a model organism routinely used in devel...

  2. Desorption in Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbayevich; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Sakai, Yuji; Takaishi, Rio; Habib, Ahsan; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry, analytes must be released in the gas phase. There are two representative methods for the gasification of the condensed samples, i.e. , ablation and desorption. While ablation is based on the explosion induced by the energy accumulated in the condensed matrix, desorption is a single molecular process taking place on the surface. In this paper, desorption methods for mass spectrometry developed in our laboratory: flash heating/rapid cooling, Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD), solid/solid friction, liquid/solid friction, electrospray droplet impact (EDI) ionization/desorption, and probe electrospray ionization (PESI), will be described. All the methods are concerned with the surface and interface phenomena. The concept of how to desorb less-volatility compounds from the surface will be discussed.

  3. Desorption in Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbayevich; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Sakai, Yuji; Takaishi, Rio; Habib, Ahsan; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry, analytes must be released in the gas phase. There are two representative methods for the gasification of the condensed samples, i.e., ablation and desorption. While ablation is based on the explosion induced by the energy accumulated in the condensed matrix, desorption is a single molecular process taking place on the surface. In this paper, desorption methods for mass spectrometry developed in our laboratory: flash heating/rapid cooling, Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD), solid/solid friction, liquid/solid friction, electrospray droplet impact (EDI) ionization/desorption, and probe electrospray ionization (PESI), will be described. All the methods are concerned with the surface and interface phenomena. The concept of how to desorb less-volatility compounds from the surface will be discussed. PMID:28337398

  4. Silver-109-based laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry method for detection and quantification of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Arendowski, Adrian; Nizioł, Joanna; Ruman, Tomasz

    2018-04-01

    A new methodology applicable for both high-resolution laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging of amino acids is presented. The matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-type target containing monoisotopic cationic 109 Ag nanoparticles ( 109 AgNPs) was used for rapid mass spectrometry measurements of 11 amino acids of different chemical properties. Amino acids were directly tested in 100,000-fold concentration change conditions ranging from 100 μg/mL to 1 ng/mL which equates to 50 ng to 500 fg of amino acid per measurement spot. Limit of detection values obtained suggest that presented method/target system is among the fastest and most sensitive ones in laser mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry imaging of spots of human blood plasma spiked with amino acids showed their surface distribution allowing optimization of quantitative measurements. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Kiss, András; Smith, Donald F; Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-30

    Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with polyatomic primary ion sources, are required to exploit the full potential of microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging, i.e. to efficiently push the limits of ultra-high spatial resolution, sample throughput and sensitivity. In this work, a C60 primary source was combined with a commercial mass microscope for microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The detector setup is a pixelated detector from the Medipix/Timepix family with high-voltage post-acceleration capabilities. The system's mass spectral and imaging performance is tested with various benchmark samples and thin tissue sections. The high secondary ion yield (with respect to 'traditional' monatomic primary ion sources) of the C60 primary ion source and the increased sensitivity of the high voltage detector setup improve microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The analysis time and the signal-to-noise ratio are improved compared with other microscope mode imaging systems, all at high spatial resolution. We have demonstrated the unique capabilities of a C60 ion microscope with a Timepix detector for high spatial resolution microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Mass spectrometry with accelerators.

    PubMed

    Litherland, A E; Zhao, X-L; Kieser, W E

    2011-01-01

    As one in a series of articles on Canadian contributions to mass spectrometry, this review begins with an outline of the history of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), noting roles played by researchers at three Canadian AMS laboratories. After a description of the unique features of AMS, three examples, (14)C, (10)Be, and (129)I are given to illustrate the methods. The capabilities of mass spectrometry have been extended by the addition of atomic isobar selection, molecular isobar attenuation, further ion acceleration, followed by ion detection and ion identification at essentially zero dark current or ion flux. This has been accomplished by exploiting the techniques and accelerators of atomic and nuclear physics. In 1939, the first principles of AMS were established using a cyclotron. In 1977 the selection of isobars in the ion source was established when it was shown that the (14)N(-) ion was very unstable, or extremely difficult to create, making a tandem electrostatic accelerator highly suitable for assisting the mass spectrometric measurement of the rare long-lived radioactive isotope (14)C in the environment. This observation, together with the large attenuation of the molecular isobars (13)CH(-) and (12)CH 2(-) during tandem acceleration and the observed very low background contamination from the ion source, was found to facilitate the mass spectrometry of (14)C to at least a level of (14)C/C ~ 6 × 10(-16), the equivalent of a radiocarbon age of 60,000 years. Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, or AMS, has now made possible the accurate radiocarbon dating of milligram-sized carbon samples by ion counting as well as dating and tracing with many other long-lived radioactive isotopes such as (10)Be, (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (129)I. The difficulty of obtaining large anion currents with low electron affinities and the difficulties of isobar separation, especially for the heavier mass ions, has prompted the use of molecular anions and the search for alternative

  7. Unbiased and targeted mass spectrometry for the HDL proteome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sasha A; Aikawa, Masanori

    2017-02-01

    Mass spectrometry is an ever evolving technology that is equipped with a variety of tools for protein research. Some lipoprotein studies, especially those pertaining to HDL biology, have been exploiting the versatility of mass spectrometry to understand HDL function through its proteome. Despite the role of mass spectrometry in advancing research as a whole, however, the technology remains obscure to those without hands on experience, but still wishing to understand it. In this review, we walk the reader through the coevolution of common mass spectrometry workflows and HDL research, starting from the basic unbiased mass spectrometry methods used to profile the HDL proteome to the most recent targeted methods that have enabled an unprecedented view of HDL metabolism. Unbiased global proteomics have demonstrated that the HDL proteome is organized into subgroups across the HDL size fractions providing further evidence that HDL functional heterogeneity is in part governed by its varying protein constituents. Parallel reaction monitoring, a novel targeted mass spectrometry method, was used to monitor the metabolism of HDL apolipoproteins in humans and revealed that apolipoproteins contained within the same HDL size fraction exhibit diverse metabolic properties. Mass spectrometry provides a variety of tools and strategies to facilitate understanding, through its proteins, the complex biology of HDL.

  8. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  9. Quantitative thin-layer chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of caffeine using a surface sampling probe electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry system.

    PubMed

    Ford, Michael J; Deibel, Michael A; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-07-15

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 mum/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methods determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 muL) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by approximately 8% or more) than the literature values.

  10. CREATININE DETERMINATION IN URINE BY LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION-TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY METHOD.

    PubMed

    Dereziński, Paweł; Klupczyńska, Agnieszka; Sawicki, Wojciech; Kokot, Zenon J

    2016-01-01

    Creatinine determination in urine is used to estimate the completeness of the 24-h urine collection, compensation for variable diuresis and as a preliminary step in protein profiling in urine. Despite the fact that a wide range of methods of measuring creatinine level in biofluids has been developed, many of them are adversely affected by interfering substances. A new liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for creatinine determination in urine has been developed. Chromatographic separation was performed by applying C18 column and a gradient elution. Analyses were carried out on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ion source. The developed method was fully validated according to the international guidelines. The quantification range of the method was 5-1500 ng/mL, which corresponds to 1-300 mg/dL in urine. Limit of detection and quantitation were 2 and 5 ng/mL, respectively. Additionally, the comparison of creatinine determination by newly developed method to the colorimetric method was performed. The method enables the determination of creatinine in urine samples with a minimal sample preparation, excellent sensitivity and prominent selectivity. Since mass spectrometry allows to measure a number of compounds simultaneously, a future perspective would be to incorporate the determination of other clinically important compounds excreted in urine.

  11. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  12. Quantitative Thin-Layer Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Caffeine Using a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Deibel, Michael A.; Tomkins, Bruce A

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 {mu}m/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methodsmore » determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 {mu}L) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by 8% or more) than the literature values.« less

  13. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, David J.; Nordholt, Jane E.

    1992-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

  14. Crux: Rapid Open Source Protein Tandem Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Efficiently and accurately analyzing big protein tandem mass spectrometry data sets requires robust software that incorporates state-of-the-art computational, machine learning, and statistical methods. The Crux mass spectrometry analysis software toolkit (http://cruxtoolkit.sourceforge.net) is an open source project that aims to provide users with a cross-platform suite of analysis tools for interpreting protein mass spectrometry data. PMID:25182276

  15. Chromatography - mass spectrometry in aerospace industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buryak, A. K.; Serdyuk, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    The applications of chromatography - mass spectrometry in aerospace industry are considered. The primary attention is devoted to the development of physicochemical grounds of the use of various chromatography - mass spectrometry procedures to solve topical problems of this industry. Various methods for investigation of the composition of rocket fuels, surfaces of structural materials and environmental media affected by aerospace activities are compared. The application of chromatography - mass spectrometry for the development and evaluation of processes for decontaminations of equipment, industrial wastes and soils from rocket fuel components is substantiated. The bibliography includes 135 references.

  16. Sequencing Cyclic Peptides by Multistage Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mohimani, Hosein; Yang, Yu-Liang; Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most effective antibiotics (e.g., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. While hundreds of biomedically important cyclic peptides have been sequenced, the computational techniques for sequencing cyclic peptides are still in their infancy. Previous methods for sequencing peptide antibiotics and other cyclic peptides are based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, and require large amount (miligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Recently, development of mass spectrometry based methods has provided some hope for accurate sequencing of cyclic peptides using picograms of materials. In this paper we develop a method for sequencing of cyclic peptides by multistage mass spectrometry, and show its advantages over single stage mass spectrometry. The method is tested on known and new cyclic peptides from Bacillus brevis, Dianthus superbus and Streptomyces griseus, as well as a new family of cyclic peptides produced by marine bacteria. PMID:21751357

  17. Imaging mass spectrometry statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emrys A; Deininger, Sören-Oliver; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Deelder, André M; McDonnell, Liam A

    2012-08-30

    Imaging mass spectrometry is increasingly used to identify new candidate biomarkers. This clinical application of imaging mass spectrometry is highly multidisciplinary: expertise in mass spectrometry is necessary to acquire high quality data, histology is required to accurately label the origin of each pixel's mass spectrum, disease biology is necessary to understand the potential meaning of the imaging mass spectrometry results, and statistics to assess the confidence of any findings. Imaging mass spectrometry data analysis is further complicated because of the unique nature of the data (within the mass spectrometry field); several of the assumptions implicit in the analysis of LC-MS/profiling datasets are not applicable to imaging. The very large size of imaging datasets and the reporting of many data analysis routines, combined with inadequate training and accessible reviews, have exacerbated this problem. In this paper we provide an accessible review of the nature of imaging data and the different strategies by which the data may be analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the assumptions of the data analysis routines to ensure that the reader is apprised of their correct usage in imaging mass spectrometry research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. MASS SPECTROMETRY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers applications of mass spectrometry to the environmental sciences. From the early applications of mass spectrometry to environmental research in the 1960s and 1970s, mass spectrometry has played an important role in aiding our understanding of environmental poll...

  19. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  20. Microscale mass spectrometry systems, devices and related methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, John Michael

    Mass spectrometry systems or assemblies therefore include an ionizer that includes at least one planar conductor, a mass analyzer with a planar electrode assembly, and a detector comprising at least one planar conductor. The ionizer, the mass analyzer and the detector are attached together in a compact stack assembly. The stack assembly has a perimeter that bounds an area that is between about 0.01 mm.sup.2 to about 25 cm.sup.2 and the stack assembly has a thickness that is between about 0.1 mm to about 25 mm.

  1. Microscale mass spectrometry systems, devices and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, John Michael

    2016-06-21

    Mass spectrometry systems or assemblies therefore include an ionizer that includes at least one planar conductor, a mass analyzer with a planar electrode assembly, and a detector comprising at least one planar conductor. The ionizer, the mass analyzer and the detector are attached together in a compact stack assembly. The stack assembly has a perimeter that bounds an area that is between about 0.01 mm.sup.2 to about 25 cm.sup.2 and the stack assembly has a thickness that is between about 0.1 mm to about 25 mm.

  2. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    DOE PAGES

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this hasmore » been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.« less

  3. Defining Putative Glycan Cancer Biomarkers by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mechref, Yehia; Hu, Yunli; Garcia, Aldo; Hussein, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Summary For decades, the association between aberrant glycosylation and many types of cancers has been shown. However, defining the changes of glycan structures has not been demonstrated until recently. This has been facilitated by the major advances in mass spectrometry and separation science which allowed the detailed characterization of glycan changes associated with cancer. Mass spectrometry glycomics methods have been successfully employed to compare the glycomic profiles of different human specimen collected from disease-free individuals and patients with cancer. Additionally, comparing the glycomic profiles of glycoproteins purified from specimen collected from disease-free individuals and patients with cancer has also been performed. These types of glycan analyses employing mass spectrometry or liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry allowed the characterization of native, labeled, and permethylated glycans. This review discusses the different glycomic and glycoproteomic methods employed for defining glycans as cancer biomarkers of different organs, including breast, colon, esophagus, liver, lung, ovarian, pancreas and prostate. PMID:23157355

  4. Guideline on Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, Amy

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry is used to determine the concentration of an element of interest in a bulk sample. It is a destructive analysis technique that is applicable to a wide range of analytes and bulk sample types. With this method, a known amount of a rare isotope, or ‘spike’, of the element of interest is added to a known amount of sample. The element of interest is chemically purified from the bulk sample, the isotope ratio of the spiked sample is measured by mass spectrometry, and the concentration of the element of interest is calculated from this result. Thismore » method is widely used, although a mass spectrometer required for this analysis may be fairly expensive.« less

  5. Recent applications of gas chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Špánik, Ivan; Machyňáková, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical method that combines excellent separation power of gas chromatography with improved identification based on an accurate mass measurement. These features designate gas chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry as the first choice for identification and structure elucidation of unknown volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. Gas chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry quantitative analyses was previously focused on the determination of dioxins and related compounds using magnetic sector type analyzers, a standing requirement of many international standards. The introduction of a quadrupole high-resolution time-of-flight mass analyzer broadened interest in this method and novel applications were developed, especially for multi-target screening purposes. This review is focused on the development and the most interesting applications of gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry towards analysis of environmental matrices, biological fluids, and food safety since 2010. The main attention is paid to various approaches and applications of gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry for non-target screening to identify contaminants and to characterize the chemical composition of environmental, food, and biological samples. The most interesting quantitative applications, where a significant contribution of gas chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry over the currently used methods is expected, will be discussed as well. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry biometrics

    DOEpatents

    Leclerc, Marion; Bowen, Benjamin; Northen, Trent

    2015-09-08

    Several embodiments described herein are drawn to methods of identifying an analyte on a subject's skin, methods of generating a fingerprint, methods of determining a physiological change in a subject, methods of diagnosing health status of a subject, and assay systems for detecting an analyte and generating a fingerprint, by nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS).

  7. Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook.

  8. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

  9. [Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Histopathologic Analysis].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Fumiyoshi; Seto, Mitsutoshi

    2015-04-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) enables visualization of the distribution of a range of biomolecules by integrating biochemical information from mass spectrometry with positional information from microscopy. IMS identifies a target molecule. In addition, IMS enables global analysis of biomolecules containing unknown molecules by detecting the ratio of the molecular weight to electric charge without any target, which makes it possible to identify novel molecules. IMS generates data on the distribution of lipids and small molecules in tissues, which is difficult to visualize with either conventional counter-staining or immunohistochemistry. In this review, we firstly introduce the principle of imaging mass spectrometry and recent advances in the sample preparation method. Secondly, we present findings regarding biological samples, especially pathological ones. Finally, we discuss the limitations and problems of the IMS technique and clinical application, such as in drug development.

  10. Analytical aspects of hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Engen, John R.; Wales, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The analytical aspects of measuring hydrogen exchange by mass spectrometry are reviewed. The nature of analytical selectivity in hydrogen exchange is described followed by review of the analytical tools required to accomplish fragmentation, separation, and the mass spectrometry measurements under restrictive exchange quench conditions. In contrast to analytical quantitation that relies on measurements of peak intensity or area, quantitation in hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry depends on measuring a mass change with respect to an undeuterated or deuterated control, resulting in a value between zero and the maximum amount of deuterium that could be incorporated. Reliable quantitation is a function of experimental fidelity and to achieve high measurement reproducibility, a large number of experimental variables must be controlled during sample preparation and analysis. The method also reports on important qualitative aspects of the sample, including conformational heterogeneity and population dynamics. PMID:26048552

  11. Mass spectrometry of atmospheric aerosols--recent developments and applications. Part II: On-line mass spectrometry techniques.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Kerri A; Prather, Kimberly A

    2012-01-01

    Many of the significant advances in our understanding of atmospheric particles can be attributed to the application of mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry provides high sensitivity with fast response time to probe chemically complex particles. This review focuses on recent developments and applications in the field of mass spectrometry of atmospheric aerosols. In Part II of this two-part review, we concentrate on real-time mass spectrometry techniques, which provide high time resolution for insight into brief events and diurnal changes while eliminating the potential artifacts acquired during long-term filter sampling. In particular, real-time mass spectrometry has been shown recently to provide the ability to probe the chemical composition of ambient individual particles <30 nm in diameter to further our understanding of how particles are formed through nucleation in the atmosphere. Further, transportable real-time mass spectrometry techniques are now used frequently on ground-, ship-, and aircraft-based studies around the globe to further our understanding of the spatial distribution of atmospheric aerosols. In addition, coupling aerosol mass spectrometry techniques with other measurements in series has allowed the in situ determination of chemically resolved particle effective density, refractive index, volatility, and cloud activation properties. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Simultaneous Detection of Androgen and Estrogen Abuse in Breeding Animals by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry/Combustion/Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/C/IRMS) Evaluated against Alternative Methods.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Geert; Mangelinckx, Sven; Courtheyn, Dirk; De Kimpe, Norbert; Matthijs, Bert; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2015-09-02

    The administration of synthetic homologues of naturally occurring steroids can be demonstrated by measuring (13)C/(12)C isotopic ratios of their urinary metabolites. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-MS/C/IRMS) was used in this study to appraise in a global approach isotopic deviations of two 17β-testosterone metabolites (17α-testosterone and etiocholanolone) and one 17β-estradiol metabolite (17α-estradiol) together with those of 5-androstene-3β,17α-diol as endogenous reference compound (ERC). Intermediate precisions of 0.35‰, 1.05‰, 0.35‰, and 0.21‰, respectively, were observed (n = 8). To assess the performance of the analytical method, a bull and a heifer were treated with 17β-testosterone propionate and 17β-estradiol-3-benzoate. The sensitivity of the method permitted the demonstration of 17β-estradiol treatment up to 24 days. For 17β-testosterone treatment, the detection windows were 3 days and 24 days for the bull and the heifer, respectively. The capability of GC-MS/C/IRMS to demonstrate natural steroid abuse for urinary steroids was eventually compared to those of mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) when measuring intact steroid esters in blood and hair.

  13. Identification of Unknown Contaminants in Water Samples from ISS Employing Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (MS/MS) is a powerful technique for identifying unknown organic compounds. For non-volatile or thermally unstable unknowns dissolved in liquids, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) is often the variety of MS/MS used for the identification. One type of LC/MS/MS that is rapidly becoming popular is time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. This technique is now in use at the Johnson Space Center for identification of unknown nonvolatile organics in water samples from the space program. An example of the successful identification of one unknown is reviewed in detail in this paper. The advantages of time-of-flight instrumentation are demonstrated through this example as well as the strategy employed in using time-of-flight data to identify unknowns.

  14. Proteomic Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Skin Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lazova, Rossitza; Seeley, Erin H

    2017-10-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging can be successfully used for skin cancer diagnosis, particularly for the diagnosis of challenging melanocytic lesions. This method analyzes proteins within benign and malignant melanocytic tumor cells and, based on their differences, which constitute a unique molecular signature of 5 to 20 proteins, can render a diagnosis of benign nevus versus malignant melanoma. Mass spectrometry imaging may assist in the differentiation between metastases and nevi as well as between proliferative nodules in nevi and melanoma arising in a nevus. In the difficult area of atypical Spitzoid neoplasms, mass spectrometry diagnosis can predict clinical outcome better than histopathology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mass Spectrometry in the Home and Garden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, Christopher J.; Bain, Ryan M.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application.

  16. High resolution laser mass spectrometry bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kermit K; Seneviratne, Chinthaka A; Ghorai, Suman

    2016-07-15

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was introduced more than five decades ago with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and a decade later with laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry (MS). Large biomolecule imaging by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was developed in the 1990s and ambient laser MS a decade ago. Although SIMS has been capable of imaging with a moderate mass range at sub-micrometer lateral resolution from its inception, laser MS requires additional effort to achieve a lateral resolution of 10μm or below which is required to image at the size scale of single mammalian cells. This review covers untargeted large biomolecule MSI using lasers for desorption/ionization or laser desorption and post-ionization. These methods include laser microprobe (LDI) MSI, MALDI MSI, laser ambient and atmospheric pressure MSI, and near-field laser ablation MS. Novel approaches to improving lateral resolution are discussed, including oversampling, beam shaping, transmission geometry, reflective and through-hole objectives, microscope mode, and near-field optics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dereplication of plant phenolics using a mass-spectrometry database independent method.

    PubMed

    Borges, Ricardo M; Taujale, Rahil; de Souza, Juliana Santana; de Andrade Bezerra, Thaís; Silva, Eder Lana E; Herzog, Ronny; Ponce, Francesca V; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Edison, Arthur S

    2018-05-29

    Dereplication, an approach to sidestep the efforts involved in the isolation of known compounds, is generally accepted as being the first stage of novel discoveries in natural product research. It is based on metabolite profiling analysis of complex natural extracts. To present the application of LipidXplorer for automatic targeted dereplication of phenolics in plant crude extracts based on direct infusion high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry data. LipidXplorer uses a user-defined molecular fragmentation query language (MFQL) to search for specific characteristic fragmentation patterns in large data sets and highlight the corresponding metabolites. To this end, MFQL files were written to dereplicate common phenolics occurring in plant extracts. Complementary MFQL files were used for validation purposes. New MFQL files with molecular formula restrictions for common classes of phenolic natural products were generated for the metabolite profiling of different representative crude plant extracts. This method was evaluated against an open-source software for mass-spectrometry data processing (MZMine®) and against manual annotation based on published data. The targeted LipidXplorer method implemented using common phenolic fragmentation patterns, was found to be able to annotate more phenolics than MZMine® that is based on automated queries on the available databases. Additionally, screening for ascarosides, natural products with unrelated structures to plant phenolics collected from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, demonstrated the specificity of this method by cross-testing both groups of chemicals in both plants and nematodes. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. [Advances in mass spectrometry-based approaches for neuropeptide analysis].

    PubMed

    Ji, Qianyue; Ma, Min; Peng, Xin; Jia, Chenxi; Ji, Qianyue

    2017-07-25

    Neuropeptides are an important class of endogenous bioactive substances involved in the function of the nervous system, and connect the brain and other neural and peripheral organs. Mass spectrometry-based neuropeptidomics are designed to study neuropeptides in a large-scale manner and obtain important molecular information to further understand the mechanism of nervous system regulation and the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. This review summarizes the basic strategies for the study of neuropeptides using mass spectrometry, including sample preparation and processing, qualitative and quantitative methods, and mass spectrometry imagining.

  19. Targeted Quantitation of Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of proteins is one of the most fundamental analytical tasks in a biochemistry laboratory, but widely used immunochemical methods often have limited specificity and high measurement variation. In this review, we discuss applications of multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, which allows sensitive, precise quantitative analyses of peptides and the proteins from which they are derived. Systematic development of MRM assays is permitted by databases of peptide mass spectra and sequences, software tools for analysis design and data analysis, and rapid evolution of tandem mass spectrometer technology. Key advantages of MRM assays are the ability to target specific peptide sequences, including variants and modified forms, and the capacity for multiplexing that allows analysis of dozens to hundreds of peptides. Different quantitative standardization methods provide options that balance precision, sensitivity, and assay cost. Targeted protein quantitation by MRM and related mass spectrometry methods can advance biochemistry by transforming approaches to protein measurement. PMID:23517332

  20. Targeted quantitation of proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liebler, Daniel C; Zimmerman, Lisa J

    2013-06-04

    Quantitative measurement of proteins is one of the most fundamental analytical tasks in a biochemistry laboratory, but widely used immunochemical methods often have limited specificity and high measurement variation. In this review, we discuss applications of multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, which allows sensitive, precise quantitative analyses of peptides and the proteins from which they are derived. Systematic development of MRM assays is permitted by databases of peptide mass spectra and sequences, software tools for analysis design and data analysis, and rapid evolution of tandem mass spectrometer technology. Key advantages of MRM assays are the ability to target specific peptide sequences, including variants and modified forms, and the capacity for multiplexing that allows analysis of dozens to hundreds of peptides. Different quantitative standardization methods provide options that balance precision, sensitivity, and assay cost. Targeted protein quantitation by MRM and related mass spectrometry methods can advance biochemistry by transforming approaches to protein measurement.

  1. Ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of alkylphenols in soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Pan, Hefang; Liu, Zhengzheng; Ge, Fei

    2009-03-20

    A novel method has been developed for the determination of alkylphenols in soil by ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography employing small particle sizes, combined with tandem mass spectrometry. Soil samples were extracted with pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and then cleaned with solid-phase extraction (SPE). The extracts were separated on C18 column (1.7 microm, 50 mm x 2.1mm) with a gradient elution and a mobile phase consisting of water and acetonitrile, and then detected by an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in negative ion mode with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Compared with traditional liquid chromatography, it took ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography much less time to analyze alkylphenols. Additionally, the ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method produces satisfactory reliability, sensitivity, and accuracy. The average recoveries of the three target analytes were 74.0-103.4%, with the RSD<15%. The calibration curves for alkylphenols were linear within the range of 0.01-0.4 microg/ml, with the correlation coefficients greater than 0.99. When 10 g soil sample was used for analysis, the limits of quantification (LOQs) of the three alkylphenols were all 1.0 microg/kg.

  2. Collaborative trial validation study of two methods, one based on high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of acrylamide in bakery and potato products.

    PubMed

    Wenzl, Thomas; Karasek, Lubomir; Rosen, Johan; Hellenaes, Karl-Erik; Crews, Colin; Castle, Laurence; Anklam, Elke

    2006-11-03

    A European inter-laboratory study was conducted to validate two analytical procedures for the determination of acrylamide in bakery ware (crispbreads, biscuits) and potato products (chips), within a concentration range from about 20 microg/kg to about 9000 microgg/kg. The methods are based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of the derivatised analyte and on high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) of native acrylamide. Isotope dilution with isotopically labelled acrylamide was an integral part of both methods. The study was evaluated according to internationally accepted guidelines. The performance of the HPLC-MS/MS method was found to be superior to that of the GC-MS method and to be fit-for-the-purpose.

  3. Mass Spectrometry Imaging, an Emerging Technology in Neuropsychopharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Svenningsson, Per; Andrén, Per E

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is a powerful tool for directly determining the distribution of proteins, peptides, lipids, neurotransmitters, metabolites and drugs in neural tissue sections in situ. Molecule-specific imaging can be achieved using various ionization techniques that are suited to different applications but which all yield data with high mass accuracies and spatial resolutions. The ability to simultaneously obtain images showing the distributions of chemical species ranging from metal ions to macromolecules makes it possible to explore the chemical organization of a sample and to correlate the results obtained with specific anatomical features. The imaging of biomolecules has provided new insights into multiple neurological diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Mass spectrometry imaging can also be used in conjunction with other imaging techniques in order to identify correlations between changes in the distribution of important chemical species and other changes in the properties of the tissue. Here we review the applications of mass spectrometry imaging in neuroscience research and discuss its potential. The results presented demonstrate that mass spectrometry imaging is a useful experimental method with diverse applications in neuroscience. PMID:23966069

  4. Mass spectrometry imaging, an emerging technology in neuropsychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Svenningsson, Per; Andrén, Per E

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is a powerful tool for directly determining the distribution of proteins, peptides, lipids, neurotransmitters, metabolites and drugs in neural tissue sections in situ. Molecule-specific imaging can be achieved using various ionization techniques that are suited to different applications but which all yield data with high mass accuracies and spatial resolutions. The ability to simultaneously obtain images showing the distributions of chemical species ranging from metal ions to macromolecules makes it possible to explore the chemical organization of a sample and to correlate the results obtained with specific anatomical features. The imaging of biomolecules has provided new insights into multiple neurological diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Mass spectrometry imaging can also be used in conjunction with other imaging techniques in order to identify correlations between changes in the distribution of important chemical species and other changes in the properties of the tissue. Here we review the applications of mass spectrometry imaging in neuroscience research and discuss its potential. The results presented demonstrate that mass spectrometry imaging is a useful experimental method with diverse applications in neuroscience.

  5. Statistical methods for quantitative mass spectrometry proteomic experiments with labeling.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Ann L; Mahoney, Douglas W

    2012-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry utilizing labeling allows multiple specimens to be subjected to mass spectrometry simultaneously. As a result, between-experiment variability is reduced. Here we describe use of fundamental concepts of statistical experimental design in the labeling framework in order to minimize variability and avoid biases. We demonstrate how to export data in the format that is most efficient for statistical analysis. We demonstrate how to assess the need for normalization, perform normalization, and check whether it worked. We describe how to build a model explaining the observed values and test for differential protein abundance along with descriptive statistics and measures of reliability of the findings. Concepts are illustrated through the use of three case studies utilizing the iTRAQ 4-plex labeling protocol.

  6. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  7. May the Best Molecule Win: Competition ESI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Sarah; Wilson, W. David

    2015-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has become invaluable in the characterization of macromolecular biological systems such as nucleic acids and proteins. Recent advances in the field of mass spectrometry and the soft conditions characteristic of electrospray ionization allow for the investigation of non-covalent interactions among large biomolecules and ligands. Modulation of genetic processes through the use of small molecule inhibitors with the DNA minor groove is gaining attention as a potential therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the development of a competition method using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to probe the interactions of multiple DNA sequences with libraries of minor groove binding molecules. Such an approach acts as a high-throughput screening method to determine important information including the stoichiometry, binding mode, cooperativity, and relative binding affinity. In addition to small molecule-DNA complexes, we highlight other applications in which competition mass spectrometry has been used. A competitive approach to simultaneously investigate complex interactions promises to be a powerful tool in the discovery of small molecule inhibitors with high specificity and for specific, important DNA sequences. PMID:26501262

  8. Mass spectrometry and renal calculi

    PubMed Central

    Purcarea, VL; Sisu, I; Sisu, E

    2010-01-01

    The present review represents a concise and complete survey of the literature covering 2004–2009, concerning the mass spectrometric techniques involved in the structural investigation of renal calculi. After a short presentation of the fundamental mass spectrometric techniques (MALDI–TOF, QTOF, MS–MS) as well as hyphenated methods (GC–MS, LC–MS, CE–MS), an extensive study of the urinary proteome analysis as well as the detection and quantification by mass spectrometry of toxins, drugs and metabolites from renal calculi is presented. PMID:20968197

  9. A General Method for Targeted Quantitative Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Juan D; Eng, Jimmy K; Schweppe, Devin K; Cilia, Michelle; Rivera, Keith; Zhong, Xuefei; Wu, Xia; Allen, Terrence; Khurgel, Moshe; Kumar, Akhilesh; Lampropoulos, Athanasios; Larsson, Mårten; Maity, Shuvadeep; Morozov, Yaroslav; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Perez-Neut, Mathew; Pineyro-Ruiz, Coriness; Polina, Elizabeth; Post, Stephanie; Rider, Mark; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Tyson, Katherine; Vieira Parrine Sant'Ana, Debora; Bruce, James E

    2016-01-01

    Chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) provides protein structural information by identifying covalently linked proximal amino acid residues on protein surfaces. The information gained by this technique is complementary to other structural biology methods such as x-ray crystallography, NMR and cryo-electron microscopy[1]. The extension of traditional quantitative proteomics methods with chemical cross-linking can provide information on the structural dynamics of protein structures and protein complexes. The identification and quantitation of cross-linked peptides remains challenging for the general community, requiring specialized expertise ultimately limiting more widespread adoption of the technique. We describe a general method for targeted quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of cross-linked peptide pairs. We report the adaptation of the widely used, open source software package Skyline, for the analysis of quantitative XL-MS data as a means for data analysis and sharing of methods. We demonstrate the utility and robustness of the method with a cross-laboratory study and present data that is supported by and validates previously published data on quantified cross-linked peptide pairs. This advance provides an easy to use resource so that any lab with access to a LC-MS system capable of performing targeted quantitative analysis can quickly and accurately measure dynamic changes in protein structure and protein interactions.

  10. Mass spectrometry of long-lived radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Johanna Sabine

    2003-10-01

    The capability of determining element concentrations at the trace and ultratrace level and isotope ratios is a main feature of inorganic mass spectrometry. The precise and accurate determination of isotope ratios of long-lived natural and artificial radionuclides is required, e.g. for their environmental monitoring and health control, for studying radionuclide migration, for age dating, for determining isotope ratios of radiogenic elements in the nuclear industry, for quality assurance and determination of the burn-up of fuel material in a nuclear power plant, for reprocessing plants, nuclear material accounting and radioactive waste control. Inorganic mass spectrometry, especially inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as the most important inorganic mass spectrometric technique today, possesses excellent sensitivity, precision and good accuracy for isotope ratio measurements and practically no restriction with respect to the ionization potential of the element investigated—therefore, thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), which has been used as the dominant analytical technique for precise isotope ratio measurements of long-lived radionuclides for many decades, is being replaced increasingly by ICP-MS. In the last few years instrumental progress in improving figures of merit for the determination of isotope ratio measurements of long-lived radionuclides in ICP-MS has been achieved by the application of a multiple ion collector device (MC-ICP-MS) and the introduction of the collision cell interface in order to dissociate disturbing argon-based molecular ions, to reduce the kinetic energy of ions and neutralize the disturbing noble gas ions (e.g. of 129Xe + for the determination of 129I). The review describes the state of the art and the progress of different inorganic mass spectrometric techniques such as ICP-MS, laser ablation ICP-MS vs. TIMS, glow discharge mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, resonance ionization mass

  11. Environmental applications for the analysis of chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans using mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Reiner, E.J.; Schellenberg, D.H.; Taguchi, V.Y.

    1991-01-01

    A mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry-multiple reaction monitoring (MS/MS-MRM) technique for the analysis of all tetra- through octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (Cl{sub x}DD, x = 4-8) and dibenzofurans (Cl{sub x}DF, x = 4-8) has been developed at the Ministry of the Environment (MOE) utilizing a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Optimization of instrumental parameters using the analyte of interest in a direct insertion probe (DIP) resulted in sensitivities approaching those obtainable by high-resolution mass spectrometric (HRMS) methods. All congeners of dioxins and furans were detected in the femtogram range. Results on selected samples indicated that for some matrices, fewer chemical interferences were observed by MS/MSmore » than by HRMS. The technique used to optimize the instrument for chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDDs) and chlorinated dibenzofurans (CDFs) analysis is adaptable to other analytes.« less

  12. Clinical review: improving the measurement of serum thyroglobulin with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Roth, Mara Y

    2013-04-01

    Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurements are central to the management of patients treated for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. For decades, Tg measurements have relied on methods that are subject to interference by commonly found substances in human serum and plasma, such as Tg autoantibodies. As a result, many patients need additional imaging studies to rule out cancer persistence or recurrence that could be avoided with more sensitive and specific testing methods. The aims of this review are to: 1) briefly review the interferences common to Tg immunoassays; 2) introduce readers to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry as a method for quantifying proteins in human serum/plasma; and 3) discuss the potential benefits and limitations of the method in the quantification of serum Tg. Mass spectrometric methods have traditionally lacked the sensitivity, robustness, and throughput to be useful clinical assays. These methods failed to meet the necessary clinical benchmarks due to the nature of the mass spectrometry workflow and instrumentation. Over the past few years, there have been major advances in reagents, automation, and instrumentation for the quantification of proteins using mass spectrometry. More recently, methods using mass spectrometry to detect and quantify Tg have been developed and are of sufficient quality to be used in the management of patients. Novel serum Tg assays that use mass spectrometry may avoid the issue of autoantibody interference and other problems with currently available immunoassays for Tg. Prospective studies are needed to fully understand the potential benefits of novel Tg assays to patients and care providers.

  13. Application of Laser Mass Spectrometry to Art and Archaeology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulian, Lase Lisa E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Muliadi, Sarah; Owens, Shawn; McGovern, Patrick E.; Schmidt, Catherine M.; Trentelman, Karen A.; deVries, Mattanjah S.

    2011-01-01

    REMPI laser mass spectrometry is a combination of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy and time of flight mass spectrometry, This technique enables the collection of mass specific optical spectra as well as of optically selected mass spectra. Analytes are jet-cooled by entrainment in a molecular beam, and this low temperature gas phase analysis has the benefit of excellent vibronic resolution. Utilizing this method, mass spectrometric analysis of historically relevant samples can be simplified and improved; Optical selection of targets eliminates the need for chromatography while knowledge of a target's gas phase spectroscopy allows for facile differentiation of molecules that are in the aqueous phase considered spectroscopically indistinguishable. These two factors allow smaller sample sizes than commercial MS instruments, which in turn will require less damage to objects of antiquity. We have explored methods to optimize REMPI laser mass spectrometry as an analytical tool to archaeology using theobromine and caffeine as molecular markers in Mesoamerican pottery, and are expanding this approach to the field of art to examine laccaic acid in shellacs.

  14. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Mechanistic Studies and Methods for Improving the Structural Identification of Carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yin-Hung; Wang, Yi-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Although matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is one of the most widely used soft ionization methods for biomolecules, the lack of detailed understanding of ionization mechanisms restricts its application in the analysis of carbohydrates. Structural identification of carbohydrates achieved by MALDI mass spectrometry helps us to gain insights into biological functions and pathogenesis of disease. In this review, we highlight mechanistic details of MALDI, including both ionization and desorption. Strategies to improve the ion yield of carbohydrates are also reviewed. Furthermore, commonly used fragmentation methods to identify the structure are discussed. PMID:28959517

  15. Rapid characterization of microorganisms by mass spectrometry--what can be learned and how?

    PubMed

    Fenselau, Catherine C

    2013-08-01

    Strategies for the rapid and reliable analysis of microorganisms have been sought to meet national needs in defense, homeland security, space exploration, food and water safety, and clinical diagnosis. Mass spectrometry has long been a candidate technique because it is extremely rapid and can provide highly specific information. It has excellent sensitivity. Molecular and fragment ion masses provide detailed fingerprints, which can also be interpreted. Mass spectrometry is also a broad band method--everything has a mass--and it is automatable. Mass spectrometry is a physiochemical method that is orthogonal and complementary to biochemical and morphological methods used to characterize microorganisms.

  16. Through a Glass Darkly: Glimpses into the Future of Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cooks, R. Graham; Mueller, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The paper has three parts, (i) a brief overview of the main achievements made using mass spectrometry across all the fields of science, (ii) a survey of some of the topics currently being pursued most activity, including both applications and fundamental studies, and (iii) some hints as to what the future of mass spectrometry might hold with particular emphasis on revolutionary changes in the subject. Emphasis is given to ambient methods of ionization and their use in disease diagnosis and to their use in combination with miniature mass spectrometers for in-situ measurements. Special attention goes to the chemical aspects of mass spectrometry, including its emerging role as a preparative method based on accelerated bimolecular reaction rates in solution and on ion soft landing as a means of surface tailoring. In summary, the paper covers the proud history, vibrant present and expansive future of mass spectrometry. PMID:24349920

  17. Ambient Mass Spectrometry in Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Takats, Z; Strittmatter, N; McKenzie, J S

    2017-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry was developed as a sample preparation-free alternative to traditional MS-based workflows. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI)-MS methods were demonstrated to allow the direct analysis of a broad range of samples including unaltered biological tissue specimens. In contrast to this advantageous feature, nowadays DESI-MS is almost exclusively used for sample preparation intensive mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in the area of cancer research. As an alternative to MALDI, DESI-MSI offers matrix deposition-free experiment with improved signal in the lower (<500m/z) range. DESI-MSI enables the spatial mapping of tumor metabolism and has been broadly demonstrated to offer an alternative to frozen section histology for intraoperative tissue identification and surgical margin assessment. Rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS) was developed exclusively for the latter purpose by the direct combination of electrosurgical devices and mass spectrometry. In case of the REIMS technology, aerosol particles produced by electrosurgical dissection are subjected to MS analysis, providing spectral information on the structural lipid composition of tissues. REIMS technology was demonstrated to give real-time information on the histological nature of tissues being dissected, deeming it an ideal tool for intraoperative tissue identification including surgical margin control. More recently, the method has also been used for the rapid lipidomic phenotyping of cancer cell lines as it was demonstrated in case of the NCI-60 cell line collection. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Leland

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) methods can reveal much about the structure, energetics, and dynamics of proteins. The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) to an earlier fragmentation-separation HX analysis now extends HX studies to larger proteins at high structural resolution and can provide information not available before. This chapter discusses experimental aspects of HX labeling, especially with respect to the use of MS and the analysis of MS data. PMID:26791986

  19. Comparative Study of Three Methods for Affinity Measurements: Capillary Electrophoresis Coupled with UV Detection and Mass Spectrometry, and Direct Infusion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, Gleb G.; Logie, Jennifer; Okhonin, Victor; Renaud, Justin B.; Mayer, Paul M.; Berezovski, Maxim V.

    2012-07-01

    We present affinity capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (ACE-MS) as a comprehensive separation technique for label-free solution-based affinity analysis. The application of ACE-MS for measuring affinity constants between eight small molecule drugs [ibuprofen, s-flurbiprofen, diclofenac, phenylbutazone, naproxen, folic acid, resveratrol, and 4,4'-(propane-1,3-diyl) dibenzoic acid] and β-cyclodextrin is described. We couple on-line ACE with MS to combine the separation and kinetic capability of ACE together with the molecular weight and structural elucidation of MS in one system. To understand the full potential of ACE-MS, we compare it with two other methods: Direct infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) and ACE with UV detection (ACE-UV). After the evaluation, DIMS provides less reliable equilibrium dissociation constants than separation-based ACE-UV and ACE-MS, and cannot be used solely for the study of noncovalent interactions. ACE-MS determines apparent dissociation constants for all reacting small molecules in a mixture, even in cases when drugs overlap with each other during separation. The ability of ACE-MS to interact, separate, and rapidly scan through m/z can facilitate the simultaneous affinity analysis of multiple interacting pairs, potentially leading to the high-throughput screening of drug candidates.

  20. Mass spectrometry of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colony, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is used for chemical analysis of aerospace materials and contaminants. Years of analytical aerospace experience have resulted in the development of specialized techniques of sampling and analysis which are required in order to optimize results. This work has resulted in the evolution of a hybrid method of indexing mass spectra which include both the largest peaks and the structurally significant peaks in a concise format. With this system, a library of mass spectra of aerospace materials was assembled, including the materials responsible for 80 to 90 percent of the contamination problems at Goddard Space Flight Center during the past several years.

  1. Development of a nucleotide sugar purification method using a mixed mode column & mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Heather; Xia, Fang; Lo, Mei-Chu; Zhou, Jing; Jordan, John B; McCarter, John; Barnhart, Wesley W; Gahm, Kyung-Hyun

    2015-11-10

    Analysis of nucleotide sugars, nucleoside di- and triphosphates and sugar-phosphates is an essential step in the process of understanding enzymatic pathways. A facile and rapid separation method was developed to analyze these compounds present in an enzymatic reaction mixture utilized to produce nucleotide sugars. The Primesep SB column explored in this study utilizes hydrophobic interactions as well as electrostatic interactions with the phosphoric portion of the nucleotide sugars. Ammonium formate buffer was selected due to its compatibility with mass spectrometry. Negative ion mode mass spectrometry was adopted for detection of the sugar phosphate (fucose-1-phophate), as the compound is not amenable to UV detection. Various mobile phase conditions such as pH, buffer concentration and organic modifier were explored. The semi-preparative separation method was developed to prepare 30mg of the nucleotide sugar. (19)F NMR was utilized to determine purity of the purified fluorinated nucleotide sugar. The collected nucleotide sugar was found to be 99% pure. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Mass spectrometry in grape and wine chemistry. Part II: The consumer protection.

    PubMed

    Flamini, Riccardo; Panighel, Annarita

    2006-01-01

    Controls in food industry are fundamental to protect the consumer health. For products of high quality, warranty of origin and identity is required and analytical control is very important to prevent frauds. In this article, the "state of art" of mass spectrometry in enological chemistry as a consumer safety contribute is reported. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) methods have been developed to determine pesticides, ethyl carbamate, and compounds from the yeast and bacterial metabolism in wine. The presence of pesticides in wine is mainly linked to the use of dicarboxyimide fungicides on vineyard shortly before the harvest to prevent the Botrytis cinerea attack of grape. Pesticide residues are regulated at maximum residue limits in grape of low ppm levels, but significantly lower levels in wine have to be detected, and mass spectrometry offers effective and sensitive methods. Moreover, mass spectrometry represent an advantageous alternative to the radioactive-source-containing electron capture detector commonly used in GC analysis of pesticides. Analysis of ochratoxin A (OTA) in wine by LC/MS and multiple mass spectrometry (MS/MS) permits to confirm the toxin presence without the use of expensive immunoaffinity columns, or time and solvent consuming sample derivatization procedures. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) is used to control heavy metals contamination in wine, and to verify the wine origin and authenticity. Isotopic ratio-mass spectrometry (IRMS) is applied to reveal wine watering and sugar additions, and to determine the product origin and traceability.

  3. Quantitative correlations between collision induced dissociation mass spectrometry coupled with electrospray ionization or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry - Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael

    2018-04-01

    The problematic that we consider in this paper treats the quantitative correlation model equations between experimental kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of coupled electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry with collision induced dissociation mass spectrometry, accounting for the fact that the physical phenomena and mechanisms of ESI- and APCI-ion formation are completely different. There are described forty two fragment reactions of three analytes under independent ESI- and APCI-measurements. The developed new quantitative models allow us to study correlatively the reaction kinetics and thermodynamics using the methods of mass spectrometry, which complementary application with the methods of the quantum chemistry provide 3D structural information of the analytes. Both static and dynamic quantum chemical computations are carried out. The object of analyses are [2,3-dimethyl-4-(4-methyl-benzoyl)-2,3-di-p-tolyl-cyclobutyl]-p-tolyl-methanone (1) and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons derivatives of dibenzoperylen (2) and tetrabenzo [a,c,fg,op]naphthacene (3), respectively. As far as (1) is known to be a product of [2π+2π] cycloaddition reactions of chalcone (1,3-di-p-tolyl-propenone), however producing cyclic derivatives with different stereo selectivity, so that the study provide crucial data about the capability of mass spectrometry to provide determine the stereo selectivity of the analytes. This work also first provides quantitative treatment of the relations '3D molecular/electronic structures'-'quantum chemical diffusion coefficient'-'mass spectrometric diffusion coefficient', thus extending the capability of the mass spectrometry for determination of the exact 3D structure of the analytes using independent measurements and computations of the diffusion coefficients. The determination of the experimental diffusion parameters is carried out within the 'current monitoring method

  4. The life sciences mass spectrometry research unit.

    PubMed

    Hopfgartner, Gérard; Varesio, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    The Life Sciences Mass Spectrometry (LSMS) research unit focuses on the development of novel analytical workflows based on innovative mass spectrometric and software tools for the analysis of low molecular weight compounds, peptides and proteins in complex biological matrices. The present article summarizes some of the recent work of the unit: i) the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of drug of abuse in hair, ii) the use of high resolution mass spectrometry for simultaneous qualitative/quantitative analysis in drug metabolism and metabolomics, and iii) the absolute quantitation of proteins by mass spectrometry using the selected reaction monitoring mode.

  5. A multi-residue method for 17 anticoccidial drugs and ractopamine in animal tissues by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Matus, Johanna L; Boison, Joe O

    2016-05-01

    A new and sensitive multi-residue liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QToF-MS) method was developed and validated for the determination and confirmation of residues of 17 anticoccidials, plus free ractopamine in poultry muscle and liver, and bovine muscle, liver, and kidney tissues. The 17 anticoccidials are lasalocid, halofuginone, narasin, monensin, semduramicin, ethopabate, robenidine, buquinolate, toltrazuril as its sulfone metabolite, maduramicin, salinomycin, diclazuril, amprolium, decoquinate, dinitolmide, clopidol, and the nicarbazin metabolite DNC (N,N1-bis(4-nitrophenyl)urea). The analytes were extracted and cleaned up within a 3-hour period by simply extracting the analytes into a solvent mixture with salts followed by centrifugation, dilution, and filtration. The validated method was used in a pilot study for the analysis of 173 samples that included quail liver, bovine kidney, liver, muscle, and horse muscle. The predominant residues found in this study were monensin, ractopamine, and lasalocid. The results of this pilot study showed that this new method is applicable to real samples, and is fit for use in a regulatory testing programme. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Drug Testing and Analysis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Drug Testing and Analysis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Targeted Multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Transmission Geometry for Subcellular Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lavenant, Gwendoline Thiery; Zavalin, Andrey I.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry utilizes several different antigen-specific primary antibodies, each directly labeled with a unique photocleavable mass tag, to detect multiple antigens in a single tissue section. Each photocleavable mass tag bound to an antibody has a unique molecular weight and can be readily ionized by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. This manuscript describes a mass spectrometry method that allows imaging of targeted single cells within tissue using transmission geometry laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Transmission geometry focuses the laser beam on the back side of the tissue placed on a glass slide, providing a 2 μm diameter laser spot irradiating the biological specimen. This matrix-free method enables simultaneous localization at the sub-cellular level of multiple antigens using specific tagged antibodies. We have used this technology to visualize the co-expression of synaptophysin and two major hormones peptides, insulin and somatostatin, in duplex assays in beta and delta cells contained in a human pancreatic islet. PMID:23397138

  7. Targeted Multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Transmission Geometry for Subcellular Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery-Lavenant, Gwendoline; Zavalin, Andre I.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-04-01

    Targeted multiplex imaging mass spectrometry utilizes several different antigen-specific primary antibodies, each directly labeled with a unique photocleavable mass tag, to detect multiple antigens in a single tissue section. Each photocleavable mass tag bound to an antibody has a unique molecular weight and can be readily ionized by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. This article describes a mass spectrometry method that allows imaging of targeted single cells within tissue using transmission geometry laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Transmission geometry focuses the laser beam on the back side of the tissue placed on a glass slide, providing a 2 μm diameter laser spot irradiating the biological specimen. This matrix-free method enables simultaneous localization at the sub-cellular level of multiple antigens using specific tagged antibodies. We have used this technology to visualize the co-expression of synaptophysin and two major hormones peptides, insulin and somatostatin, in duplex assays in beta and delta cells contained in a human pancreatic islet.

  8. EMERGING POLLUTANTS, MASS SPECTROMETRY, AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Historically fundamental to amassing our understanding of environmental processes and chemical pollution is the realm of mass spectrometry (MS) - the mainstay of analytical chemistry - the workhorse that supplies definitive data that environmental scientists and engineers reply upon for identifying molecular compositions (and ultimately structures) of chemicals. While the power of MS has long been visible to the practicing environmental chemist, it borders on obscurity to the lay public and many scientists. While MS has played a long, historic (and largely invisible) role in establishing our knowledge of environmental processes and pollution, what recognition it does enjoy is usually relegated to that of a tool. It is usually the relevance or significance of the knowledge acquired from the application of the tool that has ultimate meaning to the public and science at large - not how the data were acquired. Methods (736/800): Mass Spectrometry and the

  9. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  10. Antibodies as means for selective mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boström, Tove; Takanen, Jenny Ottosson; Hober, Sophia

    2016-05-15

    For protein analysis of biological samples, two major strategies are used today; mass spectrometry (MS) and antibody-based methods. Each strategy offers advantages and drawbacks. However, combining the two using an immunoenrichment step with MS analysis brings together the benefits of each method resulting in increased sensitivity, faster analysis and possibility of higher degrees of multiplexing. The immunoenrichment can be performed either on protein or peptide level and quantification standards can be added in order to enable determination of the absolute protein concentration in the sample. The combination of immunoenrichment and MS holds great promise for the future in both proteomics and clinical diagnostics. This review describes different setups of immunoenrichment coupled to mass spectrometry and how these can be utilized in various applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of Mass Spectrometry in Clinical Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Ketha, Siva S; Singh, Ravinder J; Ketha, Hemamalini

    2017-09-01

    The advent of mass spectrometry into the clinical laboratory has led to an improvement in clinical management of several endocrine diseases. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry found some of its first clinical applications in the diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism, in quantitative steroid analysis, and in drug analysis laboratories. Mass spectrometry assays offer analytical sensitivity and specificity that is superior to immunoassays for many analytes. This article highlights several areas of clinical endocrinology that have witnessed the use of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to improve clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct Analysis of Large Living Organism by Megavolt Electrostatic Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kwan-Ming; Tang, Ho-Wai; Man, Sin-Heng; Mak, Pui-Yuk; Choi, Yi-Ching; Wong, Melody Yee-Man

    2014-09-01

    A new ambient ionization method allowing the direct chemical analysis of living human body by mass spectrometry (MS) was developed. This MS method, namely Megavolt Electrostatic Ionization Mass Spectrometry, is based on electrostatic charging of a living individual to megavolt (MV) potential, illicit drugs, and explosives on skin/glove, flammable solvent on cloth/tissue paper, and volatile food substances in breath were readily ionized and detected by a mass spectrometer.

  13. Direct analysis of large living organism by megavolt electrostatic ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kwan-Ming; Tang, Ho-Wai; Man, Sin-Heng; Mak, Pui-Yuk; Choi, Yi-Ching; Wong, Melody Yee-Man

    2014-09-01

    A new ambient ionization method allowing the direct chemical analysis of living human body by mass spectrometry (MS) was developed. This MS method, namely Megavolt Electrostatic Ionization Mass Spectrometry, is based on electrostatic charging of a living individual to megavolt (MV) potential, illicit drugs, and explosives on skin/glove, flammable solvent on cloth/tissue paper, and volatile food substances in breath were readily ionized and detected by a mass spectrometer.

  14. Analysis of hydroxamate siderophores in soil solution using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry with on-line sample preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Madelen A; Bylund, Dan

    2015-10-01

    A liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method was developed to quantitatively and qualitatively analyze 13 hydroxamate siderophores (ferrichrome, ferrirubin, ferrirhodin, ferrichrysin, ferricrocin, ferrioxamine B, D1 , E and G, neocoprogen I and II, coprogen and triacetylfusarinine C). Samples were preconcentrated on-line by a switch-valve setup prior to analyte separation on a Kinetex C18 column. Gradient elution was performed using a mixture of an ammonium formate buffer and acetonitrile. Total analysis time including column conditioning was 20.5 min. Analytes were fragmented by applying collision-induced dissociation, enabling structural identification by tandem mass spectrometry. Limit of detection values for the selected ion monitoring method ranged from 71 pM to 1.5 nM with corresponding values of two to nine times higher for the multiple reaction monitoring method. The liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry method resulted in a robust and sensitive quantification of hydroxamate siderophores as indicated by retention time stability, linearity, sensitivity, precision and recovery. The analytical error of the methods, assessed through random-order, duplicate analysis of soil samples extracted with a mixture of 10 mM phosphate buffer and methanol, appears negligible in relation to between-sample variations. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Mass spectrometry imaging under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunping; Dill, Allison L; Eberlin, Livia S; Cooks, R Graham; Ifa, Demian R

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has emerged as an important tool in the last decade and it is beginning to show potential to provide new information in many fields owing to its unique ability to acquire molecularly specific images and to provide multiplexed information, without the need for labeling or staining. In MSI, the chemical identity of molecules present on a surface is investigated as a function of spatial distribution. In addition to now standard methods involving MSI in vacuum, recently developed ambient ionization techniques allow MSI to be performed under atmospheric pressure on untreated samples outside the mass spectrometer. Here we review recent developments and applications of MSI emphasizing the ambient ionization techniques of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), probe electrospray ionization (PESI), desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI), femtosecond laser desorption ionization (fs-LDI), laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS), infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI), liquid microjunction surface sampling probe mass spectrometry (LMJ-SSP MS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI), and plasma sources such as the low temperature plasma (LTP) probe and laser ablation coupled to flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (LA-FAPA). Included are discussions of some of the features of ambient MSI for example the ability to implement chemical reactions with the goal of providing high abundance ions characteristic of specific compounds of interest and the use of tandem mass spectrometry to either map the distribution of targeted molecules with high specificity or to provide additional MS information on the structural identification of compounds. We also describe the role of bioinformatics in acquiring and interpreting the chemical and spatial information obtained through MSI, especially in biological applications for tissue

  16. Mass Spectrometry Imaging under Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunping; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Cooks, R. Graham; Ifa, Demian R.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has emerged as an important tool in the last decade and it is beginning to show potential to provide new information in many fields owing to its unique ability to acquire molecularly specific images and to provide multiplexed information, without the need for labeling or staining. In MSI, the chemical identity of molecules present on a surface is investigated as a function of spatial distribution. In addition to now standard methods involving MSI in vacuum, recently developed ambient ionization techniques allow MSI to be performed under atmospheric pressure on untreated samples outside the mass spectrometer. Here we review recent developments and applications of MSI emphasizing the ambient ionization techniques of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), probe electrospray ionization (PESI), desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI), femtosecond laser desorption ionization (fs-LDI), laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS), infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI), liquid microjunction surface sampling probe mass spectrometry (LMJ-SSP MS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI), and plasma sources such as the low temperature plasma (LTP) probe and laser ablation coupled to flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (LA-FAPA). Included are discussions of some of the features of ambient MSI including the ability to implement chemical reactions with the goal of providing high abundance ions characteristic of specific compounds of interest and the use of tandem mass spectrometry to either map the distribution of targeted molecules with high specificity or to provide additional MS information in the structural identification of compounds. We also describe the role of bioinformatics in acquiring and interpreting the chemical and spatial information obtained through MSI, especially in biological applications for tissue

  17. Structural analysis of commercial ceramides by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bleton, J; Gaudin, K; Chaminade, P; Goursaud, S; Baillet, A; Tchapla, A

    2001-05-11

    A simple method using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to analyse structures of ceramides. Identification of trimethylsilylated ceramides were obtained in short analysis times (derivatization of ceramides in 30 min at room temperature and 20 min gas chromatography mass spectrometry run) even for complex mixtures. For example in ceramide Type III, 18 peaks were observed which represent 27 various structures. The coeluted compounds were ceramides containing the same functional groups and the same carbon number but with a different distribution on the two alkyl chains of the molecule. They were accurately differentiated by mass spectrometry. Therefore, 83 structures of trimethylsilylated ceramides were identified in 11 different commercial mixtures. For 52 structures of these, mass spectral data were not described in the literature, neither full mass spectra nor characteristic fragments.

  18. A four dimensional separation method based on continuous heart-cutting gas chromatography with ion mobility and high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lipok, Christian; Hippler, Jörg; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2018-02-09

    A two-dimensional GC (2D-GC) method was developed and coupled to an ion mobility-high resolution mass spectrometer, which enables the separation of complex samples in four dimensions (2D-GC, ion mobilility spectrometry and mass spectrometry). This approach works as a continuous multiheart-cutting GC-system (GC+GC), using a long modulation time of 20s, which allows the complete transfer of most of the first dimension peaks to the second dimension column without fractionation, in comparison to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC). Hence, each compound delivers only one peak in the second dimension, which simplifies the data handling even when ion mobility spectrometry as a third and mass spectrometry as a fourth dimension are introduced. The analysis of a plant extract from Calendula officinales shows the separation power of this four dimensional separation method. The introduction of ion mobility spectrometry provides an additional separation dimension and allows to determine collision cross sections (CCS) of the analytes as a further physicochemical constant supporting the identification. A CCS database with more than 800 standard substances including drug-like compounds and pesticides was used for CCS data base search in this work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Imaging mass spectrometry in microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry tools which allow for the 2-D visualization of the distribution of trace metals, metabolites, surface lipids, peptides and proteins directly from biological samples without the need for chemical tagging or antibodies are becoming increasingly useful for microbiology applications. These tools, comprised of different imaging mass spectrometry techniques, are ushering in an exciting new era of discovery by allowing for the generation of chemical hypotheses based on of the spatial mapping of atoms and molecules that can correlate to or transcend observed phenotypes. In this review, we explore the wide range of imaging mass spectrometry techniques available to microbiologists and describe their unique applications to microbiology with respect to the types of microbiology samples to be investigated. PMID:21822293

  20. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on themore » status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.« less

  1. High Resolution Laser Mass Spectrometry Bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kermit K.; Seneviratne, Chinthaka A.; Ghorai, Suman

    2016-01-01

    MSI (MSI) was introduced more than five decades ago with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and a decade later with laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry (MS). Large biomolecule imaging by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was developed in the 1990s and ambient laser MS a decade ago. Although SIMS has been capable of imaging with a moderate mass range at sub-micrometer lateral resolution from its inception, laser MS requires additional effort to achieve a lateral resolution of 10 μm or below which is required to image at the size scale of single mammalian cells. This review covers untargeted large biomolecule MSI using lasers for desorption/ionization or laser desorption and post-ionization. These methods include laser microprobe (LDI) MSI, MALDI MSI, laser ambient and atmospheric pressure MSI, and near-field laser ablation MS. Novel approaches to improving lateral resolution are discussed, including oversampling, beam shaping, transmission geometry, reflective and through-hole objectives, microscope mode, and near-field optics. PMID:26972785

  2. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  3. Elucidating rhizosphere processes by mass spectrometry - A review.

    PubMed

    Rugova, Ariana; Puschenreiter, Markus; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    The presented review discusses state-of-the-art mass spectrometric methods, which have been developed and applied for investigation of chemical processes in the soil-root interface, the so-called rhizosphere. Rhizosphere soil's physical and chemical characteristics are to a great extent influenced by a complex mixture of compounds released from plant roots, i.e. root exudates, which have a high impact on nutrient and trace element dynamics in the soil-root interface as well as on microbial activities or soil physico-chemical characteristics. Chemical characterization as well as accurate quantification of the compounds present in the rhizosphere is a major prerequisite for a better understanding of rhizosphere processes and requires the development and application of advanced sampling procedures in combination with highly selective and sensitive analytical techniques. During the last years, targeted and non-targeted mass spectrometry-based methods have emerged and their combination with specific separation methods for various elements and compounds of a wide polarity range have been successfully applied in several studies. With this review we critically discuss the work that has been conducted within the last decade in the context of rhizosphere research and elemental or molecular mass spectrometry emphasizing different separation techniques as GC, LC and CE. Moreover, selected applications such as metal detoxification or nutrient acquisition will be discussed regarding the mass spectrometric techniques applied in studies of root exudates in plant-bacteria interactions. Additionally, a more recent isotope probing technique as novel mass spectrometry based application is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A onmore » Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached« less

  5. Method for the Simultaneous Quantitation of Apolipoprotein E Isoforms using Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wildsmith, Kristin R.; Han, Bomie; Bateman, Randall J.

    2009-01-01

    Using Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) as a model protein, we developed a protein isoform analysis method utilizing Stable Isotope Labeling Tandem Mass Spectrometry (SILT MS). ApoE isoforms are quantitated using the intensities of the b and y ions of the 13C-labeled tryptic isoform-specific peptides versus unlabeled tryptic isoform-specific peptides. The ApoE protein isoform analysis using SILT allows for the simultaneous detection and relative quantitation of different ApoE isoforms from the same sample. This method provides a less biased assessment of ApoE isoforms compared to antibody-dependent methods, and may lead to a better understanding of the biological differences between isoforms. PMID:19653990

  6. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray mass spectrometry for speciation analysis: applications and instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Amy L.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2004-02-01

    To gain an understanding of the function, toxicity and distribution of trace elements, it is necessary to determine not only the presence and concentration of the elements of interest, but also their speciation, by identifying and characterizing the compounds within which each is present. For sensitive detection of compounds containing elements of interest, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a popular method, and for identification of compounds via determination of molecular weight, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is gaining increasing use. ICP-MS and ESI-MS, usually coupled to a separation technique such as chromatography or capillary electrophoresis, have already been applied to a large number of research problems in such diverse fields as environmental chemistry, nutritional science, and bioinorganic chemistry, but a great deal of work remains to be completed. Current areas of research to which ICP-MS and ESI-MS have been applied are discussed, and the existing instrumentation used to solve speciation problems is described.

  7. Laser mass spectrometry for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Taranenko, N. I.; Zhu, Y. F.; Chung, C. N.; Allman, S. L.

    1997-05-01

    Since laser mass spectrometry has the potential for achieving very fast DNA analysis, we recently applied it to DNA sequencing, DNA typing for fingerprinting, and DNA screening for disease diagnosis. Two different approaches for sequencing DNA have been successfully demonstrated. One is to sequence DNA with DNA ladders produced from Sanger's enzymatic method. The other is to do direct sequencing without DNA ladders. The need for quick DNA typing for identification purposes is critical for forensic application. Our preliminary results indicate laser mass spectrometry can possible be used for rapid DNA fingerprinting applications at a much lower cost than gel electrophoresis. Population screening for certain genetic disease can be a very efficient step to reducing medical costs through prevention. Since laser mass spectrometry can provide very fast DNA analysis, we applied laser mass spectrometry to disease diagnosis. Clinical samples with both base deletion and point mutation have been tested with complete success.

  8. Comparison of Analytical Methods for the Determination of Uranium in Seawater Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Jordana R.; Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung

    2016-04-20

    Trace element determinations in seawater by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry are analytically challenging due to the typically very low concentrations of the trace elements and the potential interference of the salt matrix. In this study, we did a comparison for uranium analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) of Sequim Bay seawater samples and three seawater certified reference materials (SLEW-3, CASS-5 and NASS-6) using seven different analytical approaches. The methods evaluated include: direct analysis, Fe/Pd reductive precipitation, standard addition calibration, online automated dilution using an external calibration with and without matrix matching, and online automated pre-concentration. The methodmore » which produced the most accurate results was the method of standard addition calibration, recovering uranium from a Sequim Bay seawater sample at 101 ± 1.2%. The on-line preconcentration method and the automated dilution with matrix-matched calibration method also performed well. The two least effective methods were the direct analysis and the Fe/Pd reductive precipitation using sodium borohydride« less

  9. Silver nanostructures in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Sekuła, Justyna; Nizioł, Joanna; Rode, Wojciech; Ruman, Tomasz

    2015-09-21

    Silver nanoparticles have been successfully applied as a matrix replacement for the laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-ToF-MS). Nanoparticles, producing spectra with highly reduced chemical background in the low m/z region, are perfectly suited for low-molecular weight compound analysis and imaging. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) can efficiently absorb ultraviolet laser radiation, transfer energy to the analyte and promote analyte desorption, but also constitute a source of silver ions suitable for analyte cationisation. This review provides an overview of the literature on silver nanomaterials as non-conventional desorption and ionization promoters in LDI-MS and mass spectrometry imaging.

  10. Mass spectrometry-based biomarker discovery: toward a global proteome index of individuality.

    PubMed

    Hawkridge, Adam M; Muddiman, David C

    2009-01-01

    Biomarker discovery and proteomics have become synonymous with mass spectrometry in recent years. Although this conflation is an injustice to the many essential biomolecular techniques widely used in biomarker-discovery platforms, it underscores the power and potential of contemporary mass spectrometry. Numerous novel and powerful technologies have been developed around mass spectrometry, proteomics, and biomarker discovery over the past 20 years to globally study complex proteomes (e.g., plasma). However, very few large-scale longitudinal studies have been carried out using these platforms to establish the analytical variability relative to true biological variability. The purpose of this review is not to cover exhaustively the applications of mass spectrometry to biomarker discovery, but rather to discuss the analytical methods and strategies that have been developed for mass spectrometry-based biomarker-discovery platforms and to place them in the context of the many challenges and opportunities yet to be addressed.

  11. Combinatorial Labeling Method for Improving Peptide Fragmentation in Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchibhotla, Bhanuramanand; Kola, Sankara Rao; Medicherla, Jagannadham V.; Cherukuvada, Swamy V.; Dhople, Vishnu M.; Nalam, Madhusudhana Rao

    2017-06-01

    Annotation of peptide sequence from tandem mass spectra constitutes the central step of mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Peptide mass spectra are obtained upon gas-phase fragmentation. Identification of the protein from a set of experimental peptide spectral matches is usually referred as protein inference. Occurrence and intensity of these fragment ions in the MS/MS spectra are dependent on many factors such as amino acid composition, peptide basicity, activation mode, protease, etc. Particularly, chemical derivatizations of peptides were known to alter their fragmentation. In this study, the influence of acetylation, guanidinylation, and their combination on peptide fragmentation was assessed initially on a lipase (LipA) from Bacillus subtilis followed by a bovine six protein mix digest. The dual modification resulted in improved fragment ion occurrence and intensity changes, and this resulted in the equivalent representation of b- and y-type fragment ions in an ion trap MS/MS spectrum. The improved representation has allowed us to accurately annotate the peptide sequences de novo. Dual labeling has significantly reduced the false positive protein identifications in standard bovine six peptide digest. Our study suggests that the combinatorial labeling of peptides is a useful method to validate protein identifications for high confidence protein inference. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Diagnosis of gastroenterological diseases by metabolome analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masaru; Hatano, Naoya; Nishiumi, Shin; Irino, Yasuhiro; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Azuma, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Recently, metabolome analysis has been increasingly applied to biomarker detection and disease diagnosis in medical studies. Metabolome analysis is a strategy for studying the characteristics and interactions of low molecular weight metabolites under a specific set of conditions and is performed using mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. There is a strong possibility that changes in metabolite levels reflect the functional status of a cell because alterations in their levels occur downstream of DNA, RNA, and protein. Therefore, the metabolite profile of a cell is more likely to represent the current status of a cell than DNA, RNA, or protein. Thus, owing to the rapid development of mass spectrometry analytical techniques metabolome analysis is becoming an important experimental method in life sciences including the medical field. Here, we describe metabolome analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry, and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry. Then, the findings of studies about GC-MS-based metabolome analysis of gastroenterological diseases are summarized, and our research results are also introduced. Finally, we discuss the realization of disease diagnosis by metabolome analysis. The development of metabolome analysis using mass spectrometry will aid the discovery of novel biomarkers, hopefully leading to the early detection of various diseases.

  13. Development of stereotactic mass spectrometry for brain tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Agar, Nathalie Y R; Golby, Alexandra J; Ligon, Keith L; Norton, Isaiah; Mohan, Vandana; Wiseman, Justin M; Tannenbaum, Allen; Jolesz, Ferenc A

    2011-02-01

    Surgery remains the first and most important treatment modality for the majority of solid tumors. Across a range of brain tumor types and grades, postoperative residual tumor has a great impact on prognosis. The principal challenge and objective of neurosurgical intervention is therefore to maximize tumor resection while minimizing the potential for neurological deficit by preserving critical tissue. To introduce the integration of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry into surgery for in vivo molecular tissue characterization and intraoperative definition of tumor boundaries without systemic injection of contrast agents. Using a frameless stereotactic sampling approach and by integrating a 3-dimensional navigation system with an ultrasonic surgical probe, we obtained image-registered surgical specimens. The samples were analyzed with ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and validated against standard histopathology. This new approach will enable neurosurgeons to detect tumor infiltration of the normal brain intraoperatively with mass spectrometry and to obtain spatially resolved molecular tissue characterization without any exogenous agent and with high sensitivity and specificity. Proof of concept is presented in using mass spectrometry intraoperatively for real-time measurement of molecular structure and using that tissue characterization method to detect tumor boundaries. Multiple sampling sites within the tumor mass were defined for a patient with a recurrent left frontal oligodendroglioma, World Health Organization grade II with chromosome 1p/19q codeletion, and mass spectrometry data indicated a correlation between lipid constitution and tumor cell prevalence. The mass spectrometry measurements reflect a complex molecular structure and are integrated with frameless stereotaxy and imaging, providing 3-dimensional molecular imaging without systemic injection of any agents, which can be implemented for surgical margins delineation of

  14. Biological particle analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilker, V. L.; Platz, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    An instrument that analyzes the chemical composition of biological particles in aerosol or hydrosol form was developed. Efforts were directed toward the acquisition of mass spectra from aerosols of biomolecules and bacteria. The filament ion source was installed on the particle analysis by mass spectrometry system. Modifications of the vacuum system improved the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer. After the modifications were incorporated, detailed mass spectra of simple compounds from the three major classes of biomolecules, proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates were obtained. A method of generating bacterial aerosols was developed. The aerosols generated were collected and examined in the scanning electron microscope to insure that the bacteria delivered to the mass spectrometer were intact and free from debris.

  15. Identification of chemical components in Baidianling Capsule based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenying; Chen, Yu; Wang, Binjie; Sun, Xiaoyang; Guo, Ping; Chen, Xiaohui

    2017-08-01

    Baidianling Capsule, which is made from 16 Chinese herbs, has been widely used for treating vitiligo clinically. In this study, the sensitive and rapid method has been developed for the analysis of chemical components in Baidianling Capsule by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with retention indices and high-performance liquid chromatography combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Firstly, a total of 110 potential volatile compounds obtained from different extraction procedures including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, ketones, ethers, aldehydes, alcohols, phenols, organic acids, esters, furans, pyrrole, acid amides, heterocycles, and oxides were detected from Baidianling Capsule by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, of which 75 were identified by mass spectrometry in combination with the retention index. Then, a total of 124 components were tentatively identified by high-performance liquid chromatography combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Fifteen constituents from Baidianling Capsule were accurately identified by comparing the retention times with those of reference compounds, others were identified by comparing the retention times and mass spectrometry data, as well as retrieving the reference literature. This study provides a practical strategy for rapidly screening and identifying the multiple constituents of a complex traditional Chinese medicine. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Analysis of the Proteome of Hair-Cell Stereocilia by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Krey, Jocelyn F.; Wilmarth, Philip A.; David, Larry L.; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G.

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of proteins that mediate mechanotransduction by hair cells, the sensory cells of the inner ear, is hampered by the scarcity of these cells and their sensory organelle, the hair bundle. Mass spectrometry, with its high sensitivity and identification precision, is the ideal method for determining which proteins are present in bundles and what proteins they interact with. We describe here the isolation of mouse hair bundles, as well as preparation of bundle-protein samples for mass spectrometry. We also describe protocols for data-dependent (shotgun) and parallel-reaction-monitoring (targeted) mass spectrometry that allow us to identify and quantify proteins of the hair bundle. These sensitive methods are particularly useful for comparing proteomes of wild-type and mice with deafness mutations affecting hair-bundle proteins. (120 words; maximum 250) PMID:28109437

  17. Clinical Application of Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Hua; Hsieh, Hua-Yi; Hsu, Cheng-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Ambient ionization allows mass spectrometry analysis directly on the sample surface under atmospheric pressure with almost zero sample pretreatment. Since the development of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) in 2004, many other ambient ionization techniques were developed. Due to their simplicity and low operation cost, rapid and on-site clinical mass spectrometry analysis becomes real. In this review, we will highlight some of the most widely used ambient ionization mass spectrometry approaches and their applications in clinical study. PMID:28337399

  18. Single-protein nanomechanical mass spectrometry in real time

    PubMed Central

    Hanay, M.S.; Kelber, S.; Naik, A.K.; Chi, D.; Hentz, S.; Bullard, E.C.; Colinet, E.; Duraffourg, L.; Roukes, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) resonators can detect mass with exceptional sensitivity. Previously, mass spectra from several hundred adsorption events were assembled in NEMS-based mass spectrometry using statistical analysis. Here, we report the first realization of single-molecule NEMS-based mass spectrometry in real time. As each molecule in the sample adsorbs upon the NEMS resonator, its mass and the position-of-adsorption are determined by continuously tracking two driven vibrational modes of the device. We demonstrate the potential of multimode NEMS-based mass spectrometry by analyzing IgM antibody complexes in real-time. NEMS-MS is a unique and promising new form of mass spectrometry: it can resolve neutral species, provides resolving power that increases markedly for very large masses, and allows acquisition of spectra, molecule-by-molecule, in real-time. PMID:22922541

  19. [Sample preparation and bioanalysis in mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Bourgogne, Emmanuel; Wagner, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of compounds of clinical interest of low molecular weight (<1000 Da) in biological fluids is currently in most cases performed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Analysis of these compounds in biological fluids (plasma, urine, saliva, hair...) is a difficult task requiring a sample preparation. Sample preparation is a crucial part of chemical/biological analysis and in a sense is considered the bottleneck of the whole analytical process. The main objectives of sample preparation are the removal of potential interferences, analyte preconcentration, and converting (if needed) the analyte into a more suitable form for detection or separation. Without chromatographic separation, endogenous compounds, co-eluted products may affect a quantitative method in mass spectrometry performance. This work focuses on three distinct parts. First, quantitative bioanalysis will be defined, different matrices and sample preparation techniques currently used in bioanalysis by mass spectrometry of/for small molecules of clinical interest in biological fluids. In a second step the goals of sample preparation will be described. Finally, in a third step, sample preparation strategies will be made either directly ("dilute and shoot") or after precipitation.

  20. Imaging mass spectrometry in drug development and toxicology.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Hanrieder, Jörg

    2017-06-01

    During the last decades, imaging mass spectrometry has gained significant relevance in biomedical research. Recent advances in imaging mass spectrometry have paved the way for in situ studies on drug development, metabolism and toxicology. In contrast to whole-body autoradiography that images the localization of radiolabeled compounds, imaging mass spectrometry provides the possibility to simultaneously determine the discrete tissue distribution of the parent compound and its metabolites. In addition, imaging mass spectrometry features high molecular specificity and allows comprehensive, multiplexed detection and localization of hundreds of proteins, peptides and lipids directly in tissues. Toxicologists traditionally screen for adverse findings by histopathological examination. However, studies of the molecular and cellular processes underpinning toxicological and pathologic findings induced by candidate drugs or toxins are important to reach a mechanistic understanding and an effective risk assessment strategy. One of IMS strengths is the ability to directly overlay the molecular information from the mass spectrometric analysis with the tissue section and allow correlative comparisons of molecular and histologic information. Imaging mass spectrometry could therefore be a powerful tool for omics profiling of pharmacological/toxicological effects of drug candidates and toxicants in discrete tissue regions. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of imaging mass spectrometry, with particular focus on MALDI imaging mass spectrometry, and its use in drug development and toxicology in general.

  1. The current role of high-resolution mass spectrometry in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Anton

    2012-05-01

    High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), which is used for residue analysis in food, has gained wider acceptance in the last few years. This development is due to the availability of more rugged, sensitive, and selective instrumentation. The benefits provided by HRMS over classical unit-mass-resolution tandem mass spectrometry are considerable. These benefits include the collection of full-scan spectra, which provides greater insight into the composition of a sample. Consequently, the analyst has the freedom to measure compounds without previous compound-specific tuning, the possibility of retrospective data analysis, and the capability of performing structural elucidations of unknown or suspected compounds. HRMS strongly competes with classical tandem mass spectrometry in the field of quantitative multiresidue methods (e.g., pesticides and veterinary drugs). It is one of the most promising tools when moving towards nontargeted approaches. Certain hardware and software issues still have to be addressed by the instrument manufacturers for it to dislodge tandem mass spectrometry from its position as the standard trace analysis tool.

  2. Quantitation of acrylamide in foods by high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Troise, Antonio Dario; Fiore, Alberto; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2014-01-08

    Acrylamide detection still represents one of the hottest topics in food chemistry. Solid phase cleanup coupled to liquid chromatography separation and tandem mass spectrometry detection along with GC-MS detection are nowadays the gold standard procedure for acrylamide quantitation thanks to high reproducibility, good recovery, and low relative standard deviation. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) is particularly suitable for the detection of low molecular weight amides, and it can provide some analytical advantages over other MS techniques. In this paper a liquid chromatography (LC) method for acrylamide determination using HRMS detection was developed and compared to LC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The procedure applied a simplified extraction, no cleanup steps, and a 4 min chromatography. It proved to be solid and robust with an acrylamide mass accuracy of 0.7 ppm, a limit of detection of 2.65 ppb, and a limit of quantitation of 5 ppb. The method was tested on four acrylamide-containing foods: cookies, French fries, ground coffee, and brewed coffee. Results were perfectly in line with those obtained by LC-MS/MS.

  3. Single event mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  4. Allele-specific HLA-DR typing by mass spectrometry: an alternative to hybridization-based typing methods.

    PubMed

    Worrall, T A; Schmeckpeper, B J; Corvera, J S; Cotter, R J

    2000-11-01

    The primer oligomer base extension (PROBE) reaction, combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, is used to characterize HLA-DR2 polymorphism. Alleles are distinguished rapidly and accurately by measuring the mass of primer extension products at every known variable region of HLA-DR2 alleles. Since differentiation of alleles by PROBE relies on measuring differences in extension product mass rather than differences in hybridization properties, mistyped alleles resulting from nonspecific hybridization are absent. The method shows considerable potential for high-throughput screening of HLA-DR polymorphism in a chip-based format, including rapid tissue typing of unrelated volunteer donors.

  5. Comprehensive Urine Drug Screen by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Ramoo, Bheemraj; Funke, Melissa; Frazee, Clint; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Drug screening is an essential component of clinical toxicology laboratory service. Some laboratories use only automated chemistry analyzers for limited screening of drugs of abuse and few other drugs. Other laboratories use a combination of various techniques such as immunoassays, colorimetric tests, and mass spectrometry to provide more detailed comprehensive drug screening. Mass spectrometry, gas or liquid, can screen for hundreds of drugs and is often considered the gold standard for comprehensive drug screening. We describe an efficient and rapid gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for comprehensive drug screening in urine which utilizes a liquid-liquid extraction, sample concentration, and analysis by GC/MS.

  6. Imaging with Mass Spectrometry of Bacteria on the Exoskeleton of Fungus-Growing Ants.

    PubMed

    Gemperline, Erin; Horn, Heidi A; DeLaney, Kellen; Currie, Cameron R; Li, Lingjun

    2017-08-18

    Mass spectrometry imaging is a powerful analytical technique for detecting and determining spatial distributions of molecules within a sample. Typically, mass spectrometry imaging is limited to the analysis of thin tissue sections taken from the middle of a sample. In this work, we present a mass spectrometry imaging method for the detection of compounds produced by bacteria on the outside surface of ant exoskeletons in response to pathogen exposure. Fungus-growing ants have a specialized mutualism with Pseudonocardia, a bacterium that lives on the ants' exoskeletons and helps protect their fungal garden food source from harmful pathogens. The developed method allows for visualization of bacterial-derived compounds on the ant exoskeleton. This method demonstrates the capability to detect compounds that are specifically localized to the bacterial patch on ant exoskeletons, shows good reproducibility across individual ants, and achieves accurate mass measurements within 5 ppm error when using a high-resolution, accurate-mass mass spectrometer.

  7. A gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC/HRMS) method for determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in fish.

    PubMed

    Alaee, M; Sergeant, D B; Ikonomou, M G; Luross, J M

    2001-09-01

    A method for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in biota for routine analysis is described. The mass spectroscopic (MS) evaluation of 23 brominated diphenyl ethers, under electron ionization and electron capture negative ion conditions using magnetic sector and quadrupole mass spectrometers, showed that high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) under electron ionization conditions was the most reliable technique, with high selectivity and adequate sensitivity. The instrument detection limit for this method ranged for individual congeners between 4.8 and 0.1 pg for 3-bromodiphenyl ether (BDE-2) and 2,3',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-66), respectively, and method detection limit for each homologue group ranged between 5 pg/g for salmon certified reference material (CRM) and 93 pg/g for lake trout CRM. The effectiveness of this method was evaluated by analyzing the occurrence of PBDEs in commercially available CRMs comprising Lake Ontario lake trout, Pacific herring, and sockeye salmon. The average coefficients of variation for the replicate analyses of PDBEs in several tissue samples were: 25% for lake trout, 36% for Pacific herring, and 34% for sockeye salmon. The average deviations in the inter-laboratory study were: 14% for lake trout, 15% for Pacific herring, and 37% for sockeye salmon. Results indicated that the described method, based on gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry, is reliable for determining PBDE concentrations in biological tissues.

  8. Detection of new emerging type-A trichothecenes by untargeted mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González-Jartín, Jesús M; Alfonso, Amparo; Sainz, María J; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2018-02-01

    Mycotoxins occur naturally as agricultural contaminants all over the world. The toxic effects of some of their metabolites are known and their presence regulated in food and feed. This paper describes two methods for the detection of toxins of type-A trichothecenes group, and their modified forms, using mass spectrometry. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry-ion trap-time of flight (UPLC-MS-IT-TOF) was employed to characterize the fragmentation pathways of 10 type-A trichothecenes, and characteristic ions were tentatively identified in scan mode through their accurate masses. Unknown signals were detected in a F. sporotrichioides extract, which afterwards were identified as seven modified forms of neosolaniol (NEO) and T-2 toxin. Then, UPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was employed to develop a precursor ion scanning method that can be used as a screening tool to detect any modified type-A trichothecenes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. "EMERGING" POLLUTANTS, MASS SPECTROMETRY, AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A foundation for Environmental Science - Mass Spectrometry: Historically fundamental to amassing our understanding of environmental processes and chemical pollution is the realm of mass spectrometry - the mainstay of analytical chemistry - the workhorse that supplies much of the definitive data that environmental scientists rely upon for identifying the molecular compositions (and ultimately the structures) of chemicals. This is not to ignore the complementary, critical roles played by the adjunct practices of sample enrichment (via any of various means of selective extraction) and analyte separation (via the myriad forms of chromatography and electrophoresis).While the power of mass spectrometry has long been highly visible to the practicing environmental chemist, it borders on continued obscurity to the lay public and most non-chemists. Even though mass spectrometry has played a long, historic (and largely invisible) role in establishing or undergirdidng our existing knowledge about environmental processes and pollution, what recognition it does enjoy is usually relegated to that of a tool. It is ususally the relevance of ssignificance of the knowledge acquired from the application of the tool that has ultimate meaning to the public and science at large - not how the knowledge was acquired. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in

  10. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange in mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kostyukevich, Yury; Acter, Thamina; Zherebker, Alexander; Ahmed, Arif; Kim, Sunghwan; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2018-03-30

    The isotopic exchange approach is in use since the first observation of such reactions in 1933 by Lewis. This approach allows the investigation of the pathways of chemical and biochemical reactions, determination of structure, composition, and conformation of molecules. Mass spectrometry has now become one of the most important analytical tools for the monitoring of the isotopic exchange reactions. Investigation of conformational dynamics of proteins, quantitative measurements, obtaining chemical, and structural information about individual compounds of the complex natural mixtures are mainly based on the use of isotope exchange in combination with high resolution mass spectrometry. The most important reaction is the Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange, which is mainly performed in the solution. Recently we have developed the approach allowing performing of the Hydrogen/Deuterium reaction on-line directly in the ionization source under atmospheric pressure. Such approach simplifies the sample preparation and can accelerate the exchange reaction so that certain hydrogens that are considered as non-labile will also participate in the exchange. The use of in-ionization source H/D exchange in modern mass spectrometry for structural elucidation of molecules serves as the basic theme in this review. We will focus on the mechanisms of the isotopic exchange reactions and on the application of in-ESI, in-APCI, and in-APPI source Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange for the investigation of petroleum, natural organic matter, oligosaccharides, and proteins including protein-protein complexes. The simple scenario for adaptation of H/D exchange reactions into mass spectrometric method is also highlighted along with a couple of examples collected from previous studies. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Analysis of adulterants in a traditional herbal medicinal product using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lau, Aik-Jiang; Holmes, Michael J; Woo, Soo-On; Koh, Hwee-Ling

    2003-02-26

    Adulterations with synthetic drugs are common problems with herbal medicine and this can potentially cause serious adverse effects. It is therefore important to determine the presence of synthetic drugs in herbal medicine to ensure patients' safety. The objective of this study was to develop sensitive and specific methods to analyse phenylbutazone, caffeine and oxyphenbutazone present in a traditional Indonesian herbal product. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) methods in the selected reaction-monitoring (SRM) mode were developed. It was found that the sample contained 0.53% w/w (n=3, RSD=7.56%) phenylbutazone and 0.04% w/w (n=3, RSD=8.39%) caffeine. This corresponded to 43.17 mg phenylbutazone and 3.23 mg caffeine in each sachet of powder. The methods were validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, LOD and LOQ. LOD and LOQ were found to be 3.69 and 12.29 ng/ml, respectively for phenylbutazone. For caffeine, the LOD and LOQ were 0.84 and 2.80 ng/ml, respectively. Oxyphenbutazone in the sample was found to be present at a level below the quantification level of 10.2 ng/ml. With better methods developed for analysis of adulterants in herbal medicine, the quality and safety of these medicines can be better controlled and regulated to ensure patients' safety.

  12. Microfluidics-to-Mass Spectrometry: A review of coupling methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Yi, Lian; Mukhitov, Nikita; Schrell, Adrian M.; Dhumpa, Raghuram; Roper, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices offer great advantages in integrating sample processes, minimizing sample and reagent volumes, and increasing analysis speed, while mass spectrometry detection provides high information content, is sensitive, and can be used in quantitative analyses. The coupling of microfluidic devices to mass spectrometers is becoming more common with the strengths of both systems being combined to analyze precious and complex samples. This review summarizes select achievements published between 2010 – July 2014 in novel coupling between microfluidic devices and mass spectrometers. The review is subdivided by the types of ionization sources employed, and the different microfluidic systems used. PMID:25458901

  13. Mass Spectrometry Parameters Optimization for the 46 Multiclass Pesticides Determination in Strawberries with Gas Chromatography Ion-Trap Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Virgínia C.; Vera, Jose L.; Domingues, Valentina F.; Silva, Luís M. S.; Mateus, Nuno; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2012-12-01

    Multiclass analysis method was optimized in order to analyze pesticides traces by gas chromatography with ion-trap and tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The influence of some analytical parameters on pesticide signal response was explored. Five ion trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS) operating parameters, including isolation time (IT), excitation voltage (EV), excitation time (ET), maximum excitation energy or " q" value (q), and isolation mass window (IMW) were numerically tested in order to maximize the instrument analytical signal response. For this, multiple linear regression was used in data analysis to evaluate the influence of the five parameters on the analytical response in the ion trap mass spectrometer and to predict its response. The assessment of the five parameters based on the regression equations substantially increased the sensitivity of IT-MS/MS in the MS/MS mode. The results obtained show that for most of the pesticides, these parameters have a strong influence on both signal response and detection limit. Using the optimized method, a multiclass pesticide analysis was performed for 46 pesticides in a strawberry matrix. Levels higher than the limit established for strawberries by the European Union were found in some samples.

  14. DNA adducts: Mass spectrometry methods and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, P.B.; Brown, K.; Tompkins, E.

    2005-09-01

    Detection of DNA adducts is widely used for the monitoring of exposure to genotoxic carcinogens. Knowledge of the nature and amounts of DNA adducts formed in vivo also gives valuable information regarding the mutational effects that may result from particular exposures. The power of mass spectrometry (MS) to achieve qualitative and quantitative analyses of human DNA adducts has increased greatly in recent years with the development of improved chromatographic interfaces and ionisation sources. Adducts have been detected on nucleic acid bases, 2'-deoxynucleosides or 2'-deoxynucleotides, with LC-MS/MS being the favoured technique for many of these analyses. Our current applications of thismore » technique include the determination of N7-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-guanine, which was postulated to be found as a DNA repair product in urine following exposure to acrylamide, and of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyadenosine, as markers of oxidative damage in human lymphocyte DNA. Higher sensitivity (with a detection limit of 1-10 adducts/10{sup 12} nucleotides) may be achieved by the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), although this requires the presence of certain isotopes, such as [{sup 14}C], in the material being analysed. In order to make this technique more amenable for studies of human exposure to environmental carcinogens, new postlabelling techniques, incorporating [{sup 14}C] into specific DNA adducts after formation, are being developed. It is expected that combining the use of advanced MS techniques with existing {sup 32}P-postlabelling and immunochemical methodologies will contribute greatly to the understanding of the burden of human exposure to environmental carcinogens.« less

  15. Mass Spectrometry for the Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey, C.; Samide, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple, qualitative experiment is developed for implementation, where the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role, into the laboratory curriculum of a chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. This laboratory experiment is well suited for the students as it helps them to determine the validity of their…

  16. POTAMOS mass spectrometry calculator: computer aided mass spectrometry to the post-translational modifications of proteins. A focus on histones.

    PubMed

    Vlachopanos, A; Soupsana, E; Politou, A S; Papamokos, G V

    2014-12-01

    Mass spectrometry is a widely used technique for protein identification and it has also become the method of choice in order to detect and characterize the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. Many software tools have been developed to deal with this complication. In this paper we introduce a new, free and user friendly online software tool, named POTAMOS Mass Spectrometry Calculator, which was developed in the open source application framework Ruby on Rails. It can provide calculated mass spectrometry data in a time saving manner, independently of instrumentation. In this web application we have focused on a well known protein family of histones whose PTMs are believed to play a crucial role in gene regulation, as suggested by the so called "histone code" hypothesis. The PTMs implemented in this software are: methylations of arginines and lysines, acetylations of lysines and phosphorylations of serines and threonines. The application is able to calculate the kind, the number and the combinations of the possible PTMs corresponding to a given peptide sequence and a given mass along with the full set of the unique primary structures produced by the possible distributions along the amino acid sequence. It can also calculate the masses and charges of a fragmented histone variant, which carries predefined modifications already implemented. Additional functionality is provided by the calculation of the masses of fragments produced upon protein cleavage by the proteolytic enzymes that are most widely used in proteomics studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. LILBID-mass spectrometry of the mitochondrial preprotein translocase TOM.

    PubMed

    Mager, Frauke; Sokolova, Lucie; Lintzel, Julia; Brutschy, Bernhard; Nussberger, Stephan

    2010-11-17

    In the present work we applied a novel mass spectrometry method termed laser-induced liquid bead ion desorption mass spectrometry (LILBID-MS) to the outer mitochondrial membrane protein translocon TOM to analyze its subunit composition and stoichiometry. With TOM core complex, purified at high pH, we demonstrate that a TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa is composed of at least two Tom40 and Tom22 molecules, respectively, and more than five small Tom subunits between 5.5 and 6.4 kDa. We show that the multiprotein complex has a total molecular mass higher than 170 depending on the number of Tom5, Tom6 and Tom7 molecules bound.

  18. LILBID-mass spectrometry of the mitochondrial preprotein translocase TOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, Frauke; Sokolova, Lucie; Lintzel, Julia; Brutschy, Bernhard; Nussberger, Stephan

    2010-11-01

    In the present work we applied a novel mass spectrometry method termed laser-induced liquid bead ion desorption mass spectrometry (LILBID-MS) to the outer mitochondrial membrane protein translocon TOM to analyze its subunit composition and stoichiometry. With TOM core complex, purified at high pH, we demonstrate that a TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa is composed of at least two Tom40 and Tom22 molecules, respectively, and more than five small Tom subunits between 5.5 and 6.4 kDa. We show that the multiprotein complex has a total molecular mass higher than 170 depending on the number of Tom5, Tom6 and Tom7 molecules bound.

  19. Analysis of Glycosaminoglycans Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Gregory O.; Zaia, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear polysaccharides expressed on animal cell surfaces and in extracellular matrices. Their biosynthesis is under complex control and confers a domain structure that is essential to their ability to bind to protein partners. Key to understanding the functions of GAGs are methods to determine accurately and rapidly patterns of sulfation, acetylation and uronic acid epimerization that correlate with protein binding or other biological activities. Mass spectrometry (MS) is particularly suitable for the analysis of GAGs for biomedical purposes. Using modern ionization techniques it is possible to accurately determine molecular weights of GAG oligosaccharides and their distributions within a mixture. Methods for direct interfacing with liquid chromatography have been developed to permit online mass spectrometric analysis of GAGs. New tandem mass spectrometric methods for fine structure determination of GAGs are emerging. This review summarizes MS-based approaches for analysis of GAGs, including tissue extraction and chromatographic methods compatible with LC/MS and tandem MS. PMID:25705143

  20. Illustrating the Concepts of Isotopes and Mass Spectrometry in Introductory Courses: A MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopke, Nancy Carter; Lovett, Timothy Neal

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a widely used and versatile tool for scientists in many different fields. Soft ionization techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) allow for the analysis of biomolecules, polymers, and clusters. This article describes a MALDI mass spectrometry experiment designed for students in introductory…

  1. Matrix Assisted Ionization Vacuum (MAIV), a New Ionization Method for Biological Materials Analysis Using Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Inutan, Ellen D.; Trimpin, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for the mass spectrometric analysis of peptides and proteins had a dramatic impact on biological science. We now report that a wide variety of compounds, including peptides, proteins, and protein complexes, are transported directly from a solid-state small molecule matrix to gas-phase ions when placed into the vacuum of a mass spectrometer without the use of high voltage, a laser, or added heat. This ionization process produces ions having charge states similar to ESI, making the method applicable for high performance mass spectrometers designed for atmospheric pressure ionization. We demonstrate highly sensitive ionization using intermediate pressure MALDI and modified ESI sources. This matrix and vacuum assisted soft ionization method is suitable for the direct surface analysis of biological materials, including tissue, via mass spectrometry. PMID:23242551

  2. Mass Spectrometry Analyses of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Acland, Mitchell; Mittal, Parul; Lokman, Noor A; Klingler-Hoffmann, Manuela; Oehler, Martin K; Hoffmann, Peter

    2018-05-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are a powerful biological in vitro model, which closely mimics the 3D structure of primary avascularized tumors. Mass spectrometry (MS) has established itself as a powerful analytical tool, not only to better understand and describe the complex structure of MCTS, but also to monitor their response to cancer therapeutics. The first part of this review focuses on traditional mass spectrometry approaches with an emphasis on elucidating the molecular characteristics of these structures. Then the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) approaches used to obtain spatially defined information from MCTS is described. Finally the analysis of primary spheroids, such as those present in ovarian cancer, and the great potential that mass spectrometry analysis of these structures has for improved understanding of cancer progression and for personalized in vitro therapeutic testing is discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Identification of carbohydrate anomers using ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, J; Hahm, H S; Seeberger, P H; Pagel, K

    2015-10-08

    Carbohydrates are ubiquitous biological polymers that are important in a broad range of biological processes. However, owing to their branched structures and the presence of stereogenic centres at each glycosidic linkage between monomers, carbohydrates are harder to characterize than are peptides and oligonucleotides. Methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to characterize glycosidic linkages, but this technique requires milligram amounts of material and cannot detect small amounts of coexisting isomers. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, can provide information on carbohydrate composition and connectivity for even small amounts of sample, but it cannot be used to distinguish between stereoisomers. Here, we demonstrate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a method that separates molecules according to their mass, charge, size, and shape--can unambiguously identify carbohydrate linkage-isomers and stereoisomers. We analysed six synthetic carbohydrate isomers that differ in composition, connectivity, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified, and relative concentrations of the minor isomer as low as 0.1 per cent can be detected. In addition, the analysis is rapid, and requires no derivatization and only small amounts of sample. These results indicate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry is an effective tool for the analysis of complex carbohydrates. This method could have an impact on the field of carbohydrate synthesis similar to that of the advent of high-performance liquid chromatography on the field of peptide assembly in the late 1970s.

  4. Identification of carbohydrate anomers using ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, J.; Hahm, H. S.; Seeberger, P. H.; Pagel, K.

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrates are ubiquitous biological polymers that are important in a broad range of biological processes. However, owing to their branched structures and the presence of stereogenic centres at each glycosidic linkage between monomers, carbohydrates are harder to characterize than are peptides and oligonucleotides. Methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to characterize glycosidic linkages, but this technique requires milligram amounts of material and cannot detect small amounts of coexisting isomers. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, can provide information on carbohydrate composition and connectivity for even small amounts of sample, but it cannot be used to distinguish between stereoisomers. Here, we demonstrate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a method that separates molecules according to their mass, charge, size, and shape--can unambiguously identify carbohydrate linkage-isomers and stereoisomers. We analysed six synthetic carbohydrate isomers that differ in composition, connectivity, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified, and relative concentrations of the minor isomer as low as 0.1 per cent can be detected. In addition, the analysis is rapid, and requires no derivatization and only small amounts of sample. These results indicate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry is an effective tool for the analysis of complex carbohydrates. This method could have an impact on the field of carbohydrate synthesis similar to that of the advent of high-performance liquid chromatography on the field of peptide assembly in the late 1970s.

  5. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling newmore » applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.« less

  6. Nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: Novel sample preparation methods and nanoparticle screening for plant metabolite imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yagnik, Gargey B.

    The main goal of the presented research is development of nanoparticle based matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). This dissertation includes the application of previously developed data acquisition methods, development of novel sample preparation methods, application and comparison of novel nanoparticle matrices, and comparison of two nanoparticle matrix application methods for MALDI-MS and MALDI-MS imaging.

  7. Zero voltage mass spectrometry probes and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Wleklinski, Michael Stanley; Bag, Soumabha

    The invention generally relates to zero volt mass spectrometry probes and systems. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system including a mass spectrometry probe including a porous material, and a mass spectrometer (bench-top or miniature mass spectrometer). The system operates without an application of voltage to the probe. In certain embodiments, the probe is oriented such that a distal end faces an inlet of the mass spectrometer. In other embodiments, the distal end of the probe is 5 mm or less from an inlet of the mass spectrometer.

  8. Impact of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry on food analysis.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Q; Purcaro, Giorgia; Maimone, Mariarosa; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry has been on the separation-science scene for about 15 years. This three-dimensional method has made a great positive impact on various fields of research, and among these that related to food analysis is certainly at the forefront. The present critical review is based on the use of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in the untargeted (general qualitative profiling and fingerprinting) and targeted analysis of food volatiles; attention is focused not only on its potential in such applications, but also on how recent advances in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry will potentially be important for food analysis. Additionally, emphasis is devoted to the many instances in which straightforward gas chromatography with mass spectrometry is a sufficiently-powerful analytical tool. Finally, possible future scenarios in the comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry food analysis field are discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Integrating Mass Spectrometry of Intact Protein Complexes into Structural Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mass spectrometry analysis of intact protein complexes has emerged as an established technology for assessing the composition and connectivity within dynamic, heterogeneous multiprotein complexes at low concentrations and in the context of mixtures. As this technology continues to move forward, one of the main challenges is to integrate the information content of such intact protein complex measurements with other mass spectrometry approaches in structural biology. Methods such as H/D exchange, oxidative foot-printing, chemical cross-linking, affinity purification, and ion mobility separation add complementary information that allows access to every level of protein structure and organization. Here, we survey the structural information that can be retrieved by such experiments, demonstrate the applicability of integrative mass spectrometry approaches in structural proteomics, and look to the future to explore upcoming innovations in this rapidly-advancing area. PMID:22611037

  10. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  11. Peptide Analysis Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    to give pyroglutamic acid during storage, eliminating ammonia. It is almost absent in the spectrum of a freshly-prepared sample and is not seen in...USING TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY INTRODUCTION S The objective of the project was to determine the complete amino acid sequence of the large polypeptide...Ubiquitin by use of fast atom bombardment (FAB) ionization and tandem mass spectrometry. The peptide containing 76 amino acid residues was available

  12. Characterizing the lipid and metabolite changes associated with placental function and pregnancy complications using ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin S.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2017-03-29

    A successful pregnancy is dependent upon discrete biological events, which include embryo implantation, decidualization, and placentation. Furthermore, problems associated with each of these events can cause infertility or conditions such as preeclampsia. A greater understanding of the molecular changes associated with these complex processes is necessary to aid in identifying treatments for each condition. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies have been used to identify metabolites and lipids associated with pregnancy-related complications. However, due to limitations associated with conventional implementations of both techniques, novel technology developments are needed to more fully understand the initiation and development ofmore » pregnancy related problems at the molecular level. Here, we describe current analytical techniques for metabolomic and lipidomic characterization of pregnancy complications and discuss the potential for new technologies such as ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular changes that affect the placenta and pregnancy outcomes.« less

  13. Characterizing the lipid and metabolite changes associated with placental function and pregnancy complications using ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin S.; Metz, Thomas O.

    Successful pregnancy is dependent upon discrete biological events, which include embryo implantation, decidualization, and placentation. Problems associated with each of these events can cause infertility or conditions such as preeclampsia. A greater understanding of the molecular changes associated with these complex processes is necessary to aid in identifying treatments for each condition. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies have been used to identify metabolites and lipids associated with pregnancy-related complications. However, due to limitations associated with conventional implementations of both techniques, novel technology developments are needed to more fully understand the initiation and development of pregnancy relatedmore » problems at the molecular level. In this perspective, we describe current analytical techniques for metabolomic and lipidomic characterization of pregnancy complications and discuss the potential for new technologies such as ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular changes that affect the placenta and pregnancy outcomes.« less

  14. Characterizing the lipid and metabolite changes associated with placental function and pregnancy complications using ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin S.; Metz, Thomas O.

    A successful pregnancy is dependent upon discrete biological events, which include embryo implantation, decidualization, and placentation. Furthermore, problems associated with each of these events can cause infertility or conditions such as preeclampsia. A greater understanding of the molecular changes associated with these complex processes is necessary to aid in identifying treatments for each condition. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies have been used to identify metabolites and lipids associated with pregnancy-related complications. However, due to limitations associated with conventional implementations of both techniques, novel technology developments are needed to more fully understand the initiation and development ofmore » pregnancy related problems at the molecular level. Here, we describe current analytical techniques for metabolomic and lipidomic characterization of pregnancy complications and discuss the potential for new technologies such as ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular changes that affect the placenta and pregnancy outcomes.« less

  15. MASS SPECTROMETRY-BASED METABOLOMICS

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Katja; Aronov, Pavel A.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the dynamically developing field of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Metabolomics aims at the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of wide arrays of metabolites in biological samples. These numerous analytes have very diverse physico-chemical properties and occur at different abundance levels. Consequently, comprehensive metabolomics investigations are primarily a challenge for analytical chemistry and specifically mass spectrometry has vast potential as a tool for this type of investigation. Metabolomics require special approaches for sample preparation, separation, and mass spectrometric analysis. Current examples of those approaches are described in this review. It primarily focuses on metabolic fingerprinting, a technique that analyzes all detectable analytes in a given sample with subsequent classification of samples and identification of differentially expressed metabolites, which define the sample classes. To perform this complex task, data analysis tools, metabolite libraries, and databases are required. Therefore, recent advances in metabolomics bioinformatics are also discussed. PMID:16921475

  16. Rapid Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Method Quantifies Oxygen-Rich Lignin Compound in Complex Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boes, Kelsey S.; Roberts, Michael S.; Vinueza, Nelson R.

    2018-03-01

    Complex mixture analysis is a costly and time-consuming task facing researchers with foci as varied as food science and fuel analysis. When faced with the task of quantifying oxygen-rich bio-oil molecules in a complex diesel mixture, we asked whether complex mixtures could be qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed on a single mass spectrometer with mid-range resolving power without the use of lengthy separations. To answer this question, we developed and evaluated a quantitation method that eliminated chromatography steps and expanded the use of quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry from primarily qualitative to quantitative as well. To account for mixture complexity, the method employed an ionization dopant, targeted tandem mass spectrometry, and an internal standard. This combination of three techniques achieved reliable quantitation of oxygen-rich eugenol in diesel from 300 to 2500 ng/mL with sufficient linearity (R2 = 0.97 ± 0.01) and excellent accuracy (percent error = 0% ± 5). To understand the limitations of the method, it was compared to quantitation attained on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, the gold standard for quantitation. The triple quadrupole quantified eugenol from 50 to 2500 ng/mL with stronger linearity (R2 = 0.996 ± 0.003) than the quadrupole-time-of-flight and comparable accuracy (percent error = 4% ± 5). This demonstrates that a quadrupole-time-of-flight can be used for not only qualitative analysis but also targeted quantitation of oxygen-rich lignin molecules in complex mixtures without extensive sample preparation. The rapid and cost-effective method presented here offers new possibilities for bio-oil research, including: (1) allowing for bio-oil studies that demand repetitive analysis as process parameters are changed and (2) making this research accessible to more laboratories. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Rapid Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Method Quantifies Oxygen-Rich Lignin Compound in Complex Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boes, Kelsey S.; Roberts, Michael S.; Vinueza, Nelson R.

    2017-12-01

    Complex mixture analysis is a costly and time-consuming task facing researchers with foci as varied as food science and fuel analysis. When faced with the task of quantifying oxygen-rich bio-oil molecules in a complex diesel mixture, we asked whether complex mixtures could be qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed on a single mass spectrometer with mid-range resolving power without the use of lengthy separations. To answer this question, we developed and evaluated a quantitation method that eliminated chromatography steps and expanded the use of quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry from primarily qualitative to quantitative as well. To account for mixture complexity, the method employed an ionization dopant, targeted tandem mass spectrometry, and an internal standard. This combination of three techniques achieved reliable quantitation of oxygen-rich eugenol in diesel from 300 to 2500 ng/mL with sufficient linearity (R2 = 0.97 ± 0.01) and excellent accuracy (percent error = 0% ± 5). To understand the limitations of the method, it was compared to quantitation attained on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, the gold standard for quantitation. The triple quadrupole quantified eugenol from 50 to 2500 ng/mL with stronger linearity (R2 = 0.996 ± 0.003) than the quadrupole-time-of-flight and comparable accuracy (percent error = 4% ± 5). This demonstrates that a quadrupole-time-of-flight can be used for not only qualitative analysis but also targeted quantitation of oxygen-rich lignin molecules in complex mixtures without extensive sample preparation. The rapid and cost-effective method presented here offers new possibilities for bio-oil research, including: (1) allowing for bio-oil studies that demand repetitive analysis as process parameters are changed and (2) making this research accessible to more laboratories. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Rapid Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Method Quantifies Oxygen-Rich Lignin Compound in Complex Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Boes, Kelsey S; Roberts, Michael S; Vinueza, Nelson R

    2018-03-01

    Complex mixture analysis is a costly and time-consuming task facing researchers with foci as varied as food science and fuel analysis. When faced with the task of quantifying oxygen-rich bio-oil molecules in a complex diesel mixture, we asked whether complex mixtures could be qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed on a single mass spectrometer with mid-range resolving power without the use of lengthy separations. To answer this question, we developed and evaluated a quantitation method that eliminated chromatography steps and expanded the use of quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry from primarily qualitative to quantitative as well. To account for mixture complexity, the method employed an ionization dopant, targeted tandem mass spectrometry, and an internal standard. This combination of three techniques achieved reliable quantitation of oxygen-rich eugenol in diesel from 300 to 2500 ng/mL with sufficient linearity (R 2 = 0.97 ± 0.01) and excellent accuracy (percent error = 0% ± 5). To understand the limitations of the method, it was compared to quantitation attained on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, the gold standard for quantitation. The triple quadrupole quantified eugenol from 50 to 2500 ng/mL with stronger linearity (R 2 = 0.996 ± 0.003) than the quadrupole-time-of-flight and comparable accuracy (percent error = 4% ± 5). This demonstrates that a quadrupole-time-of-flight can be used for not only qualitative analysis but also targeted quantitation of oxygen-rich lignin molecules in complex mixtures without extensive sample preparation. The rapid and cost-effective method presented here offers new possibilities for bio-oil research, including: (1) allowing for bio-oil studies that demand repetitive analysis as process parameters are changed and (2) making this research accessible to more laboratories. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  19. Identifying protein kinase target preferences using mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Douglass, Jacqueline; Gunaratne, Ruwan; Bradford, Davis; Saeed, Fahad; Hoffert, Jason D.; Steinbach, Peter J.; Pisitkun, Trairak

    2012-01-01

    A general question in molecular physiology is how to identify candidate protein kinases corresponding to a known or hypothetical phosphorylation site in a protein of interest. It is generally recognized that the amino acid sequence surrounding the phosphorylation site provides information that is relevant to identification of the cognate protein kinase. Here, we present a mass spectrometry-based method for profiling the target specificity of a given protein kinase as well as a computational tool for the calculation and visualization of the target preferences. The mass spectrometry-based method identifies sites phosphorylated in response to in vitro incubation of protein mixtures with active recombinant protein kinases followed by standard phosphoproteomic methodologies. The computational tool, called “PhosphoLogo,” uses an information-theoretic algorithm to calculate position-specific amino acid preferences and anti-preferences from the mass-spectrometry data (http://helixweb.nih.gov/PhosphoLogo/). The method was tested using protein kinase A (catalytic subunit α), revealing the well-known preference for basic amino acids in positions −2 and −3 relative to the phosphorylated amino acid. It also provides evidence for a preference for amino acids with a branched aliphatic side chain in position +1, a finding compatible with known crystal structures of protein kinase A. The method was also employed to profile target preferences and anti-preferences for 15 additional protein kinases with potential roles in regulation of epithelial transport: CK2, p38, AKT1, SGK1, PKCδ, CaMK2δ, DAPK1, MAPKAPK2, PKD3, PIM1, OSR1, STK39/SPAK, GSK3β, Wnk1, and Wnk4. PMID:22723110

  20. [Mass spectrometry in the clinical microbiology laboratory].

    PubMed

    Jordana-Lluch, Elena; Martró Català, Elisa; Ausina Ruiz, Vicente

    2012-12-01

    Infectious diseases are still a cause of high mortality and morbidity rates. Current microbiological diagnostic methods are based on culture and phenotypic identification of isolated microorganisms, which can be obtained in about 24-48 h. Given that the microbiological identification is of major importance for patient management, new diagnostic methods are needed in order to detect and identify microorganisms in a timely and accurate manner. Over the last few years, several molecular techniques based on the amplification of microbial nucleic acids have been developed with the aim of reducing the time needed for the identification of the microorganisms involved in different infectious processes. On the other hand, mass spectrometry has emerged as a rapid and consistent alternative to conventional methods for microorganism identification. This review describes the most widely used mass spectrometry technologies -matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and electrospray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF)-, both for protein and nucleic acid analysis, as well as the commercial platforms available. Related publications of most interest in clinical microbiology are also reviewed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Quantitative Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun

    2011-07-22

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based quantitative proteomics has become increasingly applied for a broad range of biological applications due to growing capabilities for broad proteome coverage and good accuracy in quantification. Herein, we review the current LC-MS-based quantification methods with respect to their advantages and limitations, and highlight their potential applications.

  2. Integration of gas chromatography mass spectrometry methods for differentiating ricin preparation methods.

    PubMed

    Wunschel, David S; Melville, Angela M; Ehrhardt, Christopher J; Colburn, Heather A; Victry, Kristin D; Antolick, Kathryn C; Wahl, Jon H; Wahl, Karen L

    2012-05-07

    The investigation of crimes involving chemical or biological agents is infrequent, but presents unique analytical challenges. The protein toxin ricin is encountered more frequently than other agents and is found in the seeds of Ricinus communis, commonly known as the castor plant. Typically, the toxin is extracted from castor seeds utilizing a variety of different recipes that result in varying purity of the toxin. Moreover, these various purification steps can also leave or differentially remove a variety of exogenous and endogenous residual components with the toxin that may indicate the type and number of purification steps involved. We have applied three gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based analytical methods to measure the variation in seed carbohydrates and castor oil ricinoleic acid, as well as the presence of solvents used for purification. These methods were applied to the same samples prepared using four previously identified toxin preparation methods, starting from four varieties of castor seeds. The individual data sets for seed carbohydrate profiles, ricinoleic acid, or acetone amount each provided information capable of differentiating different types of toxin preparations across seed types. However, the integration of the data sets using multivariate factor analysis provided a clear distinction of all samples based on the preparation method, independent of the seed source. In particular, the abundance of mannose, arabinose, fucose, ricinoleic acid, and acetone were shown to be important differentiating factors. These complementary tools provide a more confident determination of the method of toxin preparation than would be possible using a single analytical method.

  3. Mass spectrometry in life science research.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Stefan; Markgraf, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Investigating complex signatures of biomolecules by mass spectrometry approaches has become indispensable in molecular life science research. Nowadays, various mass spectrometry-based omics technologies are available to monitor qualitative and quantitative changes within hundreds or thousands of biological active components, including proteins/peptides, lipids and metabolites. These comprehensive investigations have the potential to decipher the pathophysiology of disease development at a molecular level and to monitor the individual response of pharmacological treatment or lifestyle intervention.

  4. Low-temperature plasma-probe mass spectrometry based method for determination of new psychoactive substances in oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaochen; Hua, Zhendong; Yang, Zhaoguang; Li, Haipu; Liu, Huwei; Qiu, Bo; Nie, Honggang

    2018-06-15

    Owing to the widespread abuse of new psychoactive substances (NPSs), developing a rapid, easily operable method to detect NPSs in oral fluid is of high priority. Their ease of collection and non-invasive nature make oral fluid samples suitable for on-site tests and forensic cases. Herein we report a rapid and sensitive method to screen and quantitate 11 new NPSs in oral fluid. Low-temperature plasma-probe mass spectrometry (LTP-MS) was applied and, to improve the signal intensity, thermally assisted desorption was employed. Tandem mass spectrometry was performed to exclude false positive signals and to decrease noise at the m/z values of interest. Linearity was studied using matrix-matched calibration curves; all the analytes exhibited good linearity with R 2 varying from 0.9907 to 0.9981. The estimated limits of detection (LODs) were in the range of 3.0-15.2 ng/mL, which are comparable to those of immunoassay; relative standard deviations (RSDs) are no greater than 23% at the studied concentration levels. The proposed LTP-MS-based method was promising in forensic and on-site applications to curb the abuse of NPSs. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Electrospray and MALDI mass spectrometry in the identification of spermicides in criminal investigations.

    PubMed

    Hollenbeck, T P; Siuzdak, G; Blackledge, R D

    1999-07-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry have been used to examine evidence in a sexual assault investigation. Because condoms are being used increasingly by sexual assailants and some condom brands include the spermicide nonoxynol-9 (nonylphenoxy polyethoxyethanol) in the lubricant formulation, the recovery, and identification of nonoxynol-9 from evidence items may assist in proving corpus delicti. A method was developed for the recovery of nonoxynol-9 from internal vaginal swabs and for its identification by reverse phase liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC ESI-MS), nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) mass spectrometry, and high resolution MALDI Fourier transform mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTMS). The method was tested on extracts from precoitus, immediate postcoitus, and four-hours postcoitus vaginal swabs provided by a volunteer whose partner does not normally use condoms, but for this trial used a condom having a water-soluble gel-type lubricant that includes 5% nonoxynol-9 in its formulation. Subsequently, LC ESI-MS was used to identify traces of nonoxynol-9 from the internal vaginal swab of a victim of a sexual assault.

  6. Advancements in mass spectrometry for biological samples: Protein chemical cross-linking and metabolite analysis of plant tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Adam

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents work on advancements and applications of methodology for the analysis of biological samples using mass spectrometry. Included in this work are improvements to chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (CXMS) for the study of protein structures and mass spectrometry imaging and quantitative analysis to study plant metabolites. Applications include using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) to further explore metabolic heterogeneity in plant tissues and chemical interactions at the interface between plants and pests. Additional work was focused on developing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) methods to investigate metabolites associated with plant-pest interactions.

  7. Mass Spectrometry: A Technique of Many Faces

    PubMed Central

    Olshina, Maya A.; Sharon, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes form the critical foundation for a wide range of biological process, however understanding the intricate details of their activities is often challenging. In this review we describe how mass spectrometry plays a key role in the analysis of protein assemblies and the cellular pathways which they are involved in. Specifically, we discuss how the versatility of mass spectrometric approaches provides unprecedented information on multiple levels. We demonstrate this on the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway, a process that is responsible for protein turnover. We follow the various steps of this degradation route and illustrate the different mass spectrometry workflows that were applied for elucidating molecular information. Overall, this review aims to stimulate the integrated use of multiple mass spectrometry approaches for analyzing complex biological systems. PMID:28100928

  8. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics for translational research: a technical overview.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Joao A; Kadiyala, Vivek; Banks, Peter A; Steen, Hanno; Conwell, Darwin L

    2012-03-01

    Mass spectrometry-based investigation of clinical samples enables the high-throughput identification of protein biomarkers. We provide an overview of mass spectrometry-based proteomic techniques that are applicable to the investigation of clinical samples. We address sample collection, protein extraction and fractionation, mass spectrometry modalities, and quantitative proteomics. Finally, we examine the limitations and further potential of such technologies. Liquid chromatography fractionation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry is well suited to handle mixtures of hundreds or thousands of proteins. Mass spectrometry-based proteome elucidation can reveal potential biomarkers and aid in the development of hypotheses for downstream investigation of the molecular mechanisms of disease.

  9. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for Translational Research: A Technical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Kadiyala, Vivek; Banks, Peter A.; Steen, Hanno; Conwell, Darwin L.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based investigation of clinical samples enables the high-throughput identification of protein biomarkers. We provide an overview of mass spectrometry-based proteomic techniques that are applicable to the investigation of clinical samples. We address sample collection, protein extraction and fractionation, mass spectrometry modalities, and quantitative proteomics. Finally, we examine the limitations and further potential of such technologies. Liquid chromatography fractionation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry is well suited to handle mixtures of hundreds or thousands of proteins. Mass spectrometry-based proteome elucidation can reveal potential biomarkers and aid in the development of hypotheses for downstream investigation of the molecular mechanisms of disease. PMID:22461744

  10. Trends in biochemical and biomedical applications of mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelpi, Emilio

    1992-09-01

    This review attempts an in-depth evaluation of progress and achievements made since the last 11th International Mass Spectrometry Conference in the application of mass spectrometric techniques to biochemistry and biomedicine. For this purpose, scientific contributions in this field at major international meetings have been monitored, together with an extensive appraisal of literature data covering the period from 1988 to 1991. A bibliometric evaluation of the MEDLINE database for this period provides a total of almost 4000 entries for mass spectrometry. This allows a detailed study of literature and geographical sources of the most frequent applications, of disciplines where mass spectrometry is most active and of types of sample and instrumentation most commonly used. In this regard major efforts according to number of publications (over 100 literature reports) are concentrated in countries like Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Sweden, UK and the USA. Also, most of the work using mass spectrometry in biochemistry and biomedicine is centred on studies on biotransformation, metabolism, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and toxicology, which have been carried out on samples of blood, urine, plasma and tissue, by order of frequency of use. Human and animal studies appear to be evenly distributed in terms of the number of reports published in the literature in which the authors make use of experimental animals or describe work on human samples. Along these lines, special attention is given to the real usefulness of mass spectrometry (MS) technology in routine medical practice. Thus the review concentrates on evaluating the progress made in disease diagnosis and overall patient care. As regards prevailing techniques, GCMS continues to be the mainstay of the state of the art methods for multicomponent analysis, stable isotope tracer studies and metabolic profiling, while HPLC--MS and tandem MS are becoming increasingly important in biomedical research. However

  11. Detection of Stimulants and Narcotics by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Sports Doping Control.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Brian D; Kucherova, Yulia; Butch, Anthony W

    2016-01-01

    Sports drug testing laboratories are required to detect several classes of compounds that are prohibited at all times, which include anabolic agents, peptide hormones, growth factors, beta-2 agonists, hormones and metabolic modulators, and diuretics/masking agents. Other classes of compounds such as stimulants, narcotics, cannabinoids, and glucocorticoids are also prohibited, but only when an athlete is in competition. A single class of compounds can contain a large number of prohibited substances and all of the compounds should be detected by the testing procedure. Since there are almost 70 stimulants on the prohibited list it can be a challenge to develop a single screening method that will optimally detect all the compounds. We describe a combined liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) testing method for detection of all the stimulants and narcotics on the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list. Urine for LC-MS/MS testing does not require sample pretreatment and is a direct dilute and shoot method. Urine samples for the GC-MS method require a liquid-liquid extraction followed by derivatization with trifluoroacetic anhydride.

  12. Quantitative Caffeine Analysis Using a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Deibel, Michael A.; Tomkins, Bruce A

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 {mu}m/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methodsmore » determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 {mu}L) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by 8% or more) than the literature values.« less

  13. Clinical protein mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scherl, Alexander

    2015-06-15

    Quantitative protein analysis is routinely performed in clinical chemistry laboratories for diagnosis, therapeutic monitoring, and prognosis. Today, protein assays are mostly performed either with non-specific detection methods or immunoassays. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a very specific analytical method potentially very well suited for clinical laboratories. Its unique advantage relies in the high specificity of the detection. Any protein sequence variant, the presence of a post-translational modification or degradation will differ in mass and structure, and these differences will appear in the mass spectrum of the protein. On the other hand, protein MS is a relatively young technique, demanding specialized personnel and expensive instrumentation. Many scientists and opinion leaders predict MS to replace immunoassays for routine protein analysis, but there are only few protein MS applications routinely used in clinical chemistry laboratories today. The present review consists of a didactical introduction summarizing the pros and cons of MS assays compared to immunoassays, the different instrumentations, and various MS protein assays that have been proposed and/or are used in clinical laboratories. An important distinction is made between full length protein analysis (top-down method) and peptide analysis after enzymatic digestion of the proteins (bottom-up method) and its implication for the protein assay. The document ends with an outlook on what type of analyses could be used in the future, and for what type of applications MS has a clear advantage compared to immunoassays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Trace and surface analysis of ceramic layers of solid oxide fuel cells by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Becker, J S; Breuer, U; Westheide, J; Saprykin, A I; Holzbrecher, H; Nickel, H; Dietze, H J

    1996-06-01

    For the trace analysis of impurities in thick ceramic layers of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) sensitive solid-state mass spectrometric methods, such as laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and radiofrequency glow discharge mass spectrometry (rf-GDMS) have been developed and used. In order to quantify the analytical results of LA-ICP-MS, the relative sensitivity coefficients of elements in a La(0.6)Sr(0.35)MnO(3) matrix have been determined using synthetic standards. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) - as a surface analytical method - has been used to characterize the element distribution and diffusion profiles of matrix elements on the interface of a perovskite/Y-stabilized ZrO(2) layer. The application of different mass spectrometric methods for process control in the preparation of ceramic layers for the SOFC is described.

  15. Classification and Identification of Bacteria by Mass Spectrometry and Computational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Sascha; Freiwald, Anja; Maier, Thomas; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Kostrzewa, Markus; Geider, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Background In general, the definite determination of bacterial species is a tedious process and requires extensive manual labour. Novel technologies for bacterial detection and analysis can therefore help microbiologists in minimising their efforts in developing a number of microbiological applications. Methodology We present a robust, standardized procedure for automated bacterial analysis that is based on the detection of patterns of protein masses by MALDI mass spectrometry. We particularly applied the approach for classifying and identifying strains in species of the genus Erwinia. Many species of this genus are associated with disastrous plant diseases such as fire blight. Using our experimental procedure, we created a general bacterial mass spectra database that currently contains 2800 entries of bacteria of different genera. This database will be steadily expanded. To support users with a feasible analytical method, we developed and tested comprehensive software tools that are demonstrated herein. Furthermore, to gain additional analytical accuracy and reliability in the analysis we used genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms by mass spectrometry to unambiguously determine closely related strains that are difficult to distinguish by only relying on protein mass pattern detection. Conclusions With the method for bacterial analysis, we could identify fire blight pathogens from a variety of biological sources. The method can be used for a number of additional bacterial genera. Moreover, the mass spectrometry approach presented allows the integration of data from different biological levels such as the genome and the proteome. PMID:18665227

  16. A MASSive Laboratory Tour. An Interactive Mass Spectrometry Outreach Activity for Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, Julia H.; Mascini, Nadine E.; Kiss, Andras; Smith, Donald F.; Klinkert, Ivo; Eijkel, Gert B.; Duursma, Marc C.; Cillero Pastor, Berta; Chughtai, Kamila; Chughtai, Sanaullah; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2013-07-01

    It is imperative to fascinate young children at an early stage in their education for the analytical sciences. The exposure of the public to mass spectrometry presently increases rapidly through the common media. Outreach activities can take advantage of this exposure and employ mass spectrometry as an exquisite example of an analytical science in which children can be fascinated. The presented teaching modules introduce children to mass spectrometry and give them the opportunity to experience a modern research laboratory. The modules are highly adaptable and can be applied to young children from the age of 6 to 14 y. In an interactive tour, the students explore three major scientific concepts related to mass spectrometry; the building blocks of matter, charged particle manipulation by electrostatic fields, and analyte identification by mass analysis. Also, the students carry out a mass spectrometry experiment and learn to interpret the resulting mass spectra. The multistage, inquiry-based tour contains flexible methods, which teach the students current-day research techniques and possible applications to real research topics. Besides the scientific concepts, laboratory safety and hygiene are stressed and the students are enthused for the analytical sciences by participating in "hands-on" work. The presented modules have repeatedly been successfully employed during laboratory open days. They are also found to be extremely suitable for (early) high school science classes during laboratory visit-focused field trips.

  17. Developments in Plasma-Source Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-11

    Spectrometry 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Gary M. Hieftje and George H. Vickers 13a. TYPE OF REPORT b.TMCOEE . TEO POTYerMohay 5.AGCUN Technical FROM TO 11 July...4134006 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 41 DEVELOPMENTS IN PLASMA-SOURCE MASS SPECTROMETRY by Gary M. Hieftje and George H. Vickers Acessoo i or * NTIS GRMX Prepared...G. M. Hieftje , and A. T. Zander, Spectrochim. Acta 1987, 42B, 29 60 Determination of Lead Isotope Ratios by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass

  18. Nanomanipulation-coupled nanospray mass spectrometry as an approach for single cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, Mandy; Hamilton, Jason; Verbeck, Guido F.

    2014-12-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometry is now a widely used technique for observing cell content of various biological tissues. However, electrospray techniques (liquid chromatography and direct infusion) often involve lysing a group of cells and extracting the biomolecules of interest, rather than a sensitive, individual cell method to observe local chemistry. Presented here is an approach of combining a nanomanipulator workstation with nanospray mass spectrometry, which allows for extraction of a single cell, followed by rapid mass analysis that can provide a detailed metabolic profile. Triacylglycerol content was profiled with this tool coupled to mass spectrometry to investigate heterogeneity between healthy and tumorous tissues as well as lipid droplet containing adipocytes in vitro as proof of concept. This selective approach provides cellular resolution and complements existing bioanalytical techniques with minimal invasion to samples. In addition, the coupling of nanomanipulation and mass spectrometry holds the potential to be used in a great number of applications for individual organelles, diseased tissues, and in vitro cell cultures for observing heterogeneity even amongst cells and organelles of the same tissue.

  19. Quantitative mass spectrometry of unconventional human biological matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Ewelina P.; Urban, Pawel L.

    2016-10-01

    The development of sensitive and versatile mass spectrometric methodology has fuelled interest in the analysis of metabolites and drugs in unconventional biological specimens. Here, we discuss the analysis of eight human matrices-hair, nail, breath, saliva, tears, meibum, nasal mucus and skin excretions (including sweat)-by mass spectrometry (MS). The use of such specimens brings a number of advantages, the most important being non-invasive sampling, the limited risk of adulteration and the ability to obtain information that complements blood and urine tests. The most often studied matrices are hair, breath and saliva. This review primarily focuses on endogenous (e.g. potential biomarkers, hormones) and exogenous (e.g. drugs, environmental contaminants) small molecules. The majority of analytical methods used chromatographic separation prior to MS; however, such a hyphenated methodology greatly limits analytical throughput. On the other hand, the mass spectrometric methods that exclude chromatographic separation are fast but suffer from matrix interferences. To enable development of quantitative assays for unconventional matrices, it is desirable to standardize the protocols for the analysis of each specimen and create appropriate certified reference materials. Overcoming these challenges will make analysis of unconventional human biological matrices more common in a clinical setting. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  20. METHOD 332.0: DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH SUPPRESSED CONDUCTIVITY AND ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method is applicable to the identification and quantitation of perchlorate in raw and finished drinking waters. The approach used is ion chromatography with suppressed conductivity and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (IC-ESI/MS)

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL MASS SPECTROMETRY: EMERGING CONTAMINANTS AND CURRENT ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers developments in environmental mass spectrometry over the period of 2000-2001. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2002 are also included. The previous Environmental Mass Spectrometry review was very comprehensive, including...

  2. Characterizing the lipid and metabolite changes associated with placental function and pregnancy complications using ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E; Baker, Erin S; Metz, Thomas O

    2017-12-01

    Successful pregnancy is dependent upon discrete biological events, which include embryo implantation, decidualization, and placentation. Problems associated with each of these events can cause infertility or conditions such as preeclampsia. A greater understanding of the molecular changes associated with these complex processes is necessary to aid in identifying treatments for each condition. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies have been used to identify metabolites and lipids associated with pregnancy-related complications. However, due to limitations associated with conventional implementations of both techniques, novel technology developments are needed to more fully understand the initiation and development of pregnancy related problems at the molecular level. In this perspective, we describe current analytical techniques for metabolomic and lipidomic characterization of pregnancy complications and discuss the potential for new technologies such as ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular changes that affect the placenta and pregnancy outcomes. Copyright © 2017 IFPA, Elsevier Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Tackling saponin diversity in marine animals by mass spectrometry: data acquisition and integration.

    PubMed

    Decroo, Corentin; Colson, Emmanuel; Demeyer, Marie; Lemaur, Vincent; Caulier, Guillaume; Eeckhaut, Igor; Cornil, Jérôme; Flammang, Patrick; Gerbaux, Pascal

    2017-05-01

    Saponin analysis by mass spectrometry methods is nowadays progressively supplementing other analytical methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Indeed, saponin extracts from plant or marine animals are often constituted by a complex mixture of (slightly) different saponin molecules that requires extensive purification and separation steps to meet the requirement for NMR spectroscopy measurements. Based on its intrinsic features, mass spectrometry represents an inescapable tool to access the structures of saponins within extracts by using LC-MS, MALDI-MS, and tandem mass spectrometry experiments. The combination of different MS methods nowadays allows for a nice description of saponin structures, without extensive purification. However, the structural characterization process is based on low kinetic energy CID which cannot afford a total structure elucidation as far as stereochemistry is concerned. Moreover, the structural difference between saponins in a same extract is often so small that coelution upon LC-MS analysis is unavoidable, rendering the isomeric distinction and characterization by CID challenging or impossible. In the present paper, we introduce ion mobility in combination with liquid chromatography to better tackle the structural complexity of saponin congeners. When analyzing saponin extracts with MS-based methods, handling the data remains problematic for the comprehensive report of the results, but also for their efficient comparison. We here introduce an original schematic representation using sector diagrams that are constructed from mass spectrometry data. We strongly believe that the proposed data integration could be useful for data interpretation since it allows for a direct and fast comparison, both in terms of composition and relative proportion of the saponin contents in different extracts. Graphical Abstract A combination of state-of-the-art mass spectrometry methods, including ion mobility spectroscopy, is developed to afford a

  4. [Latest development in mass spectrometry for clinical application].

    PubMed

    Takino, Masahiko

    2013-09-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has seen enormous growth in special clinical chemistry laboratories. It significantly increases the analytic potential in clinical chemistry, especially in the field of low molecular weight biomarker analysis. This review summarizes the state of the art in mass spectrometry and related techniques for clinical application with a main focus on recent developments in LC-MS. Current trends in ionization techniques, automated online sample preparation techniques coupled with LC-MS, and ion mobility spectrometry are discussed. Emerging mass spectrometric approaches complementary to LC-MS are discussed as well.

  5. Mass spectrometry: a revolution in clinical microbiology?

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Espinal, Paula; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Messad, Nourredine; Pantel, Alix; Sotto, Albert

    2013-02-01

    Recently, different bacteriological laboratory interventions that decrease reporting time have been developed. These promising new broad-based techniques have merit, based on their ability to identify rapidly many bacteria, organisms difficult to grow or newly emerging strains, as well as their capacity to track disease transmission. The benefit of rapid reporting of identification and/or resistance of bacteria can greatly impact patient outcomes, with an improvement in the use of antibiotics, in the reduction of the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria and in mortality rates. Different techniques revolve around mass spectrometry (MS) technology: matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), PCR combined with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESIMS), iPLEX MassArray system and other new evolutions combining different techniques. This report emphasizes the (r)evolution of these technologies in clinical microbiology.

  6. Determination of thyroid hormones in mouse tissues by isotope-dilution microflow liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Meri; Giesert, Florian; Finan, Brian; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Müller, Timo D; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Tschöp, Matthias H; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2016-10-15

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play a critical role in the regulation of many biological processes such as growth, metabolism and development both in humans and wildlife. In general, TH levels are measured by immunoassay (IA) methods but the specificity of the antibodies used in these assays limits selectivity. In the last decade, several analytical methods using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have been developed to measure THs. These new techniques proved to be more accurate than the IA analysis and they were widely used for the determination of TH level in different human and animal tissues. A large part of LC-MS/MS methods described in literature employed between 200 and 500mg of sample, however this quantity can be considered too high especially when preclinical studies are conducted using mice as test subjects. Thus an analytical method that reduces the amount of tissue is essential. In this study, we developed a procedure for the analysis of six THs; L-thyroxine (T4), 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3), 3,3',5'-triiodo-l-thyronine (rT3), 3,5-diiodo-l-thyronine (rT2), 3,3'-diiodo-l-thyronine (T2), 3-iodo-l-thyronine (T1) using isotope ((13)C6-T4, (13)C6-T3, (13)C6-rT3, (13)C6-T2) dilution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major difference with previously described methods lies in the utilization of a nano-UPLC (Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography) system in micro configuration. This approach leads to a reduction compared to the published methods, of column internal diameter, flow rate, and injected volume. The result of all these improvements is a decrease in the amount of sample necessary for the analysis. The method was tested on six different mouse tissues: liver, heart, kidney, muscle, lung and brown adipose tissue (BAT). The nano-UPLC system was interfaced with a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (Q-TOF2-MS) using the positive ion mode electrospray ionization. In our analytical method

  7. Quantitative interaction proteomics using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wepf, Alexander; Glatter, Timo; Schmidt, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gstaiger, Matthias

    2009-03-01

    We present a mass spectrometry-based strategy for the absolute quantification of protein complex components isolated through affinity purification. We quantified bait proteins via isotope-labeled reference peptides corresponding to an affinity tag sequence and prey proteins by label-free correlational quantification using the precursor ion signal intensities of proteotypic peptides generated in reciprocal purifications. We used this method to quantitatively analyze interaction stoichiometries in the human protein phosphatase 2A network.

  8. Quantification of proteins in urine samples using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Khristenko, Nina; Domon, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Numerous clinical proteomics studies are focused on the development of biomarkers to improve either diagnostics for early disease detection or the monitoring of the response to the treatment. Although, a wealth of biomarker candidates are available, their evaluation and validation in a true clinical setup remains challenging. In biomarkers evaluation studies, a panel of proteins of interest are systematically analyzed in a large cohort of samples. However, in spite of the latest progresses in mass spectrometry, the consistent detection of pertinent proteins in high complex biological samples is still a challenging task. Thus, targeted LC-MS/MS methods are better suited for the systematic analysis of biomarkers rather than shotgun approaches. This chapter describes the workflow used to perform targeted quantitative analyses of proteins in urinary samples. The peptides, as surrogates of the protein of interest, are commonly measured using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometers operated in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. More recently, the advances in targeted LC-MS/MS analysis based on parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) performed on a quadrupole-orbitrap instrument have allowed to increase the specificity and selectivity of the measurements.

  9. The allure of mass spectrometry: From an earlyday chemist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Tőkés, László

    2017-07-01

    This reminiscing review article is an account of the author's fascination and involvements with mass spectrometry from the perspective of an organic chemist with an interest in natural product chemistry. It covers a period from 1961 through the mid 1990s as mass spectrometry evolved form a novelty technique to become a most widely used analytical technique. Following a brief synopsis of my pathway to mass spectrometry, my research efforts in this field are presented with a focus mainly on evolving principles and technologies which I had personal involvements with. To provide historical perspectives, discussions of these developments are accompanied by brief outlines of the relevant state-of-the-art, shedding light on the technical and conceptual challenges encountered during those early days in mass spectrometry. Examples are presented of my involvements with basic and applied research in mass spectrometry during graduate studies at Stanford University and close to three decade tenure in pharmaceutical research at Syntex Research. My basic research interests focused mainly on principles of electron ionization induced fragmentation mechanisms, with an emphasis on steroids and other model compounds. Extensive deuterium labeling evidence was used to determine the fragmentation mechanisms of the diagnostically significant ions in the spectra of numerous model compounds, uncovering examples of wide-ranging hydrogen transfers, skeletal rearrangements, methyl and phenyl migrations, stereoselective fragmentations and low and high energy fragmentation processes. Depiction of the industrial research phase of my career includes comments on the pivotal role mass spectrometry played on advancing modern pharmaceutical research. Examples are presented of involvements with instrumental developments and a few select cases of applied research, including studies of bile mechanisms in vertebrates, identification of bisphenol-A leaching from sterilized polycarbonate containers, high

  10. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for molecular diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Taranenko, N. I.; Zhu, Y. F.; Allman, S. L.; Tang, K.; Matteson, K. J.; Chang, L. Y.; Chung, C. N.; Martin, Steve; Haff, Lawrence

    1996-04-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been used for molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Both 3-base deletion and single-base point mutation have been successfully detected by clinical samples. This new detection method can possibly speed up the diagnosis by one order of magnitude in the future. It may become a new biotechnology technique for population screening of genetic disease.

  11. History of mass spectrometry at the Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Hemmersbach, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Mass spectrometry has played a decisive role in doping analysis and doping control in human sport for almost 40 years. The standard of qualitative and quantitative determinations in body fluids has always attracted maximum attention from scientists. With its unique sensitivity and selectivity properties, mass spectrometry provides state-of-the-art technology in analytical chemistry. Both anti-doping organizations and the athletes concerned expect the utmost endeavours to prevent false-positive and false-negative results of the analytical evidence. The Olympic Games play an important role in international sport today and are milestones for technical development in doping analysis. This review of the part played by mass spectrometry in doping control from Munich 1972 to Beijing 2008 Olympics gives an overview of how doping analysis has developed and where we are today. In recognizing the achievements made towards effective doping control, it is of the utmost importance to applaud the joint endeavours of the World Anti-Doping Agency, the International Olympic Committee, the international federations and national anti-doping agencies to combat doping. Advances against the misuse of prohibited substances and methods, which are performance-enhancing, dangerous to health and violate the spirit of sport, can be achieved only if all the stakeholders work together. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Sampling and analyte enrichment strategies for ambient mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianjiang; Ma, Wen; Li, Hongmei; Ai, Wanpeng; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2018-01-01

    Ambient mass spectrometry provides great convenience for fast screening, and has showed promising potential in analytical chemistry. However, its relatively low sensitivity seriously restricts its practical utility in trace compound analysis. In this review, we summarize the sampling and analyte enrichment strategies coupled with nine modes of representative ambient mass spectrometry (desorption electrospray ionization, paper vhspray ionization, wooden-tip spray ionization, probe electrospray ionization, coated blade spray ionization, direct analysis in real time, desorption corona beam ionization, dielectric barrier discharge ionization, and atmospheric-pressure solids analysis probe) that have dramatically increased the detection sensitivity. We believe that these advances will promote routine use of ambient mass spectrometry. Graphical abstract Scheme of sampling stretagies for ambient mass spectrometry.

  13. Mass spectrometry-based carboxyl footprinting of proteins: Method evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hao; Wen, Jianzhong; Huang, Richard Y-C.

    2012-02-01

    Protein structure determines function in biology, and a variety of approaches have been employed to obtain structural information about proteins. Mass spectrometry-based protein footprinting is one fast-growing approach. One labeling-based footprinting approach is the use of a water-soluble carbodiimide, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and glycine ethyl ester (GEE) to modify solvent-accessible carboxyl groups on glutamate (E) and aspartate (D). This paper describes method development of carboxyl-group modification in protein footprinting. The modification protocol was evaluated by using the protein calmodulin as a model. Because carboxyl-group modification is a slow reaction relative to protein folding and unfolding, there is an issue that modificationsmore » at certain sites may induce protein unfolding and lead to additional modification at sites that are not solvent-accessible in the wild-type protein. We investigated this possibility by using hydrogen deuterium amide exchange (H/DX). The study demonstrated that application of carboxyl group modification in probing conformational changes in calmodulin induced by Ca{sup 2+} binding provides useful information that is not compromised by modification-induced protein unfolding.« less

  14. Computational mass spectrometry for small molecules

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecules from mass spectrometry (MS) data remains a major challenge in the interpretation of MS data. This review covers the computational aspects of identifying small molecules, from the identification of a compound searching a reference spectral library, to the structural elucidation of unknowns. In detail, we describe the basic principles and pitfalls of searching mass spectral reference libraries. Determining the molecular formula of the compound can serve as a basis for subsequent structural elucidation; consequently, we cover different methods for molecular formula identification, focussing on isotope pattern analysis. We then discuss automated methods to deal with mass spectra of compounds that are not present in spectral libraries, and provide an insight into de novo analysis of fragmentation spectra using fragmentation trees. In addition, this review shortly covers the reconstruction of metabolic networks using MS data. Finally, we list available software for different steps of the analysis pipeline. PMID:23453222

  15. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Alan G.

    1998-06-01

    As for Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) interferometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the introduction of pulsed Fourier transform techniques revolutionized ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: increased speed (factor of 10,000), increased sensitivity (factor of 100), increased mass resolution (factor of 10,000-an improvement not shared by the introduction of FT techniques to IR or NMR spectroscopy), increased mass range (factor of 500), and automated operation. FT-ICR mass spectrometry is the most versatile technique for unscrambling and quantifying ion-molecule reaction kinetics and equilibria in the absence of solvent (i.e., the gas phase). In addition, FT-ICR MS has the following analytically important features: speed (~1 second per spectrum); ultrahigh mass resolution and ultrahigh mass accuracy for analysis of mixtures and polymers; attomole sensitivity; MSn with one spectrometer, including two-dimensional FT/FT-ICR/MS; positive and/or negative ions; multiple ion sources (especially MALDI and electrospray); biomolecular molecular weight and sequencing; LC/MS; and single-molecule detection up to 108 Dalton. Here, some basic features and recent developments of FT-ICR mass spectrometry are reviewed, with applications ranging from crude oil to molecular biology.

  16. Comparison of pulse glow discharge-ion mobility spectrometry and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry based on multiplug filtration cleanup for the analysis of tricaine mesylate residues in fish and water.

    PubMed

    Zou, Nan; Chen, Ronghua; Qin, Yuhong; Song, Shuangyu; Tang, Xinglin; Pan, Canping

    2016-09-01

    Analytical methods based on multiplug filtration cleanup coupled with pulse glow discharge-ion mobility spectrometry and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry were developed for the analysis of tricaine mesylate residue in fish and fish-raising water samples. A silica fiber holder and an appropriate new interface were designed to make the direct introduction of the fiber into the pulse glow discharge-ion mobility spectrometry introduction mechanism. The multiplug filtration cleanup method with adsorption mixtures was optimized for the determination of tricaine mesylate in fish samples. Good linear relationships were obtained by the two methods. For fish samples, limits of detection were 6 and 0.6 μg/kg by ion mobility spectrometry and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. The matrix effect of the established liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method was negligible for fish samples but that of the ion mobility spectrometry method was not. The two methods were compared. The ion mobility spectrometry system could be used a rapid screening tool on site with the advantage of rapidity, simplicity, and portability, and the liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry system could be used for validation in laboratory conditions with the advantage of lower limit of detection, stability, and precision. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Development of analytical methods for multiplex bio-assay with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ornatsky, Olga I.; Kinach, Robert; Bandura, Dmitry R.; Lou, Xudong; Tanner, Scott D.; Baranov, Vladimir I.; Nitz, Mark; Winnik, Mitchell A.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in the development of highly multiplexed bio-analytical assays with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection are discussed. Use of novel reagents specifically designed for immunological methods utilizing elemental analysis is presented. The major steps of method development, including selection of elements for tags, validation of tagged reagents, and examples of multiplexed assays, are considered in detail. The paper further describes experimental protocols for elemental tagging of antibodies, immunostaining of live and fixed human leukemia cells, and preparation of samples for ICP-MS analysis. Quantitative analysis of surface antigens on model cell lines using a cocktail of seven lanthanide labeled antibodies demonstrated high specificity and concordance with conventional immunophenotyping. PMID:19122859

  18. Development of analytical methods for multiplex bio-assay with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ornatsky, Olga I; Kinach, Robert; Bandura, Dmitry R; Lou, Xudong; Tanner, Scott D; Baranov, Vladimir I; Nitz, Mark; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2008-01-01

    Advances in the development of highly multiplexed bio-analytical assays with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection are discussed. Use of novel reagents specifically designed for immunological methods utilizing elemental analysis is presented. The major steps of method development, including selection of elements for tags, validation of tagged reagents, and examples of multiplexed assays, are considered in detail. The paper further describes experimental protocols for elemental tagging of antibodies, immunostaining of live and fixed human leukemia cells, and preparation of samples for ICP-MS analysis. Quantitative analysis of surface antigens on model cell lines using a cocktail of seven lanthanide labeled antibodies demonstrated high specificity and concordance with conventional immunophenotyping.

  19. Computational methods and challenges in hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Claesen, Jürgen; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2017-09-01

    Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange (HDX) has been applied, since the 1930s, as an analytical tool to study the structure and dynamics of (small) biomolecules. The popularity of using HDX to study proteins increased drastically in the last two decades due to the successful combination with mass spectrometry (MS). Together with this growth in popularity, several technological advances have been made, such as improved quenching and fragmentation. As a consequence of these experimental improvements and the increased use of protein-HDXMS, large amounts of complex data are generated, which require appropriate analysis. Computational analysis of HDXMS requires several steps. A typical workflow for proteins consists of identification of (non-)deuterated peptides or fragments of the protein under study (local analysis), or identification of the deuterated protein as a whole (global analysis); determination of the deuteration level; estimation of the protection extent or exchange rates of the labile backbone amide hydrogen atoms; and a statistically sound interpretation of the estimated protection extent or exchange rates. Several algorithms, specifically designed for HDX analysis, have been proposed. They range from procedures that focus on one specific step in the analysis of HDX data to complete HDX workflow analysis tools. In this review, we provide an overview of the computational methods and discuss outstanding challenges. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 36:649-667, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Quantification of Global DNA Methylation Levels by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Agustin F; Valledor, Luis; Vallejo, Fernando; Cañal, Maria Jesús; Fraga, Mario F

    2018-01-01

    Global DNA methylation was classically considered the relative percentage of 5-methylcysine (5mC) with respect to total cytosine (C). Early approaches were based on the use of high-performance separation technologies and UV detection. However, the recent development of protocols using mass spectrometry for the detection has increased sensibility and permitted the precise identification of peak compounds based on their molecular masses. This allows work to be conducted with much less genomic DNA starting material and also to quantify 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine (5hmC), a recently identified form of methylated cytosine that could play an important role in active DNA demethylation. Here, we describe the protocol that we currently use in our laboratory to analyze 5mC and 5hmC by mass spectrometry. The protocol, which is based on the method originally developed by Le and colleagues using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) and mass spectrometry (triple Quadrupole (QqQ)) detection, allows for the rapid and accurate quantification of relative global 5mC and 5hmC levels starting from just 1 μg of genomic DNA, which allows for the rapid and accurate quantification of relative global 5mC and 5hmC levels.

  1. Development of quantitative laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS). Final report, 1 Aug 87-1 Jan 90

    SciTech Connect

    Odom, R.W.

    1991-06-04

    The objective of the research was to develop quantitative microanalysis methods for dielectric thin films using the laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS) technique. The research involved preparation of thin (5,000 A) films of SiO2, Al2O3, MgF2, TiO2, Cr2O3, Ta2O5, Si3N4, and ZrO2, and doping these films with ion implant impurities of 11B, 40Ca, 56Fe, 68Zn, 81Br, and 121Sb. Laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) were performed on these films. The research demonstrated quantitative LIMS analysis down to detection levels of 10-100 ppm, and led to the development of (1) a compoundmore » thin film standards product line for the performing organization, (2) routine LIMS analytical methods, and (3) the manufacture of high speed preamplifiers for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) techniques.« less

  2. Three Minute Method for Amino Acid Analysis by UHPLC and high resolution quadrupole orbitrap mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nemkov, Travis; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is a powerful bioanalytical technique for many biomedical research endeavors, including cancer, emergency medicine, nutrition and neuroscience research. In the present study, we present a three minute analytical method for underivatized amino acid analysis that employs ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and high resolution quadrupole orbitrap mass spectrometry. This method has demonstrated linearity (mM to nM range), reproducibility (intra-day<5%, inter-day<20%), sensitivity (low fmol) and selectivity. Here, we illustrate the rapidity and accuracy of the method through comparison with conventional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods. We further demonstrate the robustness and sensitivity of this method on a diverse range of biological matrices. Using this method we were able to selectively discriminate murine pancreatic cancer cells with and without knocked down expression of Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α; plasma, lymph and bronchioalveolar lavage fluid samples from control versus hemorrhaged rats; and muscle tissue samples harvested from rats subjected to both low fat and high fat diets. Furthermore, we were able to exploit the sensitivity of the method to detect and quantify the release of glutamate from sparsely isolated murine taste buds. Spiked in light or heavy standards (13C6-arginine, 13C6-lysine, 13C515N2-glutamine) or xenometabolites were used to determine coefficient of variations, confirm linearity of relative quantitation in four different matrices, and overcome matrix effects for absolute quantitation. The presented method enables high-throughput analysis of low abundance samples requiring only one percent of the material extracted from 100,000 cells, 10 μl of biological fluid, or 2 mg of muscle tissue. PMID:26058356

  3. Influences of Normalization Method on Biomarker Discovery in Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based Untargeted Metabolomics: What Should Be Considered?

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiaqing; Zhang, Pei; Lv, Mengying; Guo, Huimin; Huang, Yin; Zhang, Zunjian; Xu, Fengguo

    2017-05-16

    Data reduction techniques in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based untargeted metabolomics has made the following workflow of data analysis more lucid. However, the normalization process still perplexes researchers, and its effects are always ignored. In order to reveal the influences of normalization method, five representative normalization methods (mass spectrometry total useful signal, median, probabilistic quotient normalization, remove unwanted variation-random, and systematic ratio normalization) were compared in three real data sets with different types. First, data reduction techniques were used to refine the original data. Then, quality control samples and relative log abundance plots were utilized to evaluate the unwanted variations and the efficiencies of normalization process. Furthermore, the potential biomarkers which were screened out by the Mann-Whitney U test, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, random forest, and feature selection algorithm Boruta in different normalized data sets were compared. The results indicated the determination of the normalization method was difficult because the commonly accepted rules were easy to fulfill but different normalization methods had unforeseen influences on both the kind and number of potential biomarkers. Lastly, an integrated strategy for normalization method selection was recommended.

  4. Tandem mass spectrometry data quality assessment by self-convolution.

    PubMed

    Choo, Keng Wah; Tham, Wai Mun

    2007-09-20

    Many algorithms have been developed for deciphering the tandem mass spectrometry (MS) data sets. They can be essentially clustered into two classes. The first performs searches on theoretical mass spectrum database, while the second based itself on de novo sequencing from raw mass spectrometry data. It was noted that the quality of mass spectra affects significantly the protein identification processes in both instances. This prompted the authors to explore ways to measure the quality of MS data sets before subjecting them to the protein identification algorithms, thus allowing for more meaningful searches and increased confidence level of proteins identified. The proposed method measures the qualities of MS data sets based on the symmetric property of b- and y-ion peaks present in a MS spectrum. Self-convolution on MS data and its time-reversal copy was employed. Due to the symmetric nature of b-ions and y-ions peaks, the self-convolution result of a good spectrum would produce a highest mid point intensity peak. To reduce processing time, self-convolution was achieved using Fast Fourier Transform and its inverse transform, followed by the removal of the "DC" (Direct Current) component and the normalisation of the data set. The quality score was defined as the ratio of the intensity at the mid point to the remaining peaks of the convolution result. The method was validated using both theoretical mass spectra, with various permutations, and several real MS data sets. The results were encouraging, revealing a high percentage of positive prediction rates for spectra with good quality scores. We have demonstrated in this work a method for determining the quality of tandem MS data set. By pre-determining the quality of tandem MS data before subjecting them to protein identification algorithms, spurious protein predictions due to poor tandem MS data are avoided, giving scientists greater confidence in the predicted results. We conclude that the algorithm performs well

  5. Mass spectrometry-compatible silver staining of histones resolved on acetic acid-urea-Triton PAGE.

    PubMed

    Pramod, Khare Satyajeet; Bharat, Khade; Sanjay, Gupta

    2009-05-01

    Acetic acid-Urea-Triton (AUT) PAGE is commonly used method to separate histone variants and their post-translationally modified forms. Coomassie staining is the preferred method for protein visualization; however, its sensitivity is less than that of silver staining. Though silver staining of histones in AUT-PAGE has been reported, the method is time-consuming, dependent on prior staining by Amido black and has not been reported suitable for mass spectrometry. Here, we propose 'SDS-Silver' method for rapid, sensitive and mass spectrometry-compatible staining of histones resolved on AUT-PAGE.

  6. Mass spectrometry: Raw protein from the top down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuker, Kathrin

    2018-02-01

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful technique for analysing proteins, yet linking higher-order protein structure to amino acid sequence and post-translational modifications is far from simple. Now, a native top-down method has been developed that can provide information on higher-order protein structure and different proteoforms at the same time.

  7. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  8. Differentiating Fragmentation Pathways of Cholesterol by Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Agthoven, Maria A; Barrow, Mark P; Chiron, Lionel; Coutouly, Marie-Aude; Kilgour, David; Wootton, Christopher A; Wei, Juan; Soulby, Andrew; Delsuc, Marc-André; Rolando, Christian; O'Connor, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is a data-independent analytical method that records the fragmentation patterns of all the compounds in a sample. This study shows the implementation of atmospheric pressure photoionization with two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. In the resulting 2D mass spectrum, the fragmentation patterns of the radical and protonated species from cholesterol are differentiated. This study shows the use of fragment ion lines, precursor ion lines, and neutral loss lines in the 2D mass spectrum to determine fragmentation mechanisms of known compounds and to gain information on unknown ion species in the spectrum. In concert with high resolution mass spectrometry, 2D Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry can be a useful tool for the structural analysis of small molecules. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. APPLICATION OF A SPRAY DEPOSITION METHOD FOR REVERSED PHASE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four coal gasification wastewater samples were analyzed for nonvolatile and polar organics by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Samples were separated on a reverse phase liquid chromatographic column using an aqueous solvent as the eluant. A special spray depositio...

  10. A history of mass spectrometry in Australia.

    PubMed

    Downard, Kevin M; de Laeter, John R

    2005-09-01

    An interest in mass spectrometry in Australia can be traced back to the 1920s with an early correspondence with Francis Aston who first visited these shores a decade earlier. The region has a rich tradition in both the development of the field and its application, from early measurements of ionization and appearance potentials by Jim Morrison at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) around 1950 to the design and construction of instrumentation including the first use of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for tandem mass spectrometry, the first suite of programs to simulate ion optics (SIMION), the development of early TOF/TOF instruments and orthogonal acceleration and the local design and construction of several generations of a sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) instrument. Mass spectrometry has been exploited in the study and characterization of the constituents of this nation's unique flora and fauna from Australian apples, honey, tea plant and eucalyptus oil, snake, spider, fish and frog venoms, coal, oil, sediments and shale, environmental studies of groundwater to geochronological dating of limestone and granite, other terrestrial and meteoritic rocks and coral from the Great Barrier Reef. Peter Jeffery's establishment of geochronological dating techniques in Western Australia in the early 1950s led to the establishment of geochronology research both at the Australian National University and at what is now the Curtin Institute of Technology in the 1960s. This article traces the history of mass spectrometry in its many guises and applications in the island continent of Australia. An article such as this can never be complete. It instead focuses on contributions of scientists who played a major role in the early establishment of mass spectrometry in Australia. In general, those who are presently active in the field, and whose histories are incomplete, have been mentioned at best only briefly despite their important

  11. [Measurement of free urinary cortisol and cortisone using liquid chromatography associated with tandem mass spectrometry method].

    PubMed

    Vieira, José Gilberto H; Nakamura, Odete H; Carvalho, Valdemir M

    2005-04-01

    Free urinary cortisol (UFF) measurement is one of the most useful screening tests for Cushing's syndrome. Immunoassays employed today by most clinical laboratories present limitations, specially concerning specificity. These limitations restrain a widespread application of the method, as well as the comparison of results obtained by the use of different methods. We present the development and characterization of a UFF and cortisone method based on liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A 200 microL aliquot from a 24 h urine sample is mixed with a solution containing a known quantity of deuterated cortisol and on-line extracted in solid phase (C18). The eluate is transferred to a second C18 column (Phenomenex Luna, 3 micro, 50 x 2 mm) and the isocratic mode elution profile is directly applied to a tandem mass spectrometer model Quattro Micro operating in positive mode atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI). All process is automated and the quantification is performed by isotopic dilution, based on the analyte and the deuterated internal standard peak area ratios. The specificity study showed that all the steroids tested presented cross reactivity of <1% for cortisol and cortisone. Functional sensitivity is <1 microg/L for both steroids, and the interassay CV <8%. Recovery and linearity studies were satisfactory and comparison of results obtained using a RIA for UFF and the present method in 98 routine samples showed a correlation of r= 0.838, with the results obtained with LC-MS/MS significantly lower (medians of 22.0 vs. 49.4 microg/24 h for RIA) (P<0.0001). Reference values for cortisol were defined as values between 11 and 43 microg/24 h, compatible to those recently described for similar methods. The concomitant measurement of UF cortisone allows the study of the activity of the enzyme 11beta-HSD2 and the diagnosis of the apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome. The method represents the first steroid assay of a new generation

  12. Neuropeptide Signaling in Crustaceans Probed by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhidan

    Neuropeptides are one of the most diverse classes of signaling molecules whose identities and functions are not yet fully understood. They have been implicated in the regulation of a wide range of physiological processes, including feeding-related and motivated behaviors, and also environmental adaptations. In this work, improved mass spectrometry-based analytical platforms were developed and applied to the crustacean systems to characterize signaling molecules. This dissertation begins with a review of mass spectrometry-based neuropeptide studies from both temporal- and spatial-domains. This review is then followed by several chapters detailing a few research projects related to the crustacean neuropeptidomic characterization and comparative analysis. The neuropeptidome of crayfish, Orconectes rusticus is characterized for the first time using mass spectrometry-based tools. In vivo microdialysis sampling technique offers the capability of direct sampling from extracellular space in a time-resolved manner. It is used to investigate the secreted neuropeptide and neurotransmitter content in Jonah crab, Cancer borealis, in this work. A new quantitation strategy using alternative mass spectrometry data acquisition approach is developed and applied for the first time to quantify neuropeptides. Coupling of this method with microdialysis enables the study of neuropeptide dynamics concurrent with different behaviors. Proof-of-principle experiments validating this approach have been carried out in Jonah crab, Cancer borealis to study feeding- and circadian rhythm-related neuropeptide changes using micoridialysis in a time-resolved manner. This permits a close correlation between behavioral and neurochemical changes, providing potential candidates for future validation of regulatory roles. In addition to providing spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) technique enables the characterization of signaling molecules while preserving the temporal resolution. A

  13. The allure of mass spectrometry: From an earlyday chemist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    1 This reminiscing review article is an account of the author's fascination and involvements with mass spectrometry from the perspective of an organic chemist with an interest in natural product chemistry. It covers a period from 1961 through the mid 1990s as mass spectrometry evolved form a novelty technique to become a most widely used analytical technique. Following a brief synopsis of my pathway to mass spectrometry, my research efforts in this field are presented with a focus mainly on evolving principles and technologies which I had personal involvements with. To provide historical perspectives, discussions of these developments are accompanied by brief outlines of the relevant state‐of‐the‐art, shedding light on the technical and conceptual challenges encountered during those early days in mass spectrometry. Examples are presented of my involvements with basic and applied research in mass spectrometry during graduate studies at Stanford University and close to three decade tenure in pharmaceutical research at Syntex Research. My basic research interests focused mainly on principles of electron ionization induced fragmentation mechanisms, with an emphasis on steroids and other model compounds. Extensive deuterium labeling evidence was used to determine the fragmentation mechanisms of the diagnostically significant ions in the spectra of numerous model compounds, uncovering examples of wide‐ranging hydrogen transfers, skeletal rearrangements, methyl and phenyl migrations, stereoselective fragmentations and low and high energy fragmentation processes. Depiction of the industrial research phase of my career includes comments on the pivotal role mass spectrometry played on advancing modern pharmaceutical research. Examples are presented of involvements with instrumental developments and a few select cases of applied research, including studies of bile mechanisms in vertebrates, identification of bisphenol‐A leaching from sterilized polycarbonate

  14. Isotope-dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the analysis of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Garg, Uttam; Scott, David; Frazee, Clint; Kearns, Gregory; Neville, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Hydroxyurea is used in the treatment of various malignancies and sickle cell disease. There are limited studies on the pharmacokinetics of hydroxyurea, particularly in pediatric patients. An accurate, precise, and sensitive method is needed to support such studies and to monitor therapeutic adherence. We describe a novel gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the determination of hydroxyurea concentration in plasma using stable labeled hydroxyurea C N2 as an internal standard. The method involved an organic extraction followed by the preparation of trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives of hydroxyurea for GC-MS selected ion-monitoring analysis. The following mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio ions for silated hydroxyurea and hydroxyurea C N2 were monitored: hydroxyurea-quantitative ion 277, qualifier ions 292 and 249; hydroxyurea C N2-quantitative ion 280, qualifier ion 295. This method was evaluated for reportable range, accuracy, within-run and between-run imprecisions, and limits of quantification. The reportable range for the method was 0.1-100 mcg/mL. All results were accurate within an allowable error of 15%. Within-run and between-run imprecisions were <15%. Samples were stable for at least 4 hours at room temperature, 2 months at -20°C, and 6 months at -70°C, and after 3 freeze/thaw cycles. Extraction efficiency for 1-, 5-, 10-, and 50-mcg/mL samples averaged 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.6%, and 1.4%, respectively. The isotope-dilution GC-MS method for analysis of hydroxyurea described here is accurate, sensitive, precise, and robust. Its characteristics make the method suitable for supporting pharmacokinetic studies and/or clinical therapeutic monitoring.

  15. Biological Matrix Effects in Quantitative Tandem Mass Spectrometry-Based Analytical Methods: Advancing Biomonitoring

    PubMed Central

    Panuwet, Parinya; Hunter, Ronald E.; D’Souza, Priya E.; Chen, Xianyu; Radford, Samantha A.; Cohen, Jordan R.; Marder, M. Elizabeth; Kartavenka, Kostya; Ryan, P. Barry; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2015-01-01

    The ability to quantify levels of target analytes in biological samples accurately and precisely, in biomonitoring, involves the use of highly sensitive and selective instrumentation such as tandem mass spectrometers and a thorough understanding of highly variable matrix effects. Typically, matrix effects are caused by co-eluting matrix components that alter the ionization of target analytes as well as the chromatographic response of target analytes, leading to reduced or increased sensitivity of the analysis. Thus, before the desired accuracy and precision standards of laboratory data are achieved, these effects must be characterized and controlled. Here we present our review and observations of matrix effects encountered during the validation and implementation of tandem mass spectrometry-based analytical methods. We also provide systematic, comprehensive laboratory strategies needed to control challenges posed by matrix effects in order to ensure delivery of the most accurate data for biomonitoring studies assessing exposure to environmental toxicants. PMID:25562585

  16. Chiral Analysis by Tandem Mass Spectrometry Using the Kinetic Method, by Polarimetry, and by [Superscript 1]H NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedick, Patrick W.; Bain, Ryan M.; Bain, Kinsey; Cooks, R. Graham

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this laboratory exercise was for students to understand the concept of chirality and how enantiomeric excess (ee) is experimentally determined using the analysis of ibuprofen as an example. Students determined the enantiomeric excess of the analyte by three different instrumental methods: mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance…

  17. Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry method based two-step precursor ion scanning for the structural elucidation of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Pang, Tao; Shi, Junli; Lu, Xiuping; Deng, Jianhua; Lin, Qian

    2014-11-01

    Plant flavonoids are very important secondary metabolites for insect and virus control of their host plant and are potent nutrients for humans. To be able to understand the bioavailability and functions of plant flavonoids, it is necessary to reveal their exact chemical structures. Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry is a powerful approach for structural elucidation of metabolites. In this report, a two-step precursor ion scanning based liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the structural elucidation of plant flavonoids. The established method consists of the two-step precursor ions scanning for possible flavonoids extraction, MS(2) fragment spectra acquisition and comparison with an online database, liquid chromatography retention rules correction, and commercial standards verification. The developed method was used for the structure elucidation of flavonoids in flowers and leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and 17 flavonoids were identified in the tobacco variety Yunyan 97. Nine of the 17 identified flavonoids were considered to be found in tobacco flowers or/and leaves for the first time based on the available references. This method was proved to be very effective and can be used for the identification of flavonoids in other plants. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. An analysis of nuclear fuel burnup in the AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment using gamma spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and computational simulation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Winston, Philip L.

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methodsmore » for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1% FIMA for the direct method and 20.0% FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3% FIMA to 10.7% FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. Furthermore, the results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma

  19. An analysis of nuclear fuel burnup in the AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment using gamma spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and computational simulation techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Winston, Philip L.; ...

    2014-09-03

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methodsmore » for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1% FIMA for the direct method and 20.0% FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3% FIMA to 10.7% FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. Furthermore, the results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma

  20. Application of Solid Phase Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry as a Rapid Method for Field Sampling and Analysis of Chemical Warfare Agents and Toxic Industrial Chemicals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    PHASE MICROEXTRACTION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY AS A RAPID METHOD FOR FIELD SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS...SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS AND TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY AS A RAPID METHOD FOR FIELD SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS AND TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

  1. Profiling Changes in Histone Post-translational Modifications by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Mowei; Wu, Si; Stenoien, David L.

    Top-down mass spectrometry is a valuable tool for charactering post-translational modifications on histones for understanding of gene control and expression. In this protocol, we describe a top-down workflow using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry for fast global profiling of changes in histone proteoforms between a wild-type and a mutant of a fungal species. The proteoforms exhibiting different abundances can be subjected to further targeted studies by other mass spectrometric or biochemical assays. This method can be generally adapted for preliminary screening for changes in histone modifications between samples such as wild-type vs. mutant, and control vs. disease.

  2. High-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental studies.

    PubMed

    Kluge, H-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry for fundamental studies in metrology and atomic, nuclear and particle physics requires extreme sensitivity and efficiency as well as ultimate resolving power and accuracy. An overview will be given on the global status of high-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental physics and metrology. Three quite different examples of modern mass spectrometric experiments in physics are presented: (i) the retardation spectrometer KATRIN at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, employing electrostatic filtering in combination with magnetic-adiabatic collimation-the biggest mass spectrometer for determining the smallest mass, i.e. the mass of the electron anti-neutrino, (ii) the Experimental Cooler-Storage Ring at GSI-a mass spectrometer of medium size, relative to other accelerators, for determining medium-heavy masses and (iii) the Penning trap facility, SHIPTRAP, at GSI-the smallest mass spectrometer for determining the heaviest masses, those of super-heavy elements. Finally, a short view into the future will address the GSI project HITRAP at GSI for fundamental studies with highly-charged ions.

  3. Automated in-line gel filtration for native state mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Waitt, Greg M; Xu, Robert; Wisely, G Bruce; Williams, Jon D

    2008-02-01

    Characterization of protein-ligand complexes by nondenaturing mass spectrometry provides direct evidence of drug-like molecules binding with potential therapeutic targets. Typically, protein-ligand complexes to be analyzed contain buffer salts, detergents, and other additives to enhance protein solubility, all of which make the sample unable to be analyzed directly by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. This work describes an in-line gel-filtration method that has been automated and optimized. Automation was achieved using commercial HPLC equipment. Gel column parameters that were optimized include: column dimensions, flow rate, packing material type, particle size, and molecular weight cut-off. Under optimal conditions, desalted protein ions are detected 4 min after injection and the analysis is completed in 20 min. The gel column retains good performance even after >200 injections. A demonstration for using the in-line gel-filtration system is shown for monitoring the exchange of fatty acids from the pocket of a nuclear hormone receptor, peroxisome proliferator activator-delta (PPARdelta) with a tool compound. Additional utilities of in-line gel-filtration mass spectrometry system will also be discussed.

  4. Nanoparticle assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for small molecule analytes.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser

    2018-03-01

    Nanoparticle assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (NPs-ALDI-MS) shows remarkable characteristics and has a promising future in terms of real sample analysis. The incorporation of NPs can advance several methods including surface assisted LDI-MS, and surface enhanced LDI-MS. These methods have advanced the detection of many thermally labile and nonvolatile biomolecules. Nanoparticles circumvent the drawbacks of conventional organic matrices for the analysis of small molecules. In most cases, NPs offer a clear background without interfering peaks, absence of fragmentation of thermally labile molecules, and allow the ionization of species with weak noncovalent interactions. Furthermore, an enhancement in sensitivity and selectivity can be achieved. NPs enable straightforward analysis of target species in a complex sample. This review (with 239 refs.) covers the progress made in laser-based mass spectrometry in combination with the use of metallic NPs (such as AuNPs, AgNPs, PtNPs, and PdNPs), NPs consisting of oxides and chalcogenides, silicon-based NPs, carbon-based nanomaterials, quantum dots, and metal-organic frameworks. Graphical abstract An overview is given on nanomaterials for use in surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of small molecules.

  5. Achievements and Future Directions of the APFCB Mass Spectrometry Harmonisation Project on Serum Testosterone.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Ronda F; Ho, Chung S; Hoad, Kirsten E; Joseph, John; McWhinney, Brett; Gill, Janice P; Koal, Therese; Fouracre, Chris; Iu, Heidi P; Cooke, Brian R; Boyder, Conchita; Pham, Hai T; Jolly, Lisa M

    2016-05-01

    As an outcome of the 2010 Asian Pacific Conference for Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry in Hong Kong, a collaborative working group was formed to promote the harmonisation of mass spectrometry methods. The Mass Spectrometry Harmonisation Working Group resides under the combined auspices of the Asia-Pacific Federation for Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine (APFCB) and the Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB). A decision was made to initially focus attention on serum steroids due to the common interest of members in this area; with the first steroid to assess being testosterone. In principle, full standardisation with traceability should be achievable for all steroids as they are small compounds with defined molecular weight and structure. In order to achieve this we need certified reference materials, reference methods, reference laboratories, reference intervals and external quality assurance programs; each being an important pillar in the process. When all the pillars are present, such as for serum testosterone, it is feasible to fully standardise the liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods. In a collaborative process with interested stakeholders, we commenced on a pathway to provide ongoing assessment and seek opportunities for improvement in the LC-MS/MS methods for serum steroids. Here we discuss the outcomes to date and major challenges related to the accurate measurement of serum steroids with a focus on serum testosterone.

  6. Affinity purification combined with mass spectrometry to identify herpes simplex virus protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Meckes, David G

    2014-01-01

    The identification and characterization of herpes simplex virus protein interaction complexes are fundamental to understanding the molecular mechanisms governing the replication and pathogenesis of the virus. Recent advances in affinity-based methods, mass spectrometry configurations, and bioinformatics tools have greatly increased the quantity and quality of protein-protein interaction datasets. In this chapter, detailed and reliable methods that can easily be implemented are presented for the identification of protein-protein interactions using cryogenic cell lysis, affinity purification, trypsin digestion, and mass spectrometry.

  7. Chemometrics comparison of gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry Daphnia magna metabolic profiles exposed to salinity.

    PubMed

    Parastar, Hadi; Garreta-Lara, Elba; Campos, Bruno; Barata, Carlos; Lacorte, Silvia; Tauler, Roma

    2018-06-01

    The performances of gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry are examined through the comparison of Daphnia magna metabolic profiles. Gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry were used to compare the concentration changes of metabolites under saline conditions. In this regard, a chemometric strategy based on wavelet compression and multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares is used to compare the performances of gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the untargeted metabolic profiling of Daphnia magna in control and salinity-exposed samples. Examination of the results confirmed the outperformance of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry over gas chromatography with mass spectrometry for the detection of metabolites in D. magna samples. The peak areas of multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares resolved elution profiles in every sample analyzed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry were arranged in a new data matrix that was then modeled by partial least squares discriminant analysis. The control and salt-exposed daphnids samples were discriminated and the most relevant metabolites were estimated using variable importance in projection and selectivity ratio values. Salinity de-regulated 18 metabolites from metabolic pathways involved in protein translation, transmembrane cell transport, carbon metabolism, secondary metabolism, glycolysis, and osmoregulation. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. [EXPRESS IDENTIFICATION OF POSITIVE BLOOD CULTURES USING DIRECT MALDI-TOF MASS SPECTROMETRY].

    PubMed

    Popov, D A; Ovseenko, S T; Vostrikova, T Yu

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of direct identification of pathogens of bacteremia by direct matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-flight mass spectrometry (mALDI-TOF) compared to routine method. A prospective study included 211 positive blood cultures obtained from 116 patients (106 adults and 10 children, aged from 2 weeks to 77 years old in the ICU after open heart surgery. Incubation was carried out under aerobic vials with a sorbent for antibiotics Analyzer BacT/ALERT 3D 120 (bioMerieux, France) in parallel with the primary sieving blood cultures on solid nutrient media with subsequent identification of pure cultures using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analyzer Vitek MS, bioMerieux, France routine method), after appropriate sample preparation we carried out a direct (without screening) MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric study of monocomponental blood cultures (n = 201). using a routine method in 211 positive blood cultures we identified 23 types of microorganisms (Staphylococcus (n = 87), Enterobacteria- ceae (n = 71), Enterococci (n = 20), non-fermentative Gram-negative bacteria (n = 18), others (n = 5). The average time of incubation of samples to obtain a signal of a blood culture growth was 16.2 ± 7.4 h (from 3.75 to 51 hours.) During the first 12 hours of incubation, growth was obtained in 32.4% of the samples, and on the first day in 92.2%. In the direct mass spectrometric analysis mnonocomponental blood cultures (n = 201) is well defined up to 153 species of the sample (76.1%), while the share of successful identification of Gram-negative bacteria was higher than that of Gram-positive (85.4 and 69, 1%, respectively p = 0.01). The high degree of consistency in the results of standard and direct method of identifying blood cultures using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (κ = 0.96, p < 0.001; the samples included in the calculation for which both option given result). Duration of the direct mass spectrometric analysis, including sample preparation, was no

  9. imzML: Imaging Mass Spectrometry Markup Language: A common data format for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Römpp, Andreas; Schramm, Thorsten; Hester, Alfons; Klinkert, Ivo; Both, Jean-Pierre; Heeren, Ron M A; Stöckli, Markus; Spengler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is the method of scanning a sample of interest and generating an "image" of the intensity distribution of a specific analyte. The data sets consist of a large number of mass spectra which are usually acquired with identical settings. Existing data formats are not sufficient to describe an MS imaging experiment completely. The data format imzML was developed to allow the flexible and efficient exchange of MS imaging data between different instruments and data analysis software.For this purpose, the MS imaging data is divided in two separate files. The mass spectral data is stored in a binary file to ensure efficient storage. All metadata (e.g., instrumental parameters, sample details) are stored in an XML file which is based on the standard data format mzML developed by HUPO-PSI. The original mzML controlled vocabulary was extended to include specific parameters of imaging mass spectrometry (such as x/y position and spatial resolution). The two files (XML and binary) are connected by offset values in the XML file and are unambiguously linked by a universally unique identifier. The resulting datasets are comparable in size to the raw data and the separate metadata file allows flexible handling of large datasets.Several imaging MS software tools already support imzML. This allows choosing from a (growing) number of processing tools. One is no longer limited to proprietary software, but is able to use the processing software which is best suited for a specific question or application. On the other hand, measurements from different instruments can be compared within one software application using identical settings for data processing. All necessary information for evaluating and implementing imzML can be found at http://www.imzML.org .

  10. Analysis of psilocybin and psilocin in Psilocybe subcubensis Guzmán by ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Keller, T; Schneider, A; Regenscheit, P; Dirnhofer, R; Rücker, T; Jaspers, J; Kisser, W

    1999-01-11

    A new method has been developed for the rapid analysis of psilocybin and/or psilocin in fungus material using ion mobility spectrometry. Quantitative analysis was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after a simple one-step extraction involving homogenization of the dried fruit bodies of fungi in chloroform and derivatization with MSTFA. The proposed methods resulted in rapid procedures useful in analyzing psychotropic fungi for psilocybin and psilocin.

  11. The diverse and expanding role of mass spectrometry in structural and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Lössl, Philip; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Heck, Albert Jr

    2016-12-15

    The emergence of proteomics has led to major technological advances in mass spectrometry (MS). These advancements not only benefitted MS-based high-throughput proteomics but also increased the impact of mass spectrometry on the field of structural and molecular biology. Here, we review how state-of-the-art MS methods, including native MS, top-down protein sequencing, cross-linking-MS, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange-MS, nowadays enable the characterization of biomolecular structures, functions, and interactions. In particular, we focus on the role of mass spectrometry in integrated structural and molecular biology investigations of biological macromolecular complexes and cellular machineries, highlighting work on CRISPR-Cas systems and eukaryotic transcription complexes. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  12. Capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for the rapid identification and quantification of almond flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Hughey, Christine A; Wilcox, Bruce; Minardi, Carina S; Takehara, Chiyo W; Sundararaman, Meenakshi; Were, Lilian M

    2008-05-30

    A rapid negative ion ESI high-performance capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed to identify and quantify flavonoids (e.g., flavanols, flavonols, flavanones and glycosides). Fifteen standards and two varieties of almond skin extract powder (Carmel and Nonpareil) were used to demonstrate the chromatographic separation, reproducibility and accuracy of the method that employed a 150 mm x 0.3 mm ChromXP 3C18-EP-120 column. All standards eluted in less than 10 min, providing a 9-12x reduction in analysis time compared to existing methods (90-120 min). However, isomers (e.g., catechin/epicatechin and galactosides/glucosides) were not resolved and, therefore, identified and quantified collectively. RSDs for retention time and peak area reproducibility (mass spectrometry data) were <0.5% and <5.0%, respectively. Peak area reproducibility was greatly improved (from a RSD>10%) after the implementation of a low-flow metal needle in the ESI source. Quantitation by mass spectrometry also afforded a % error less than 5% for most compounds.

  13. Identification of Fatty Acids, Phospholipids, and Their Oxidation Products Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Christopher W.; Mang, Stephen A.; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) have found increasing application in the analysis of biological samples. Using these techniques to solve problems in analytical chemistry should be an essential component of the training of undergraduate chemists. We…

  14. US Food and Drug Administration Perspectives on Clinical Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Julia Tait; Jeffery, Douglas A; Shea, Yvonne R; Scholl, Peter F; Chan, Maria M

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro diagnostic devices that measure proteins and peptides are underutilized in clinical practice, and none has been cleared or approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for marketing or for use in clinical trials. One way to increase their utilization is through enhanced interactions between the FDA and the clinical mass spectrometry community to improve the validation and regulatory review of these devices. As a reference point from which to develop these interactions, this article surveys the FDA's regulation of mass spectrometry-based devices, explains how the FDA uses guidance documents and standards in the review process, and describes the FDA's previous outreach to stakeholders. Here we also discuss how further communication and collaboration with the clinical mass spectrometry communities can identify opportunities for the FDA to provide help in the development of mass spectrometry-based devices and enhance their entry into the clinic. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  15. Determination of selected non-authorized insecticides in peppers by liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mezcua, Milagros; Ferrer, Carmen; García-Reyes, Juan F; Martínez-Bueno, María Jesús; Albarracín, Micaela; Claret, María; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2008-05-01

    In this work, two analytical methods based on liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-TOFMS) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) are described for the identification, confirmation and quantitation of three insecticides non-authorized in the European Union (nitenpyram, isocarbophos and isofenphos-methyl) but detected in recent monitoring programmes in pepper samples. The proposed methodologies involved a sample extraction procedure using liquid-liquid partition with acetonitrile followed by a cleanup step based on dispersive solid-phase extraction. Recovery studies performed on peppers spiked at different fortification levels (10 and 50 microg kg(-1)) yielded average recoveries in the range 76-100% with relative standard deviation (RSD) (%) values below 10%. Identification, confirmation and quantitation were carried out by LC/TOFMS and LC/MS/MS using a hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap (QqLIT) instrument in multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The obtained limits of quantitation (LOQs) were in the range 0.1-5 microg kg(-1), depending on each individual technique. Finally, the proposed methods were successfully applied to the analysis of suspected pepper samples. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Recent developments in atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Syage, Jack A; Benter, Thorsten

    2017-05-01

    Recent developments in atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), which is one of the three most important ionization techniques in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, are reviewed. The emphasis is on the practical aspects of APPI analysis, its combination with different separation techniques, novel instrumental developments - especially in gas chromatography and ambient mass spectrometry - and the applications that have appeared in 2009-2014. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 36:423-449, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Rapid analysis of drug dissolution by paper spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Ning; Zhou, Ya-Nan; Lin, Lan; He, Lan

    2017-03-20

    With a great quantity of solid dosage tested by dissolution technology, developing a rapid and sensitive method to access the content of drug within dissolution media is highly desired by analysts and scientists. Traditionally, dissolution media is not compatible with mass spectrometry since the inorganic salts in the media might damage the mass spectrometer. Here, paper spray ionization mass spectrometry (PSI-MS), one of the ambient mass spectrometry technologies, is developed to characterize the content of drugs in dissolution media. The porous structure of paper can effectively retain salts from entering mass spectrometer. This makes the measurement of drug content within dissolution media by mass spectrometer possible. After the experimental parameters were optimized, calibration curves of model drugs - enalapril, quinapril and benazepril were established by using corresponding deuterated internal standards. PSI-MS was then deployed to characterize the content of enalapril from the dissolution testing of enalapril tablets. The results from PSI-MS are comparable to those from HPLC characterization. More importantly, the analysis time of 6 samples is shortened from 90min to 6min. Detection limit of enalapril maleate tablets by PSI-MS is 1/300 of LC. PSI-MS is rapid, sensitive and accurate in analyzing drug content from dissolution tests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging. PMID:23530951

  19. Apparatus and method for hydrogen and oxygen mass spectrometry of the terrestrial magnetosphere

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O [Los Alamos, NM; Dors, Eric E [Los Alamos, NM; Harper, Ronnie W [Los Alamos, NM; Reisenfeld, Daniel B [Stevensville, MT

    2007-05-15

    A detector element for mass spectrometry of a flux of heavy and light ions, that includes: a first detector to detect light ions that transit through a foil operatively placed in front of the first detector, and a second detector that detects the flux of heavy and light ions.

  20. Mass-tag enhanced immuno-laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for sensitive detection of intact protein antigens.

    PubMed

    Lorey, Martina; Adler, Belinda; Yan, Hong; Soliymani, Rabah; Ekström, Simon; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Laurell, Thomas; Baumann, Marc

    2015-05-19

    A new read-out method for antibody arrays using laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is presented. Small, photocleavable reporter molecules with a defined mass called "mass-tags" are used for detection of immunocaptured proteins from human plasma. Using prostate specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker for prostate cancer, as a model antigen, a high sensitivity generic detection methodology based immunocapture with a primary antibody and with a biotin labeled secondary antibody coupled to mass-tagged avidin is demonstrated. As each secondary antibody can bind several avidin molecules, each having a large number of mass-tags, signal amplification can be achieved. The developed PSA sandwich mass-tag analysis method provided a limit of detection below 200 pg/mL (6 pM) for a 10 μL plasma sample, well below the clinically relevant cutoff value of 3-4 ng/mL. This brings the limit of detection (LOD) for detection of intact antigens with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) down to levels comparable to capture by anti-peptide antibodies selected reaction monitoring (SISCAPA SRM) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), as 6 pM corresponds to a maximal amount of 60 amol PSA captured on-spot. We propose the potential use of LDI (laser desorption/ionization) with mass-tag read-out implemented in a sandwich assay format for low abundant and/or early disease biomarker detection.

  1. Rapid Analysis of Microalgal Triacylglycerols with Direct-Infusion Mass Spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Christensen, Earl; Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dandamudi, Kodanda Phani Raj; ...

    2015-09-01

    Cultivation of microalgae has the potential to provide lipid-derived feedstocks for conversion to liquid transportation fuels. Lipid extracts from microalgae are significantly more complex than those of traditional seed oils, and their composition changes significantly throughout the microalgal growth period. With three acyl side chains per molecule, triglycerides (TAGs) are an important fuel precursor, and the distribution of acyl chain composition for TAGs has a significant impact on fuel properties and processing. Therefore, determination of the distribution of microalgal TAG production is needed to assess the value of algal extracts designed for fuel production and to optimize strain, cultivation, andmore » harvesting practices. Methods utilized for TAG speciation commonly involve complicated and time-consuming chromatographic techniques. Here we present a method for TAG speciation and quantification based on direct-infusion mass spectrometry, which provides rapid characterization of TAG profiles without chromatographic separation. Specifically, we utilize Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) to provide a reference library of TAGs for the microalgae Nannochloropsis sp. that provides the basis for high-throughput TAG quantitation by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS). In conclusion, we demonstrate the application of this novel approach for lipid characterization with respect to TAG compound distribution, which informs both immediate and future strain and process optimization strategies.« less

  2. Quantitative mass spectrometry: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Pawel L.

    2016-10-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a mainstream chemical analysis technique in the twenty-first century. It has contributed to numerous discoveries in chemistry, physics and biochemistry. Hundreds of research laboratories scattered all over the world use MS every day to investigate fundamental phenomena on the molecular level. MS is also widely used by industry-especially in drug discovery, quality control and food safety protocols. In some cases, mass spectrometers are indispensable and irreplaceable by any other metrological tools. The uniqueness of MS is due to the fact that it enables direct identification of molecules based on the mass-to-charge ratios as well as fragmentation patterns. Thus, for several decades now, MS has been used in qualitative chemical analysis. To address the pressing need for quantitative molecular measurements, a number of laboratories focused on technological and methodological improvements that could render MS a fully quantitative metrological platform. In this theme issue, the experts working for some of those laboratories share their knowledge and enthusiasm about quantitative MS. I hope this theme issue will benefit readers, and foster fundamental and applied research based on quantitative MS measurements. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  3. A SIMPLE AND RAPID MATRIX-ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION/IONIZATION TIME OF FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETRY METHOD TO SCREEN FISH PLASMA SAMPLES FOR ESTROGEN-RESPONSIVE BIOMARKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we describe and evaluate the performance of a simple and rapid mass spectral method for screening fish plasma for estrogen-responsive biomarkers using matrix assisted laster desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) couopled with a short...

  4. xTract: software for characterizing conformational changes of protein complexes by quantitative cross-linking mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Walzthoeni, Thomas; Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Rosenberger, George; Röst, Hannes L; Malmström, Lars; Leitner, Alexander; Frydman, Judith; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-12-01

    Chemical cross-linking in combination with mass spectrometry generates distance restraints of amino acid pairs in close proximity on the surface of native proteins and protein complexes. In this study we used quantitative mass spectrometry and chemical cross-linking to quantify differences in cross-linked peptides obtained from complexes in spatially discrete states. We describe a generic computational pipeline for quantitative cross-linking mass spectrometry consisting of modules for quantitative data extraction and statistical assessment of the obtained results. We used the method to detect conformational changes in two model systems: firefly luciferase and the bovine TRiC complex. Our method discovers and explains the structural heterogeneity of protein complexes using only sparse structural information.

  5. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Kilgour, David P.; Konijnenburg, Marco

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here we present the first use of absorption mode formore » Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image and then these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode ?Datacubes? for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.« less

  6. A mass spectrometry-based multiplex SNP genotyping by utilizing allele-specific ligation and strand displacement amplification.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Hun; Jang, Hyowon; Jung, Yun Kyung; Jung, Ye Lim; Shin, Inkyung; Cho, Dae-Yeon; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2017-05-15

    We herein describe a new mass spectrometry-based method for multiplex SNP genotyping by utilizing allele-specific ligation and strand displacement amplification (SDA) reaction. In this method, allele-specific ligation is first performed to discriminate base sequence variations at the SNP site within the PCR-amplified target DNA. The primary ligation probe is extended by a universal primer annealing site while the secondary ligation probe has base sequences as an overhang with a nicking enzyme recognition site and complementary mass marker sequence. The ligation probe pairs are ligated by DNA ligase only at specific allele in the target DNA and the resulting ligated product serves as a template to promote the SDA reaction using a universal primer. This process isothermally amplifies short DNA fragments, called mass markers, to be analyzed by mass spectrometry. By varying the sizes of the mass markers, we successfully demonstrated the multiplex SNP genotyping capability of this method by reliably identifying several BRCA mutations in a multiplex manner with mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Conventional and Advanced Separations in Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics: Methodologies and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Heyman, Heino M.; Zhang, Xing; Tang, Keqi

    2016-02-16

    Metabolomics is the quantitative analysis of all metabolites in a given sample. Due to the chemical complexity of the metabolome, optimal separations are required for comprehensive identification and quantification of sample constituents. This chapter provides an overview of both conventional and advanced separations methods in practice for reducing the complexity of metabolite extracts delivered to the mass spectrometer detector, and covers gas chromatography (GC), liquid chromatography (LC), capillary electrophoresis (CE), supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separation techniques coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) as both uni-dimensional and as multi-dimensional approaches.

  8. A novel high-throughput method for supported liquid extraction of retinol and alpha-tocopherol from human serum and simultaneous quantitation by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hinchliffe, Edward; Rudge, James; Reed, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of vitamin A (retinol) and E (alpha-tocopherol) in UK clinical laboratories is currently performed exclusively by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. We investigated whether retinol and alpha-tocopherol could be measured simultaneously by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Serum samples (100 μL) were extracted using Isolute + Supported Liquid Extraction plates. Chromatography was performed on a Phenomenex Kinetex Biphenyl 2.6 μm, 50 × 2.1 mm column, and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry on a Waters Acquity TQD. Injection-to-injection time was 4.3 min. The assay was validated according to published guidelines. Patient samples were used to compare liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection methods. For retinol and alpha-tocopherol, respectively, the assay was linear up to 6.0 and 80.0 μmol/L, and lower limit of quantification was 0.07 and 0.26 μmol/L. Intra and interassay imprecision were within desirable analytical specifications. Analysis of quality control material aligned to NIST SRM 968e, and relative spiked recovery from human serum, both yielded results within 15% of target values. Method comparison with high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection methodology demonstrated a negative bias for retinol and alpha-tocopherol by the liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method. Analysis of United Kingdom National External Quality Assurance Scheme samples yielded mean bias from the target value of +3.0% for retinol and -11.2% for alpha-tocopherol. We have developed a novel, high-throughput method for extraction of retinol and alpha-tocopherol from human serum followed by simultaneous quantitation by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The method offers a rapid, sensitive, specific and cost-effective alternative to high-performance liquid chromatography with

  9. Neuroscience and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Palmblad, M N; Buchholz, B A; Hillegonds, D J

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a mass spectrometric method for quantifying rare isotopes. It has had great impact in geochronology and archaeology and is now being applied in biomedicine. AMS measures radioisotopes such as {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 41}Ca, with zepto- or attomole sensitivity and high precision and throughput, enabling safe human pharmacokinetic studies involving: microgram doses, agents having low bioavailability, or toxicology studies where administered doses must be kept low (<1 {micro}g/kg). It is used to study long-term pharmacokinetics, to identify biomolecular interactions, to determine chronic and low-dose effects or molecular targets ofmore » neurotoxic substances, to quantify transport across the blood-brain barrier and to resolve molecular turnover rates in the human brain on the timescale of decades. We will here review how AMS is applied in neurotoxicology and neuroscience.« less

  10. Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) of an Organothiophosphate at Ultrahigh Resolution by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Prokai, Laszlo; Stevens, Stanley M.

    2016-01-01

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) is a recently developed ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry to enable rapid and sensitive analyses with little or no sample preparation. After swab-based field sampling, the organothiophosphate malathion was analyzed using DART-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Mass resolution was documented to be over 800,000 in full-scan MS mode and over 1,000,000 for an MS/MS product ion produced by collision-induced dissociation of the protonated analyte. Mass measurement accuracy below 1 ppm was obtained for all DART-generated ions that belonged to the test compound in the mass spectra acquired using only external mass calibration. This high mass measurement accuracy, achievable at present only through FTMS, was required for unequivocal identification of the corresponding molecular formulae. PMID:26784186

  11. Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) of an Organothiophosphate at Ultrahigh Resolution by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry and Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Prokai, Laszlo; Stevens, Stanley M

    2016-01-16

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) is a recently developed ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry to enable rapid and sensitive analyses with little or no sample preparation. After swab-based field sampling, the organothiophosphate malathion was analyzed using DART-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Mass resolution was documented to be over 800,000 in full-scan MS mode and over 1,000,000 for an MS/MS product ion produced by collision-induced dissociation of the protonated analyte. Mass measurement accuracy below 1 ppm was obtained for all DART-generated ions that belonged to the test compound in the mass spectra acquired using only external mass calibration. This high mass measurement accuracy, achievable at present only through FTMS, was required for unequivocal identification of the corresponding molecular formulae.

  12. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the detection and quantitation of monofluoroacetate in plants toxic to livestock

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Monofluoroacetate (MFA) is a potent toxin that occurs in over 50 plant species in Africa, Australia, and South America and is responsible for significant livestock deaths in these regions. A gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the analysis of MFA in plants based on the derivatiza...

  13. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the detection and quantitation of monofluoroacetate in plants toxic to livestock

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Monofluoroacetate (MFA) is a potent toxin that occurs in over 50 plant species in Africa, Australia, and South America and is responsible for significant livestock deaths in these regions. A gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the analysis of MFA in plants based on the derivatiz...

  14. Data preprocessing method for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Shi, Xue; Kim, Seongho; Zhang, Li; Patrick, Jeffrey S; Binkley, Joe; McClain, Craig; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-09-18

    A set of data preprocessing algorithms for peak detection and peak list alignment are reported for analysis of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based metabolomics data. For spectrum deconvolution, peak picking is achieved at the selected ion chromatogram (XIC) level. To estimate and remove the noise in XICs, each XIC is first segmented into several peak groups based on the continuity of scan number, and the noise level is estimated by all the XIC signals, except the regions potentially with presence of metabolite ion peaks. After removing noise, the peaks of molecular ions are detected using both the first and the second derivatives, followed by an efficient exponentially modified Gaussian-based peak deconvolution method for peak fitting. A two-stage alignment algorithm is also developed, where the retention times of all peaks are first transferred into the z-score domain and the peaks are aligned based on the measure of their mixture scores after retention time correction using a partial linear regression. Analysis of a set of spike-in LC-MS data from three groups of samples containing 16 metabolite standards mixed with metabolite extract from mouse livers demonstrates that the developed data preprocessing method performs better than two of the existing popular data analysis packages, MZmine2.6 and XCMS(2), for peak picking, peak list alignment, and quantification.

  15. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  16. Analysis of Mammalian Sphingolipids by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and Tissue Imaging Mass Spectrometry (TIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Sullards, M. Cameron; Liu, Ying; Chen, Yanfeng; Merrill, Alfred H.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a highly diverse category of molecules that serve not only as components of biological structures but also as regulators of numerous cell functions. Because so many of the structural features of sphingolipids give rise to their biological activity, there is a need for comprehensive or “sphingolipidomic” methods for identification and quantitation of as many individual subspecies as possible. This review defines sphingolipids as a class, briefly discusses classical methods for their analysis, and focuses primarily on liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and tissue imaging mass spectrometry (TIMS). Recently, a set of evolving and expanding methods have been developed and rigorously validated for the extraction, identification, separation, and quantitation of sphingolipids by LC-MS/MS. Quantitation of these biomolecules is made possible via the use of an internal standard cocktail. The compounds that can be readily analyzed are free long-chain (sphingoid) bases, sphingoid base 1-phosphates, and more complex species such as ceramides, ceramide 1-phosphates, sphingomyelins, mono- and di-hexosylceramides sulfatides, and novel compounds such as the 1-deoxy- and 1-(deoxymethyl)-sphingoid bases and their N-acyl-derivatives. These methods can be altered slightly to separate and quantitate isomeric species such as glucosyl/galactosylceramide. Because these techniques require the extraction of sphingolipids from their native environment, any information regarding their localization in histological slices is lost. Therefore, this review also describes methods for TIMS. This technique has been shown to be a powerful tool to determine the localization of individual molecular species of sphingolipids directly from tissue slices. PMID:21749933

  17. Visualization of metallodrugs in single cells by secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kui; Jia, Feifei; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Qun; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Fuyi

    2017-07-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry, including nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), has emerged as a powerful tool for biological imaging, especially for single cell imaging. SIMS imaging can provide information on subcellular distribution of endogenous and exogenous chemicals, including metallodrugs, from membrane through to cytoplasm and nucleus without labeling, and with high spatial resolution and chemical specificity. In this mini-review, we summarize recent progress in the field of SIMS imaging, particularly in the characterization of the subcellular distribution of metallodrugs. We anticipate that the SIMS imaging method will be widely applied to visualize subcellular distributions of drugs and drug candidates in single cells, exerting significant influence on early drug evaluation and metabolism in medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry. Recent progress of SIMS applications in characterizing the subcellular distributions of metallodrugs was summarized.

  18. Mass spectrometry in systems biology an introduction.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Warwick B

    2011-01-01

    The qualitative detection, quantification, and structural characterization of analytes in biological systems are important requirements for objectives to be fulfilled in systems biology research. One analytical tool applied to a multitude of systems biology studies is mass spectrometry, particularly for the study of proteins and metabolites. Here, the role of mass spectrometry in systems biology will be assessed, the advantages and disadvantages discussed, and the instrument configurations available described. Finally, general applications will be briefly reviewed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Applications of Mass Spectrometry Imaging to Cancer.

    PubMed

    Arentz, G; Mittal, P; Zhang, C; Ho, Y-Y; Briggs, M; Winderbaum, L; Hoffmann, M K; Hoffmann, P

    2017-01-01

    Pathologists play an essential role in the diagnosis and prognosis of benign and cancerous tumors. Clinicians provide tissue samples, for example, from a biopsy, which are then processed and thin sections are placed onto glass slides, followed by staining of the tissue with visible dyes. Upon processing and microscopic examination, a pathology report is provided, which relies on the pathologist's interpretation of the phenotypical presentation of the tissue. Targeted analysis of single proteins provide further insight and together with clinical data these results influence clinical decision making. Recent developments in mass spectrometry facilitate the collection of molecular information about such tissue specimens. These relatively new techniques generate label-free mass spectra across tissue sections providing nonbiased, nontargeted molecular information. At each pixel with spatial coordinates (x/y) a mass spectrum is acquired. The acquired mass spectrums can be visualized as intensity maps displaying the distribution of single m/z values of interest. Based on the sample preparation, proteins, peptides, lipids, small molecules, or glycans can be analyzed. The generated intensity maps/images allow new insights into tumor tissues. The technique has the ability to detect and characterize tumor cells and their environment in a spatial context and combined with histological staining, can be used to aid pathologists and clinicians in the diagnosis and management of cancer. Moreover, such data may help classify patients to aid therapy decisions and predict outcomes. The novel complementary mass spectrometry-based methods described in this chapter will contribute to the transformation of pathology services around the world. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Improved sample preparation of glyphosate and methylphosphonic acid by EPA method 6800A and time-of-flight mass spectrometry using novel solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Rebecca; Wetzel, Stephanie J; Kern, John; Kingston, H M Skip

    2012-02-01

    The employment of chemical weapons by rogue states and/or terrorist organizations is an ongoing concern in the United States. The quantitative analysis of nerve agents must be rapid and reliable for use in the private and public sectors. Current methods describe a tedious and time-consuming derivatization for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography in tandem with mass spectrometry. Two solid-phase extraction (SPE) techniques for the analysis of glyphosate and methylphosphonic acid are described with the utilization of isotopically enriched analytes for quantitation via atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (APCI-Q-TOF-MS) that does not require derivatization. Solid-phase extraction-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SPE-IDMS) involves pre-equilibration of a naturally occurring sample with an isotopically enriched standard. The second extraction method, i-Spike, involves loading an isotopically enriched standard onto the SPE column before the naturally occurring sample. The sample and the spike are then co-eluted from the column enabling precise and accurate quantitation via IDMS. The SPE methods in conjunction with IDMS eliminate concerns of incomplete elution, matrix and sorbent effects, and MS drift. For accurate quantitation with IDMS, the isotopic contribution of all atoms in the target molecule must be statistically taken into account. This paper describes two newly developed sample preparation techniques for the analysis of nerve agent surrogates in drinking water as well as statistical probability analysis for proper molecular IDMS. The methods described in this paper demonstrate accurate molecular IDMS using APCI-Q-TOF-MS with limits of quantitation as low as 0.400 mg/kg for glyphosate and 0.031 mg/kg for methylphosphonic acid. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO2 and reduced to graphite to determine 14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  2. Single Laboratory Validated Method for Determination of Cylindrospermopsin and Anatoxin-a in Ambient Freshwaters by Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS/MS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is a standardized single laboratory validated liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for the detection and quantification of cyanotoxins (combined intracellular and extracellular) in ambient freshwaters.

  3. Accuracy of delta 18O isotope ratio measurements on the same sample by continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The doubly labeled water method is considered the reference method to measure energy expenditure. Conventional mass spectrometry requires a separate aliquot of the same sample to be prepared and analyzed separately. With continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry, the same sample could be analy...

  4. Improved method for peak picking in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kempka, Martin; Sjödahl, Johan; Björk, Anders; Roeraade, Johan

    2004-01-01

    A method for peak picking for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) is described. The method is based on the assumption that two sets of ions are formed during the ionization stage, which have Gaussian distributions but different velocity profiles. This gives rise to a certain degree of peak skewness. Our algorithm deconvolutes the peak and utilizes the fast velocity, bulk ion distribution for peak picking. Evaluation of the performance of the new method was conducted using peptide peaks from a bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest, and compared with the commercial peak-picking algorithms Centroid and SNAP. When using the new two-Gaussian algorithm, for strong signals the mass accuracy was equal to or marginally better than the results obtained from the commercial algorithms. However, for weak, distorted peaks, considerable improvement in both mass accuracy and precision was obtained. This improvement should be particularly useful in proteomics, where a lack of signal strength is often encountered when dealing with weakly expressed proteins. Finally, since the new peak-picking method uses information from the entire signal, no adjustments of parameters related to peak height have to be made, which simplifies its practical use. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine ("Tetramine") Spiked into Beverages by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Validation by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, J; Hok, S; Alcaraz, A

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine, commonly known as tetramine, is a highly neurotoxic rodenticide (human oral LD{sub 50} = 0.1 mg/kg) used in hundreds of deliberate food poisoning events in China. Here we describe a method for quantitation of tetramine spiked into beverages, including milk, juice, tea, cola, and water and cleaned up by C8 solid phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction. Quantitation by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was based upon fragmentation of m/z 347 to m/z 268. The method was validated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) operated in SIM mode for ions m/z 212, 240, and 360. The limitmore » of quantitation was 0.10 {micro}g/mL by LC/MS/MS versus 0.15 {micro}g/mL for GC/MS. Fortifications of the beverages at 2.5 {micro}g/mL and 0.25 {micro}g/mL were recovered ranging from 73-128% by liquid-liquid extraction for GC/MS analysis, 13-96% by SPE and 10-101% by liquid-liquid extraction for LC/MS/MS analysis.« less

  6. Multiple parallel mass spectrometry for lipid and vitamin D analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) has become the method of choice for analysis of complex lipid samples. Two types of ionization sources have emerged as the most commonly used to couple LC to MS: atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization ...

  7. Utility of mass spectrometry in the diagnosis of prion diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We developed a sensitive mass spectrometry-based method of quantitating the prions present in a variety of mammalian species. Calibration curves relating the area ratios of the selected analyte peptides and their oxidized analogs to their homologous stable isotope labeled internal standards were pre...

  8. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, T.; Booth, M.; Benyezzar, M.; Bacak, A.; Alfarra, M. R. R.; Topping, D. O.; Percival, C.

    2015-12-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  9. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, Thomas; Booth, A. Murray; Alfarra, Rami; Bacak, Asan; Pericval, Carl

    2016-04-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  10. Diclofenac in municipal wastewater treatment plant: quantification using laser diode thermal desorption--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--tandem mass spectrometry approach in comparison with an established liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Lonappan, Linson; Pulicharla, Rama; Rouissi, Tarek; Brar, Satinder K; Verma, Mausam; Surampalli, Rao Y; Valero, José R

    2016-02-12

    Diclofenac (DCF), a prevalent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) is often detected in wastewater and surface water. Analysis of the pharmaceuticals in complex matrices is often laden with challenges. In this study a reliable, rapid and sensitive method based on laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD/APCI) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed for the quantification of DCF in wastewater and wastewater sludge. An established conventional LC-ESI-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry) method was compared with LDTD-APCI-MS/MS approach. The newly developed LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method reduced the analysis time to 12s in lieu of 12 min for LC-ESI-MS/MS method. The method detection limits for LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method were found to be 270 ng L(-1) (LOD) and 1000 ng L(-1) (LOQ). Furthermore, two extraction procedures, ultrasonic assisted extraction (USE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for the extraction of DCF from wastewater sludge were compared and ASE with 95.6 ± 7% recovery was effective over USE with 86 ± 4% recovery. The fate and partitioning of DCF in wastewater (WW) and wastewater sludge (WWS) in wastewater treatment plant was also monitored at various stages of treatment in Quebec Urban community wastewater treatment plant. DCF exhibited affinity towards WW than WWS with a presence about 60% of DCF in WW in contrary with theoretical prediction (LogKow=4.51). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Forensic applications of ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ifa, Demian R; Jackson, Ayanna U; Paglia, Giuseppe; Cooks, R Graham

    2009-08-01

    This review highlights and critically assesses forensic applications in the developing field of ambient ionization mass spectrometry. Ambient ionization methods permit the ionization of samples outside the mass spectrometer in the ordinary atmosphere, with minimal sample preparation. Several ambient ionization methods have been created since 2004 and they utilize different mechanisms to create ions for mass-spectrometric analysis. Forensic applications of these techniques--to the analysis of toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, illicit drugs and formulations, explosives, foodstuff, inks, fingerprints, and skin--are reviewed. The minimal sample pretreatment needed is illustrated with examples of analysis from complex matrices (e.g., food) on various substrates (e.g., paper). The low limits of detection achieved by most of the ambient ionization methods for compounds of forensic interest readily offer qualitative confirmation of chemical identity; in some cases quantitative data are also available. The forensic applications of ambient ionization methods are a growing research field and there are still many types of applications which remain to be explored, particularly those involving on-site analysis. Aspects of ambient ionization currently undergoing rapid development include molecular imaging and increased detection specificity through simultaneous chemical reaction and ionization by addition of appropriate chemical reagents.

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry of strontium-90 for homeland security, environmental monitoring and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumey, Scott J.; Brown, Thomas A.; Hamilton, Terry E.; Hillegonds, Darren J.

    2008-05-01

    Strontium-90 is one of the most hazardous materials managed by agencies charged with protecting the public from radiation. Traditional radiometric methods have been limited by low sample throughput and slow turnaround times. Mass spectrometry offers the advantage of shorter analysis times and the ability to measure samples immediately after processing, however conventional mass spectrometric techniques are susceptible to molecular isobaric interferences that limit their overall sensitivity. In contrast, accelerator mass spectrometry is insensitive to molecular interferences and we have therefore begun developing a method for determination of 90Sr by accelerator mass spectrometry. Despite a pervasive interference from 90Zr, our initial development has yielded an instrumental background of ∼108 atoms (75 mBq) per sample. Further refinement of our system (e.g. redesign of our detector, use of alternative target materials) is expected to push the background below 106 atoms, close to the theoretical limit for AMS. Once we have refined our system and developed suitable sample preparation protocols, we will utilize our capability in applications to homeland security, environmental monitoring and human health.

  13. Evaluation of a Semiquantitative Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Method for Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jette S; Hamacher, Christina; Gross, Birgit; Sparbier, Katrin; Lange, Christoph; Kostrzewa, Markus; Schubert, Sören

    2016-11-01

    With the increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, rapid identification of the pathogen and its individual antibiotic resistance is crucial to ensure adequate antiinfective treatment at the earliest time point. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry for the identification of bacteria directly from the blood culture bottle has been widely established; however, there is still an urgent need for new methods that permit rapid resistance testing. Recently, a semiquantitative MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry-based method for the prediction of antibiotic resistance was described. We evaluated this method for detecting nonsusceptibility against two β-lactam and two non-β-lactam antibiotics. A collection of 30 spiked blood cultures was tested for nonsusceptibility against gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, 99 patient-derived blood cultures were tested for nonsusceptibility against cefotaxime, piperacillin-tazobactam, and ciprofloxacin in parallel with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification from the blood culture fluid. The assay correctly classified all isolates tested for nonsusceptibility against gentamicin and cefotaxime. One misclassification for ciprofloxacin nonsusceptibility and five misclassifications for piperacillin-tazobactam nonsusceptibility occurred. Identification of the bacterium and prediction of nonsusceptibility was possible within approximately 4 h. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Tip-enhanced ablation and ionization mass spectrometry for nanoscale chemical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhisen; Zhang, Shudi; Li, Xiaoping; Wang, Tongtong; Huang, Yaping; Hang, Wei; Yang, Zhilin; Li, Jianfeng; Tian, Zhongqun

    2017-01-01

    Spectroscopic methods with nanoscale lateral resolution are becoming essential in the fields of physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and materials science. However, the lateral resolution of laser-based mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) techniques has so far been limited to the microscale. This report presents the development of tip-enhanced ablation and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TEAI-TOFMS), using a shell-isolated apertureless silver tip. The TEAI-TOFMS results indicate the capability and reproducibility of the system for generating nanosized craters and for acquiring the corresponding mass spectral signals. Multi-elemental analysis of nine inorganic salt residues and MSI of a potassium salt residue pattern at a 50-nm lateral resolution were achieved. These results demonstrate the opportunity for the distribution of chemical compositions at the nanoscale to be visualized. PMID:29226250

  15. Validation of the Mass-Extraction-Window for Quantitative Methods Using Liquid Chromatography High Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Gaétan; Grund, Baptiste; Gassner, Anne-Laure; Menin, Laure; Henry, Hugues; Bromirski, Maciej; Schütz, Frédéric; McMullen, Justin; Rochat, Bertrand

    2016-03-15

    A paradigm shift is underway in the field of quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis thanks to the arrival of recent high-resolution mass spectrometers (HRMS). The capability of HRMS to perform sensitive and reliable quantifications of a large variety of analytes in HR-full scan mode is showing that it is now realistic to perform quantitative and qualitative analysis with the same instrument. Moreover, HR-full scan acquisition offers a global view of sample extracts and allows retrospective investigations as virtually all ionized compounds are detected with a high sensitivity. In time, the versatility of HRMS together with the increasing need for relative quantification of hundreds of endogenous metabolites should promote a shift from triple-quadrupole MS to HRMS. However, a current "pitfall" in quantitative LC-HRMS analysis is the lack of HRMS-specific guidance for validated quantitative analyses. Indeed, false positive and false negative HRMS detections are rare, albeit possible, if inadequate parameters are used. Here, we investigated two key parameters for the validation of LC-HRMS quantitative analyses: the mass accuracy (MA) and the mass-extraction-window (MEW) that is used to construct the extracted-ion-chromatograms. We propose MA-parameters, graphs, and equations to calculate rational MEW width for the validation of quantitative LC-HRMS methods. MA measurements were performed on four different LC-HRMS platforms. Experimentally determined MEW values ranged between 5.6 and 16.5 ppm and depended on the HRMS platform, its working environment, the calibration procedure, and the analyte considered. The proposed procedure provides a fit-for-purpose MEW determination and prevents false detections.

  16. Electrochemistry coupled online to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for fast simulation of biotransformation reactions of the insecticide chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Tessema F; Panne, Ulrich; Koch, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    An automated method is presented for fast simulation of (bio)transformation products (TPs) of the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) based on electrochemistry coupled online to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (EC-LC-MS). Oxidative TPs were produced by a boron doped diamond (BDD) electrode, separated by reversed phase HPLC and online detected by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Furthermore, EC oxidative TPs were investigated by HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and FT-ICR high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and compared to in vitro assay metabolites (rat and human liver microsomes). Main phase I metabolites of CPF: chlorpyrifos oxon (CPF oxon), trichloropyridinol (TCP), diethylthiophosphate (DETP), diethylphosphate (DEP), desethyl chlorpyrifos (De-CPF), and desethyl chlorpyrifos oxon (De-CPF oxon), were successfully identified by the developed EC-LC-MS method. The EC-LC-MS method showed similar metabolites compared to the in vitro assay with possibilities of determining reactive species. Our results reveal that online EC-(LC)-MS brings an advantage on time of analysis by eliminating sample preparation steps and matrix complexity compared to conventional in vivo or in vitro methods.

  17. Characterization of Compounds in Psoralea corylifolia Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Diode Array Detection, Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry and Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guangguo; Yang, Tiehong; Miao, Huayan; Chen, Hao; Chai, Yifeng; Wu, Hong

    2015-10-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD), time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-TOFMS) and quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-QITMS) were used for separation and identification of multi-components in Psoralea corylifolia. Benefiting from combining the accurate mass measurement of HPLC-TOFMS to generate elemental compositions, the complementary multilevel structural information provided by HPLC-QITMS and the characteristic UV spectra obtained from HPLC-DAD, 24 components in P. corylifolia were identified. The five groups of isomers were differentiated based on the fragmentation behaviors in QITMS and UV spectra. It can be concluded that an effective method based on the combination of HPLC-DAD, HPLC-TOFMS and HPLC-QITMS for identification of chemical components in P. corylifolia was established. The results provide essential data for further pharmacological and clinical studies of P. corylifolia and facilitate the rapid quality control of the crude drug. © Crown copyright 2015.

  18. Estimating the Efficiency of Phosphopeptide Identification by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Xue, Liang; Arrington, Justine V.; Wang, Pengcheng; Paez Paez, Juan Sebastian; Zhou, Yuan; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Tao, W. Andy

    2017-06-01

    Mass spectrometry has played a significant role in the identification of unknown phosphoproteins and sites of phosphorylation in biological samples. Analyses of protein phosphorylation, particularly large scale phosphoproteomic experiments, have recently been enhanced by efficient enrichment, fast and accurate instrumentation, and better software, but challenges remain because of the low stoichiometry of phosphorylation and poor phosphopeptide ionization efficiency and fragmentation due to neutral loss. Phosphoproteomics has become an important dimension in systems biology studies, and it is essential to have efficient analytical tools to cover a broad range of signaling events. To evaluate current mass spectrometric performance, we present here a novel method to estimate the efficiency of phosphopeptide identification by tandem mass spectrometry. Phosphopeptides were directly isolated from whole plant cell extracts, dephosphorylated, and then incubated with one of three purified kinases—casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinase 6, and SNF-related protein kinase 2.6—along with 16O4- and 18O4-ATP separately for in vitro kinase reactions. Phosphopeptides were enriched and analyzed by LC-MS. The phosphopeptide identification rate was estimated by comparing phosphopeptides identified by tandem mass spectrometry with phosphopeptide pairs generated by stable isotope labeled kinase reactions. Overall, we found that current high speed and high accuracy mass spectrometers can only identify 20%-40% of total phosphopeptides primarily due to relatively poor fragmentation, additional modifications, and low abundance, highlighting the urgent need for continuous efforts to improve phosphopeptide identification efficiency. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Mass spectrometry of peptides and proteins from human blood.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peihong; Bowden, Peter; Zhang, Du; Marshall, John G

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult to convey the accelerating rate and growing importance of mass spectrometry applications to human blood proteins and peptides. Mass spectrometry can rapidly detect and identify the ionizable peptides from the proteins in a simple mixture and reveal many of their post-translational modifications. However, blood is a complex mixture that may contain many proteins first expressed in cells and tissues. The complete analysis of blood proteins is a daunting task that will rely on a wide range of disciplines from physics, chemistry, biochemistry, genetics, electromagnetic instrumentation, mathematics and computation. Therefore the comprehensive discovery and analysis of blood proteins will rank among the great technical challenges and require the cumulative sum of many of mankind's scientific achievements together. A variety of methods have been used to fractionate, analyze and identify proteins from blood, each yielding a small piece of the whole and throwing the great size of the task into sharp relief. The approaches attempted to date clearly indicate that enumerating the proteins and peptides of blood can be accomplished. There is no doubt that the mass spectrometry of blood will be crucial to the discovery and analysis of proteins, enzyme activities, and post-translational processes that underlay the mechanisms of disease. At present both discovery and quantification of proteins from blood are commonly reaching sensitivities of ∼1 ng/mL. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Sample Preparation of Corn Seed Tissue to Prevent Analyte Relocations for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Jeongkwon; Lee, Young Jin; Lee, Tae Geol; Yoon, Sohee

    2017-08-01

    Corn seed tissue sections were prepared by the tape support method using an adhesive tape, and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was performed. The effect of heat generated during sample preparation was investigated by time-of-flight secondary mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging of corn seed tissue prepared by the tape support and the thaw-mounted methods. Unlike thaw-mounted sample preparation, the tape support method does not cause imaging distortion because of the absence of heat, which can cause migration of the analytes on the sample. By applying the tape-support method, the corn seed tissue was prepared without structural damage and MSI with accurate spatial information of analytes was successfully performed.

  1. Study of odor recorder using Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Tomohiro; Nakamoto, Takamichi; Moriizumi, Toyosaka

    It is necessary to determine the recipe of a target odor with sufficient accuracy to realize an odor recorder for recording and reproducing it. We studied the recipe measurement method of a target odor using a mass spectrometry. It was confirmed that the linear superposition was valid when the binary mixture of the apple-flavor components such as isobutyric acid and ethyl valerate was measured. The superposition of a mass spectrum pattern may enable the recipe determination of a multi-component odor easily. In this research, we succeeded in the recipe determinations of orange flavor made up of 14 component odors when its typical recipe, the equalized, the citral-enhanced and the citronellol-enhanced ones were measured.

  2. Alkyd paints in art: characterization using integrated mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    La Nasa, Jacopo; Degano, Ilaria; Modugno, Francesca; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2013-10-03

    Alkyd resins have been commonly used as binders in artist paints since the 1940s. The characterization of alkyds in samples from artworks can help to solve attribution and dating issues, investigate decay processes, and contribute to the planning of conservation strategies. Being able to assess the components of industrially formulated paint materials and to differentiate between different trademarks and producers is extremely interesting and requires multi-analytical approaches. In this paper we describe the characterization of commercial alkyd paint materials using a multi-analytical approach based on the integration of three different mass spectrometric techniques: gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with a tandem quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometer (HPLC-ESI-Q-ToF), and flow injection analysis (FIA) in the ESI-Q-ToF mass spectrometer. GC/MS was successful in determining the fatty acid and aromatic fractions of the resins after hydrolysis; HPLC-ESI-Q-ToF analysis enabled us to identify the triglycerides (TAGs) and diglycerides (DAGs) profile of each resin, and FIA analysis was used as a rapid method to evaluate the presence of possible additives such as synthetic polymers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Tissues, Cells, and Microbial Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderton, Christopher R.; Gamble, Lara J.

    2016-03-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) techniques are increasingly being utilized within many biological fields, including medicine, pathology, microbial ecology, and more. Of the MSI methods available, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) offers the highest lateral resolution of any technique. Moreover, SIMS versatility in the number of different operating modes and types of mass spectrometers available has made it an increasing popular method for bio-related measurements. Here, we discuss SIMS ability to image tissues, single cells, and microbes with a particular emphasis on the types chemical and spatial information that can be ascertained by the different types of SIMS instruments and methods.more » The recently developed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) SIMS located at PNNL is capable of generating molecular maps of tissues with an unprecedented mass resolving power and mass accuracy, with respect to SIMS measurements. ToF-SIMS can generate chemical maps, where detection of small molecules and fragments can be acquired with an order of magnitude better lateral resolution than the FTICR-SIMS. Furthermore, many of commercially available ToF-SIMS instruments are capable of depth profiling measurements, offering the ability to attain three-dimensional information of one’s sample. The NanoSIMS instrument offers the highest lateral resolution of any MSI method available. In practice, NanoSIMS regularly achieves sub-100 nm resolution of atomic and diatomic secondary ions within biological samples. The strengths of the different SIMS methods are more and more being leveraged in both multimodal-imaging endeavors that use complementary MSI techniques as well with optical, fluorescence, and force microscopy methods.« less

  4. Systematic forensic toxicological analysis by liquid-chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry in serum and comparison to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Grapp, Marcel; Kaufmann, Christoph; Streit, Frank; Binder, Lutz

    2018-06-01

    Comprehensive screening procedures for psychoactive agents in body fluids are an essential task in clinical and forensic toxicology. With the continuous emergence and adaption of new psychoactive substances (NPS) keeping a screening method up to date is challenging. To meet these demands, hyphenated high-resolution mass spectrometry has gained interest as extensive and expandable screening approach. Here we present a comprehensive method for systematic toxicological analysis of serum by liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) with data independent acquisition. The potential of this method was demonstrated by analysis of 247 authentic serum- and 12 post-mortem femoral blood samples. Thus 950 compounds, comprising 185 different drugs and metabolites could be identified. For the detected substances, including pharmaceutical substances, illicit drugs as well as NPS, serum concentrations were confirmed ranging from traces to toxic values indicating the capability for forensic toxicological requirements. Positive identification of drugs was achieved by accurate mass measurement (±5ppm for [M+H] + ; ±10ppm for [M-H] - ), retention time (±0.35min), isotopic pattern match (less than 10 m/z RMS [ppm]), isotope match intensity (less than 20% RMS) and the presence of at least two fragment ions. The LC-QTOF-MS procedure was shown to be superior to serum screening by GC-MS, since 240% (335 versus 141) more drugs were identified in serum samples compared to GC-MS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Analytical considerations for mass spectrometry profiling in serum biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Gordon R; Colantonio, Simona; Sacconi, Andrea; Saul, Richard G

    2009-03-01

    The potential of using mass spectrometry profiling as a diagnostic tool has been demonstrated for a wide variety of diseases. Various cancers and cancer-related diseases have been the focus of much of this work because of both the paucity of good diagnostic markers and the knowledge that early diagnosis is the most powerful weapon in treating cancer. The implementation of mass spectrometry as a routine diagnostic tool has proved to be difficult, however, primarily because of the stringent controls that are required for the method to be reproducible. The method is evolving as a powerful guide to the discovery of biomarkers that could, in turn, be used either individually or in an array or panel of tests for early disease detection. Using proteomic patterns to guide biomarker discovery and the possibility of deployment in the clinical laboratory environment on current instrumentation or in a hybrid technology has the possibility of being the early diagnosis tool that is needed.

  6. Evaluation of automated sample preparation, retention time locked gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and data analysis methods for the metabolomic study of Arabidopsis species.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qun; David, Frank; Lynen, Frédéric; Rumpel, Klaus; Dugardeyn, Jasper; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Xu, Guowang; Sandra, Pat

    2011-05-27

    In this paper, automated sample preparation, retention time locked gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and data analysis methods for the metabolomics study were evaluated. A miniaturized and automated derivatisation method using sequential oximation and silylation was applied to a polar extract of 4 types (2 types×2 ages) of Arabidopsis thaliana, a popular model organism often used in plant sciences and genetics. Automation of the derivatisation process offers excellent repeatability, and the time between sample preparation and analysis was short and constant, reducing artifact formation. Retention time locked (RTL) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used, resulting in reproducible retention times and GC-MS profiles. Two approaches were used for data analysis. XCMS followed by principal component analysis (approach 1) and AMDIS deconvolution combined with a commercially available program (Mass Profiler Professional) followed by principal component analysis (approach 2) were compared. Several features that were up- or down-regulated in the different types were detected. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The expanding role of mass spectrometry in the field of vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vaneet Kumar; Sharma, Ity; Glick, James

    2018-05-31

    Biological mass spectrometry has evolved as a core analytical technology in the last decade mainly because of its unparalleled ability to perform qualitative as well as quantitative profiling of enormously complex biological samples with high mass accuracy, sensitivity, selectivity and specificity. Mass spectrometry-based techniques are also routinely used to assess glycosylation and other post-translational modifications, disulfide bond linkage, and scrambling as well as for the detection of host cell protein contaminants in the field of biopharmaceuticals. The role of mass spectrometry in vaccine development has been very limited but is now expanding as the landscape of global vaccine development is shifting towards the development of recombinant vaccines. In this review, the role of mass spectrometry in vaccine development is presented, some of the ongoing efforts to develop vaccines for diseases with global unmet medical need are discussed and the regulatory challenges of implementing mass spectrometry techniques in a quality control laboratory setting are highlighted. © 2018 The Authors. Mass Spectrometry Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Lipid imaging by mass spectrometry - a review.

    PubMed

    Gode, David; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2013-03-07

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has proven to be extremely useful for applications such as the spatial analysis of peptides and proteins in biological tissue, the performance assessment of drugs in vivo or the measurement of protein or metabolite expression as tissue classifiers or biomarkers from disease versus control tissue comparisons. The most popular MSI technique is MALDI mass spectrometry. First invented by Richard Caprioli in the mid-1990s, it is the highest performing MSI technique in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity for intact biomolecules and application range today. The unique ability to identify and spatially resolve numerous compounds simultaneously, based on m/z values has inter alia been applied to untargeted and targeted chemical mapping of biological compartments, revealing changes of physiological states, disease pathologies and metabolic faith and distribution of xenobiotics. Many MSI applications focus on lipid species because of the lipids' diverse roles as structural components of cell membranes, their function in the surfactant cycle, and their involvement as second messengers in signalling cascades of tissues and cells. This article gives a comprehensive overview of lipid imaging techniques and applications using established MALDI and SIMS methods but also other promising MSI techniques such as DESI.

  9. Nuclear applications of inorganic mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Laeter, John

    2010-01-01

    There are several basic characteristics of mass spectrometry that are not always fully appreciated by the science community. These characteristics include the distinction between relative and absolute isotope abundances, and the influence of isotope fractionation on the accuracy of isotopic measurements. These characteristics can be illustrated in the field of nuclear physics with reference to the measurement of nuclear parameters, which involve the use of enriched isotopes, and to test models of s-, r-, and p-process nucleosynthesis. The power of isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) to measure trace elements in primitive meteorites to produce accurate Solar System abundances has been essential to the development of nuclear astrophysics. The variety of mass spectrometric instrumentation used to measure the isotopic composition of elements has sometimes been accompanied by a lack of implementation of basic mass spectrometric protocols which are applicable to all instruments. These metrological protocols are especially important in atomic weight determinations, but must also be carefully observed in cases where the anomalies might be very small, such as in studies of the daughter products of extinct radionuclides to decipher events in the early history of the Solar System. There are occasions in which misleading conclusions have been drawn from isotopic data derived from mass spectrometers where such protocols have been ignored. It is important to choose the mass spectrometer instrument most appropriate to the proposed experiment. The importance of the integrative nature of mass spectrometric measurements has been demonstrated by experiments in which long, double beta decay and geochronological decay half-lives have been measured as an alternative to costly radioactive-counting experiments. This characteristic is also illustrated in the measurement of spontaneous fission yields, which have accumulated over long periods of time. Mass spectrometry is also a

  10. METHOD 544. DETERMINATION OF MICROCYSTINS AND NODULARIN IN DRINKING WATER BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY (LC/MS/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method 544 is an accurate and precise analytical method to determine six microcystins (including MC-LR) and nodularin in drinking water using solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC/MS/MS). The advantage of this SPE-LC/MS/MS is its sensi...

  11. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: The Transformation of Modern Environmental Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Lucy; Yan, Fangzhi; Bach, Stephen; Pihakari, Katianna; Klein, David

    2016-01-01

    Unknown compounds in environmental samples are difficult to identify using standard mass spectrometric methods. Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) has revolutionized how environmental analyses are performed. With its unsurpassed mass accuracy, high resolution and sensitivity, researchers now have a tool for difficult and complex environmental analyses. Two features of FTMS are responsible for changing the face of how complex analyses are accomplished. First is the ability to quickly and with high mass accuracy determine the presence of unknown chemical residues in samples. For years, the field has been limited by mass spectrometric methods that were based on knowing what compounds of interest were. Secondly, by utilizing the high resolution capabilities coupled with the low detection limits of FTMS, analysts also could dilute the sample sufficiently to minimize the ionization changes from varied matrices. PMID:26784175

  12. Mass spectrometry imaging: Towards a lipid microscope?

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain; Laprévote, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Biological imaging techniques are the most efficient way to locally measure the variation of different parameters on tissue sections. These analyses are gaining increasing interest since 20 years and allow observing extremely complex biological phenomena at lower and lower time and resolution scale. Nevertheless, most of them only target very few compounds of interest, which are chosen a priori, due to their low resolution power and sensitivity. New chemical imaging technique has to be introduced in order to overcome these limitations, leading to more informative and sensitive analyses for biologists and physicians. Two major mass spectrometry methods can be efficiently used to generate the distribution of biological compounds over a tissue section. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS) needs the co-crystallization of the sample with a matrix before to be irradiated by a laser, whereas the analyte is directly desorbed by a primary ion bombardment for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) experiments. In both cases, energy used for desorption/ionization is locally deposited -some tens of microns for the laser and some hundreds of nanometers for the ion beam- meaning that small areas over the surface sample can be separately analyzed. Step by step analysis allows spectrum acquisitions over the tissue sections and the data are treated by modern informatics software in order to create ion density maps, i.e., the intensity plot of one specific ion versus the (x,y) position. Main advantages of SIMS and MALDI compared to other chemical imaging techniques lie in the simultaneous acquisition of a large number of biological compounds in mixture with an excellent sensitivity obtained by Time-of-Flight (ToF) mass analyzer. Moreover, data treatment is done a posteriori, due to the fact that no compound is selectively marked, and let us access to the localization of different lipid classes in only one complete acquisition. Copyright © 2010

  13. Simultaneous determination of creatinine and creatine in human serum by double-spike isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, Mario; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; Añón Álvarez, M Elena; Rodríguez, Felix; Menéndez, Francisco V Álvarez; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2015-04-07

    This work describes the first multiple spiking isotope dilution procedure for organic compounds using (13)C labeling. A double-spiking isotope dilution method capable of correcting and quantifying the creatine-creatinine interconversion occurring during the analytical determination of both compounds in human serum is presented. The determination of serum creatinine may be affected by the interconversion between creatine and creatinine during sample preparation or by inefficient chemical separation of those compounds by solid phase extraction (SPE). The methodology is based on the use differently labeled (13)C analogues ((13)C1-creatinine and (13)C2-creatine), the measurement of the isotopic distribution of creatine and creatinine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and the application of multiple linear regression. Five different lyophilized serum-based controls and two certified human serum reference materials (ERM-DA252a and ERM-DA253a) were analyzed to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the proposed double-spike LC-MS/MS method. The methodology was applied to study the creatine-creatinine interconversion during LC-MS/MS and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses and the separation efficiency of the SPE step required in the traditional gas chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (GC-IDMS) reference methods employed for the determination of serum creatinine. The analysis of real serum samples by GC-MS showed that creatine-creatinine separation by SPE can be a nonquantitative step that may induce creatinine overestimations up to 28% in samples containing high amounts of creatine. Also, a detectable conversion of creatine into creatinine was observed during sample preparation for LC-MS/MS. The developed double-spike LC-MS/MS improves the current state of the art for the determination of creatinine in human serum by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS), because corrections are made for all the possible errors

  14. EPA Method 525.3 - Determination of Semivolatile Organic Chemicals in Drinking Water by Solid Phase Extraction and Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method 525.3 is an analytical method that uses solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the identification and quantitation of 125 selected semi-volatile organic chemicals in drinking water.

  15. Chemical separation and mass spectrometry of Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, and Cu in terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials using thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Akane; Yamashita, Katsuyuki; Makishima, Akio; Nakamura, Eizo

    2009-12-01

    A sequential chemical separation technique for Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, and Cu in terrestrial and extraterrestrial silicate rocks was developed for precise and accurate determination of elemental concentration by the isotope dilution method (ID). The technique uses a combination of cation-anion exchange chromatography and Eichrom nickel specific resin. The method was tested using a variety of matrixes including bulk meteorite (Allende), terrestrial peridotite (JP-1), and basalt (JB-1b). Concentrations of each element was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) using W filaments and a Si-B-Al type activator for Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zn and a Re filament and silicic acid-H3PO4 activator for Cu. The method can be used to precisely determine the concentrations of these elements in very small silicate samples, including meteorites, geochemical reference samples, and mineral standards for microprobe analysis. Furthermore, the Cr mass spectrometry procedure developed in this study can be extended to determine the isotopic ratios of 53Cr/52Cr and 54Cr/52Cr with precision of approximately 0.05epsilon and approximately 0.10epsilon (1epsilon = 0.01%), respectively, enabling cosmochemical applications such as high precision Mn-Cr chronology and investigation of nucleosynthetic isotopic anomalies in meteorites.

  16. Generation of CsI cluster ions for mass calibration in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xianwen; van Dongen, Joost L J; Meijer, E W

    2010-07-01

    A simple method was developed for the generation of cesium iodide (CsI) cluster ions up to m/z over 20,000 in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). Calibration ions in both positive and negative ion modes can readily be generated from a single MALDI spot of CsI(3) with 2-[(2E)-3-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-2-methylprop-2-enylidene] malononitrile (DCTB) matrix. The major cluster ion series observed in the positive ion mode is [(CsI)(n)Cs](+), and in the negative ion mode is [(CsI)(n)I](-). In both cluster series, ions spread evenly every 259.81 units. The easy method described here for the production of CsI cluster ions should be useful for MALDI MS calibrations. Copyright 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Linking high resolution mass spectrometry data with exposure ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is a growing need in the field of exposure science for monitoring methods that rapidly screen environmental media for suspect contaminants. Measurement and analysis platforms, based on high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), now exist to meet this need. Here we describe results of a study that links HRMS data with exposure predictions from the U.S. EPA's ExpoCast™ program and in vitro bioassay data from the U.S. interagency Tox21 consortium. Vacuum dust samples were collected from 56 households across the U.S. as part of the American Healthy Homes Survey (AHHS). Sample extracts were analyzed using liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC–TOF/MS) with electrospray ionization. On average, approximately 2000 molecular features were identified per sample (based on accurate mass) in negative ion mode, and 3000 in positive ion mode. Exact mass, isotope distribution, and isotope spacing were used to match molecular features with a unique listing of chemical formulas extracted from EPA's Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) database. A total of 978 DSSTox formulas were consistent with the dust LC–TOF/molecular feature data (match score ≥ 90); these formulas mapped to 3228 possible chemicals in the database. Correct assignment of a unique chemical to a given formula required additional validation steps. Each suspect chemical was prioritized for follow-up confirmation using abundance and detection frequency results, along wi

  18. Hands-on Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Naomi L.; March, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for the detection, identification, and quantification of organic compounds. As mass spectrometers have become more user-friendly and affordable, many students--often with little experience in mass spectrometry--find themselves needing to incorporate mass spectrometry into…

  19. Determination of formetanate hydrochloride in fruit samples using liquid chromatography-mass selective detection or -tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Podhorniak, Lynda V; Kamel, Alaa; Rains, Diane M

    2010-05-26

    A rapid multiresidue method that captures residues of the insecticide formetanate hydrochloride (FHCl) in selected fruits is described. The method was used to provide residue data for dietary exposure determinations of FHCl. Using an acetonitrile extraction with a dispersive cleanup based on AOAC International method 2007.01, also known as QuEChERS, which was further modified and streamlined, thousands of samples were successfully analyzed for FHCl residues. FHCl levels were determined both by liquid chromatography-single-stage mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The target limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) achieved for FHCl were 3.33 and 10 ng/g, respectively, with LC-MS and 0.1 and 0.3 ng/g, respectively, with LC-MS/MS. Recoveries at these previously unpublished levels ranged from 95 to 109%. A set of 20-40 samples can be prepared in one working day by two chemists.

  20. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Tsao, J.Y.

    1992-12-15

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth. 3 figs.

  1. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Hammons, B. Eugene; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    1992-01-01

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

  2. Structural characterisation of medically relevant protein assemblies by integrating mass spectrometry with computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Politis, Argyris; Schmidt, Carla

    2018-03-20

    Structural mass spectrometry with its various techniques is a powerful tool for the structural elucidation of medically relevant protein assemblies. It delivers information on the composition, stoichiometries, interactions and topologies of these assemblies. Most importantly it can deal with heterogeneous mixtures and assemblies which makes it universal among the conventional structural techniques. In this review we summarise recent advances and challenges in structural mass spectrometric techniques. We describe how the combination of the different mass spectrometry-based methods with computational strategies enable structural models at molecular levels of resolution. These models hold significant potential for helping us in characterizing the function of protein assemblies related to human health and disease. In this review we summarise the techniques of structural mass spectrometry often applied when studying protein-ligand complexes. We exemplify these techniques through recent examples from literature that helped in the understanding of medically relevant protein assemblies. We further provide a detailed introduction into various computational approaches that can be integrated with these mass spectrometric techniques. Last but not least we discuss case studies that integrated mass spectrometry and computational modelling approaches and yielded models of medically important protein assembly states such as fibrils and amyloids. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Mbughuni, Michael M.; Jannetto, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used in the Toxicological analysis of drugs, poisons, and metabolites of both. To date, MS applications have permeated all fields of toxicology which include; environmental, clinical, and forensic toxicology. While many different analytical applications are used in these fields, MS and its hyphenated applications such as; gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), inductively coupled plasma ionization MS (ICP-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MSn) have emerged as powerful tools used in toxicology laboratories. This review will focus on these hyphenated MS technologies and their applications for toxicology. PMID:28149262

  4. MASS SPECTROMETRY OF FATTY ALDEHYDES

    PubMed Central

    Berdyshev, Evgeny V.

    2011-01-01

    Fatty aldehydes are important components of the cellular lipidome. Significant interest has been developed towards the analysis of the short chain α,β-unsaturated and hydroxylated aldehydes formed as a result of oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Multiple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and subsequently liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) approaches have been developed to identify and quantify short-chain as well as long-chain fatty aldehydes. Due to the ability to non-enzymaticaly form Schiff bases with amino groups of proteins, lipids, and with DNA guanidine, free aldehydes are viewed as a marker or metric of fatty acid oxidation and not the part of intracellular signaling pathways which has significantly limited the overall attention this group of molecules have received. This review provides an overview of current GC/MS and LC/MS approaches of fatty aldehyde analysis as well as discusses technical challenges standing in the way of free fatty aldehyde quantitation. PMID:21930240

  5. IDENTIFICATION OF POLAR DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY - MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A qualitative method using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatization followed by analysis with liquid chromatography (LC)/negative ion-electrospray mass spectrometry (MS) was developed for identifying polar aldehydes and ketones in ozonated drinking water. This method offe...

  6. Extraction and Analysis of Sulfur Mustard (HD) from Various Food Matrices by Gas ChromatographyMass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS OF SULFUR MUSTARD (HD) FROM VARIOUS FOOD MATRICES BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY–MASS...Sulfur Mustard (HD) from Various Food Matrices by Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...spectrometry was used to analyze sulfur mustard (HD) in various food matrices. The development of a solid-phase extraction method using a normal

  7. Molecular recognition of emerald ash borer infestation using leaf spray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Caitlin E; Cooks, R Graham

    2016-06-15

    The introduction of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) (EAB) from Asia to Michigan, USA, in the 1990s caused the widespread death of ash trees in two Canadian provinces and 24 US states. The three current methods for the detection of emerald ash borer infestation, visual surveys, tree girdling and artificial traps, can be unreliable, and there is clearly a need for a rapid, dependable technique for the detection of emerald ash borer infestation. Leaf spray, an ambient ionization method for mass spectrometry (MS), gives direct chemical information on a leaf sample by applying a high voltage to a naturally or artificially sharply pointed leaf piece causing ions to be generated directly from the leaf tip for MS analysis. Leaflets from 23 healthy and EAB-infested ash trees were analyzed by leaf spray mass spectrometry in an attempt to distinguish healthy and EAB-infested ash trees. In negative ion mode, healthy ash trees showed an increased abundance of ions m/z 455.5, 471.5 and 487.5, and ash trees infested with the EAB displayed an increased abundance of ions m/z 181 and 217. The identities of the chemical discriminators ursolic acid and oleanolic acid in healthy ash trees, and six-carbon sugar alcohols in infested ash trees, were determined by tandem mass spectrometry and confirmed with standards. This preliminary study suggests that leaf spray mass spectrometry of ash tree leaflets provides a potential tool for the early detection of ash tree infestation by the emerald ash borer. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Evaluating lipid mediator structural complexity using ion mobility spectrometry combined with mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, Jennifer E.; Aly, Noor; Zheng, Xueyun

    Lipid mediators (LMs) are broadly defined as a class of bioactive lipophilic molecules that regulate cell-to-cell communication events with many having a strong correlation with various human diseases and conditions. LMs are usually analyzed with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS), but their numerous isomers greatly complicate the measurements with essentially identical fragmentation spectra and LC separations not always sufficient for distinguishing the features. In this work, we characterized LMs having specific categories using ion mobility spectrometry coupled with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). The IMS collision cross sections and MS m/z values displayed distinct trends for each LM category studied. LC-IMS-MSmore » analyses on flu infected mouse tissue samples also illustrated the presence of additional LM species not in our databases.« less

  9. Confirmation of diosmetin 3-O-glucuronide as major metabolite of diosmin in humans, using micro-liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silvestro, Luigi; Tarcomnicu, Isabela; Dulea, Constanta; Attili, Nageswara Rao B N; Ciuca, Valentin; Peru, Dan; Rizea Savu, Simona

    2013-10-01

    Diosmin is a flavonoid often administered in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, hemorrhoids, and related affections. Diosmin is rapidly hydrolized in the intestine to its aglicone, diosmetin, which is further metabolized to conjugates. In this study, the development and validations of three new methods for the determination of diosmetin, free and after enzymatic deconjugation, and of its potential glucuronide metabolites, diosmetin-3-O-glucuronide, diosmetin-7-O-glucuronide, and diosmetin-3,7-O-glucuronide from human plasma and urine are presented. First, the quantification of diosmetin, free and after deconjugation, was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, on an Ascentis RP-Amide column (150 × 2.1 mm, 5 μm), in reversed-phase conditions, after enzymatic digestion. Then glucuronide metabolites from plasma were separated by micro-liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry on a HALO C18 (50 × 0.3 mm, 2.7 μm, 90 Å) column, after solid-phase extraction. Finally, glucuronides from urine were measured using a Discovery HSF5 (100 × 2.1 mm, 5 μm) column, after simple dilution with mobile phase. The methods were validated by assessing linearity, accuracy, precision, low limit of quantification, selectivity, extraction recovery, stability, and matrix effects; results in agreement with regulatory (Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency) guidelines acceptance criteria were obtained in all cases. The methods were applied to a pharmacokinetic study with diosmin (450 mg orally administered tablets). The mean C max of diosmetin in plasma was 6,049.3 ± 5,548.6 pg/mL. A very good correlation between measured diosmetin and glucuronide metabolites concentrations was obtained. Diosmetin-3-O-glucuronide was identified as a major circulating metabolite of diosmetin in plasma and in urine, and this finding was confirmed by supplementary experiments with differential ion

  10. METHOD 530 DETERMINATION OF SELECT SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN DRINKING WATER BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ MASS SPECTROMETRY (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    1.1. This is a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for the determination of selected semivolatile organic compounds in drinking waters. Accuracy and precision data have been generated in reagent water, and in finished ground and surface waters for the compounds li...

  11. Application of ion mobility-mass spectrometry to microRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Kosuke; Hirose, Kenji; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2013-03-01

    Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry is widely used for studying sequence determination and modification analysis of small RNAs. However, the efficiency of liquid chromatography-based separation of intact small RNA species is insufficient, since the physiochemical properties among small RNAs are very similar. In this study, we focused on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), which is a gas-phase separation technique coupled with mass spectrometry; we have evaluated the utility of IM-MS for microRNA (miRNA) analysis. A multiply charged deprotonated ion derived from an 18-24-nt-long miRNA was formed by electrospray ionization, and then the time, called the "drift time", taken by each ion to migrate through a buffer gas was measured. Each multivalent ion was temporally separated on the basis of the charge state and structural formation; 3 types of unique mass-mobility correlation patterns (i.e., chainlike-form, hairpin-form, and dimer-form) were present on the two-dimensional mobility-mass spectrum. Moreover, we found that the ion size (sequence length) and the secondary structures of the small RNAs strongly contributed to the IM-MS-based separation, although solvent conditions such as pH had no effect. Therefore, sequence isomers could also be discerned by the selection of each specific charged ion, i.e., the 6(-) charged ion reflected a majority among chainlike-, hairpin-, and other structures. We concluded that the IM-MS provides additional capability for separation; thus, this analytical method will be a powerful tool for comprehensive small RNA analysis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry of Strontium-90 for homeland security, environmental monitoring, and human health

    SciTech Connect

    Tumey, S J; Brown, T A; Hamilton, T F

    2008-03-03

    Strontium-90 is one of the most hazardous materials managed by agencies charged with protecting the public from radiation. Traditional radiometric methods have been limited by low sample throughput and slow turnaround times. Mass spectrometry offers the advantage of shorter analysis times and the ability to measure samples immediately after processing, however conventional mass spectrometric techniques are susceptible to molecular isobaric interferences that limit their overall sensitivity. In contrast, accelerator mass spectrometry is insensitive to molecular interferences and we have therefore begun developing a method for determination of {sup 90}Sr by accelerator mass spectrometry. Despite a pervasive interference from {sup 90}Zr,more » our initial development has yielded an instrumental background of {approx} 10{sup 8} atoms (75 mBq) per sample. Further refinement of our system (e.g., redesign of our detector, use of alternative target materials) is expected to push the background below 10{sup 6} atoms, close to the theoretical limit for AMS. Once we have refined our system and developed suitable sample preparation protocols, we will utilize our capability in applications to homeland security, environmental monitoring, and human health.« less

  13. Quantitative bioanalysis of strontium in human serum by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Somarouthu, Srikanth; Ohh, Jayoung; Shaked, Jonathan; Cunico, Robert L; Yakatan, Gerald; Corritori, Suzana; Tami, Joe; Foehr, Erik D

    2015-01-01

    Aim: A bioanalytical method using inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to measure endogenous levels of strontium in human serum was developed and validated. Results & methodology: This article details the experimental procedures used for the method development and validation thus demonstrating the application of the inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry method for quantification of strontium in human serum samples. The assay was validated for specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery and stability. Significant endogenous levels of strontium are present in human serum samples ranging from 19 to 96 ng/ml with a mean of 34.6 ± 15.2 ng/ml (SD). Discussion & conclusion: Calibration procedures and sample pretreatment were simplified for high throughput analysis. The validation demonstrates that the method was sensitive, selective for quantification of strontium (88Sr) and is suitable for routine clinical testing of strontium in human serum samples. PMID:28031925

  14. U/Th dating by SHRIMP RG ion-microprobe mass spectrometry using single ion-exchange beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, James L.; Wooden, Joe; Murphy, Fred; Williams, Ross W.

    2005-04-01

    We present a new analytical method for U-series isotopes using the SHRIMP RG (Sensitive High mass Resolution Ion MicroProbe) mass spectrometer that utilizes the preconcentration of the U-series isotopes from a sample onto a single ion-exchange bead. Ion-microprobe mass spectrometry is capable of producing Th ionization efficiencies in excess of 2%. Analytical precision is typically better than alpha spectroscopy, but not as good as thermal ionization mass spectroscopy (TIMS) and inductively coupled plasma multicollector mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Like TIMS and ICP-MS the method allows analysis of small samples sizes, but also adds the advantage of rapidity of analysis. A major advantage of ion-microprobe analysis is that U and Th isotopes are analyzed in the same bead, simplifying the process of chemical separation. Analytical time on the instrument is ˜60 min per sample, and a single instrument-loading can accommodate 15-20 samples to be analyzed in a 24-h day. An additional advantage is that the method allows multiple reanalyses of the same bead and that samples can be archived for reanalysis at a later time. Because the ion beam excavates a pit only a few μm deep, the mount can later be repolished and reanalyzed numerous times. The method described of preconcentrating a low concentration sample onto a small conductive substrate to allow ion-microprobe mass spectrometry is potentially applicable to many other systems.

  15. U/Th dating by SHRIMP RG ion-microprobe mass spectrometry using single ion-exchange beads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Wooden, J.; Murphy, F.; Williams, Ross W.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new analytical method for U-series isotopes using the SHRIMP RG (Sensitive High mass Resolution Ion MicroProbe) mass spectrometer that utilizes the preconcentration of the U-series isotopes from a sample onto a single ion-exchange bead. Ion-microprobe mass spectrometry is capable of producing Th ionization efficiencies in excess of 2%. Analytical precision is typically better than alpha spectroscopy, but not as good as thermal ionization mass spectroscopy (TIMS) and inductively coupled plasma multicollector mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Like TIMS and ICP-MS the method allows analysis of small samples sizes, but also adds the advantage of rapidity of analysis. A major advantage of ion-microprobe analysis is that U and Th isotopes are analyzed in the same bead, simplifying the process of chemical separation. Analytical time on the instrument is ???60 min per sample, and a single instrument-loading can accommodate 15-20 samples to be analyzed in a 24-h day. An additional advantage is that the method allows multiple reanalyses of the same bead and that samples can be archived for reanalysis at a later time. Because the ion beam excavates a pit only a few ??m deep, the mount can later be repolished and reanalyzed numerous times. The method described of preconcentrating a low concentration sample onto a small conductive substrate to allow ion-microprobe mass spectrometry is potentially applicable to many other systems. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. NEGATIVE-ION MASS SPECTROMETRY OF SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonylurea herbicides have been studied using neg-ion desorption chem.-ionization (DCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and DCI-MS/MS techniques. Both {M-H]- and M.- ions were obsd. in the DCI mass spectra. The collisonally activated dissocn. (CAD) spectra were characteristic of the str...

  17. A comprehensive high-resolution mass spectrometry approach for characterization of metabolites by combination of ambient ionization, chromatography and imaging methods.

    PubMed

    Berisha, Arton; Dold, Sebastian; Guenther, Sabine; Desbenoit, Nicolas; Takats, Zoltan; Spengler, Bernhard; Römpp, Andreas

    2014-08-30

    An ideal method for bioanalytical applications would deliver spatially resolved quantitative information in real time and without sample preparation. In reality these requirements can typically not be met by a single analytical technique. Therefore, we combine different mass spectrometry approaches: chromatographic separation, ambient ionization and imaging techniques, in order to obtain comprehensive information about metabolites in complex biological samples. Samples were analyzed by laser desorption followed by electrospray ionization (LD-ESI) as an ambient ionization technique, by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging for spatial distribution analysis and by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS) for quantitation and validation of compound identification. All MS data were acquired with high mass resolution and accurate mass (using orbital trapping and ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers). Grape berries were analyzed and evaluated in detail, whereas wheat seeds and mouse brain tissue were analyzed in proof-of-concept experiments. In situ measurements by LD-ESI without any sample preparation allowed for fast screening of plant metabolites on the grape surface. MALDI imaging of grape cross sections at 20 µm pixel size revealed the detailed distribution of metabolites which were in accordance with their biological function. HPLC/ESI-MS was used to quantify 13 anthocyanin species as well as to separate and identify isomeric compounds. A total of 41 metabolites (amino acids, carbohydrates, anthocyanins) were identified with all three approaches. Mass accuracy for all MS measurements was better than 2 ppm (root mean square error). The combined approach provides fast screening capabilities, spatial distribution information and the possibility to quantify metabolites. Accurate mass measurements proved to be critical in order to reliably combine data from different MS

  18. Multi-residue method for the determination of 450 pesticide residues in honey, fruit juice and wine by double-cartridge solid-phase extraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pang, G-F; Fan, C-L; Liu, Y-M; Cao, Y-Z; Zhang, J-J; Fu, B-L; Li, X-M; Li, Z-Y; Wu, Y-P

    2006-08-01

    A multi-residue method was developed for the determination of 450 pesticide residues in honey, fruit juice and wine using double-cartridge solid-phase extraction (SPE), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). The method development was based on an appraisal of the characteristics of GC-MS and LC-MS-MS for 654 pesticides as well as the efficiency of extraction and purification from honey, fruit juice and wine. Samples were first diluted with water plus acetone, then extracted with portions of dichloromethane. The extracts were concentrated and cleaned up with graphitized carbon black and aminopropyl cartridges stacked in tandem. Pesticides were eluted with acetonitrile + toluene, and the eluates were concentrated. For 383 pesticides, the eluate was extracted with hexane twice and internal standard solution was added prior to GC-MS determination. For 67 pesticides, extraction was with methanol prior to LC-MS-MS determination. The limit of detection for the method was between 1.0 and 300 ng g(-1) depending on each pesticide analyte. At the three fortification levels of 2.0-3000 ng g(-1), the average recovery rates were between 59 and 123%, among which 413 pesticides (92% of the 450) had recovery rates of 70-120% and 35 pesticides (8% of the 450) had recovery rates of 59-70%. There were 437 pesticides (97% of the 450) with a relative standard deviation below 25%; there were 13 varieties (3% of the 450) between 25.0 and 30.4%.

  19. Unravelling associations between unassigned mass spectrometry peaks with frequent itemset mining techniques.

    PubMed

    Vu, Trung Nghia; Mrzic, Aida; Valkenborg, Dirk; Maes, Evelyne; Lemière, Filip; Goethals, Bart; Laukens, Kris

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics experiments generate spectra that are rich in information. Often only a fraction of this information is used for peptide/protein identification, whereas a significant proportion of the peaks in a spectrum remain unexplained. In this paper we explore how a specific class of data mining techniques termed "frequent itemset mining" can be employed to discover patterns in the unassigned data, and how such patterns can help us interpret the origin of the unexpected/unexplained peaks. First a model is proposed that describes the origin of the observed peaks in a mass spectrum. For this purpose we use the classical correlative database search algorithm. Peaks that support a positive identification of the spectrum are termed explained peaks. Next, frequent itemset mining techniques are introduced to infer which unexplained peaks are associated in a spectrum. The method is validated on two types of experimental proteomic data. First, peptide mass fingerprint data is analyzed to explain the unassigned peaks in a full scan mass spectrum. Interestingly, a large numbers of experimental spectra reveals several highly frequent unexplained masses, and pattern mining on these frequent masses demonstrates that subsets of these peaks frequently co-occur. Further evaluation shows that several of these co-occurring peaks indeed have a known common origin, and other patterns are promising hypothesis generators for further analysis. Second, the proposed methodology is validated on tandem mass spectrometral data using a public spectral library, where associations within the mass differences of unassigned peaks and peptide modifications are explored. The investigation of the found patterns illustrates that meaningful patterns can be discovered that can be explained by features of the employed technology and found modifications. This simple approach offers opportunities to monitor accumulating unexplained mass spectrometry data for emerging new patterns

  20. Peptide Peak Detection for Low Resolution MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jingwen; Utsunomiya, Shin-Ichi; Kajihara, Shigeki; Tabata, Tsuyoshi; Aoshima, Ken; Oda, Yoshiya; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    A new peak detection method has been developed for rapid selection of peptide and its fragment ion peaks for protein identification using tandem mass spectrometry. The algorithm applies classification of peak intensities present in the defined mass range to determine the noise level. A threshold is then given to select ion peaks according to the determined noise level in each mass range. This algorithm was initially designed for the peak detection of low resolution peptide mass spectra, such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra. But it can also be applied to other type of mass spectra. This method has demonstrated obtaining a good rate of number of real ions to noises for even poorly fragmented peptide spectra. The effect of using peak lists generated from this method produces improved protein scores in database search results. The reliability of the protein identifications is increased by finding more peptide identifications. This software tool is freely available at the Mass++ home page (http://www.first-ms3d.jp/english/achievement/software/).

  1. Peptide Peak Detection for Low Resolution MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jingwen; Utsunomiya, Shin-ichi; Kajihara, Shigeki; Tabata, Tsuyoshi; Aoshima, Ken; Oda, Yoshiya; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    A new peak detection method has been developed for rapid selection of peptide and its fragment ion peaks for protein identification using tandem mass spectrometry. The algorithm applies classification of peak intensities present in the defined mass range to determine the noise level. A threshold is then given to select ion peaks according to the determined noise level in each mass range. This algorithm was initially designed for the peak detection of low resolution peptide mass spectra, such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra. But it can also be applied to other type of mass spectra. This method has demonstrated obtaining a good rate of number of real ions to noises for even poorly fragmented peptide spectra. The effect of using peak lists generated from this method produces improved protein scores in database search results. The reliability of the protein identifications is increased by finding more peptide identifications. This software tool is freely available at the Mass++ home page (http://www.first-ms3d.jp/english/achievement/software/). PMID:26819872

  2. A mass spectrometry proteomics data management platform.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vagisha; Eng, Jimmy K; Maccoss, Michael J; Riffle, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is increasingly being used in biomedical research. These experiments typically generate a large volume of highly complex data, and the volume and complexity are only increasing with time. There exist many software pipelines for analyzing these data (each typically with its own file formats), and as technology improves, these file formats change and new formats are developed. Files produced from these myriad software programs may accumulate on hard disks or tape drives over time, with older files being rendered progressively more obsolete and unusable with each successive technical advancement and data format change. Although initiatives exist to standardize the file formats used in proteomics, they do not address the core failings of a file-based data management system: (1) files are typically poorly annotated experimentally, (2) files are "organically" distributed across laboratory file systems in an ad hoc manner, (3) files formats become obsolete, and (4) searching the data and comparing and contrasting results across separate experiments is very inefficient (if possible at all). Here we present a relational database architecture and accompanying web application dubbed Mass Spectrometry Data Platform that is designed to address the failings of the file-based mass spectrometry data management approach. The database is designed such that the output of disparate software pipelines may be imported into a core set of unified tables, with these core tables being extended to support data generated by specific pipelines. Because the data are unified, they may be queried, viewed, and compared across multiple experiments using a common web interface. Mass Spectrometry Data Platform is open source and freely available at http://code.google.com/p/msdapl/.

  3. A Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Data Management Platform*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vagisha; Eng, Jimmy K.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Riffle, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is increasingly being used in biomedical research. These experiments typically generate a large volume of highly complex data, and the volume and complexity are only increasing with time. There exist many software pipelines for analyzing these data (each typically with its own file formats), and as technology improves, these file formats change and new formats are developed. Files produced from these myriad software programs may accumulate on hard disks or tape drives over time, with older files being rendered progressively more obsolete and unusable with each successive technical advancement and data format change. Although initiatives exist to standardize the file formats used in proteomics, they do not address the core failings of a file-based data management system: (1) files are typically poorly annotated experimentally, (2) files are “organically” distributed across laboratory file systems in an ad hoc manner, (3) files formats become obsolete, and (4) searching the data and comparing and contrasting results across separate experiments is very inefficient (if possible at all). Here we present a relational database architecture and accompanying web application dubbed Mass Spectrometry Data Platform that is designed to address the failings of the file-based mass spectrometry data management approach. The database is designed such that the output of disparate software pipelines may be imported into a core set of unified tables, with these core tables being extended to support data generated by specific pipelines. Because the data are unified, they may be queried, viewed, and compared across multiple experiments using a common web interface. Mass Spectrometry Data Platform is open source and freely available at http://code.google.com/p/msdapl/. PMID:22611296

  4. Investigating quantitation of phosphorylation using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Parker, Laurie; Engel-Hall, Aaron; Drew, Kevin; Steinhardt, George; Helseth, Donald L; Jabon, David; McMurry, Timothy; Angulo, David S; Kron, Stephen J

    2008-04-01

    Despite advances in methods and instrumentation for analysis of phosphopeptides using mass spectrometry, it is still difficult to quantify the extent of phosphorylation of a substrate because of physiochemical differences between unphosphorylated and phosphorylated peptides. Here we report experiments to investigate those differences using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for a set of synthetic peptides by creating calibration curves of known input ratios of peptides/phosphopeptides and analyzing their resulting signal intensity ratios. These calibration curves reveal subtleties in sequence-dependent differences for relative desorption/ionization efficiencies that cannot be seen from single-point calibrations. We found that the behaviors were reproducible with a variability of 5-10% for observed phosphopeptide signal. Although these data allow us to begin addressing the issues related to modeling these properties and predicting relative signal strengths for other peptide sequences, it is clear that this behavior is highly complex and needs to be further explored. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  5. Investigating quantitation of phosphorylation using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Laurie; Engel-Hall, Aaron; Drew, Kevin; Steinhardt, George; Helseth, Donald L.; Jabon, David; McMurry, Timothy; Angulo, David S.; Kron, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in methods and instrumentation for analysis of phosphopeptides using mass spectrometry, it is still difficult to quantify the extent of phosphorylation of a substrate due to physiochemical differences between unphosphorylated and phosphorylated peptides. Here we report experiments to investigate those differences using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for a set of synthetic peptides by creating calibration curves of known input ratios of peptides/phosphopeptides and analyzing their resulting signal intensity ratios. These calibration curves reveal subtleties in sequence-dependent differences for relative desorption/ionization efficiencies that cannot be seen from single-point calibrations. We found that the behaviors were reproducible with a variability of 5–10% for observed phosphopeptide signal. Although these data allow us to begin addressing the issues related to modeling these properties and predicting relative signal strengths for other peptide sequences, it is clear this behavior is highly complex and needs to be further explored. PMID:18064576

  6. Deciphering Dorin M glycosylation by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Man, Petr; Kovár, Vojtech; Sterba, Ján; Strohalm, Martin; Kavan, Daniel; Kopácek, Petr; Grubhoffer, Libor; Havlícek, Vladimír

    2008-01-01

    The soft tick, Ornithodoros moubata, is a vector of several bacterial and viral pathogens including Borrelia duttoni, a causative agent of relapsing fever and African swine fever virus. Previously, a sialic acid-specific lectin Dorin M was isolated from its hemolymph. Here, we report on the complete characterization of the primary sequence of Dorin M. Using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, we identified three different glycopeptides in the tryptic digest of Dorin M. The peptide, as well as the glycan part of all glycopeptides, were further fully sequenced by means of tandem mass spectrometry (MS2) and multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS3). Two classical N-glycosylation sites were modified by high-mannose-type glycans containing up to nine mannose residues. The third site bore a glycan with four to five mannose residues and a deoxyhexose (fucose) attached to the proximal N-acetylglycosamine. The microheterogeneity at each site was estimated based on chromatographic behavior of different glycoforms. The fourth, a non-classical N-glycosylation site (Asn-Asn-Cys), was not glycosylated, probably due to the involvement of the cysteine residue in a disulfide bridge.

  7. Macromolecule mass spectrometry: citation mining of user documents.

    PubMed

    Kostoff, Ronald N; Bedford, Clifford D; del Río, J Antonio; Cortes, Héctor D; Karypis, George

    2004-03-01

    Identifying research users, applications, and impact is important for research performers, managers, evaluators, and sponsors. Identification of the user audience and the research impact is complex and time consuming due to the many indirect pathways through which fundamental research can impact applications. This paper identified the literature pathways through which two highly-cited papers of 2002 Chemistry Nobel Laureates Fenn and Tanaka impacted research, technology development, and applications. Citation Mining, an integration of citation bibliometrics and text mining, was applied to the >1600 first generation Science Citation Index (SCI) citing papers to Fenn's 1989 Science paper on Electrospray Ionization for Mass Spectrometry, and to the >400 first generation SCI citing papers to Tanaka's 1988 Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry paper on Laser Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry. Bibliometrics was performed on the citing papers to profile the user characteristics. Text mining was performed on the citing papers to identify the technical areas impacted by the research, and the relationships among these technical areas.

  8. Deep learning for tumor classification in imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Jens; Etmann, Christian; Boskamp, Tobias; Casadonte, Rita; Kriegsmann, Jörg; Maaß, Peter

    2018-04-01

    Tumor classification using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) data has a high potential for future applications in pathology. Due to the complexity and size of the data, automated feature extraction and classification steps are required to fully process the data. Since mass spectra exhibit certain structural similarities to image data, deep learning may offer a promising strategy for classification of IMS data as it has been successfully applied to image classification. Methodologically, we propose an adapted architecture based on deep convolutional networks to handle the characteristics of mass spectrometry data, as well as a strategy to interpret the learned model in the spectral domain based on a sensitivity analysis. The proposed methods are evaluated on two algorithmically challenging tumor classification tasks and compared to a baseline approach. Competitiveness of the proposed methods is shown on both tasks by studying the performance via cross-validation. Moreover, the learned models are analyzed by the proposed sensitivity analysis revealing biologically plausible effects as well as confounding factors of the considered tasks. Thus, this study may serve as a starting point for further development of deep learning approaches in IMS classification tasks. https://gitlab.informatik.uni-bremen.de/digipath/Deep_Learning_for_Tumor_Classification_in_IMS. jbehrmann@uni-bremen.de or christianetmann@uni-bremen.de. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  9. DETERMINATION OF ELEMENTAL COMPOSITIONS BY HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY WITHOUT MASS CALIBRANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widely applicable mass calibrants, including perfluorokerosene, are available for gas-phase introduction of analytes ionized by electron impact (EI) prior to analysis using high resolution mass spectrometry. Unfortunately, no all-purpose calibrants are available for recently dev...

  10. Silver Coating for High-Mass-Accuracy Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Fingerprints on Nanostructured Silicon.

    PubMed

    Guinan, Taryn M; Gustafsson, Ove J R; McPhee, Gordon; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-11-17

    Nanostructure imaging mass spectrometry (NIMS) using porous silicon (pSi) is a key technique for molecular imaging of exogenous and endogenous low molecular weight compounds from fingerprints. However, high-mass-accuracy NIMS can be difficult to achieve as time-of-flight (ToF) mass analyzers, which dominate the field, cannot sufficiently compensate for shifts in measured m/z values. Here, we show internal recalibration using a thin layer of silver (Ag) sputter-coated onto functionalized pSi substrates. NIMS peaks for several previously reported fingerprint components were selected and mass accuracy was compared to theoretical values. Mass accuracy was improved by more than an order of magnitude in several cases. This straightforward method should form part of the standard guidelines for NIMS studies for spatial characterization of small molecules.

  11. Fast characterization of cheeses by dynamic headspace-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pérès, Christophe; Denoyer, Christian; Tournayre, Pascal; Berdagué, Jean-Louis

    2002-03-15

    This study describes a rapid method to characterize cheeses by analysis of their volatile fraction using dynamic headspace-mass spectrometry. Major factors governing the extraction and concentration of the volatile components were first studied. These components were extracted from the headspace of the cheeses in a stream of helium and concentrated on a Tenax TA trap. They were then desorbed by heating and injected directly into the source of a mass spectrometer via a short deactivated silica transfer line. The mass spectra of the mixture of volatile components were considered as fingerprints of the analyzed substances. Forward stepwise factorial discriminant analysis afforded a limited number of characteristic mass fragments that allowed a good classification of the batches of cheeses studied.

  12. Protein N- and C-Termini Identification Using Mass Spectrometry and Isotopic Labeling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new method for protein N- and C-terminal analysis using mass spectrometry is introduced. A novel stable isotopic labeling scheme has been developed to identify terminal peptides generated from an enzyme digestion for the determination of both N- and C-termini of the protein. This method works dire...

  13. Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility Characterization of Bioactive Peptide-Synthetic Polymer Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Alalwiat, Ahlam; Tang, Wen; Gerişlioğlu, Selim; Becker, Matthew L; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2017-01-17

    The bioconjugate BMP2-(PEO-HA) 2 , composed of a dendron with two monodisperse poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) branches terminated by a hydroxyapatite binding peptide (HA), and a focal point substituted with a bone growth stimulating peptide (BMP2), has been comprehensively characterized by mass spectrometry (MS) methods, encompassing matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), tandem mass spectrometry (MS 2 ), and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS). MS 2 experiments using different ion activation techniques validated the sequences of the synthetic, bioactive peptides HA and BMP2, which contained highly basic amino acid residues either at the N-terminus (BMP2) or C-terminus (HA). Application of MALDI-MS, ESI-MS, and IM-MS to the polymer-peptide biomaterial confirmed its composition. Collision cross-section measurements and molecular modeling indicated that BMP2-(PEO-HA) 2 exists in several folded and extended conformations, depending on the degree of protonation. Protonation of all basic sites of the hybrid material nearly doubles its conformational space and accessible surface area.

  14. freeQuant: A Mass Spectrometry Label-Free Quantification Software Tool for Complex Proteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ning; Li, Zhenye; Pan, Chao; Duan, Huilong

    2015-01-01

    Study of complex proteome brings forward higher request for the quantification method using mass spectrometry technology. In this paper, we present a mass spectrometry label-free quantification tool for complex proteomes, called freeQuant, which integrated quantification with functional analysis effectively. freeQuant consists of two well-integrated modules: label-free quantification and functional analysis with biomedical knowledge. freeQuant supports label-free quantitative analysis which makes full use of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectral count, protein sequence length, shared peptides, and ion intensity. It adopts spectral count for quantitative analysis and builds a new method for shared peptides to accurately evaluate abundance of isoforms. For proteins with low abundance, MS/MS total ion count coupled with spectral count is included to ensure accurate protein quantification. Furthermore, freeQuant supports the large-scale functional annotations for complex proteomes. Mitochondrial proteomes from the mouse heart, the mouse liver, and the human heart were used to evaluate the usability and performance of freeQuant. The evaluation showed that the quantitative algorithms implemented in freeQuant can improve accuracy of quantification with better dynamic range.

  15. Profiling the metabolic signals involved in chemical communication between microbes using imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stasulli, Nikolas M; Shank, Elizabeth A

    2016-11-01

    The ability of microbes to secrete bioactive chemical signals into their environment has been known for over a century. However, it is only in the last decade that imaging mass spectrometry has provided us with the ability to directly visualize the spatial distributions of these microbial metabolites. This technology involves collecting mass spectra from multiple discrete locations across a biological sample, yielding chemical ‘maps’ that simultaneously reveal the distributions of hundreds of metabolites in two dimensions. Advances in microbial imaging mass spectrometry summarized here have included the identification of novel strain- or coculture-specific compounds, the visualization of biotransformation events (where one metabolite is converted into another by a neighboring microbe), and the implementation of a method to reconstruct the 3D subsurface distributions of metabolites, among others. Here we review the recent literature and discuss how imaging mass spectrometry has spurred novel insights regarding the chemical consequences of microbial interactions.

  16. Rapid multiplexed genotyping for hereditary thrombophilia by SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shangbin; Xu, Lihui; Wu, Haifeng M

    2010-03-01

    Approximately 50% of patients with venous thromboembolism also present with hereditary predisposition. The most common genetic factors are single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T. Genotyping these SNPs helps clinicians to correctly diagnose the disease and properly manage patients. In this study, we report a novel method using surface-enhanced laser desorption and ionization time of flight mass spectrometry to rapidly genotype, in a multiplex fashion, 3 SNPs that predispose patients to thrombosis. First, patient DNA samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction to amplify and extend the DNA products with masses corresponding to specific genotypes. Polymerase chain reaction products were then applied to Q10 anionic protein chips, undergoing on-chip sample enrichment and clean-up. Finally, the genotypes of the SNPs were determined by surface-enhanced laser desorption and ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. This method offers a rapid turnaround time of less than 5 hours from sample collection to result reporting. The analytical accuracy of each SNP genotyping result has been confirmed by DNA sequencing. In addition, the genotype results produced by this method were validated by comparing them with results obtained by the approved method in the clinical reference laboratory. This novel method is fast, accurate, and reproducible, and thus provides an excellent platform to promote personalized medicine in the management of clotting disorders.

  17. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  18. Evaluation of chemical labeling methods for identifying functional arginine residues of proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wanigasekara, Maheshika S K; Chowdhury, Saiful M

    2016-09-07

    Arginine residues undergo several kinds of post-translational modifications (PTMs). These PTMs are associated with several inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Mass spectrometric studies of arginine modified proteins and peptides are very important, not only to identify the reactive arginine residues but also to understand the tandem mass spectrometry behavior of these peptides for assigning the sequences unambiguously. Herein, we utilize tandem mass spectrometry to report the performance of two widely used arginine labeling reagents, 1,2-cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylglyoxal (PG) with several arginine containing peptides and proteins. Time course labeling studies were performed to demonstrate the selectivity of the reagents in proteins or protein digests. Structural studies on the proteins were also explored to better understand the reaction sites and position of arginine residues. We found CHD showed better labeling efficiencies compared to phenylglyoxal. Reactive arginine profiling on a purified albumin protein clearly pointed out the cellular glycation modification site for this protein with high confidence. We believe these detailed mass-spectrometric studies will provide significant input to profile reactive arginine residues in large-scale studies; therefore, targeted proteomics can be performed to the short listed reactive sites for cellular arginine modifications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation into accurate mass capability of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, with respect to radical ion species.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Mark F; Stein, Bridget K; Brenton, A Gareth

    2006-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) has been shown to be an effective technique for the characterization of organometallic, coordination, and highly conjugated compounds. The preferred matrix is 2-[(2E)-3-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-2-methylprop-2-enylidene]malononitrile (DCTB), with radical ions observed. However, MALDI-TOFMS is generally not favored for accurate mass measurement. A specific method had to be developed for such compounds to assure the quality of our accurate mass results. Therefore, in this preliminary study, two methods of data acquisition, and both even-electron (EE+) ion and odd-electron (OE+.) radical ion mass calibration standards, have been investigated to establish the basic measurement technique. The benefit of this technique is demonstrated for a copper compound for which ions were observed by MALDI, but not by electrospray (ESI) or liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (LSIMS); a mean mass accuracy error of -1.2 ppm was obtained.

  20. A new method for differentiating adducts of common drinking water DBPs from higher molecular weight DBPs in electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiangru

    2009-05-01

    With the presence of bromide in source waters, numerous brominated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are formed during chlorination. Many of them are polar/highly polar DBPs and thus hard to be detected by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) is reported to be an effective method in finding polar brominated DBPs by setting precursor ion scans of m/z 79 and 81. But as a soft ionization technique, ESI could form adducts of common DBPs, which may complicate ESI-MS/MS spectra and hinder the efforts in finding new brominated DBPs. In this paper, a new method was developed for differentiating adducts of common DBPs from higher molecular weight DBPs. This method was based on the ESI-MS/MS precursor ion scans of the fragments that correspond to the molecular ions of common DBPs. Adducts of common DBPs were selectively detected in the ESI-MS/MS spectra of a simulated drinking water sample. Moreover, the structures of several new brominated DBPs in the sample were tentatively proposed.

  1. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assay method for the therapeutic drug monitoring of the antiepileptic drug tiagabine.

    PubMed

    Chollet, D F; Castella, E; Goumaz, L; Anderegg, G

    1999-11-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assay method suitable for the therapeutic drug monitoring of the antiepileptic drug tiagabine is described. Tiagabine and its desmethylated analogue used as internal standard were first extracted from serum by liquid-liquid extraction using an ethyl ether-isobutanol 98:2 mixture. Tiagabine and the internal standard were then methylated in the organic phase in presence of methanol by means of a safe and stable diazomethane derivative. After evaporation, the reconstituted extracts were chromatographed on a crosslinked phenyl methyl siloxane capillary column and detected by mass fragmentometry at m/z = 156. No other antiepileptic drug possibly administrated in polytherapy and no metabolite were found to interfere in the assay. The limit of quantification was 5 ng/ml. The precision and the accuracy were found to be suitable for the therapeutic drug monitoring of tiagabine.

  2. Parallel Exploration of Interaction Space by BioID and Affinity Purification Coupled to Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Geoffrey G; Youn, Ji-Young; Samavarchi-Tehrani, Payman; Raught, Brian; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2017-01-01

    Complete understanding of cellular function requires knowledge of the composition and dynamics of protein interaction networks, the importance of which spans all molecular cell biology fields. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches are instrumental in this process, with affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (AP-MS) now widely used for defining interaction landscapes. Traditional AP-MS methods are well suited to providing information regarding the temporal aspects of soluble protein-protein interactions, but the requirement to maintain protein-protein interactions during cell lysis and AP means that both weak-affinity interactions and spatial information is lost. A more recently developed method called BioID employs the expression of bait proteins fused to a nonspecific biotin ligase, BirA*, that induces in vivo biotinylation of proximal proteins. Coupling this method to biotin affinity enrichment and mass spectrometry negates many of the solubility and interaction strength issues inherent in traditional AP-MS methods, and provides unparalleled spatial context for protein interactions. Here we describe the parallel implementation of both BioID and FLAG AP-MS allowing simultaneous exploration of both spatial and temporal aspects of protein interaction networks.

  3. Future Directions of Structural Mass Spectrometry using Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Kiselar, Janna G.; Chance, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry has been developed over the last decade and has matured to a powerful method for analyzing protein structure and dynamics. It has been successfully applied in the analysis of protein structure, protein folding, protein dynamics, and protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Using synchrotron radiolysis, exposures of proteins to a “white” x-ray beam for milliseconds provide sufficient oxidative modifications to surface amino acid side chains that can be easily detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. Thus, conformational changes in proteins or protein complexes can be examined using a time-resolved approach, which would be a valuable method for the study of macromolecular dynamics. In this review, we describe a new application of hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to probe the time evolution of the calcium-dependent conformational changes of gelsolin on the millisecond timescale. The data suggest a cooperative transition as multiple sites in different molecular sub-domains have similar rates of conformational change. These findings demonstrate that time-resolved protein footprinting is suitable for studies of protein dynamics that occur over periods ranging from milliseconds to seconds. In this review we also show how the structural resolution and sensitivity of the technology can be improved as well. The hydroxyl radical varies in its reactivity to different side chains by over two orders of magnitude, thus oxidation of amino acid side chains of lower reactivity are more rarely observed in such experiments. Here we demonstrate that selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based method can be utilized for quantification of oxidized species, improving the signal to noise ratio. This expansion of the set of oxidized residues of lower reactivity will improve the overall structural resolution of the technique. This approach is also suggested as a basis for developing hypothesis driven

  4. A comparative study of 129I content in environmental standard materials IAEA-375, NIST SRM 4354 and NIST SRM 4357 by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, John; Adamic, Mary; Snyder, Darin

    Iodine environmental measurements have consistently been backed up in the literature by standard materials like IAEA-375, Chernobyl Soil. There are not many other sources of a certified reference material for 129I content for mass spectrometry measurements. Some that have been found in the literature include NIST-4354 and NIST-4357. They are still available at the time of this writing. They don’t have certified content or isotopic values. There has been some work in the literature to show that iodine is present, but there hasn’t been enough to establish a consensus value. These materials have been analyzed at INL through two separatemore » mass spectrometry techniques. They involve a combustion method of the starting material in oxygen, followed by TIMS analysis and a leaching preparation analyzed by accelerator mass spectrometry. Combustion/TIMS preparation of NIST SRM-4354 resulted in a 129I/127I ratio of 1.92 x 10-6 which agrees with AMS measurements which measured the 129I/127I ratio to be 1.93 x 10-6.« less

  5. Native Mass Spectrometry: What is in the Name?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leney, Aneika C.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2017-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is nowadays one of the cornerstones of biomolecular mass spectrometry and proteomics. Advances in sample preparation and mass analyzers have enabled researchers to extract much more information from biological samples than just the molecular weight. In particular, relevant for structural biology, noncovalent protein-protein and protein-ligand complexes can now also be analyzed by MS. For these types of analyses, assemblies need to be retained in their native quaternary state in the gas phase. This initial small niche of biomolecular mass spectrometry, nowadays often referred to as "native MS," has come to maturation over the last two decades, with dozens of laboratories using it to study mostly protein assemblies, but also DNA and RNA-protein assemblies, with the goal to define structure-function relationships. In this perspective, we describe the origins of and (re)define the term native MS, portraying in detail what we meant by "native MS," when the term was coined and also describing what it does (according to us) not entail. Additionally, we describe a few examples highlighting what native MS is, showing its successes to date while illustrating the wide scope this technology has in solving complex biological questions.

  6. A simple method to identify ether lipids in spermatozoa samples by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nimptsch, Ariane; Fuchs, Beate; Süß, Rosmarie; Zschörnig, Kristin; Jakop, Ulrike; Göritz, Frank; Schiller, Jürgen; Müller, Karin

    2013-08-01

    Plasmalogens (alkenylacyl glycerophospholipids) are important lipid constituents of many tissues and cells (e.g., selected spermatozoa). Since the molecular weights of plasmalogens overlap with that of diacyl- or alkyl acyl lipids, sophisticated mass spectrometry (MS; including MS/MS) analysis is normally used for the unequivocal identification of plasmalogens. We will show here that a simple matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (without MS/MS capability) in combination with acidic hydrolysis and subsequent derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and/or digestion with phospholipase A2 (PLA2) is sufficient to determine the contributions of ether lipids in spermatozoa extracts. As neither diacyl nor alkylacyl lipids are sensitive to acids and do not react with DNPH, the comparison of the mass spectra before and after treatment with acids and/or DNPH addition readily provides unequivocal information about the plasmalogen content. Additionally, the released aldehydes are readily converted into the 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones and can be easily identified in the corresponding negative ion mass spectra. Finally, PLA2 digestion is very useful in confirming the presence of plasmalogens. The suggested method was validated by analyzing roe deer, bovine, boar, and domestic cat spermatozoa extracts and comparing the results with isolated phospholipids.

  7. "EMERGING" POLLUTANTS, MASS SPECTROMETRY, AND COMMUNICATING SCIENCE: PHARMACEUTICALS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A foundation for Environmental Science - Mass Spectrometry: Historically fundamental to amassing our understanding of environmental processes and chemical pollution is the realm of mass spectrometry - the mainstay of analytical chemistry - the workhorse that supplies much of the...

  8. A novel amino acid analysis method using derivatization of multiple functional groups followed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yohei; Kinumi, Tomoya; Yamazaki, Taichi; Takatsu, Akiko

    2015-03-21

    We have developed a novel amino acid analysis method using derivatization of multiple functional groups (amino, carboxyl, and phenolic hydroxyl groups). The amino, carboxyl, and phenolic hydroxyl groups of the amino acids were derivatized with 1-bromobutane so that the hydrophobicities and basicities of the amino acids were improved. The derivatized amino acids, including amino group-modified amino acids, could be detected with high sensitivity using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, 17 amino acids obtained by hydrolyzing proteins and 4 amino group-modified amino acids found in the human body (N,N-dimethylglycine, N-formyl-L-methionine, L-pyroglutamic acid, and sarcosine) were selected as target compounds. The 21 derivatized amino acids could be separated using an octadecyl-silylated silica column within 20 min and simultaneously detected. The detection limits for the 21 amino acids were 5.4-91 fmol, and the calibration curves were linear over the range of 10-100 nmol L(-1) (r(2) > 0.9984) with good repeatability. A confirmatory experiment showed that our proposed method could be applied to the determination of a protein certified reference material using the analysis of 12 amino acids combined with isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Furthermore, the proposed method was successfully applied to a stable isotope-coded derivatization method using 1-bromobutane and 1-bromobutane-4,4,4-d3 for comparative analysis of amino acids in human serum.

  9. EPA Method 8321B (SW-846): Solvent-Extractable Nonvolatile Compounds by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Thermospray-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-TS-MS) or Ultraviolet (UV) Detection

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Method 8321B describes procedures for preparation and analysis of solid, aqueous liquid, drinking water and wipe samples using high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for extractable non-volatile compounds.

  10. Protein Quantification by Elemental Mass Spectrometry: An Experiment for Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Gunnar; Ickert, Stefanie; Wegner, Nina; Nehring, Andreas; Beck, Sebastian; Tiemann, Ruediger; Linscheid, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    A multiday laboratory experiment was designed to integrate inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in the context of protein quantification into an advanced practical course in analytical and environmental chemistry. Graduate students were familiar with the analytical methods employed, whereas the combination of bioanalytical assays…

  11. Parsimonious Charge Deconvolution for Native Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Charge deconvolution infers the mass from mass over charge (m/z) measurements in electrospray ionization mass spectra. When applied over a wide input m/z or broad target mass range, charge-deconvolution algorithms can produce artifacts, such as false masses at one-half or one-third of the correct mass. Indeed, a maximum entropy term in the objective function of MaxEnt, the most commonly used charge deconvolution algorithm, favors a deconvolved spectrum with many peaks over one with fewer peaks. Here we describe a new “parsimonious” charge deconvolution algorithm that produces fewer artifacts. The algorithm is especially well-suited to high-resolution native mass spectrometry of intact glycoproteins and protein complexes. Deconvolution of native mass spectra poses special challenges due to salt and small molecule adducts, multimers, wide mass ranges, and fewer and lower charge states. We demonstrate the performance of the new deconvolution algorithm on a range of samples. On the heavily glycosylated plasma properdin glycoprotein, the new algorithm could deconvolve monomer and dimer simultaneously and, when focused on the m/z range of the monomer, gave accurate and interpretable masses for glycoforms that had previously been analyzed manually using m/z peaks rather than deconvolved masses. On therapeutic antibodies, the new algorithm facilitated the analysis of extensions, truncations, and Fab glycosylation. The algorithm facilitates the use of native mass spectrometry for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of protein and protein assemblies. PMID:29376659

  12. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1987-11-10

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface. 8 figs.

  13. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  14. Determination of toxic compounds in paper-recycling process waters by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rigol, A; Latorre, A; Lacorte, S; Barceló, D

    2002-07-19

    Three analytical methods were developed for the determination of toxic compounds in recirculating waters of a paper-recycling industry. Three main groups of compounds were considered: (i) wood extractives originated from the raw material; (ii) biocides added during the production process and (iii) surfactants and other adjuvants present in the formulates of these biocides. Wood extractives considered in this study included fatty and resin acids. They were analysed by liquid-liquid extraction using methyl tert.-butyl ether, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for previous formation of the respective trimethylsilyl esters. Water samples were also extracted with Oasis HLB (copolymer [poly(divinylbenzene-co-N-vinylpyrrolidone]) solid-phase extraction cartridges of 60 mg and analysed by liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry for the determination of additives and biocides. Using these two approaches levels up to 15 mg/l for total resin and fatty acids, 5 mg/l for alkylbenzene sulfonates and 2-(thiocyanomethylthio)benzotiazol, 100 microg/l for bisphenol A and 2,2-dibromo-3-nitrilepropionamide, and 300 microg/l for nonylphenol ethoxycarboxylate were detected in process waters at different production treatment stages. These levels are of relevance since poor water quality affects the paper-recycling process, the primary water treatment process and eventually, the environmental water quality.

  15. Detection of Biomarkers of Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri Through Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Hercules; Izquierdo, Fernando; Woolfitt, Adrian R.; Wagner, Glauber; Pinto, Tatiana; del Aguila, Carmen; Barr, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Emerging methods based on mass spectrometry (MS) can be used in the rapid identification of microorganisms. Thus far, these practical and rapidly evolving methods have mainly been applied to characterize prokaryotes. We applied matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF MS in the analysis of whole cells of 18 N. fowleri isolates belonging to three genotypes. Fourteen originated from the cerebrospinal fluid or brain tissue of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis patients and four originated from water samples of hot springs, rivers, lakes or municipal water supplies. Whole Naegleria trophozoites grown in axenic cultures were washed and mixed with MALDI matrix. Mass spectra were acquired with a 4700 TOF-TOF instrument. MALDI-TOF MS yielded consistent patterns for all isolates examined. Using a combination of novel data processing methods for visual peak comparison, statistical analysis and proteomics database searching we were able to detect several biomarkers that can differentiate all species and isolates studied, along with common biomarkers for all N. fowleri isolates. Naegleria fowleri could be easily separated from other species within the genus Naegleria. A number of peaks detected were tentatively identified. MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting is a rapid, reproducible, high-throughput alternative method for identifying Naegleria isolates. This method has potential for studying eukaryotic agents. PMID:25231600

  16. The identification and characterization of non-coding and coding RNAs and their modified nucleosides by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Kirk W; Limbach, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of ribonucleic acids (RNA) by mass spectrometry has been a valuable analytical approach for more than 25 years. In fact, mass spectrometry has become a method of choice for the analysis of modified nucleosides from RNA isolated out of biological samples. This review summarizes recent progress that has been made in both nucleoside and oligonucleotide mass spectral analysis. Applications of mass spectrometry in the identification, characterization and quantification of modified nucleosides are discussed. At the oligonucleotide level, advances in modern mass spectrometry approaches combined with the standard RNA modification mapping protocol enable the characterization of RNAs of varying lengths ranging from low molecular weight short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to the extremely large 23 S rRNAs. New variations and improvements to this protocol are reviewed, including top-down strategies, as these developments now enable qualitative and quantitative measurements of RNA modification patterns in a variety of biological systems. PMID:25616408

  17. The identification and characterization of non-coding and coding RNAs and their modified nucleosides by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Kirk W; Limbach, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of ribonucleic acids (RNA) by mass spectrometry has been a valuable analytical approach for more than 25 years. In fact, mass spectrometry has become a method of choice for the analysis of modified nucleosides from RNA isolated out of biological samples. This review summarizes recent progress that has been made in both nucleoside and oligonucleotide mass spectral analysis. Applications of mass spectrometry in the identification, characterization and quantification of modified nucleosides are discussed. At the oligonucleotide level, advances in modern mass spectrometry approaches combined with the standard RNA modification mapping protocol enable the characterization of RNAs of varying lengths ranging from low molecular weight short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to the extremely large 23 S rRNAs. New variations and improvements to this protocol are reviewed, including top-down strategies, as these developments now enable qualitative and quantitative measurements of RNA modification patterns in a variety of biological systems.

  18. Revealing Individual Lifestyles through Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Chemical Compounds in Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Hinners, Paige; O'Neill, Kelly C; Lee, Young Jin

    2018-03-26

    Fingerprints, specifically the ridge details within the print, have long been used in forensic investigations for individual identification. Beyond the ridge detail, fingerprints contain useful chemical information. The study of fingerprint chemical information has become of interest, especially with mass spectrometry imaging technologies. Mass spectrometry imaging visualizes the spatial relationship of each compound detected, allowing ridge detail and chemical information in a single analysis. In this work, a range of exogenous fingerprint compounds that may reveal a personal lifestyle were studied using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Studied chemical compounds include various brands of bug sprays and sunscreens, as well as food oils, alcohols, and citrus fruits. Brand differentiation and source determination were possible based on the active ingredients or exclusive compounds left in fingerprints. Tandem mass spectrometry was performed for the key compounds, so that these compounds could be confidently identified in a single multiplex mass spectrometry imaging data acquisition.

  19. A validated method for measurement of serum total, serum free, and salivary cortisol, using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution ESI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Montskó, Gergely; Tarjányi, Zita; Mezősi, Emese; Kovács, Gábor L

    2014-04-01

    Blood cortisol level is routinely analysed in laboratory medicine, but the immunoassays in widespread use have the disadvantage of cross-reactivity with some commonly used steroid drugs. Mass spectrometry has become a method of increasing importance for cortisol estimation. However, current methods do not offer the option of accurate mass identification. Our objective was to develop a mass spectrometry method to analyse salivary, serum total, and serum free cortisol via accurate mass identification. The analysis was performed on a Bruker micrOTOF high-resolution mass spectrometer. Sample preparation involved protein precipitation, serum ultrafiltration, and solid-phase extraction. Limit of quantification was 12.5 nmol L(-1) for total cortisol, 440 pmol L(-1) for serum ultrafiltrate, and 600 pmol L(-1) for saliva. Average intra-assay variation was 4.7%, and inter-assay variation was 6.6%. Mass accuracy was <2.5 ppm. Serum total cortisol levels were in the range 35.6-1088 nmol L(-1), and serum free cortisol levels were in the range 0.5-12.4 nmol L(-1). Salivary cortisol levels were in the range 0.7-10.4 nmol L(-1). Mass accuracy was equal to or below 2.5 ppm, resulting in a mass error less than 1 mDa and thus providing high specificity. We did not observe any interference with routinely used steroidal drugs. The method is capable of specific cortisol quantification in different matrices on the basis of accurate mass identification.

  20. FDR-controlled metabolite annotation for high-resolution imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Andrew; Phapale, Prasad; Chernyavsky, Ilya; Lavigne, Regis; Fay, Dominik; Tarasov, Artem; Kovalev, Vitaly; Fuchser, Jens; Nikolenko, Sergey; Pineau, Charles; Becker, Michael; Alexandrov, Theodore

    2017-01-01

    High-mass-resolution imaging mass spectrometry promises to localize hundreds of metabolites in tissues, cell cultures, and agar plates with cellular resolution, but it is hampered by the lack of bioinformatics tools for automated metabolite identification. We report pySM, a framework for false discovery rate (FDR)-controlled metabolite annotation at the level of the molecular sum formula, for high-mass-resolution imaging mass spectrometry (https://github.com/alexandrovteam/pySM). We introduce a metabolite-signal match score and a target-decoy FDR estimate for spatial metabolomics.

  1. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Biemann, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    I review laboratory research on the development of mass spectrometric methodology for the determination of the structure of natural products of biological and medical interest, which I conducted from 1958 to the end of the twentieth century. The methodology was developed by converting small peptides to their corresponding polyamino alcohols to make them amenable to mass spectrometry, thereby making it applicable to whole proteins. The structures of alkaloids were determined by analyzing the fragmentation of a known alkaloid and then using the results to deduce the structures of related compounds. Heparin-like structures were investigated by determining their molecular weights from the mass of protonated molecular ions of complexes with highly basic, synthetic peptides. Mass spectrometry was also employed in the analysis of lunar material returned by the Apollo missions. A miniaturized gas chromatograph mass spectrometer was sent to Mars on board of the two Viking 1976 spacecrafts.

  2. A candidate reference method for serum potassium measurement by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Han, Bingqing; Zeng, Jie; Zhou, Weiyan; Zhang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Jiangtao; Chen, Wenxiang; Zhang, Chuanbao

    2017-08-28

    Potassium is an important serum ion that is frequently assayed in clinical laboratories. Quality assurance requires reference methods; thus, the establishment of a candidate reference method for serum potassium measurements is important. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method was developed. Serum samples were gravimetrically spiked with an aluminum internal standard, digested with 69% ultrapure nitric acid, and diluted to the required concentration. The 39K/27Al ratios were measured by ICP-MS in hydrogen mode. The method was calibrated using 5% nitric acid matrix calibrators, and the calibration function was established using the bracketing method. The correlation coefficients between the measured 39K/27Al ratios and the analyte concentration ratios were >0.9999. The coefficients of variation were 0.40%, 0.68%, and 0.22% for the three serum samples, and the analytical recovery was 99.8%. The accuracy of the measurement was also verified by measuring certified reference materials, SRM909b and SRM956b. Comparison with the ion selective electrode routine method and international inter-laboratory comparisons gave satisfied results. The new ICP-MS method is specific, precise, simple, and low-cost, and it may be used as a candidate reference method for standardizing serum potassium measurements.

  3. Comparison of a bioassay and a liquid chromatography-fluorescence-mass spectrometry(n) method for the detection of incurred enrofloxacin residues in chicken tissues.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M J; Donoghue, D J

    2004-05-01

    Regulatory monitoring for most antibiotic residues in edible poultry tissues is often accomplished with accurate, although expensive and technically demanding, chemical analytical techniques. The purpose of this study is to determine if a simple, inexpensive bioassay could detect fluoroquinolone (FQ) residues in chicken muscle above the FDA established tolerance (300 ppb) comparable to a liquid chromatography-fluorescencemass spectrometry(n) method. To produce incurred enrofloxacin (ENRO) tissues (where ENRO is incorporated into complex tissue matrices) for the method comparison, 40-d-old broilers (mixed sex) were orally dosed through drinking water for 3 d at the FDA-approved dose of ENRO (50 ppm). At the end of each day of the 3-d dosing period and for 3 d postdosing, birds were sacrificed and breast and thigh muscle collected and analyzed. Both methods were able to detect ENRO at and below the tolerance level in the muscle, with limits of detection of 26 ppb (bioassay), 0.1 ppb for ENRO, and 0.5 ppb for the ENRO metabolite, ciprofloxacin (liquid chromatography-fluorescence-mass spectrometry(n)). All samples that had violative levels of antibiotic were detected by the bioassay. These results support the use of this bioassay as a screening method for examining large numbers of samples for regulatory monitoring. Positive samples should then be examined by a more extensive method, such as liquid chromatography-fluorescence-mass spectrometry(n), to provide confirmation of the analyte.

  4. Profiling Changes in Histone Post-translational Modifications by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mowei; Wu, Si; Stenoien, David L; Zhang, Zhaorui; Connolly, Lanelle; Freitag, Michael; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2017-01-01

    Top-down mass spectrometry is a valuable tool for understanding gene expression through characterization of combinatorial histone post-translational modifications (i.e., histone code). In this protocol, we describe a top-down workflow that employs liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS), for fast global profiling of changes in histone proteoforms, and apply LCMS top-down approach for comparative analysis of a wild-type and a mutant fungal species. The proteoforms exhibiting differential abundances can be subjected to further targeted studies by other MS or orthogonal (e.g., biochemical) assays. This method can be generally adapted for screening of changes in histone modifications between samples such as wild type vs. mutant or healthy vs. diseased.

  5. Speciation of arsenic in marine food (Anemonia sulcata) by liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and organic mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Acuña, M; García-Barrera, T; García-Sevillano, M A; Gómez-Ariza, J L

    2013-03-22

    Arsenic species have been investigated in Anemonia sulcata, which is frequently consumed food staple in Spain battered in wheat flour and fried with olive oil. Speciation in tissue extracts was carried out by anion/cation exchange chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-(AEC/CEC)-ICP-MS). Three methods for the extraction of arsenic species were investigated (ultrasonic bath, ultrasonic probe and focused microwave) and the optimal one was applied. Arsenic speciation was carried out in raw and cooked anemone and the dominant species are dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) followed by arsenobetaine (AB), As(V), monomethylarsonic acid (MA(V)), tetramethylarsonium ion (TETRA) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO). In addition, arsenocholine (AsC), glyceryl phosphorylarsenocholine (GPAsC) and dimethylarsinothioic acid (DMAS) were identified by liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). These results are interesting since GPAsC has been previously reported in marine organisms after experimental exposure to AsC, but not in natural samples. In addition, this paper reports for the first time the identification of DMAS in marine food. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods for the quantitation of Anisakis simplex proteins in fish.

    PubMed

    Fæste, Christiane Kruse; Moen, Anders; Schniedewind, Björn; Haug Anonsen, Jan; Klawitter, Jelena; Christians, Uwe

    2016-02-05

    The parasite Anisakis simplex is present in many marine fish species that are directly used as food or in processed products. The anisakid larvae infect mostly the gut and inner organs of fish but have also been shown to penetrate into the fillet. Thus, human health can be at risk, either by contracting anisakiasis through the consumption of raw or under-cooked fish, or by sensitisation to anisakid proteins in processed food. A number of different methods for the detection of A. simplex in fish and products thereof have been developed, including visual techniques and PCR for larvae tracing, and immunological assays for the determination of proteins. The recent identification of a number of anisakid proteins by mass spectrometry-based proteomics has laid the groundwork for the development of two quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods for the detection of A. simplex in fish that are described in the present study. Both, the label-free semi-quantitative nLC-nESI-Orbitrap-MS/MS (MS1) and the heavy peptide-applying absolute-quantitative (AQUA) LC-TripleQ-MS/MS (MS2) use unique reporter peptides derived from anisakid hemoglobin and SXP/RAL-2 protein as analytes. Standard curves in buffer and in salmon matrix showed limits of detection at 1μg/mL and 10μg/mL for MS1 and 0.1μg/mL and 2μg/mL for MS2. Preliminary method validation included the assessment of sensitivity, repeatability, reproducibility, and applicability to incurred and naturally-contaminated samples for both assays. By further optimization and full validation in accordance with current recommendations the LC-MS/MS methods could be standardized and used generally as confirmative techniques for the detection of A. simplex protein in fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Mg Tracer Diffusion: Issues and Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tuggle, Jay; Giordani, Andrew; Kulkarni, Nagraj S

    2014-01-01

    A Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) method has been developed to measure stable Mg isotope tracer diffusion. This SIMS method was then used to calculate Mg self- diffusivities and the data was verified against historical data measured using radio tracers. The SIMS method has been validated as a reliable alternative to the radio-tracer technique for the measurement of Mg self-diffusion coefficients and can be used as a routine method for determining diffusion coefficients.

  8. Determination of Grayanotoxins from Rhododendron brachycarpum in Dietary Supplements and Homemade Wine by Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time-of-Flight-Mass Spectrometry and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Taeik; Noh, Eunyoung; Jeong, Ji Hye; Park, Sung-Kwan; Shin, Dongwoo; Kang, Hoil

    2018-02-28

    A sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) method combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for the determination of grayanotoxins I and III in dietary supplements and homemade wine. Grayanotoxins I and III were successfully extracted using solid-phase extraction cartridges, characterized by LC-QTOF-MS, and quantitated by LC-MS/MS. The LC-MS/MS calibration curves were linear over concentrations of 10-100 ng/mL (grayanotoxin I) and 20-400 ng/mL (grayanotoxin III). Grayanotoxins I and III were found in 51 foodstuffs, with quantitative determinations revealing total toxin concentrations of 18.4-101 000 ng/mL (grayanotoxin I) and 15.3-56 000 ng/mL (grayanotoxin III). The potential of the validated method was demonstrated by successful quantitative analysis of grayanotoxins I and III in dietary supplements and homemade wine; the method appears suitable for the routine detection of grayanotoxins I and III from Rhododendron brachycarpum.

  9. Method and apparatus for multispray emitter for mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Lin, Yuehe

    2004-12-14

    A method and apparatus that utilizes two or more emitters simultaneously to form an electrospray of a sample that is then directed into a mass spectrometer, thereby increasing the total ion current introduced into an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer, given a liquid flow rate of a sample. The method and apparatus are most conveniently constructed as an array of spray emitters fabricated on a single chip, however, the present invention encompasses any apparatus wherein two or more emitters are simultaneously utilized to form an electrospray of a sample that is then directed into a mass spectrometer.

  10. Determination of nandrolone metabolites in human urine: comparison between liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buiarelli, Francesca; Giannetti, Luigi; Jasionowska, Renata; Cruciani, Claudia; Neri, Bruno

    2010-07-15

    Nandrolone (19-nortestosterone) is an androgenic anabolic steroid illegally used as a growth-promoting agent in animal breeding and as a performance enhancer in athletics. Therefore, its use was officially banned in 1974 by the Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). Following nandrolone administration, the main metabolites in humans are 19-norandrosterone, 19-norethiocolanolone and 19-norepiandrosterone, and their presence in urine is the basis of detecting its abuse. The present work was undertaken to determine, in human urine, nandrolone metabolites (phase I and phase II) by developing and comparing multiresidue liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods. A double extraction by solid-phase extraction (SPE) was necessary for the complete elimination of the interfering compounds. The proposed methods were also tested on a real positive sample, and they allow us to determine the conjugated/free fractions ratio reducing the risk of false positive or misleading results and they should allow laboratories involved in doping control analysis to monitor the illegal use of steroids. The advantages of LC/MS/MS over GC/MS (which is the technique mainly used) include the elimination of the hydrolysis and derivatization steps: it is known that during enzymatic hydrolysis several steroids can be converted into related compounds and deconjugation is not always 100% effective. The validation parameters for the two methods were similar (limit of quantification (LOQ) <1 ng/mL and percentage coefficient of variance (CV%) <16.4), and both were able to confirm unambiguously all the analytes, thus confirming the validity of both techniques. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Steroid Profiling by Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry and High Performance Liquid Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry for Adrenal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Matthew, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The ability to measure steroid hormone concentrations in blood and urine specimens is central to the diagnosis and proper treatment of adrenal diseases. The traditional approach has been to assay each steroid hormone, precursor, or metabolite using individual aliquots of serum, each with a separate immunoassay. For complex diseases, such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia and adrenocortical cancer, in which the assay of several steroids is essential for management, this approach is time consuming and costly, in addition to using large amounts of serum. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry profiling of steroid metabolites in urine has been employed for many years but only in a small number of specialized laboratories and suffers from slow throughput. The advent of commercial high-performance liquid chromatography instruments coupled to tandem mass spectrometers offers the potential for medium- to high-throughput profiling of serum steroids using small quantities of sample. Here, we review the physical principles of mass spectrometry, the instrumentation used for these techniques, the terminology used in this field and applications to steroid analysis. PMID:22170384

  12. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of whole-grain phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Koistinen, Ville Mikael; Hanhineva, Kati

    2017-05-24

    Whole grains are a rich source of several classes of phytochemicals, such as alkylresorcinols, benzoxazinoids, flavonoids, lignans, and phytosterols. A high intake of whole grains has been linked to a reduced risk of some major noncommunicable diseases, and it has been postulated that a complex mixture of phytochemicals works in synergy to generate beneficial health effects. Mass spectrometry, especially when coupled with liquid chromatography, is a widely used method for the analysis of phytochemicals owing to its high sensitivity and dynamic range. In this review, the current knowledge of the mass spectral properties of the most important classes of phytochemicals found in cereals of common wheat, barley, oats, and rye is discussed.

  13. Newborn screening for sickling and other haemoglobin disorders using tandem mass spectrometry: A pilot study of methodology in laboratories in England.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Yvonne A; Henthorn, Joan

    2016-12-01

    To determine (i) if electrospray mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry with the SpOtOn Diagnostics Ltd reagent kit for sickle cell screening could be integrated into the English newborn screening programme, under routine screening conditions, and provide mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry results which match existing methods, and (ii) if common action values could be set for all manufacturers in the study, for all assessed haemoglobins, to indicate which samples require further investigation. Anonymised residual blood spots were analysed using the SpOtOn reagent kit as per manufacturer's instructions, in parallel with existing techniques at four laboratories. Mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry instrumentation at Laboratories A and B was AB Sciex (Warrington, UK) AP4000, and at Laboratories C and D, Waters Micromass (Manchester, UK), Xevo TQMS and Premier, respectively. There were 23,898 results accepted from the four laboratories. Excellent specificity at 100% sensitivity was observed for haemoglobin S, haemoglobin C, haemoglobin E and haemoglobin O Arab . A common action value was not possible for Hb C, but action values were set by manufacturer. The two haemoglobin D Punjab cases at Laboratory D were not detected using the common action value. Conversely, false-positive results with haemoglobin D Punjab were a problem at the remaining three laboratories. This multicentre study demonstrates that it is possible to implement mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry into an established screening programme while maintaining consistency with existing methods for haemoglobinopathy screening. However, one of the instruments investigated cannot be recommended for use with this application. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Nucleic Acid analysis by fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Frahm, J L; Muddiman, D C

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometers measure an intrinsic property (i.e., mass) of a molecule, which makes it an ideal platform for nucleic acid analysis. Importantly, the unparalleled capabilities of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry further extend its usefulness for nucleic acid analysis. The beginning of the twenty-first century has been marked with notable advances in the field of FT-ICR mass spectrometry analysis of nucleic acids. Some of these accomplishments include fundamental studies of nucleic acid properties, improvements in sample clean up and preparation, better methods to obtain higher mass measurement accuracy, analysis of noncovalent complexes, tandem mass spectrometry, and characterization of peptide nucleic acids. This diverse range of studies will be presented herein.

  15. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 2: Peptide Identification via Molecular Mass Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine analytical tool in the undergraduate curriculum in the form of GC-MS. While relatively few undergraduate programs have incorporated biological mass spectrometry into their programs, the importance of these techniques, as demonstrated by their recognition with the 2002 Nobel Prize, will hopefully lead to…

  16. Characterization of crude oil biomarkers using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mogollón, Noroska Gabriela Salazar; Prata, Paloma Santana; Dos Reis, Jadson Zeni; Neto, Eugênio Vaz Dos Santos; Augusto, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Oil samples from Recôncavo basin (NE Brazil), previously analyzed by traditional techniques such as gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, were evaluated using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole mass spectrometry and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry along with simplified methods of samples preparation to evaluate the differences and advantages of these analytical techniques to better understand the development of the organic matter in this basin without altering the normal distribution of the compounds in the samples. As a result, the geochemical parameters calculated by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry described better the origin, maturity, and biodegradation of both samples probably by increased selectivity, resolution, and sensitivity inherent of the multidimensional technique. Additionally, the detection of the compounds such as, the C(14α-) homo-26-nor-17α-hopane series, diamoretanes, nor-spergulanes, C19 -C26 A-nor-steranes and 4α-methylsteranes resolved and detected by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry were key to classify and differentiate these lacustrine samples according to their maturity and deposition conditions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Identification of hemoglobin variants by top-down mass spectrometry using selected diagnostic product ions.

    PubMed

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Hartmer, Ralf; Jabs, Wolfgang; Beris, Photis; Clerici, Lorella; Stoermer, Carsten; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis; Tsybin, Yury O; Scherl, Alexander; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Hemoglobin disorder diagnosis is a complex procedure combining several analytical steps. Due to the lack of specificity of the currently used protein analysis methods, the identification of uncommon hemoglobin variants (proteoforms) can become a hard task to accomplish. The aim of this work was to develop a mass spectrometry-based approach to quickly identify mutated protein sequences within globin chain variants. To reach this goal, a top-down electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry method was developed for hemoglobin β chain analysis. A diagnostic product ion list was established with a color code strategy allowing to quickly and specifically localize a mutation in the hemoglobin β chain sequence. The method was applied to the analysis of rare hemoglobin β chain variants and an (A)γ-β fusion protein. The results showed that the developed data analysis process allows fast and reliable interpretation of top-down electron transfer dissociation mass spectra by nonexpert users in the clinical area.

  18. Accurate mass measurement by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. II. Measurement of negative radical ions using porphyrin and fullerene standard reference materials.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhecheng; Wyatt, Mark F; Stein, Bridget K; Brenton, A Gareth

    2010-10-30

    A method for the accurate mass measurement of negative radical ions by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) is described. This is an extension to our previously described method for the accurate mass measurement of positive radical ions (Griffiths NW, Wyatt MF, Kean SD, Graham AE, Stein BK, Brenton AG. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2010; 24: 1629). The porphyrin standard reference materials (SRMs) developed for positive mode measurements cannot be observed in negative ion mode, so fullerene and fluorinated porphyrin compounds were identified as effective SRMs. The method is of immediate practical use for the accurate mass measurement of functionalised fullerenes, for which negative ion MALDI-TOFMS is the principal mass spectrometry characterisation technique. This was demonstrated by the accurate mass measurement of six functionalised C(60) compounds. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Boundaries of mass resolution in native mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lössl, Philip; Snijder, Joost; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-06-01

    Over the last two decades, native mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a valuable tool to study intact proteins and noncovalent protein complexes. Studied experimental systems range from small-molecule (drug)-protein interactions, to nanomachineries such as the proteasome and ribosome, to even virus assembly. In native MS, ions attain high m/z values, requiring special mass analyzers for their detection. Depending on the particular mass analyzer used, instrumental mass resolution does often decrease at higher m/z but can still be above a couple of thousand at m/z 5000. However, the mass resolving power obtained on charge states of protein complexes in this m/z region is experimentally found to remain well below the inherent instrument resolution of the mass analyzers employed. Here, we inquire into reasons for this discrepancy and ask how native MS would benefit from higher instrumental mass resolution. To answer this question, we discuss advantages and shortcomings of mass analyzers used to study intact biomolecules and biomolecular complexes in their native state, and we review which other factors determine mass resolving power in native MS analyses. Recent examples from the literature are given to illustrate the current status and limitations.

  20. FAPA mass spectrometry of designer drugs.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Gierczyk, Blazej; Reszke, Edward; Babij, Michal; Gotszalk, Teodor; Schroeder, Grzegorz; Silberring, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Application of a flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS) for the analysis of designer drugs is described. In this paper, we present application of FAPA MS for identification of exemplary psychotropic drugs: JWH-122, 4BMC, Pentedrone, 3,4-DNNC and ETH-CAT. We have utilized two approaches for introducing samples into the plasma stream; first in the form of a methanolic aerosol from the nebulizer, and the second based on a release of vapors from the electrically heated crucible by thermal desorption. The analytes were ionized by FAPA and identified in the mass analyzer. The order of release of the compounds depends on their volatility. These methods offer fast and reliable structural information, without pre-separation, and can be an alternative to the Electron Impact, GC/MS, and ESI for fast analysis of designer-, and other psychoactive drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Methods of Analysis - Determination of Pyrethroid Insecticides in Water and Sediment Using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle; Smalling, Kelly L.; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    A method for the determination of 14 pyrethroid insecticides in environmental water and sediment samples is described. The method was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in response to increasing concern over the effects of pyrethroids on aquatic organisms. The pyrethroids included in this method are ones that are applied to many agricultural and urban areas. Filtered water samples are extracted for pyrethroids using solid-phase extraction (SPE) with no additional cleanup steps. Sediment and soil samples are extracted using a microwave-assisted extraction system, and the pyrethroids of interest are separated from co-extracted matrix interferences by passing the extracts through stacked graphitized carbon and alumina SPE cartridges, along with the use of high-performance liquid chromatography and gel-permeation chromatography (HPLC/GPC). Quantification of the pyrethroids from the extracted water and sediment samples is done using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) or gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS). Recoveries in test water samples fortified at 10 ng/L ranged from 83 to 107 percent, and recoveries in test sediment samples fortified at 10 ug/kg ranged from 82 to 101 percent; relative standard deviations ranged from 5 to 9 percent in the water samples and 3 to 9 percent in the sediment samples. Method detection limits (MDLs), calculated using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency procedures (40 CFR 136, Appendix B), in water ranged from 2.0 to 6.0 ng/L using GC/MS and 0.5 to 1.0 ng/L using GC/MS/MS. For sediment, the MDLs ranged from 1.0 to 2.6 ug/kg dry weight using GC/MS and 0.2 to 0.5 ug/kg dry weight using GC/MS/MS. The matrix-spike recoveries for each compound, when averaged for 12 environmental water samples, ranged from 84 to 96 percent, and when averaged for 27 environmental sediment samples, ranged from 88 to 100 percent.

  2. Methods of analysis-Determination of pesticides in sediment using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle; McWayne, Megan M.

    2012-01-01

    A method for the determination of 119 pesticides in environmental sediment samples is described. The method was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in support of the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The pesticides included in this method were chosen through prior prioritization. Herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides along with degradates are included in this method and span a variety of chemical classes including, but not limited to, chloroacetanilides, organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, triazines, and triazoles. Sediment samples are extracted by using an accelerated solvent extraction system (ASE®, and the compounds of interest are separated from co-extracted matrix interferences (including sulfur) by passing the extracts through high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with gel-permeation chromatography (GPC) along with the use of either stacked graphitized carbon and alumina solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges or packed Florisil®. Chromatographic separation, detection, and quantification of the pesticides from the sediment-sample extracts are done by using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Recoveries in test sediment samples fortified at 10 micrograms per kilogram (μg/kg) dry weight ranged from 75 to 102 percent; relative standard deviations ranged from 3 to 13 percent. Method detection limits (MDLs), calculated by using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency procedures (40 CFR 136, Appendix B), ranged from 0.6 to 3.4 μg/kg dry weight.

  3. Comparison of the sensitivity of mass spectrometry atmospheric pressure ionization techniques in the analysis of porphyrinoids.

    PubMed

    Swider, Paweł; Lewtak, Jan P; Gryko, Daniel T; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2013-10-01

    The porphyrinoids chemistry is greatly dependent on the data obtained in mass spectrometry. For this reason, it is essential to determine the range of applicability of mass spectrometry ionization methods. In this study, the sensitivity of three different atmospheric pressure ionization techniques, electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization, was tested for several porphyrinods and their metallocomplexes. Electrospray ionization method was shown to be the best ionization technique because of its high sensitivity for derivatives of cyanocobalamin, free-base corroles and porphyrins. In the case of metallocorroles and metalloporphyrins, atmospheric pressure photoionization with dopant proved to be the most sensitive ionization method. It was also shown that for relatively acidic compounds, particularly for corroles, the negative ion mode provides better sensitivity than the positive ion mode. The results supply a lot of relevant information on the methodology of porphyrinoids analysis carried out by mass spectrometry. The information can be useful in designing future MS or liquid chromatography-MS experiments. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Cancer Diagnosis and Surgical Margin Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ifa, Demian R.; Eberlin, Livia S.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a clinical need for new technologies that would enable rapid disease diagnosis based on diagnostic molecular signatures. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry has revolutionized the means by which molecular information can be obtained from tissue samples in real time and with minimal sample pretreatment. New developments in ambient ionization techniques applied to clinical research suggest that ambient ionization mass spectrometry will soon become a routine medical tool for tissue diagnosis. Content This review summarizes the main developments in ambient ionization techniques applied to tissue analysis, with focus on desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, probe electrospray ionization, touch spray, and rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry. We describe their applications to human cancer research and surgical margin evaluation, highlighting integrated approaches tested for ex vivo and in vivo human cancer tissue analysis. We also discuss the challenges for clinical implementation of these tools and offer perspectives on the future of the field. Summary A variety of studies have showcased the value of ambient ionization mass spectrometry for rapid and accurate cancer diagnosis. Small molecules have been identified as potential diagnostic biomarkers, including metabolites, fatty acids, and glycerophospholipids. Statistical analysis allows tissue discrimination with high accuracy rates (>95%) being common. This young field has challenges to overcome before it is ready to be broadly accepted as a medical tool for cancer diagnosis. Growing research in new, integrated ambient ionization mass spectrometry technologies and the ongoing improvements in the existing tools make this field very promising for future translation into the clinic. PMID:26555455

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its use are described. AMS is a highly sensitive method of counting atoms. It is used to detect very low concentrations of natural isotopic abundances (typically in the range between 10(-12) and 10(-16)) of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg and even sub-mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than 1 hr). The equipment used for AMS is almost exclusively based on the electrostatic tandem accelerator, although some of the newest systems are based on a slightly different principle. Dedicated accelerators as well as older "nuclear physics machines" can be found in the 80 or so AMS laboratories in existence today. The most widely used isotope studied with AMS is 14C. Besides radiocarbon dating this isotope is used in climate studies, biomedicine applications and many other fields. More than 100,000 14C samples are measured per year. Other isotopes studied include 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 129I, U, and Pu. Although these measurements are important, the number of samples of these other isotopes measured each year is estimated to be less than 10% of the number of 14C samples. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vestal, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews techniques for online coupling of high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, emphasizing those suitable for application to nonvolatile samples. Also summarizes the present status, strengths, and weaknesses of various techniques and discusses potential applications of recently developed techniques for combined liquid…

  7. Bayesian Integration and Classification of Composition C-4 Plastic Explosives Based on Time-of-Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Christine M; Kelly, Ryan T; Alexander, Liz; Newburn, Matt; Bader, Sydney; Ewing, Robert G; Fahey, Albert J; Atkinson, David A; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2016-04-05

    Time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) were used for characterization and identification of unique signatures from a series of 18 Composition C-4 plastic explosives. The samples were obtained from various commercial and military sources around the country. Positive and negative ion TOF-SIMS data were acquired directly from the C-4 residue on Si surfaces, where the positive ion mass spectra obtained were consistent with the major composition of organic additives, and the negative ion mass spectra were more consistent with explosive content in the C-4 samples. Each series of mass spectra was subjected to partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), a multivariate statistical analysis approach which serves to first find the areas of maximum variance within different classes of C-4 and subsequently to classify unknown samples based on correlations between the unknown data set and the original data set (often referred to as a training data set). This method was able to successfully classify test samples of C-4, though with a limited degree of certainty. The classification accuracy of the method was further improved by integrating the positive and negative ion data using a Bayesian approach. The TOF-SIMS data was combined with a second analytical method, LA-ICPMS, which was used to analyze elemental signatures in the C-4. The integrated data were able to classify test samples with a high degree of certainty. Results indicate that this Bayesian integrated approach constitutes a robust classification method that should be employable even in dirty samples collected in the field.

  8. Homogeneous Matrix Deposition on Dried Agar for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Microbial Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique.

  9. A Compressive Sensing Approach for Glioma Margin Delineation Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Behnood; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Haddad, Wassim M.; Tannenbaum, Allen R.

    2013-01-01

    Surgery, and specifically, tumor resection, is the primary treatment for most patients suffering from brain tumors. Medical imaging techniques, and in particular, magnetic resonance imaging are currently used in diagnosis as well as image-guided surgery procedures. However, studies show that computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging fail to accurately identify the full extent of malignant brain tumors and their microscopic infiltration. Mass spectrometry is a well-known analytical technique used to identify molecules in a given sample based on their mass. In a recent study, it is proposed to use mass spectrometry as an intraoperative tool for discriminating tumor and non-tumor tissue. Integration of mass spectrometry with the resection module allows for tumor resection and immediate molecular analysis. In this paper, we propose a framework for tumor margin delineation using compressive sensing. Specifically, we show that the spatial distribution of tumor cell concentration can be efficiently reconstructed and updated using mass spectrometry information from the resected tissue. In addition, our proposed framework is model-free, and hence, requires no prior information of spatial distribution of the tumor cell concentration. PMID:22255629

  10. Bio-Aerosol Detection Using Mass Spectrometry: Public Health Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ludvigson, Laura D.

    2004-01-01

    I recently spent a summer as an intern at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I worked on a project involving the real-time, reagentless, single cell detection of aerosolized pathogens using a novel mass spectrometry approach called Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS). Based upon preliminary results showing the differentiation capabilities of BAMS, I would like to explore the development and use of this novel detection system in the context of both environmental and clinical sample pathogen detection. I would also like to explore the broader public health applications that a system such as BAMS might have in terms of infectious disease preventionmore » and control. In order to appreciate the potential of this instrument, I will demonstrate the need for better pathogen detection methods, and outline the instrumentation, data analysis and preliminary results that lead me toward a desire to explore this technology further. I will also discuss potential experiments for the future along with possible problems that may be encountered along the way.« less

  11. Comparison of gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for carbon stable-isotope analysis of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Tanja C W; Schierbeek, Henk; Houtekamer, Marco; van Engeland, Tom; Derrien, Delphine; Stal, Lucas J; Boschker, Henricus T S

    2015-07-15

    We compared gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) for the measurement of δ(13)C values in carbohydrates. Contrary to GC/IRMS, no derivatisation is needed for LC/IRMS analysis of carbohydrates. Hence, although LC/IRMS is expected to be more accurate and precise, no direct comparison has been reported. GC/IRMS with the aldonitrile penta-acetate (ANPA) derivatisation method was compared with LC/IRMS without derivatisation. A large number of glucose standards and a variety of natural samples were analysed for five neutral carbohydrates at natural abundance as well as at (13)C-enriched levels. Gas chromatography/chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (GC/CIMS) was applied to check for incomplete derivatisation of the carbohydrate, which would impair the accuracy of the GC/IRMS method. The LC/IRMS technique provided excellent precision (±0.08‰ and ±3.1‰ at natural abundance and enrichment levels, respectively) for the glucose standards and this technique proved to be superior to GC/IRMS (±0.62‰ and ±19.8‰ at natural abundance and enrichment levels, respectively). For GC/IRMS measurements the derivatisation correction and the conversion of carbohydrates into CO2 had a considerable effect on the measured δ(13)C values. However, we did not find any significant differences in the accuracy of the two techniques over the full range of natural δ(13)C abundances and (13)C-labelled glucose. The difference in the performance of GC/IRMS and LC/IRMS diminished when the δ(13)C values were measured in natural samples, because the chromatographic performance and background correction became critical factors, particularly for LC/IRMS. The derivatisation of carbohydrates for the GC/IRMS method was complete. Although both LC/IRMS and GC/IRMS are reliable techniques for compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis of carbohydrates (provided that derivatisation is complete and the

  12. Stable Isotope Labeling Strategy for Curcumin Metabolite Study in Human Liver Microsomes by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dan; Chen, Xiaowu; Yang, Xiaomei; Wu, Qin; Jin, Feng; Wen, Hongliang; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2015-04-01

    The identification of drug metabolites is very important in drug development. Nowadays, the most widely used methods are isotopes and mass spectrometry. However, the commercial isotopic labeled reagents are usually very expensive, and the rapid and convenient identification of metabolites is still difficult. In this paper, an 18O isotope labeling strategy was developed and the isotopes were used as a tool to identify drug metabolites using mass spectrometry. Curcumin was selected as a model drug to evaluate the established method, and the 18O labeled curcumin was successfully synthesized. The non-labeled and 18O labeled curcumin were simultaneously metabolized in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The two groups of chromatograms obtained from metabolic reaction mixture with and without cofactors were compared and analyzed using Metabolynx software (Waters Corp., Milford, MA, USA). The mass spectra of the newly appearing chromatographic peaks in the experimental sample were further analyzed to find the metabolite candidates. Their chemical structures were confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry. Three metabolites, including two reduction products and a glucuronide conjugate, were successfully detected under their specific HLMs metabolic conditions, which were in accordance with the literature reported results. The results demonstrated that the developed isotope labeling method, together with post-acquisition data processing using Metabolynx software, could be used for fast identification of new drug metabolites.

  13. Mass spectrometry for the determination of fission products 135Cs, 137Cs and 90Sr: A review of methodology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Wenting; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Xuemei; Long, Kaiming; Hu, Sheng; Uchida, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    The radioactive fission products 135Cs, 137Cs and 90Sr have been released into the environment by human activities such as nuclear weapon tests, nuclear fuel reprocessing and nuclear power plant accidents. Monitoring of these radionuclides is important for dose assessment. Moreover, the 135Cs/137Cs isotopic ratio can be used as an important long-term fingerprint for radioactive source identification as it varies with weapon, reactor and fuel types. In recent years, mass spectrometry has become a powerful method for the determination of 135Cs, 137Cs and 90Sr in environmental samples. Mass spectrometry is characterized by the high sensitivity and low detection limit and the relatively shorter sample preparation and analysis times compared with radiometric methods. However, the mass spectrometric determination of radiocesium and 90Sr is affected by the peak tailings of the stable nuclides 133Cs and 88Sr, respectively, and the related isobaric and polyatomic interferences. Chemical separation and optimization of the mass spectrometry instrumental setup are strongly needed prior to the mass spectrometry detection. In this paper, we have reviewed the published works about the determination of 135Cs, 137Cs and 90Sr by mass spectrometry. The mass spectrometric techniques we cover are resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS), thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). For each technique, the principles or strategies used for the analysis of these radionuclides are discussed; these included the abundance sensitivity, ways to suppress the interference signals, and the instrumental setup. In particular, the chemical procedures for eliminating the interferences are also summarized. To date, triple quadrupole ICP-MS (ICP-QQQ) showed great ability for the analysis of these radionuclides and the detection limits were as low as 0.01 pg/mL levels. Finally, some investigations on the

  14. Analysis of chirality by femtosecond laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Horsch, Philipp; Urbasch, Gunter; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2012-09-01

    Recent progress in the field of chirality analysis employing laser ionization mass spectrometry is reviewed. Emphasis is given to femtosecond (fs) laser ionization work from the author's group. We begin by reviewing fundamental aspects of determining circular dichroism (CD) in fs-laser ionization mass spectrometry (fs-LIMS) discussing an example from the literature (resonant fs-LIMS of 3-methylcyclopentanone). Second, we present new data indicating CD in non-resonant fs-LIMS of propylene oxide. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  15. The Fundamental Flaws of Immunoassays and Potential Solutions Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Wener, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Immunoassays have made it possible to measure dozens of individual proteins and other analytes in human samples for help in establishing the diagnosis and prognosis of disease. In too many cases the results of those measurements are misleading and can lead to unnecessary treatment or missed opportunities for therapeutic interventions. These cases stem from problems inherent to immunoassays performed with human samples, which include a lack of concordance across platforms, autoantibodies, anti-reagent antibodies, and the high-dose hook effect. Tandem mass spectrometry may represent a detection method capable of alleviating many of the flaws inherent to immunoassays. We review our understanding of the problems associated with immunoassays on human specimens and describe methodologies using tandem mass spectrometry that could solve some of those problems. We also provide a critical discussion of the potential pitfalls of novel mass spectrometric approaches in the clinical laboratory. PMID:19538965

  16. Detection of biomarkers of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri through mass spectrometry and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Moura, Hercules; Izquierdo, Fernando; Woolfitt, Adrian R; Wagner, Glauber; Pinto, Tatiana; del Aguila, Carmen; Barr, John R

    2015-01-01

    Emerging methods based on mass spectrometry (MS) can be used in the rapid identification of microorganisms. Thus far, these practical and rapidly evolving methods have mainly been applied to characterize prokaryotes. We applied matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF MS in the analysis of whole cells of 18 N. fowleri isolates belonging to three genotypes. Fourteen originated from the cerebrospinal fluid or brain tissue of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis patients and four originated from water samples of hot springs, rivers, lakes or municipal water supplies. Whole Naegleria trophozoites grown in axenic cultures were washed and mixed with MALDI matrix. Mass spectra were acquired with a 4700 TOF-TOF instrument. MALDI-TOF MS yielded consistent patterns for all isolates examined. Using a combination of novel data processing methods for visual peak comparison, statistical analysis and proteomics database searching we were able to detect several biomarkers that can differentiate all species and isolates studied, along with common biomarkers for all N. fowleri isolates. Naegleria fowleri could be easily separated from other species within the genus Naegleria. A number of peaks detected were tentatively identified. MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting is a rapid, reproducible, high-throughput alternative method for identifying Naegleria isolates. This method has potential for studying eukaryotic agents. © 2014 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2014 International Society of Protistologists.

  17. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for Pre-Eclampsia and Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Law, Kai P.; Han, Ting-Li; Tong, Chao; Baker, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy-related complications such as pre-eclampsia and preterm birth now represent a notable burden of adverse health. Pre-eclampsia is a hypertensive disorder unique to pregnancy. It is an important cause of maternal death worldwide and a leading cause of fetal growth restriction and iatrogenic prematurity. Fifteen million infants are born preterm each year globally, but more than one million of those do not survive their first month of life. Currently there are no predictive tests available for diagnosis of these pregnancy-related complications and the biological mechanisms of the diseases have not been fully elucidated. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics have all the necessary attributes to provide the needed breakthrough in understanding the pathophysiology of complex human diseases thorough the discovery of biomarkers. The mass spectrometry methodologies employed in the studies for pregnancy-related complications are evaluated in this article. Top-down proteomic and peptidomic profiling by laser mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography or capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry, and bottom-up quantitative proteomics and targeted proteomics by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry have been applied to elucidate protein biomarkers and biological mechanism of pregnancy-related complications. The proteomes of serum, urine, amniotic fluid, cervical-vaginal fluid, placental tissue, and cytotrophoblastic cells have all been investigated. Numerous biomarkers or biomarker candidates that could distinguish complicated pregnancies from healthy controls have been proposed. Nevertheless, questions as to the clinically utility and the capacity to elucidate the pathogenesis of the pre-eclampsia and preterm birth remain to be answered. PMID:26006232

  18. Quantification of Protein-Ligand Interactions by Laser Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Jieutonne J.; Karki, Santosh; Shi, Fengjian; Sistani, Habiballah; Levis, Robert J.

    2018-04-01

    Laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS) measurement of the dissociation constant (Kd) for hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and N,N',N″-triacetylchitotriose (NAG3) revealed an apparent Kd value of 313.2 ± 25.9 μM for the ligand titration method. Similar measurements for N,N',N″,N″'-tetraacetylchitotetraose (NAG4) revealed an apparent Kd of 249.3 ± 13.6 μM. An electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) experiment determined a Kd value of 9.8 ± 0.6 μM. In a second LEMS approach, a calibrated measurement was used to determine a Kd value of 6.8 ± 1.5 μM for NAG3. The capture efficiency of LEMS was measured to be 3.6 ± 1.8% and is defined as the fraction of LEMS sample detected after merging with the ESI plume. When the dilution is factored into the ligand titration measurement, the adjusted Kd value was 11.3 μM for NAG3 and 9.0 μM for NAG4. The calibration method for measuring Kd developed in this study can be applied to solutions containing unknown analyte concentrations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Current use of high-resolution mass spectrometry in drug screening relevant to clinical and forensic toxicology and doping control.

    PubMed

    Ojanperä, Ilkka; Kolmonen, Marjo; Pelander, Anna

    2012-05-01

    Clinical and forensic toxicology and doping control deal with hundreds or thousands of drugs that may cause poisoning or are abused, are illicit, or are prohibited in sports. Rapid and reliable screening for all these compounds of different chemical and pharmaceutical nature, preferably in a single analytical method, is a substantial effort for analytical toxicologists. Combined chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques with standardised reference libraries have been most commonly used for the purpose. In the last ten years, the focus has shifted from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, because of progress in instrument technology and partly because of the polarity and low volatility of many new relevant substances. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), which enables accurate mass measurement at high resolving power, has recently evolved to the stage that is rapidly causing a shift from unit-resolution, quadrupole-dominated instrumentation. The main HRMS techniques today are time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Orbitrap Fourier-transform mass spectrometry. Both techniques enable a range of different drug-screening strategies that essentially rely on measuring a compound's or a fragment's mass with sufficiently high accuracy that its elemental composition can be determined directly. Accurate mass and isotopic pattern acts as a filter for confirming the identity of a compound or even identification of an unknown. High mass resolution is essential for improving confidence in accurate mass results in the analysis of complex biological samples. This review discusses recent applications of HRMS in analytical toxicology.

  20. Advances in ultrasensitive mass spectrometry of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Kandiah, Mathivathani; Urban, Pawel L

    2013-06-21

    Ultrasensitive mass spectrometric analysis of organic molecules is important for various branches of chemistry, and other fields including physics, earth and environmental sciences, archaeology, biomedicine, and materials science. It finds applications--as an enabling tool--in systems biology, biological imaging, clinical analysis, and forensics. Although there are a number of technical obstacles associated with the analysis of samples by mass spectrometry at ultratrace level (for example analyte losses during sample preparation, insufficient sensitivity, ion suppression), several noteworthy developments have been made over the years. They include: sensitive ion sources, loss-free interfaces, ion optics components, efficient mass analyzers and detectors, as well as "smart" sample preparation strategies. Some of the mass spectrometric methods published to date can achieve sensitivity which is by several orders of magnitude higher than that of alternative approaches. Femto- and attomole level limits of detection are nowadays common, while zepto- and yoctomole level limits of detection have also been reported. We envision that the ultrasensitive mass spectrometric assays will soon contribute to new discoveries in bioscience and other areas.

  1. Identifying Ca2+-Binding Sites in Proteins by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Using Ca2+-Directed Dissociations

    PubMed Central

    Jamalian, Azadeh; Sneekes, Evert-Jan; Wienk, Hans; Dekker, Lennard J. M.; Ruttink, Paul J. A.; Ursem, Mario; Luider, Theo M.; Burgers, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a new method to identify calcium-binding sites in proteins using high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in concert with calcium-directed collision-induced dissociations. Our method does not require any modifications to the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry apparatus, uses standard digestion protocols, and can be applied to existing high-resolution MS data files. In contrast to NMR, our method is applicable to very small amounts of complex protein mixtures (femtomole level). Calcium-bound peptides can be identified using three criteria: (1) the calculated exact mass of the calcium containing peptide; (2) specific dissociations of the calcium-containing peptide from threonine and serine residues; and (3) the very similar retention times of the calcium-containing peptide and the free peptide. PMID:25023127

  2. [Mass spectrometry in medicine and biotechnology].

    PubMed

    Polunina, T A; Kireev, M N; Khramchenkova, T A; Spitsyn, A N; Grigor'eva, G V

    2013-01-01

    History of development and improvement of tandem mass spectrometry, possibilities of its application at the contemporary stage in various fields of medicine and biotechnology including production of novel medicinal preparations, identification of biologically active substances, pathogenic microorganisms and causative agents of especially dangerous infections is given.

  3. Review of in situ derivatization techniques for enhanced bioanalysis using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baghdady, Yehia Z; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and specific analysis of target molecules in complex biological matrices remains a significant challenge, especially when ultra-trace detection limits are required. Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry is often the method of choice for bioanalysis. Conventional sample preparation and clean-up methods prior to the analysis of biological fluids such as liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, or protein precipitation are time-consuming, tedious, and can negatively affect target recovery and detection sensitivity. An alternative or complementary strategy is the use of an off-line or on-line in situ derivatization technique. In situ derivatization can be incorporated to directly derivatize target analytes in their native biological matrices, without any prior sample clean-up methods, to substitute or even enhance the extraction and preconcentration efficiency of these traditional sample preparation methods. Designed appropriately, it can reduce the number of sample preparation steps necessary prior to analysis. Moreover, in situ derivatization can be used to enhance the performance of the developed liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis methods regarding stability, chromatographic separation, selectivity, and ionization efficiency. This review presents an overview of the commonly used in situ derivatization techniques coupled to liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis to guide and to stimulate future research. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Mass Spectrometry for Paper-Based Immunoassays: Toward On-Demand Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Suming; Wan, Qiongqiong; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K

    2016-05-25

    Current analytical methods, either point-of-care or centralized detection, are not able to meet recent demands of patient-friendly testing and increased reliability of results. Here, we describe a two-point separation on-demand diagnostic strategy based on a paper-based mass spectrometry immunoassay platform that adopts stable and cleavable ionic probes as mass reporter; these probes make possible sensitive, interruptible, storable, and restorable on-demand detection. In addition, a new touch paper spray method was developed for on-chip, sensitive, and cost-effective analyte detection. This concept is successfully demonstrated via (i) the detection of Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 antigen and (ii) multiplexed and simultaneous detection of cancer antigen 125 and carcinoembryonic antigen.

  5. Assessment of Non-traditional Isotopic Ratios by Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Nuclear Activities. Annual Report 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Biegalski, Steven R.; Buchholz, Bruce A.

    2011-08-24

    The objective of this work is to identify isotopic ratios suitable for analysis via mass spectrometry that distinguish between commercial nuclear reactor fuel cycles, fuel cycles for weapons grade plutonium, and products from nuclear weapons explosions. Methods will also be determined to distinguish the above from medical and industrial radionuclide sources. Mass spectrometry systems will be identified that are suitable for field measurement of such isotopes in an expedient manner.

  6. Significant advancement of mass spectrometry imaging for food chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Zaima, Nobuhiro

    2016-11-01

    Food contains various compounds that have an impact on our daily lives. Many technologies have been established to analyze these molecules of interest in foods. However, the analysis of the spatial distribution of these compounds in foods using conventional technology, such as high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is difficult. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) is considered an ideal complementary approach. MALDI-MSI is a two-dimensional MALDI-MS technology that can detect compounds in a tissue section without extraction, purification, separation, or labeling. MALDI-MSI can be used to visualize the spatial distribution of chemical compounds or biomolecules in foods. Although the methodology of MALDI-MSI in food science is not yet fully established, the versatility of MALDI-MSI is expected to open a new frontier in food science. Herein, we describe the principles and applications of MALDI-MSI in food science and related fields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of automation on mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan Victoria; Rockwood, Alan

    2015-10-23

    Mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography (LC-MS and LC-MS/MS) is an analytical technique that has rapidly grown in popularity in clinical practice. In contrast to traditional technology, mass spectrometry is superior in many respects including resolution, specificity, multiplex capability and has the ability to measure analytes in various matrices. Despite these advantages, LC-MS/MS remains high cost, labor intensive and has limited throughput. This specialized technology requires highly trained personnel and therefore has largely been limited to large institutions, academic organizations and reference laboratories. Advances in automation will be paramount to break through this bottleneck and increase its appeal for routine use. This article reviews these challenges, shares perspectives on essential features for LC-MS/MS total automation and proposes a step-wise and incremental approach to achieve total automation through reducing human intervention, increasing throughput and eventually integrating the LC-MS/MS system into the automated clinical laboratory operations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mass Spectrometry on Future Mars Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry investigations on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and the 2018 ExoMars missions will address core science objectives related to the potential habitability of their landing site environments and more generally the near-surface organic inventory of Mars. The analysis of complex solid samples by mass spectrometry is a well-known approach that can provide a broad and sensitive survey of organic and inorganic compounds as well as supportive data for mineralogical analysis. The science value of such compositional information is maximized when one appreciates the particular opportunities and limitations of in situ analysis with resource-constrained instrumentation in the context of a complete science payload and applied to materials found in a particular environment. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on MSL and the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on ExoMars will thus benefit from and inform broad-based analog field site work linked to the Mars environments where such analysis will occur.

  9. Single Laboratory Validated Method for Determination of Microcystins and Nodularin in Ambient Freshwaters by Solid Phase Extraction and Liquid Chromatography/ Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS/MS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is a standardized, single laboratory validated liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for the detection of cyanotoxins—microsystins and nodularin (combined intracellular and extracellular)—in ambient freshwaters.

  10. Multiclass mycotoxin analysis in edible oils using a simple solvent extraction method and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eom, Taeyong; Cho, Hyun-Deok; Kim, Junghyun; Park, Mihee; An, Jinyoung; Kim, Moosung; Kim, Sheen-Hee; Han, Sang Beom

    2017-11-01

    A simple and rapid method for the simultaneous determination of 11 mycotoxins - aflatoxins B 1 , B 2 , G 1 and G 2 ; fumonisins B 1 , B 2 and B 3 ; ochratoxin A; zearalenone; deoxynivalenol; and T-2 toxin - in edible oils was established using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe), QuEChERS with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, and solvent extraction were examined for sample preparation. Among these methods, solvent extraction with a mixture of formic acid/acetonitrile (5/95, v/v) successfully extracted all target mycotoxins. Subsequently, a defatting process using n-hexane was employed to remove the fats present in the edible oil samples. Mass spectrometry was carried out using electrospray ionisation in polarity switching mode with multiple reaction monitoring. The developed LC-MS/MS method was validated by assessing the specificity, linearity, recovery, limit of quantification (LOQ), accuracy and precision with reference to Commission Regulation (EC) 401/2006. Mycotoxin recoveries of 51.6-82.8% were achieved in addition to LOQs ranging from 0.025 ng/g to 1 ng/g. The edible oils proved to be relatively uncomplicated matrices and the developed method was applied to 9 edible oil samples, including soybean oil, corn oil and rice bran oil, to evaluate potential mycotoxin contamination. The levels of detection were significantly lower than the international regulatory standards. Therefore, we expect that our developed method, based on simple, two-step sample preparation process, will be suitable for the large-scale screening of mycotoxin contamination in edible oils.

  11. Application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-MS/C/IRMS) to detect the abuse of 17β-estradiol in cattle.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Geert; Mangelinckx, Sven; Courtheyn, Dirk; Prévost, Stéphanie; De Poorter, Geert; De Kimpe, Norbert; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2013-07-31

    Although the ability to differentiate between endogenous steroids and synthetic homologues on the basis of their (13)C/(12)C isotopic ratio has been known for over a decade, this technique has been scarcely implemented for food safety purposes. In this study, a method was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-MS/C/IRMS) to demonstrate the abuse of 17β-estradiol in cattle, by comparison of the (13)C/(12)C ratios of the main metabolite 17α-estradiol and an endogenous reference compound (ERC), 5-androstene-3β,17α-diol, in bovine urine. The intermediate precisions were determined as 0.46 and 0.26‰ for 5-androstene-3β,17α-diol and 17α-estradiol, respectively. This is, to the authors' knowledge, the first reported use of GC-MS/C/IRMS for the analysis of steroid compounds for food safety issues.

  12. Method for the elucidation of the elemental composition of low molecular mass chemicals using exact masses of product ions and neutral losses: application to environmental chemicals measured by liquid chromatography with hybrid quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Ishii, Tetsuko; Yasuhara, Akio; Sakai, Shinichi

    2005-01-01

    A method for elucidating the elemental compositions of low molecular weight chemicals, based primarily on mass measurements made using liquid chromatography (LC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) and quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/QTOFMS), was developed and tested for 113 chemicals of environmental interest with molecular masses up to approximately 400 Da. As the algorithm incorporating the method is not affected by differences in the instrument used, or by the ionization method and other ionization conditions, the method is useful not only for LC/TOFMS, but also for all kinds of mass spectra measured with higher accuracy and precision (uncertainties of a few mDa) employing all ionization methods and on-line separation techniques. The method involves calculating candidate compositions for intact ionized molecules (ionized forms of the sample molecule that have lost or gained no more than a proton, i.e., [M+H](+) or [M-H](-)) as well as for fragment ions and corresponding neutral losses, and eliminating those atomic compositions for the molecules that are inconsistent with the corresponding candidate compositions of fragment ions and neutral losses. Candidate compositions were calculated for the measured masses of the intact ionized molecules and of the fragment ions and corresponding neutral losses, using mass uncertainties of 2 and 5 mDa, respectively. Compositions proposed for the ionized molecule that did not correspond to the sum of the compositions of a candidate fragment ion and its corresponding neutral loss were discarded. One, 2-5, 6-10, 11-20, and >20 candidate compositions were found for 65%, 39%, 1%, 1%, and 0%, respectively, for the 124 ionized molecules formed from the 113 chemicals tested (both positive and negative ions were obtained from 11 of the chemicals). However, no candidate composition was found for 2% of the test cases (i.e., 3 chemicals), for each of which the measured mass of one of the product ions was in

  13. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for determination of panel of neurotransmitters in cerebrospinal fluid from the rat model for tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Andrej; Somikova, Zuzana; Zilka, Norbert; Novak, Michal

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still being recognized today as an unmet medical need. Currently, there is no cure and early preclinical diagnostic assay available for AD. Therefore much attention is now being directed at the development of novel methods for quantitative determination of AD biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Here, we describe the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for determination of 5-hydroxytryptamine (SER), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), homovanilic acid (HVA), noradrenaline (NADR), adrenaline (ADR), dopamine (DA), glutamic acid (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and histamine (HIS) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the rat model for human tauopathy. The benzoyl chloride was used as pre-column derivatization reagents. Neurotransmitters and metabolites were analysed on ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) on C18 column in combination with tandem mass spectrometry. The method is simple, highly sensitive and showed excellent linearity with regression coefficients higher than 0.99. The accuracy was in a range of 93-113% for all analytes. The inter-day precision (n=5 days), expressed as %RSD, was in a range 2-10% for all analytes. Using this method we detected significant changes of CSF levels of two important neurotransmitters/metabolites, ADR and 5-HIAA, which correlates with progression of neurodegeneration in our animal model. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Depth Profiles of Mg, Si, and Zn Implants in GaN by Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Prasad, G. V.; Pelicon, P.; Mitchell, L. J.; McDaniel, F. D.

    2003-08-01

    GaN is one of the most promising electronic materials for applications requiring high-power, high frequencies, or high-temperatures as well as opto-electronics in the blue to ultraviolet spectral region. We have recently measured depth profiles of Mg, Si, and Zn implants in GaN substrates by the TEAMS particle counting method for both matrix and trace elements, using a gas ionization chamber. Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TEAMS) is a combination of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to measure trace elements at ppb levels. Negative ions from a SIMS like source are injected into a tandem accelerator. Molecular interferences inherent with the SIMS method are eliminated in the TEAMS method. Negative ion currents are extremely low with GaN as neither gallium nor nitrogen readily forms negative ions making the depth profile measurements more difficult. The energies of the measured ions are in the range of 4-8 MeV. A careful selection of mass/charge ratios of the detected ions combined with energy-loss behavior of the ions in the ionization chamber eliminated molecular interferences.

  15. Advanced Mass Spectrometric Methods for the Rapid and Quantitative Characterization of Proteomes

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Progress is reviewedmore » towards the development of a global strategy that aims to extend the sensitivity, dynamic range, comprehensiveness and throughput of proteomic measurements based upon the use of high performance separations and mass spectrometry. The approach uses high accuracy mass measurements from Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR) to validate peptide ‘accurate mass tags’ (AMTs) produced by global protein enzymatic digestions for a specific organism, tissue or cell type from ‘potential mass tags’ tentatively identified using conventional tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). This provides the basis for subsequent measurements without the need for MS/ MS. High resolution capillary liquid chromatography separations combined with high sensitivity, and high resolution accurate FTICR measurements are shown to be capable of characterizing peptide mixtures of more than 10 5 components. The strategy has been initially demonstrated using the microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Deinococcus radiodurans. Advantages of the approach include the high confidence of protein identification, its broad proteome coverage, high sensitivity, and the capability for stableisotope labeling methods for precise relative protein abundance measurements. Abbreviations : LC, liquid chromatography; FTICR, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance; AMT, accurate mass tag; PMT, potential mass tag; MMA, mass measurement accuracy; MS, mass spectrometry; MS/MS, tandem mass spectrometry; ppm, parts per million.« less

  16. Focus on Advancing High Performance Mass Spectrometry, Honoring Dr. Richard D. Smith, Recipient of the 2013 Award for a Distinguished Contribution in Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Muddiman, David C.; Loo, Joseph

    This special focus issue of the Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry celebrates the accomplishments of Dr. Richard D. Smith, the recipient of the 2013ASMS Award for a Distinguished Contribution in Mass Spectrometry, and who serves as a Battelle Fellow, Chief Scientist in the Biological Sciences Division, and Director of Proteomics Research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, WA. The award is for his development of the electrodynamic ion funnel.

  17. Analysis of reduced monoclonal antibodies using size exclusion chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongcheng; Gaza-Bulseco, Georgeen; Chumsae, Chris

    2009-12-01

    Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) has been widely used to detect antibody aggregates, monomer, and fragments. SEC coupled to mass spectrometry has been reported to measure the molecular weights of antibody; antibody conjugates, and antibody light chain and heavy chain. In this study, separation of antibody light chain and heavy chain by SEC and direct coupling to a mass spectrometer was further studied. It was determined that employing mobile phases containing acetonitrile, trifluoroacetic acid, and formic acid allowed the separation of antibody light chain and heavy chain after reduction by SEC. In addition, this mobile phase allowed the coupling of SEC to a mass spectrometer to obtain a direct molecular weight measurement. The application of the SEC-MS method was demonstrated by the separation of the light chain and the heavy chain of multiple recombinant monoclonal antibodies. In addition, separation of a thioether linked light chain and heavy chain from the free light chain and the free heavy chain of a recombinant monoclonal antibody after reduction was also achieved. This optimized method provided a separation of antibody light chain and heavy chain based on size and allowed a direct measurement of molecular weights by mass spectrometry. In addition, this method may help to identify peaks eluting from SEC column directly.

  18. Native Mass Spectrometry in Fragment-Based Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Liliana; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-07-28

    The advent of native mass spectrometry (MS) in 1990 led to the development of new mass spectrometry instrumentation and methodologies for the analysis of noncovalent protein-ligand complexes. Native MS has matured to become a fast, simple, highly sensitive and automatable technique with well-established utility for fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD). Native MS has the capability to directly detect weak ligand binding to proteins, to determine stoichiometry, relative or absolute binding affinities and specificities. Native MS can be used to delineate ligand-binding sites, to elucidate mechanisms of cooperativity and to study the thermodynamics of binding. This review highlights key attributes of native MS for FBDD campaigns.

  19. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for trace analysis of agrochemicals in food.

    PubMed

    García-Reyes, Juan F; Jackson, Ayanna U; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; Cooks, R Graham

    2009-01-15

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is applied to the rapid, in situ, direct qualitative and quantitative (ultra)trace analysis of agrochemicals in foodstuffs. To evaluate the potential of DESI mass spectrometry (MS) in toxic residue testing in food, 16 representative multiclass agricultural chemicals (pesticides, insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides) were selected (namely, ametryn, amitraz, azoxystrobin, bitertanol, buprofezin, imazalil, imazalil metabolite, isofenphos-methyl, malathion, nitenpyram, prochloraz, spinosad, terbuthylazine, thiabendazole, and thiacloprid). The DESI-MS experiments were performed using 3 microL of solution spotted onto conventional smooth poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) surfaces, with examination by MS and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using an ion trap mass spectrometer. Optimization of the spray solvent led to the use of acetonitrile/water (80:20) (v/v), with 1% formic acid. Most of the compounds tested showed remarkable sensitivity in the positive ion mode, approaching that attainable with conventional direct infusion electrospray mass spectrometry. To evaluate the potential of the proposed approach in real samples, different experiments were performed including the direct DESI-MS/MS analysis of fruit peels and also of fruit/vegetable extracts. The results proved that DESI allows the detection and confirmation of traces of agrochemicals in actual market-purchased samples. In addition, MS/MS confirmation of selected pesticides in spiked vegetable extracts was obtained at absolute levels as low as 1 pg for ametryn. Quantitation of imazalil residues was also undertaken using an isotopically labeled standard. The data obtained were in agreement with those from the liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) reference method, with relative standard deviation (RSD) values consistently below 15%. The results obtained demonstrate the sensitivity of DESI as they meet the stringent European Union pesticide regulation

  20. Applications of Mass Spectrometry to Structural Analysis of Marine Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Yinzhi; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Lili; Yu, Guangli

    2014-01-01

    Marine oligosaccharides have attracted increasing attention recently in developing potential drugs and biomaterials for their particular physical and chemical properties. However, the composition and sequence analysis of marine oligosaccharides are very challenging for their structural complexity and heterogeneity. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important technique for carbohydrate analysis by providing more detailed structural information, including molecular mass, sugar constituent, sequence, inter-residue linkage position and substitution pattern. This paper provides an overview of the structural analysis based on MS approaches in marine oligosaccharides, which are derived from some biologically important marine polysaccharides, including agaran, carrageenan, alginate, sulfated fucan, chitosan, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and GAG-like polysaccharides. Applications of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) are mainly presented and the general applications of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) are also outlined. Some technical challenges in the structural analysis of marine oligosaccharides by MS have also been pointed out. PMID:24983643

  1. Ongoing revolution in bacteriology: routine identification of bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seng, Piseth; Drancourt, Michel; Gouriet, Frédérique; La Scola, Bernard; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Rolain, Jean Marc; Raoult, Didier

    2009-08-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry accurately identifies both selected bacteria and bacteria in select clinical situations. It has not been evaluated for routine use in the clinic. We prospectively analyzed routine MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification in parallel with conventional phenotypic identification of bacteria regardless of phylum or source of isolation. Discrepancies were resolved by 16S ribosomal RNA and rpoB gene sequence-based molecular identification. Colonies (4 spots per isolate directly deposited on the MALDI-TOF plate) were analyzed using an Autoflex II Bruker Daltonik mass spectrometer. Peptidic spectra were compared with the Bruker BioTyper database, version 2.0, and the identification score was noted. Delays and costs of identification were measured. Of 1660 bacterial isolates analyzed, 95.4% were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry; 84.1% were identified at the species level, and 11.3% were identified at the genus level. In most cases, absence of identification (2.8% of isolates) and erroneous identification (1.7% of isolates) were due to improper database entries. Accurate MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification was significantly correlated with having 10 reference spectra in the database (P=.01). The mean time required for MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification of 1 isolate was 6 minutes for an estimated 22%-32% cost of current methods of identification. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is a cost-effective, accurate method for routine identification of bacterial isolates in <1 h using a database comprising > or =10 reference spectra per bacterial species and a 1.9 identification score (Brucker system). It may replace Gram staining and biochemical identification in the near future.

  2. Comprehensive evaluation of direct injection mass spectrometry for the quantitative profiling of volatiles in food samples

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although qualitative strategies based on direct injection mass spectrometry (DIMS) have recently emerged as an alternative for the rapid classification of food samples, the potential of these approaches in quantitative tasks has scarcely been addressed to date. In this paper, the applicability of different multivariate regression procedures to data collected by DIMS from simulated mixtures has been evaluated. The most relevant factors affecting quantitation, such as random noise, the number of calibration samples, type of validation, mixture complexity and similarity of mass spectra, were also considered and comprehensively discussed. Based on the conclusions drawn from simulated data, and as an example of application, experimental mass spectral fingerprints collected by direct thermal desorption coupled to mass spectrometry were used for the quantitation of major volatiles in Thymus zygis subsp. zygis chemotypes. The results obtained, validated with the direct thermal desorption coupled to gas chromatography–mass spectrometry method here used as a reference, show the potential of DIMS approaches for the fast and precise quantitative profiling of volatiles in foods. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644978

  3. Study of Simvastatin Self-Association Using Electrospray-Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrova, E. V.; Lekar, A. V.; Filonova, O. V.; Borisenko, S. N.; Maksimenko, E. V.; Borisenko, N. I.

    2015-07-01

    Self-association of simvastatin, which is widely used to treat coronary heart disease, was investigated using electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry. Formation of simvastatin self-associates in various solvents was demonstrated using mass spectrometry. Solvation effects were shown to play a special role in the formation of the self-associates. Self-associates containing from two to fi ve simvastatin molecules were detected in mass spectra of an aqueous MeOH (20%) solution of simvastatin. The formation of simvastatin self-associates could compete with the complexation of supramolecular structures during the synthesis of new generation drugs.

  4. Homogeneous matrix deposition on dried agar for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  5. OpenMS - A platform for reproducible analysis of mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Pfeuffer, Julianus; Sachsenberg, Timo; Alka, Oliver; Walzer, Mathias; Fillbrunn, Alexander; Nilse, Lars; Schilling, Oliver; Reinert, Knut; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2017-11-10

    In recent years, several mass spectrometry-based omics technologies emerged to investigate qualitative and quantitative changes within thousands of biologically active components such as proteins, lipids and metabolites. The research enabled through these methods potentially contributes to the diagnosis and pathophysiology of human diseases as well as to the clarification of structures and interactions between biomolecules. Simultaneously, technological advances in the field of mass spectrometry leading to an ever increasing amount of data, demand high standards in efficiency, accuracy and reproducibility of potential analysis software. This article presents the current state and ongoing developments in OpenMS, a versatile open-source framework aimed at enabling reproducible analyses of high-throughput mass spectrometry data. It provides implementations of frequently occurring processing operations on MS data through a clean application programming interface in C++ and Python. A collection of 185 tools and ready-made workflows for typical MS-based experiments enable convenient analyses for non-developers and facilitate reproducible research without losing flexibility. OpenMS will continue to increase its ease of use for developers as well as users with improved continuous integration/deployment strategies, regular trainings with updated training materials and multiple sources of support. The active developer community ensures the incorporation of new features to support state of the art research. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mass spectrometry of the photolysis of sulfonylurea herbicides in Prairie waters.

    PubMed

    Headley, John V; Du, Jing-Long; Peru, Kerry M; McMartin, Dena W

    2010-01-01

    This review of mass spectrometry of sulfonylurea herbicides includes a focus on studies relevant to Canadian Prairie waters. Emphasis is given to data gaps in the literature for the rates of photolysis of selected sulfonylurea herbicides in different water matrices. Specifically, results are evaluated for positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry with liquid chromatography separation for the study of the photolysis of chlorsulfuron, tribenuron-methyl, thifensulfuron-methyl, metsulfuron-methyl, and ethametsulfuron-methyl. LC-MS/MS is shown to be the method of choice for the quantification of sulfonylurea herbicides with instrumental detection limits ranging from 1.3 to 7.2 pg (on-column). Tandem mass spectrometry coupled with the use of authentic standards likewise has proven to be well suited for the identification of transformation products. To date, however, the power of time-of-flight MS and ultrahigh resolution MS has not been exploited fully for the identification of unknown photolysis products. Dissipation of the herbicides under natural sunlight fit pseudo-first-order kinetics with half-life values ranging from 4.4 to 99 days. For simulated sunlight, radiation wavelengths shorter than 400 nm are required to induce significant photolytic reactions. The correlation between field dissipation studies and laboratory photolysis experiments suggests that photolysis is a major pathway for the dissipation of some sulfonylurea herbicides in natural Prairie waters. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  8. A Novel and Rapid Method to Determine Doxycycline in Human Plasma by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, A. Chaitanya; Sathiyaraj, M.; Saravanan, R. S.; Chelladurai, R.; Vignesh, R.

    2012-01-01

    A simple, rapid, specific and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric method has been developed and validated for the determination of doxycycline from the human plasma. Doxycycline is extracted from human plasma by solid phase extraction. Demeclocycline was used as an internal standard. Detection was performed at transitions of 444.800→428.200 for doxycycline and 464.700→448.100 for demeclocycline using mass spectrometry. Chromatographic separation of analyte and internal standard were carried out using a reverse phase C18, column at 0.500 ml/min flow. The assay of doxycycline is linear over the range of 0.055-7.612 μg/ml, with a precision <14.83%, regression coefficient (r2)=0.9961 and the limit of quantification in plasma for doxycycline was 0.055 μg/ml. Mean extraction recovery obtained was 95.55%. Samples are stable at room temperature for 6 h, processed samples were stable at least for 30.20 h and also stable at three freeze-thaw cycles. The method has been used to perform pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies in human plasma. PMID:23798780

  9. On-tissue Direct Monitoring of Global Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange by MALDI Mass Spectrometry: Tissue Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (TDXMS)*

    PubMed Central

    Quanico, Jusal; Franck, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometric (H/DXMS) methods for protein structural analysis are conventionally performed in solution. We present Tissue Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (TDXMS), a method to directly monitor deuterium uptake on tissue, as a means to better approximate the deuterium exchange behavior of proteins in their native microenvironment. Using this method, a difference in deuterium uptake behavior was observed when the same proteins were monitored in solution and on tissue. The higher maximum deuterium uptake at equilibrium for all proteins analyzed in solution suggests a more open conformation in the absence of interacting partners normally observed on tissue. We also demonstrate a difference in the deuterium uptake behavior of a few proteins across different morphological regions of the same tissue section. Modifications of the total number of hydrogens exchanged, as well as the kinetics of exchange, were both observed. These results provide information on the implication of protein interactions with partners as well as on the conformational changes related to these interactions, and illustrate the importance of examining protein deuterium exchange behavior in the presence of its specific microenvironment directly at the level of tissues. PMID:27512083

  10. Measurement and Visualization of Mass Transport for the Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Ambient Mass-Spectrometry Source

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; Ray, Steven J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has developed into an important analytical field over the last nine years. The ability to analyze samples under ambient conditions while retaining the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry has led to numerous applications and a corresponding jump in the popularity of this field. Despite the great potential of ADI-MS, problems remain in the areas of ion identification and quantification. Difficulties with ion identification can be solved through modified instrumentation, including accurate-mass or MS/MS capabilities for analyte identification. More difficult problems include quantification due to the ambient nature of the sampling process. To characterize and improve sample volatilization, ionization, and introduction into the mass-spectrometer interface, a method of visualizing mass transport into the mass spectrometer is needed. Schlieren imaging is a well-established technique that renders small changes in refractive index visible. Here, schlieren imaging was used to visualize helium flow from a plasma-based ADI-MS source into a mass spectrometer while ion signals were recorded. Optimal sample positions for melting-point capillary and transmission-mode (stainless steel mesh) introduction were found to be near (within 1 mm of) the mass spectrometer inlet. Additionally, the orientation of the sampled surface plays a significant role. More efficient mass transport resulted for analyte deposits directly facing the MS inlet. Different surfaces (glass slide and rough surface) were also examined; for both it was found that the optimal position is immediately beneath the MS inlet. PMID:24658804

  11. Measurement and visualization of mass transport for the flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ambient mass-spectrometry source.

    PubMed

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M

    2014-05-01

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has developed into an important analytical field over the last 9 years. The ability to analyze samples under ambient conditions while retaining the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry has led to numerous applications and a corresponding jump in the popularity of this field. Despite the great potential of ADI-MS, problems remain in the areas of ion identification and quantification. Difficulties with ion identification can be solved through modified instrumentation, including accurate-mass or MS/MS capabilities for analyte identification. More difficult problems include quantification because of the ambient nature of the sampling process. To characterize and improve sample volatilization, ionization, and introduction into the mass spectrometer interface, a method of visualizing mass transport into the mass spectrometer is needed. Schlieren imaging is a well-established technique that renders small changes in refractive index visible. Here, schlieren imaging was used to visualize helium flow from a plasma-based ADI-MS source into a mass spectrometer while ion signals were recorded. Optimal sample positions for melting-point capillary and transmission-mode (stainless steel mesh) introduction were found to be near (within 1 mm of) the mass spectrometer inlet. Additionally, the orientation of the sampled surface plays a significant role. More efficient mass transport resulted for analyte deposits directly facing the MS inlet. Different surfaces (glass slide and rough surface) were also examined; for both it was found that the optimal position is immediately beneath the MS inlet.

  12. Measurement and Visualization of Mass Transport for the Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Ambient Mass-Spectrometry Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; Ray, Steven J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2014-05-01

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has developed into an important analytical field over the last 9 years. The ability to analyze samples under ambient conditions while retaining the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry has led to numerous applications and a corresponding jump in the popularity of this field. Despite the great potential of ADI-MS, problems remain in the areas of ion identification and quantification. Difficulties with ion identification can be solved through modified instrumentation, including accurate-mass or MS/MS capabilities for analyte identification. More difficult problems include quantification because of the ambient nature of the sampling process. To characterize and improve sample volatilization, ionization, and introduction into the mass spectrometer interface, a method of visualizing mass transport into the mass spectrometer is needed. Schlieren imaging is a well-established technique that renders small changes in refractive index visible. Here, schlieren imaging was used to visualize helium flow from a plasma-based ADI-MS source into a mass spectrometer while ion signals were recorded. Optimal sample positions for melting-point capillary and transmission-mode (stainless steel mesh) introduction were found to be near (within 1 mm of) the mass spectrometer inlet. Additionally, the orientation of the sampled surface plays a significant role. More efficient mass transport resulted for analyte deposits directly facing the MS inlet. Different surfaces (glass slide and rough surface) were also examined; for both it was found that the optimal position is immediately beneath the MS inlet.

  13. DMS-prefiltered mass spectrometry for the detection of biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.

    2008-04-01

    Technologies based on Differential Mobility Spectrometry (DMS) are ideally matched to rapid, sensitive, and selective detection of chemicals like biomarkers. Biomarkers linked to exposure to radiation, exposure to CWA's, exposure to toxic materials (TICs and TIMs) and to specific diseases are being examined in a number of laboratories. Screening for these types of exposure can be improved in accuracy and greatly speeded up by using DMS-MS instead of slower techniques like LC-MS and GC-MS. We have performed an extensive series of tests with nanospray-DMS-mass spectroscopy and standalone nanospray-DMS obtaining extensive information on chemistry and detectivity. DMS-MS systems implemented with low-resolution, low-cost, portable mass-spectrometry systems are very promising. Lowresolution mass spectrometry alone would be inadequate for the task, but with DMS pre-filtration to suppress interferences, can be quite effective, even for quantitative measurement. Bio-fluids and digests are well suited to ionization by electrospray and detection by mass-spectrometry, but signals from critical markers are overwhelmed by chemical noise from unrelated species, making essential quantitative analysis impossible. Sionex and collaborators have presented data using DMS to suppress chemical noise, allowing detection of cancer biomarkers in 10,000-fold excess of normal products 1,2. In addition, a linear dynamic range of approximately 2,000 has been demonstrated with accurate quantitation 3. We will review the range of possible applications and present new data on DMS-MS biomarker detection.

  14. Structural analysis of isomeric chondroitin sulfate oligosaccharides using regioselective 6-O-desulfation method and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Ting; Her, Guor-Rong

    2014-09-16

    A strategy based on a regioselective 6-O-desulfation reaction and negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)) was developed for the structural delineation of isomeric chondroitin sulfate oligosaccharides. Product ions resulting from the glycosidic cleavage provided information about the number of sulfate groups in each sugar residue. After the regioselective 6-O-desulfation reaction, the number of sulfate groups on each residue was obtained using a tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the reaction product. The sulfation pattern could be obtained based on the product ions of analytes before and after the desulfation reaction. The strategy was demonstrated using a series of tetrasaccharides prepared from shark cartilage chondroitin sulfate D. Among the 12 identified tetrasaccharides, six structures had not been reported before. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mass spectrometry method to monitor the sevoflurane concentration in an apparatus for inhalational anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elokhin, V. A.; Ershov, T. D.; Levshankov, A. I.; Nikolaev, V. I.; Saifullin, M. F.; Elizarov, A. Yu.

    2010-08-01

    The feasibility of real-time monitoring of the inhalational anesthetic (sevoflurane) concentration in the respiratory circuit of an apparatus for inhalational anesthesia using mass spectrometry is considered. It is shown that the absolute anesthetic concentration can be monitored in real time if low-flow ventilation is provided during general anesthesia. The time dependences of the anesthetic concentration are taken at different stages of anesthesia in the inspiration-expiration regime.

  16. Enantioselective supercritical fluid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous estimation of risperidone and its 9-hydroxyl metabolites in rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Thatipamula R; Joseph, Siji; Kole, Prashant; Kumar, Anoop; Subramanian, Murali; Rajagopalan, Sudha; Kr, Prabhakar

    2017-11-01

    Objective of the current work was to develop a 'green chemistry' compliant selective and sensitive supercritical fluid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous estimation of risperidone (RIS) and its chiral metabolites in rat plasma. Methodology & results: Agilent 1260 Infinity analytical supercritical fluid chromatography system resolved RIS and its chiral metabolites within runtime of 6 min using a gradient chromatography method. Using a simple protein precipitation sample preparation followed by mass spectrometric detection achieved a sensitivity of 0.92 nM (lower limit of quantification). With linearity over four log units (0.91-7500 nM), the method was found to be selective, accurate, precise and robust. The method was validated and was successfully applied for simultaneous estimation of RIS and 9-hydroxyrisperidone metabolites (R & S individually) after intravenous and per oral administration to rats.

  17. Analytical pyrolysis mass spectrometry: new vistas opened by temperature-resolved in-source PYMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Jaap J.

    1992-09-01

    Analytical pyrolysis mass spectrometry (PYMS) is introduced and its applications to the analysis of synthetic polymers, biopolymers, biomacromolecular systems and geomacromolecules are critically reviewed. Analytical pyrolysis inside the ionisation chamber of a mass spectrometer, i.e. in-source PYMS, gives a complete inventory of the pyrolysis products evolved from a solid sample. The temperature-resolved nature of the experiment gives a good insight into the temperature dependence of the volatilisation and pyrolytic dissociation processes. Chemical ionisation techniques appear to be especially suitable for the analysis of oligomeric fragments released in early stages of the pyrolysis of polymer systems. Large oligomeric fragments were observed for linear polymers such as cellulose (pentadecamer), polyhydroxyoctanoic acid (tridecamer) and polyhydroxybutyric acid (heneicosamer). New in-source PYMS data are presented on artists' paints, the plant polysaccharides cellulose and xyloglucan, several microbial polyhydroxyalkanoates, wood and enzyme-digested wood, biodegraded roots and a fossil cuticle of Miocene age. On-line and off-line pyrolysis chromatography mass spectrometric approaches are also discussed. New data presented on high temperature gas chromatography--mass spectrometry of deuterio-reduced permethylated pyrolysates of cellulose lead to a better understanding of polysaccharide dissociation mechanisms. Pyrolysis as an on-line sample pretreatment method for organic macromolecules in combination with MS techniques is a very challenging field of mass spectrometry. Pyrolytic dissociation and desorption is not at all a chaotic process but proceeds according to very specific mechanisms.

  18. Mass spectrometry. [review of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Kimble, B. J.; Derrick, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and its applications over the past decade are reviewed in depth, with annotated literature references. New instrumentation and techniques surveyed include: modulated-beam MS, chromatographic MS on-line computer techniques, digital computer-compatible quadrupole MS, selected ion monitoring (mass fragmentography), and computer-aided management of MS data and interpretation. Areas of application surveyed include: organic MS and electron impact MS, field ionization kinetics, appearance potentials, translational energy release, studies of metastable species, photoionization, calculations of molecular orbitals, chemical kinetics, field desorption MS, high pressure MS, ion cyclotron resonance, biochemistry, medical/clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and environmental chemistry and pollution studies.

  19. Nuclear Forensics: Measurements of Uranium Oxides Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Isotope Ratio Analysis of Actinides , Fission Products, and Geolocators by High- efficiency Multi-collector Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry...Information, 1999. Hou, Xiaolin, and Per Roos. “ Critical Comparison of radiometric and Mass Spectrometric Methods for the Determination of...NUCLEAR FORENSICS: MEASUREMENTS OF URANIUM OXIDES USING TIME-OF-FLIGHT SECONDARY ION MASS

  20. Clinical, biopsy, and mass spectrometry findings of renal gelsolin amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Dasari, Surendra; Amin, Md Shahrier; Vrana, Julie A; Theis, Jason D; Alexander, Mariam P; Kurtin, Paul J

    2017-04-01

    Gelsolin amyloidosis is a rare type of amyloidosis typically involving the cranial and peripheral nerves, but rarely the kidney. Here we report the clinical, kidney biopsy, and mass spectrometry findings in 12 cases of renal gelsolin amyloidosis. Of the 12 patients, five were men and seven were women with mean age at diagnosis of 63.8 years. Gelsolin amyloidosis was most common in Caucasians (six patients) and Asians (four patients), and included one each African-American and Hispanic patients. Nephrotic syndrome was the most common cause of biopsy, although most patients also had progressive loss of kidney function. Hematological and serological evaluation was negative in 11 patients, while one patient had a monoclonal gammopathy. The renal biopsy showed large amounts of pale eosinophilic Congo red-positive amyloid deposits typically restricted to the glomeruli. Immunofluorescence studies were negative for immunoglobulins in nine cases with three cases of smudgy glomerular staining for IgG. Electron microscopy showed mostly random arrangement of amyloid fibrils with focally parallel bundles/sheets of amyloid fibrils present. Laser microdissection of the amyloid deposits followed by mass spectrometry showed large spectra numbers for gelsolin, serum amyloid P component, and apolipoproteins E and AIV. Furthermore, the p. Asn211Lys gelsolin mutation on mass spectrometry studies was detected in three patients by mass spectrometry, which appears to represent a renal-limited form of gelsolin amyloidosis. Thus, renal gelsolin amyloidosis is seen in older patients, presents with nephrotic syndrome and progressive chronic kidney disease, and histologically exhibits glomerular involvement. The diagnosis can be confirmed by mass spectrometry studies. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative analysis of multiple high-resolution mass spectrometry images using chemometric methods: quantitation of chlordecone in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Saeedeh; Parastar, Hadi

    2018-05-15

    In this work, a chemometrics-based strategy is developed for quantitative mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). In this regard, quantification of chlordecone as a carcinogenic organochlorinated pesticide (C10Cll0O) in mouse liver using the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization MSI (MALDI-MSI) method is used as a case study. The MSI datasets corresponded to 1, 5 and 10 days of mouse exposure to the standard chlordecone in the quantity range of 0 to 450 μg g-1. The binning approach in the m/z direction is used to group high resolution m/z values and to reduce the big data size. To consider the effect of bin size on the quality of results, three different bin sizes of 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 were chosen. Afterwards, three-way MSI data arrays (two spatial and one m/z dimensions) for seven standards and four unknown samples were column-wise augmented with m/z values as the common mode. Then, these datasets were analyzed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) using proper constraints. The resolved mass spectra were used for identification of chlordecone in the presence of a complex background and interference. Additionally, the augmented spatial profiles were post-processed and 2D images for each component were obtained in calibration and unknown samples. The sum of these profiles was utilized to set the calibration curve and to obtain the analytical figures of merit (AFOMs). Inspection of the results showed that the lower bin size (i.e., 0.25) provides more accurate results. Finally, the obtained results by MCR for three datasets were compared with those of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and MALDI-MSI. The results showed that the MCR-assisted method gives a higher amount of chlordecone than MALDI-MSI and a lower amount than GC-MS. It is concluded that a combination of chemometric methods with MSI can be considered as an alternative way for MSI quantification.

  2. Determination of pesticide epitopic density in protein immunoconjugates by electrospray mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canosa, D.; Daniel, R.; Barceló, D.; Gelpí, E.; Le Goffic, F.; Abián, J.

    1997-01-01

    Several immunoconjugates of [beta]-lactoglobulin with different covalently bound pesticides (phenuron, chlortoluron, isoproturon, simazine, desethylatrazine, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) have been characterized by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The protein has 15 theoretical binding sites and the average number of pesticide molecules bound per protein ranged from two (phenuron) to 13 (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid). These results were compared with those obtained by a spectrophotometric method and by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The pesticide density in the immunoconjugate is very dependent on the pesticide structure, indicating that steric hindrance could be one of the limiting factors of the coupling procedure. The favored binding positions have been determined in the case of chlortoluron and isoproturon by ESI-MS analysis of the peptides obtained after enzymatic digestion of the protein with trypsin.

  3. Identification of water-soluble polar organics in air and vehicular emitted particulate matter using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry and Capillary electrophoresis - mass spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Yassine, M.; Gebefugi, I.; Hertkorn, N.; Dabek-Zlotorzynska, E.

    2009-04-01

    The effects of aerosols on human health, atmospheric chemistry, and climate are among the central topics in current environmental health research. Detailed and accurate measurements of the chemical composition of air particulate matter (PM) represent a challenging analytical task. Minute sample amounts are usually composed of several main constituents and hundreds of minor and trace constituents. Moreover, the composition of individual particles can be fairly uniform or very different (internally or externally mixed aerosols), depending on their origin and atmospheric aging processes (coagulation, condensation / evaporation, chemical reaction). The aim of the presentation was the characterization of the organic matter (OM) fraction of environmental aerosols which is not accessible by GC-methods, either because of their high molecular weight, their polarity or due to thermal instability. We also describe the main chemical characteristics of complexe oligomeric organic fraction extracted from different aerosols collected in urban and rural area in Germany and Canada. Mass spectrometry (MS) became an essential tool used by many prominent leaders of the biological research community and the importance of MS to the future of biological research is now clearly evident as in the fields of Proteomics and Metabolomics. Especially Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS) is an ultrahigh resolution MS that allows new approach in the analysis of complex mixtures. The mass resolution (< 200 ppb) allowed assigning the elemental composition (C, H, O, N, S…) to each of the obtained mass peaks and thus already a description of the mixture in terms of molecular composition. This possibility is used by the authors together with a high resolution separation method of charged compounds: capillary electrophoresis. A CE-ESI-MS method using an ammonium acetate based background electrolyte (pH 4.7) was developed for the determination of isomeric benzoic acids in

  4. Atmospheric pressure ionization-tandem mass spectrometry of the phenicol drug family.

    PubMed

    Alechaga, Élida; Moyano, Encarnación; Galceran, M Teresa

    2013-11-01

    In this work, the mass spectrometry behaviour of the veterinary drug family of phenicols, including chloramphenicol (CAP) and its related compounds thiamphenicol (TAP), florfenicol (FF) and FF amine (FFA), was studied. Several atmospheric pressure ionization sources, electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization were compared. In all atmospheric pressure ionization sources, CAP, TAP and FF were ionized in both positive and negative modes; while for the metabolite FFA, only positive ionization was possible. In general, in positive mode, [M + H](+) dominated the mass spectrum for FFA, while the other compounds, CAP, TAP and FF, with lower proton affinity showed intense adducts with species present in the mobile phase. In negative mode, ESI and atmospheric pressure photoionization showed the deprotonated molecule [M-H](-), while atmospheric pressure chemical ionization provided the radical molecular ion by electron capture. All these ions were characterized by tandem mass spectrometry using the combined information obtained by multistage mass spectrometry and high-resolution mass spectrometry in a quadrupole-Orbitrap instrument. In general, the fragmentation occurred via cyclization and losses or fragmentation of the N-(alkyl)acetamide group, and common fragmentation pathways were established for this family of compounds. A new chemical structure for the product ion at m/z 257 for CAP, on the basis of the MS(3) and MS(4) spectra is proposed. Thermally assisted ESI and selected reaction monitoring are proposed for the determination of these compounds by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, achieving instrumental detection limits down to 0.1 pg. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Magnetic solid phase extraction and static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ying; Yan, Zhihong; Wang, Lijia; NguyenVan, Manh; Cai, Qingyun

    2016-01-15

    A magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) protocol combining a static headspace gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method has been developed for extraction, and determination of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in drinking water samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and modified by cholesterol chloroformate. Transmission electron microscope, vibrating sample magnetometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the cholesterol-functionalized sorbents, and the main parameters affecting the extraction as well as HS sampling, such as sorbent amount, extraction time, oven temperature and equilibration time have been investigated and established. Combination with HS sampling, the MSPE procedure was simple, fast and environmentally friendly, without need of any organic solvent. Method validation proved the feasibility of the developed sorbents for the quantitation of the investigated analytes at trace levels obtaining the limit of detection (S/N=3) ranging from 0.20 to 7.8 ng/L. Good values for intra and inter-day precision were obtained (RSDs ≤ 9.9%). The proposed method was successfully applied to drinking water samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. RAPID DETERMINATION OF ACTINIDES IN URINE BY INDUCTIVELY-COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY AND ALPHA SPECTROMETRY: A HYBRID APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Jones, V.

    2009-05-27

    A new rapid separation method that allows separation and preconcentration of actinides in urine samples was developed for the measurement of longer lived actinides by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and short-lived actinides by alpha spectrometry; a hybrid approach. This method uses stacked extraction chromatography cartridges and vacuum box technology to facilitate rapid separations. Preconcentration, if required, is performed using a streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation. Similar technology has been applied to separate actinides prior to measurement by alpha spectrometry, but this new method has been developed with elution reagents now compatible with ICP-MS as well. Purified solutions are splitmore » between ICP-MS and alpha spectrometry so that long- and short-lived actinide isotopes can be measured successfully. The method allows for simultaneous extraction of 24 samples (including QC samples) in less than 3 h. Simultaneous sample preparation can offer significant time savings over sequential sample preparation. For example, sequential sample preparation of 24 samples taking just 15 min each requires 6 h to complete. The simplicity and speed of this new method makes it attractive for radiological emergency response. If preconcentration is applied, the method is applicable to larger sample aliquots for occupational exposures as well. The chemical recoveries are typically greater than 90%, in contrast to other reported methods using flow injection separation techniques for urine samples where plutonium yields were 70-80%. This method allows measurement of both long-lived and short-lived actinide isotopes. 239Pu, 242Pu, 237Np, 243Am, 234U, 235U and 238U were measured by ICP-MS, while 236Pu, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 244Cm were measured by alpha spectrometry. The method can also be adapted so that the separation of uranium isotopes for assay is not required, if uranium assay by direct dilution of the urine sample is preferred

  7. Accounting for isotopic clustering in Fourier transform mass spectrometry data analysis for clinical diagnostic studies.

    PubMed

    Kakourou, Alexia; Vach, Werner; Nicolardi, Simone; van der Burgt, Yuri; Mertens, Bart

    2016-10-01

    Mass spectrometry based clinical proteomics has emerged as a powerful tool for high-throughput protein profiling and biomarker discovery. Recent improvements in mass spectrometry technology have boosted the potential of proteomic studies in biomedical research. However, the complexity of the proteomic expression introduces new statistical challenges in summarizing and analyzing the acquired data. Statistical methods for optimally processing proteomic data are currently a growing field of research. In this paper we present simple, yet appropriate methods to preprocess, summarize and analyze high-throughput MALDI-FTICR mass spectrometry data, collected in a case-control fashion, while dealing with the statistical challenges that accompany such data. The known statistical properties of the isotopic distribution of the peptide molecules are used to preprocess the spectra and translate the proteomic expression into a condensed data set. Information on either the intensity level or the shape of the identified isotopic clusters is used to derive summary measures on which diagnostic rules for disease status allocation will be based. Results indicate that both the shape of the identified isotopic clusters and the overall intensity level carry information on the class outcome and can be used to predict the presence or absence of the disease.

  8. A pilot study: subclinical hypothyroidism and free thyroid hormone measurement by immunoassay and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gounden, Verena; Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Soldin, Steven J

    2014-03-20

    The diagnosis of subclinical hypothyroidism is defined as the presence of an elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) with a normal free thyroxine (FT4) level. The commonly used direct analogue immunoassays for the measurement of FT4 have been shown to have poor performance at the upper and lower limits of the FT4 reference interval. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the percentage of individuals classified as having subclinical hypothyroidism with a standard immunoassay, that actually have low free thyroid hormone levels by mass spectrometry measurements. Outpatient samples with elevated TSH values and normal FT4 concentrations as per standard immunoassay methods were collected. FT4 and free triiodothyronine (FT3) analyses were performed on these samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Sixty five percent (n=26) of patients (n=40) had (LC-MS/MS) FT4 or FT3 or both FT4 and FT3 values below mass spectrometry reference limits. Our findings indicate that the direct analogue immunoassay method for FT4 measurement results in a significant proportion of patients being misclassified as having subclinical hypothyroidism. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Subattomole sensitivity in biological accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salehpour, Mehran; Possnert, Göran; Bryhni, Helge

    2008-05-15

    The Uppsala University 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator has been used to study (14)C-labeled biological samples utilizing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) technology. We have adapted a sample preparation method for small biological samples down to a few tens of micrograms of carbon, involving among others, miniaturizing of the graphitization reactor. Standard AMS requires about 1 mg of carbon with a limit of quantitation of about 10 amol. Results are presented for a range of small sample sizes with concentrations down to below 1 pM of a pharmaceutical substance in human blood. It is shown that (14)C-labeled molecular markers can be routinely measured from the femtomole range down to a few hundred zeptomole (10 (-21) mol), without the use of any additional separation methods.

  10. Cross-Linking and Mass Spectrometry Methodologies to Facilitate Structural Biology: Finding a Path through the Maze

    SciTech Connect

    Merkley, Eric D.; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-09-01

    Multiprotein complexes, rather than individual proteins, make up a large part of the biological macromolecular machinery of a cell. Understanding the structure and organization of these complexes is critical to understanding cellular function. Chemical cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry is emerging as a complementary technique to traditional structural biology methods and can provide low-resolution structural information for a multitude of purposes, such as distance constraints in computational modeling of protein complexes. In this review, we discuss the experimental considerations for successful application of chemical cross-linking-mass spectrometry in biological studies and highlight three examples of such studies from the recent literature.more » These examples (as well as many others) illustrate the utility of a chemical cross-linking-mass spectrometry approach in facilitating structural analysis of large and challenging complexes.« less

  11. MALDI Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry Profiling of Dysregulated Sulfoglycosphingolipids in Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirásko, Robert; Holčapek, Michal; Khalikova, Maria; Vrána, David; Študent, Vladimír; Prouzová, Zuzana; Melichar, Bohuslav

    2017-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization coupled with Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MALDI-Orbitrap-MS) is used for the clinical study of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC), as the most common type of kidney cancer. Significant changes in sulfoglycosphingolipid abundances between tumor and autologous normal kidney tissues are observed. First, sulfoglycosphingolipid species in studied RCC samples are identified using high mass accuracy full scan and tandem mass spectra. Subsequently, optimization, method validation, and statistical evaluation of MALDI-MS data for 158 tissues of 80 patients are discussed. More than 120 sulfoglycosphingolipids containing one to five hexosyl units are identified in human RCC samples based on the systematic study of their fragmentation behavior. Many of them are recorded here for the first time. Multivariate data analysis (MDA) methods, i.e., unsupervised principal component analysis (PCA) and supervised orthogonal partial least square discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), are used for the visualization of differences between normal and tumor samples to reveal the most up- and downregulated lipids in tumor tissues. Obtained results are closely correlated with MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) and histologic staining. Important steps of the present MALDI-Orbitrap-MS approach are also discussed, such as the selection of best matrix, correct normalization, validation for semiquantitative study, and problems with possible isobaric interferences on closed masses in full scan mass spectra.

  12. Mass spectrometry as a quantitative tool in plant metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Tiago F.; Mata, Ana T.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a research field used to acquire comprehensive information on the composition of a metabolite pool to provide a functional screen of the cellular state. Studies of the plant metabolome include the analysis of a wide range of chemical species with very diverse physico-chemical properties, and therefore powerful analytical tools are required for the separation, characterization and quantification of this vast compound diversity present in plant matrices. In this review, challenges in the use of mass spectrometry (MS) as a quantitative tool in plant metabolomics experiments are discussed, and important criteria for the development and validation of MS-based analytical methods provided. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644967

  13. Determination of albendazole sulfoxide in human plasma by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saraner, Nihal; Özkan, Güler Yağmur; Güney, Berrak; Alkan, Erkin; Burul-Bozkurt, Nihan; Sağlam, Onursal; Fikirdeşici, Ezgi; Yıldırım, Mevlüt

    2016-06-01

    A rapid, simple and sensitive method was developed and validated using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for determination of albendazole sulfoxide (ABZOX) in human plasma. The plasma samples were extracted by protein precipitation using albendazole sulfoxide-d3 as internal standard (IS). The chromatographic separation was performed on Waters Xbridge C18Column (100×4.6mm, 3.5μm) with a mobile phase consisting of ammonia solution, water and methanol at a flow rate of 0.70mL/min. ABZOX was detected and identified by mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization (ESI) in positive ion and multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The method was linear in the range of 3-1500ng/mL for ABZOX. This method was successfully applied to the bioequivalence study in human plasma samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative aspects of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulska, Ewa; Wagner, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Accurate determination of elements in various kinds of samples is essential for many areas, including environmental science, medicine, as well as industry. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a powerful tool enabling multi-elemental analysis of numerous matrices with high sensitivity and good precision. Various calibration approaches can be used to perform accurate quantitative measurements by ICP-MS. They include the use of pure standards, matrix-matched standards, or relevant certified reference materials, assuring traceability of the reported results. This review critically evaluates the advantages and limitations of different calibration approaches, which are used in quantitative analyses by ICP-MS. Examples of such analyses are provided. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  15. [Clinical application of mass spectrometry in the pediatric field: current topics].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2013-09-01

    Mass spectrometry, including tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), is becoming prominent in the diagnosis of metabolic disorders in the pediatric field. It enables biochemical diagnosis of metabolic disorders from the metabolic profiles obtained by MS/MS and/or GC/MS. In neonatal mass screening for inherited metabolic disease (IMD) using MS/MS, amino acids and acylcarnitines on dried blood spots are analyzed. The target diseases include amino acidemia, urea cycle disorder, organic acidemia, and fatty acid oxidation disorder. In the MS/MS screening, organic acid analysis using GC/MS is required for differential and/or definite diagnosis of the IMDs. GC/MS data processing, however, is difficult, and metabolic diagnosis often requires the necessary skills and expertize. We developed an automated system of GC/MS data processing and autodiagnosis, and the biochemical diagnosis using GC/MS became markedly easier and user-friendly. Mass spectrometric techniques will expand from research laboratories to clinical laboratories in the near future.

  16. Urea free and more efficient sample preparation method for mass spectrometry based protein identification via combining the formic acid-assisted chemical cleavage and trypsin digestion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuaibin; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2011-10-30

    A formic acid (FA)-assisted sample preparation method was presented for protein identification via mass spectrometry (MS). Detailedly, an aqueous solution containing 2% FA and dithiothreitol was selected to perform protein denaturation, aspartic acid (D) sites cleavage and disulfide linkages reduction simultaneously at 108°C for 2h. Subsequently, FA wiped off via vacuum concentration. Finally, iodoacetamide (IAA) alkylation and trypsin digestion could be performed ordinally. A series of model proteins (BSA, β-lactoglobulin and apo-Transferrin) were treated respectively using such method, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. The identified peptide number was increased by ∼ 80% in comparison with the conventional urea-assisted sample preparation method. Moreover, BSA identification was achieved efficiently down to femtomole (25 ± 0 sequence coverage and 16 ± 1 peptides) via such method. In contrast, there were not peptides identified confidently via the urea-assisted method before desalination via the C18 zip tip. The absence of urea in this sample preparation method was an advantage for the more favorable digestion and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. The performances of two methods for the real sample (rat liver proteome) were also compared, followed by a nanoflow reversed-phase liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry system analysis. As a result, 1335 ± 43 peptides were identified confidently (false discovery rate <1%) via FA-assisted method, corresponding to 295 ± 12 proteins (of top match=1 and requiring 2 unique peptides at least). In contrast, there were only 1107 ± 16 peptides (corresponding to 231 ± 10 proteins) obtained from the conventional urea-assisted method. It was serving as a more efficient protein sample preparation method for researching specific proteomes better, and providing assistance to develop other proteomics analysis methods

  17. Improvement and validation of a high-performance liquid chromatography in tandem mass spectrometry method for monitoring of omeprazole in plasma.

    PubMed

    Wojnicz, Aneta; Gil García, Ana Isabel; Román-Martínez, Manuel; Ochoa-Mazarro, Dolores; Abad-Santos, Francisco; Ruiz-Nuño, Ana

    2015-06-01

    Omeprazole (OME) is a proton pump inhibitor with a 58% bioavailability after a single oral dose. It is subject to marked interindividual variations and significant drug-drug interactions. The authors developed a simple and rapid method based on liquid chromatography in tandem with mass spectrometry with solid phase extraction and isotope-labeled internal standard to monitor plasma levels of OME in pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interaction studies. OME and its internal standard (OME-D3) were eluted with a Zorbax Extend C-18 rapid resolution column (4.6 × 50 mm, 3.5 μm) at 25°C, under isocratic conditions through a mobile phase consisting of 1 mM ammonium acetate, pH 8.5 (55%), and acetonitrile (45%). The flow rate was 0.8 mL/min, and the chromatogram run time was 1.2 minutes. OME was detected and quantified by liquid chromatography in tandem with mass spectrometry with positive electrospray ionization, which operates in multiple-reaction monitoring mode. The method was linear in the range of 1.5-2000 ng/mL for OME. The validation assays for accuracy and precision, matrix effect, extraction recovery, and stability of the samples for OME did not deviate more than 20% for the lower limit of quantification and no more than 15% for other quality controls. These findings are consistent with the requirements of regulatory agencies. The method enables rapid quantification of OME concentrations and can be used in pharmacokinetic and drug-drug interaction studies.

  18. Quantitation of acrylamide in food products by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, B Loye; Ewald, Deborah K; Sanders, Robert A; Tallmadge, Daniel H; Zyzak, David V; Strothers, Melissa A

    2005-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) method was developed for the quantitation of acrylamide in various food products. The method involved spiking the isotope-substituted internal standard (1-C13 acrylamide) onto 6.00 g of the food product, adding 40 mL distilled/deionized water, and heating at 65 degrees C for 30 min. Afterwards, 10 mL ethylene dichloride was added and the mixture was homogenized for 30 s and centrifuged at 2700 x g for 30 min, and then 8 g supernatant was extracted with 10, 5, and 5 mL portions of ethyl acetate. The extracts were combined, dried with sodium sulfate, and concentrated to 100-200 microL. Acrylamide was determined by analysis of the final extract on a single quadrupole, bench-top mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization, using a 2 mm id C18 column and monitoring m/z = 72 (acrylamide) and m/z = 73 (internal standard). For difficult food matrixes, such as coffee and cocoa, a solid-phase extraction cleanup step was incorporated to improve both chromatography and column lifetime. The method had a limit of quantitation of 10 ppb, and coefficients of determination (r2) for calibration curves were typically better than 0.998. Acceptable spike recovery results were achieved in 11 different food matrixes. Precision in potato chip analyses was 5-8% (relative standard deviation). This method provides an LC/MS alternative to the current LC/MS/MS methods and derivatization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods, and is applicable to difficult food products such as coffee, cocoa, and high-salt foods.

  19. [MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry in the investigation of large high-molecular biological compounds].

    PubMed

    Porubl'ova, L V; Rebriiev, A V; Hromovyĭ, T Iu; Minia, I I; Obolens'ka, M Iu

    2009-01-01

    MALDI-TOF (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight) mass spectrometry has become, in the recent years, a tool of choice for analyses of biological polymers. The wide mass range, high accuracy, informativity and sensitivity make it a superior method for analysis of all kinds of high-molecular biological compounds including proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. MALDI-TOF-MS is particularly suitable for the identification of proteins by mass fingerprint or microsequencing. Therefore it has become an important technique of proteomics. Furthermore, the method allows making a detailed analysis of post-translational protein modifications, protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions. Recently, the method was also successfully applied to nucleic acid sequencing as well as screening for mutations.

  20. Sensitive method for the quantitative determination of proguanil and its metabolites in rat blood and plasma by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leveque, Nathalie L; Charman, William N; Chiu, Francis C K

    2006-01-18

    A sensitive, simple and fast liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method for the determination of proguanil (PG) and its metabolites, cycloguanil (CG) and 1-(4-chlorophenyl)biguanide (4CPB), was developed and validated over a concentration range of 1-2000 ng/mL using only 50 microL of blood or plasma. After a simple solvent precipitation procedure, the supernatant was analysed directly by HPLC-MS/MS. Separation was achieved using an ethyl-linked phenyl reverse phase column with polar endcapping with an acetonitrile-water-formic acid gradient. Mass spectrometry was performed using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in positive electrospray ionization mode. The elution of PG (254.07-->169.99), CG (252.12-->195.02) and 4CPB (212.06-->153.06) was monitored using selected reaction monitoring. The three compounds and the internal standard (chloroproguanil) were well separated by HPLC and no interfering peaks were detected at the usual concentrations found in blood and plasma. The limit of quantification of PG and CG was 1 ng/mL and 5 ng/mL for 4CPB in rat blood and plasma. The extraction efficiency of PG, CG and 4CPB from rat blood and plasma was higher than 73%. The intra- and inter-assay variability of PG, CG and 4CPB were within 12% and the accuracy within +/-5%. This new assay offers higher sensitivity and a much shorter run time over earlier methods.

  1. Surface analysis of lipids by mass spectrometry: more than just imaging.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Shane R; Brown, Simon H; In Het Panhuis, Marc; Blanksby, Stephen J; Mitchell, Todd W

    2013-10-01

    Mass spectrometry is now an indispensable tool for lipid analysis and is arguably the driving force in the renaissance of lipid research. In its various forms, mass spectrometry is uniquely capable of resolving the extensive compositional and structural diversity of lipids in biological systems. Furthermore, it provides the ability to accurately quantify molecular-level changes in lipid populations associated with changes in metabolism and environment; bringing lipid science to the "omics" age. The recent explosion of mass spectrometry-based surface analysis techniques is fuelling further expansion of the lipidomics field. This is evidenced by the numerous papers published on the subject of mass spectrometric imaging of lipids in recent years. While imaging mass spectrometry provides new and exciting possibilities, it is but one of the many opportunities direct surface analysis offers the lipid researcher. In this review we describe the current state-of-the-art in the direct surface analysis of lipids with a focus on tissue sections, intact cells and thin-layer chromatography substrates. The suitability of these different approaches towards analysis of the major lipid classes along with their current and potential applications in the field of lipid analysis are evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimal turnaround time for direct identification of microorganisms by mass spectrometry in blood culture.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, Adrien; Simon, Marc; Goffinet, Pierre; Classen, Jean-François; Hougardy, Nicolas; Pierre, Pascal; Kinzinger, Philippe; Mauel, Etienne; Goffinet, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-11-01

    During the past few years, several studies describing direct identification of bacteria from blood culture using mass spectrometry have been published. These methods cannot, however, be easily integrated into a common laboratory workflow because of the high hands-on time they require. In this paper, we propose a new method of identification with a short hands-on time and a turnaround time shorter than 15min. Positive blood bottles were homogenised and 600μL of blood were transferred to an Eppendorf tube where 600μL of lysis buffer were added. After homogenisation, a centrifugation step of 4min at 10,500g was performed and the supernatant was discarded. The pellet was then washed and loaded in quadruplicate into wells of a Vitek® MS-DS plate. Each well was covered with a saturated matrix solution and a MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis was performed. Species were identified using the software Myla 3.2.0-2. We analysed 266 positive blood culture bottles. A microorganism grew in 261 cultures, while five bottles remained sterile after 48h of incubation in subculture. Our method reaches a probability of detection at the species level of 77.8% (203/261) with a positive predictive value of 99.5% (202/203). We developed a new method for the identification of microorganisms using mass spectrometry, directly performed from a positive blood culture. This method has short hands-on time and turnaround time and can easily take place in the workflow of a laboratory, with comparable results in performance with other methods reported in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY (R823292)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The combination of micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) with mass spectrometry (MS) is very attractive for the direct identification of analyte molecules, for the possibility of selectivity enhancement, and for the structure confirmation and analysis in a MS-MS mode. The...

  4. Assessment of a new method for the analysis of decomposition gases of polymers by a combining thermogravimetric solid-phase extraction and thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duemichen, E; Braun, U; Senz, R; Fabian, G; Sturm, H

    2014-08-08

    For analysis of the gaseous thermal decomposition products of polymers, the common techniques are thermogravimetry, combined with Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR) and mass spectrometry (TGA-MS). These methods offer a simple approach to the decomposition mechanism, especially for small decomposition molecules. Complex spectra of gaseous mixtures are very often hard to identify because of overlapping signals. In this paper a new method is described to adsorb the decomposition products during controlled conditions in TGA on solid-phase extraction (SPE) material: twisters. Subsequently the twisters were analysed with thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TDS-GC-MS), which allows the decomposition products to be separated and identified using an MS library. The thermoplastics polyamide 66 (PA 66) and polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) were used as example polymers. The influence of the sample mass and of the purge gas flow during the decomposition process was investigated in TGA. The advantages and limitations of the method were presented in comparison to the common analysis techniques, TGA-FTIR and TGA-MS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Multiresidue analysis of pesticides in straw roughage by liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A multiresidue analytical method using a modification of the “quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe” (QuEChERS) sample preparation approach combined with liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis was established and validated for the rapid determination of 69 pesti...

  6. A surrogate analyte method to determine D-serine in mouse brain using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Kohnosuke; Jingu, Shigeji; Yamaguchi, Jun-ichi

    2013-01-15

    A bioanalytical method for determining endogenous d-serine levels in the mouse brain using a surrogate analyte and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed. [2,3,3-(2)H]D-serine and [(15)N]D-serine were used as a surrogate analyte and an internal standard, respectively. The surrogate analyte was spiked into brain homogenate to yield calibration standards and quality control (QC) samples. Both endogenous and surrogate analytes were extracted using protein precipitation followed by solid phase extraction. Enantiomeric separation was achieved on a chiral crown ether column with an analysis time of only 6 min without any derivatization. The column eluent was introduced into an electrospray interface of a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer. The calibration range was 1.00 to 300 nmol/g, and the method showed acceptable accuracy and precision at all QC concentration levels from a validation point of view. In addition, the brain d-serine levels of normal mice determined using this method were the same as those obtained by a standard addition method, which is time-consuming but is often used for the accurate measurement of endogenous substances. Thus, this surrogate analyte method should be applicable to the measurement of d-serine levels as a potential biomarker for monitoring certain effects of drug candidates on the central nervous system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange for Metabolomics Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Hossein; Karanji, Ahmad K.; Majuta, Sandra; Maurer, Megan M.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2018-02-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) in combination with gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) is evaluated as an analytical method for small-molecule standard and mixture characterization. Experiments show that compound ions exhibit unique HDX reactivities that can be used to distinguish different species. Additionally, it is shown that gas-phase HDX kinetics can be exploited to provide even further distinguishing capabilities by using different partial pressures of reagent gas. The relative HDX reactivity of a wide variety of molecules is discussed in light of the various molecular structures. Additionally, hydrogen accessibility scoring (HAS) and HDX kinetics modeling of candidate ( in silico) ion structures is utilized to estimate the relative ion conformer populations giving rise to specific HDX behavior. These data interpretation methods are discussed with a focus on developing predictive tools for HDX behavior. Finally, an example is provided in which ion mobility information is supplemented with HDX reactivity data to aid identification efforts of compounds in a metabolite extract.

  8. Quasi-dynamic mode of nanomembranes for time-of-flight mass spectrometry of proteins.

    PubMed

    Park, Jonghoo; Kim, Hyunseok; Blick, Robert H

    2012-04-21

    Mechanical resonators realized on the nano-scale by now offer applications in mass-sensing of biomolecules with extraordinary sensitivity. The general idea is that perfect mechanical biosensors should be of extremely small size to achieve zeptogram sensitivity in weighing single molecules similar to a balance. However, the small scale and long response time of weighing biomolecules with a cantilever restrict their usefulness as a high-throughput method. Commercial mass spectrometry (MS) such as electro-spray ionization (ESI)-MS and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF)-MS are the gold standards to which nanomechanical resonators have to live up to. These two methods rely on the ionization and acceleration of biomolecules and the following ion detection after a mass selection step, such as time-of-flight (TOF). Hence, the spectrum is typically represented in m/z, i.e. the mass to ionization charge ratio. Here, we describe the feasibility and mass range of detection of a new mechanical approach for ion detection in time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the principle of which is that the impinging ion packets excite mechanical oscillations in a silicon nitride nanomembrane. These mechanical oscillations are henceforth detected via field emission of electrons from the nanomembrane. Ion detection is demonstrated in MALDI-TOF analysis over a broad range with angiotensin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and an equimolar protein mixture of insulin, BSA, and immunoglobulin G (IgG). We find an unprecedented mass range of operation of the nanomembrane detector.

  9. Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: What, Why, and How?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Elise A.; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-11-01

    Distance-of-flight mass spectrometry (DOFMS) separates ions of different mass-to-charge ( m/ z) by the distance they travel in a given time after acceleration. Like time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS), separation and mass assignment are based on ion velocity. However, DOFMS is not a variant of TOFMS; different methods of ion focusing and detection are used. In DOFMS, ions are driven orthogonally, at the detection time, onto an array of detectors parallel to the flight path. Through the independent detection of each m/ z, DOFMS can provide both wider dynamic range and increased throughput for m/ z of interest compared with conventional TOFMS. The iso-mass focusing and detection of ions is achieved by constant-momentum acceleration (CMA) and a linear-field ion mirror. Improved energy focus (including turn-around) is achieved in DOFMS, but the initial spatial dispersion of ions remains unchanged upon detection. Therefore, the point-source nature of surface ionization techniques could put them at an advantage for DOFMS. To date, three types of position-sensitive detectors have been used for DOFMS: a microchannel plate with a phosphorescent screen, a focal plane camera, and an IonCCD array; advances in detector technology will likely improve DOFMS figures-of-merit. In addition, the combination of CMA with TOF detection has provided improved resolution and duty factor over a narrow m/ z range (compared with conventional, single-pass TOFMS). The unique characteristics of DOFMS can enable the intact collection of large biomolecules, clusters, and organisms. DOFMS might also play a key role in achieving the long-sought goal of simultaneous MS/MS.

  10. Structural Elucidation of Enzymatically Synthesized Galacto-oligosaccharides Using Ion-Mobility Spectrometry-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carević, Milica; Bezbradica, Dejan; Banjanac, Katarina; Milivojević, Ana; Fanuel, Mathieu; Rogniaux, Hélène; Ropartz, David; Veličković, Dušan

    2016-05-11

    Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) represent a diverse group of well-characterized prebiotic ingredients derived from lactose in a reaction catalyzed with β-galactosidases. Enzymatic transgalactosylation results in a mixture of compounds of various degrees of polymerization and types of linkages. Because structure plays an important role in terms of prebiotic activity, it is of crucial importance to provide an insight into the mechanism of transgalactosylation reaction and occurrence of different types of β-linkages during GOS synthesis. Our study proved that a novel one-step method, based on ion-mobility spectrometry-tandem mass spectrometry (IMS-MS/MS), enables complete elucidation of GOS structure. It has been shown that β-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae has the highest affinity toward formation of β-(1→3) or β-(1→6) linkages. Additionally, it was observed that the occurrence of different linkages varies during the reaction course, indicating that tailoring favorable GOS structures with improved prebiotic activity can be achieved by adequate control of enzymatic synthesis.

  11. A differential mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry platform for the rapid detection and quantitation of DNA adduct dG-ABP.

    PubMed

    Kafle, Amol; Klaene, Joshua; Hall, Adam B; Glick, James; Coy, Stephen L; Vouros, Paul

    2013-07-15

    There is continued interest in exploring new analytical technologies for the detection and quantitation of DNA adducts, biomarkers which provide direct evidence of exposure and genetic damage in cells. With the goal of reducing clean-up steps and improving sample throughput, a Differential Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (DMS/MS) platform has been introduced for adduct analysis. A DMS/MS platform has been utilized for the analysis of dG-ABP, the deoxyguanosine adduct of the bladder carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP). After optimization of the DMS parameters, each sample was analyzed in just 30 s following a simple protein precipitation step of the digested DNA. A detection limit of one modification in 10^6 nucleosides has been achieved using only 2 µg of DNA. A brief comparison (quantitative and qualitative) with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry is also presented highlighting the advantages of using the DMS/MS method as a high-throughput platform. The data presented demonstrate the successful application of a DMS/MS/MS platform for the rapid quantitation of DNA adducts using, as a model analyte, the deoxyguanosine adduct of the bladder carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Measuring Thermodynamic Properties of Metals and Alloys With Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan H.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2010-01-01

    This report reviews Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) as it relates to thermodynamic measurements of metals and alloys. First, general aspects are reviewed, with emphasis on the Knudsen-cell vapor source and molecular beam formation, and mass spectrometry issues germane to this type of instrument are discussed briefly. The relationship between the vapor pressure inside the effusion cell and the measured ion intensity is the key to KEMS and is derived in detail. Then common methods used to determine thermodynamic quantities with KEMS are discussed. Enthalpies of vaporization, the fundamental measurement, are determined from the variation of relative partial pressure with temperature using the second-law method or by calculating a free energy of formation and subtracting the entropy contribution using the third-law method. For single-cell KEMS instruments, measurements can be used to determine the partial Gibbs free energy if the sensitivity factor remains constant over multiple experiments. The ion-current ratio method and dimer-monomer method are also viable in some systems. For a multiple-cell KEMS instrument, activities are obtained by direct comparison with a suitable component reference state or a secondary standard. Internal checks for correct instrument operation and general procedural guidelines also are discussed. Finally, general comments are made about future directions in measuring alloy thermodynamics with KEMS.

  13. Space Applications of Mass Spectrometry. Chapter 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Limero, Thomas; Arkin, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been involved in essentially all aspects of space exploration. This chapter outlines some of these many uses. Mass spectrometers have not only helped to expand our knowledge and understanding of the world and solar system around us, they have helped to put man safely in space and expand our frontier. Mass spectrometry continues to prove to be a very reliable, robust, and flexible analytical instrument, ensuring that its use will continue to help aid our investigation of the universe and this small planet that we call home.

  14. Static Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) | Materials

    Science.gov Websites

    -Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) Image of high mass resolution and mass accuracy provided by TOF SIMS We used the high mass resolution and mass accuracy of TOF SIMS to study surface cleanliness acidic wash resulted in contamination by Fe and other metals. Without high mass accuracy, the CaO signal

  15. Use of Tritium Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Tree Ring Analysis

    PubMed Central

    LOVE, ADAM H.; HUNT, JAMES R.; ROBERTS, MARK L.; SOUTHON, JOHN R.; CHIARAPPA - ZUCCA, MARINA L.; DINGLEY, KAREN H.

    2010-01-01

    Public concerns over the health effects associated with low-level and long-term exposure to tritium released from industrial point sources have generated the demand for better methods to evaluate historical tritium exposure levels for these communities. The cellulose of trees accurately reflects the tritium concentration in the source water and may contain the only historical record of tritium exposure. The tritium activity in the annual rings of a tree was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry to reconstruct historical annual averages of tritium exposure. Milligram-sized samples of the annual tree rings from a Tamarix located at the Nevada Test Site are used for validation of this methodology. The salt cedar was chosen since it had a single source of tritiated water that was well-characterized as it varied over time. The decay-corrected tritium activity of the water in which the salt cedar grew closely agrees with the organically bound tritium activity in its annual rings. This demonstrates that the milligram-sized samples used in tritium accelerator mass spectrometry are suited for reconstructing anthropogenic tritium levels in the environment. PMID:12144257

  16. On the importance of mathematical methods for analysis of MALDI-imaging mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Trede, Dennis; Kobarg, Jan Hendrik; Oetjen, Janina; Thiele, Herbert; Maass, Peter; Alexandrov, Theodore

    2012-03-21

    In the last decade, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), also called as MALDI-imaging, has proven its potential in proteomics and was successfully applied to various types of biomedical problems, in particular to histopathological label-free analysis of tissue sections. In histopathology, MALDI-imaging is used as a general analytic tool revealing the functional proteomic structure of tissue sections, and as a discovery tool for detecting new biomarkers discriminating a region annotated by an