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Sample records for methylated arsenical-induced phosphatidylserine

  1. Trivalent methylated arsenical-induced phosphatidylserine exposure and apoptosis in platelets may lead to increased thrombus formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Ok-Nam; Lim, Kyung-Min; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2009-09-01

    Trivalent methylated metabolites of arsenic, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}), have been found highly reactive and toxic in various cells and in vivo animal models, suggesting their roles in the arsenic-associated toxicity. However, their effects on cardiovascular system including blood cells, one of the most important targets for arsenic toxicity, remain poorly understood. Here we found that MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III} could induce procoagulant activity and apoptosis in platelets, which play key roles in the development of various cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) through excessive thrombus formation. In freshly isolated human platelets, treatment of MMA{sup III} resulted in phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, a hallmark of procoagulant activation, accompanied by distinctive apoptotic features including mitochondrial membrane potential disruption, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation. These procoagulant activation and apoptotic features were found to be mediated by the depletion of protein thiol and intracellular ATP, and flippase inhibition by MMA{sup III}, while the intracellular calcium increase or reactive oxygen species generation was not involved. Importantly, increased platelet procoagulant activity by MMA{sup III} resulted in enhanced blood coagulation and excessive thrombus formation in a rat in vivo venous thrombosis model. DMA{sup III} also induced PS-exposure with apoptotic features mediated by protein thiol depletion, which resulted in enhanced thrombin generation. In summary, we believe that this study provides an important evidence for the role of trivalent methylated arsenic metabolites in arsenic-associated CVDs, giving a novel insight into the role of platelet apoptosis in toxicant-induced cardiovascular toxicity.

  2. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation changes with development of arsenic-induced skin lesions in Bangladesh: a case-control follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Seow, Wei Jie; Kile, Molly L; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Pan, Wen-Chi; Byun, Hyang-Min; Mostofa, Golam; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Lin, Xihong; Christiani, David C

    2014-07-01

    Studies have found an association between aberrant DNA methylation and arsenic-induced skin lesions. However, little is known about DNA methylation changes over time in people who develop arsenic-induced skin lesions. We sought to investigate epigenome-wide changes of DNA methylation in people who developed arsenic-induced skin lesions in a 10-year period. In 2009-2011, we conducted a follow-up study of 900 skin lesion cases and 900 controls and identified 10 people who developed skin lesions since a baseline survey in 2001-2003. The 10 cases ("New Cases") were matched with 10 controls who did not have skin lesions at baseline or follow-up ("Persistent Controls"). Drinking water and blood samples were collected, and skin lesion was diagnosed by the same physician at both time points. We measured DNA methylation in blood using Infinium HumanMethylation450K BeadChip, followed by quantitative validation using pyrosequencing. Two-sample t-tests were used to compare changes in percent methylation between New Cases and Persistent Controls. Six CpG (cytosine-phosphate-guanine) sites with greatest changes of DNA methylation over time among New Cases were further validated with a correlation of 93% using pyrosequencing. One of the validated CpG site (cg03333116; change of %methylation was 13.2 in New Cases versus -0.09 in Persistent Controls; P < 0.001) belonged to the RHBDF1 gene, which was previously reported to be hypermethylated in arsenic-exposed cases. We examined DNA methylation changes with the development of arsenic-induced skin lesions over time but nothing was statistically significant given the small sample size of this exploratory study and the high dimensionality of data.

  3. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation changes with development of arsenic-induced skin lesions in Bangladesh: a case-control follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Wei Jie; Kile, Molly L.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Pan, Wen-Chi; Byun, Hyang-Min; Mostofa, Golam; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Lin, Xihong; Christiani, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Studies have found an association between aberrant DNA methylation and arsenic-induced skin lesions. Yet, little is known about DNA methylation changes over time in people who develop arsenic-induced skin lesions. We sought to investigate epigenome-wide changes of DNA methylation in people who developed arsenic-induced skin lesions in a ten year period. In 2009–2011, we conducted a follow-up study of 900 skin lesion cases and 900 controls and identified 10 people who developed skin lesions since a baseline survey in 2001–2003. The 10 cases (“New Cases”) were matched with 10 controls who did not have skin lesions at baseline or follow-up (“Persistent Controls”). Drinking water and blood samples were collected and skin lesion was diagnosed by the same physician at both time points. We measured DNA methylation in blood using Infinium HumanMethylation450K BeadChip, followed by quantitative validation using pyrosequencing. Two-sample t-tests were used to compare changes in percent methylation between New Cases and Persistent Controls. Six CpG sites with greatest changes of DNA methylation over time among New Cases were further validated with a correlation of 93% using pyrosequencing. One of the validated CpG site (cg03333116; change of %methylation was 13.2 in New Cases versus −0.09 in Persistent Controls; P <0.001) belonged to the RHBDF1 gene, which was previously reported to be hypermethylated in arsenic-exposed cases. We examined DNA methylation changes with the development of arsenic-induced skin lesions over time but nothing was statistically significant given the small sample size of this exploratory study and the high dimensionality of data. PMID:24677489

  4. Arsenic-Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Sean; Zancosky, Krysia; Farah, Katie

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide has brought about tremendous advancement in the treatment of acute promyelocytic myelogenous leukemia (APML). In most instances, the benefits of these treatments outweigh the risks associated with their respective safety profiles. Although acute pancreatitis is not commonly associated with arsenic toxicity, it should be considered as a possible side effect. We report a case of arsenic-induced pancreatitis in a patient with APML. PMID:22606427

  5. Pomegranate protects against arsenic-induced p53-dependent ROS-mediated inflammation and apoptosis in liver cells.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Sreetama; Ghosh, Sayan; Mukherjee, Sudeshna; Gupta, Payal; Bhattacharya, Saurav; Adhikary, Arghya; Chattopadhyay, Sreya

    2016-12-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in arsenic-induced toxicity are complex and elusive. Liver is one of the most favored organs for arsenic toxicity as methylation of arsenic occurs mostly in the liver. In this study, we have selected a range of environmentally relevant doses of arsenic to examine the basis of arsenic toxicity and the role of pomegranate fruit extract (PFE) in combating it. Male Swiss albino mice exposed to different doses of arsenic presented marked hepatic injury as evident from histological and electron microscopic studies. Increased activities of enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase corroborated extensive liver damage. It was further noted that arsenic exposure initiated reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent apoptosis in the hepatocytes involving loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Arsenic significantly increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), coupled with increase in phosphorylated Iκ-B, possibly as adaptive cellular survival strategies. Arsenic-induced oxidative DNA damage to liver cells culminated in p53 activation and increased expression of p53 targets like miR-34a and Bax. Pomegranate polyphenols are known to possess remarkable antioxidant properties and are capable of protecting normal cells from various stimuli-induced oxidative stress and toxicities. We explored the protective role of PFE in ameliorating arsenic-induced hepatic damage. PFE was shown to reduce ROS generation in hepatocytes, thereby reducing arsenic-induced Nrf2 activation. PFE also inhibited arsenic-induced NF-κB-inflammatory pathway. Data revealed that PFE reversed arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity and apoptosis by modulating the ROS/Nrf2/p53-miR-34a axis. For the first time, we have mapped the possible signaling pathways associated with arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity and its rescue by pomegranate polyphenols.

  6. Association of arsenic-induced malignant transformation with DNA hypomethylation and aberrant gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Christopher Q.; Young, Matthew R.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Coogan, Timothy P.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    1997-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic, a human carcinogen, is enzymatically methylated for detoxication, consuming S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) in the process. The fact that DNA methyltransferases (MeTases) require this same methyl donor suggests a role for methylation in arsenic carcinogenesis. Here we test the hypothesis that arsenic-induced initiation results from DNA hypomethylation caused by continuous methyl depletion. The hypothesis was tested by first inducing transformation in a rat liver epithelial cell line by chronic exposure to low levels of arsenic, as confirmed by the development of highly aggressive, malignant tumors after inoculation of cells into Nude mice. Global DNA hypomethylation occurred concurrently with malignant transformation and in the presence of depressed levels of S-adenosyl-methionine. Arsenic-induced DNA hypomethylation was a function of dose and exposure duration, and remained constant even after withdrawal of arsenic. Hyperexpressibility of the MT gene, a gene for which expression is clearly controlled by DNA methylation, was also detected in transformed cells. Acute arsenic or arsenic at nontransforming levels did not induce global hypomethylation of DNA. Whereas transcription of DNA MeTase was elevated, the MeTase enzymatic activity was reduced with arsenic transformation. Taken together, these results indicate arsenic can act as a carcinogen by inducing DNA hypomethylation, which in turn facilitates aberrant gene expression, and they constitute a tenable theory of mechanism in arsenic carcinogenesis. PMID:9380733

  7. Natural Antioxidants Against Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Munesh; Lalit, Minakshi; Thakur, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic is present in water, soil, and air in organic as well as in inorganic forms. However, inorganic arsenic is more toxic than organic and can cause many diseases including cancers in humans. Its genotoxic effect is considered as one of its carcinogenic actions. Arsenic can cause DNA strand breaks, deletion mutations, micronuclei formation, DNA-protein cross-linking, sister chromatid exchange, and DNA repair inhibition. Evidences indicate that arsenic causes DNA damage by generation of reactive free radicals. Nutritional supplementation of antioxidants has been proven highly beneficial against arsenic genotoxicity in experimental animals. Recent studies suggest that antioxidants protect mainly by reducing excess free radicals via restoring the activities of cellular enzymatic as well as non-enzymatic antioxidants and decreasing the oxidation processes such as lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent literature on arsenic-induced genotoxicity and its mitigation by naturally derived antioxidants in various biological systems.

  8. Sensing phosphatidylserine in cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Kay, Jason G; Grinstein, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine, a phospholipid with a negatively charged head-group, is an important constituent of eukaryotic cellular membranes. On the plasma membrane, rather than being evenly distributed, phosphatidylserine is found preferentially in the inner leaflet. Disruption of this asymmetry, leading to the appearance of phosphatidylserine on the surface of the cell, is known to play a central role in both apoptosis and blood clotting. Despite its importance, comparatively little is known about phosphatidylserine in cells: its precise subcellular localization, transmembrane topology and intracellular dynamics are poorly characterized. The recent development of new, genetically-encoded probes able to detect phosphatidylserine within live cells, however, is leading to a more in-depth understanding of the biology of this phospholipid. This review aims to give an overview of the current methods for phosphatidylserine detection within cells, and some of the recent realizations derived from their use.

  9. ANTIOXIDANTS AMELIORATION OF ARSENICAL-INDUCED EFFECTS IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Antioxidant amelioration of arsenical-induced effects in vivo. ES Hunter and EH Rogers. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, US EPA, RTP, NC.

    Antioxidants have been reported to ameliorate the effects of many developmental toxicants. We tested the hypothesis that oxi...

  10. Arsenic-induced Histological Alterations in Various Organs of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Noman, Abu Shadat Mohammod; Dilruba, Sayada; Mohanto, Nayan Chandra; Rahman, Lutfur; Khatun, Zohora; Riad, Wahiduzzaman; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Alam, Shahnur; Aktar, Sharmin; Chowdhury, Srikanta; Saud, Zahangir Alam; Rahman, Zillur; Hossain, Khaled; Haque, Azizul

    2015-01-01

    Deposition of arsenic in mice through groundwater is well documented but little is known about the histological changes of organs by the metalloid. Present study was designed to evaluate arsenic-induced histological alterations in kidney, liver, thoracic artery and brain of mice which are not well documented yet. Swiss albino male mice were divided into 2 groups and treated as follows: Group 1: control, 2: arsenic (sodium arsenite at 10 mg/kg b.w. orally for 8 wks). Group 2 showed marked degenerative changes in kidney, liver, thoracic artery, and brain whereas Group 1 did not reveal any abnormalities on histopathology. We therefore concluded that arsenic induces histological alterations in the tested organs. PMID:26740907

  11. Arsenic-induced Aurora-A activation contributes to chromosome instability and tumorigenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Han; Tseng, Ya-Shih; Yang, Chao-Chun; Kao, Yu-Ting; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic may cause serious environmental pollution and is a serious industrial problem. Depending on the dosage, arsenic may trigger the cells undergoing either proliferation or apoptosis-related cell death. Because of lack of the proper animal model to study arsenic induced tumorigenesis, the accurate risk level of arsenic exposure has not been determined. Arsenic shows genotoxic effect on human beings who uptake water contaminated by arsenic. Chromosome aberration is frequently detected in arsenic exposure-related diseases and is associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased DNA repairing activity, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Aurora-A is a mitotic kinase, over-expression of Aurora-A leads to centrosome amplification, chromosomal instability and cell transformation. We revealed that Aurora-A is over-expressed in the skin and bladder cancer patients from blackfoot-disease endemic areas. Our cell line studies reveal that arsenic exposure between 0.5 μM and 1 μM for 2-7 days are able to induce Aurora-A expression and activation based on promoter activity, RNA and protein analysis. Aurora-A overexpression further increases the frequency of unsymmetrical chromosome segregation through centrosome amplification followed by cell population accumulated at S phase in immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) and uroepithelial cells (E7). Furthermore, Aurora-A over-expression was sustained for 1-4 weeks by chronic treatment of immortalized bladder and skin cells with NaAsO2. Aurora-A promoter methylation and gene amplification was not detected in the long-term arsenic treated E7 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of E2F1 transcription factor (E2F1) is increased in the presence of arsenic, and arsenic-related Aurora-A over-expression is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1. We further demonstrated that overexpression of Aurora-A and mutant Ha-ras or Aurora-A and mutant p53 may act additively to trigger arsenic-related bladder and skin cancer

  12. Arsenic Induces p62 Expression to Form a Positive Feedback Loop with Nrf2 in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes: Implications for Preventing Arsenic-Induced Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Palak; Trinh, Elaine; Qiang, Lei; Xie, Lishi; Hu, Wen-Yang; Prins, Gail S.; Pi, Jingbo; He, Yu-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic in contaminated drinking water poses an environmental public health threat for hundreds of millions of people in the US and around the world. Arsenic is a known carcinogen for skin cancer. However, the mechanism by which arsenic induces skin cancer remains poorly understood. Here, we have shown that arsenic induces p62 expression in an autophagy-independent manner in human HaCaT keratinocytes. In mouse skin, chronic arsenic exposure through drinking water increases p62 protein levels in the epidermis. Nrf2 is required for basal and arsenic-induced p62 up-regulation. p62 knockdown reduces arsenic-induced Nrf2 activity, and induces sustained p21 up-regulation. p62 induction is associated with increased proliferation in mouse epidermis. p62 knockdown had little effect on arsenic-induced apoptosis, while it decreased cell proliferation following arsenic treatment. Our findings indicate that arsenic induces p62 expression to regulate the Nrf2 pathway in human keratinocytes and suggest that targeting p62 may help prevent arsenic-induced skin cancer. PMID:28125038

  13. Molecular features in arsenic-induced lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a well-known human carcinogen, which potentially affects ~160 million people worldwide via exposure to unsafe levels in drinking water. Lungs are one of the main target organs for arsenic-related carcinogenesis. These tumors exhibit particular features, such as squamous cell-type specificity and high incidence among never smokers. Arsenic-induced malignant transformation is mainly related to the biotransformation process intended for the metabolic clearing of the carcinogen, which results in specific genetic and epigenetic alterations that ultimately affect key pathways in lung carcinogenesis. Based on this, lung tumors induced by arsenic exposure could be considered an additional subtype of lung cancer, especially in the case of never-smokers, where arsenic is a known etiological agent. In this article, we review the current knowledge on the various mechanisms of arsenic carcinogenicity and the specific roles of this metalloid in signaling pathways leading to lung cancer. PMID:23510327

  14. THE ROLE OF VALENCE AND METHYLATION STATE ON THE ACTIVITY OF ARSENIC DURING MITOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trivalent methylated arsenicals are much more potent DNA damaging agents, clastogens, and large deletion mutagens than are their inorganic and pentavalent counterparts. Previously we had noticed that many of the arsenicals induced "c-type" anaphases characteristic of spindle pois...

  15. Arsenic-Induced Antioxidant Depletion, Oxidative DNA Breakage, and Tissue Damages are Prevented by the Combined Action of Folate and Vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Acharyya, Nirmallya; Deb, Bimal; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Maiti, Smarajit

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic is a grade I human carcinogen. It acts by disrupting one-carbon (1C) metabolism and cellular methyl (-CH3) pool. The -CH3 group helps in arsenic disposition and detoxification of the biological systems. Vitamin B12 and folate, the key promoters of 1C metabolism were tested recently (daily 0.07 and 4.0 μg, respectively/100 g b.w. of rat for 28 days) to evaluate their combined efficacy in the protection from mutagenic DNA-breakage and tissue damages. The selected tissues like intestine (first-pass site), liver (major xenobiotic metabolizer) and lung (major arsenic accumulator) were collected from arsenic-ingested (0.6 ppm/same schedule) female rats. The hemo-toxicity and liver and kidney functions were monitored. Our earlier studies on arsenic-exposed humans can correlate carcinogenesis with DNA damage. Here, we demonstrate that the supplementation of physiological/therapeutic dose of vitamin B12 and folate protected the rodents significantly from arsenic-induced DNA damage (DNA fragmentation and comet assay) and hepatic and renal tissue degeneration (histo-architecture, HE staining). The level of arsenic-induced free-radical products (TBARS and conjugated diene) was significantly declined by the restored actions of several antioxidants viz. urate, thiol, catalase, xanthine oxidase, lactoperoxidase, and superoxide dismutase in the tissues of vitamin-supplemented group. The alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, urea and creatinine (hepatic and kidney toxicity marker), and lactate dehydrogenase (tissue degeneration marker) were significantly impaired in the arsenic-fed group. But a significant protection was evident in the vitamin-supplemented group. In conclusion, the combined action of folate and B12 results in the restitution in the 1C metabolic pathway and cellular methyl pool. The cumulative outcome from the enhanced arsenic methylation and antioxidative capacity was protective against arsenic induced mutagenic DNA breakages and tissue damages.

  16. Unraveling the mechanism of neuroprotection of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic dysfunctions in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Pranay; Yadav, Rajesh S.; Chandravanshi, Lalit P.; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Dhuriya, Yogesh K.; Chauhan, Lalit K.S.; Dwivedi, Hari N.; Pant, Aditiya B.; Khanna, Vinay K.

    2014-09-15

    Earlier, we found that arsenic induced cholinergic deficits in rat brain could be protected by curcumin. In continuation to this, the present study is focused to unravel the molecular mechanisms associated with the protective efficacy of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits. Exposure to arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats resulted to decrease the expression of CHRM2 receptor gene associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions as evident by decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, activity of mitochondrial complexes and enhanced apoptosis both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in comparison to controls. The ultrastructural images of arsenic exposed rats, assessed by transmission electron microscope, exhibited loss of myelin sheath and distorted cristae in the mitochondria both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus as compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats was found to protect arsenic induced changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of mitochondrial complexes both in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Alterations in the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and ultrastructural damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus following arsenic exposure were also protected in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin. The data of the present study reveal that curcumin could protect arsenic induced cholinergic deficits by modulating the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in the brain. More interestingly, arsenic induced functional and ultrastructural changes in the brain mitochondria were also protected by curcumin. - Highlights: • Neuroprotective mechanism of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits studied • Curcumin protected arsenic induced enhanced expression of stress markers in rat brain • Arsenic compromised mitochondrial electron transport chain protected

  17. Possible mechanisms for arsenic-induced proliferative diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Wetterhahn, K.E.; Dudek, E.J.; Shumilla, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Possible mechanisms for cardiovascular diseases and cancers which have been observed on chronic exposure to arsenic have been investigated. We tested the hypothesis that nonlethal levels of arsenic are mitogenic, cause oxidative stress, increase nuclear translocation of trans-acting factors, and increase expression of genes involved in proliferation. Cultured porcine vascular (from aorta) endothelial cells were used as a model cell system to study the effects of arsenic on the target cells for cardiovascular diseases. Treatment of postconfluent cell cultures with nonovertly toxic concentrations of arsenite increased DNA synthesis, similar to the mitogenic response observed with hydrogen peroxide. Within 1 hour of adding noncytotoxic concentrations of arsenite, cellular levels of oxidants increased relative to control levels, indicating that arsenite promotes cellular oxidations. Arsenite treatment increased nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, an oxidative stress-responsive transcription factor, in a manner similar to that observed with hydrogen peroxide. Pretreatment of intact cells with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and dimethylfumarate prevented the arsenite-induced increases in cellular oxidant formation and NF-KB translocation. Arsenite had little or no effect on binding of NF-KB to its DNA recognition sequence in vitro, indicating that it is unlikely that arsenite directly affects NF-KB. The steady-state mRNA levels of intracellular adhesion molecule and urokinase-like plasminogen activator, genes associated with the active endothelial phenotype in arteriosclerosis and cancer metastasis, were increased by nontoxic concentrations of arsenite. These data suggest that arsenite promotes proliferative diseases like heart disease and cancer by activating oxidant-sensitive endothelial cell signaling and gene expression. It is possible that antioxidant therapy would be useful in preventing arsenic-induced cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  18. Protective effects of Moringa oleifera Lam. leaves against arsenic-induced toxicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Afzal; Yeasmin, Fouzia; Agarwal, Smita; Rahman, Mashiur; Islam, Khairul; Hossain, Ekhtear; Hossain, Shakhawoat; Karim, Md Rezaul; Nikkon, Farjana; Saud, Zahangir Alam; Hossain, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the protective role of leaves of Moringa oleifera (M. oleifera) Lam. against arsenic-induced toxicity in mice. Methods Swiss albino male mice were divided into four groups. The first group was used as non-treated control group while, the second, third, and fourth groups were treated with M. oleifera leaves (50 mg/kg body weight per day), sodium arsenite (10 mg/kg body weight per day) and sodium arsenite plus M. oleifera leaves, respectively. Serum indices related to cardiac, liver and renal functions were analyzed to evaluate the protective effect of Moringa leaves on arsenic-induced effects in mice. Results It revealed that food supplementation of M. oleifera leaves abrogated the arsenic-induced elevation of triglyceride, glucose, urea and the activities of alkaline phospatase, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in serum. M. oleifera leaves also prevented the arsenic-induced perturbation of serum butyryl cholinesterase activity, total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusions The results indicate that the leaves of M. oleifera may be useful in reducing the effects of arsenic-induced toxicity. PMID:25183111

  19. Protection of arsenic-induced testicular oxidative stress by arjunolic acid.

    PubMed

    Manna, Prasenjit; Sinha, Mahua; Sil, Parames C

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic-induced tissue damage is a major concern to the human population. An impaired antioxidant defense mechanism followed by oxidative stress is the major cause of arsenic-induced toxicity, which can lead to reproductive failure. The present study was carried out to investigate the preventive role of arjunolic acid, a triterpenoid saponin isolated from the bark of Terminalia arjuna, against arsenic-induced testicular damage in mice. Administration of arsenic (in the form of sodium arsenite, NaAsO(2), at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight) for 2 days significantly decreased the intracellular antioxidant power, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes, as well as the levels of cellular metabolites. In addition, arsenic intoxication enhanced testicular arsenic content, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and the level of glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Exposure to arsenic also caused significant degeneration of the seminiferous tubules with necrosis and defoliation of spermatocytes. Pretreatment with arjunolic acid at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight for 4 days could prevent the arsenic-induced testicular oxidative stress and injury to the histological structures of the testes. Arjunolic acid had free radical scavenging activity in a cell-free system and antioxidant power in vivo. In summary, the results suggest that the chemopreventive role of arjunolic acid against arsenic-induced testicular toxicity may be due to its intrinsic antioxidant property.

  20. Phosphatidylserine dynamics in cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Kay, Jason G; Koivusalo, Mirkka; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wohland, Thorsten; Grinstein, Sergio

    2012-06-01

    Much has been learned about the role of exofacial phosphatidylserine (PS) in apoptosis and blood clotting using annexin V. However, because annexins are impermeant and unable to bind PS at low calcium concentration, they are unsuitable for intracellular use. Thus little is known about the topology and dynamics of PS in the endomembranes of normal cells. We used two new probes-green fluorescent protein (GFP)-LactC2, a genetically encoded fluorescent PS biosensor, and 1-palmitoyl-2-(dipyrrometheneboron difluoride)undecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (TopFluor-PS), a synthetic fluorescent PS analogue-to examine PS distribution and dynamics inside live cells. The mobility of PS was assessed by a combination of advanced optical methods, including single-particle tracking and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Our results reveal the existence of a sizable fraction of PS with limited mobility, with cortical actin contributing to the confinement of PS in the plasma membrane. We were also able to measure the dynamics of PS in endomembrane organelles. By targeting GFP-LactC2 to the secretory pathway, we detected the presence of PS in the luminal leaflet of the endoplasmic reticulum. Our data provide new insights into properties of PS inside cells and suggest mechanisms to account for the subcellular distribution and function of this phospholipid.

  1. p38α MAPK is required for arsenic-induced cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Gyum; Shi, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic exposure has been reported to cause neoplastic transformation through the activation of PcG proteins. In the present study, we show that activation of p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is required for arsenic-induced neoplastic transformation. Exposure of cells to 0.5 μM arsenic increased CRE and c-Fos promoter activities that were accompanied by increases in p38α MAPK and CREB phosphorylation and expression levels concurrently with AP-1 activation. Introduction of short hairpin (sh) RNA-p38α into BALB/c 3T3 cells markedly suppressed arsenic-induced colony formation compared with wildtype cells. CREB phosphorylation and AP-1 activation were decreased in p38α knockdown cells after arsenic treatment. Arsenic-induced AP-1 activation, measured as c-Fos and CRE promoter activities, and CREB phosphorylation were attenuated by p38 inhibition in BALB/c 3T3 cells. Thus, p38α MAPK activation is required for arsenic-induced neoplastic transformation mediated through CREB phosphorylation and AP-1 activation.

  2. DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES ARSENIC-INDUCED MICRONUCLEUS FORMATION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory


    Dietary folate deficiency enhances arsenic-induced micronucleus formation in mice.

    Folate deficiency increases background levels ofDNA damage and can enhance the mutagenicity of chemical agents. Duplicate experiments were performed to investigate the effect of dietary...

  3. EFFECTS OF DIETARY FOLATE ON ARSENIC-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Dietary Folate on Arsenic-induced Gene Expression in Mice

    Arsenic, a drinking water contaminant, is a known carcinogen. Human exposure to inorganic arsenic has been linked to tumors of skin, bladder, lung, and to a lesser extent, kidney and liver. Dietary fola...

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF INTERSPECIES CONCORDANCE OF MECHANISMS OF ARSENIC INDUCED BLADDER CANCER BY GENE EXPRESSION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a human carcinogen that induces urinary bladder cancer. Several mechanisms have been proposed for arsenic-induced cancer. Although inorganic arsenic (iAs) does not induce tumors in adult rodents, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), a major metabolite of iAs, is a rat bladder c...

  5. Phosphatidylserine biosynthesis in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. I. Inhibition of de novo phosphatidylserine biosynthesis by exogenous phosphatidylserine and its efficient incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishijima, M.; Kuge, O.; Akamatsu, Y.

    1986-05-05

    The effect of phosphatidylserine exogenously added to the medium on de novo biosynthesis of phosphatidylserine was investigated in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. When cells were cultured for several generations in medium supplemented with phosphatidylserine and /sup 32/Pi, the incorporation of /sup 32/Pi into cellular phosphatidylserine was remarkably inhibited, the degree of inhibition being dependent upon the concentration of added phosphatidylserine. /sup 32/Pi uptake into cellular phosphatidylethanolamine was also partly reduced by the addition of exogenous phosphatidylserine, consistent with the idea that phosphatidylethanolamine is biosynthesized via decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine. However, incorporation of /sup 32/Pi into phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylinositol was not significantly affected. In contrast, the addition of either phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylethanolamine, or phosphatidylinositol to the medium did not inhibit endogenous biosynthesis of the corresponding phospholipid. Radiochemical and chemical analyses of the cellular phospholipid composition revealed that phosphatidylserine in cells grown with 80 microM phosphatidylserine was almost entirely derived from the added phospholipid. Phosphatidylserine uptake was also directly determined by using (/sup 3/H)serine-labeled phospholipid. Pulse and pulse-chase experiments with L-(U-/sup 14/C) serine showed that when cells were cultured with 80 microM phosphatidylserine, the rate of synthesis of phosphatidylserine was reduced 3-5-fold. Enzyme assaying of extracts prepared from cells grown with and without phosphatidylserine indicated that the inhibition of de novo phosphatidylserine biosynthesis by the added phosphatidylserine appeared not to be caused by a reduction in the level of the enzyme involved in the base-exchange reaction between phospholipids and serine.

  6. Efficient synthesis of phosphatidylserine in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhang-Qun; Hu, Fei

    2013-01-10

    2-Methyltetrahydrofuran has recently been described as a promising and green solvent. Herein, it was successfully used as the reaction medium for enzyme-mediated transphosphatidylation of phosphatidylcholine with L-serine with the aim of phosphatidylserine synthesis for the first time. Our results indicated that as high as 90% yield of phosphatidylserine could be achieved after 12 h combined with no byproduct (phosphatidic acid) forming. The present work accommodated a facilely and efficiently enzymatic strategy for preparing phosphatidylserine, which possessed obvious advantages over the reported processes in terms of high efficiency and environmental friendliness. This work is also a proof-of-concept opening the use of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran in biosynthesis as well.

  7. The Effects of Boron on Arsenic-Induced Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidant Status in Male and Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Kucukkurt, Ismail; Ince, Sinan; Demirel, Hasan Huseyin; Turkmen, Ruhi; Akbel, Erten; Celik, Yasemin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible protective effects of boron, an antioxidant agent, against arsenic-induced oxidative stress in male and female rats. In total, 42 Wistar albino male and female rats were divided into three equal groups: The animals in the control group were given normal drinking water, the second group was given drinking water with 100 mg/L arsenic, and the third group was orally administered drinking water with 100 mg/kg boron together with arsenic. At the end of the 28-day experiment, arsenic increased lipid peroxidation and damage in the tissues of rats. However, boron treatment reversed this arsenic-induced lipid peroxidation and activities of antioxidant enzymes in rats. Moreover, boron exhibited a protective action against arsenic-induced histopathological changes in the tissues of rats. In conclusion, boron was found to be effective in protecting rats against arsenic-induced lipid peroxidation by enhancing antioxidant defense mechanisms.

  8. Specific stabilization of CFTR by phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Ellen; Khazanov, Netaly; Kappes, John C; Dai, Qun; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Urbatsch, Ina L

    2017-02-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR, ABCC7) is a plasma membrane chloride ion channel in the ABC transporter superfamily. CFTR is a key target for cystic fibrosis drug development, and its structural elucidation would advance those efforts. However, the limited in vivo and in vitro stability of the protein, particularly its nucleotide binding domains, has made structural studies challenging. Here we demonstrate that phosphatidylserine uniquely stimulates and thermally stabilizes the ATP hydrolysis function of purified human CFTR. Among several lipids tested, the greatest stabilization was observed with brain phosphatidylserine, which shifted the Tm for ATPase activity from 22.7±0.8°C to 35.0±0.2°C in wild-type CFTR, and from 26.6±0.7°C to 42.1±0.2°C in a more stable mutant CFTR having deleted regulatory insertion and S492P/A534P/I539T mutations. When ATPase activity was measured at 37°C in the presence of brain phosphatidylserine, Vmax for wild-type CFTR was 240±60nmol/min/mg, a rate higher than previously reported and consistent with rates for other purified ABC transporters. The significant thermal stabilization of CFTR by phosphatidylserine may be advantageous in future structural and biophysical studies of CFTR.

  9. Dietary Yucca schidigera supplementation reduces arsenic-induced oxidative stress in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Ince, Sinan; Kucukkurt, Ismail; Turkmen, Ruhi; Demirel, Hasan Huseyin; Sever, Emine

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of dietary supplementation with Yucca schidigera (Ys) on lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant activity, some biochemical parameters and histopathological changes in arsenic-exposed mice. Forty Swiss albino male mice were divided into five equal groups. Group I (control group) was given normal diet and tap water for 28 days. Group II (arsenic group) was given normal diet and 100 mg/L arsenic along with drinking water for 28 days. Groups III-V were given three different doses of Ys (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) in supplemented diet and arsenic (100 mg/L) along with drinking water throughout the entire period of 28 days. The arsenic significantly increased serum biochemical parameters and malondialdehyde levels in blood and tissue. However, arsenic significantly decreased tissue glutathione concentration, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. In contrast, dietary supplementation of Ys, in a dose-dependent manner, resulted in reversal of arsenic-induced oxidative stress, LPO and activities of antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, Ys also exhibited protective action against the arsenic-induced focal gliosis and hyperemi in brain, necrosis and degeneration in liver, degeneration and dilatation in Bowman's capsule of kidney and hyaline degeneration in heart tissue of mice. Consequently, our results demonstrate that Ys especially high-dose supplementation in diet decreases arsenic-induced oxidative stress and enhances the antioxidant defence mechanism and regenerate of tissues in Swiss albino mice.

  10. Phosphatidylserine biosynthesis in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. II. Isolation and characterization of phosphatidylserine auxotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Kuge, O.; Nishijima, M.; Akamatsu, Y.

    1986-05-05

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutants that required exogenously added phosphatidylserine for cell growth were isolated by using the replica technique with polyester cloth, and three such mutants were characterized. Labeling experiments on intact cells with /sup 32/Pi and L-(U-/sup 14/C)serine revealed that a phosphatidylserine auxotroph, designated as PSA-3, was strikingly defective in phosphatidylserine biosynthesis. When cells were grown for 2 days without phosphatidylserine, the phosphatidylserine content of PSA-3 was about one-third of that of the parent. In extracts of the mutant, the enzymatic activity of the base-exchange reaction of phospholipids with serine producing phosphatidylserine was reduced to 33% of that in the parent; in addition, the activities of base-exchange reactions of phospholipids with choline and ethanolamine in the mutant were also reduced to 1 and 45% of those in the parent, respectively. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the serine-exchange activity in the parent was inhibited approximately 60% when choline was added to the reaction mixture whereas that in the mutant was not significantly affected. From the results presented here, we conclude the following. There are at least two kinds of serine-exchange enzymes in CHO cells; one (serine-exchange enzyme I) can catalyze the base-exchange reactions of phospholipids with serine, choline, and ethanolamine while the other (serine-exchange enzyme II) does not use the choline as a substrate. Serine-exchange enzyme I, in which mutant PSA-3 is defective, plays a major role in phosphatidylserine biosynthesis in CHO cells. Serine-exchange enzyme I is essential for the growth of CHO cells.

  11. Phosphatidylserine in the brain: metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Yong; Huang, Bill X; Spector, Arthur A

    2014-10-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is the major anionic phospholipid class particularly enriched in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in neural tissues. PS is synthesized from phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine by exchanging the base head group with serine, and this reaction is catalyzed by phosphatidylserine synthase 1 and phosphatidylserine synthase 2 located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Activation of Akt, Raf-1 and protein kinase C signaling, which supports neuronal survival and differentiation, requires interaction of these proteins with PS localized in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, neurotransmitter release by exocytosis and a number of synaptic receptors and proteins are modulated by PS present in the neuronal membranes. Brain is highly enriched with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and brain PS has a high DHA content. By promoting PS synthesis, DHA can uniquely expand the PS pool in neuronal membranes and thereby influence PS-dependent signaling and protein function. Ethanol decreases DHA-promoted PS synthesis and accumulation in neurons, which may contribute to the deleterious effects of ethanol intake. Improvement of some memory functions has been observed in cognitively impaired subjects as a result of PS supplementation, but the mechanism is unclear.

  12. Arsenic-induced alteration in intracellular calcium homeostasis induces head kidney macrophage apoptosis involving the activation of calpain-2 and ERK in Clarias batrachus

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Chaitali; Goswami, Ramansu; Datta, Soma; Rajagopal, R.; Mazumder, Shibnath

    2011-10-01

    We had earlier shown that exposure to arsenic (0.50 {mu}M) caused caspase-3 mediated head kidney macrophage (HKM) apoptosis involving the p38-JNK pathway in Clarias batrachus. Here we examined the roles of calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) and extra-cellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), the other member of MAPK-pathway on arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. Arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis involved increased expression of ERK and calpain-2. Nifedipine, verapamil and EGTA pre-treatment inhibited the activation of calpain-2, ERK and reduced arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis as evidenced from reduced caspase-3 activity, Annexin V-FITC-propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342 staining. Pre-incubation with ERK inhibitor U 0126 inhibited the activation of calpain-2 and interfered with arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. Additionally, pre-incubation with calpain-2 inhibitor also interfered with the activation of ERK and inhibited arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin and diphenyleneiodonium chloride also inhibited ERK activation indicating activation of ERK in arsenic-exposed HKM also depends on signals from NADPH oxidase pathway. Our study demonstrates the critical role of Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis on arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. We suggest that arsenic-induced alteration in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels initiates pro-apoptotic ERK and calpain-2; the two pathways influence each other positively and induce caspase-3 mediated HKM apoptosis. Besides, our study also indicates the role of ROS in the activation of ERK pathway in arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis in C. batrachus. - Highlights: > Altered Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis leads to arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. > Calpain-2 plays a critical role in the process. > ERK is pro-apoptotic in arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. > Arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis involves cross talk between calpain-2 and ERK.

  13. Arsenic-induced micronuclei formation in mammalian cells and its counteraction by tea.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Dona; Roy, Madhumita; Siddiqi, Maqsood; Bhattacharya, Rathin K

    2005-01-01

    The Gangetic plain of West Bengal, India, has been engulfed by a disastrous environmental calamity of arsenic contamination of the ground water. Chronic arsenic toxicity caused by drinking arsenic-contaminated water has been one of the worst health hazards gradually affecting nine districts of West Bengal since the early 1980s. Over and above hyperpigmentation and keratosis,weakness, burning sensation of the eyes, swelling of the legs, liver fibrosis, chronic lung disease, gangrene of the toes, neuropathy, and skin cancer are other manifestations. Induction of cancer is frequently associated with DNA damage, changes in ploidy of cells, and non-random chromosome aberrations. Counteraction of these genotoxic and cytogenetic abnormalities with natural dietary polyphenols could be a useful strategy to combat arsenic-induced DNA damage and thereby cancer. A review of the literature showed that it is the antioxidant property of tea polyphenols that affords protection against various types of cancer. The present study was conducted to investigate whether the extracts of green tea and black tea (Darjeeling and Assam) as well as their polyphenols could ameliorate this arsenic-induced genotoxicity. The normal mammalian cell culture derived from male Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells (V79) was used as the test system to assess the genotoxicity by micronucleus assay. The results showed that both green tea and black tea extracts have equal potential in modulating the arsenic-induced genotoxicity. This effect was perhaps induced by the constituent polyphenols present in green and black tea. In addition, the repair activity of the damaged cells was enhanced when treated with these tea extracts and their polyphenols. Thus, tea and its polyphenols may have a promising role in counteracting the devastating effects of arsenic.

  14. Phytoremedial effect of Withania somnifera against arsenic-induced testicular toxicity in Charles Foster rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun; Kumar, Ranjit; Rahman, Mohammad Samuir; Iqubal, Mohammad Asif; Anand, Gautam; Niraj, Pintoo Kumar; Ali, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The main objective of the current study was to observe the ameliorative effect of Withania somnifera on arsenic-induced testicular toxicity by exploring the crucial parameters such as sperm counts, sperm motility, hormonal assay and lipid peroxidation including histopathology. Materials and Methods: In the present study, arsenic in the form of sodium arsenite was administered orally to male Charles Foster rats for 45 days. Thereafter, ethanolic root extract of Withania somnifera was administered for 30 days to observe its ameliorative effect on male reproductive system. Results: The study revealed that after administration of sodium arsenite, there was a decrease in the sperm counts and sperm motility accompanied by an increased incidence of sperm abnormalities and hormonal imbalance leading to infertility. However, after administration of Withania somnifera, there was significant reversal in the parameters denoting that it not only possesses antioxidant and rejuvenating property but also maintains the cellular integrity of testicular cells leading to normal functioning of it. Conclusion: The study concludes that Withania somnifera possesses phytoremedial effect. It is one of the best antidotes against arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity. PMID:26445714

  15. Integrated proteomics and metabolomics analysis of rat testis: Mechanism of arsenic-induced male reproductive toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qingyu; Luo, Lianzhong; Alamdar, Ambreen; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Liangpo; Tian, Meiping; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Shen, Heqing

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is a widespread metalloid in environment, whose exposure has been associated with a broad spectrum of toxic effects. However, a global view of arsenic-induced male reproductive toxicity is still lack, and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Our results revealed that arsenic exposure decreased testosterone level and reduced sperm quality in rats. By conducting an integrated proteomics and metabolomics analysis, the present study aims to investigate the global influence of arsenic exposure on the proteome and metabolome in rat testis. The abundance of 70 proteins (36 up-regulated and 34 down-regulated) and 13 metabolites (8 increased and 5 decreased) were found to be significantly altered by arsenic treatment. Among these, 19 proteins and 2 metabolites were specifically related to male reproductive system development and function, including spermatogenesis, sperm function and fertilization, fertility, internal genitalia development, and mating behavior. It is further proposed that arsenic mainly impaired spermatogenesis and fertilization via aberrant modulation of these male reproduction-related proteins and metabolites, which may be mediated by the ERK/AKT/NF-κB-dependent signaling pathway. Overall, these findings will aid our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for arsenic-induced male reproductive toxicity, and from such studies useful biomarkers indicative of arsenic exposure could be discovered. PMID:27585557

  16. Ameliorative Effect of Tephrosia Purpurea in Arsenic-induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gora, Ravuri Halley; Kerketta, Priscilla; Baxla, Sushma Lalita; Toppo, Reetu; Prasad, Raju; Patra, Pabitra Hriday; Roy, Birendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The present investigation was conducted to evaluate the nephroprotective activity of Tephrosia purpurea (TPE) against arsenic-induced toxicity. Materials and Methods: Twenty four number of wistar rats were equally divided into three groups. Sodium arsenite (10 mg/kg) was orally given to group I for 28 days, additionally group II was orally treated with TPE (500 mg/kg), while the control group was kept untreated with neither arsenic nor TPE. Serum biomarker levels, oxidative stress indices and arsenic concentration in kidney were estimated. Histopathology of kidney was also conducted. Results: Group II animals show significantly reduced blood urea nitrogen and plasma creatinine, and increased serum albumin level compared to group I. The higher lipid peroxidation with exhausted superoxide dismutase activity and reduced glutathione level were noticed in group I compared to group II. There was no significant difference in arsenic accumulation in kidneys between the two arsenic treated groups, but the histopathology of kidney of group II rats revealed reduced necrosis and intact tubular architecture as compared to group I. Conclusions: Tephrosia Purpurea extract has a significant role in protecting the animals from arsenic-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:24748739

  17. Integrated proteomics and metabolomics analysis of rat testis: Mechanism of arsenic-induced male reproductive toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qingyu; Luo, Lianzhong; Alamdar, Ambreen; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Liangpo; Tian, Meiping; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Shen, Heqing

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a widespread metalloid in environment, whose exposure has been associated with a broad spectrum of toxic effects. However, a global view of arsenic-induced male reproductive toxicity is still lack, and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Our results revealed that arsenic exposure decreased testosterone level and reduced sperm quality in rats. By conducting an integrated proteomics and metabolomics analysis, the present study aims to investigate the global influence of arsenic exposure on the proteome and metabolome in rat testis. The abundance of 70 proteins (36 up-regulated and 34 down-regulated) and 13 metabolites (8 increased and 5 decreased) were found to be significantly altered by arsenic treatment. Among these, 19 proteins and 2 metabolites were specifically related to male reproductive system development and function, including spermatogenesis, sperm function and fertilization, fertility, internal genitalia development, and mating behavior. It is further proposed that arsenic mainly impaired spermatogenesis and fertilization via aberrant modulation of these male reproduction-related proteins and metabolites, which may be mediated by the ERK/AKT/NF-κB-dependent signaling pathway. Overall, these findings will aid our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for arsenic-induced male reproductive toxicity, and from such studies useful biomarkers indicative of arsenic exposure could be discovered.

  18. Arsenic induces apoptosis in mouse liver is mitochondria dependent and is abrogated by N-acetylcysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Amal . E-mail: asantra2000@yahoo.co.in; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Ghatak, Subhadip; Biswas, Ayan; Dhali, Gopal Krishna

    2007-04-15

    Arsenicosis, caused by arsenic contamination of drinking water supplies, is a major public health problem in India and Bangladesh. Chronic liver disease, often with portal hypertension occurs in chronic arsenicosis, contributes to the morbidity and mortality. The early cellular events that initiate liver cell injury due to arsenicosis have not been studied. Our aim was to identify the possible mechanisms related to arsenic-induced liver injury in mice. Liver injury was induced in mice by arsenic treatment. The liver was used for mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Evidence of apoptosis was sought by TUNEL test, caspase assay and histology. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) was done to modulate hepatic GSH level. Arsenic treatment in mice caused liver injury associated with increased oxidative stress in liver mitochondria and alteration of MPT. Altered MPT facilitated cytochrome c release in the cytosol, activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 activities and apoptotic cell death. Pretreatment of NAC to arsenic-treated mice abrogated all these alteration suggesting a glutathione (GSH)-dependent mechanism. Oxidative stress in mitochondria and inappropriate MPT are important in the pathogenesis of arsenic induced apoptotic liver cell injury. The phenomenon is GSH dependent and supplementation of NAC might have beneficial effects.

  19. Further studies on aberrant gene expression associated with arsenic-induced malignant transformation in rat liver TRL1215 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jie . E-mail: Liu6@niehs.nih.gov; Benbrahim-Tallaa, Lamia; Qian Xun; Yu, Limei; Xie Yaxiong; Boos, Jennifer; Qu Wei; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2006-11-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure of rat liver epithelial TRL1215 cells induced malignant transformation in a concentration-dependent manner. To further define the molecular events of these arsenic-transformed cells (termed CAsE cells), gene expressions associated with arsenic carcinogenesis or influenced by methylation were examined. Real-time RT-PCR showed that at carcinogenic concentrations (500 nM, and to a less extent 250 nM of arsenite), the expressions of {alpha}-fetoprotein (AFP), Wilm's tumor protein-1 (WT-1), c-jun, c-myc, H-ras, c-met and hepatocyte growth factor, heme oxygenase-1, superoxide dismutase-1, glutathione-S-transferase-{pi} and metallothionein-1 (MT) were increased between 3 to 12-fold, while expressions of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR1) were essentially abolished. These changes were not significant at the non-carcinogenic concentration (125 nM), except for IGF-II. The positive cell-cycle regulators cyclin D1 and PCNA were overexpressed in CAsE cells, while the negative regulators p21 and p16 were suppressed. Western-blot confirmed increases in AFP, WT-1, cyclin D1 and decreases in p16 and p21 protein in CAsE cells. The CAsE cells over-expressed MT but the demethylating agent 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC, 2.5 {mu}M, 72 h) stimulated further MT expression. 5-Aza-deoxycytidine restored the loss of expression of p21 in CAsE cells to control levels, but did not restore the expression of p16, IGF-II, or FGFR1, indicating the loss of expression of these genes is due to factors other than DNA methylation changes. Overall, an intricate variety of gene expression changes occur in arsenic-induced malignant transformation of liver cells including oncogene activation and alterations in expression of genes critical to growth regulation.

  20. Erythrocyte phosphatidylserine exposure in β-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hamdy A; Fouda, Manal I; Yahya, Raida S; Abousamra, Nashwa K; Abd Elazim, Rania A

    2014-06-01

    [ABS]Phospholipid asymmetry is well maintained in erythrocyte (RBC) membranes with phosphatidylserine (PS) exclusively present in the inner leaflet. Eryptosis, the suicidal death of RBCs, is characterized by cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, and cell membrane phospholipids scrambling with PS exposure at the cell surface. Erythrocytes exposing PS are recognized, bound, engulfed, and degraded by macrophages. Eryptosis thus fosters clearance of affected RBCs from circulating blood, which may aggravate anemia in pathological conditions. Thalassemia patients are more sensitive to the eryptotic depletion and osmotic shock which may affect RBC membrane phospholipid asymmetry. We aimed in this work to determine the RBC PS exposure in splenectomized and nonsplenectomized β-thalassemia major (β-TM) patients and correlate it with the clinical presentation and laboratory data. RBCs were stained for annexin V to detect phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure in 46 β-TM patients (27 splenectomized and 19 nonsplenectomized) compared to 17 healthy subjects as a control group. We observed a significant increase in RBC PS exposure in β-TM patients compared to control group (P = .0001). Erythrocyte PS exposure was significantly higher in splenectomized β-TM patients compared with nonsplenectomized β-TM patients (P = .001). No correlation was found between RBC PS exposure and clinical or hematological data of β-TM patients, but there was a positive correlation between RBC PS exposure and ferritin level in β-TM patients have higher levels of RBC PS exposure, and splenectomy was shown to aggravate RBC PS exposure without aggravation of anemia.

  1. Regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by phospholipid precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, M A; Homann, M J; Bae-Lee, M S; Carman, G M

    1986-01-01

    The addition of ethanolamine or choline to inositol-containing growth medium of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type cells resulted in a reduction of membrane-associated phosphatidylserine synthase (CDPdiacylglycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase, EC 2.7.8.8) activity in cell extracts. The reduction of activity did not occur when inositol was absent from the growth medium. Under the growth conditions where a reduction of enzyme activity occurred, there was a corresponding qualitative reduction of enzyme subunit as determined by immunoblotting with antiserum raised against purified phosphatidylserine synthase. Water-soluble phospholipid precursors did not effect purified phosphatidylserine synthase activity. Phosphatidylserine synthase (activity and enzyme subunit) was not regulated by the availability of water-soluble phospholipid precursors in S. cerevisiae VAL2C(YEp CHO1) and the opi1 mutant. VAL2C(YEp CHO1) is a plasmid-bearing strain that over produces phosphatidylserine synthase activity, and the opi1 mutant is an inositol biosynthesis regulatory mutant. The results of this study suggest that the regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase by the availability of phospholipid precursors occurs at the level of enzyme formation and not at the enzyme activity level. Furthermore, the regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase is coupled to inositol synthesis. Images PMID:3023284

  2. Transport of phosphatidylserine from the endoplasmic reticulum to the site of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase2 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Muthukumar; Riekhof, Wayne R; Voelker, Dennis R

    2015-02-01

    Over the past two decades, most of the genes specifying lipid synthesis and metabolism in yeast have been identified and characterized. Several of these biosynthetic genes and their encoded enzymes have provided valuable tools for the genetic and biochemical dissection of interorganelle lipid transport processes in yeast. One such pathway involves the synthesis of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and its non-vesicular transport to the site of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase2 (Psd2p) in membranes of the Golgi and endosomal sorting system. In this review, we summarize the identification and characterization of the yeast phosphatidylserine decarboxylases, and examine their role in studies of the transport-dependent pathways of de novo synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn). The emerging picture of the Psd2p-specific transport pathway is one in which the enzyme and its non-catalytic N-terminal domains act as a hub to nucleate the assembly of a multiprotein complex, which facilitates PtdSer transport at membrane contact sites between the ER and Golgi/endosome membranes. After transport to the catalytic site of Psd2p, PtdSer is decarboxylated to form PtdEtn, which is disseminated throughout the cell to support the structural and functional needs of multiple membranes.

  3. An Apoptotic 'Eat Me' Signal: Phosphatidylserine Exposure.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Katsumori; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2015-11-01

    Apoptosis and the clearance of apoptotic cells are essential processes in animal development and homeostasis. For apoptotic cells to be cleared, they must display an 'eat me' signal, most likely phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) exposure, which prompts phagocytes to engulf the cells. PtdSer, which is recognized by several different systems, is normally confined to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane by a 'flippase'; apoptosis activates a 'scramblase' that quickly exposes PtdSer on the cell surface. The molecules that flip and scramble phospholipids at the plasma membrane have recently been identified. Here we discuss recent findings regarding the molecular mechanisms of apoptotic PtdSer exposure and the clearance of apoptotic cells.

  4. Apical phosphatidylserine externalization in auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaorui; Gillespie, Peter G; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2007-01-01

    In hair cells of the inner ear, phosphatidylserine (PS), detected with fluorescent annexin V labeling, was rapidly exposed on the external leaflet of apical plasma membranes upon dissection of the organ of Corti. PS externalization was unchanged by caspase inhibition, suggesting that externalization did not portend apoptosis or necrosis. Consistent with that conclusion, mitochondrial membrane potential and hair-cell nuclear structure remained normal during externalization. PS externalization was triggered by forskolin, which raises cAMP, and blocked by inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase. Blocking Na(+) influx by inhibiting the mechanoelectrical transduction channels and P2X ATP channels also inhibited external PS externalization. Diminished PS externalization was also seen in cells exposed to LY 294002, which blocks membrane recycling in hair cells by inhibiting phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. These results indicate that PS exposure on the external leaflet, presumably requiring vesicular transport, results from elevation of intracellular cAMP, which can be triggered by Na(+) entry into hair cells.

  5. Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity and Genetic Susceptibility to Arsenic-Related Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Faita, Francesca; Cori, Liliana; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    The arsenic (As) exposure represents an important problem in many parts of the World. Indeed, it is estimated that over 100 million individuals are exposed to arsenic, mainly through a contamination of groundwaters. Chronic exposure to As is associated with adverse effects on human health such as cancers, cardiovascular diseases, neurological diseases and the rate of morbidity and mortality in populations exposed is alarming. The purpose of this review is to summarize the genotoxic effects of As in the cells as well as to discuss the importance of signaling and repair of arsenic-induced DNA damage. The current knowledge of specific polymorphisms in candidate genes that confer susceptibility to arsenic exposure is also reviewed. We also discuss the perspectives offered by the determination of biological markers of early effect on health, incorporating genetic polymorphisms, with biomarkers for exposure to better evaluate exposure-response clinical relationships as well as to develop novel preventative strategies for arsenic- health effects. PMID:23583964

  6. Arsenic induces structural and compositional colonic microbiome change and promotes host nitrogen and amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dheer, Rishu; Patterson, Jena; Dudash, Mark; Stachler, Elyse N; Bibby, Kyle J; Stolz, Donna B; Shiva, Sruti; Wang, Zeneng; Hazen, Stanley L; Barchowsky, Aaron; Stolz, John F

    2015-12-15

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water causes cancer and non-cancer diseases. However, mechanisms for chronic arsenic-induced pathogenesis, especially in response to lower exposure levels, are unclear. In addition, the importance of health impacts from xeniobiotic-promoted microbiome changes is just being realized and effects of arsenic on the microbiome with relation to disease promotion are unknown. To investigate impact of arsenic exposure on both microbiome and host metabolism, the stucture and composition of colonic microbiota, their metabolic phenotype, and host tissue and plasma metabolite levels were compared in mice exposed for 2, 5, or 10weeks to 0, 10 (low) or 250 (high) ppb arsenite (As(III)). Genotyping of colonic bacteria revealed time and arsenic concentration dependent shifts in community composition, particularly the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, relative to those seen in the time-matched controls. Arsenic-induced erosion of bacterial biofilms adjacent to the mucosal lining and changes in the diversity and abundance of morphologically distinct species indicated changes in microbial community structure. Bacterical spores increased in abundance and intracellular inclusions decreased with high dose arsenic. Interestingly, expression of arsenate reductase (arsA) and the As(III) exporter arsB, remained unchanged, while the dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nrfA) gene expression increased. In keeping with the change in nitrogen metabolism, colonic and liver nitrite and nitrate levels and ratios changed with time. In addition, there was a concomitant increase in pathogenic arginine metabolites in the mouse circulation. These data suggest that arsenic exposure impacts the microbiome and microbiome/host nitrogen metabolism to support disease enhancing pathogenic phenotypes.

  7. Sustained Early Disruption of Mitochondrial Function Contributes to Arsenic-Induced Prostate Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, B; Kulawiec, M; Owens, K M; Singh, A; Singh, K K

    2016-10-01

    Arsenic is a well-known human carcinogen that affects millions of people worldwide, but the underlying mechanisms of carcinogenesis are unclear. Several epidemiological studies have suggested increased prostate cancer incidence and mortality due to exposure to arsenic. Due to lack of an animal model of arsenic-induced carcinogenesis, we used a prostate epithelial cell culture model to identify a role for mitochondria in arsenic-induced prostate cancer. Mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential was impacted within a few hours of arsenic exposure of non-neoplastic prostate epithelial cells. Chronic arsenic treatment induced mutations in mitochondrial genes and altered mitochondrial functions. Human non-neoplastic prostate epithelial cells continuously cultured for seven months in the presence of 5 µM arsenite showed tumorigenic properties in vitro and induced tumors in SCID mice, which indicated transformation of these cells. Protein and mRNA expression of subunits of mtOXPHOS complex I were decreased in arsenic-transformed cells. Alterations in complex I, a main site for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as well as increased expression of ROS-producing NOX4 in arsenic-transformed cells suggested a role of oxidative stress in tumorigenic transformation of prostate epithelial cells. Whole genome cGH array analyses of arsenic-transformed prostate cells identified extensive genomic instability. Our study revealed mitochondrial dysfunction induced oxidative stress and decreased expression of p53 in arsenic-transformed cells as an underlying mechanism of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomic instability. These studies suggest that early changes in mitochondrial functions are sustained during prolong arsenic exposure. Overall, our study provides evidence that arsenic disruption of mitochondrial function is an early and key step in tumorigenic transformation of prostate epithelial cells.

  8. Atorvastatin ameliorates arsenic-induced hypertension and enhancement of vascular redox signaling in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sarath, Thengumpallil Sasindran; Waghe, Prashantkumar; Gupta, Priyanka; Choudhury, Soumen; Kannan, Kandasamy; Pillai, Ayyappan Harikrishna; Harikumar, Sankaran Kutty; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath

    2014-11-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been linked to elevated blood pressure and cardiovascular diseases, while statins reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease predominantly by their low density lipoprotein-lowering effect. Besides, statins have other beneficial effects, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. We evaluated whether atorvastatin, a widely used statin, can ameliorate arsenic-induced increase in blood pressure and alteration in lipid profile and also whether the amelioration could relate to altered NO and ROS signaling. Rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (100 ppm) through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg bw, orally) was administered once daily during the last 30 days of arsenic exposure. On the 91st day, blood was collected for lipid profile. Western blot of iNOS and eNOS protein, NO and 3-nitrotyrosine production, Nox-4 and p22Phox mRNA expression, Nox activity, ROS generation, lipid peroxidation and antioxidants were evaluated in thoracic aorta. Arsenic increased systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure, while it decreased HDL-C and increased LDL-C, total cholesterol and triglycerides in serum. Arsenic down-regulated eNOS and up-regulated iNOS protein expression and increased basal NO and 3-nitrotyrosine level. Arsenic increased aortic Nox-4 and p22Phox mRNA expression, Nox activity, ROS generation and lipid peroxidation. Further, arsenic decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase and depleted aortic GSH content. Atorvastatin regularized blood pressure, improved lipid profile and attenuated arsenic-mediated redox alterations. The results demonstrate that atorvastatin has the potential to ameliorate arsenic-induced hypertension by improving lipid profile, aortic NO signaling and restoring vascular redox homeostasis. - Highlights: • Arsenic increased systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure and caused dyslipidemia. • Arsenic increased

  9. Arsenic induces structural and compositional colonic microbiome change and promotes host nitrogen and amino acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dheer, Rishu; Patterson, Jena; Dudash, Mark; Stachler, Elyse N.; Bibby, Kyle J.; Stolz, Donna B.; Shiva, Sruti; Wang, Zeneng; Hazen, Stanley L.; Barchowsky, Aaron; Stolz, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water causes cancer and non-cancer diseases. However, mechanisms for chronic arsenic-induced pathogeneis, especially in response to lower exposure levels, are unclear. In addition, the importance of health impacts from xeniobiotic-promoted microbiome changes is just being realized and effects of arsenic on the microbiome with relation to disease promotion are unknown. To investigate impact of arsenic exposure on both microbiome and host metabolism, the stucture and composition of colonic microbiota, their metabolic phenotype, and host tissue and plasma metabolite levels were compared in mice exposed for 2, 5, or 10 weeks to 0, 10 (low) or 250 (high) ppb arsenite (As(III)). Genotyping of colonic bacteria revealed time and arsenic concentration dependent shifts in community composition, particularly the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, relative to those seen in the time-matched controls. Arsenic-induced erosion of bacterial biofilms adjacent to the mucosal lining and changes in the diversity and abundance of morphologically distinct species indicated changes in microbial community structure. Bacterical spores increased in abundance and intracellular inclusions decreased with high dose arsenic. Interestingly, expression of arsenate reductase (arsA) and the As(III) exporter arsB, remained unchanged, while the dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nrfA) gene expression increased. In keeping with the change in nitrogen metabolism, colonic and liver nitrite and nitrate levels and ratios changed with time. In addition, there was a concomitant increase in pathogenic arginine metabolites in the mouse circulation. These data suggest that arsenic exposure impacts the microbiome and microbiome/host nitrogen metabolism to support disease enhancing pathogenic phenotypes. PMID:26529668

  10. Detection of intracellular phosphatidylserine in living cells.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Frances; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2008-03-01

    To demonstrate the intracellular phosphatidylserine (PS) distribution in neuronal cells, neuroblastoma cells and hippocampal neurons expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP)-AnnexinV were stimulated with a calcium ionophore and localization of GFP-AnnexinV was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Initially, GFP-AnnexinV distributed evenly in the cytosol and nucleus. Raising the intracellular calcium level with ionomycin-induced translocation of cytoplasmic GFP-AnnexinV to the plasma membrane but not to the nuclear membrane, indicating that PS distributes in the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane. Nuclear GFP-AnnexinV subsequently translocated to the nuclear membrane, indicating PS localization in the nuclear envelope. GFP-AnnexinV also localized in a juxtanuclear organelle that was identified as the recycling endosome. However, minimal fluorescence was detected in any other subcellular organelles including mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complex, and lysosomes, strongly suggesting that PS distribution in the cytoplasmic face in these organelles is negligible. Similarly, in hippocampal primary neurons PS distributed in the inner leaflet of plasma membranes of cell body and dendrites, and in the nuclear envelope. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of intracellular PS localization in living cells, providing an insight for specific sites of PS interaction with soluble proteins involved in signaling processes.

  11. MicroRNA-181b and microRNA-9 mediate arsenic-induced angiogenesis via NRP1.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yi; Han, Zhongji; Hu, Yi; Song, Ge; Hao, Chanjuan; Xia, Hongfei; Ma, Xu

    2012-02-01

    Environmental exposure to inorganic arsenic compounds has been reported to have serious health effects on humans. Recent studies reported that arsenic targets endothelial cells lining blood vessels, and endothelial cell activation or dysfunction, may underlie the pathogenesis of arsenic-induced diseases and developmental toxicity. It has been reported that microRNAs (miRNAs) may act as an angiogenic switch by regulating related genes. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that arsenite-regulated miRNAs play pivotal roles in arsenic-induced toxicity. Fertilized eggs were injected via the yolk sac with 100  nM sodium arsenite at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) stages 6, 9, and 12, and harvested at HH stage 18. To identify the individual miRNAs and mRNAs that may regulate the genetic network, the expression profiles of chick embryos were analyzed by microarray analysis. Microarray analyses revealed that the expression of a set of miRNAs changed after arsenite administration, especially miRNA-9, 181b, 124, 10b, and 125b, which exhibited a massive decrease in expression. Integrative analyses of the microarray data revealed that several miRNAs, including miR-9 and miR-181b, might target several key genes involved in arsenic-induced developmental toxicity. A luciferase reporter assay confirmed neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) as a target of mir-9 and mir-181b. Data from the transwell migration assay and the tube-formation assay indicated that miR-9 and mir-181b inhibited the arsenic-induced EA.hy926 cell migration and tube formation by targeting NRP1. Our study demonstrates that the environmental toxin, sodium arsenite, induced angiogenesis by altering the expression of miRNAs and their cognate mRNA targets.

  12. The risk of arsenic induced skin lesions in Bangladeshi men and women is affected by arsenic metabolism and the age at first exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, Anna-Lena; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Persson, Lars-Ake; Vahter, Marie

    2008-07-01

    It is known that a high fraction of methylarsonate (MA) in urine is a risk modifying factor for several arsenic induced health effects, including skin lesions, and that men are more susceptible for developing skin lesions than women. Thus, we aimed at elucidating the interaction between gender and arsenic metabolism for the risk of developing skin lesions. This study is part of a population-based case-referent study concerning the risk for skin lesions in relation to arsenic exposure via drinking water carried out in Matlab, a rural area 53km south-east of Dhaka, Bangladesh. We randomly selected 526 from 1579 referents and all 504 cases for analysis of arsenic metabolites in urine using HPLC coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-HG-ICPMS). The present study confirm previous studies, with the risk for skin lesions being almost three times higher in the highest tertile of %MA (adjusted OR 2.8, 95% CI: 1.9-4.2, p < 0.001) compared to the lowest tertile. The present study is the first to show that the well documented higher risk for men to develop arsenic-related skin lesions compared to women is mainly explained by the less efficient methylation of arsenic, as defined by a higher fraction of MA and lower fraction of DMA in the urine, among men. Our previously documented lower risk for skin lesions in individuals exposed since infancy, or before, was found to be independent of the observed arsenic methylation efficiency. Thus, it can be speculated that this is due to a programming effect of arsenic in utero.

  13. Methylation of Inorganic Arsenic by Murine Fetal Tissue Explants

    PubMed Central

    Broka, Derrick; Ditzel, Eric; Quach, Stephanie; Camenisch, Todd D.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is generally believed that the developing fetus is principally exposed to inorganic arsenic and the methylated metabolites from the maternal metabolism of arsenic, little is known about whether the developing embryo can autonomously metabolize arsenic. This study investigates inorganic arsenic methylation by murine embryonic organ cultures of the heart, lung, and liver. mRNA for AS3mt, the gene responsible for methylation of arsenic, was detected in all of embryonic tissue types studied. In addition, methylated arsenic metabolites were generated by all three tissue types. The fetal liver explants yielded the most methylated arsenic metabolites (~7% of total arsenic/ 48 hr incubation) while the heart, and lung preparations produced slightly greater than 2% methylated metabolites. With all tissues the methylation proceeded mostly to the dimethylated arsenic species. This has profound implications for understanding arsenic-induced fetal toxicity, particularly if the methylated metabolites are produced autonomously by embryonic tissues. PMID:26446802

  14. ARSENIC INDUCES SUSTAINED IMPAIRMENT OF SKELETAL MUSCLE AND MUSCLE PROGENITOR CELL ULTRASTRUCTURE AND BIOENERGETICS

    PubMed Central

    Fabrisia, Ambrosio; Elke, Brown; Donna, Stolz; Ricardo, Ferrari; Bret, Goodpaster; Bridget, Deasy; Giovanna, Distefano; Alexandra, Roperti; Amin, Cheikhi; Yesica, Garciafigueroa; Aaron, Barchowsky

    2014-01-01

    Over 4 million individuals in the US, and over 140 million individuals worldwide, are exposed daily to arsenic-contaminated drinking water. Human exposures can range from below the current limit of 10 µg/L to over 1 mg/L, with 100 µg/L promoting disease in a large portion of those exposed. Although increased attention has recently been paid to myopathy following arsenic exposure, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying clinical symptoms remain poorly understood. This study tested the hypothesis that arsenic induces lasting muscle mitochondrial dysfunction and impairs metabolism. When compared to non-exposed controls, mice exposed to drinking water containing 100µg/L arsenite for 5 weeks demonstrated impaired muscle function, mitochondrial myopathy, and altered oxygen consumption that were concomitant with increased mitochondrial fusion gene transcription. There was no difference in levels of inorganic arsenic or its mononomethyl- and dimethyl- metabolites between controls and exposed muscles, confirming that arsenic does not accumulate in muscle. Nevertheless, muscle progenitor cells isolated from exposed mice recapitulated the aberrant myofiber phenotype and were more resistant to oxidative stress, generated more reactive oxygen species, and displayed autophagic mitochondrial morphology, as compared to cells isolated from non-exposed mice. These pathological changes from a possible maladaptive oxidative stress response provide insight into declines in muscle functioning caused by exposure to this common environmental contaminant. PMID:24960579

  15. Protective effects of quercetin against arsenic-induced testicular damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Baltaci, B B; Uygur, R; Caglar, V; Aktas, C; Aydin, M; Ozen, O A

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of quercetin on changes in testes due to arsenic exposure. Twenty-seven male rats were divided into three groups: control (10 ml kg(-1)  day(-1) saline), arsenic (10 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) sodium arsenite) and arsenic + quercetin (arsenic + 50 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) quercetin). The rats were sacrificed at the end of 15-day experiment. There was no difference between control group and arsenic group in body weight gain, testicular weight and serum total testosterone level. Quercetin treatment did not cause a significant difference in these parameters. In the arsenic group rats, we determined deterioration in the structure of seminiferous tubules, a decrease in the number of spermatogenic cells, an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, a decrease in the number of PCNA-positive cells, a decrease in SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities, and an increase in the MDA level in testicular tissue. In all these changes, arsenic+quercetin group showed an improved compared to arsenic group. The amount of arsenic increased in the arsenic group was compared to the control group, and there was no difference between arsenic group and arsenic + quercetin group in the amount of arsenic. In conclusion, quercetin prevented arsenic-induced testicular damage with its anti-apoptotic and antioxidant effects.

  16. Arsenic-induced toxicity and the protective role of ascorbic acid in mouse testis

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Soo Im; Jin, Bohwan; Youn, Pilju; Park, Changbo; Park, Jung-Duck; Ryu, Doug-Young . E-mail: dyryu@snu.ac.kr

    2007-01-15

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to be a major cause of male reproductive failure. Here, we investigated whether arsenic, which impairs male reproductive functions in rodent models, acts by inducing oxidative stress. Male 8-week-old ICR mice were given drinking water containing 20 or 40 mg/l sodium arsenite with or without 0.75 or 1.5 g/l of the antioxidant ascorbic acid for 5 weeks. The arsenic-treated mice showed decreased epididymidal sperm counts and testicular weights compared to untreated mice. These effects were reversed in mice that were co-treated with ascorbic acid. Similarly, arsenic treatment lowered the activities of testicular 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) and 17{beta}-HSD, which play important roles in steroidogenesis, and this was reversed by co-treatment with ascorbic acid. The testicles of arsenic-treated mice had decreased glutathione (GSH) levels (which correlate inversely with the degree of cellular oxidative stress) and elevated levels of protein carbonyl (a marker of oxidative damage to tissue proteins). Ascorbic acid co-treatment reversed both of these effects. Thus, ascorbic acid blocks both the adverse effects of arsenic on male reproductive functions and the arsenic-induced testicular oxidative changes. These observations support the notion that arsenic impairs male reproductive function by inducing oxidative stress.

  17. Arsenic-induced genotoxicity in Nile tilapia (Orechromis niloticus); the role of Spirulina platensis extract.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Alaa El-Din H; Elbaghdady, Heba Allah M; Zahran, Eman

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic (As) is one of the most relevant environmental global single substance toxicants that have long been regarded as a carcinogenic and genotoxic potential. In this respect, we evaluated the cytogenetic effect of arsenic exposure in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), in terms of erythrocyte alteration, apoptosis, and induction of micronuclei. Spirulina platensis (SP) is a filamentous cyanobacterium microalgae with potent dietary phytoantioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancerous properties supplementation. The protective role of Spirulina as supplementary feeds was studied in Nile tilapia (O. niloticus) against arsenic-induced cytogenotoxicity. Four groups were assigned as control group (no SP or As), As group (exposed to water-born As in the form of NaAsO2 at 7 ppm), SP1 (SP at 7.5% + As at the same level of exposure), and SP2 (SP at 10% + As at the same level of exposure). As-treated group had a significant increase in all cytogenetic analyses including erythrocyte alteration, apoptosis, and induction of micronuclei after 2 weeks with continuous increase in response after 3 weeks. The combined treatment of Spirulina at two different concentrations of 7.5 and 10% had significantly declined the induction of erythrocyte alteration, apoptosis, and micronuclei formation induced by arsenic intoxication.

  18. Review on arsenic-induced toxicity in male reproductive system and its amelioration.

    PubMed

    Zubair, M; Ahmad, M; Qureshi, Z I

    2017-01-30

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant which causes mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic defects. It is used as herbicide, fungicide and rodenticide and results in contamination of air, soil and water. Arsenic is also produced through burning of coal industries. The sludge of factories contaminates the fodder and drinking source of water of human and livestock. Arsenic binds thiol groups in tissue proteins and impairs the function of the proteins. This metal affects the mitochondrial enzymes and interrupts the production of energy. Oxidative stress and the generation of reactive oxygen species could also be a consequence of arsenic exposure. High arsenic level may suppress the sensitivity of gonadotroph cells to GnRH as well as gonadotropin secretion by elevating plasma levels of glucocorticoids. These ultimately lead to the development of gonad toxicity in animals and cause the reduction in sperm number, sperm viability and motility. Massive degeneration of germ cells and alterations in the level of LH, FSH and testosterone are also reported. The objective of this review was to find out the effects of arsenic-induced toxicity on male reproductive system in animals and its amelioration.

  19. Oral nanoparticulate curcumin combating arsenic-induced oxidative damage in kidney and brain of rats.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Palanisamy; Telang, Avinash Gopal; Kalaivanan, Ramya; Karunakaran, Vijayakaran; Suresh, Subramaniyam; Kesavan, Manickam

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic exposure through drinking water causes oxidative stress and tissue damage in the kidney and brain. Curcumin (CUR) is a good antioxidant with limited clinical application because of its hydrophobic nature and limited bioavailability, which can be overcome by the encapsulation of CUR with nanoparticles (NPs). The present study investigates the therapeutic efficacy of free CUR and NP-encapsulated CUR (CUR-NP) against sodium arsenite-induced renal and neuronal oxidative damage in rat. The CUR-NP prepared by emulsion technique and particle size ranged between 120 and 140 nm, with the mean particle size being 130.8 nm. Rats were divided into five groups (groups 1-5) with six animals in each group. Group 1 served as control. Group 2 rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (25 ppm) daily through drinking water for 42 days. Groups 3, 4, and 5 were treated with arsenic as in Group 2; however, these animals were also administered with empty NPs, CUR (100 mg/kg body weight), and CUR-NP (100 mg/kg), respectively, by oral gavage during the last 14 days of arsenic exposure. Arsenic exposure significantly increased serum urea nitrogen and creatinine levels. Arsenic increased lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione content and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were depleted significantly in both kidney and brain. Treatment with free CUR and CUR-NP decreased the LPO and increased the enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant system in kidney and brain. Histopathological examination showed that kidney and brain injury mediated by arsenic was ameliorated by treatment. However, the amelioration percentage indicates that CUR-NP had marked therapeutic effect on arsenic-induced oxidative damage in kidney and brain tissues.

  20. Arsenic induces apoptosis by the lysosomal-mitochondrial pathway in INS-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiao; Jiang, Liping; Zhong, Laifu; Geng, Chengyan; Jia, Li; Liu, Shuang; Guan, Huai; Yang, Guang; Yao, Xiaofeng; Piao, Fengyuan; Sun, Xiance

    2016-02-01

    Recently, long term arsenic exposure was considered to be associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus. While a relation of cause-and-effect between apoptosis of pancreatic β-cells and arsenic exposure, the precise mechanisms of these events remains unclear. The aim of this study was to explore arsenic-induced pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and the mechanisms of through the possible link between lysosomal and the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. After exposure to 10 μM of arsenic, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was significantly increased at 12 h, while the mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced at 24 h and the lysosomal membrane integrity was disrupted at 48 h. A significant increase in protein expression for cytochrome c was also observed using Western blot analysis after exposure to arsenic for 48 h. To further demonstrate that arsenic reduced the lysosomal membrane integrity, cells pretreated with NH4 Cl and exposed to arsenic harbored a lower fluorescence increase than cells that were only exposed to arsenic. In addition, apoptosis was mesured using Hoechst 33342/PI dual staining by microscopy and annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide dual staining by flow cytometry. The results show an increased uptake of the arsenic dose and the cells changed from dark blue to light blue, karyopyknosis, nuclear chromatin condensation, side set or fracture, and a correlation was found between the number of apoptotic cells and arsenic dose. The result of present study suggest that arsenic may induce pancreatic β-cell apoptosis through activation of the lysosome-mitochondrial pathway.

  1. A Weibull-PBPK model for assessing risk of arsenic-induced skin lesions in children.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chung-Min; Lin, Tzu-Ling; Chen, Szu-Chieh

    2008-03-25

    Chronic arsenic exposure and skin lesions (keratosis and hyperpigmentation) are inextricably linked. This paper was to quantify the children skin lesions risks and to further recommend safe drinking water arsenic standard based on reported arsenic epidemiological data. We linked the Weibull dose-response function and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to estimate safe drinking water arsenic concentrations and to perform the risk characterization. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) to assess the relative magnitude of the effect of the arsenic exposure on the likelihood of the prevalence of children skin lesions by calculating proposed Weibull-based prevalence ratios of exposed to control groups associated with the age group-specific PBPK model predicted dimethylarsinite (MMA(III)) levels in urine. Positive relationships between arsenic exposures and cumulative prevalence ratios of skin lesions were found using Weibull dose-response model (r2=0.91-0.96). We reported that the safe drinking water arsenic standards were recommended to be 2.2 and 1 microg/L for male and 6 and 2.8 microg/L for female in 0-6 and 7-18 years age groups, respectively, based on hyperpigmentation with an excess risk of 10(-3) for a 75 years lifetime exposure. Risk predictions indicate that estimated ORs have 95% confidence intervals of 1.33-5.12, 1.74-19.15, and 2.81-19.27 based on mean drinking water arsenic contents of 283.19, 282.65, and 468.81 microg/L, respectively, in West Bengal, India, Bangladesh, and southwestern Taiwan. Our findings also suggest that increasing urinary monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) levels are associated with an increase in risks of arsenic-induced children skin lesions.

  2. Lutein alleviates arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity in male mice via Nrf2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, S G; Xu, S Z; Niu, Q; Ding, Y S; Pang, L J; Ma, R L; Jing, M X; Wang, K; Ma, X M; Feng, G L; Liu, J M; Zhang, X F; Xiang, H L; Li, F

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the mechanisms involved in the action of lutein (LU) alleviating arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity using mice model. Forty male Kunming mice were received following treatments by gavage: normal saline solution (control), arsenic trioxide (ATO; 5 mg/kg/day), LU (40 mg/kg/day), and ATO + LU (5 mg/kg/day + 40 mg/kg/day). At the end, the mice were killed by cervical dislocation and weighed. Pathological examination was done on the testis. The biomedical parameters including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), total antioxidative capability, malondialdehyde (MDA), 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and reproductive indexes were analyzed. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of Nrf2, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), glutathione S-transferase (GST), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate dehydrogenase, quinone 1 (NQO1) in testis were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. We found that there was a decrease in sperm count; testis somatic index; the activities of SOD, GSH, total antioxidative capacity (p < 0.01, respectively) in ATO-treated mice, while there was an increase in the levels of sperm abnormalities, MDA, and 8-OHdG than control (p < 0.01, respectively). The groups treated with ATO + LU showed recovery of the measured parameters between those of ATO or saline-treated group. The antagonized interaction between ATO and LU was statistically significant (p < 0.01). Mice treated with ATO + LU also showed greater mRNA expression of Nrf2, HO-1, NQO1, and GST than ATO or saline-treated groups. These findings suggest that LU alleviates reproductive toxicity induced by arsenic in male mice via Nrf2 signaling, which implicates a possible mechanism of LU in preventing the reproductive injury, and elucidates that consuming the rich plant sources of LU will alleviate the reproductive toxicity induced by chemicals.

  3. Reactive oxygen species contribute to arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation in human bronchial epithelial cells and lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lingzhi; Qiu, Ping; Chen, Bailing; Lu, Yongju; Wu, Kai; Thakur, Chitra; Chang, Qingshan; Sun, Jiaying; Chen, Fei

    2014-05-01

    Our previous studies suggested that arsenic is able to induce serine 21 phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein through activation of JNK, STAT3, and Akt signaling pathways in the bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B. In the present report, we further demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in the arsenic-induced protein kinase activation that leads to EZH2 phosphorylation. Several lines of evidence supported this notion. First, the pretreatment of the cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a potent antioxidant, abolishes arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation along with the inhibition of JNK, STAT3, and Akt. Second, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the most important form of ROS in the cells in response to extracellular stress signals, can induce phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein and the activation of JNK, STAT3, and Akt. By ectopic expression of the myc-tagged EZH2, we additionally identified direct interaction and phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein by Akt in response to arsenic and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Furthermore, both arsenic and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were able to induce the translocation of ectopically expressed or endogenous EZH2 from nucleus to cytoplasm. In summary, the data presented in this report indicate that oxidative stress due to ROS generation plays an important role in the arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation. - Highlights:: • Arsenic (As{sup 3+}) induces EZH phosphorylation. • JNK, STAT3, and Akt contribute to EZH2 phosphorylation. • Oxidative stress is involved in As{sup 3+}-induced EZH2 phosphorylation. • As{sup 3+} induces direct interaction of Akt and EZH2. • Phosphorylated EZH2 localized in cytoplasm.

  4. Role of reactive oxygen species in arsenic-induced transformation of human lung bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhuo; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Budhraja, Amit; Son, Young-Ok; Kim, Donghern; Shi, Xianglin

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Short term exposure of cells to arsenic causes ROS generation. • Chronical exposure of cells to arsenic causes malignant cell transformation. • Inhibition of ROS generation reduces cell transformation by arsenic. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit reduced capacity of generating ROS. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit increased levels of antioxidants. - Abstract: Arsenic is an environmental carcinogen, its mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain to be investigated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to be important. A previous study (Carpenter et al., 2011) has measured ROS level in human lung bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells and arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells and found that ROS levels were higher in transformed cells than that in parent normal cells. Based on these observations, the authors concluded that cell transformation induced by arsenic is mediated by increased cellular levels of ROS. This conclusion is problematic because this study only measured the basal ROS levels in transformed and parent cells and did not investigate the role of ROS in the process of arsenic-induced cell transformation. The levels of ROS in arsenic-transformed cells represent the result and not the cause of cell transformation. Thus question concerning whether ROS are important in arsenic-induced cell transformation remains to be answered. In the present study, we used expressions of catalase (antioxidant against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2, antioxidant against O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) to decrease ROS level and investigated their role in the process of arsenic-induced cell transformation. Our results show that inhibition of ROS by antioxidant enzymes decreased arsenic-induced cell transformation, demonstrating that ROS are important in this process. We have also shown that in arsenic-transformed cells, ROS generation was lower and levels of antioxidants are higher than those in parent cells, in a disagreement with the previous

  5. Atorvastatin restores arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction in rats: Modulation of nitric oxide signaling and inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Kesavan, Manickam; Sarath, Thengumpallil Sasindran; Kannan, Kandasamy; Suresh, Subramaniyam; Gupta, Priyanka; Vijayakaran, Karunakaran; Sankar, Palanisamy; Kurade, Nitin Pandurang; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated whether atorvastatin, an extensively prescribed statin for reducing the risks of cardiovascular diseases, can reduce the risk of arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction and inflammation in rats and whether the modulation could be linked to improvement in vascular NO signaling. Rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (100 ppm) through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg bw, orally) was administered once daily during the last 30 days of arsenic exposure. On the 91{sup st} day, blood was collected for measuring serum C-reactive protein. Thoracic aorta was isolated for assessing reactivity to phenylephrine, sodium nitroprusside and acetylcholine; evaluating eNOS and iNOS mRNA expression and measuring NO production, while abdominal aorta was used for ELISA of cytokines, chemokine and vascular cell adhesion molecules. Histopathology was done in aortic arches. Arsenic did not alter phenylephrine-elicited contraction. Atorvastatin inhibited E{sub max} of phenylephrine, but it augmented the contractile response in aortic rings from arsenic-exposed animals. Sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation was not altered with any treatment. However, arsenic reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and affected aortic eNOS at the levels of mRNA expression, protein concentration, phosphorylation and NO production. Further, it increased aortic iNOS mRNA expression, iNOS-derived NO synthesis, production of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, VCAM, sICAM) and serum C-reactive protein and aortic vasculopathic lesions. Atorvastatin attenuated these arsenic-mediated functional, biochemical and structural alterations. Results show that atorvastatin has the potential to ameliorate arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction and inflammation by restoring endothelial function with improvement in NO signaling and attenuating production of pro-inflammatory mediators and cell adhesion molecules. - Highlights: • We evaluated if atorvastatin reduce arsenic-induced

  6. Staurosporines disrupt phosphatidylserine trafficking and mislocalize Ras proteins.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-jin; Park, Jin-Hee; Piggott, Andrew M; Salim, Angela A; Gorfe, Alemaheyu A; Parton, Robert G; Capon, Robert J; Lacey, Ernest; Hancock, John F

    2012-12-21

    Oncogenic mutant Ras is frequently expressed in human cancers, but no anti-Ras drugs have been developed. Since membrane association is essential for Ras biological activity, we developed a high content assay for inhibitors of Ras plasma membrane localization. We discovered that staurosporine and analogs potently inhibit Ras plasma membrane binding by blocking endosomal recycling of phosphatidylserine, resulting in redistribution of phosphatidylserine from plasma membrane to endomembrane. Staurosporines are more active against K-Ras than H-Ras. K-Ras is displaced to endosomes and undergoes proteasomal-independent degradation, whereas H-Ras redistributes to the Golgi and is not degraded. K-Ras nanoclustering on the plasma membrane is also inhibited. Ras mislocalization does not correlate with protein kinase C inhibition or induction of apoptosis. Staurosporines selectively abrogate K-Ras signaling and proliferation of K-Ras-transformed cells. These results identify staurosporines as novel inhibitors of phosphatidylserine trafficking, yield new insights into the role of phosphatidylserine and electrostatics in Ras plasma membrane targeting, and validate a new target for anti-Ras therapeutics.

  7. Protective Effect of Curcumin by Modulating BDNF/DARPP32/CREB in Arsenic-Induced Alterations in Dopaminergic Signaling in Rat Corpus Striatum.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pranay; Dhuriya, Yogesh K; Gupta, Richa; Shukla, Rajendra K; Yadav, Rajesh S; Dwivedi, Hari N; Pant, Aditya B; Khanna, Vinay K

    2016-12-13

    Earlier, protective role of curcumin in arsenic-induced dopamine (DA)-D2 receptor dysfunctions in corpus striatum has been demonstrated by us. In continuation to that, the present study is focused to decipher the molecular mechanisms associated with alterations in dopaminergic signaling on arsenic exposure in corpus striatum and assess the protective efficacy of curcumin. Exposure to arsenic (20 mg/kg, body weight p.o. for 28 days) in rats resulted to decrease the expression of presynaptic proteins-tyrosine hydroxylase and VMAT2 while no effect was observed on the expression of DAT in comparison to controls. A significant decrease in the expression of DA-D2 receptors associated with alterations in the expression of PKA, pDARPP32 (Thr 34), and PP1 α was clearly evident on arsenic exposure. Expression of BDNF and pGSK3β in corpus striatum was found decreased in arsenic-exposed rats. Simultaneous treatment with curcumin (100 mg/kg, body weight p.o. for 28 days) resulted to protect arsenic-induced alterations in the expression of DA-D2 receptors, PKA, pDARPP32, pCREB, and pPP1α. Neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin can possibly be attributed to its antioxidant potential which significantly protected arsenic-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions by modulating the ROS generation and apoptosis. Modulation in the expression of BDNF and pGSK3β in corpus striatum by curcumin exhibits the importance of neuronal survival pathway in arsenic-induced dopaminergic dysfunctions. Interestingly, curcumin was also found to protect arsenic-induced ultrastructural changes in corpus striatum. The results exhibit that curcumin modulates BDNF/DARPP32/CREB in arsenic-induced alterations in dopaminergic signaling in rat corpus striatum.

  8. Arsenic induces VL30 retrotransposition: the involvement of oxidative stress and heat-shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Markopoulos, Georgios; Noutsopoulos, Dimitrios; Mantziou, Stefania; Vartholomatos, Georgios; Monokrousos, Nikolaos; Angelidis, Charalampos; Tzavaras, Theodore

    2013-08-01

    Arsenic is an environmental contaminant with known cytotoxic and carcinogenic properties, but the cellular mechanisms of its action are not fully known. As retrotransposition consists a potent mutagenic factor affecting genome stability, we investigated the effect of arsenic on retrotransposition of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged nonautonomous long terminal repeat (LTR)-retrotransposon viral-like 30 (VL30) in a mouse NIH3T3 cell culture-retrotransposition assay. Flow cytometry analysis of assay cells treated with 2.5-20μM sodium arsenite revealed induction of retrotransposition events in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was further confirmed as genomic integrations by PCR analysis and appearance of EGFP-positive cells by UV microscopy. Specifically, 20μM sodium arsenite strongly induced the VL30 retrotransposition frequency, which was ~90,000-fold higher than the natural one and also VL30 RNA expression was ~6.6-fold. Inhibition of the activity of endogenous reverse transcriptases by efavirenz at 15μM or nevirapine at 375μM suppressed the arsenite-induced VL30 retrotransposition by 71.16 or 79.88%, respectively. In addition, the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine reduced the level of arsenite-induced retrotransposition, which correlated with the rescue of arsenite-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell toxicity. Treatment of assay cells ectopically overexpressing the human heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) with 15μM sodium arsenite resulted in an additional ~4.5-fold induction of retrotransposition compared with normal assay cells, whereas treatment with 20μM produced a massive cell death. Our results show for the first time that arsenic both as an oxidative and heat-shock mimicking agent is a potent inducer of VL30 retrotransposition in mouse cells. The impact of arsenic-induced retrotransposition, as a cellular response, on contribution to or explanation of the arsenic-associated toxicity and carcinogenicity is discussed.

  9. Therapeutic effects of Moringa oleifera on arsenic-induced toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Richa; Kannan, Gurusamy M; Sharma, Mamta; S Flora, Swaran J

    2005-11-01

    the seed powder of M. oleifera has significant role in protecting animals from arsenic-induced oxidative stress and in the depletion of arsenic concentration. Further studies thus can be recommended for determining the effect of co-administrating seed powder of M. oleifera during chelation therapy with a thiol chelator.

  10. Targeting Phosphatidylserine for Radioimmunotherapy of Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    INVESTIGATOR: Rolf A. Brekken CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: U niveristy of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, TX 75390-9105 REPORT DATE: December...COVERED (From - To) 30 Sep 2012 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Phosphatidylserine for Radioimmunotherapy of Breast...antibody, PGN635, a fully human monoclonal antibody, was used to target exposed PS in the brain metastases. Our data show that PGN635 binds specifically

  11. Inhibition of arsenic induced-rat liver injury by grape seed exact through suppression of NADPH oxidase and TGF-{beta}/Smad activation

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Xinjuan; Dai Yujie; Li Xing; Niu Nannan; Li Wenjie; Liu Fangli; Zhao Yang; Yu Zengli

    2011-08-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure induces oxidative damage to liver leading to liver fibrosis. We aimed to define the effect of grape seed extract (GSE), an antioxidant dietary supplement, on arsenic-induced liver injury. First, Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a low level of arsenic in drinking water (30 ppm) with or without GSE (100 mg/kg, every other day by oral gavage) for 12 months and the effect of GSE on arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity was examined. The results from this study revealed that GSE co-treatment significantly attenuated arsenic-induced low antioxidant defense, oxidative damage, proinflammatory cytokines and fibrogenic genes. Moreover, GSE reduced arsenic-stimulated Smad2/3 phosphorylation and protein levels of NADPH oxidase subunits (Nox2, Nox4 and p47phox). Next, we explored the molecular mechanisms underlying GSE inhibition of arsenic toxicity using cultured rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). From the in vitro study, we found that GSE dose-dependently reduced arsenic-stimulated ROS production and NADPH oxidase activities. Both NADPH oxidases flavoprotein inhibitor DPI and Nox4 siRNA blocked arsenic-induced ROS production, whereas Nox4 overexpression suppressed the inhibitory effects of GSE on arsenic-induced ROS production and NADPH oxidase activities, as well as expression of TGF-{beta}1, type I procollagen (Coll-I) and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin ({alpha}-SMA) mRNA. We also observed that GSE dose-dependently inhibited TGF-{beta}1-induced transactivation of the TGF-{beta}-induced smad response element p3TP-Lux, and that forced expression of Smad3 attenuated the inhibitory effects of GSE on TGF-{beta}1-induced mRNA expression of Coll-I and {alpha}-SMA. Collectively, GSE could be a potential dietary therapeutic agent for arsenic-induced liver injury through suppression of NADPH oxidase and TGF-{beta}/Smad activation. - Research Highlights: > GSE attenuated arsenic-induced low antioxidant defense, oxidative damage, proinflammatory cytokines and

  12. Reactive oxygen species mediate arsenic induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma DLD1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhuo; Wang Xin; Cheng Senping; Sun Lijuan; Son, Young-Ok; Yao Hua; Li Wenqi; Budhraja, Amit; Li Li; Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas; Arnold, Susanne M.; Shi Xianglin

    2011-10-15

    Long term exposure to arsenic can increase incidence of human cancers, such as skin, lung, and colon rectum. The mechanism of arsenic induced carcinogenesis is still unclear. It is generally believed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the possible linkage between ROS, {beta}-catenin and arsenic induced transformation and tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, DLD1 cells. Our results show that arsenic was able to activate p47{sup phox} and p67{sup phox}, two key proteins for activation of NADPH oxidase. Arsenic was also able to generate ROS in DLD1 cells. Arsenic increased {beta}-catenin expression level and its promoter activity. ROS played a major role in arsenic-induced {beta}-catenin activation. Treatment of DLD1 cells by arsenic enhanced both transformation and tumorigenesis of these cells. The tumor volumes of arsenic treated group were much larger than those without arsenic treatment. Addition of either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase reduced arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation. The results indicate that ROS are involved in arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation possible through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line DLD1 cells. - Highlights: > Arsenic activates NADPH oxidase and increases reactive oxygen species generation in DLD1 cells. > Arsenic increases {beta}-catenin expression. > Inhibition of ROS induced by arsenic reduce {beta}-catenin expression. > Arsenic increases cell transformation in DLD1 cells and tumorigenesis in nude mice. > Blockage of ROS decrease cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by arsenic.

  13. Taurine prevents arsenic-induced cardiac oxidative stress and apoptotic damage: Role of NF-{kappa}B, p38 and JNK MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Das, Joydeep; Manna, Prasenjit

    2009-10-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide due to its complex pathogenesis. However, little is known about the mechanism of arsenic-induced cardiac abnormalities and the use of antioxidants as the possible protective agents in this pathophysiology. Conditionally essential amino acid, taurine, accounts for 25% to 50% of the amino acid pool in myocardium and possesses antioxidant properties. The present study has, therefore, been carried out to investigate the underlying mechanism of the beneficial role of taurine in arsenic-induced cardiac oxidative damage and cell death. Arsenic reduced cardiomyocyte viability, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and intracellular calcium overload, and induced apoptotic cell death by mitochondrial dependent caspase-3 activation and poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage. These changes due to arsenic exposure were found to be associated with increased IKK and NF-{kappa}B (p65) phosphorylation. Pre-exposure of myocytes to an IKK inhibitor (PS-1145) prevented As-induced caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. Arsenic also markedly increased the activity of p38 and JNK MAPKs, but not ERK to that extent. Pre-treatment with SP600125 (JNK inhibitor) and SB203580 (p38 MAPK inhibitor) attenuated NF-{kappa}B and IKK phosphorylation indicating that p38 and JNK MAPKs are mainly involved in arsenic-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. Taurine treatment suppressed these apoptotic actions, suggesting that its protective role in arsenic-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis is mediated by attenuation of p38 and JNK MAPK signaling pathways. Similarly, arsenic intoxication altered a number of biomarkers related to cardiac oxidative stress and other apoptotic indices in vivo and taurine supplementation could reduce it. Results suggest that taurine prevented arsenic-induced myocardial pathophysiology, attenuated NF-{kappa}B activation via IKK, p38 and JNK MAPK signaling pathways and could possibly provide a protection

  14. Synthesis of a fluorescently labeled compound for the detection of arsenic-induced apoptotic HL60 cells.

    PubMed

    Femia, A Lis; Temprana, C Facundo; Amor, M Silvia; Grasselli, Mariano; Alonso, Silvia Del V

    2012-03-01

    Arsenic compounds have shown medical usefulness since they proved to be effective in causing complete remission of acute promyelocytic leukemia. In this work we obtained a fluorescently labeled arsenic compound that can be used with current fluorescence techniques for basic and applied research, focused on arsenic-induced apoptosis studies. This compound is an arsanilic acid bearing a covalently linked FITC that was chemically synthesized and characterized by fluorescence, UV-Vis, mass and FTIR spectrometry. In addition, we assessed its apoptotic activity as well as its fluorescent labeling properties in HL60 cell line as a leukemia cell model through flow cytometry. We obtained a compound with a 1:1 FITC:arsenic ratio and a 595 m/z, confirming its structure by FTIR. This compound proved to be useful at inducing apoptosis in the leukemia cell model and labeling this apoptotic cell population, in such a way that the highest FITC fluorescence correlated with the highest arsenic amount.

  15. Phosphatidylserine metabolism modification precedes manganese-induced apoptosis and phosphatidylserine exposure in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, G; Gambelunghe, A; Mozzi, R; Marchetti, M C; Migliorati, G; Muzi, G; Buratta, S

    2013-12-01

    Long-term exposure to high manganese (Mn) levels can lead to Parkinson-like neurological disorders. Molecular mechanisms underlying Mn cytotoxicity have been not defined. It is known that Mn induces apoptosis in PC12 cells and that this involves the activation of some signal transduction pathways. Although the role of phospholipids in apoptosis and signal transduction is well-known, the membrane phospholipid component in Mn-related damage has not yet been investigated. Phosphatidylserine (PS) facilitates protein translocation from cytosol to plasma membrane and PS exposure on the cell surface allows macrophage recognition of apoptotic cells. This study investigates the effects of MnCl2 on PS metabolism in PC12 cells, relating them to those on cell apoptosis. Apoptosis induction decreased PS radioactivity of PC12 cells incubated with radioactive serine. MnCl2 reduced PS radioactivity even under conditions that did not affect cell viability or PS exposure, suggesting that the effects on PS metabolism may represent an early event in cell apoptosis. Thus the latter conditions that also induced a greater PS decarboxylation were utilized for further investigating on the effects on PS synthesis, by measuring the activity and expression of PS-synthesizing enzymes, in cell lysates and in total cellular membranes (TM). Compared with corresponding controls, enzyme activity of MnCl2-treated cells was lower in cell lysates and greater in TM. Evaluating the expression of two isoforms of PS-synthesizing enzyme (PSS), PSSII was increased both in cell lysate and TM, while PSSI was unchanged. MnCl2 addition to control cell lysate reduced enzyme activity. These results suggest Mn plays a dual role on PS synthesis. Once inside the cell, Mn inhibits the enzyme/s, thus accounting for reduced PS synthesis in lysates and intact cells. On the other hand, it increases PSSII expression in cell membranes. The possibility that this occurs to counteract the direct effects of Mn ions on enzyme

  16. Arsenic-induced cutaneous hyperplastic lesions are associated with the dysregulation of Yap, a Hippo signaling-related protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changzhao; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Elmets, Craig A.; Afaq, Farrukh; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Arsenic activates canonical Hippo signaling pathway and up-regulates αCatenin in the skin. •Arsenic activates transcriptional activity of Yap by its nuclear translocation. •Yap is involved in the disruption of tight/adherens junctions in arsenic-exposed animals. -- Abstract: Arsenic exposure in humans causes a number of toxic manifestations in the skin including cutaneous neoplasm. However, the mechanism of these alterations remains elusive. Here, we provide novel observations that arsenic induced Hippo signaling pathway in the murine skin. This pathway plays crucial roles in determining organ size during the embryonic development and if aberrantly activated in adults, contributes to the pathogenesis of epithelial neoplasm. Arsenic treatment enhanced phosphorylation-dependent activation of LATS1 kinase and other Hippo signaling regulatory proteins Sav1 and MOB1. Phospho-LATS kinase is known to catalyze the inactivation of a transcriptional co-activator, Yap. However, in arsenic-treated epidermis, we did not observed its inactivation. Thus, as expected, unphosphorylated-Yap was translocated to the nucleus in arsenic-treated epidermis. Yap by binding to the transcription factors TEADs induces transcription of its target genes. Consistently, an up-regulation of Yap-dependent target genes Cyr61, Gli2, Ankrd1 and Ctgf was observed in the skin of arsenic-treated mice. Phosphorylated Yap is important in regulating tight and adherens junctions through its binding to αCatenin. We found disruption of these junctions in the arsenic-treated mouse skin despite an increase in αCatenin. These data provide evidence that arsenic-induced canonical Hippo signaling pathway and Yap-mediated disruption of tight and adherens junctions are independently regulated. These effects together may contribute to the carcinogenic effects of arsenic in the skin.

  17. Protective role of Moringa oleifera (Sajina) seed on arsenic-induced hepatocellular degeneration in female albino rats.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Maiti, Smarajit; Maji, Gurupada; Deb, Bimal; Pan, Bappaditya; Ghosh, Debidas

    2011-08-01

    In an attempt to develop new herbal therapy, an aqueous extract of the seed of Moringa oleifera was used to screen the effect on arsenic-induced hepatic toxicity in female rat of Wistar strain. Subchronic exposure to sodium arsenite (0.4 ppm/100 g body weight/day via drinking water for a period of 24 days) significantly increased activities of hepatic and lipid function markers such as alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL along with a decrease in total protein and HDL. A notable distortion of hepatocellular histoarchitecture was prominent with a concomitant increase in DNA fragmentation following arsenic exposure. A marked elevation of lipid peroxidation in hepatic tissue was also evident from the hepatic accumulation of malondialdehyde and conjugated dienes along with suppressed activities in the antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and catalase. However, co-administration of aqueous seed extract of M. oleifera (500 mg/100 g body weight/day for a period of 24 days) was found to significantly prevent the arsenic-induced alteration of hepatic function markers and lipid profile. Moreover, the degeneration of histoarchitecture of liver found in arsenic-treated rats was protected along with partial but definite prevention against DNA fragmentation induction. Similarly, generation of reactive oxygen species and free radicals were found to be significantly less along with restored activities of antioxidant enzymes in M. oleifera co-administered group with comparison to arsenic alone treatment group. The present investigation offers strong evidence for the hepato-protective and antioxidative efficiencies of M. oleifera seed extract against oxidative stress induced by arsenic.

  18. Preclinical Evaluation of Sequential Combination of Oncolytic Adenovirus Delta-24-RGD and Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bingbing; Roife, David; Kang, Ya'an; Gumin, Joy; Rios Perez, Mayrim V; Li, Xinqun; Pratt, Michael; Brekken, Rolf A; Fueyo-Margareto, Juan; Lang, Frederick F; Fleming, Jason B

    2017-04-01

    Delta-24-RGD (DNX-2401) is a conditional replication-competent oncolytic virus engineered to preferentially replicate in and lyse tumor cells with abnormality of p16/RB/E2F pathway. In a phase I clinical trial, Delta-24-RGD has shown favorable safety profile and promising clinical efficacy in brain tumor, which prompted us to evaluate its anticancer activity in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which also has high frequency of homozygous deletion and promoter methylation of CDKN2A encoding the p16 protein. Our results demonstrate that Delta-24-RGD can induce dramatic cytotoxicity in a subset of PDAC cell lines with high cyclin D1 expression. Induction of autophagy and apoptosis by Delta-24-RGD in sensitive PDAC cells was confirmed with LC3B-GFP autophagy reporter and acridine orange staining as well as Western blotting analysis of LC3B-II expression. Notably, we found that Delta-24-RGD induced phosphatidylserine exposure in infected cells independent of cells' sensitivity to Delta-24-RGD, which renders a rationale for combination of Delta-24-RGD viral therapy and phosphatidylserine targeting antibody for PDAC. In a mouse PDAC model derived from a liver metastatic pancreatic cancer cell line, Delta-24-RGD significantly inhibited tumor growth compared with control (P < 0.001), and combination of phosphatidylserine targeting antibody 1N11 further enhanced its anticancer activity (P < 0.01) possibly through inducing synergistic anticancer immune responses. Given that these 2 agents are currently in clinical evaluation, our study warrants further clinical evaluation of this novel combination strategy in pancreatic cancer therapy. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(4); 662-70. ©2016 AACR.

  19. Further evidence against a direct genotoxic mode of action for arsenic-induced cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Catherine B.; Leszczynska, Joanna; Hickey, Christina; Rossman, Toby G.

    2007-08-01

    Arsenic in drinking water, a mixture of arsenite and arsenate, is associated with increased skin and other cancers in Asia and Latin America, but not the United States. Arsenite alone in drinking water does not cause skin cancers in experimental animals; therefore, it is not a complete carcinogen in skin. We recently showed that low concentrations of arsenite enhanced the tumorigenicity of solar UV irradiation in hairless mice, suggesting arsenic cocarcinogenesis with sunlight in skin cancer and perhaps with different carcinogenic partners for lung and bladder tumors. Cocarcinogenic mechanisms could include blocking DNA repair, stimulating angiogenesis, altering DNA methylation patterns, dysregulating cell cycle control, induction of aneuploidy and blocking apoptosis. Arsenicals are documented clastogens but not strong mutagens, with weak mutagenic activity reported at highly toxic concentrations of inorganic arsenic. Previously, we showed that arsenite, but not monomethylarsonous acid (MMA[III]), induced delayed mutagenesis in HOS cells. Here, we report new data on the mutagenicity of the trivalent methylated arsenic metabolites MMA(III) and dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)] at the gpt locus in Chinese hamster G12 cells. Both methylated arsenicals seemed mutagenic with apparent sublinear dose responses. However, significant mutagenesis occurred only at highly toxic concentrations of MMA(III). Most mutants induced by MMA(III) and DMA(III) exhibited transgene deletions. Some non-deletion mutants exhibited altered DNA methylation. A critical discussion of cell survival leads us to conclude that clastogenesis occurs primarily at highly cytotoxic arsenic concentrations, casting further doubt as to whether a genotoxic mode of action (MOA) for arsenicals is supportable.

  20. Cell biology, physiology and enzymology of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, Francesca; Wagner, Ariane; Daum, Günther

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine is one of the most abundant phospholipids whose major amounts are formed by phosphatidylserine decarboxylases (PSD). Here we provide a comprehensive description of different types of PSDs in the different kingdoms of life. In eukaryotes, type I PSDs are mitochondrial enzymes, whereas other PSDs are localized to other cellular compartments. We describe the role of mitochondrial Psd1 proteins, their function, enzymology, biogenesis, assembly into mitochondria and their contribution to phospholipid homeostasis in much detail. We also discuss briefly the cellular physiology and the enzymology of Psd2. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipids of Mitochondria edited by Guenther Daum.

  1. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Using Phosphatidylserine-Containing Nanoparticles in Cultured Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji; Kang, Yu-Xia; Pan, Wen; Lei, Wan; Feng, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2016-06-20

    Macrophages are one kind of innate immune cells, and produce a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to various stimuli, such as oxidized low density lipoprotein found in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effect of phosphatidylserine on anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers was investigated using macrophage cultures. Different amounts of phosphatidylserine were used in the preparation of curcumin nanoparticles, their physicochemical properties and biocompatibilities were then compared. Cellular uptake of the nanoparticles was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry analysis in order to determine the optimal phosphatidylserine concentration. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated in macrophages to test whether curcumin and phosphatidylserine have interactive effects on macrophage lipid uptake behavior and anti-inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that macrophage uptake of phosphatidylserine-containing nanostructured lipid carriers increased with increasing amount of phosphatidylserine in the range of 0%-8%, and decreased when the phosphatidylserine molar ratio reached over 12%. curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and pro-inflammatory factor production in cultured macrophages, and evidently promoted release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, when compared with curcumin or phosphatidylserine alone. These results suggest that the delivery system using PS-based nanoparticles has great potential for efficient delivery of drugs such as curcumin, specifically targeting macrophages and modulation of their anti-inflammatory functions.

  2. Phosphatidylserine recognition and induction of apoptotic cell clearance by Drosophila engulfment receptor Draper.

    PubMed

    Tung, Tran Thanh; Nagaosa, Kaz; Fujita, Yu; Kita, Asana; Mori, Hiroki; Okada, Ryo; Nonaka, Saori; Nakanishi, Yoshinobu

    2013-05-01

    The membrane phospholipid phosphatidylserine is exposed on the cell surface during apoptosis and acts as an eat-me signal in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in mammals and nematodes. However, whether this is also true in insects was unclear. When milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8, a phosphatidylserine-binding protein of mammals, was ectopically expressed in Drosophila, the level of phagocytosis was reduced, whereas this was not the case for the same protein lacking a domain responsible for the binding to phosphatidylserine. We found that the extracellular region of Draper, an engulfment receptor of Drosophila, binds to phosphatidylserine in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-like solid-phase assay and in an assay for surface plasmon resonance. A portion of Draper containing domains EMI and NIM located close to the N-terminus was required for binding to phosphatidylserine, and a Draper protein lacking this region was not active in Drosophila. Finally, the level of tyrosine-phosphorylated Draper, indicative of the activation of Draper, in a hemocyte-derived cell line was increased after treatment with phosphatidylserine-containing liposome. These results indicated that phosphatidylserine serves as an eat-me signal in the phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells in Drosophila and that Draper is a phosphatidylserine-binding receptor for phagocytosis.

  3. Effect of membrane-associated f1 bacteriophage coat protein upon the activity of Escherichia coli phosphatidylserine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, B K; Webster, R E

    1978-01-01

    The effects of insertion of the major coat protein of f1 bacteriophage into Escherichia coli membranes were investigated under conditions allowing in vivo analysis of phosphatidylserine synthesis. An E. coli strain possessing a temperature-sensitive phosphatidylserine decarboxylase was utilized under conditions in which the decarboxylase activity was reduced but nonlethal. The presence of the coat protein in the host membranes inhibits the activity of the phosphatidylserine synthetase and perhaps affects the activity of the phosphatidylserine decarboxylase. PMID:211116

  4. Ethanol increases affinity of protein kinase C for phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J.H.

    1986-03-01

    Protein kinase C is a calcium-dependent enzyme that requires phospholipid for its activation. It is present in relatively high concentration in the brain and may be involved in neuronal function. The present experiments test whether the membrane disorder induced by ethanol affects the activity of kinase C by changing its interaction with membrane lipid. Fractions rich in kinase C were purified from rat brain cytosol by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Enzyme activity was assayed by measuring the phosphorylation of histone H1. As expected, phosphatidylserine activated the enzyme, and the stimulation was further increased by the addition of calcium and/or diacylglycerol. At low concentration of free calcium (0.5-1..mu..M), ethanol (800 mM0 enhanced kinase C activity if the presence of phospholipid. similar results were observed in the absence of calcium. Double reciprocal plots of the data showed that ethanol increased the affinity of the enzyme for phosphatidylserine without affecting the V/sub max. The stimulation of kinase C activity by ethanol was not observed at high calcium concentrations. These experiments suggest that ethanol may activated protein kinase C at physiological levels of calcium by facilitating its transfer into the hydrophobic membrane environment.

  5. Staurosporines decrease ORMDL proteins and enhance sphingomyelin synthesis resulting in depletion of plasmalemmal phosphatidylserine

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Masashi; Lee, Minhyoung; Wei, Kuiru; Ridgway, Neale D.; Fairn, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of phosphatidylserine in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane is a hallmark of eukaryotes. Sublethal levels of staurosporine and related compounds deplete phosphatidylserine from the plasma membrane and abrogate K-Ras signaling. Here, we report that low-dose staurosporine and related compounds increase sphingomyelin mass. Mass-spectrometry and metabolic tracer analysis revealed an increase in both the levels and rate of synthesis of sphingomyelin in response to sublethal staurosporine. Mechanistically, it was determined that the abundance of the ORMDL proteins, which negatively regulate serine-palmitoyltransferase, are decreased by low-dose staurosporine. Finally, inhibition of ceramide synthesis, and thus sphingomyelin, prevented the displacement of phosphatidylserine and cholesterol from the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. The results establish that an optimal level of sphingomyelin is required to maintain the distribution of phosphatidylserine and cholesterol in the plasma membrane and further demonstrate a complex relationship between the trafficking of phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin. PMID:27805006

  6. Aberrant Cytokeratin Expression During Arsenic-induced Acquired Malignant Phenotype in Human HaCaT Keratinocytes Consistent with Epidermal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Pi, Jingbo; Wang, Xueqian; Tokar, Erik J.; Liu, Jie; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a known human skin carcinogen. Chronic arsenic exposure results in various human skin lesions, including hyperkeratosis and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), both characterized by distorted cytokeratin (CK) production. Prior work shows the human skin keratinocyte HaCaT cell line, when exposed chronically for >25 weeks to a low level of inorganic arsenite (100 nM) results in cells able to produce aggressive SCC upon inoculation into nude mice. In the present study, CK expression analysis was performed in arsenic-exposed HaCaT cells during the progressive acquisition of this malignant phenotype (0 to 20 weeks) to further validate this model as relevant to epidermal carcinogenesis induced by arsenic in humans. Indeed, we observed clear evidence of acquired cancer phenotype by 20 weeks of arsenite exposure including the formation of giant cells, a >4-fold increase in colony formation in soft agar and a ∼2.5-fold increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 secretion, an enzyme often secreted by cancer cells to help invade through the local extra-cellular matrix. During this acquired malignant phenotype, various CK genes showed markedly altered expression at the transcript and protein levels in a time-dependent manner. For example, CK1, a marker of hyperkeratosis, increased up to 34-fold during arsenic-induced transformation, while CK13, a marker for dermal cancer progression, increased up to 45-fold. The stem cell marker, CK15, increased up to 7-fold, particularly during the later stages of arsenic exposure, indicating a potential emergence of cancer stem-like cells with arsenic-induced acquired malignant phenotype. The expression of involucrin and loricrin, markers for keratinocyte differentiation, increased up to 9-fold. Thus, during arsenic-induced acquired cancer phenotype in human keratinocytes, dramatic and dynamic alterations in CK expression occur which are consistent with the process of epidermal carcinogenesis helping validate this as an

  7. Aberrant cytokeratin expression during arsenic-induced acquired malignant phenotype in human HaCaT keratinocytes consistent with epidermal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Pi, Jingbo; Wang, Xueqian; Tokar, Erik J; Liu, Jie; Waalkes, Michael P

    2009-08-03

    Inorganic arsenic is a known human skin carcinogen. Chronic arsenic exposure results in various human skin lesions, including hyperkeratosis and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), both characterized by distorted cytokeratin (CK) production. Prior work shows the human skin keratinocyte HaCaT cell line, when exposed chronically for >25 weeks to a low level of inorganic arsenite (100nM) results in cells able to produce aggressive SCC upon inoculation into nude mice. In the present study, CK expression analysis was performed in arsenic-exposed HaCaT cells during the progressive acquisition of this malignant phenotype (0-20 weeks) to further validate this model as relevant to epidermal carcinogenesis induced by arsenic in humans. Indeed, we observed clear evidence of acquired cancer phenotype by 20 weeks of arsenite exposure including the formation of giant cells, a >4-fold increase in colony formation in soft agar and a approximately 2.5-fold increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 secretion, an enzyme often secreted by cancer cells to help invade through the local extra-cellular matrix. During this acquired malignant phenotype, various CK genes showed markedly altered expression at the transcript and protein levels in a time-dependent manner. For example, CK1, a marker of hyperkeratosis, increased up to 34-fold during arsenic-induced transformation, while CK13, a marker for dermal cancer progression, increased up to 45-fold. The stem cell marker, CK15, increased up to 7-fold, particularly during the later stages of arsenic exposure, indicating a potential emergence of cancer stem-like cells with arsenic-induced acquired malignant phenotype. The expression of involucrin and loricrin, markers for keratinocyte differentiation, increased up to 9-fold. Thus, during arsenic-induced acquired cancer phenotype in human keratinocytes, dramatic and dynamic alterations in CK expression occur which are consistent with the process of epidermal carcinogenesis helping validate this as an

  8. All-trans retinoic acid protects against arsenic-induced uterine toxicity in female Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.; Chatterji, U.

    2011-12-15

    Background and purpose: Arsenic exposure frequently leads to reproductive failures by disrupting the rat uterine histology, hormonal integrity and estrogen signaling components of the rat uterus, possibly by generating reactive oxygen species. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) was assessed as a prospective therapeutic agent for reversing reproductive disorders. Experimental approach: Rats exposed to arsenic for 28 days were allowed to either recover naturally or were treated simultaneously with ATRA for 28 days or treatment continued up to 56 days. Hematoxylin-eosin double staining was used to evaluate changes in the uterine histology. Serum gonadotropins and estradiol were assayed by ELISA. Expression of the estrogen receptor (ER{alpha}), an estrogen responsive gene vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and CDK4, was assessed by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Key results: ATRA ameliorated sodium arsenite-induced decrease in circulating estradiol and gonadotropin levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner, along with recovery of luminal epithelial cells and endometrial glands. Concomitant up regulation of ER{alpha}, VEGF, cyclin D1, CDK4 and Ki-67 was also observed to be more prominent for ATRA-treated rats as compared to the rats that were allowed to recover naturally for 56 days. Conclusions and implications: Collectively, the results reveal that ATRA reverses arsenic-induced disruption of the circulating levels of gonadotropins and estradiol, and degeneration of luminal epithelial cells and endometrial glands of the rat uterus, indicating resumption of their functional status. Since structural and functional maintenance of the pubertal uterus is under the influence of estradiol, ATRA consequently up regulated the estrogen receptor and resumed cellular proliferation, possibly by an antioxidant therapeutic approach against arsenic toxicity. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic

  9. Arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative damage is mediated by decreased PGC-1α expression and its downstream targets in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chandra; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-08-25

    The present study was carried out to investigate the molecular mechanism of arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative damage and its relation to biogenesis in rat brain. Chronic sodium arsenite (25 ppm, orally) administration for 12 weeks decreased mitochondrial complexes activities and mRNA expression of selective complexes subunits. The expression of mitochondrial biogenesis regulator PGC-1α, and its downstream targets NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam were decreased significantly both at mRNA and protein levels suggesting impaired biogenesis following chronic arsenic-exposure. In addition to this, protein expression analysis also revealed activation of Bax and caspase-3, leading to translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol suggesting induction of apoptotic pathway under oxidative stress. This was further confirmed by electron microscopy study which depicted morphological changes in mitochondria in terms of altered nuclear and mitochondrial shape and chromatin condensation in arsenic-treated rats. The immunohistochemical studies showed both nuclear and cytosolic localization of NRF-1 and NRF-2 in arsenic-exposed rat brain further suggesting regulatory role of these transcription factors under arsenic neurotoxicity. The results of present study indicate that arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative damage is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis in rat brain that may present as important target to reveal the mechanism for arsenic-induced neurotoxicity.

  10. Association of single nucleotide polymorphism with arsenic-induced skin lesions and genetic damage in exposed population of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Nandana; Giri, Allan; Chakraborty, Sayan; Bhattacharjee, Pritha

    2016-10-01

    Long term consumption of arsenic contaminated water causes a number of dermatological and non-dermatological health problems and cancer. In a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) on Bangladesh population, a significant association of asingle nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the C10orf32 region (rs 9527; G>A) with urinary metabolites and arsenic induced skin lesions was reported. This study aims to evaluate the association of the C10orf32 G to A polymorphism (rs9527), concerned with As3MT read-through transcription, with the development of arsenic induced skin lesions in the arsenic exposed individuals of West Bengal, India. A total of 157 individuals with characteristic skin lesions (cases) and 158 individuals without any skin lesion (controls) were recruited for this study. The G>A polymorphism (rs9527) having at least one minor allele 'A' was found to be significantly higher in cases compared to controls, implying increased risk toward the development of skin lesions. The risk genotype was also found to be significantly associated with cytogenetic damage as measured by chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei formation in lymphocytes. Hence, it can be concluded that G>A change in the C10orf32 region plays an important role in arsenic induced toxicity and susceptibility.

  11. A new infrared spectroscopoic marker for cochleate phases in phosphatidylserine-containing model membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Flach, C R; Mendelsohn, R

    1993-01-01

    Fourier transform-infrared (IR) spectroscopic and electron microscopic studies are reported for 1,2-dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS) and for DMPS/1,2-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine mixtures in the presence and absence of Ca2+ ion. The frequency of the methyl symmetric deformation mode near 1,378 cm-1, previously assumed insensitive to changes in lipid morphology, has been found to respond to cochleate phase formation by undergoing an approximately 8 cm-1 increase. The new IR spectroscopic marker at 1,386 cm-1 has been used to identify and verify structures suggested from the phase diagram of J. R. Silvius and J. Gagné (1984. Biochemistry. 23:3241-3247) for this system. In addition, the ability of Mg2+ ion to induce cochleate formation has been demonstrated. Higher Mg2+ than Ca2+ levels are required for this process. Finally, IR spectroscopy has been used to monitor dehydration of the lipid surface through changes in the asymmetric PO2- stretching mode. Dehydration precedes cochleate phase formation (i.e., occurs at a lower Ca2+/phosphatidylserine level). Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 3 PMID:8494975

  12. Ameliorative effect of quercetin against arsenic-induced sperm DNA damage and daily sperm production in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Sarwat; Rehman, Saima; Ullah, Hizb; Munawar, Asma; Ain, Qurat Ul; Iqbal, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the protective effect of quercetin was evaluated against arsenic induced reproductive ailments in male rats. For this purpose, male rats (n = 5/group) weighing 180-250 g were used. First group served as control, second group received arsenic (50 ppm) in drinking water. Third group was treated with quercetin (50 mg/kg) alone, while fourth group received arsenic + quercetin. All treatments were carried out for 49 days. After treatment, animals were killed by decapitation; testis and epididymis were dissected out. Right epididymis was minced immediately for comet assay, while left epididymis was processed for histology. Similarly, right testis was homogenized for estimation of daily sperm production (DSP) and detection of metal concentration. The results of our research revealed that arsenic treatment did not cause any significant change in body weight and testicular volume. Quercetin treatment significantly prevented tissue deposition of arsenic within the testis. Arsenic treatment caused a significant reduction in DSP, however, in the arsenic + quercetin-treated group and quercetin alone-treated group, DSP was significantly high as compared to the arsenic-treated group. Histological study of epididymis showed empty lumen in arsenic-treated group while in arsenic + quercetin-treated group and quercetin alone-treated group, lumen were filled with sperm and were comparable to control. Sperm DNA damage, induced by arsenic, was significantly reversed toward control levels by supplementation of quercetin. These results suggest that quercetin not only prevents deposition of arsenic in tissues, but can also protect the sperm DNA damage.

  13. Arsenic induced toxicity in broiler chicks and its alleviation with ascorbic acid: a toxico-patho-biochemical study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Khan, Ahrar; Sharaf, Rabia; Khan, Muhammad Zargham; Saleemi, Muhammad Kashif; Mahmood, Fazal

    2013-01-01

    To find out toxico-pathological effects of arsenic (As) and ameliorating effect of ascorbic acid (Vit C), broilers birds were administered 50 and 250 mg/kg arsenic and Vit C, respectively alone/in combination. As-treated birds exhibited severe signs of toxicity such as dullness, depression, increased thirst, open mouth breathing and watery diarrhea. All these signs were partially ameliorated with the treatment of Vit C. As-treated birds showed a significant decrease in serum total proteins while serum enzymes, urea and creatinine were significantly increased. Alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase completely whereas proteins, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), urea and creatinine were partial ameliorated in birds treated with As+Vit C as compared to As-treated and control birds. Pale and hemorrhagic liver and swollen kidneys were observed in As-treated birds. Histopathologically, liver exhibited congestion and cytoplasmic vacuolation while in kidneys, condensation of tubular epithelium nuclei, epithelial necrosis, increased urinary spaces, sloughing of tubules from basement membrane and cast deposition were observed in As-treated birds. Pathological lesions were partially ameliorated with the treatment of Vit C. It can be concluded that arsenic induces biochemical and histopathological alterations in broiler birds; however, these toxic effects can be partially attenuated by Vit C.

  14. Phosphatidylserine is polarized and required for proper Cdc42 localization and for development of cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Fairn, Gregory D; Hermansson, Martin; Somerharju, Pentti; Grinstein, Sergio

    2011-10-02

    Polarity is key to the function of eukaryotic cells. On the establishment of a polarity axis, cells can vectorially target secretion, generating an asymmetric distribution of plasma membrane proteins. From Saccharomyces cerevisiae to mammals, the small GTPase Cdc42 is a pivotal regulator of polarity. We used a fluorescent probe to visualize the distribution of phosphatidylserine in live S. cerevisiae. Remarkably, phosphatidylserine was polarized in the plasma membrane, accumulating in bud necks, the bud cortex and the tips of mating projections. Polarization required vectorial delivery of phosphatidylserine-containing secretory vesicles, and phosphatidylserine was largely excluded from endocytic vesicles, contributing to its polarized retention. Mutants lacking phosphatidylserine synthase had impaired polarization of the Cdc42 complex, leading to a delay in bud emergence, and defective mating. The addition of lysophosphatidylserine resulted in resynthesis and polarization of phosphatidylserine, as well as repolarization of Cdc42. The results indicate that phosphatidylserine--and presumably its polarization--are required for optimal Cdc42 targeting and activation during cell division and mating.

  15. Effect of Ion Binding in Palmitoyl-Oleoyl Phosphatidylserine Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckler, Matthew; Matysiak, Silvina

    2013-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylserine (POPS) monolayers at the air-water interface were performed with different ionic strengths with the aim of determining the specific organization and dynamics of counterion binding events. Na + ions penetrated the monolayers into both the ester carbonyl and carboxylate regions of the phospholipids. The binding events increase with the addition of salt. Differences in lipid order parameter, headgroup orientation, and prevalence of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding events between the amine group of the lipid and oxygen groups are observed depending on whether the Na + is binding near the carboxylate or ester region of the lipid. The observed changes are explained in terms of the salting-out effect.

  16. Can phosphatidylserine enhance atheroprotective activities of high-density lipoprotein?

    PubMed

    Darabi, Maryam; Kontush, Anatol

    2016-01-01

    Although high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is well known to be protective against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, therapeutic interventions to raise HDL-cholesterol levels do not translate into reduction in cardiovascular risk. Due to the compositional complexity of HDL particles, molecular determinants of their atheroprotective function still remain to be clarified. Recent structural and functional data identify phospholipid as a major bioactive component of HDL. Such a role has recently been specifically evidenced for phosphatidylserine (PS); indeed, HDL content of PS displayed positive correlations with all metrics of HDL functionality assessed. This review summarizes current knowledge about HDL-associated PS; possible mechanisms for its atheroprotective role are discussed and potential applications of PS to HDL-based therapies are highlighted.

  17. Efficient thrombin generation requires molecular phosphatidylserine, not a membrane surface.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Rinku; Weinreb, Gabriel; Lentz, Barry R

    2005-12-27

    Activation of prothrombin to thrombin is catalyzed by a "prothrombinase" complex, traditionally viewed as factor X(a) (FX(a)) in complex with factor V(a) (FV(a)) on a phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membrane surface, which is widely regarded as required for efficient activation. Activation involves cleavage of two peptide bonds and proceeds via one of two released intermediates or through "channeling" (activation without the release of an intermediate). We ask here whether the PS molecule itself and not the membrane surface is sufficient to produce the fully active human "prothrombinase" complex in solution. Both FX(a) and FV(a) bind soluble dicaproyl-phosphatidylserine (C6PS). In the presence of sufficient C6PS to saturate both FX(a) and FV(a2) (light isoform of FV(a)), these proteins form a tight (Kd = 0.6 +/- 0.09 nM at 37 degrees C) soluble complex. Complex assembly occurs well below the critical micelle concentration of C6PS, as established in the presence of the proteins by quasi-elastic light scattering and pyrene fluorescence. Ferguson analysis of native gels shows that the complex migrates with an apparent molecular mass only slightly larger than that expected for one FX(a) and one FV(a2), further ruling out complex assembly on C6PS micelles. Human prothrombin activation by this complex occurs at nearly the same overall rate (2.2 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)) and via the same reaction pathway (50-60% channeling, with the rest via the meizothrombin intermediate) as the activation catalyzed by a complex assembled on PS-containing membranes (4.4 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)). These results question the accepted role of PS membranes as providing "dimensionality reduction" and favor a regulatory role for platelet-membrane-exposed PS.

  18. Stimulation of erythrocyte phosphatidylserine exposure by mercury ions

    SciTech Connect

    Eisele, Kerstin; Lang, Philipp A.; Kempe, Daniela S.; Klarl, Barbara A.; Niemoeller, Olivier; Wieder, Thomas; Huber, Stephan M.; Duranton, Christophe; Lang, Florian . E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de

    2006-01-15

    The sequelae of mercury intoxication include induction of apoptosis. In nucleated cells, Hg{sup 2+}-induced apoptosis involves mitochondrial damage. The present study has been performed to elucidate effects of Hg{sup 2+} in erythrocytes which lack mitochondria but are able to undergo apoptosis-like alterations of the cell membrane. Previous studies have documented that activation of a Ca{sup 2+}-sensitive erythrocyte scramblase leads to exposure of phosphatidylserine at the erythrocyte surface, a typical feature of apoptotic cells. The erythrocyte scramblase is activated by osmotic shock, oxidative stress and/or energy depletion which increase cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} activity and/or activate a sphingomyelinase leading to formation of ceramide. Ceramide sensitizes the scramblase to Ca{sup 2+}. The present experiments explored the effect of Hg{sup 2+} ions on erythrocytes. Phosphatidylserine exposure after mercury treatment was estimated from annexin binding as determined in FACS analysis. Exposure to Hg{sup 2+} (1 {mu}M) indeed significantly increased annexin binding from 2.3 {+-} 0.5% (control condition) to 23 {+-} 6% (n = 6). This effect was paralleled by activation of a clotrimazole-sensitive K{sup +}-selective conductance as measured by patch-clamp recordings and by transient cell shrinkage. Further experiments revealed also an increase of ceramide formation by {approx}66% (n = 7) after challenge with mercury (1 {mu}M). In conclusion, mercury ions activate a clotrimazole-sensitive K{sup +}-selective conductance leading to transient cell shrinkage. Moreover, Hg{sup 2+} increases ceramide formation. The observed mechanisms could similarly participate in the triggering of apoptosis in nucleated cells by Hg{sup 2+}.

  19. Phosphatidylserine biosynthesis in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. III. Genetic evidence for utilization of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine as precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Kuge, O.; Nishijima, M.; Akamatsu, Y.

    1986-05-05

    We reported that Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells contain two different serine-exchange enzymes (I and II) which catalyze the base-exchange reaction of phospholipid(s) with serine and that a phosphatidylserine-requiring mutant (strain PSA-3) of CHO cells is defective in serine-exchange enzyme I and lacks the ability to synthesize phosphatidylserine. In this study, we examined precursor phospholipids for phosphatidylserine biosynthesis in CHO cells. When mutant PSA-3 and parent (CHO-K1) cells were cultured with (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine in the parent accumulated radioactivity while that in the mutant was not labeled significantly. On the contrary, when cultured with (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylethanolamine, the mutant incorporated the label into phosphatidylserine more efficiently than the parent. Furthermore, we found that mutant PSA-3 grew normally in growth medium supplemented with 30 microM phosphatidylethanolamine as well as phosphatidylserine and that the biosynthesis of phosphatidylserine in the mutant was normal when cells were cultured in the presence of exogenous phosphatidylethanolamine. The simplest interpretation of these findings is that phosphatidylserine in CHO cells is biosynthesized through the following sequential reactions: phosphatidylcholine----phosphatidylserine----phosphatidylethanolamine--- - phosphatidylserine. The three reactions are catalyzed by serine-exchange enzyme I, phosphatidylserine decarboxylase, and serine-exchange enzyme II, respectively.

  20. Arsenicals Produce Stable Progressive Changes in DNA Methylation Patterns that are Linked to Malignant Transformation of Immortalized Urothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Taylor J.; Novak, Petr; Wnek, Shawn M.; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation participates in carcinogenesis and is a molecular hallmark of a tumor cell. Tumor cells generally exhibit a redistribution of DNA methylation resulting in global hypomethylation with regional hypermethylation; however, the speed in which these changes emerge has not been fully elucidated and may depend on the temporal location of the cell in the path from normal, finite lifespan to malignant transformation. We used a model of arsenical-induced malignant transformation of immortalized human urothelial cells and DNA methylation microarrays to examine the extent and temporal nature of changes in DNA methylation that occur during the transition from immortal to malignantly transformed. Our data presented herein suggest that during arsenical-induced malignant transformation, aberrant DNA methylation occurs non-randomly, progresses gradually at hundreds of gene promoters, alters expression of the associated gene, and these changes are coincident with the acquisition of malignant properties, such as anchorage independent growth and tumor formation in immunocompromised mice. The DNA methylation changes appear stable, since malignantly transformed cells removed from the transforming arsenical exhibited no reversion in DNA methylation levels, associated gene expression, or malignant phenotype. These data suggest that arsenicals act as epimutagens and directly link their ability to induce malignant transformation to their actions on the epigenome. PMID:19716837

  1. A review on environmental factors regulating arsenic methylation in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, C.-H.

    2009-03-15

    Subjects exposed to arsenic show significant inter-individual variation in urinary patterns of arsenic metabolites but insignificant day-to-day intra-individual variation. The inter-individual variation in arsenic methylation can be partly responsible for the variation in susceptibility to arsenic toxicity. Wide inter-ethnic variation and family correlation in urinary arsenic profile suggest a genetic effect on arsenic metabolism. In this paper the environmental factors affecting arsenic metabolism are reviewed. Methylation capacity might reduce with increasing dosage of arsenic exposure. Furthermore, women, especially at pregnancy, have better methylation capacity than their men counterparts, probably due to the effect of estrogen. Children might have better methylation capacity than adults and age shows inconsistent relevance in adults. Smoking and alcohol consumption might be associated with a poorer methylation capacity. Nutritional status is important in the methylation capacity and folate may facilitate the methylation and excretion of arsenic. Besides, general health conditions and medications might influence the arsenic methylation capacity; and technical problems can cause biased estimates. The consumption of seafood, seaweed, rice and other food with high arsenic contents and the extent of cooking and arsenic-containing water used in food preparation may also interfere with the presentation of the urinary arsenic profile. Future studies are necessary to clarify the effects of the various arsenic metabolites including the trivalent methylated forms on the development of arsenic-induced human diseases with the consideration of the effects of confounding factors and the interactions with other effect modifiers.

  2. Caspase-dependent and -independent induction of phosphatidylserine externalization during apoptosis in human renal carcinoma Cak(1)-1 and A-498 cells.

    PubMed

    Lock, Edward A; Reed, Celia J; Kinsey, Gilbert R; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2007-01-05

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common neoplasm occurring in the kidney and is largely resistant to current chemotherapy. Understanding the mechanisms involved in renal carcinoma cell death may lead to novel and more effective therapies. In Cak(i)-1 renal cancer cells, using phosphatidylserine externalization as a marker of apoptosis, the anti-cancer drugs 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and its pro-drugs, doxifluridine (Dox) and floxuridine (Flox) proceeds via a caspase-dependent mechanism. In contrast, phosphatidylserine externalization produced by staurosporine in the renal cancer cell lines Cak(i)-1 and A-498 proceeds via a caspase-independent mechanism. That is, the pan caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycabonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (ZVAD) did not ameliorate annexin V binding, cell shrinkage or changes in nuclear morphology. Subsequent experiments were conducted to determine mediators of phosphatidylserine externalization, using annexin V binding, when caspases were inhibited. Prior treatment of A-498 cells with cathepsin B (CA74 methyl ester), cathespsin D (pepstatin A) or calpain inhibitors (calpeptin, E64d) in the presence or absence of ZVAD did not ameliorate annexin V binding. The endonuclease inhibitor aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), phospholipase A(2) inhibitor bromoenol lactone (BEL), protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CH) and chloride channel blockers niflumic acid (NFA) and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) all had no effect on staurosporine-induced annexin V binding in A-498 cells either in the presence or absence of ZVAD. We also modulated sphingomyelin and the de novo pathways of ceramide synthesis and found no amelioration of staurosporine-induced annexin V binding in A-498 cells either in the presence or absence of ZVAD. These results indicate that 5-FU, Dox and Flox induce externalization of phosphatidylserine during apoptosis in Cak(i)-1 renal cancer cells primarily through a caspase-dependent mechanism and that

  3. Selenium ameliorates arsenic induced oxidative stress through modulation of antioxidant enzymes and thiols in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Singh, Rana Pratap; Singh, Pradyumna Kumar; Awasthi, Surabhi; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2014-09-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of rice is a major problem for South-East Asia. In the present study, the effect of selenium (Se) on rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants exposed to As was studied in hydroponic culture. Arsenic accumulation, plant growth, thiolic ligands and antioxidative enzyme activities were assayed after single (As and Se) and simultaneous supplementations (As + Se). The results indicated that the presence of Se (25 µM) decreased As accumulation by threefold in roots and twofold in shoots as compared to single As (25 µM) exposed plants. Arsenic induced oxidative stress in roots and shoots was significantly ameliorated by Se supplementation. The observed positive response was found associated with the increased activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11), catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx; EC 1.11.1.9) and induced levels of non-protein thiols (NPTs), glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatins (PCs) in As + Se exposed plants as compared to single As treatment. Selenium supplementation modulated the thiol metabolism enzymes viz., γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-ECS; EC 6.3.2.2), glutathione-S-transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) and phytochelatin synthase (PCS; EC 2.3.2.15). Gene expression analysis of several metalloid responsive genes (LOX, SOD and MATE) showed upregulation during As stress, however, significant downregulation during As + Se exposure as compared to single As treatment. Gene expressions of enzymes of antioxidant and GSH and PC biosynthetic systems, such as APX, CAT, GPx, γ-ECS and PCS were found to be significantly positively correlated with their enzyme activities. The findings suggested that Se supplementation could be an effective strategy to reduce As accumulation and toxicity in rice plants.

  4. Anti-Self Phosphatidylserine Antibodies Recognize Uninfected Erythrocytes Promoting Malarial Anemia.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Arias, Cristina; Rivera-Correa, Juan; Gallego-Delgado, Julio; Rudlaff, Rachel; Fernandez, Clemente; Roussel, Camille; Götz, Anton; Gonzalez, Sandra; Mohanty, Akshaya; Mohanty, Sanjib; Wassmer, Samuel; Buffet, Pierre; Ndour, Papa Alioune; Rodriguez, Ana

    2016-02-10

    Plasmodium species, the parasitic agents of malaria, invade erythrocytes to reproduce, resulting in erythrocyte loss. However, a greater loss is caused by the elimination of uninfected erythrocytes, sometimes long after infection has been cleared. Using a mouse model, we found that Plasmodium infection induces the generation of anti-self antibodies that bind to the surface of uninfected erythrocytes from infected, but not uninfected, mice. These antibodies recognize phosphatidylserine, which is exposed on the surface of a fraction of uninfected erythrocytes during malaria. We find that phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocytes are reticulocytes expressing high levels of CD47, a "do-not-eat-me" signal, but the binding of anti-phosphatidylserine antibodies mediates their phagocytosis, contributing to anemia. In human patients with late postmalarial anemia, we found a strong inverse correlation between the levels of anti-phosphatidylserine antibodies and plasma hemoglobin, suggesting a similar role in humans. Inhibition of this pathway may be exploited for treating malarial anemia.

  5. Beyond apoptosis: the mechanism and function of phosphatidylserine asymmetry in the membrane of activating mast cells.

    PubMed

    Rysavy, Noel M; Shimoda, Lori M N; Dixon, Alyssa M; Speck, Mark; Stokes, Alexander J; Turner, Helen; Umemoto, Eric Y

    2014-01-01

    Loss of plasma membrane asymmetry is a hallmark of apoptosis, but lipid bilayer asymmetry and loss of asymmetry can contribute to numerous cellular functions and responses that are independent of programmed cell death. Exofacial exposure of phosphatidylserine occurs in lymphocytes and mast cells after antigenic stimulation and in the absence of apoptosis, suggesting that there is a functional requirement for phosphatidylserine exposure in immunocytes. In this review we examine current ideas as to the nature of this functional role in mast cell activation. Mechanistically, there is controversy as to the candidate proteins responsible for phosphatidylserine translocation from the internal to external leaflet, and here we review the candidacies of mast cell PLSCR1 and TMEM16F. Finally we examine the potential relationship between functionally important mast cell membrane perturbations and phosphatidylserine exposure during activation.

  6. Interaction of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylserine with ethanol: induction of an ordered gel phase at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wachtel, E; Bach, D; Miller, I R; Borochov, N

    2007-05-01

    Using differential scanning calorimetry and small and wide-angle X-ray diffraction, we show that, unlike the saturated phosphatidylcholines, for which ethanol induces chain interdigitation in the gel state, and unlike natural phosphatidylserine in which the gel state is almost unaffected by the addition of ethanol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylserine (DPPS) assumes an ordered structure after incubation at room temperature in the presence of as little as 5% (v/v) ethanol. In the liquid crystalline state, a progressive decrease in the interbilayer spacing is observed as a function of ethanol concentration, similar to what is found for natural phosphatidylserine (PS) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylserine (POPS). The 0.37 molar fraction of cholesterol in the DPPS dispersion in the presence of 10% (v/v) ethanol, does not prevent the formation of the ordered gel.

  7. Beyond apoptosis: The mechanism and function of phosphatidylserine asymmetry in the membrane of activating mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Rysavy, Noel M.; Shimoda, Lori M. N.; Dixon, Alyssa M.; Speck, Mark; Stokes, Alexander J.; Turner, Helen; Umemoto, Eric Y.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of plasma membrane asymmetry is a hallmark of apoptosis, but lipid bilayer asymmetry and loss of asymmetry can contribute to numerous cellular functions and responses that are independent of programmed cell death. Exofacial exposure of phosphatidylserine occurs in lymphocytes and mast cells after antigenic stimulation and in the absence of apoptosis, suggesting that there is a functional requirement for phosphatidylserine exposure in immunocytes. In this review we examine current ideas as to the nature of this functional role in mast cell activation. Mechanistically, there is controversy as to the candidate proteins responsible for phosphatidylserine translocation from the internal to external leaflet, and here we review the candidacies of mast cell PLSCR1 and TMEM16F. Finally we examine the potential relationship between functionally important mast cell membrane perturbations and phosphatidylserine exposure during activation. PMID:25759911

  8. Use of Autoantigen-Loaded Phosphatidylserine-Liposomes to Arrest Autoimmunity in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pujol-Autonell, Irma; Serracant-Prat, Arnau; Cano-Sarabia, Mary; Ampudia, Rosa M.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Silvia; Sanchez, Alex; Izquierdo, Cristina; Stratmann, Thomas; Puig-Domingo, Manuel; Maspoch, Daniel; Verdaguer, Joan; Vives-Pi, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The development of new therapies to induce self-tolerance has been an important medical health challenge in type 1 diabetes. An ideal immunotherapy should inhibit the autoimmune attack, avoid systemic side effects and allow β-cell regeneration. Based on the immunomodulatory effects of apoptosis, we hypothesized that apoptotic mimicry can help to restore tolerance lost in autoimmune diabetes. Objective To generate a synthetic antigen-specific immunotherapy based on apoptosis features to specifically reestablish tolerance to β-cells in type 1 diabetes. Methods A central event on the surface of apoptotic cells is the exposure of phosphatidylserine, which provides the main signal for efferocytosis. Therefore, phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with insulin peptides were generated to simulate apoptotic cells recognition by antigen presenting cells. The effect of antigen-specific phosphatidylserine-liposomes in the reestablishment of peripheral tolerance was assessed in NOD mice, the spontaneous model of autoimmune diabetes. MHC class II-peptide tetramers were used to analyze the T cell specific response after treatment with phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with peptides. Results We have shown that phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with insulin peptides induce tolerogenic dendritic cells and impair autoreactive T cell proliferation. When administered to NOD mice, liposome signal was detected in the pancreas and draining lymph nodes. This immunotherapy arrests the autoimmune aggression, reduces the severity of insulitis and prevents type 1 diabetes by apoptotic mimicry. MHC class II tetramer analysis showed that peptide-loaded phosphatidylserine-liposomes expand antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in vivo. The administration of phosphatidylserine-free liposomes emphasizes the importance of phosphatidylserine in the modulation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cell expansion. Conclusions We conclude that this innovative immunotherapy based on the use of liposomes

  9. Effective binding of a phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody to Ebola virus infected cells and purified virions.

    PubMed

    Dowall, S D; Graham, V A; Corbin-Lickfett, K; Empig, C; Schlunegger, K; Bruce, C B; Easterbrook, L; Hewson, R

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab) has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity against Ebola virus.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a Chinese hamster ovary cell mutant with altered regulation of phosphatidylserine biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, K.; Kuge, O.; Nishijima, M.; Akamatsu, Y. )

    1989-11-25

    We have screened approximately 10,000 colonies of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells immobilized on polyester cloth for mutants defective in (14C)ethanolamine incorporation into trichloroacetic acid-precipitable phospholipids. In mutant 29, discovered in this way, the activities of enzymes involved in the CDP-ethanolamine pathway were normal; however, the intracellular pool of phosphorylethanolamine was elevated, being more than 10-fold that in the parental CHO-K1 cells. These results suggested that the reduced incorporation of (14C)ethanolamine into phosphatidylethanolamine in mutant 29 was due to dilution of phosphoryl-(14C)ethanolamine with the increased amount of cellular phosphorylethanolamine. Interestingly, the rate of incorporation of serine into phosphatidylserine and the content of phosphatidylserine in mutant 29 cells were increased 3-fold and 1.5-fold, respectively, compared with the parent cells. The overproduction of phosphorylethanolamine in mutant 29 cells was ascribed to the elevated level of phosphatidylserine biosynthesis, because ethanolamine is produced as a reaction product on the conversion of phosphatidylethanolamine to phosphatidylserine, which is catalyzed by phospholipid-serine base-exchange enzymes. Using both intact cells and the particulate fraction of a cell extract, phosphatidylserine biosynthesis in CHO-K1 cells was shown to be inhibited by phosphatidylserine itself, whereas that in mutant 29 cells was greatly resistant to the inhibition, compared with the parental cells. As a conclusion, it may be assumed that mutant 29 cells have a lesion in the regulation of phosphatidylserine biosynthesis by serine-exchange enzyme activity, which results in the overproduction of phosphatidylserine and phosphorylethanolamine as well.

  11. Dynamic adhesion of eryptotic erythrocytes to immobilized platelets via platelet phosphatidylserine receptors.

    PubMed

    Walker, Britta; Towhid, Syeda T; Schmid, Evi; Hoffmann, Sascha M; Abed, Majed; Münzer, Patrick; Vogel, Sebastian; Neis, Felix; Brucker, Sara; Gawaz, Meinrad; Borst, Oliver; Lang, Florian

    2014-02-01

    Glucose depletion of erythrocytes triggers suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, which leads to cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface. Eryptotic erythrocytes adhere to endothelial cells by a mechanism involving phosphatidylserine at the erythrocyte surface and CXCL16 as well as CD36 at the endothelial cell membrane. Nothing has hitherto been known about an interaction between eryptotic erythrocytes and platelets, the decisive cells in primary hemostasis and major players in thrombotic vascular occlusion. The present study thus explored whether and how glucose-depleted erythrocytes adhere to platelets. To this end, adhesion of phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocytes to platelets under flow conditions was examined in a flow chamber model at arterial shear rates. Platelets were immobilized on collagen and further stimulated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 10 μM) or thrombin (0.1 U/ml). As a result, a 48-h glucose depletion triggered phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface and augmented the adhesion of erythrocytes to immobilized platelets, an effect significantly increased upon platelet stimulation. Adherence of erythrocytes to platelets was blunted by coating of erythrocytic phosphatidylserine with annexin V or by neutralization of platelet phosphatidylserine receptors CXCL16 and CD36 with respective antibodies. In conclusion, glucose-depleted erythrocytes adhere to platelets. The adhesive properties of platelets are augmented by platelet activation. Erythrocyte adhesion to immobilized platelets requires phosphatidylserine at the erythrocyte surface and CXCL16 as well as CD36 expression on platelets. Thus platelet-mediated erythrocyte adhesion may foster thromboocclusive complications in diseases with stimulated phosphatidylserine exposure of erythrocytes.

  12. Arsenic-induced intensity oscillations in reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements. [during MBE of GaAs and InAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. F.; Fernandez, R.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Madhukar, A.

    1986-01-01

    A technique of arsenic-induced RHEED intensity oscillations has been used to accurately measure arsenic incorporation rates as a function of substrate temperature during the homoepitaxial growths of both GaAs and InAs by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Measurements were made at growth temperatures from 350 to 650 C and at arsenic fluxes of 0.1 to 10.0 monolayer/s. The method measures only the arsenic actually incorporated into the growing film and does not include the arsenic lost in splitting the arsenic tetramers or lost by evaporation from the sample.

  13. Phosphatidylserine exposure is required for ADAM17 sheddase function

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Anselm; Kordowski, Felix; Büch, Joscha; Maretzky, Thorsten; Evers, Astrid; Andrä, Jörg; Düsterhöft, Stefan; Michalek, Matthias; Lorenzen, Inken; Somasundaram, Prasath; Tholey, Andreas; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Kunzelmann, Karl; Heinbockel, Lena; Nehls, Christian; Gutsmann, Thomas; Grötzinger, Joachim; Bhakdi, Sucharit; Reiss, Karina

    2016-01-01

    ADAM17, a prominent member of the ‘Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase' (ADAM) family, controls vital cellular functions through cleavage of transmembrane substrates. Here we present evidence that surface exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) is pivotal for ADAM17 to exert sheddase activity. PS exposure is tightly coupled to substrate shedding provoked by diverse ADAM17 activators. PS dependency is demonstrated in the following: (a) in Raji cells undergoing apoptosis; (b) in mutant PSA-3 cells with manipulatable PS content; and (c) in Scott syndrome lymphocytes genetically defunct in their capacity to externalize PS in response to intracellular Ca2+ elevation. Soluble phosphorylserine but not phosphorylcholine inhibits substrate cleavage. The isolated membrane proximal domain (MPD) of ADAM17 binds to PS but not to phosphatidylcholine liposomes. A cationic PS-binding motif is identified in this domain, replacement of which abrogates liposome-binding and renders the protease incapable of cleaving its substrates in cells. We speculate that surface-exposed PS directs the protease to its targets where it then executes its shedding function. PMID:27161080

  14. Xkr8 phospholipid scrambling complex in apoptotic phosphatidylserine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Jun; Imanishi, Eiichi; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2016-01-01

    Xk-related protein (Xkr) 8, a protein carrying 10 transmembrane regions, is essential for scrambling phospholipids during apoptosis. Here, we found Xkr8 as a complex with basigin (BSG) or neuroplastin (NPTN), type I membrane proteins in the Ig superfamily. In BSG−/−NPTN−/− cells, Xkr8 localized intracellularly, and the apoptosis stimuli failed to expose phosphatidylserine, indicating that BSG and NPTN chaperone Xkr8 to the plasma membrane to execute its scrambling activity. Mutational analyses of BSG showed that the atypical glutamic acid in the transmembrane region is required for BSG’s association with Xkr8. In cells exposed to apoptotic signals, Xkr8 was cleaved at the C terminus and the Xkr8/BSG complex formed a higher-order complex, likely to be a heterotetramer consisting of two molecules of Xkr8 and two molecules of BSG or NPTN, suggesting that this cleavage causes the formation of a larger complex of Xkr8-BSG/NPTN for phospholipid scrambling. PMID:27503893

  15. Internalization of paramagnetic phosphatidylserine-containing liposomes by macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflammation plays an important role in many pathologies, including cardiovascular diseases, neurological conditions and oncology, and is considered an important predictor for disease progression and outcome. In vivo imaging of inflammatory cells will improve diagnosis and provide a read-out for therapy efficacy. Paramagnetic phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing liposomes were developed for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confocal microscopy imaging of macrophages. These nanoparticles also provide a platform to combine imaging with targeted drug delivery. Results Incorporation of PS into liposomes did not affect liposomal size and morphology up to 12 mol% of PS. Liposomes containing 6 mol% of PS showed the highest uptake by murine macrophages, while only minor uptake was observed in endothelial cells. Uptake of liposomes containing 6 mol% of PS was dependent on the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+. Furthermore, these 6 mol% PS-containing liposomes were mainly internalized into macrophages, whereas liposomes without PS only bound to the macrophage cell membrane. Conclusions Paramagnetic liposomes containing 6 mol% of PS for MR imaging of macrophages have been developed. In vitro these liposomes showed specific internalization by macrophages. Therefore, these liposomes might be suitable for in vivo visualization of macrophage content and for (visualization of) targeted drug delivery to inflammatory cells. PMID:22929153

  16. Dysferlin-mediated phosphatidylserine sorting engages macrophages in sarcolemma repair

    PubMed Central

    Middel, Volker; Zhou, Lu; Takamiya, Masanari; Beil, Tanja; Shahid, Maryam; Roostalu, Urmas; Grabher, Clemens; Rastegar, Sepand; Reischl, Markus; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich; Strähle, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Failure to repair the sarcolemma leads to muscle cell death, depletion of stem cells and myopathy. Hence, membrane lesions are instantly sealed by a repair patch consisting of lipids and proteins. It has remained elusive how this patch is removed to restore cell membrane integrity. Here we examine sarcolemmal repair in live zebrafish embryos by real-time imaging. Macrophages remove the patch. Phosphatidylserine (PS), an ‘eat-me' signal for macrophages, is rapidly sorted from adjacent sarcolemma to the repair patch in a Dysferlin (Dysf) dependent process in zebrafish and human cells. A previously unrecognized arginine-rich motif in Dysf is crucial for PS accumulation. It carries mutations in patients presenting with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B. This underscores the relevance of this sequence and uncovers a novel pathophysiological mechanism underlying this class of myopathies. Our data show that membrane repair is a multi-tiered process involving immediate, cell-intrinsic mechanisms as well as myofiber/macrophage interactions. PMID:27641898

  17. Phosphatidylserine receptors: enhancers of enveloped virus entry and infection

    PubMed Central

    Moller-Tank, Sven; Maury, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    A variety of both RNA and DNA viruses envelop their capsids in a lipid bilayer. One of the more recently appreciated benefits this envelope is incorporation of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer). Surface exposure of PtdSer disguises viruses as apoptotic bodies; tricking cells into engulfing virions. This mechanism is termed apoptotic mimicry. Several PtdSer receptors have been identified to enhance virus entry and we have termed this group of proteins PtdSer-mediated virus entry enhancing receptors or PVEERs. These receptors enhance entry of a broad range of enveloped viruses. Internalization of virions by PVEERs provides a broad mechanism of entry with little investment by the virus itself and may allow some viruses to attach to cells, thereby making viral glycoprotein/cellular receptor interactions more probable. Alternatively, other viruses may rely entirely on PVEERs for internalization into endosomes. This review provides an overview of PtdSer receptors that serve as PVEERs and the biology behind virion/PVEER interaction. PMID:25277499

  18. Towards programming immune tolerance through geometric manipulation of phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Reid A; Eitas, Timothy K; Byrne, James D; Johnson, Brandon M; Short, Patrick J; McKinnon, Karen P; Reisdorf, Shannon; Luft, J Christopher; DeSimone, Joseph M; Ting, Jenny P

    2015-12-01

    The possibility of engineering the immune system in a targeted fashion using biomaterials such as nanoparticles has made considerable headway in recent years. However, little is known as to how modulating the spatial presentation of a ligand augments downstream immune responses. In this report we show that geometric manipulation of phosphatidylserine (PS) through fabrication on rod-shaped PLGA nanoparticles robustly dampens inflammatory responses from innate immune cells while promoting T regulatory cell abundance by impeding effector T cell expansion. This response depends on the geometry of PS presentation as both PS liposomes and 1 micron cylindrical PS-PLGA particles are less potent signal inducers than 80 × 320 nm rod-shaped PS-PLGA particles for an equivalent dose of PS. We show that this immune tolerizing effect can be co-opted for therapeutic benefit in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis and an assay of organ rejection using a mixed lymphocyte reaction with primary human immune cells. These data provide evidence that geometric manipulation of a ligand via biomaterials may enable more efficient and tunable programming of cellular signaling networks for therapeutic benefit in a variety of disease states, including autoimmunity and organ rejection, and thus should be an active area of further research.

  19. Theory of lipid polymorphism: application to phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Schick, M

    2000-01-01

    We introduce a microscopic model of a lipid with a charged headgroup and flexible hydrophobic tails, a neutral solvent, and counter ions. Short-ranged interactions between hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties are included as are the Coulomb interactions between charges. Further, we include a short-ranged interaction between charges and neutral solvent, which mimics the short-ranged, thermally averaged interaction between charges and water dipoles. We show that the model of the uncharged lipid displays the usual lyotropic phases as a function of the relative volume fraction of the headgroup. Choosing model parameters appropriate to dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine in water, we obtain phase behavior that agrees well with experiment. Finally we choose a solvent concentration and temperature at which the uncharged lipid exhibits an inverted hexagonal phase and turn on the headgroup charge. The lipid system makes a transition from the inverted hexagonal to the lamellar phase, which is related to the increased waters of hydration correlated with the increased headgroup charge via the charge-solvent interaction. The polymorphism displayed upon variation of pH mimics that of the behavior of phosphatidylserine. PMID:10620271

  20. Phosphatidylserine is a critical modulator for Akt activation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bill X.; Akbar, Mohammed; Kevala, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Akt activation relies on the binding of Akt to phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) in the membrane. Here, we demonstrate that Akt activation requires not only PIP3 but also membrane phosphatidylserine (PS). The extent of insulin-like growth factor–induced Akt activation and downstream signaling as well as cell survival under serum starvation conditions positively correlates with plasma membrane PS levels in living cells. PS promotes Akt-PIP3 binding, participates in PIP3-induced Akt interdomain conformational changes for T308 phosphorylation, and causes an open conformation that allows for S473 phosphorylation by mTORC2. PS interacts with specific residues in the pleckstrin homology (PH) and regulatory (RD) domains of Akt. Disruption of PS–Akt interaction by mutation impairs Akt signaling and increases susceptibility to cell death. These data identify a critical function of PS for Akt activation and cell survival, particularly in conditions with limited PIP3 availability. The novel molecular interaction mechanism for Akt activation suggests potential new targets for controlling Akt-dependent cell survival and proliferation. PMID:21402788

  1. Towards programming immune tolerance through geometric manipulation of phosphatidylserine

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brandon M.; Short, Patrick J.; McKinnon, Karen P.; Reisdorf, Shannon; Luft, J. Christopher; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of engineering the immune system in a targeted fashion using biomaterials such as nanoparticles has made considerable headway in recent years. However, little is known as to how modulating the spatial presentation of a ligand augments downstream immune responses. In this report we show that geometric manipulation of phosphatidylserine (PS) through fabrication on rod-shaped PLGA nanoparticles robustly dampens inflammatory responses from innate immune cells while promoting T regulatory cell abundance by impeding effector T cell expansion. This response depends on the geometry of PS presentation as both PS liposomes and 1 micron cylindrical PS-PLGA particles are less potent signal inducers than 80 × 320 nm rod-shaped PS-PLGA particles for an equivalent dose of PS. We show that this immune tolerizing effect can be co-opted for therapeutic benefit in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis and an assay of organ rejection using a mixed lymphocyte reaction with primary human immune cells. These data provide evidence that geometric manipulation of a ligand via biomaterials may enable more efficient and tunable programming of cellular signaling networks for therapeutic benefit in a variety of disease states, including autoimmunity and organ rejection, and thus should be an active area of further research. PMID:26325217

  2. Phosphatidylserine Reversibly Binds Cu2+ with Extremely High Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Christopher F.; Cong, Xiao; Robison, Aaron; Pace, Hudson P.; Liu, Chunming; Poyton, Matthew F.; Cremer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) embedded within supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) was found to bind Cu2+ from solution with extraordinarily high affinity. In fact, the equilibrium dissociation constant was in the femtomolar range. The resulting complex formed in a 1:2 Cu2+ to PS ratio and quenches a broad spectrum of lipid-bound fluorophores in a reversible and pH-dependent fashion. At acidic pH values, the fluorophores were almost completely unquenched, while at basic pH values significant quenching (85–90%) was observed. The pH at which the transition occurred was dependent on the PS concentration and ranged from approximately pH 5 to 8. The quenching kinetics was slow at low Cu2+ concentrations and basic values pH (up to several hours), while the unquenching reaction was orders of magnitude more rapid upon lowering the pH. This was consistent with diffusion limited complex formation at basic pH, but rapid dissociation under acidic conditions. The tight binding of Cu2+ to PS may have physiological consequences under certain circumstances. PMID:22548290

  3. Phosphatidylserine immobilization of lentivirus for localized gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungjin; Tuinstra, Hannah M.; Salvay, David M.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2010-01-01

    Localized and efficient gene transfer can be promoted by exploiting the interaction between the vector and biomaterial. Regulation of the vector-material interaction was investigated by capitalizing on the binding between lentivirus and phosphatidylserine (PS), a component of the plasma membrane. PS was incorporated into microspheres composed of the copolymers of lactide and glycolide (PLG) using an emulsion process. Increasing the weight ratio of PS to PLG led to a greater incorporation of PS. Lentivirus, but not adenovirus, associated with PS-PLG microspheres, and binding was specific to PS relative to PLG alone or PLG modified with phosphatidylcholine. Immobilized lentivirus produced large numbers of transduced cells, and increased transgene expression relative to virus alone. Microspheres were subsequently formed into porous tissue engineering scaffolds, with retention of lentivirus binding. Lentivirus immobilization resulted in long-term and localized expression within a subcutaneously implanted scaffold. Microspheres were also formed into multiple channel bridges for implantation into the spinal cord. Lentivirus delivery from the bridge produced maximal expression at the implant and a gradient of expression rostrally and caudally. This specific binding of lentiviral vectors to biomaterial scaffolds may provide a versatile tool for numerous applications in regenerative medicine or within model systems that investigate tissue development. PMID:20206382

  4. Gain-of-function mutations in the phosphatidylserine synthase 1 (PTDSS1) gene cause Lenz-Majewski syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Sérgio B; Jenkins, Dagan; Chanudet, Estelle; Tasseva, Guergana; Ishida, Miho; Anderson, Glenn; Docker, James; Ryten, Mina; Sa, Joaquim; Saraiva, Jorge M; Barnicoat, Angela; Scott, Richard; Calder, Alistair; Wattanasirichaigoon, Duangrurdee; Chrzanowska, Krystyna; Simandlová, Martina; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Stanier, Philip; Beales, Philip L; Vance, Jean E; Moore, Gudrun E

    2014-01-01

    Lenz-Majewski syndrome (LMS) is a syndrome of intellectual disability and multiple congenital anomalies that features generalized craniotubular hyperostosis. By using whole-exome sequencing and selecting variants consistent with the predicted dominant de novo etiology of LMS, we identified causative heterozygous missense mutations in PTDSS1, which encodes phosphatidylserine synthase 1 (PSS1). PSS1 is one of two enzymes involved in the production of phosphatidylserine. Phosphatidylserine synthesis was increased in intact fibroblasts from affected individuals, and end-product inhibition of PSS1 by phosphatidylserine was markedly reduced. Therefore, these mutations cause a gain-of-function effect associated with regulatory dysfunction of PSS1. We have identified LMS as the first human disease, to our knowledge, caused by disrupted phosphatidylserine metabolism. Our results point to an unexplored link between phosphatidylserine synthesis and bone metabolism.

  5. 2,3,5,6-Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) down-regulated arsenic-induced heme oxygenase-1 and ARS2 expression by inhibiting Nrf2, NF-κB, AP-1 and MAPK pathways in human proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xuezhong; Ivanov, Vladimir N; Hei, Tom K

    2016-09-01

    Our recent study demonstrated that sodium arsenite at a clinically relevant dose induced nephrotoxicity in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell line HK-2, which could be inhibited by natural product 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) with antioxidant activity. The present study demonstrated that arsenic exposure resulted in protein and enzymatic induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in dose- and time-dependent manners in HK-2 cells. Blocking HO-1 enzymatic activity by zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) augmented arsenic-induced apoptosis, ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting a critical role for HO-1 as a renal protectant in this procession. On the other hand, TMP, upstream of HO-1, inhibited arsenic-induced ROS production and ROS-dependent HO-1 expression. TMP also prevented mitochondria dysfunction and suppressed activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in HK-2 cells. Our results revealed that the regulation of arsenic-induced HO-1 expression was performed through multiple ROS-dependent signal pathways and the corresponding transcription factors, including p38 MAPK and JNK (but not ERK), AP-1, Nrf2 and NF-κB. TMP inhibited arsenic-induced activations of JNK, p38 MAPK, ERK, AP-1 and Nrf2 and block HO-1 protein expression. The present study, furthermore, demonstrated arsenic-induced expression of arsenic response protein 2 (ARS2) that was regulated by p38 MAPK, ERK and NF-κB. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that ARS2 involved in arsenic-induced nephrotoxicity, while TMP pretreatment prevented such an up-regulation of ARS2 in HK-2 cells. Given ARS2 and HO-1 sharing the similar regulation mechanism, we speculated that ARS2 might also mediate cell survival in this procession. In summary, our study highlighted a role of HO-1 in the protection against arsenic-induced cytotoxicity downstream from the primary targets of TMP and further indicated that TMP may be used as a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of arsenic-induced

  6. Arsenic responsive microRNAs in vivo and their potential involvement in arsenic-induced oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xuefeng; Gaile, Daniel P.; Gong, Zhihong; Qiu, Wenting; Ge, Yichen; Zhang, Chuanwu; Huang, Chenping; Yan, Hongtao; Olson, James R.; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Wu, Hongmei

    2015-03-15

    Arsenic exposure is postulated to modify microRNA (miRNA) expression, leading to changes of gene expression and toxicities, but studies relating the responses of miRNAs to arsenic exposure are lacking, especially with respect to in vivo studies. We utilized high-throughput sequencing technology and generated miRNA expression profiles of liver tissues from Sprague Dawley (SD) rats exposed to various concentrations of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 mg/L) for 60 days. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of the miRNA expression profiles clustered the SD rats into different groups based on the arsenic exposure status, indicating a highly significant association between arsenic exposure and cluster membership (p-value of 0.0012). Multiple miRNA expressions were altered by arsenic in an exposure concentration-dependent manner. Among the identified arsenic-responsive miRNAs, several are predicted to target Nfe2l2-regulated antioxidant genes, including glutamate–cysteine ligase (GCL) catalytic subunit (GCLC) and modifier subunit (GCLM) which are involved in glutathione (GSH) synthesis. Exposure to low concentrations of arsenic increased mRNA expression for Gclc and Gclm, while high concentrations significantly reduced their expression, which were correlated to changes in hepatic GCL activity and GSH level. Moreover, our data suggested that other mechanisms, e.g., miRNAs, rather than Nfe2l2-signaling pathway, could be involved in the regulation of mRNA expression of Gclc and Gclm post-arsenic exposure in vivo. Together, our findings show that arsenic exposure disrupts the genome-wide expression of miRNAs in vivo, which could lead to the biological consequence, such as an altered balance of antioxidant defense and oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure induces changes of hepatic miRNA expression profiles. • Hepatic GCL activity and GSH level in rats are altered following arsenic exposure. • Arsenic induced GCL expression change is

  7. Role of phosphatidylserine in phospholipid flippase-mediated vesicle transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Miyoko; Yamagami, Kanako; Tanaka, Kazuma

    2014-03-01

    Phospholipid flippases translocate phospholipids from the exoplasmic to the cytoplasmic leaflet of cell membranes to generate and maintain phospholipid asymmetry. The genome of budding yeast encodes four heteromeric flippases (Drs2p, Dnf1p, Dnf2p, and Dnf3p), which associate with the Cdc50 family noncatalytic subunit, and one monomeric flippase Neo1p. Flippases have been implicated in the formation of transport vesicles, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We show here that overexpression of the phosphatidylserine synthase gene CHO1 suppresses defects in the endocytic recycling pathway in flippase mutants. This suppression seems to be mediated by increased cellular phosphatidylserine. Two models can be envisioned for the suppression mechanism: (i) phosphatidylserine in the cytoplasmic leaflet recruits proteins for vesicle formation with its negative charge, and (ii) phosphatidylserine flipping to the cytoplasmic leaflet induces membrane curvature that supports vesicle formation. In a mutant depleted for flippases, a phosphatidylserine probe GFP-Lact-C2 was still localized to endosomal membranes, suggesting that the mere presence of phosphatidylserine in the cytoplasmic leaflet is not enough for vesicle formation. The CHO1 overexpression did not suppress the growth defect in a mutant depleted or mutated for all flippases, suggesting that the suppression was dependent on flippase-mediated phospholipid flipping. Endocytic recycling was not blocked in a mutant lacking phosphatidylserine or depleted in phosphatidylethanolamine, suggesting that a specific phospholipid is not required for vesicle formation. These results suggest that flippase-dependent vesicle formation is mediated by phospholipid flipping, not by flipped phospholipids.

  8. Beta2-microglobulin causes abnormal phosphatidylserine exposure in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Barbara; Bucci, Sonia; Sirolli, Vittorio; Merlini, Giampaolo; Del Boccio, Piero; Di Rienzo, Marianna; Felaco, Paolo; Amoroso, Luigi; Sacchetta, Paolo; Di Ilio, Carmine; Federici, Giorgio; Urbani, Andrea; Bonomini, Mario

    2011-03-01

    The exposure of the aminophospholipid phosphatidylserine on the external leaflet of red blood cell plasma membrane can have several pathophysiological consequences with particular regard to the processes of cell phagocytosis, haemostasis and cell-cell interaction. A significant increase in phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocytes has been reported in chronic haemodialysis patients and found to be strongly influenced by the uraemic milieu. To identify uraemic compound(s) enhancing phosphatidylserine externalization in erythrocytes, we fractionated by chromatographic methods the ultrafiltrate obtained during dialysis, and examined by flow cytometry the effect of the resulting fractions on phosphatidylserine exposure in human red cells. Chromatographic procedures disclosed a homogeneous fraction able to increase erythrocyte phosphatidylserine exposure. The inducer of such externalization was identified by monodimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry investigations as beta2-microglobulin. To confirm the beta2-microglobulin effect and to examine the influence of protein glycation (as it occurs in uraemia) on phosphatidylserine erythrocyte exposure, erythrocytes from normal subjects were incubated with recombinant beta2-microglobulin (showing no glycation sites at mass analysis), commercial beta2-microglobulin (8 glycation sites), or with in vitro glycated recombinant beta2-microglobulin (showing multiple glycation sites). Elevated concentrations of beta2-microglobulin (corresponding to plasma levels reached in dialysis patients) increased slightly but significantly the protein's ability to externalize phosphatidylserine on human erythrocytes. Such an effect was markedly enhanced by glycated forms of the protein. Beta2-microglobulin is recognized as a surrogate marker of middle-molecule uraemic toxins and represents a key component of dialysis-associated amyloidosis. Our study adds further evidence to the potential pathophysiologic consequences of beta2

  9. Effect of phosphatidylserine on the basal and GABA-activated Cl- permeation across single nerve membranes from rabbit Deiters' neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Rapallino, M.V.; Cupello, A.; Mainardi, P.; Besio, G.; Loeb, C.W. )

    1990-06-01

    The permeation of labeled Cl- ions across single plasma membranes from Deiters' neurons has been studied in the presence of various concentrations of phosphatidylserine (PS) on their extracellular side. PS reduces significantly basal Cl- permeation only at 10(-5) M on the membrane exterior. No effect was found at other concentrations. GABA activable 36Cl- permeation is heavily reduced and almost abolished at 10(-11) - 10(-5) M phosphatidylserine. This exogenous phosphatidylserine effect is difficult to interpret in relation to the function of the endogenous phospholipid. However, it may be involved in the epileptogenic effect in vivo of exogenous phosphatidylserine administration to rats.

  10. Phosphatidylserine directly and positively regulates fusion of myoblasts into myotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jaemin; Conboy, Irina M.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} PS broadly and persistently trans-locates to the outer leaflet of plasma membrane during myoblast fusion into myotubes. {yields} Robust myotubes are formed when PS liposomes are added exogenously. {yields} PS increases the width of de novo myotubes and the numbers of myonuclei, but not the myotube length. {yields} Annexin V or PS antibody inhibits myotube formation by masking exposed PS. -- Abstract: Cell membrane consists of various lipids such as phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Among them, PS is a molecular marker of apoptosis, because it is located to the inner leaflet of plasma membrane generally but it is moved to the outer leaflet during programmed cell death. The process of apoptosis has been implicated in the fusion of muscle progenitor cells, myoblasts, into myotubes. However, it remained unclear whether PS regulates muscle cell differentiation directly. In this paper, localization of PS to the outer leaflet of plasma membrane in proliferating primary myoblasts and during fusion of these myoblasts into myotubes is validated using Annexin V. Moreover, we show the presence of PS clusters at the cell-cell contact points, suggesting the importance of membrane ruffling and PS exposure for the myogenic cell fusion. Confirming this conclusion, experimentally constructed PS, but not PC liposomes dramatically enhance the formation of myotubes from myoblasts, thus demonstrating a direct positive effect of PS on the muscle cell fusion. In contrast, myoblasts exposed to PC liposomes produce long myotubes with low numbers of myonuclei. Moreover, pharmacological masking of PS on the myoblast surface inhibits fusion of these cells into myotubes in a dose-dependent manner.

  11. Interactome map uncovers phosphatidylserine transport by oxysterol-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kenji; Anand, Kanchan; Chiapparino, Antonella; Kumar, Arun; Poletto, Mattia; Kaksonen, Marko; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2013-09-12

    The internal organization of eukaryotic cells into functionally specialized, membrane-delimited organelles of unique composition implies a need for active, regulated lipid transport. Phosphatidylserine (PS), for example, is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and then preferentially associates--through mechanisms not fully elucidated--with the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Lipids can travel via transport vesicles. Alternatively, several protein families known as lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) can extract a variety of specific lipids from biological membranes and transport them, within a hydrophobic pocket, through aqueous phases. Here we report the development of an integrated approach that combines protein fractionation and lipidomics to characterize the LTP-lipid complexes formed in vivo. We applied the procedure to 13 LTPs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: the six Sec14 homology (Sfh) proteins and the seven oxysterol-binding homology (Osh) proteins. We found that Osh6 and Osh7 have an unexpected specificity for PS. In vivo, they participate in PS homeostasis and the transport of this lipid to the plasma membrane. The structure of Osh6 bound to PS reveals unique features that are conserved among other metazoan oxysterol-binding proteins (OSBPs) and are required for PS recognition. Our findings represent the first direct evidence, to our knowledge, for the non-vesicular transfer of PS from its site of biosynthesis (the endoplasmic reticulum) to its site of biological activity (the plasma membrane). We describe a new subfamily of OSBPs, including human ORP5 and ORP10, that transfer PS and propose new mechanisms of action for a protein family that is involved in several human pathologies such as cancer, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome.

  12. Phosphatidylserine liposomes can be tethered by caldesmon to actin filaments.

    PubMed Central

    Makuch, R; Zasada, A; Mabuchi, K; Krauze, K; Wang, C L; Dabrowska, R

    1997-01-01

    Rotary shadowing electron microscopy revealed that attachment of caldesmon to phosphatidylserine (PS) liposomes was mainly through its C-terminal end. To determine the PS-binding sites of caldesmon, we have made use of synthetic peptides covering the two C-terminal calmodulin binding sites and a recombinant fragment corresponding to the N-terminal end of the C-terminal domain that contains an amphipathic helix. Interactions of these peptides with the PS liposomes were studied by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results showed that both calmodulin-binding sites of caldesmon were able to interact with PS. The affinity (Kd) of PS for these sites was in the range of 1.8-14.3 x 10(-5) M, compared to 0.69 x 10(-5) M for the whole caldesmon molecule. Fragments located outside of calmodulin-binding sites bound PS weakly (3.85 x 10(-4) M) and thus may contain a second class of lipid-binding sites. Binding of PS induced conformational changes in regions other than the C-terminal PS-binding sites, as evidenced by the changes in the susceptibility to proteolytic cleavages. Most significantly, the presence of caldesmon greatly increased binding of PS to F-actin, suggesting that caldesmon may tether PS liposomes to actin filaments. These results raise the possibility that caldesmon-lipid interactions could play a functionally important role in the assembly of contractile filaments near the membranes. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 PMID:9284327

  13. The dissimilar effect of diacylglycerols on Ca(2+)-induced phosphatidylserine vesicle fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Migallón, M P; Aranda, F J; Gómez-Fernández, J C

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the effect of physiological concentrations of different diacylglycerols on Ca(2+)-induced fusion between phosphatidylserine vesicles. We monitored vesicle fusion as mixing of membrane lipids under conditions where the limiting factor was the aggregation and also in conditions where this aggregation was not the limiting factor. We found that diacylglycerols have a different modulating effect on the Ca(2+)-induced fusion: i) depending on their interfacial conformation, so that 1,2-isomers of diacylglycerols containing unsaturated or short saturated acyl chains stimulated fusion and their 1,3-isomers did not, and ii) depending on their specific type of bilayer interior perturbation, so that diacylglycerols containing unsaturated or short chain saturated acyl chains stimulated fusion but those containing long-chain saturated acyl chains did not. These requirements resembled those required for the diacylglycerol activation of protein kinase C, suggesting that diacylglycerol acts in both the specific activation of this enzyme and the induction of membrane fusion through the same perturbation of lipid structure. We found that polylysine affected the stimulatory role of 1,2-dioleoylglycerol differently, depending on whether aggregation was the limiting factor of fusion. When we studied the effect of very low concentrations of diacylglycerols on the bulk structural properties of phosphatidylserine, we found that they neither significantly perturbed the thermotropic transitions of phosphatidylserine nor affected the interaction of Ca2+ with the phosphate group of phosphatidylserine. The underlying mechanism of fusion between phosphatidylserine vesicles is discussed. PMID:7696508

  14. Diannexin protects against renal ischemia reperfusion injury and targets phosphatidylserines in ischemic tissue.

    PubMed

    Wever, Kimberley E; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Frielink, Cathelijne; Boerman, Otto C; Scheffer, Gert J; Allison, Anthony; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Rongen, Gerard A

    2011-01-01

    Renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) frequently complicates shock, renal transplantation and cardiac and aortic surgery, and has prognostic significance. The translocation of phosphatidylserines to cell surfaces is an important pro-inflammatory signal for cell-stress after IRI. We hypothesized that shielding of exposed phosphatidylserines by the annexin A5 (ANXA5) homodimer Diannexin protects against renal IRI. Protective effects of Diannexin on the kidney were studied in a mouse model of mild renal IRI. Diannexin treatment before renal IRI decreased proximal tubule damage and leukocyte influx, decreased transcription and expression of renal injury markers Neutrophil Gelatinase Associated Lipocalin and Kidney Injury Molecule-1 and improved renal function. A mouse model of ischemic hind limb exercise was used to assess Diannexin biodistribution and targeting. When comparing its biodistribution and elimination to ANXA5, Diannexin was found to have a distinct distribution pattern and longer blood half-life. Diannexin targeted specifically to the ischemic muscle and its affinity exceeded that of ANXA5. Targeting of both proteins was inhibited by pre-treatment with unlabeled ANXA5, suggesting that Diannexin targets specifically to ischemic tissues via phosphatidylserine-binding. This study emphasizes the importance of phosphatidylserine translocation in the pathophysiology of IRI. We show for the first time that Diannexin protects against renal IRI, making it a promising therapeutic tool to prevent IRI in a clinical setting. Our results indicate that Diannexin is a potential new imaging agent for the study of phosphatidylserine-exposing organs in vivo.

  15. Differential roles of tissue factor and phosphatidylserine in activation of coagulation.

    PubMed

    Spronk, Henri M H; ten Cate, Hugo; van der Meijden, Paola E J

    2014-05-01

    It has been suggested that the main physiological trigger of coagulation, tissue factor, possesses limited procoagulant activity and occurs in an inactive or so-called encrypted state. For the conversion of encrypted into decrypted tissue factor with sufficient procoagulant activity, four distinct models have been proposed: 1; dimer formation, 2; lipid rafts, 3; disulfide bonds, and 4; phosphatidylserine exposure. Pro and cons can be given for each of these mechanisms of tissue factor encryption/decryption, however, it seems most likely that two or more mechanisms act together in activating the procoagulant activity. The exposure of phosphatidylserine in the outer layer of cell membranes supports coagulation through enhanced formation of the tenase (factors IXa, VIIIa and X) and prothrombinase (factors Xa, Va and prothrombin) complexes. The proposed role for phosphatidylserine in decryption of tissue factor could contribute to the correct orientation of the tissue factor - factor VII complex. Overall, the contribution of both tissue factor and phosphatidylserine to coagulation seems distinct with tissue factor being the physiological activator and phosphatidylserine the driving force of propagation of coagulation.

  16. Chloride channels are necessary for full platelet phosphatidylserine exposure and procoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Harper, M T; Poole, A W

    2013-12-19

    Platelets enhance thrombin generation at sites of vascular injury by exposing phosphatidylserine during necrosis-like cell death. Anoctamin 6 (Ano6) is required for Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatidylserine exposure and is defective in patients with Scott syndrome, a rare bleeding disorder. Ano6 may also form Cl(-) channels, though the role of Cl(-) fluxes in platelet procoagulant activity has not been explored. We found that Cl(-) channel blockers or removal of extracellular Cl(-) inhibited agonist-induced phosphatidylserine exposure. However, this was not due to direct inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent scrambling since Ca(2+) ionophore-induced phosphatidylserine exposure was normal. This implies that the role of Ano6 in Ca(2+-)dependent PS exposure is likely to differ from any putative function of Ano6 as a Cl(-) channel. Instead, Cl(-) channel blockade inhibited agonist-induced Ca(2+) entry. Importantly, Cl(-) channel blockers also prevented agonist-induced membrane hyperpolarization, resulting in depolarization. We propose that Cl(-) entry through Cl(-) channels is required for this hyperpolarization, maintaining the driving force for Ca(2+) entry and triggering full phosphatidylserine exposure. This demonstrates a novel role for Cl(-) channels in controlling platelet death and procoagulant activity.

  17. Role of Metabolism in Arsenic-Induced Toxicity: Identification and Quantification of Arsenic Metabolites in Tissues and Excreta

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a known toxicant and carcinogen. Methylation of inorganic arsenic was once thought to be a detoxification mechanism because of the rapid excretion and relatively lower toxicity of the pentavalent organic arsenical metabolites. Advances in analytical chemistry have al...

  18. The role of phosphatidylserine in recognition of apoptotic cells by phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Fadok, V A; Bratton, D L; Frasch, S C; Warner, M L; Henson, P M

    1998-07-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane is a surface change common to many apoptotic cells. Normally restricted to the inner leaflet, phosphatidylserine appears as a result of decreased aminophospholipid translocase activity and activation of a calcium-dependent scramblase. Phosphatidylserine exposure has several potential biological consequences, one of which is recognition and removal of the apoptotic cell by phagocytes. It is still not clear which receptors mediate PS recognition on apoptotic cells; however, several interesting candidates have been proposed. These include the Class B scavenger and thrombospondin receptor CD36, an oxLDL receptor (CD68), CD14, annexins, beta2 glycoprotein I, gas-6 and a novel activity expressed on macrophages stimulated with digestible particles such as beta-glucan. Whether PS is the sole ligand recognized by phagocytes or whether it associated with other molecules to form a complex ligand remains to be determined.

  19. Introducing biobased ionic liquids as the nonaqueous media for enzymatic synthesis of phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yan-Hong; Duan, Zhang-Qun; Li, Xiang-Qian; Wang, Zhao-Yu; Zhao, Xi-Rong

    2015-02-11

    Biobased ionic liquids with cholinium as the cation and amino acids as the anions, which could be prepared from renewable biomaterials by simple neutralization reactions, have recently been described as promising and green solvents. Herein, they were successfully used as the reaction media for enzyme-mediated transphosphatidylation of phosphatidylcholine with l-serine for phosphatidylserine synthesis for the first time. Our results indicated that the highest phosphatidylserine yield of 86.5% was achieved. Moreover, 75% original activity of the enzyme was maintained after being used for 10 batches. The present work could be considered an alternative enzymatic strategy for preparing phosphatidylserine. Additionally, the excellent results make the biobased ionic liquids more promising candidates for use as environmentally friendly solvents in biocatalysis fields.

  20. Characterization of osseointegrative phosphatidylserine and cholesterol orthopaedic implant coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, William Paul, III

    Total joint arthroplasties are one of the most successful surgeries available today for improving patients' quality of life. Increasing demand is driven largely by an ageing population and an increased occurrence of obesity. Current patient options have significant shortcomings. Nearly a third of patients require a revision surgery before the implant is 15 years old, and those who have revision surgeries are at an increased risk of requiring additional reoperations. A recent implant technology that has shown to be effective at improving bone to implant integration is the use of phosphatidylserine (DOPS) coatings. These coatings are challenging to analyze and measure due to their highly dynamic, soft, rough, thick, and optically diffractive properties. Previous work had difficulty investigating pertinent parameters for these coating's development due in large part to a lack of available analytical techniques and a dearth of understanding of the micro- and nano-structural configuration of the coatings. This work addresses the lack of techniques available for use with DOPS coatings through the development of original methods of measurement, including the use of scanning white light interferometry and nanoindentation. These techniques were then applied for the characterization of DOPS coatings and the study of effects from several factors: 1. influence of adding calcium and cholesterol to the coatings, 2. effects of composition and roughness on aqueous contact angles, and 3. impact of ageing and storage environment on the coatings. Using these newly developed, highly repeatable quantitative analysis methods, this study sheds light on the microstructural configuration of the DOPS coatings and elucidates previously unexplained phenomena of the coatings. Cholesterol was found to supersaturate in the coatings at high concentration and phase separate into an anhydrous crystalline form, while lower concentrations were found to significantly harden the coatings. Morphological

  1. Temperature dependence of calcium-induced fusion of sonicated phosphatidylserine vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, S T; Day, E P; Ho, J T

    1978-01-01

    We have measured the temperature dependence calcium-induced fusion of sonicated phosphatidylserine vesicles. The vesicles were incubated in the presence of calcium at a specified temperature until the resulting aggregation or fusion process had gone to completion. EDTA was then added and the resulting final size of the vesicle population was measured by using dynamic light scattering. This final size was plotted against incubation temperature to show the temperature dependence of calcium-induced fusion. This curve has a peak near 11 degrees C which may be associated with the phase transition of the sonicated phosphatidylserine vesicles in the presence of calcium prior to the aggregation or fusion process. PMID:279918

  2. A new high-temperature transition of crystalline cholesterol in mixtures with phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed Central

    Epand, R M; Bach, D; Epand, R F; Borochov, N; Wachtel, E

    2001-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine and cholesterol are two major components of the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. The arrangement of cholesterol is markedly affected by the presence of phosphatidylserine in model membranes. At relatively low mol fractions of cholesterol in phosphatidylserine, compared with other phospholipids, cholesterol crystallites are formed that exhibit both thermotropic phase transitions as well as diffraction of x-rays. In the present study we have observed and characterized a novel thermotropic transition occurring in mixtures of phosphatidylserine and cholesterol. This new transition is observed at 96 degrees C by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), using a heating scan rate of 2 degrees C/min. Observation of the transition requires that the hydrated lipid mixture be incubated for several days, depending on the temperature of incubation. The rate of formation of the material exhibiting a transition at 96 degrees C is more rapid at higher incubation temperatures. At 37 degrees C the half-time of conversion is approximately 7 days. Concomitant with the appearance of the 96 degrees C peak the previously known transitions of cholesterol, occurring at approximately 38 degrees C and 75 degrees C on heating scans of freshly prepared suspensions, disappear. These two transitions correspond to the polymorphic transition of anhydrous cholesterol and to the dehydration of cholesterol monohydrate, respectively. The loss of the 75 degrees C peak takes a longer time than that of the 38 degrees C peak, indicating that anhydrous cholesterol first gets hydrated to the monohydrate form exhibiting a transition at 75 degrees C and subsequently is converted by additional time of incubation to an altered form of the monohydrate, showing a phase transition at 96 degrees C. After several weeks of incubation at 37 degrees C, only the form with a phase transition at 96 degrees C remains. If such a sample undergoes several successive heating and cooling cycles

  3. An assembly of proteins and lipid domains regulates transport of phosphatidylserine to phosphatidylserine decarboxylase 2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Riekhof, Wayne R; Wu, Wen-I; Jones, Jennifer L; Nikrad, Mrinalini; Chan, Mallory M; Loewen, Christopher J R; Voelker, Dennis R

    2014-02-28

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae uses multiple biosynthetic pathways for the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine. One route involves the synthesis of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the transport of this lipid to endosomes, and decarboxylation by PtdSer decarboxylase 2 (Psd2p) to produce phosphatidylethanolamine. Several proteins and protein motifs are known to be required for PtdSer transport to occur, namely the Sec14p homolog PstB2p/Pdr17p; a PtdIns 4-kinase, Stt4p; and a C2 domain of Psd2p. The focus of this work is on defining the protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions of these components. PstB2p interacts with a protein encoded by the uncharacterized gene YPL272C, which we name Pbi1p (PstB2p-interacting 1). PstB2p, Psd2, and Pbi1p were shown to be lipid-binding proteins specific for phosphatidic acid. Pbi1p also interacts with the ER-localized Scs2p, a binding determinant for several peripheral ER proteins. A complex between Psd2p and PstB2p was also detected, and this interaction was facilitated by a cryptic C2 domain at the extreme N terminus of Psd2p (C2-1) as well the previously characterized C2 domain of Psd2p (C2-2). The predicted N-terminal helical region of PstB2p was necessary and sufficient for promoting the interaction with both Psd2p and Pbi1p. Taken together, these results support a model for PtdSer transport involving the docking of a PtdSer donor membrane with an acceptor via specific protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. Specifically, our model predicts that this process involves an acceptor membrane complex containing the C2 domains of Psd2p, PstB2p, and Pbi1p that ligate to Scs2p and phosphatidic acid present in the donor membrane, forming a zone of apposition that facilitates PtdSer transfer.

  4. Anti-self phosphatidylserine antibodies recognize uninfected erythrocytes promoting malarial anemia

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Arias, Cristina; Rivera-Correa, Juan; Gallego-Delgado, Julio; Rudlaff, Rachel; Fernandez, Clemente; Roussel, Camille; Götz, Anton; Gonzalez, Sandra; Mohanty, Akshaya; Mohanty, Sanjib; Wassmer, Samuel; Buffet, Pierre; Ndour, Papa Alioune; Rodriguez, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Summary Plasmodium species, the parasitic agents of malaria, invade erythrocytes to reproduce resulting in erythrocyte loss. However, a greater loss is caused by the elimination of uninfected erythrocytes, sometimes long after infection has been cleared. Using a mouse model, we found that Plasmodium infection induces the generation of anti-self antibodies that bind to the surface of uninfected erythrocytes from infected, but not uninfected, mice. These antibodies recognize phosphatidylserine, which is exposed on the surface of a fraction of uninfected erythrocytes during malaria. We find that phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocytes are reticulocytes expressing high levels of CD47, a ‘do-not-eat-me’ signal, but the binding of anti-phosphatidylserine antibodies mediates their phagocytosis, contributing to anemia. In human patients with late post-malarial anemia, we found a strong inverse correlation between the levels of anti-phosphatidylserine antibodies and plasma hemoglobin, suggesting a similar role in humans. Inhibition of this pathway may be exploited for treating malarial anemia. PMID:26867178

  5. Transient receptor potential channels function as a coincidence signal detector mediating phosphatidylserine exposure.

    PubMed

    Harper, Matthew T; Londoño, Juan E Camacho; Quick, Kathryn; Londoño, Julia Camacho; Flockerzi, Veit; Philipp, Stephan E; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Freichel, Marc; Poole, Alastair W

    2013-06-25

    Blood platelet aggregation must be tightly controlled to promote clotting at injury sites but avoid inappropriate occlusion of blood vessels. Thrombin, which cleaves and activates Gq-coupled protease-activated receptors, and collagen-related peptide, which activates the receptor glycoprotein VI, stimulate platelets to aggregate and form thrombi. Coincident activation by these two agonists synergizes, causing the exposure of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface, which is a marker of cell death in many cell types. Phosphatidylserine exposure is also essential to produce additional thrombin on platelet surfaces, which contributes to thrombosis. We found that activation of either thrombin receptors or glycoprotein VI alone produced a calcium signal that was largely dependent only on store-operated Ca(2+) entry. In contrast, experiments with platelets from knockout mice showed that the presence of both ligands activated nonselective cation channels of the transient receptor potential C (TRPC) family, TRPC3 and TRPC6. These channels principally allowed entry of Na(+), which coupled to reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange to allow calcium influx and thereby contribute to Ca(2+) signaling and phosphatidylserine exposure. Thus, TRPC channels act as coincidence detectors to coordinate responses to multiple signals in cells, thereby indirectly mediating in platelets an increase in intracellular calcium concentrations and exposure of prothrombotic phosphatidylserine.

  6. Identification of phosphatidylserine as a ligand for the CD300a immunoreceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahashi-Oda, Chigusa; Tahara-Hanaoka, Satoko; Honda, Shin-ichiro; Shibuya, Kazuko; Shibuya, Akira

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD300a is a new phosphatidylserine receptor expressed on myeloid cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphatidylserine delivers a signal for recruitment of SHP-1 by CD300a in mast cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CD300a/phosphatidylserine interaction is blocked by MFG-E8 or anti-CD300a antibody. -- Abstract: CD300a is a member of CD300 family molecules consisting of seven genes on human chromosome 17 and nine genes in mouse chromosome 11. CD300a has a long cytoplasmic region containing the consensus immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) sequence. Upon crosslinking with antibodies against CD300a, CD300a mediates an inhibitory signal in myeloid cells. However, the ligand for CD300a has not been identified and the physiological role of CD300a remained unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the chimeric fusion protein of CD300a extracellular domain with the Fc portion of human IgG specifically bound phosphatidylserine (PS), which is exposed on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of apoptotic cells. PS binding to CD300a induced SHP-1 recruitment by CD300a in mast cells in response to LPS. These results indicated that CD300a is a new PS receptor.

  7. In vitro uptake of apoptotic body mimicking phosphatidylserine-quantum dot micelles by monocytic cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiseyeu, Andrei; Bagalkot, Vaishali

    2014-04-01

    A new quantum dot (QD) PEGylated micelle laced with phosphatidylserine (PS) for specific scavenger receptor-mediated uptake by macrophages is reported. The size and surface chemistry of PS-QD micelles were characterized by standard methods and the effects of their physicochemical properties on specific targeting and uptake were comprehensively studied in a monocytic cell line (J774A.1).

  8. Peptidic targeting of phosphatidylserine for the MRI detection of apoptosis in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Burtea, Carmen; Laurent, Sophie; Lancelot, Eric; Ballet, Sébastien; Murariu, Oltea; Rousseaux, Olivier; Port, Marc; Vander Elst, Luce; Corot, Claire; Muller, Robert N

    2009-01-01

    Molecular and cellular imaging of atherosclerosis has garnered more interest at the beginning of the 21st century, with aims to image in vivo biological properties of plaque lesions. Apoptosis seems an attractive target for the diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques prone to a thrombotic event. The aim of the present work was to screen for apoptosis peptide binders by phage display with the final purpose to detect apoptotic cells in atherosclerotic plaques by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A phosphatidylserine-specific peptide identified by phage display was thus used to design an MRI contrast agent (CA), which was evaluated as a potential in vivo reporter of apoptotic cells. A library of linear 6-mer random peptides was screened in vitro against immobilized phosphatidylserine. Phage DNA was isolated and sequenced, and the affinity of peptides for phosphatidylserine was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phosphatidylserine-specific peptide and its scrambled homologue were attached to a linker and conjugated to DTPA-isothiocyanate. The products were purified by dialysis and by column chromatography and complexed with gadolinium chloride. After their evaluation using apoptotic cells and a mouse model of liver apoptosis, the phosphatidylserine-targeted CA was used to image atherosclerotic lesions on ApoE(-/-) transgenic mice. Apoptotic cells were detected on liver and aorta specimens by the immunostaining of phosphatidylserine and of active caspase-3. Sequencing of the phage genome highlighted nine different peptides. Their alignment with amino acid sequences of relevant proteins revealed a frequent homology with Ca2+ channels, reminiscent of the function of annexins. Alignment with molecules involved in apoptosis provides a direct correlation between peptide selection and utility. The in vivo MRI studies performed at 4.7 T provide proof of concept that apoptosis-related pathologies could be diagnosed by MRI with a low molecular weight

  9. Specific membrane binding of factor VIII is mediated by O-phospho-L-serine, a moiety of phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, G E; Drinkwater, D

    1993-09-21

    Phosphatidylserine, a negatively charged lipid, is exposed on the platelet membrane following cell stimulation, correlating with the expression of factor VIII receptors. We have explored the importance of the negative electrostatic potential of phosphatidylserine vs chemical moieties of phosphatidylserine for specific membrane binding of factor VIII. Fluorescein-labeled factor VIII bound to membranes containing 15% phosphatidic acid, a negatively charged phospholipid, with low affinity compared to phosphatidylserine-containing membranes. Binding was not specific as it was inhibited by other proteins in plasma. Factor VIII bound to membranes containing 10% phosphatidylserine in spite of a varying net charge provided by 0-15% stearylamine, a positively charged lipid. The soluble phosphatidylserine moiety, O-phospho-L-serine, inhibited factor VIII binding to phosphatidylserine-containing membranes with a Ki of 20 mM, but the stereoisomer, O-phospho-D-serine, was 5-fold less effective. Furthermore, binding of factor VIII to membranes containing synthetic phosphatidyl-D-serine was 5-fold less than binding to membranes containing phosphatidyl-L-serine. Membranes containing synthetic phosphatidyl-L-homoserine, differing from phosphatidylserine by a single methylene, supported high-affinity binding, but it was not specific as factor VIII was displaced by other plasma proteins. O-Phospho-L-serine also inhibited the binding of factor VIII to platelet-derived microparticles with a Ki of 20 mM, and the stereoisomer was 4-fold less effective. These results indicate that membrane binding of factor VIII is mediated by a stereoselective recognition O-phospho-L-serine of phosphatidylserine and that negative electrostatic potential is of lesser importance.

  10. Dysregulation of DNA methylation induced by past arsenic treatment causes persistent genomic instability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maurizio; Caradonna, Fabio; Klein, Catherine B

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms by which arsenic-induced genomic instability is initiated and maintained are poorly understood. To investigate potential epigenetic mechanisms, in this study we evaluated global DNA methylation levels in V79 cells and human HaCaT keratinocytes at several time points during expanded growth of cell cultures following removal of arsenite exposures. We have found altered genomic methylation patterns that persisted up to 40 cell generations in HaCaT cells after the treatments were withdrawn. Moreover, mRNA expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HMLH1, and HMSH2 genes, demonstrating that the down regulation of DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes, but not DNMT1, occurred in an arsenic dose-dependent manner, and persisted for many cell generations following removal of the arsenite, offering a plausible mechanism of persistently genotoxic arsenic action. Analyses of promoter methylation status of the DNA mismatch repair genes HMLH1 and HMSH2 show that HMSH2, but not HMLH1, was epigenetically regulated by promoter hypermethylation changes following arsenic treatment. The results reported here demonstrate that arsenic exposure promptly induces genome-wide global DNA hypomethylation, and some specific gene promoter methylation changes, that persist for many cell generations following withdrawal of arsenite, supporting the hypothesis that the cells undergo epigenetic reprogramming at both the gene and genome level that is durable over many cell generations in the absence of further arsenic treatment. These DNA methylation changes, in concert with other known epigenome alterations, are likely contributing to long-lasting arsenic-induced genomic instability that manifests in several ways, including aberrant chromosomal effects.

  11. Dysregulation of DNA Methylation Induced by Past Arsenic Treatment Causes Persistent Genomic Instability in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Maurizio; Caradonna, Fabio; Klein, Catherine B.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which arsenic-induced genomic instability is initiated and maintained are poorly understood. To investigate potential epigenetic mechanisms, in this study we evaluated global DNA methylation levels in V79 cells and human HaCaT keratinocytes at several time points during expanded growth of cell cultures following removal of arsenite exposures. We have found altered genomic methylation patterns that persisted up to 40 cell generations in HaCaT cells after the treatments were withdrawn. Moreover, mRNA expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HMLH1, and HMSH2 genes, demonstrating that the down regulation of DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes, but not DNMT1, occurred in an arsenic dose-dependent manner, and persisted for many cell generations following removal of the arsenite, offering a plausible mechanism of persistently genotoxic arsenic action. Analyses of promoter methylation status of the DNA mismatch repair genes HMLH1 and HMSH2 show that HMSH2, but not HMLH1, was epigenetically regulated by promoter hypermethylation changes following arsenic treatment. The results reported here demonstrate that arsenic exposure promptly induces genome-wide global DNA hypomethylation, and some specific gene promoter methylation changes, that persist for many cell generations following withdrawal of arsenite, supporting the hypothesis that the cells undergo epigenetic reprogramming at both the gene and genome level that is durable over many cell generations in the absence of further arsenic treatment. These DNA methylation changes, in concert with other known epigenome alterations, are likely contributing to long-lasting arsenic-induced genomic instability that manifests in several ways, including aberrant chromosomal effects. PMID:26581878

  12. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid loaded nano-insulin has greater potentials of combating arsenic induced hyperglycemia in mice: Some novel findings

    SciTech Connect

    Samadder, Asmita; Das, Jayeeta; Das, Sreemanti; De, Arnab; Saha, Santu Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Soumya Sundar; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2013-02-15

    Diabetes is a menacing problem, particularly to inhabitants of groundwater arsenic contaminated areas needing new medical approaches. This study examines if PLGA loaded nano-insulin (NIn), administered either intraperitoneally (i.p.) or through oral route, has a greater cost-effective anti-hyperglycemic potential than that of insulin in chronically arsenite-fed hyperglycemic mice. The particle size, morphology and zeta potential of nano-insulin were determined using dynamic light scattering method, scanning electronic and atomic force microscopies. The ability of the nano-insulin (NIn) to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) was also checked. Circular dichroic spectroscopic (CD) data of insulin and nano-insulin in presence or absence of arsenic were compared. Several diabetic markers in different groups of experimental and control mice were assessed. The mitochondrial functioning through indices like cytochrome c, pyruvate-kinase, glucokinase, ATP/ADP ratio, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell membrane potential and calcium-ion level was also evaluated. Expressions of the relevant marker proteins and mRNAs like insulin, GLUT2, GLUT4, IRS1, IRS2, UCP2, PI3, PPARγ, CYP1A1, Bcl2, caspase3 and p38 for tracking-down the signaling cascade were also analyzed. Results revealed that i.p.-injected nano-encapsulated-insulin showed better results; NIn, due to its smaller size, faster mobility, site-specific release, could cross BBB and showed positive modulation in mitochondrial signaling cascades and other downstream signaling molecules in reducing arsenic-induced-hyperglycemia. CD data indicated that nano-insulin had less distorted secondary structure as compared with that of insulin in presence of arsenic. Thus, overall analyses revealed that PLGA nano-insulin showed better efficacy in combating arsenite-induced-hyperglycemia than that of insulin and therefore, has greater potentials for use in nano-encapsulated form. - Highlights: ► PLGA encapsulated nano

  13. Identification of novel binding partners (annexins) for the cell death signal phosphatidylserine and definition of their recognition motif.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Sabrina; Kreft, Sandra; Etich, Julia; Frie, Christian; Stermann, Jacek; Grskovic, Ivan; Frey, Benjamin; Mielenz, Dirk; Pöschl, Ernst; Gaipl, Udo; Paulsson, Mats; Brachvogel, Bent

    2011-02-18

    Identification and clearance of apoptotic cells prevents the release of harmful cell contents thereby suppressing inflammation and autoimmune reactions. Highly conserved annexins may modulate the phagocytic cell removal by acting as bridging molecules to phosphatidylserine, a characteristic phagocytosis signal of dying cells. In this study five members of the structurally and functionally related annexin family were characterized for their capacity to interact with phosphatidylserine and dying cells. The results showed that AnxA3, AnxA4, AnxA13, and the already described interaction partner AnxA5 can bind to phosphatidylserine and apoptotic cells, whereas AnxA8 lacks this ability. Sequence alignment experiments located the essential amino residues for the recognition of surface exposed phosphatidylserine within the calcium binding motifs common to all annexins. These amino acid residues were missing in the evolutionary young AnxA8 and when they were reintroduced by site directed mutagenesis AnxA8 gains the capability to interact with phosphatidylserine containing liposomes and apoptotic cells. By defining the evolutionary conserved amino acid residues mediating phosphatidylserine binding of annexins we show that the recognition of dying cells represent a common feature of most annexins. Hence, the individual annexin repertoire bound to the cell surface of dying cells may fulfil opsonin-like function in cell death recognition.

  14. Effects of diacylglycerols and Ca2+ on structure of phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, E M; Lester, D S; Borchardt, D B; Zidovetzki, R

    1994-01-01

    The combined effects of the diacylglycerols (DAGs) with the various acyl chains and Ca2+ on the structure of phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine (4:1 mole/mole) bilayers were studied using 2H- and 31P NMR. The following DAG- and Ca(2+)-induced bilayer perturbations were identified. 1) Increased tendency to form nonbilayer lipid phases was induced by diolein or stearoylarachidonoylglycerol, and was synergistically enhanced by the addition of Ca2+. 2) "Transverse" bilayer perturbation was induced by dioctanoylglycerol. The addition of this DAG caused increased ordering of the phospholipid acyl side chains in the region adjacent to the headgroup, with the concomitant decrease of the order toward the bilayer interior. 3) Separation of the phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine bilayer components was induced by combinations of relatively high (1:5 mole/mole to phosphatidylserine) Ca2+ and 25 mol% (to the phospholipids) of diolein, stearoylarachidonoylglycerol, or oleoylacetylglycerol. 4) Lateral phase separation of the bilayers on the regions of different fluidities was induced by dipalmitin. These physicochemical effects were correlated with the effects of these DAGs and Ca2+ on the activity of protein kinase C. The increased tendency to form nonbilayer lipid phases and the transverse bilayer perturbations correlated with the increased protein kinase C activity, whereas the actual presence of the nonbilayer lipid phases, as well as the separation of the phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine components, was associated with the decrease in the protein kinase C activity. The lateral phase separation of the bilayer on gel-like and liquid crystalline regions did not have an effect on the activity of the enzyme. These results demonstrate the importance of the physicochemical properties of the membranes in the process of activation of protein kinase C. PMID:8161692

  15. The Interaction of Melittin with Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylcholine-Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylserine Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2016-08-13

    We report that membrane-active peptides (MAPs), which interact directly with the lipid bilayer of a cell and include toxins and host defense peptides, display lipid composition-dependent activity. Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids are anionic lipids that are found throughout the cellular membranes of most eukaryotic organisms where they serve as both a functional component and as a precursor to phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. The inner leaflet of the plasma membrane contains more PS than the outer one, and the asymmetry is actively maintained. Here, the impact of the MAP melittin on the structure of lipid bilayer vesicles made of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine was studied. Small-angle neutron scattering of the MAP associated with selectively deuterium-labeled lipid bilayer vesicles revealed how the thickness and lipid composition of phosphatidylserine-containing vesicles change in response to melittin. The peptide thickens the lipid bilayer for concentrations up to P/L = 1/500, but membrane thinning results when P/L = 1/200. The thickness transition is accompanied by a large change in the distribution of DMPS between the leaflets of the bilayer. The change in composition is driven by electrostatic interactions, while the change in bilayer thickness is driven by changes in the interaction of the peptide with the headgroup region of the lipid bilayer. Lastly, the results provide new information about lipid-specific interactions that take place in mixed composition lipid bilayer membranes.

  16. Photoaffinity labeling of the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with an aryl azide derivative of phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, M.P.; Wang, H.H. )

    1990-02-06

    A photoactivatable analogue of phosphatidylserine, {sup 125}I-labeled 4-azidosalicylic acid-phosphatidylserine ({sup 125}I ASA-PS), was used to label both native acetylcholine receptor (AchR)-rich membranes from Torpedo californica and AchR membranes affinity purified from Torpedo reconstituted into asolectin vesicles. The radioiodinated arylazido group attaches directly to the phospholipid head group and thus probes for regions of the AchR structure in contact with the negatively charged head group of phosphatidylserine. All four subunits of the AchR incorporated the label, with the {alpha} subunit incorporating approximately twice as much as each of the other subunits on a per mole basis. The regions of the AchR {alpha} subunit that incorporated {sup 125}I ASA-PS were mapped by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion. The majority of label incorporated into fragments representing a more complete digestion of the {alpha} subunit was localized to 11.7- and 10.1-kDa V8 cleavage fragments, both beginning at Asn-339 and of sufficient length to contain the hydrophobic region M4. An 18.7-kDa fragment beginning at Ser-173 and of sufficient length to contain the hydrophobic regions M1, M2, and M3 was also significantly labeled. In contrast, V8 cleavage fragments representing roughly a third of the amino-terminal portion of the {alpha} subunit incorporated little or no detectable amount of probe.

  17. Proteinase 3 Is a Phosphatidylserine-binding Protein That Affects the Production and Function of Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Martin, Katherine R; Kantari-Mimoun, Chahrazade; Yin, Min; Pederzoli-Ribeil, Magali; Angelot-Delettre, Fanny; Ceroi, Adam; Grauffel, Cédric; Benhamou, Marc; Reuter, Nathalie; Saas, Philippe; Frachet, Philippe; Boulanger, Chantal M; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-05-13

    Proteinase 3 (PR3), the autoantigen in granulomatosis with polyangiitis, is expressed at the plasma membrane of resting neutrophils, and this membrane expression increases during both activation and apoptosis. Using surface plasmon resonance and protein-lipid overlay assays, this study demonstrates that PR3 is a phosphatidylserine-binding protein and this interaction is dependent on the hydrophobic patch responsible for membrane anchorage. Molecular simulations suggest that PR3 interacts with phosphatidylserine via a small number of amino acids, which engage in long lasting interactions with the lipid heads. As phosphatidylserine is a major component of microvesicles (MVs), this study also examined the consequences of this interaction on MV production and function. PR3-expressing cells produced significantly fewer MVs during both activation and apoptosis, and this reduction was dependent on the ability of PR3 to associate with the membrane as mutating the hydrophobic patch restored MV production. Functionally, activation-evoked MVs from PR3-expressing cells induced a significantly larger respiratory burst in human neutrophils compared with control MVs. Conversely, MVs generated during apoptosis inhibited the basal respiratory burst in human neutrophils, and those generated from PR3-expressing cells hampered this inhibition. Given that membrane expression of PR3 is increased in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis, MVs generated from neutrophils expressing membrane PR3 may potentiate oxidative damage of endothelial cells and promote the systemic inflammation observed in this disease.

  18. BNIP-2 binds phosphatidylserine, localizes to vesicles, and is transported by kinesin-1.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Rie; Ishida-Kitagawa, Norihiro; Aoyama, Takane; Oka, Chio; Kawaichi, Masashi

    2015-02-01

    BNIP-2 shows high homology with the Cayman ataxia protein, caytaxin, which functions as a kinesin-1 adapter bridging cargos and kinesin light chains (KLCs). BNIP-2 is known to induce cell shape changes when over-expressed in culture cells, but its physiological functions are mostly unknown. BNIP-2 interacts with KLC through the conserved WED motif in the N-terminal region of BNIP-2. Interaction with KLC and transportation by kinesin-1 are essential for over-expressed BNIP-2 to elongate cells and induce cellular processes. Endogenous BNIP-2 localizes to the Golgi apparatus, early and recycling endosomes and mitochondria, aligned with microtubules, and moves at a speed compatible with kinesin-1 transportation. The CRAL-TRIO domain of BNIP-2 specifically interacts with phosphatidylserine, and the vesicular localization of BNIP-2 requires interaction with this phospholipid. BNIP-2 mutants which do not bind phosphatidylserine do not induce morphological changes in cells. These data show that similar to caytaxin, BNIP-2 is a kinesin-1 adapter involved in vesicular transportation in the cytoplasm and that association with cargos depends on interaction of the CRAL-TRIO domain with membrane phosphatidylserine.

  19. Phosphatidylserine-selective targeting and anticancer effects of SapC-DOPS nanovesicles on brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Víctor M; Chu, Zhengtao; Vallabhapurapu, Subrahmanya D; Sulaiman, Mahaboob K; Kendler, Ady; Rixe, Olivier; Warnick, Ronald E; Franco, Robert S; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2014-08-30

    Brain tumors, either primary (e.g., glioblastoma multiforme) or secondary (metastatic), remain among the most intractable and fatal of all cancers. We have shown that nanovesicles consisting of Saposin C (SapC) and dioleylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) are able to effectively target and kill cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. These actions are a consequence of the affinity of SapC-DOPS for phosphatidylserine, an acidic phospholipid abundantly present in the outer membrane of a variety of tumor cells and tumor-associated vasculature. In this study, we first characterize SapC-DOPS bioavailability and antitumor effects on human glioblastoma xenografts, and confirm SapC-DOPS specificity towards phosphatidylserine by showing that glioblastoma targeting is abrogated after in vivo exposure to lactadherin, which binds phosphatidylserine with high affinity. Second, we demonstrate that SapC-DOPS selectively targets brain metastases-forming cancer cells both in vitro, in co-cultures with human astrocytes, and in vivo, in mouse models of brain metastases derived from human breast or lung cancer cells. Third, we demonstrate that SapC-DOPS have cytotoxic activity against metastatic breast cancer cells in vitro, and prolong the survival of mice harboring brain metastases. Taken together, these results support the potential of SapC-DOPS for the diagnosis and therapy of primary and metastatic brain tumors.

  20. The Interaction of Melittin with Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylcholine-Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylserine Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2016-08-13

    We report that membrane-active peptides (MAPs), which interact directly with the lipid bilayer of a cell and include toxins and host defense peptides, display lipid composition-dependent activity. Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids are anionic lipids that are found throughout the cellular membranes of most eukaryotic organisms where they serve as both a functional component and as a precursor to phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. The inner leaflet of the plasma membrane contains more PS than the outer one, and the asymmetry is actively maintained. Here, the impact of the MAP melittin on the structure of lipid bilayer vesicles made of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine andmore » phosphatidylserine was studied. Small-angle neutron scattering of the MAP associated with selectively deuterium-labeled lipid bilayer vesicles revealed how the thickness and lipid composition of phosphatidylserine-containing vesicles change in response to melittin. The peptide thickens the lipid bilayer for concentrations up to P/L = 1/500, but membrane thinning results when P/L = 1/200. The thickness transition is accompanied by a large change in the distribution of DMPS between the leaflets of the bilayer. The change in composition is driven by electrostatic interactions, while the change in bilayer thickness is driven by changes in the interaction of the peptide with the headgroup region of the lipid bilayer. Lastly, the results provide new information about lipid-specific interactions that take place in mixed composition lipid bilayer membranes.« less

  1. Copper-induced peroxidation of phosphatidylserine-containing liposomes is inhibited by nanomolar concentrations of specific antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Gal, S; Lichtenberg, D; Bor, A; Pinchuk, I

    2007-12-01

    Copper-induced peroxidation of liposomal palmitoyllinoleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (PLPC) is inhibited by alpha-tocopherol at micromolar concentrations. In our previous study we found that when the liposomes contain phosphatidylserine (PS), nanomolar concentrations of Toc were sufficient to inhibit peroxidation. In an attempt to gain understanding of the origin of this extreme antioxidative potency, we tested the antioxidative potency of 36 additional antioxidants and the dependence of their potency on the presence of PS in the liposomes. The results of these studies reveal that only 11 of the tested antioxidants possess similar antioxidative potency to that of Toc. These include trolox, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), curcumin, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), diethylstilbestrol (DES), 2 of the 13 tested flavonoids (luteolin and 7,3',4'-trihydroxyflavone; T-414), alpha-naphthol, 1,5-, 1,6- and 1,7-dihydroxynaphthalenes (DHNs). Propyl gallate (PG), methyl syringate, rosmarinic acid, resveratrol, other flavonoids, as well as beta-naphthol, 1,2-, 1,3-, 1,4-, 2,3-, 2,6-, and 2,7-DHNs were either moderately antioxidative or pro-oxidative. For liposomes made of PLPC (250 microM) and PS (25 microM) the "lag" preceding copper-induced peroxidation (5 microM copper) was doubled upon addition of 30-130nM of the "super-active" antioxidants. We propose that the mechanism responsible for the extreme antioxidative potency against copper-induced peroxidation in PS-containing liposomes involves replenishment of the antioxidant in a ternary PS-copper-antioxidant complex. Based on structure-activity relationship of the 37 tested antioxidants, the "super-antioxidative potency" is attributed to the recycling of relatively stable semiquinone or semiquinone-like radicals.

  2. Molecular characterization of Oryza sativa arsenic-induced RING E3 ligase 1 (OsAIR1): Expression patterns, localization, functional interaction, and heterogeneous overexpression.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sun-Goo; Park, Hyeon Mi; Han, A-Reum; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2016-02-01

    High levels of arsenic (As) in plants are a serious threat to human health, and arsenic accumulation affects plant metabolism and ultimately photosynthesis, growth, and development. We attempted to isolate As-responsive Really Interesting New Gene (RING) E3 ubiquitin ligase genes from rice, and we have designated one such gene Oryza sativa arsenic-induced RING E3 ligase 1 (OsAIR1). OsAIR1 expression was induced under abiotic stress conditions, including drought, salt, heat, and As exposure. Results from an in vitro ubiquitination assay showed that OsAIR1 possesses E3 ligase activity. Within the cell, the expression of this gene was found to be localized to the vacuole. In a network-based analysis, we found significantly enriched gene ontology (GO) functions, which included ribonucleoprotein complexes such as ribosomes, suggesting that the function of OsAIR1 are related to translation. Differences in the proportion of seedlings with expanded cotyledons and root lengths, and the lack of differences in germination rates between OsAIR1-overexpressing lines and control plants under AsV stress, suggest that OsAIR1 may positively regulate post-germination plant growth under stress conditions.

  3. Methylation matters

    PubMed Central

    Costello, J.; Plass, C.

    2001-01-01

    DNA methylation is not just for basic scientists any more. There is a growing awareness in the medical field that having the correct pattern of genomic methylation is essential for healthy cells and organs. If methylation patterns are not properly established or maintained, disorders as diverse as mental retardation, immune deficiency, and sporadic or inherited cancers may follow. Through inappropriate silencing of growth regulating genes and simultaneous destabilisation of whole chromosomes, methylation defects help create a chaotic state from which cancer cells evolve. Methylation defects are present in cells before the onset of obvious malignancy and therefore cannot be explained simply as a consequence of a deregulated cancer cell. Researchers are now able to detect with exquisite sensitivity the cells harbouring methylation defects, sometimes months or years before the time when cancer is clinically detectable. Furthermore, aberrant methylation of specific genes has been directly linked with the tumour response to chemotherapy and patient survival. Advances in our ability to observe the methylation status of the entire cancer cell genome have led us to the unmistakable conclusion that methylation abnormalities are far more prevalent than expected. This methylomics approach permits the integration of an ever growing repertoire of methylation defects with the genetic alterations catalogued from tumours over the past two decades. Here we discuss the current knowledge of DNA methylation in normal cells and disease states, and how this relates directly to our current understanding of the mechanisms by which tumours arise.


Keywords: methylation; cancer PMID:11333864

  4. Differential Methylation of the Arsenic (III) Methyltransferase Promoter According to Arsenic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Matthew O.; Tang, Wan-yee; Shang, Yan; Pollak, Jonathan; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Guallar, Eliseo; Cole, Shelley A.; Fallin, M. Daniele; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is methylated in the body by arsenic (III) methyltransferase. Arsenic methylation is thought to play a role in arsenic-related epigenetic phenomena including aberrant DNA and histone methylation. However, it is unclear whether the promoter of the AS3MT gene, which codes for arsenic (III) methyltransferase, is differentially methylated as a function of arsenic exposure. In this study we evaluated AS3MT promoter methylation according to exposure, assessed by urinary arsenic excretion in a stratified random sample of 48 participants from the Strong Heart Study who had urine arsenic measured at baseline and DNA available from 1989–1991 and 1998–1999. For this study, all data are from the 1989–1991 visit. We measured AS3MT promoter methylation at its 48 CpG loci by bisulphite sequencing. We compared mean % methylation at each CpG locus by arsenic exposure group using linear regression adjusted for study centre, age and sex. A hypomethylated region in the AS3MT promoter was associated with higher arsenic exposure. In vitro, arsenic induced AS3MT promoter hypomethylation and it increased AS3MT expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These findings may suggest that arsenic exposure influences the epigenetic regulation of a major arsenic metabolism gene. PMID:24154821

  5. Identification of a novel phospholipase D with high transphosphatidylation activity and its application in synthesis of phosphatidylserine and DHA-phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangzhao; Liu, Qianqian; Qiu, Yongqian; Fan, Xiaoqin; Han, Qingqing; Liu, Yanjun; Zhang, Lujia; Xue, Changhu

    2017-03-25

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) and docosahexaenoic acid-phosphatidylserine (DHA-PS) have significant nutritional and biological functions, which are extensively used in functional food industries. Phospholipase D (PLD)-mediated transphosphatidylation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) or DHA-PC with l-serine, is an effective method for PS and DHA-PS preparation. However, because of the hydrolysis activity of PLD, PC and DHA-PC would be converted to the undesirable byproduct, phosphatidic acid (PA) and DHA-PA. In this study, a novel phospholipase D (PLDa2) was firstly cloned from Acinetobacter radioresistens a2 with high transphosphatidylation activity and no hydrolysis activity. In the PLD-catalyzed synthesis process (12h), both the transphosphatidylation conversion rate and selectivity of PS and DHA-PS were about 100%, which is the only PLD enzyme reported with this superiority up till now. In comparison with the majority of other known PLDs, PLDa2 exerted the highest activity at neutral pH, and it was stable from pH 4.0 to pH 9.0. In addition, PLDa2 had excellent thermal stability, with an optimum reaction temperature of 40°C and keeping more than 80% activity from 20°C to 60°C. The high catalytic selectivity mechanism of PLDa2 was explained by utilizing homology modeling, two-step docking, and binding energy and conformation analysis. PLDa2 ensured a stable supply of the biocatalyst with its most preponderant transphosphatidylation activity and PS selectivity, and had great potential in phospholipids industrial production.

  6. Protective Effects of Combined Selenium and Punica granatum Treatment on Some Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Markers in Arsenic-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shafik, Noha M; El Batsh, Maha M

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the major mechanisms implicated in inorganic arsenic poisoning. Punica granatum is known by its free radical scavenging properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of combined selenium and P. granatum against arsenic-induced liver injury. Seventy-five female albino rats were divided into five groups (of 15 rats each). Toxicity was induced by oral sodium arsenite (5.5 mg/kg body weight (bw) daily) (group ІІ). Treatment of arsenic-intoxicated rats was induced by daily oral administration of sodium selenite (3 mg/kg bw) (group ІІІ), 100 mg of P. granatum ethanol extract per kilogram body weight dissolved in 300 mL distilled water in three divided doses (100 mL of this suspension every 8 h) (group IV), and combined daily oral treatment with both selenite and P. granatum ethanol extract (group V). After 3 weeks, serum and liver tissues were obtained from the decapitated rats for different estimations. Hepatotoxicity was demonstrated by significant elevation in liver weights and activities of liver enzymes, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and decrease in serum total proteins and albumin (p < 0.05) which were confirmed by histopathological examination. Additionally, arsenic hepatotoxicity led to an increased values of malondialdehyde, advanced oxidation protein products, nitric oxide, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) (p < 0.05) and decreased activity of thioredoxin reductase, values of total anti-oxidant capacity, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) gene expression. Significant improvement in all assessed parameters was observed in rat group treated with both P. granatum and selenium. It was concluded that combined P. granatum and selenium treatment had a synergistic hepatoprotective effect against arsenic toxicity through activation of Nrf2 anti-oxidant pathway.

  7. Contributions of phosphatidylserine-positive platelets and leukocytes and microparticles to hypercoagulable state in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunfa; Ma, Ruishuang; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Muhua; Zhao, Liangliang; Bi, Yayan; Kou, Junjie; Shi, Jialan; Zou, Xiaoming

    2016-06-01

    Hypercoagulability in gastric cancer is a common complication and a major contributor to poor prognosis. This study aimed to determine procoagulant activity of blood cells and microparticles (MPs) in gastric cancer patients. Phosphatidylserine-positive blood cells and MPs, and their procoagulant properties in particular, were assessed in 48 gastric cancer patients and 35 healthy controls. Phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs in patients with tumor-node-metastasis stage III/IV gastric cancer were significantly higher than those in stage I/II patients or healthy controls. Moreover, procoagulant activity of platelets, leukocytes, and MPs in stage III/IV patients was significantly increased compared to the controls, as indicated by shorter clotting time, higher intrinsic and extrinsic factor tenase, and prothrombinase complex activity. Interestingly, lactadherin, which competes with factors V and VIII to bind phosphatidylserine, dramatically prolonged clotting time of the cells and MPs by inhibiting factor tenase and prothrombinase complex activity. Although anti-tissue factor antibody significantly attenuated extrinsic tenase complex activity of leukocytes and MPs, it only slightly prolonged clotting times. Meanwhile, treatment with radical resection reduced phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs, and prolonged the clotting times of the remaining cells and MPs. Our results suggest that phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs contribute to hypercoagulability and represent a potential therapeutic target to prevent coagulation in patients with stage III/IV gastric cancer.

  8. Splenic gene delivery system using self-assembling nano-complex with phosphatidylserine analog.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Nakasone, Chihiro; Kodama, Yukinobu; Egashira, Kanoko; Harasawa, Hitomi; Muro, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Hiroo; Kitahara, Takashi; Higuchi, Norihide; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Sasaki, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of phosphatidylserine on the erythrocyte membrane mediates erythrophagocytosis by resident spleen macrophages. The application of phosphatidylserine to a gene vector may be a novel approach for splenic drug delivery. Therefore, we chose 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serin (DOPS) as an analogue of phosphatidylserine for splenic gene delivery of plasmid DNA (pDNA). In the present study, we successfully prepared a stable pDNA ternary complex using DOPS and polyethyleneimine (PEI) and evaluated its efficacy and safety. The pDNA/PEI complex had a positive charge and showed high transgene efficacy, although it caused cytotoxicity and agglutination. The addition of DOPS changed the ζ-potential of the pDNA/PEI complex to negative. It is known that anionic complexes are not taken up well by cells. Surprisingly, however, the pDNA/PEI/DOPS complex showed relatively high transgene efficacy in vitro. Fluorescence microscope observation revealed that the pDNA/PEI/DOPS complex internalized the cells while maintaining the complex formation. The injection of the pDNA/PEI complex killed most mice within 24 h at high doses, although all mice in the pDNA/PEI/DOPS complex group survived. The ternary complex with DOPS showed markedly better safety compared with the pDNA/PEI complex. The pDNA/PEI/DOPS complex showed high gene expression selectively in the spleen after intravenous injection into mice. Thus the ternary complex with DOPS can be used to deliver pDNA to the spleen, in which immune cells are abundant. It appears to have an excellent safety level, although further study to determine the mechanism of action is necessary.

  9. Selective peroxidation and externalization of phosphatidylserine in normal human epidermal keratinocytes during oxidative stress induced by cumene hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Shvedova, Anna A; Tyurina, Julia Y; Kawai, Kazuaki; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Kommineni, Choudari; Castranova, Vincent; Fabisiak, James P; Kagan, Valerian E

    2002-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species not only modulate important signal transduction pathways, but also induce DNA damage and cytotoxicity in keratinocytes. Hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides are particularly important as these chemicals are widely used in dermally applied cosmetics and pharmaceuticals, and also represent endogenous metabolic intermediates. Lipid peroxidation is of fundamental interest in the cellular response to peroxides, as lipids are extremely sensitive to oxidation and lipid-based signaling systems have been implicated in a number of cellular processes, including apoptosis. Oxidation of specific phospholipid classes was measured in normal human epidermal keratinocytes exposed to cumene hydroperoxide after metabolic incorporation of the fluorescent oxidation-sensitive fatty acid, cis-parinaric acid, using a fluorescence high-performance liquid chromatography assay. In addition, lipid oxidation was correlated with changes in membrane phospholipid asymmetry and other markers of apoptosis. Although cumene hydroperoxide produced significant oxidation of cis-parinaric acid in all phospholipid classes, one phospholipid, phosphatidylserine, appeared to be preferentially oxidized above all other species. Using fluorescamine derivatization and annexin V binding it was observed that specific oxidation of phosphatidylserine was accompanied by phosphatidylserine translocation from the inner to the outer plasma membrane surface where it may serve as a recognition signal for interaction with phagocytic macrophages. These effects occurred much earlier than any detectable changes in other apoptotic markers such as caspase-3 activation, DNA fragmentation, or changes in nuclear morphology. Thus, normal human epidermal keratinocytes undergo profound lipid oxidation with preference for phosphatidylserine followed by phosphatidylserine externalization upon exposure to cumene hydroperoxide. It is therefore likely that normal human epidermal keratinocytes exposed to similar

  10. In Vitro Induction of Erythrocyte Phosphatidylserine Translocation by the Natural Naphthoquinone Shikonin

    PubMed Central

    Lupescu, Adrian; Bissinger, Rosi; Jilani, Kashif; Lang, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Shikonin, the most important component of Lithospermum erythrorhizon, has previously been shown to exert antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic, antiviral, antimicrobial and anticancer effects. The anticancer effect has been attributed to the stimulation of suicidal cell death or apoptosis. Similar to the apoptosis of nucleated cells, erythrocytes may experience eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by cell shrinkage and by phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include the increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i) and ceramide formation. The present study explored whether Shikonin stimulates eryptosis. To this end, Fluo 3 fluorescence was measured to quantify [Ca2+]i, forward scatter to estimate cell volume, annexin V binding to identify phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocytes, hemoglobin release to determine hemolysis and antibodies to quantify ceramide abundance. As a result, a 48 h exposure of human erythrocytes to Shikonin (1 µM) significantly increased [Ca2+]i, increased ceramide abundance, decreased forward scatter and increased annexin V binding. The effect of Shikonin (1 µM) on annexin V binding was significantly blunted, but not abolished by the removal of extracellular Ca2+. In conclusion, Shikonin stimulates suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, an effect at least partially due to the stimulation of Ca2+ entry and ceramide formation. PMID:24828755

  11. Endocytic sorting and recycling require membrane phosphatidylserine asymmetry maintained by TAT-1/CHAT-1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baohui; Jiang, Yue; Zeng, Sheng; Yan, Jiacong; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yan; Zou, Wei; Wang, Xiaochen

    2010-12-09

    Endocytic sorting is achieved through the formation of morphologically and functionally distinct sub-domains within early endosomes. Cargoes destined for recycling are sorted to and transported through newly-formed tubular membranes, but the processes that regulate membrane tubulation are poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel Caenorhabditis elegans Cdc50 family protein, CHAT-1, which acts as the chaperone of the TAT-1 P4-ATPase to regulate membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) asymmetry and endocytic transport. In chat-1 and tat-1 mutants, the endocytic sorting process is disrupted, leading to defects in both cargo recycling and degradation. TAT-1 and CHAT-1 colocalize to the tubular domain of the early endosome, the tubular endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), and the recycling endosome where PS is enriched on the cytosolic surface. Loss of tat-1 and chat-1 function disrupts membrane PS asymmetry and abrogates the tubular membrane structure. Our data suggest that CHAT-1 and TAT-1 maintain membrane phosphatidylserine asymmetry, thus promoting membrane tubulation and regulating endocytic sorting and recycling.

  12. Endocytic Sorting and Recycling Require Membrane Phosphatidylserine Asymmetry Maintained by TAT-1/CHAT-1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baohui; Jiang, Yue; Zeng, Sheng; Yan, Jiacong; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yan; Zou, Wei; Wang, Xiaochen

    2010-01-01

    Endocytic sorting is achieved through the formation of morphologically and functionally distinct sub-domains within early endosomes. Cargoes destined for recycling are sorted to and transported through newly-formed tubular membranes, but the processes that regulate membrane tubulation are poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel Caenorhabditis elegans Cdc50 family protein, CHAT-1, which acts as the chaperone of the TAT-1 P4-ATPase to regulate membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) asymmetry and endocytic transport. In chat-1 and tat-1 mutants, the endocytic sorting process is disrupted, leading to defects in both cargo recycling and degradation. TAT-1 and CHAT-1 colocalize to the tubular domain of the early endosome, the tubular endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), and the recycling endosome where PS is enriched on the cytosolic surface. Loss of tat-1 and chat-1 function disrupts membrane PS asymmetry and abrogates the tubular membrane structure. Our data suggest that CHAT-1 and TAT-1 maintain membrane phosphatidylserine asymmetry, thus promoting membrane tubulation and regulating endocytic sorting and recycling. PMID:21170358

  13. Phosphatidylserine Synthase Controls Cell Elongation Especially in the Uppermost Internode in Rice by Regulation of Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Shen, Jinbo; Zhang, Baocai; Ren, Yulong; Ding, Yu; Zhou, Yihua; Zhang, Huan; Zhou, Kunneng; Wang, Jiu-Lin; Lei, Cailin; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Gao, He; Bao, Yiqun; Wan, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    The uppermost internode is one of the fastest elongating organs in rice, and is expected to require an adequate supply of cell-wall materials and enzymes to the cell surface to enhance mechanical strength. Although it has been reported that the phenotype of shortened uppermost internode 1 (sui1) is caused by mutations in PHOSPHATIDYLSERINE SYNTHASE (OsPSS), the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that the OsPSS-1, as a gene expressed predominantly in elongating cells, regulates post-Golgi vesicle secretion to intercellular spaces. Mutation of OsPSS-1 leads to compromised delivery of CESA4 and secGFP towards the cell surface, resulting in weakened intercellular adhesion and disorganized cell arrangement in parenchyma. The phenotype of sui1-4 is caused largely by the reduction in cellulose contents in the whole plant and detrimental delivery of pectins in the uppermost internode. We found that OsPSS-1 and its potential product PS (phosphatidylserine) localized to organelles associated with exocytosis. These results together suggest that OsPSS-1 plays a potential role in mediating cell expansion by regulating secretion of cell wall components. PMID:27055010

  14. Effect of steroidal saponins-loaded nano-bioglass/phosphatidylserine/collagen bone substitute on bone healing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunrong; Wu, Huazhong; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-11-10

    The objective of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of nano-bioglass/phosphatidylserine/collagen (nBG/PS/COL) scaffolds loaded with steroidal saponins as an inducer factor for skeletal defects. The drugs-encapsulated bone substitute was prepared by loading steroidal saponins-collagen microsphere suspension in nano-bioglass and phosphatidylserine (PS) composite. The scaffolds possess an interconnected porous structure with a porosity of about 82.3%. The pore size ranges from several micrometers up to about 400 μm. The drug release assays showed the long-term sustained release of steroidal saponins from the scaffolds with effective and safe bioactivity. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies showed that the involvement of steroidal saponins contributed to the secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) in MC3T3-E1 cells, which may be the possible factor that greatly enhanced bone healing. The results suggest that the bone substitute is an effective implantable drug-delivery system for use in bone repair.

  15. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Monticelli, Luca; Heberle, Frederick A; Kucerka, Norbert; Tieleman, D. Peter; Katsaras, John

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  16. The Ebola virus matrix protein VP40 selectively induces vesiculation from phosphatidylserine-enriched membranes.

    PubMed

    Soni, Smita P; Stahelin, Robert V

    2014-11-28

    Ebola virus is from the Filoviridae family of viruses and is one of the most virulent pathogens known with ∼ 60% clinical fatality. The Ebola virus negative sense RNA genome encodes seven proteins including viral matrix protein 40 (VP40), which is the most abundant protein found in the virions. Within infected cells VP40 localizes at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane (PM), binds lipids, and regulates formation of new virus particles. Expression of VP40 in mammalian cells is sufficient to form virus-like particles that are nearly indistinguishable from the authentic virions. However, how VP40 interacts with the PM and forms virus-like particles is for the most part unknown. To investigate VP40 lipid specificity in a model of viral egress we employed giant unilamellar vesicles with different lipid compositions. The results demonstrate VP40 selectively induces vesiculation from membranes containing phosphatidylserine (PS) at concentrations of PS that are representative of the PM inner leaflet content. The formation of intraluminal vesicles was not significantly detected in the presence of other important PM lipids including cholesterol and polyvalent phosphoinositides, further demonstrating PS selectivity. Taken together, these studies suggest that PM phosphatidylserine may be an important component of Ebola virus budding and that VP40 may be able to mediate PM scission.

  17. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in phosphatidylserine synthase-deficient (chol) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Letts, V.A.; Henry, S.A.

    1985-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants, chol, are deficient in the synthesis of the phospholipid phosphatidylserine owing to lowered activity of the membrane-associated enzyme phosphatidylserine synthase. These mutants are auxotrophic for ethanolamine or choline and, in the absence of these supplements, cannot synthesize phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylcholine (PC). The authors exploited these characteristics of the chol mutants to examine the regulation of phospholipid metabolism in S. cerevisiae. Macromolecular synthesis and phospholipid metabolism were examined in chol cells starved for ethanolamine. Coupled to the decline in PC biosynthesis was a simultaneous decrease in the overall rate of phospholipid synthesis. In particular, the rate of synthesis of phosphatidylinositol decreased in parallel with the decline in PC biosynthesis. However, under conditions of ethanolamine deprivation in chol cells, the cytoplasmic enzyme inositol-1-phosphate synthase could not be repressed by exogenous inositol, and the endogenous synthesis of the phospholipid precursor inositol appeared to be elevated. The implications of these findings with respect to the coordinated regulation of phospholipid synthesis are discussed.

  18. Characterization of Plasmodium phosphatidylserine decarboxylase expressed in yeast and application for inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Yeon; Kumar, Vidya; Pachikara, Niseema; Garg, Aprajita; Lawres, Lauren; Toh, Justin Y; Voelker, Dennis R; Ben Mamoun, Choukri

    2016-03-01

    Phospholipid biosynthesis is critical for the development, differentiation and pathogenesis of several eukaryotic pathogens. Genetic studies have validated the pathway for phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis from phosphatidylserine catalyzed by phosphatidylserine decarboxylase enzymes (PSD) as a suitable target for development of antimicrobials; however no inhibitors of this class of enzymes have been discovered. We show that the Plasmodium falciparum PSD can restore the essential function of the yeast gene in strains requiring PSD for growth. Genetic, biochemical and metabolic analyses demonstrate that amino acids between positions 40 and 70 of the parasite enzyme are critical for proenzyme processing and decarboxylase activity. We used the essential role of Plasmodium PSD in yeast as a tool for screening a library of anti-malarials. One of these compounds is 7-chloro-N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-4-quinolinamine, an inhibitor with potent activity against P. falciparum, and low toxicity toward mammalian cells. We synthesized an analog of this compound and showed that it inhibits PfPSD activity and eliminates Plasmodium yoelii infection in mice. These results highlight the importance of 4-quinolinamines as a novel class of drugs targeting membrane biogenesis via inhibition of PSD activity.

  19. Complementary probes reveal that phosphatidylserine is required for the proper transbilayer distribution of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Masashi; Fairn, Gregory D

    2015-04-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component of metazoan cellular membranes and it helps to maintain the structural integrity and fluidity of the plasma membrane. Here, we developed a cholesterol biosensor, termed D4H, based on the fourth domain of Clostridium perfringens theta-toxin, which recognizes cholesterol in the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane and organelles. The D4H probe disassociates from the plasma membrane upon cholesterol extraction and after perturbations in cellular cholesterol trafficking. When used in combination with a recombinant version of the biosensor, we show that plasmalemmal phosphatidylserine is essential for retaining cholesterol in the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane. In vitro experiments reveal that 1-stearoy-2-oleoyl phosphatidylserine can induce phase separation in cholesterol-containing lipid bilayers and shield cholesterol from cholesterol oxidase. Finally, the altered transbilayer distribution of cholesterol causes flotillin-1 to relocalize to endocytic organelles. This probe should be useful in the future to study pools of cholesterol in the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane and organelles.

  20. Phosphatidylserine Ameliorates Neurodegenerative Symptoms and Enhances Axonal Transport in a Mouse Model of Familial Dysautonomia

    PubMed Central

    Naftelberg, Shiran; Abramovitch, Ziv; Gluska, Shani; Yannai, Sivan; Joshi, Yuvraj; Donyo, Maya; Ben-Yaakov, Keren; Gradus, Tal; Zonszain, Jonathan; Farhy, Chen; Ashery-Padan, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Familial Dysautonomia (FD) is a neurodegenerative disease in which aberrant tissue-specific splicing of IKBKAP exon 20 leads to reduction of IKAP protein levels in neuronal tissues. Here we generated a conditional knockout (CKO) mouse in which exon 20 of IKBKAP is deleted in the nervous system. The CKO FD mice exhibit developmental delays, sensory abnormalities, and less organized dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) with attenuated axons compared to wild-type mice. Furthermore, the CKO FD DRGs show elevated HDAC6 levels, reduced acetylated α-tubulin, unstable microtubules, and impairment of axonal retrograde transport of nerve growth factor (NGF). These abnormalities in DRG properties underlie neuronal degeneration and FD symptoms. Phosphatidylserine treatment decreased HDAC6 levels and thus increased acetylation of α-tubulin. Further PS treatment resulted in recovery of axonal outgrowth and enhanced retrograde axonal transport by decreasing histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) levels and thus increasing acetylation of α-tubulin levels. Thus, we have identified the molecular pathway that leads to neurodegeneration in FD and have demonstrated that phosphatidylserine treatment has the potential to slow progression of neurodegeneration. PMID:27997532

  1. Human rhinovirus-induced inflammatory responses are inhibited by phosphatidylserine containing liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, C A; Kaur, R; Edwards, M R; Mondhe, M; Robinson, D; Prestwich, E C; Hume, R D; Marshall, C A; Perrie, Y; O'Donnell, V B; Harwood, J L; Sabroe, I; Parker, L C

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections are major contributors to the healthcare burden associated with acute exacerbations of chronic airway disease, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Cellular responses to HRV are mediated through pattern recognition receptors that may in part signal from membrane microdomains. We previously found Toll-like receptor signaling is reduced, by targeting membrane microdomains with a specific liposomal phosphatidylserine species, 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (SAPS). Here we explored the ability of this approach to target a clinically important pathogen. We determined the biochemical and biophysical properties and stability of SAPS liposomes and studied their ability to modulate rhinovirus-induced inflammation, measured by cytokine production, and rhinovirus replication in both immortalized and normal primary bronchial epithelial cells. SAPS liposomes rapidly partitioned throughout the plasma membrane and internal cellular membranes of epithelial cells. Uptake of liposomes did not cause cell death, but was associated with markedly reduced inflammatory responses to rhinovirus, at the expense of only modest non-significant increases in viral replication, and without impairment of interferon receptor signaling. Thus using liposomes of phosphatidylserine to target membrane microdomains is a feasible mechanism for modulating rhinovirus-induced signaling, and potentially a prototypic new therapy for viral-mediated inflammation. PMID:26906404

  2. Characterization of Plasmodium phosphatidylserine decarboxylase expressed in yeast and application for inhibitor screening

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Yeon; Lawres, Lauren; Toh, Justin Y.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Ben Mamoun, Choukri

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phospholipid biosynthesis is critical for the development, differentiation and pathogenesis of several eukaryotic pathogens. Genetic studies have validated the pathway for phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis from phosphatidylserine catalyzed by phosphatidylserine decarboxylase enzymes (PSD) as a suitable target for development of antimicrobials; however no inhibitors of this class of enzymes have been discovered. We show that the Plasmodium falciparum PSD can restore the essential function of the yeast gene in strains requiring PSD for growth. Genetic, biochemical and metabolic analyses demonstrate that amino acids between positions 40 and 70 of the parasite enzyme are critical for proenzyme processing and decarboxylase activity. We used the essential role of Plasmodium PSD in yeast as a tool for screening a library of anti-malarials. One of these compounds is 7-chloro-N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-4-quinolinamine, an inhibitor with potent activity against P. falciparum, and low toxicity toward mammalian cells. We synthesized an analog of this compound and showed that it inhibits PfPSD activity and eliminates Plasmodium yoelii infection in mice. These results highlight the importance of 4-quinolinamines as a novel class of drugs targeting membrane biogenesis via inhibition of PSD activity PMID:26585333

  3. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in phosphatidylserine synthase-deficient (chol) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Letts, V A; Henry, S A

    1985-01-01

    chol mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are deficient in the synthesis of the phospholipid phosphatidylserine owing to lowered activity of the membrane-associated enzyme phosphatidylserine synthase. chol mutants are auxotrophic for ethanolamine or choline and, in the absence of these supplements, cannot synthesize phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylcholine (PC). We exploited these characteristics of the chol mutants to examine the regulation of phospholipid metabolism in S. cerevisiae. Macromolecular synthesis and phospholipid metabolism were examined in chol cells starved for ethanolamine. As expected, when chol mutants were starved for ethanolamine, the rates of synthesis of the phospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine and PC declined rapidly. Surprisingly, however, coupled to the decline in PC biosynthesis was a simultaneous decrease in the overall rate of phospholipid synthesis. In particular, the rate of synthesis of phosphatidylinositol decreased in parallel with the decline in PC biosynthesis. The results obtained suggest that the slowing of PC biosynthesis in ethanolamine-starved chol cells leads to a coordinated decrease in the synthesis of all phospholipids. However, under conditions of ethanolamine deprivation in chol cells, the cytoplasmic enzyme inositol-1-phosphate synthase could not be repressed by exogenous inositol, and the endogenous synthesis of the phospholipid precursor inositol appeared to be elevated. The implications of these findings with respect to the coordinated regulation of phospholipid synthesis are discussed. Images PMID:2991194

  4. The cholesterol content of the erythrocyte membrane is an important determinant of phosphatidylserine exposure.

    PubMed

    van Zwieten, Rob; Bochem, Andrea E; Hilarius, Petra M; van Bruggen, Robin; Bergkamp, Ferry; Hovingh, G Kees; Verhoeven, Arthur J

    2012-12-01

    Maintenance of the asymmetric distribution of phospholipids across the plasma membrane is a prerequisite for the survival of erythrocytes. Various stimuli have been shown to induce scrambling of phospholipids and thereby exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS). In two types of patients, both with aberrant plasma cholesterol levels, we observed an aberrant PS exposure in erythrocytes upon stimulation. We investigated the effect of high and low levels of cholesterol on the ATP-dependent flippase, which maintains phospholipid asymmetry, and the ATP-independent scrambling activity, which breaks down phospholipid asymmetry. We analyzed erythrocytes of a patient with spur cell anemia, characterized by elevated plasma cholesterol, and the erythrocytes of Tangier disease patients with very low levels of plasma cholesterol. In normal erythrocytes, loaded with cholesterol or depleted of cholesterol in vitro, the same analyses were performed. Changes in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio of erythrocytes had marked effects on PS exposure upon cell activation. Excess cholesterol profoundly inhibited PS exposure, whereas cholesterol depletion led to increased PS exposure. The activity of the ATP-dependent flippase was not changed, suggesting a major influence of cholesterol on the outward translocation of PS. The effects of cholesterol were not accompanied by eminent changes in cytoskeletal and membrane proteins. These findings emphasize the importance of cholesterol exchange between circulating plasma and the erythrocyte membrane as determinant for phosphatidylserine exposure in erythrocytes.

  5. Human rhinovirus-induced inflammatory responses are inhibited by phosphatidylserine containing liposomes.

    PubMed

    Stokes, C A; Kaur, R; Edwards, M R; Mondhe, M; Robinson, D; Prestwich, E C; Hume, R D; Marshall, C A; Perrie, Y; O'Donnell, V B; Harwood, J L; Sabroe, I; Parker, L C

    2016-09-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections are major contributors to the healthcare burden associated with acute exacerbations of chronic airway disease, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Cellular responses to HRV are mediated through pattern recognition receptors that may in part signal from membrane microdomains. We previously found Toll-like receptor signaling is reduced, by targeting membrane microdomains with a specific liposomal phosphatidylserine species, 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (SAPS). Here we explored the ability of this approach to target a clinically important pathogen. We determined the biochemical and biophysical properties and stability of SAPS liposomes and studied their ability to modulate rhinovirus-induced inflammation, measured by cytokine production, and rhinovirus replication in both immortalized and normal primary bronchial epithelial cells. SAPS liposomes rapidly partitioned throughout the plasma membrane and internal cellular membranes of epithelial cells. Uptake of liposomes did not cause cell death, but was associated with markedly reduced inflammatory responses to rhinovirus, at the expense of only modest non-significant increases in viral replication, and without impairment of interferon receptor signaling. Thus using liposomes of phosphatidylserine to target membrane microdomains is a feasible mechanism for modulating rhinovirus-induced signaling, and potentially a prototypic new therapy for viral-mediated inflammation.

  6. CG methylation.

    PubMed

    Vinson, Charles; Chatterjee, Raghunath

    2012-12-01

    A striking feature of mammalian genomes is the paucity of the CG dinucleotide. There are approximately 20,000 regions termed CpG islands where CGs cluster. This represents 5% of all CGs and 1% of the genome. CpG islands are typically unmethylated and are often promoters for housekeeping genes. The remaining 95% of CG dinucleotides are disposed throughout 99% of the genome and are typically methylated and found in half of all promoters. CG methylation facilitates binding of the C/EBP family of transcription factors, proteins critical for differentiation of many tissues. This allows these proteins to localize in the methylated CG poor regions of the genome where they may produce advantageous changes in gene expression at nearby or more distant regions of the genome. In this review, our growing understanding of the consequences of CG methylation will be surveyed.

  7. Methyl methacrylate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW of METHYL METHACRYLATE ( CAS No . 80 - 62 - 6 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) January 1998 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC TABLE OF CONTENTS DISCLAIMER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  8. Ameliorative effects of Syzygium jambolanum extract and its poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid nano-encapsulated form on arsenic-induced hyperglycemic stress: a multi-parametric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Samadder, Asmita; Das, Sreemanti; Das, Jayeeta; Paul, Avijit; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2012-12-01

    In South East Asia, groundwater arsenic contamination has become a great menace. Chronic arsenic intoxication leads to a hyperglycemic condition in animals and man. Because of undesirable side-effects and affordability, orthodox medicine, like insulin, is not preferred by many who like natural products instead. Unfortunately, such natural products mostly lack scientific validation. Therefore, we became interested in assessing the efficacy of the ethanolic seed extract of Syzygium jambolanum (SJ), traditionally used against diabetic conditions. We also formulated poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA)-encapsulated nano-SJ (NSJ) and tested whether the ameliorative potentials of SJ could be enhanced by nano-encapsulation. In this study, we conducted both in vitro (in L6 cells) and in vivo (in mice) experiments to assess the relative efficacy of SJ and NSJ. We characterized the physico-chemical features of NSJ by atomic force microscopy and critically analyzed several bio-markers and signal proteins associated with arsenic-induced stress and hyperglycemia. We also determined the relative ameliorative potentials of SJ and NSJ by using standard protocols. NSJ could cross the blood brain barrier in mice. Overall results suggested that NSJ had a greater potential than that of SJ, indicating the possibility of using NSJ in the future drug design and management of arsenic-induced hyperglycemia and stress.

  9. Association of oxidative stress with arsenic methylation in chronic arsenic-exposed children and adults

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yuanyuan; Wang Yi; Zheng Quanmei; Li Xin; Li Bing; Jin Yaping; Sun Xiance; Sun Guifan

    2008-10-01

    Though oxidative stress is recognized as an important pathogenic mechanism of arsenic, and arsenic methylation capacity is suggested to be highly involved in arsenic-related diseases, the association of arsenic methylation capacity with arsenic-induced oxidative stress remains unclear. To explore oxidative stress and its association with arsenic methylation, cross-sectional studies were conducted among 208 high and 59 low arsenic-exposed subjects. Levels of urinary arsenic species [inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylated arsenic (MMA) and dimethylated arsenic (DMA)] were determined by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Proportions of urinary arsenic species, the first methylation ratio (FMR) and the secondary methylation ratio (SMR) were used as indicators for arsenic methylation capacity. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentrations were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in whole blood were determined to reflect anti-oxidative status. The high arsenic-exposed children and adults were significantly increased in urinary 8-OHdG concentrations but decreased in blood GSH levels compared with the low exposed children and adults. In multiple linear regression models, blood GSH levels and urinary 8-OHdG concentrations of arsenic-exposed children and adults showed strong associations with the levels of urinary arsenic species. Arsenic-exposed subjects in the lower and the upper quartiles of proportions of urinary arsenic species, FMR or SMR were significantly different in urinary 8-OHdG, blood GSH and SOD. The associations of arsenic methylation capacity with 8-OHdG, GSH and SOD were also observed in multivariate regression analyses. These results may provide linkage between arsenic methylation capacity and oxidative stress in humans and suggest that adverse health effects induced by arsenic are related to arsenic methylation through oxidative stress.

  10. Thymosin α1 Interacts with Exposed Phosphatidylserine in Membrane Models and in Cells and Uses Serum Albumin as a Carrier.

    PubMed

    Mandaliti, Walter; Nepravishta, Ridvan; Sinibaldi Vallebona, Paola; Pica, Francesca; Garaci, Enrico; Paci, Maurizio

    2016-03-15

    Thymosin α1 is a peptidic hormone with pleiotropic activity and is used in the therapy of several diseases. It is unstructured in water solution and interacts with negative regions of vesicles by assuming two tracts of helical conformation with a structural break between them. This study reports on Thymosin α1's interaction with mixed phospholipids phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine, the negative component of the membranes, by ¹H and natural abundance ¹⁵N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The results indicate that interaction occurs when the membrane is negatively charged by exposing phosphatidylserine. Moreover, the direct interaction of Thymosin α1 with K562 cells with an overexposure of phosphatidylserine as a consequence of resveratrol-induced apoptosis was conducted. Thymosin α1's interaction with human serum albumin was also investigated by NMR spectroscopy. Steady-state saturation transfer, transfer nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, and diffusion-ordered spectroscopy methodologies all reveal that the C-terminal region of Thymosin α1 is involved in the interaction with serum albumin. These results may shed more light on Thymosin α1's mechanism of action by its insertion in negative regions of membranes due to the exposure of phosphatidylserine. Once Thymosin α1's N-terminus has been inserted into the membrane, the rest may interact with nearby proteins and/or receptors acting as effectors and causing a biological signaling cascade, thus exerting thymosin α1's pleiotropy.

  11. Ribavirin-induced externalization of phosphatidylserine in erythrocytes is predominantly caused by inhibition of aminophospholipid translocase activity.

    PubMed

    Kleinegris, Marie-Claire; Koek, Ger H; Mast, Kelly; Mestrom, Eveline H C; Wolfs, Jef L N; Bevers, Edouard M

    2012-10-15

    Ribavirin in combination with interferon-α is the standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C, but often induces severe anemia forcing discontinuation of the therapy. Whereas suppression of bone marrow by interferon may impact on the production of erythrocytes, it has been suggested that accumulation of ribavirin in erythrocytes induces alterations causing an early removal of these cells by the mononuclear phagocytic system. Externalization of phosphatidylserine, which is exclusively present in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane, is a recognition signal for phagocytosis in particular of apoptotic cells. Here, we demonstrate that surface exposure of phosphatidylserine upon prolonged treatment of erythrocytes with ribavirin results mainly from inactivation of the aminophospholipid translocase, an ATP-dependent lipid pump, which specifically transports phosphatidylserine from the outer to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Inactivation is due to severe ATP depletion, although competitive inhibition by ribavirin or its phosphorylated derivatives cannot be excluded. Phospholipid scramblase, responsible for collapse of lipid asymmetry, appears to be of minor importance as erythrocytes of patients with the Scott syndrome, lacking Ca(2+)-induced lipid scrambling, are equally sensitive to ribavirin treatment. Neither the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine nor the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPH did affect ribavirin-induced phosphatidylserine exposure, suggesting that oxidative stress or apoptotic-related mechanisms are not involved in this process. In conclusion, we propose that spontaneous loss of lipid asymmetry, not corrected by aminophospholipid translocase activity, is the mechanism for ribavirin-induced phosphatidylserine exposure that may contribute to ribavirin-induced anemia.

  12. Respiratory Deficiency Mediates the Regulation of CHO1-encoded Phosphatidylserine Synthase by mRNA Stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    The CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase (CDP-diacylglycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase, EC 2.7.8.8) is one of the most highly regulated phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. CHO1 expression is regulated by nutrient availability through a regulatory circuit involving a UASINO cis-acting element in the CHO1 promoter, the positive transcription factors Ino2p and Ino4p, and the transcriptional repressor Opi1p. In this work, we examined the posttranscriptional regulation of CHO1 by mRNA stability. CHO1 mRNA was stabilized in mutants defective in deadenylation (ccr4Δ), mRNA decapping (dcp1), and the 5’-3’ exonuclease (xrn1) indicating that the CHO1 transcript is primarily degraded through the general 5’-3’ mRNA decay pathway. In respiratory sufficient cells, the CHO1 transcript was moderately stable with a half-life of 12 min. However, the CHO1 transcript was stabilized to a half-life of greater than 45 min in respiratory deficient (rho− and rho°) cells, the cox4Δ mutant defective in the cytochrome c oxidase, and wild type cells treated with KCN (a cytochorome c oxidase inhibitor). The increased CHO1 mRNA stability in response to respiratory deficiency caused increases in CHO1 mRNA abundance, phosphatidylserine synthase protein and activity, and the synthesis of phosphatidylserine in vivo. Respiratory deficiency also caused increases in the activities of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase, phosphatidylserine decarboxylase, and the phospholipid methyltransferases. Phosphatidylinositol synthase and choline kinase activities were not affected by respiratory deficiency. This work advances our understanding of phosphatidylserine synthase regulation and underscores the importance of mitochondrial respiration to the regulation of phospholipid synthesis in S. cerevisiae. PMID:17761681

  13. The TAM family: phosphatidylserine sensing receptor tyrosine kinases gone awry in cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, Douglas K; DeRyckere, Deborah; Davies, Kurtis D; Earp, H Shelton

    2014-12-01

    The TYRO3, AXL (also known as UFO) and MERTK (TAM) family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are aberrantly expressed in multiple haematological and epithelial malignancies. Rather than functioning as oncogenic drivers, their induction in tumour cells predominately promotes survival, chemoresistance and motility. The unique mode of maximal activation of this RTK family requires an extracellular lipid–protein complex. For example, the protein ligand, growth arrest-specific protein 6 (GAS6), binds to phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) that is externalized on apoptotic cell membranes, which activates MERTK on macrophages. This triggers engulfment of apoptotic material and subsequent anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization. In tumours, autocrine and paracrine ligands and apoptotic cells are abundant, which provide a survival signal to the tumour cell and favour an anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive microenvironment. Thus, TAM kinase inhibition could stimulate antitumour immunity, reduce tumour cell survival, enhance chemosensitivity and diminish metastatic potential.

  14. Calcium and phosphatidylserine inhibit lipid electropore formation and reduce pore lifetime.

    PubMed

    Levine, Zachary A; Vernier, P Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of electroporation of homogeneous phospholipid bilayers show that the pore creation time is strongly dependent on the magnitude of the applied electric field. Here, we investigated whether heterogeneous bilayers containing phospholipids with zwitterionic and anionic headgroups exhibit a similar dependence. To facilitate this analysis we divide the life cycle of an electropore into several stages, marking the sequence of steps for pore creation and pore annihilation (restoration of the bilayer after removal of the electric field). We also report simulations of calcium binding isotherms and the effects of calcium ions on the electroporation of heterogeneous lipid bilayers. Calcium binding simulations are consistent with experimental data using a 1:2 Langmuir binding isotherm. We find that calcium ions and phosphatidylserine increase pore creation time and decrease pore annihilation time. For all systems tested, pore creation time was inversely proportional to the bilayer internal electric field.

  15. Cooperative binding of Annexin A5 to phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janko, Christina; Jeremic, Ivica; Biermann, Mona; Chaurio, Ricardo; Schorn, Christine; Muñoz, Luis E.; Herrmann, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Healthy cells exhibit an asymmetric plasma membrane with phosphatidylserine (PS) located on the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane bilayer. Annexin A5-FITC, a PS binding protein, is commonly used to evaluate apoptosis in flow cytometry. PS exposed by apoptotic cells serves as a major ‘eat-me’ signal for phagocytes. Although exposition of PS has been observed after alternative stimuli, no clearance of viable, PS exposing cells has been detected. Thus, besides PS exposure, membranes of viable and apoptotic cells might exhibit specific characteristics. Here, we show that Annexin A5 binds in a cooperative manner to different types of dead cells. Shrunken apoptotic cells thereby showed the highest Hill coefficient values. Contrarily, parafomaldehyde fixation of apoptotic cells completely abrogates the cooperativity effect seen with dead and dying cells. We tend to speculate that the cooperative binding of Annexin A5 to the membranes of apoptotic cells reflects higher fluidity of the exposed membranes facilitating PS clustering.

  16. Suppression of atopic dermatitis in mice model by reducing inflammation utilizing phosphatidylserine-coated biodegradable microparticles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Purnima; Hosain, Md Zahangir; Kang, Jeong-Hun; Takeo, Masafumi; Kishimura, Akihiro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Controlling inflammatory response is important to avoid chronic inflammation in many diseases including atopic dermatitis (AD). In this research, we tried using a phosphatidylserine (PS)-coated microparticles in the AD mouse model for achieving the modulation of the macrophage phenotype to an anti-inflammatory state. Here, we prepared poly (D,L-lactic acid) microparticle coated with PS on the outside shell. We confirmed the cellular uptake of the PS-coated microparticle, which leads to the significant downregulation of the inflammatory cytokine production. In the mouse model of AD, the PS-coated microparticle was injected subcutaneously for a period of 12 days. The mice showed significant reduction in the development of AD symptoms comparing with the mice treated with the PC-coated microparticle.

  17. Involvement of VAT-1 in Phosphatidylserine Transfer from the Endoplasmic Reticulum to Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Junker, Mirco; Rapoport, Tom A

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondria receive phosphatidylserine (PS) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but how PS is moved from the ER to mitochondria is unclear. Current models postulate a physical link between the organelles, but no involvement of cytosolic proteins. Here, we have reconstituted PS transport from the ER to mitochondria in vitro using Xenopus egg components. Transport is independent of ER proteins, but is dependent on a cytosolic factor that has a preferential affinity for PS. Crosslinking with a photoactivatable PS analog identified VAT-1 as a candidate for a cytosolic PS transport protein. Recombinant, purified VAT-1 stimulated PS transport into mitochondria and depletion of VAT-1 from Xenopus cytosol with specific antibodies led to a reduction of transport. Our results suggest that cytosolic factors have a role in PS transport from the ER to mitochondria, implicate VAT-1 in the transport process, and indicate that physical contact between the organelles is not essential.

  18. Gradients of phosphatidylserine contribute to plasma membrane charge localization and cell polarity in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Armin; Minc, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Surface charges at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane may contribute to regulate the surface recruitment of key signaling factors. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an abundant charged lipid that may regulate charge distribution in different cell types. Here we characterize the subcellular distribution and function of PS in the rod-shaped, polarized fission yeast. We find that PS preferably accumulates at cell tips and defines a gradient of negative charges along the cell surface. This polarization depends on actin-mediated endocytosis and contributes to the subcellular partitioning of charged polarity-regulating Rho GTPases like Rho1 or Cdc42 in a protein charge–dependent manner. Cells depleted of PS have altered cell dimensions and fail to properly regulate growth from the second end, suggesting a role for PS and membrane charge in polarized cell growth. PMID:27852900

  19. Room temperature ordering of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylserine bilayers induced by short chain alcohols.

    PubMed

    Wachtel, E; Bach, D; Miller, I R

    2013-01-01

    Using differential scanning calorimetry and small and wide angle X-ray diffraction, we show that, following extended incubation at room temperature, methanol, propanol, and three of the isomers of butanol can induce ordering in dipalmitoyl phosphatidylserine (DPPS) gel phase bilayers. The organization of the bilayers in the presence of ethanol, described previously, is now observed to be a general effect of short chain alcohols. Evidence is presented for tilting of the acyl chains with respect to the bilayer normal in the presence of ethanol or propanol. However, the different chain lengths of the alcohols, and isomeric form, influence the thermal stability of the ordered gel to different extents. This behavior is unlike that of the gel state phosphatidylcholine analog which, in the presence of short chain alcohols, undergoes hydrocarbon chain interdigitation. Dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine added to DPPS in the presence of 20 vol% ethanol, acts to suppress the ordered gel phase.

  20. ATP-Dependent Formation of Phosphatidylserine-Rich Vesicles from the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Leek Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sturbois-Balcerzak, Bénédicte; Vincent, Patrick; Maneta-Peyret, Lilly; Duvert, Michel; Satiat-Jeunemaitre, Béatrice; Cassagne, Claude; Moreau, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Leek (Allium porrum) plasma membrane is enriched in phosphatidylserine (PS) by the vesicular pathway, in a way similar to that already observed in animal cells (B. Sturbois-Balcerzak, D.J. Morré, O. Loreau, J.P. Noel, P. Moreau, C. Cassagne [1995] Plant Physiol Biochem 33: 625–637). In this paper we document the formation of PS-rich small vesicles from leek endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes upon addition of ATP and other factors. The omission of ATP or its replacement by ATPγ-S prevents vesicle formation. These vesicles correspond to small structures (70–80 nm) and their phospholipid composition, characterized by a PS enrichment, is compatible with a role in PS transport. Moreover, the PS enrichment over phosphatidylinositol in the ER-derived vesicles is the first example, to our knowledge, of phospholipid sorting from the ER to ER-derived vesicles in plant cells. PMID:10318702

  1. Phosphatidylserine lipids and membrane order precisely regulate the activity of Polybia-MP1 peptide.

    PubMed

    Alvares, Dayane S; Neto, João Ruggiero; Ambroggio, Ernesto E

    2017-03-05

    Polybia-MP1 (IDWKKLLDAAKQIL-NH2) is a lytic peptide from the Brazilian wasp venom with known anti-cancer properties. Previous evidence indicates that phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids are relevant for the lytic activity of MP1. In agreement with this requirement, phosphatidylserine lipids are translocated to the outer leaflet of cells, and are available for MP1 binding, depending on the presence of liquid-ordered domains. Here, we investigated the effect of PS on MP1 activity when this lipid is reconstituted in membranes of giant or large liposomes with different lipid-phase states. By monitoring the membrane and soluble luminal content of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), using fluorescence confocal microscopy, we were able to determine that MP1 has a pore-forming activity at the membrane level. Liquid-ordered domains, which were phase-separated within the membrane of GUVs, influenced the pore-forming activity of MP1. Experiments evaluating the membrane-binding and lytic activity of MP1 on large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), with the same lipid composition as GUVs, demonstrated that there was synergy between liquid-ordered domains and PS, which enhanced both activities. Based on our findings, we propose that the physicochemical properties of cancer cell membranes, which possess a much higher concentration of PS than normal cells, renders them susceptible to MP1 binding and lytic pore formation. These results can be correlated with MP1's potent and selective anti-cancer activity and pave the way for future research to develop cancer therapies that harness and exploit the properties of MP1.

  2. Phosphatidylserine and caffeine attenuate postexercise mood disturbance and perception of fatigue in humans.

    PubMed

    Wells, Adam J; Hoffman, Jay R; Gonzalez, Adam M; Stout, Jeffrey R; Fragala, Maren S; Mangine, Gerald T; McCormack, William P; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Robinson, Edward H

    2013-06-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) may attenuate the adverse effects of physical fatigue. Therefore, we investigated the effects of a multi-ingredient supplement containing 400 mg/d PS and 100 mg/d caffeine (supplement [SUP]) for 2 weeks on measures of cognitive function (CF), reaction time (RT), and mood (MD) following an acute exercise stress. It is hypothesized that PS will maintain preexercise CF and RT scores, while attenuating postexercise fatigue. Participants completed 2 acute bouts of resistance exercise (T1 and T2) separated by 2-week ingestion of SUP or control (CON). Outcome measures were assessed pre- and postexercise. When collapsed across groups, a significant decrease in RT performance was seen in the 60-second reaction drill from pre- to postexercise at T1. All other RT tests were similar from pre- to postexercise at T1. Reaction time was not significantly changed by PS. When collapsed across groups, a significant increase in performance of the serial subtraction test was seen. A significant increase (8.9% and 7.1%) in the number of correct answers and a significant decrease (8.0% and 7.5%) in time to answer were seen from pre- to postworkout at T1 and T2, respectively. A significant increase in total MD score from pre- to postworkout was observed for CON but not for PS at T2. Phosphatidylserine significantly attenuated pre- to postexercise perception of fatigue compared to CON. Ingestion of SUP for 14 days appears to attenuate postexercise MD scores and perception of fatigue, but does not affect CF or RT, in recreationally trained individuals.

  3. Host Cell Plasma Membrane Phosphatidylserine Regulates the Assembly and Budding of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Johnson, Kristen A.; Fraser, Mark E.; Scott, Jordan L.; Soni, Smita P.; Jones, Keaton R.; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Tessier, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipid-enveloped viruses replicate and bud from the host cell where they acquire their lipid coat. Ebola virus, which buds from the plasma membrane of the host cell, causes viral hemorrhagic fever and has a high fatality rate. To date, little has been known about how budding and egress of Ebola virus are mediated at the plasma membrane. We have found that the lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) regulates the assembly of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40. VP40 binds PS-containing membranes with nanomolar affinity, and binding of PS regulates VP40 localization and oligomerization on the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Further, alteration of PS levels in mammalian cells inhibits assembly and egress of VP40. Notably, interactions of VP40 with the plasma membrane induced exposure of PS on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane at sites of egress, whereas PS is typically found only on the inner leaflet. Taking the data together, we present a model accounting for the role of plasma membrane PS in assembly of Ebola virus-like particles. IMPORTANCE The lipid-enveloped Ebola virus causes severe infection with a high mortality rate and currently lacks FDA-approved therapeutics or vaccines. Ebola virus harbors just seven genes in its genome, and there is a critical requirement for acquisition of its lipid envelope from the plasma membrane of the human cell that it infects during the replication process. There is, however, a dearth of information available on the required contents of this envelope for egress and subsequent attachment and entry. Here we demonstrate that plasma membrane phosphatidylserine is critical for Ebola virus budding from the host cell plasma membrane. This report, to our knowledge, is the first to highlight the role of lipids in human cell membranes in the Ebola virus replication cycle and draws a clear link between selective binding and transport of a lipid across the membrane of the human cell and use of that lipid for subsequent viral entry. PMID

  4. Methyl isocyanate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl isocyanate ; CASRN 624 - 83 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  5. Methyl chlorocarbonate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl chlorocarbonate ; CASRN 79 - 22 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  6. Methyl iodide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl iodide ; CASRN 74 - 88 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effe

  7. Methyl parathion

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl parathion ; CASRN 298 - 00 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  8. Methyl acrylate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl acrylate ; CASRN 96 - 33 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  9. Methyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R01 / 003 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHYL CHLORIDE ( CAS No . 74 - 87 - 3 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) June 2001 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.

  10. The Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidylethanolamine Receptor CD300a Binds Dengue Virus and Enhances Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carnec, Xavier; Meertens, Laurent; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Perera-Lecoin, Manuel; Hafirassou, Mohamed Lamine; Kitaura, Jiro; Ramdasi, Rasika; Schwartz, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV) is the etiological agent of the major human arboviral disease. We previously demonstrated that the TIM and TAM families of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) receptors involved in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells mediate DENV entry into target cells. We show here that human CD300a, a recently identified phospholipid receptor, also binds directly DENV particles and enhances viral entry. CD300a facilitates infection of the four DENV serotypes, as well as of other mosquito-borne viruses such as West Nile virus and Chikungunya virus. CD300a acts as an attachment factor that enhances DENV internalization through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. CD300a recognizes predominantly phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEth) and to a lesser extent PtdSer associated with viral particles. Mutation of residues in the IgV domain critical for phospholipid binding abrogate CD300a-mediated enhancement of DENV infection. Finally, we show that CD300a is expressed at the surface of primary macrophages and anti-CD300a polyclonal antibodies partially inhibited DENV infection of these cells. Overall, these data indicate that CD300a is a novel DENV binding receptor that recognizes PtdEth and PtdSer present on virions and enhance infection. IMPORTANCE Dengue disease, caused by dengue virus (DENV), has emerged as the most important mosquito-borne viral disease of humans and is a major global health concern. The molecular bases of DENV-host cell interactions during virus entry are poorly understood, hampering the discovery of new targets for antiviral intervention. We recently discovered that the TIM and TAM proteins, two receptor families involved in the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer)-dependent phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells, interact with DENV particles-associated PtdSer through a mechanism that mimics the recognition of apoptotic cells and mediate DENV infection. In this study, we show that CD300a, a novel identified phospholipid receptor, mediates DENV infection. CD300a

  11. Evaluation of Phosphatidylserine-Binding Peptides Radiolabeled with Fluorine 18 for in vivo Imaging of Apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapty, Janice Sarah

    We currently do not have a clinical method to directly assess apoptosis induced by cancer therapies. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an attractive target for imaging apoptosis since it is on the exterior of the apoptotic cells and PS externalization is an early marker of apoptosis. PS-binding peptides are an attractive option for developing an imaging probe to detect apoptosis using positron emission tomography. In this study we evaluated binding characteristics of PS-binding peptides for ability to bind to PS, radiolabeled PS-binding peptides with fluorine-18, and performed in vitro and in vivo analysis of 18F radiolabeled PS-binding peptides including biodistribution analysis and dynamic PET imaging in a murine tumor model of apoptosis. Four peptides were evaluated for PS binding characteristics using a plate based assay system, a liposome mimic of cell membrane PS presentation, and a cell assay of apoptosis. The results indicate that all four peptides bind to PS and are specific to apoptotic cells. The widely used 18 F prosthetic group N-succinimidyl-4-[18F]fluorobenzoate ([18F]SFB) and the recently developed N-[6-(4-[ 18F]fluorobenzylidene) aminooxyhexyl]maleimide ([18F]FBAM) were investigated for radiolabeling of two representative phosphatidylserine-binding peptides. The prosthetic groups were compared with respect to required reaction conditions for optimum labeling, radiolabeling yield and chemoselectivity. The N-terminus labeled product produced by reaction of [18F]SFB with binding peptide LIKKPF was produced in 18% radiochemical yield while no N-terminus labeled product could be isolated following [18F]SFB reaction with PDGLSR. When the peptides were modified by addition of a cysteine residue at the N-terminus they provided almost quantitative radiochemical yields with [18F]FBAM. Results indicate that for the peptides in this study, [18F]FBAM is a more useful prosthetic group compared to [18F]SFB due to its excellent chemo-selectivity and high radiochemical

  12. Investigation into the role of phosphatidylserine in modifying the susceptibility of human lymphocytes to secretory phospholipase A(2) using cells deficient in the expression of scramblase.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jennifer; Francom, Lyndee L; Anderson, Lynn; Damm, Kelly; Baker, Ryan; Chen, Joseph; Franklin, Sarah; Hamaker, Amy; Izidoro, Izadora; Moss, Eric; Orton, Mikayla; Stevens, Evan; Yeung, Celestine; Judd, Allan M; Bell, John D

    2012-05-01

    Normal human lymphocytes resisted the hydrolytic action of secretory phospholipase A(2) but became susceptible to the enzyme following treatment with a calcium ionophore, ionomycin. To test the hypothesis that this susceptibility requires exposure of the anionic lipid phosphatidylserine on the external face of the cell membrane, experiments were repeated with a human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line (Raji cells). In contrast to normal lymphocytes or S49 mouse lymphoma cells, most of the Raji cells (83%) did not translocate phosphatidylserine to the cell surface upon treatment with ionomycin. Those few that did display exposed phosphatidylserine were hydrolyzed immediately upon addition of phospholipase A(2). Interestingly, the remaining cells were also completely susceptible to the enzyme but were hydrolyzed at a slower rate and after a latency of about 100s. In contradistinction to the defect in phosphatidylserine translocation, Raji cells did display other physical membrane changes upon ionomycin treatment that may be relevant to hydrolysis by phospholipase A(2). These changes were detected by merocyanine 540 and trimethylammonium diphenylhexatriene fluorescence and were common among normal lymphocytes, S49 cells, and Raji cells. The levels of these latter effects corresponded well with the relative rates of hydrolysis among the three cell lines. These results suggested that while phosphatidylserine enhances the rate of cell membrane hydrolysis by secretory phospholipase A(2), it is not an absolute requirement. Other physical properties such as membrane order contribute to the level of membrane susceptibility to the enzyme independent of phosphatidylserine.

  13. Methyl eucomate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linglin; Zhou, Guang-Xiong; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound [systematic name: methyl 3-carboxy-3-hydr­oxy-3-(4-hydroxy­benz­yl)propanoate], C12H14O6, is stabilized by inter­molecular O—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The mol­ecules are arranged in layers, parallel to (001), which are inter­connected by the O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:21202973

  14. Efficient identification of phosphatidylserine-binding proteins by ORF phage display

    SciTech Connect

    Caberoy, Nora B.; Zhou, Yixiong; Alvarado, Gabriela; Fan, Xianqun; Li, Wei

    2009-08-14

    To efficiently elucidate the biological roles of phosphatidylserine (PS), we developed open-reading-frame (ORF) phage display to identify PS-binding proteins. The procedure of phage panning was optimized with a phage clone expressing MFG-E8, a well-known PS-binding protein. Three rounds of phage panning with ORF phage display cDNA library resulted in {approx}300-fold enrichment in PS-binding activity. A total of 17 PS-binding phage clones were identified. Unlike phage display with conventional cDNA libraries, all 17 PS-binding clones were ORFs encoding 13 real proteins. Sequence analysis revealed that all identified PS-specific phage clones had dimeric basic amino acid residues. GST fusion proteins were expressed for 3 PS-binding proteins and verified for their binding activity to PS liposomes, but not phosphatidylcholine liposomes. These results elucidated previously unknown PS-binding proteins and demonstrated that ORF phage display is a versatile technology capable of efficiently identifying binding proteins for non-protein molecules like PS.

  15. Mediated trehalose un-loading for reduced erythrocyte osmotic fragility and phosphatidylserine translocation.

    PubMed

    Lynch, A L; Slaater, N K H

    2011-01-01

    Recently, high concentrations of intracellular trehalose (>200mM) were employed to enhance the cryoprotection and desiccation protection of human erythrocytes. However, significant challenges must be overcome if this advancement is to be translated into clinical practice. It is here demonstrated that 247 ± 5 mM intracellular trehalose caused the lysis of 60 ± 2 percent of erythrocytes upon resuspension in PBS of physiological osmolality (300 mOsm) and caused surviving cells to swell up to 140 ± 2 percent of isotonic cell volume. Trehalose loaded cells also exhibited 24 ± 1 percent incidence of phosphatidylserine translocation upon resuspension in 300 mOsm PBS, likely due to loading induced cell swelling. Un-loading of trehalose from erythrocytes using the membrane-permeabilizing biopolymer PP-50 was investigated as a technique to mitigate these damaging effects. After erythrocyte un-loading from 247 ± 5 mM to 39 ± 2 mM intracellular trehalose, cell lysis at 300 mOsm PBS was reduced from 60 ± 2 percent to 17 ± 3 percent. Un-loading also reduced cellular incidence of PS translocation in resuspended cells from 24 ± 1 percent to 13 ± 1 percent.

  16. Phosphatidylserine exposure and other apoptotic-like events in Bernard-Soulier syndrome platelets.

    PubMed

    Rand, Margaret L; Wang, Hong; Bang, K W Annie; Teitel, Jerome M; Blanchette, Victor S; Freedman, John; Nurden, Alan T

    2010-08-01

    In the Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS), the giant platelets are said to have increased phosphatidylserine (PS) surface exposure in the resting state and shortened survival in the circulation. When normal platelets are activated, they undergo many biochemical and morphological changes, some of which are apoptotic. Herein, we investigated apoptotic-like events in BSS platelets upon activation, specifically, PS exposure, microparticle (MP) formation, cell shrinkage, and loss of mitochondrial inner membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)). Platelets from two unrelated BSS patients were examined in whole blood; agonists used were collagen, thrombin, PAR1- or PAR4-activating peptides (APs), or combinations of collagen with thrombin, and the PAR-APs. Flow cytometry was used to measure PS exposure (annexin A5 binding), platelet-derived MPs (forward scatter; events <0.75 microm size), and DeltaPsi(m) (TMRM fluorescence). PS exposure was increased on resting and activated BSS platelets, and this was independent of the platelet size. MP formation by BSS platelets was generally enhanced. Cell shrinkage occurred on activation to form smaller, PS-exposing platelets in BSS and controls. A proportion of PS-exposing BSS and control platelets exhibited DeltaPsi(m) loss, but unlike controls, there was also loss of DeltaPsi(m) in the BSS platelets not exposing PS. Thus, BSS platelets undergo apoptotic-like events upon activation, with PS exposure and MP formation being enhanced. These events may play a role in the shortened survival in BSS, as well as affecting thrombin generation.

  17. Antibodies to Phosphatidylserine/Prothrombin Complex in Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Analytical and Clinical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lisa K; Willis, Rohan; Harris, E Nigel; Branch, Ware D; Tebo, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by thrombosis and/or pregnancy-related morbidity accompanied by persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Current laboratory criteria for APS classification recommend testing for lupus anticoagulant as well as IgG and IgM anticardiolipin, and beta-2 glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) antibodies. However, there appears to be a subset of patients with classical APS manifestations who test negative for the recommended criteria aPL tests. While acknowledging that such patients may have clinical features that are not of an autoimmune etiology, experts also speculate that these "seronegative" patients may test negative for relevant autoantibodies as a result of a lack of harmonization and/or standardization. Alternatively, they may have aPL that target other antigens involved in the pathogenesis of APS. In the latter, autoantibodies that recognize a phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (PS/PT) complex have been reported to be associated with APS and may have diagnostic relevance. This review highlights analytical and clinical attributes associated with PS/PT antibodies, taking into consideration the performance characteristics of criteria aPL tests in APS with specific recommendations for harmonization and standardization efforts.

  18. Exposure of Phosphatidylserine by Xk-related Protein Family Members during Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Jun; Imanishi, Eiichi; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cells expose phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) on their surface as an “eat me” signal. Mammalian Xk-related (Xkr) protein 8, which is predicted to contain six transmembrane regions, and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog CED-8 promote apoptotic PtdSer exposure. The mouse and human Xkr families consist of eight and nine members, respectively. Here, we found that mouse Xkr family members, with the exception of Xkr2, are localized to the plasma membrane. When Xkr8-deficient cells, which do not expose PtdSer during apoptosis, were transformed by Xkr family members, the transformants expressing Xkr4, Xkr8, or Xkr9 responded to apoptotic stimuli by exposing cell surface PtdSer and were efficiently engulfed by macrophages. Like Xkr8, Xkr4 and Xkr9 were found to possess a caspase recognition site in the C-terminal region and to require its direct cleavage by caspases for their function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the amino acid residues conserved among CED-8, Xkr4, Xkr8, and Xkr9 identified several essential residues in the second transmembrane and second cytoplasmic regions. Real time PCR analysis indicated that unlike Xkr8, which is ubiquitously expressed, Xkr4 and Xkr9 expression is tissue-specific. PMID:25231987

  19. Phosphatidylserine is a global immunosuppressive signal in efferocytosis, infectious disease, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Birge, R B; Boeltz, S; Kumar, S; Carlson, J; Wanderley, J; Calianese, D; Barcinski, M; Brekken, R A; Huang, X; Hutchins, J T; Freimark, B; Empig, C; Mercer, J; Schroit, A J; Schett, G; Herrmann, M

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is an evolutionarily conserved and tightly regulated cell death modality. It serves important roles in physiology by sculpting complex tissues during embryogenesis and by removing effete cells that have reached advanced age or whose genomes have been irreparably damaged. Apoptosis culminates in the rapid and decisive removal of cell corpses by efferocytosis, a term used to distinguish the engulfment of apoptotic cells from other phagocytic processes. Over the past decades, the molecular and cell biological events associated with efferocytosis have been rigorously studied, and many eat-me signals and receptors have been identified. The externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) is arguably the most emblematic eat-me signal that is in turn bound by a large number of serum proteins and opsonins that facilitate efferocytosis. Under physiological conditions, externalized PS functions as a dominant and evolutionarily conserved immunosuppressive signal that promotes tolerance and prevents local and systemic immune activation. Pathologically, the innate immunosuppressive effect of externalized PS has been hijacked by numerous viruses, microorganisms, and parasites to facilitate infection, and in many cases, establish infection latency. PS is also profoundly dysregulated in the tumor microenvironment and antagonizes the development of tumor immunity. In this review, we discuss the biology of PS with respect to its role as a global immunosuppressive signal and how PS is exploited to drive diverse pathological processes such as infection and cancer. Finally, we outline the rationale that agents targeting PS could have significant value in cancer and infectious disease therapeutics. PMID:26915293

  20. Calcium transport in vesicles from carrot cells: Stimulation by calmodulin and phosphatidylserine. [Daucus carota cv. Danvers

    SciTech Connect

    Wenling Hsieh; Sze, Heven )

    1991-05-01

    The transport properties of Ca-pumping ATPases from carrot (Daucus carota cv. Danvers) tissue culture cells were studied. ATP dependent Ca transport in vesicles that comigrated with an ER marker, was stimulated 3-4 fold by calmodulin. Cyclopiazonic acid (a specific inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase) partially inhibited oxalate-stimulated Ca transport activity; however, it had little or not effect on calmodulin-stimulated Ca uptake. The results suggested the presence of two types of Ca ATPases, and ER- and a plasma membrane-type. Incubation of membranes with (gamma{sup 32}P)ATP resulted in the formation of a single acyl ({sup 32}P) phosphoprotein of 120 kDa. Formation of this phosphoprotein was dependent on Ca, and enhanced by La {sup 3+}, characteristic of the plasma membrane CaATPase. Acidic phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, stimulated Ca transport, similar to their effect on the erythrocyte plasma membrane CaATPase. These results would indicate that the calmodulin-stimulated Ca transport originated in large part from a plasma membrane-type Ca pump of 120 kDa.

  1. Plasminogen associates with phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets and contributes to thrombus lysis under flow.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Claire S; Swieringa, Frauke; Mastenbroek, Tom G; Lionikiene, Ausra S; Lancé, Marcus D; van der Meijden, Paola E J; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Mutch, Nicola J

    2015-04-16

    The interaction of plasminogen with platelets and their localization during thrombus formation and fibrinolysis under flow are not defined. Using a novel model of whole blood thrombi, formed under flow, we examine dose-dependent fibrinolysis using fluorescence microscopy. Fibrinolysis was dependent upon flow and the balance between fibrin formation and plasminogen activation, with tissue plasminogen activator-mediated lysis being more efficient than urokinase plasminogen activator-mediated lysis. Fluorescently labeled plasminogen radiates from platelet aggregates at the base of thrombi, primarily in association with fibrin. Hirudin attenuates, but does not abolish plasminogen binding, denoting the importance of fibrin. Flow cytometry revealed that stimulation of platelets with thrombin/convulxin significantly increased the plasminogen signal associated with phosphatidylserine (PS)-exposing platelets. Binding was attenuated by tirofiban and Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro amide, confirming a role for fibrin in amplifying plasminogen binding to PS-exposing platelets. Confocal microscopy revealed direct binding of plasminogen and fibrinogen to different platelet subpopulations. Binding of plasminogen and fibrinogen co-localized with PAC-1 in the center of spread platelets. In contrast, PS-exposing platelets were PAC-1 negative, and bound plasminogen and fibrinogen in a protruding "cap." These data show that different subpopulations of platelets harbor plasminogen by diverse mechanisms and provide an essential scaffold for the accumulation of fibrinolytic proteins that mediate fibrinolysis under flow.

  2. Poloxamer 188 reduces normal and phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in dextran solutions.

    PubMed

    Koo, Stephanie; Yang, Yang; Neu, Björn

    2013-12-01

    Abnormal red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelial cells (ECs) has been correlated with vascular complications in diseases such as sickle cell anemia and diabetes. Poloxamer 188 (P188) has been clinically tested to treat vaso-occlusion. However, the underlying mechanism(s) have not been clarified, making a methodical application difficult. In this study, we investigate how and to what extent P188 reduces RBC adhesion to ECs in plasma-like solutions. RBC adhesion to ECs is studied in solutions containing dextran, which is known to induce adhesion via macromolecular depletion interaction. It is demonstrated that P188 itself does not induce adhesion of normal RBCs to ECs but significantly reduces the adhesion in solutions containing high molecular mass-dextran. In addition, it is shown that P188 can reduce the adhesion of RBCs with enhanced exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS). Measurements of the electrophoretic mobility indicate that P188 increases the local viscosity inside the electric double layer of RBCs. Based on these results this study suggests that P188 reduces macromolecular depletion interaction, via penetrating into the depletion layer. Taking into consideration that dextran mimics the effects of pro-adhesive non-adsorbing plasma proteins and macromolecules, our study therefore suggests a mechanism for the adhesion reducing effect of P188 and should thus be of potential value for a detailed understanding of how cell-cell interactions in pathological conditions can be reduced.

  3. Processes involved in assisted reproduction technologies significantly increase sperm DNA fragmentation and phosphatidylserine translocation.

    PubMed

    Balasuriya, A; Serhal, P; Doshi, A; Harper, J C

    2014-03-01

    Sperm preparation techniques in assisted reproduction technologies (ART) are potential generators of exogenous stresses that cause additional DNA damage. DNA fragmentation tests, such as the sperm chromatin structure assay, involve freezing sperm samples in the absence of cryoprotectant. Thermal, oxidative stress (OS) and freezing are detrimental to sperm DNA fragmentation and phosphatidylserine (PS) translocation. The primary aim of this study was to subject mature sperm to environmental insults that normally occur during ART. We tested the hypotheses that OS, thermal stress and freeze-thawing caused sperm nuclear and membrane damage and that a positive correlation exists between PS translocation and DNA fragmentation. Sperm DNA integrity deteriorates in semen samples from men with advancing age and a sperm concentration of <15 m ml(-1) . The significant increase in sperm DNA fragmentation at 37 °C after merely 1 h is important clinically as semen liquefaction and short-term sperm storage in an ART cycle involve incubating samples at this temperature. Freezing without a cryoprotectant significantly increases the level of sperm nuclear damage, so it is important not to freeze neat semen prior to DNA fragmentation testing. This study highlights the importance of minimising the production of exogenous stresses during sperm preparation in ART.

  4. Phosphatidylserine Outer Layer Translocation Is Implicated in IL-10 Secretion by Human Regulatory B Cells.

    PubMed

    Audo, Rachel; Hua, Charlotte; Hahne, Michael; Combe, Bernard; Morel, Jacques; Daien, Claire I

    2017-01-01

    B cells can have a regulatory role, mainly mediated by interleukin 10 (IL-10). IL-10 producing B cells (B10 cells) cells remain to be better characterized. Annexin V binds phosphatidylserine (PS), which is externalized during apoptosis. Previous works suggested that B10 cells are apoptotic cells since they bind Annexin V. Others showed that Annexin V binding could also be expressed on viable B cells. We aimed to explore if PS exposure can be a marker of B10 cells and if PS exposure has a functional role on B cell IL-10 production in healthy subjects. We found that B10 cells were significantly more often Annexin V+ than IL-10 non-producing B cells. After CpG activation, Annexin V+ B cells differentiated more often into B10 cells than Annexin Vneg B cells. Cell death and early apoptosis were similar between Annexin V+ and Annexin Vneg B cells. PS blockage, using biotinylated AnV and glyburide, decreased B10 cell differentiation. This study showed that B10 cells have an increased PS exposure independently of any apoptotic state. B cells exposing PS differentiate more into B10 cells whereas PS blockage inhibits B10 cells generation. These results strongly suggest a link between PS exposure and B10 cells.

  5. Role of flippases, scramblases and transfer proteins in phosphatidylserine subcellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Hankins, Hannah M; Baldridge, Ryan D; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that lipids are heterogeneously distributed throughout the cell. Most lipid species are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and then distributed to different cellular locations in order to create the distinct membrane compositions observed in eukaryotes. However, the mechanisms by which specific lipid species are trafficked to and maintained in specific areas of the cell are poorly understood and constitute an active area of research. Of particular interest is the distribution of phosphatidylserine (PS), an anionic lipid that is enriched in the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane. PS transport occurs by both vesicular and non-vesicular routes, with members of the oxysterol-binding protein family (Osh6 and Osh7) recently implicated in the latter route. In addition, the flippase activity of P4-ATPases helps build PS membrane asymmetry by preferentially translocating PS to the cytosolic leaflet. This asymmetric PS distribution can be used as a signaling device by the regulated activation of scramblases, which rapidly expose PS on the extracellular leaflet and play important roles in blood clotting and apoptosis. This review will discuss recent advances made in the study of phospholipid flippases, scramblases and PS-specific lipid transfer proteins, as well as how these proteins contribute to subcellular PS distribution.

  6. Indolic uremic solutes enhance procoagulant activity of red blood cells through phosphatidylserine exposure and microparticle release.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunyan; Ji, Shuting; Dong, Weijun; Qi, Yushan; Song, Wen; Cui, Debin; Shi, Jialan

    2015-10-28

    Increased accumulation of indolic uremic solutes in the blood of uremic patients contributes to the risk of thrombotic events. Red blood cells (RBCs), the most abundant blood cells in circulation, may be a privileged target of these solutes. However, the effect of uremic solutes indoxyl sulfate (IS) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on procoagulant activity (PCA) of erythrocyte is unclear. Here, RBCs from healthy adults were treated with IS and IAA (mean and maximal concentrations reported in uremic patients). Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure of RBCs and their microparticles (MPs) release were labeled with Alexa Fluor 488-lactadherin and detected by flow cytometer. Cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]) with Fluo 3/AM was analyzed by flow cytometer. PCA was assessed by clotting time and purified coagulation complex assays. We found that PS exposure, MPs generation, and consequent PCA of RBCs at mean concentrations of IS and IAA enhanced and peaked in maximal uremic concentrations. Moreover, 128 nM lactadherin, a PS inhibitor, inhibited over 90% PCA of RBCs and RMPs. Eryptosis or damage, by indolic uremic solutes was due to, at least partially, the increase of cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. Our results suggest that RBC eryptosis in uremic solutes IS and IAA plays an important role in thrombus formation through releasing RMPs and exposing PS. Lactadherin acts as an efficient anticoagulant in this process.

  7. Phosphatidylserine enhances IKBKAP transcription by activating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Donyo, Maya; Hollander, Dror; Abramovitch, Ziv; Naftelberg, Shiran; Ast, Gil

    2016-04-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a genetic disorder manifested due to abnormal development and progressive degeneration of the sensory and autonomic nervous system. FD is caused by a point mutation in the IKBKAP gene encoding the IKAP protein, resulting in decreased protein levels. A promising potential treatment for FD is phosphatidylserine (PS); however, the manner by which PS elevates IKAP levels has yet to be identified. Analysis of ChIP-seq results of the IKBKAP promoter region revealed binding of the transcription factors CREB and ELK1, which are regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. We show that PS treatment enhanced ERK phosphorylation in cells derived from FD patients. ERK activation resulted in elevated IKBKAP transcription and IKAP protein levels, whereas pretreatment with the MAPK inhibitor U0126 blocked elevation of the IKAP protein level. Overexpression of either ELK1 or CREB activated the IKBKAP promoter, whereas downregulation of these transcription factors resulted in a decrease of the IKAP protein. Additionally, we show that PS improves cell migration, known to be enhanced by MAPK/ERK activation and abrogated in FD cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PS activates the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway, resulting in activation of transcription factors that bind the promoter region of IKBKAP and thus enhancing its transcription. Therefore, compounds that activate the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway could constitute potential treatments for FD.

  8. TMEM16F is required for phosphatidylserine exposure and microparticle release in activated mouse platelets.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Sakata, Asuka; Nishimura, Satoshi; Eto, Koji; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2015-10-13

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) exposure on the surface of activated platelets requires the action of a phospholipid scramblase(s), and serves as a scaffold for the assembly of the tenase and prothrombinase complexes involved in blood coagulation. Here, we found that the activation of mouse platelets with thrombin/collagen or Ca(2+) ionophore at 20 °C induces PtdSer exposure without compromising plasma membrane integrity. Among five transmembrane protein 16 (TMEM16) members that support Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipid scrambling, TMEM16F was the only one that showed high expression in mouse platelets. Platelets from platelet-specific TMEM16F-deficient mice exhibited defects in activation-induced PtdSer exposure and microparticle shedding, although α-granule and dense granule release remained intact. The rate of tissue factor-induced thrombin generation by TMEM16F-deficient platelets was severely reduced, whereas thrombin-induced clot retraction was unaffected. The imaging of laser-induced thrombus formation in whole animals showed that PtdSer exposure on aggregated platelets was TMEM16F-dependent in vivo. The phenotypes of the platelet-specific TMEM16F-null mice resemble those of patients with Scott syndrome, a mild bleeding disorder, indicating that these mice may provide a useful model for human Scott syndrome.

  9. Oral administration of squid lecithin-transphosphatidylated phosphatidylserine improves memory impairment in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bombi; Sur, Bong-Jun; Han, Jeong-Jun; Shim, Insop; Her, Song; Lee, Yang-Seok; Lee, Hye-Jung; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2015-01-02

    Recently, lecithin-derived phosphatidylserine (PS), which originates from marine life, has received much attention as a viable alternative to bovine cerebral cortex PS. In this study, the use of squid phosphatidylcholine-transphosphatidylated PS (SQ-PS) was evaluated through examination of its ameliorating effects on age-associated learning and memory deficits in rats. Aged rats were orally administered SQ-PS (10, 20, or 50 mg/kg per day) once a day for seven days 30 min prior to behavioral assessment in a Morris water maze. SQ-PS administration produced significant dose-dependent improvements in escape latency for finding the platform in the Morris water maze in the aged rats even though Soy-PS administration also exhibited comparable improvements with SQ-PS. Biochemical alterations in the hippocampal cholinergic system, including changes in choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase immunoreactivity, were consistent with the behavioral results. In addition, SQ-PS treatment significantly restored age-associated decreases of choline transporter and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor type 1 mRNA expression in the hippocampus. These results demonstrate that orally administered SQ-PS dose-dependently aids in the improvement of memory deficits that occur during normal aging in rats. This suggests that SQ-PS may be a useful therapeutic agent in the treatment of diminished memory function in elderly people.

  10. Variation in human cancer cell external phosphatidylserine is regulated by flippase activity and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Vallabhapurapu, Subrahmanya D; Blanco, Víctor M; Sulaiman, Mahaboob K; Vallabhapurapu, Swarajya Lakshmi; Chu, Zhengtao; Franco, Robert S; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2015-10-27

    Viable cancer cells expose elevated levels of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the exoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. However, the mechanisms leading to elevated PS exposure in viable cancer cells have not been defined. We previously showed that externalized PS may be used to monitor, target and kill tumor cells. In addition, PS on tumor cells is recognized by macrophages and has implications in antitumor immunity. Therefore, it is important to understand the molecular details of PS exposure on cancer cells in order to improve therapeutic targeting. Here we explored the mechanisms regulating the surface PS exposure in human cancer cells and found that differential flippase activity and intracellular calcium are the major regulators of surface PS exposure in viable human cancer cells. In general, cancer cell lines with high surface PS exhibited low flippase activity and high intracellular calcium, whereas cancer cells with low surface PS exhibited high flippase activity and low intracellular calcium. High surface PS cancer cells also had higher total cellular PS than low surface PS cells. Together, our results indicate that the amount of external PS in cancer cells is regulated by calcium dependent flippase activity and may also be influenced by total cellular PS.

  11. Phosphatidylserine index as a marker of the procoagulant phenotype of acute myelogenous leukemia cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Recht, Olivia; Gruber, András; Levine, Ross L.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) are at risk for thrombotic complications. Risk to develop thrombosis is closely tied to leukemia subtype, and studies have shown an association between leukocytosis and thrombosis in AML M3. We evaluated the relative roles of cell count and the surface expression of tissue factor (TF) and phosphatidylserine (PS) in the procoagulant phenotype of AML cell lines. The TF-positive AML M3 cell lines, NB4 and HL60, and AML M2 cell line, AML14, exhibited both extrinsic tenase and prothrombinase activity in a purified system and promoted experimental thrombus formation. In contrast, the TF-negative AML cell line, HEL, exhibited only prothrombinase activity and did not affect the rate of occlusive thrombus formation. In plasma, NB4, HL60 and AML14 shortened clotting times in a cell-count, PS- and TF-dependent manner. Exposure of cultured NB4, HL60, and AML14 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent daunorubicin increased their extrinsic tenase activity and PS expression. Clot initiation time inversely correlated with logarithm of PS index, defined as the product of multiplying leukocyte count with cell surface PS exposure. We propose that leukemia cell PS index may serve as a biomarker for procoagulant activity.

  12. Autophagic vesicles on mature human reticulocytes explain phosphatidylserine-positive red cells in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Mankelow, Tosti J; Griffiths, Rebecca E; Trompeter, Sara; Flatt, Joanna F; Cogan, Nicola M; Massey, Edwin J; Anstee, David J

    2015-10-08

    During maturation to an erythrocyte, a reticulocyte must eliminate any residual organelles and reduce its surface area and volume. Here we show this involves a novel process whereby large, intact, inside-out phosphatidylserine (PS)-exposed autophagic vesicles are extruded. Cell surface PS is a well-characterized apoptotic signal initiating phagocytosis. In peripheral blood from patients after splenectomy or in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), the number of circulating red cells exposing PS on their surface is elevated. We show that in these patients PS is present on the cell surface of red cells in large (∼1.4 µm) discrete areas corresponding to autophagic vesicles. The autophagic vesicles found on reticulocytes are identical to those observed on red cells from splenectomized individuals and patients with SCD. Our data suggest the increased thrombotic risk associated with splenectomy, and patients with hemoglobinopathies is a possible consequence of increased levels of circulating mature reticulocytes expressing inside-out PS-exposed autophagic vesicles because of asplenia.

  13. INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT. Phosphatidylserine transport by ORP/Osh proteins is driven by phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Moser von Filseck, Joachim; Čopič, Alenka; Delfosse, Vanessa; Vanni, Stefano; Jackson, Catherine L; Bourguet, William; Drin, Guillaume

    2015-07-24

    In eukaryotic cells, phosphatidylserine (PS) is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but is highly enriched in the plasma membrane (PM), where it contributes negative charge and to specific recruitment of signaling proteins. This distribution relies on transport mechanisms whose nature remains elusive. Here, we found that the PS transporter Osh6p extracted phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) and exchanged PS for PI4P between two membranes. We solved the crystal structure of Osh6p:PI4P complex and demonstrated that the transport of PS by Osh6p depends on PI4P recognition in vivo. Finally, we showed that the PI4P-phosphatase Sac1p, by maintaining a PI4P gradient at the ER/PM interface, drove PS transport. Thus, PS transport by oxysterol-binding protein-related protein (ORP)/oxysterol-binding homology (Osh) proteins is fueled by PI4P metabolism through PS/PI4P exchange cycles.

  14. Phosphatidylserine synthesis at membrane contact sites promotes its transport out of the ER.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Muthukumar; Lahiri, Sujoy; Liu, Li-Ka; Choudhary, Vineet; Prinz, William A

    2017-03-01

    Close contacts between organelles, often called membrane contact sites (MCSs), are regions where lipids are exchanged between organelles. Here, we identify a novel mechanism by which cells promote phospholipid exchange at MCSs. Previous studies have shown that phosphatidylserine (PS) synthase activity is highly enriched in portions of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in contact with mitochondria. The objective of this study was to determine whether this enrichment promotes PS transport out of the ER. We found that PS transport to mitochondria was more efficient when PS synthase was fused to a protein in the ER at ER-mitochondria contacts than when it was fused to a protein in all portions of the ER. Inefficient PS transport to mitochondria was corrected by increasing tethering between these organelles. PS transport to endosomes was similarly enhanced by PS production in regions of the ER in contact with endosomes. Together, these findings indicate that PS production at MCSs promotes PS transport out of the ER and suggest that phospholipid production at MCSs may be a general mechanism of channeling lipids to specific cellular compartments.

  15. CD300b regulates the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells via phosphatidylserine recognition

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Y; Tian, L; Voss, O H; Margulies, D H; Krzewski, K; Coligan, J E

    2014-01-01

    The CD300 receptor family members are a group of molecules that modulate a variety of immune cell processes. We show that mouse CD300b (CLM7/LMIR5), expressed on myeloid cells, recognizes outer membrane-exposed phosphatidylserine (PS) and does not, as previously reported, directly recognize TIM1 or TIM4. CD300b accumulates in phagocytic cups along with F-actin at apoptotic cell contacts, thereby facilitating their engulfment. The CD300b-mediated activation signal is conveyed through CD300b association with the adaptor molecule DAP12, and requires a functional DAP12 ITAM motif. Binding of apoptotic cells promotes the activation of the PI3K-Akt kinase pathway in macrophages, while silencing of CD300b expression diminishes PI3K-Akt kinase activation and impairs efferocytosis. Collectively, our data show that CD300b recognizes PS as a ligand, and regulates the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells via the DAP12 signaling pathway. PMID:25034781

  16. Lipid flip-flop in binary membranes composed of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Brown, Krystal L; Conboy, John C

    2013-12-05

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of lipid flip-flop in bilayers composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (DPPS) and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) were studied using sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy. The kinetics of DSPC and DPPS flip-flop were examined as a function of temperature and bilayer composition. The rate of DSPC flip-flop did not exhibit any significant dependence on bilayer composition while the rate of DPPS flip-flop was inversely dependent on the mole fraction of DPPS. The transition-state thermodynamics for DSPC and DPPS lipids in these mixed bilayers were determined in order to identify the energetic impact of the phosphatidylserine headgroup on lipid flip-flop. The thermodynamics for the DSPC component remained statistically identical to bilayers composed entirely of DSPC. The activation energy for the DPPS component showed a linear correlation with the mole fraction of DPPS for all bilayer compositions. The enthalpy and entropy for DPPS flip-flop did not increase linearly with the fraction of DPPS but did directly correlate with the molecular area. The DPPS component also exhibited enthalpy-entropy compensation which suggests that lipid hydration may play a significant role in membrane dynamics.

  17. Phosphatidylserine Outer Layer Translocation Is Implicated in IL-10 Secretion by Human Regulatory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Michael; Combe, Bernard; Morel, Jacques; Daien, Claire I.

    2017-01-01

    B cells can have a regulatory role, mainly mediated by interleukin 10 (IL-10). IL-10 producing B cells (B10 cells) cells remain to be better characterized. Annexin V binds phosphatidylserine (PS), which is externalized during apoptosis. Previous works suggested that B10 cells are apoptotic cells since they bind Annexin V. Others showed that Annexin V binding could also be expressed on viable B cells. We aimed to explore if PS exposure can be a marker of B10 cells and if PS exposure has a functional role on B cell IL-10 production in healthy subjects. We found that B10 cells were significantly more often Annexin V+ than IL-10 non-producing B cells. After CpG activation, Annexin V+ B cells differentiated more often into B10 cells than Annexin Vneg B cells. Cell death and early apoptosis were similar between Annexin V+ and Annexin Vneg B cells. PS blockage, using biotinylated AnV and glyburide, decreased B10 cell differentiation. This study showed that B10 cells have an increased PS exposure independently of any apoptotic state. B cells exposing PS differentiate more into B10 cells whereas PS blockage inhibits B10 cells generation. These results strongly suggest a link between PS exposure and B10 cells. PMID:28072868

  18. Involvement of Sac1 phosphoinositide phosphatase in the metabolism of phosphatidylserine in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2014-04-01

    Sac1 is a phosphoinositide phosphatase that preferentially dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate. Mutation of SAC1 causes not only the accumulation of phosphoinositides but also reduction of the phosphatidylserine (PS) level in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we characterized the mechanism underlying the PS reduction in SAC1-deleted cells. Incorporation of (32) P into PS was significantly delayed in sac1∆ cells. Such a delay was also observed in SAC1- and PS decarboxylase gene-deleted cells, suggesting that the reduction in the PS level is caused by a reduction in the rate of biosynthesis of PS. A reduction in the PS level was also observed with repression of STT4 encoding phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase or deletion of VPS34 encoding phophatidylinositol 3-kinase. However, the combination of mutations of SAC1 and STT4 or VPS34 did not restore the reduced PS level, suggesting that both the synthesis and degradation of phosphoinositides are important for maintenance of the PS level. Finally, we observed an abnormal PS distribution in sac1∆ cells when a specific probe for PS was expressed. Collectively, these results suggested that Sac1 is involved in the maintenance of a normal rate of biosynthesis and distribution of PS.

  19. Characterization and localization of phosphatidylglycerophosphate and phosphatidylserine synthases in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, C W; Steiner, F X; Carman, G M; Niederman, R A

    1989-01-01

    Catalytic properties and membrane associations of the phosphatidylglycerophosphate (PGP) and phosphatidylserine (PS) synthases of Rhodobacter sphaeroides were examined to further characterize sites of phospholipid biosynthesis. In preparations of cytoplasmic membrane (CM) enriched in these activities, apparent Km values of PGP synthase were 90 microM for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate and 60 microM for CDP-diacylglycerol; the apparent Km of PS synthase for L-serine was near 165 microM. Both enzymes required Triton X-100 with optimal PS synthase activity at a detergent/CDP-diacylglycerol (mol/mol) ratio of 7.5:1.0, while for optimal PGP synthase, a range of 10-50:1.0 was observed. Unlike the enzyme in Escherichia coli and several other Gram-negative bacteria, the PS synthase activity had a specific requirement for magnesium and was tightly associated with membranes rather than ribosomes in crude cell extracts. Sedimentation studies suggested that the PGP synthase was distributed uniformly over the CM in both chemoheterotrophically and photoheterotrophically grown cells, while the PS synthase was confined mainly to a vesicular CM fraction. Solubilized PGP synthase activity migrated as a single band with a pI value near 5.5 in a chromato-focusing column and 5.8 on isoelectric focusing; in the latter procedure, the pI was shifted to 5.3 in the presence of CDP-diacylglycerol. The PGP synthase activity gave rise to a single polypeptide band in lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at 4 degrees C.

  20. Molecular mechanism for differential recognition of membrane phosphatidylserine by the immune regulatory receptor Tim4.

    PubMed

    Tietjen, Gregory T; Gong, Zhiliang; Chen, Chiu-Hao; Vargas, Ernesto; Crooks, James E; Cao, Kathleen D; Heffern, Charles T R; Henderson, J Michael; Meron, Mati; Lin, Binhua; Roux, Benot; Schlossman, Mark L; Steck, Theodore L; Lee, Ka Yee C; Adams, Erin J

    2014-04-15

    Recognition of phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids exposed on the extracellular leaflet of plasma membranes is implicated in both apoptotic cell removal and immune regulation. The PS receptor T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain-containing molecule 4 (Tim4) regulates T-cell immunity via phagocytosis of both apoptotic (high PS exposure) and nonapoptotic (intermediate PS exposure) activated T cells. The latter population must be removed at lower efficiency to sensitively control immune tolerance and memory cell population size, but the molecular basis for how Tim4 achieves this sensitivity is unknown. Using a combination of interfacial X-ray scattering, molecular dynamics simulations, and membrane binding assays, we demonstrate how Tim4 recognizes PS in the context of a lipid bilayer. Our data reveal that in addition to the known Ca(2+)-coordinated, single-PS binding pocket, Tim4 has four weaker sites of potential ionic interactions with PS lipids. This organization makes Tim4 sensitive to PS surface concentration in a manner capable of supporting differential recognition on the basis of PS exposure level. The structurally homologous, but functionally distinct, Tim1 and Tim3 are significantly less sensitive to PS surface density, likely reflecting the differences in immunological function between the Tim proteins. These results establish the potential for lipid membrane parameters, such as PS surface density, to play a critical role in facilitating selective recognition of PS-exposing cells. Furthermore, our multidisciplinary approach overcomes the difficulties associated with characterizing dynamic protein/membrane systems to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying Tim4's recognition properties, and thereby provides an approach capable of providing atomic-level detail to uncover the nuances of protein/membrane interactions.

  1. Aminoglycoside-induced phosphatidylserine externalisation in sensory hair cells is regionally restricted, rapid and reversible

    PubMed Central

    Goodyear, R.J.; Gale, J.E.; Ranatunga, K.M.; Kros, C.J.; Richardson, G.P.

    2012-01-01

    The aminophospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) is normally restricted to the inner leaflet of the plasmalemma. During certain cellular processes, including apoptosis, PS translocates to the outer leaflet and can be labelled with externally-applied annexin-V, a calcium-dependent PS-binding protein. In mouse cochlear cultures, annexin-V labelling reveals the aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin induces rapid PS externalisation, specifically on the apical surface of hair cells. PS externalisation is observed within ~75 seconds of neomycin perfusion, first on the hair bundle and then on membrane blebs forming around the apical surface. Whole-cell capacitance also increases significantly within minutes of neomycin application indicating blebbing is accompanied by membrane addition to the hair-cell surface. PS-externalisation and membrane blebbing can, nonetheless, occur independently. Pre-treating hair cells with calcium chelators, a procedure that blocks mechanotransduction, or overexpressing a PIP2-binding pleckstrin-homology domain, can reduce neomycin-induced PS externalisation, suggesting neomycin enters hair cells via transduction channels, clusters PIP2, and thereby activates lipid scrambling. The effects of short-term neomycin treatment are reversible. Following neomycin washout, PS is no longer detected on the apical surface, apical membrane blebs disappear and surface-bound annexin-V is internalised, distributing throughout the supra-nuclear cytoplasm of the hair cell. Hair cells can therefore repair, and recover from, neomycin-induced surface damage. Hair cells lacking myosin VI, a minus-end directed actin-based motor implicated in endocytosis, can also recover from brief neomycin treatment. Internalised annexin-V, however, remains below the apical surface thereby pinpointing a critical role for myosin VI in the transport of endocytosed material away from the hair cell’s periphery. PMID:18829952

  2. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization. PMID:26572827

  3. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei; Fairn, Gregory D; Hancock, John F

    2015-11-16

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization.

  4. Phosphatidylserine exposure and red cell viability in red cell aging and in hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Franz Edward; Forman, Linda; Beutler, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) normally localizes to the inner leaflet of cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cells, signaling macrophages to ingest them. Along similar lines, it seemed possible that the removal of red cells from circulation because of normal aging or in hemolytic anemias might be triggered by PS exposure. To investigate the role of PS exposure in normal red cell aging, we used N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin to tag rabbit red cells in vivo, then used phycoerythrin-streptavidin to label the biotinylated cells, and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to detect the exposed PS. Flow cytometric analysis of these cells drawn at 10-day intervals up to 70 days after biotinylation indicated that older, biotinylated cells expose more PS. Furthermore, our data match a simple model of red cell senescence that assumes both an age-dependent destruction of senescent red cells preceded by several hours of PS exposure and a random destruction of red cells without PS exposure. By using this model, we demonstrated that the exposure of PS parallels the rate at which biotinylated red cells are removed from circulation. On the other hand, using an annexin V-FITC label and flow cytometry demonstrates that exposed PS does not cause the reduced red cell life span of patients with hemolytic anemia, with the possible exception of those with unstable hemoglobins or sickle cell anemia. Thus, in some cases PS exposure on the cell surface may signal the removal of red cells from circulation, but in other cases some other signal must trigger the sequestration of cells. PMID:9501218

  5. CIRCULATING MICROPARTICLES, BLOOD CELLS, AND ENDOTHELIUM INDUCE PROCOAGULANT ACTIVITY IN SEPSIS THROUGH PHOSPHATIDYLSERINE EXPOSURE.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Meng, Huan; Ma, Ruishuang; He, Zhangxiu; Wu, Xiaoming; Cao, Muhua; Yao, Zhipeng; Zhao, Lu; Li, Tao; Deng, Ruijuan; Dong, Zengxiang; Tian, Ye; Bi, Yayan; Kou, Junjie; Thatte, Hemant S; Zhou, Jin; Shi, Jialan

    2016-03-01

    Sepsis is invariably accompanied by altered coagulation cascade; however, the precise role of phosphatidylserine (PS) in inflammation-associated coagulopathy in sepsis has not been well elucidated. We explored the possibility of exposed PS on microparticles (MPs), blood cells, as well as on endothelium, and defined its role in procoagulant activity (PCA) in sepsis. PS-positive MPs and cells were detected by flow cytometry, while PCA was assessed with clotting time, purified coagulation complex, and fibrin formation assays. Plasma levels of PS MPs derived from platelets, leukocytes (including neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes), erythrocytes, and endothelial cells were elevated by 1.49-, 1.60-, 2.93-, and 1.53-fold, respectively, in septic patients. Meanwhile, PS exposure on blood cells was markedly higher in septic patients than in controls. Additionally, we found that the endothelial cells (ECs) treated with septic serum in vitro exposed more PS than with healthy serum. Isolated MPs/blood cells from septic patients and cultured ECs treated with septic serum in vitro demonstrated significantly shortened coagulation time, greatly enhanced intrinsic/extrinsic FXa generation, and increased thrombin formation. Importantly, confocal imaging of MPs or septic serum-treated ECs identified binding sites for FVa and FXa to form prothrombinase, and further supported fibrin formation in the area where PS exposure was abundant. Pretreatment with lactadherin blocked PS on MPs/blood cells/ECs, prolonged coagulation time by at least 25%, reduced FXa/thrombin generation, and inhibited fibrin formation by approximately 85%. Our findings suggest a key role for PS exposed on MPs, blood cells, and endothelium in augmenting coagulation in sepsis. Therefore, therapies targeting PS may be of particular importance.

  6. ATP11C mutation is responsible for the defect in phosphatidylserine uptake in UPS-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Naoto; Takatsu, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Rie; Nakayama, Kazuhisa; Shin, Hye-Won

    2015-01-01

    Type IV P-type ATPases (P4-ATPases) translocate phospholipids from the exoplasmic to the cytoplasmic leaflets of cellular membranes. We and others previously showed that ATP11C, a member of the P4-ATPases, translocates phosphatidylserine (PS) at the plasma membrane. Twenty years ago, the UPS-1 (uptake of fluorescent PS analogs) cell line was isolated from mutagenized Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells with a defect in nonendocytic uptake of nitrobenzoxadiazole PS. Due to its defect in PS uptake, the UPS-1 cell line has been used in an assay for PS-flipping activity; however, the gene(s) responsible for the defect have not been identified to date. Here, we found that the mRNA level of ATP11C was dramatically reduced in UPS-1 cells relative to parental CHO-K1 cells. By contrast, the level of ATP11A, another PS-flipping P4-ATPase at the plasma membrane, or CDC50A, which is essential for delivery of most P4-ATPases to the plasma membrane, was not affected in UPS-1 cells. Importantly, we identified a nonsense mutation in the ATP11C gene in UPS-1 cells, indicating that the intact ATP11C protein is not expressed. Moreover, exogenous expression of ATP11C can restore PS uptake in UPS-1 cells. These results indicate that lack of the functional ATP11C protein is responsible for the defect in PS uptake in UPS-1 cells and ATP11C is crucial for PS flipping in CHO-K1 cells. PMID:26420878

  7. Effect of Calcium and Magnesium on Phosphatidylserine Membranes: Experiments and All-Atomic Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Molina, Alberto; Rodríguez-Beas, César; Faraudo, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    It is known that phosphatidylserine (PS−) lipids have a very similar affinity for Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations, as revealed by electrokinetic and stability experiments. However, despite this similar affinity, experimental evidence shows that the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+ induces very different aggregation behavior for PS− liposomes as characterized by their fractal dimensions. Also, turbidity measurements confirm substantial differences in aggregation behavior depending on the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+ cations. These puzzling results suggest that although these two cations have a similar affinity for PS− lipids, they induce substantial structural differences in lipid bilayers containing each of these cations. In other words, these cations have strong ion-specific effects on the structure of PS− membranes. This interpretation is supported by all-atomic molecular-dynamics simulations showing that Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations have different binding sites and induce different membrane hydration. We show that although both ions are incorporated deep into the hydrophilic region of the membrane, they have different positions and configurations at the membrane. Absorbed Ca2+ cations present a peak at a distance ∼2 nm from the center of the lipid bilayer, and their most probable binding configuration involves two oxygen atoms from each of the charged moieties of the PS molecule (phosphate and carboxyl groups). In contrast, the distribution of absorbed Mg2+ cations has two different peaks, located a few angstroms before and after the Ca2+ peak. The most probable configurations (corresponding to these two peaks) involve binding to two oxygen atoms from carboxyl groups (the most superficial binding peak) or two oxygen atoms from phosphate groups (the most internal peak). Moreover, simulations also show differences in the hydration structure of the membrane: we obtained a hydration of 7.5 and 9 water molecules per lipid in simulations with Ca2+ and Mg2+, respectively. PMID:22824273

  8. Effects of diacylglycerols on conformation of phosphatidylcholine headgroups in phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, E M; Lester, D S; Borchardt, D B; Zidovetzki, R

    1995-01-01

    The effects of five diacylglycerols (DAGs), diolein, 1-stearoyl,2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol, dioctanoylglycerol, 1-oleoyl,2-sn-acetylglycerol, and dipalmitin (DP), on the structure of lipid bilayers composed of mixtures of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine (4:1 mol/mol) were examined by 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine deuterated at the alpha- and beta-positions of the choline moiety was used to probe the surface region of the membranes. Addition of each DAG except DP caused a continuous decrease in the beta-deuteron quadrupole splittings and a concomitant increase in the alpha-deuteron splittings indicating that DAGs induce a conformational change in the phosphatidylcholine headgroup. Additional evidence of conformational change was found at high DAG concentrations (> or = 20 mol%) where the alpha-deuteron peaks became doublets indicating that the two alpha-deuterons were not equivalent. The changes induced by DP were consistent with the lateral phase separation of the bilayers into gel-like and fluid-like domains with the phosphatidylcholine headgroups in the latter phase being virtually unaffected by DP. The DAG-induced changes in alpha-deuteron splittings were found to correlate with DAG-enhanced protein kinase C (PK-C) activity, suggesting that the DAG-induced conformational changes of the phosphatidylcholine headgroups are either directly or indirectly related to a mechanism of PK-C activation. 2H NMR relaxation measurements showed significant increase of the spin-lattice relaxation times for the region of the phosphatidylcholine headgroups, induced by all DAGs except DP. However, this effect of DAGs did not correlate with the DAG-induced activation of PK-C. PMID:8519996

  9. Phosphatidylserine translocation to the mitochondrion is an ATP-dependent process in permeabilized animal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voelker, D.R. )

    1989-12-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were pulse labeled with ({sup 3}H)serine, and the synthesis of phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine from phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)serine during the subsequent chase was used as a measure of lipid translocation to the mitochondria. When the CHO-K1 cells were pulse labeled and subsequently permeabilized with 50 {mu}g of saponin per ml, there was no significant turnover of nascent phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)serine to form phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine during an ensuring chase. Supplementation of the permeabilized cells with 2 mM ATP resulted in significant phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine synthesis (83% of that found in intact cells) from phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)serine during a subsequent 2-hr chase. Phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine synthesis essentially ceased after 2 hr in the permeabilized cells. The translocation-dependent synthesis of phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine was a saturable process with respect to ATP concentration in permeabilized cells. The conversion of phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)serine to phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine did not occur in saponin-treated cultures supplemented with 2 mM AMP, 2 mM 5{prime}-adenylyl imidodiphosphate, or apyrase plus 2 mM ATP. ATP was the most effective nucleotide, but the addition of GTP, CTP, UTP, and ADP also supported the translocation-dependent synthesis of phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine albeit to a lesser extent. These data provide evidence that the interorganelle translocation of phosphatidylserine requires ATP and is largely independent of soluble cytosolic proteins.

  10. Radioiodinated, photoactivatable phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine: transfer properties and differential photoreactive interaction with human erythrocyte membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schroit, A.J.; Madsen, J.; Ruoho, A.E.

    1987-04-07

    An isotopically labeled cross-linking reagent, succinimido 3-(3-(/sup 125/I)iodo-4-azidophenyl)propionate, has been synthesized and coupled to 1-acyl-2-(aminocaproyl)phosphatidylcholine according to previously described procedures. /sup 125/I- and N/sub 3/-labeled phosphatidylserine (/sup 125/I-N/sub 3/-PS) was produced from the phosphatidylcholine (PC) analog by phospholipase D catalyzed base exchange in the presence of L-serine. These phospholipid analogues are photoactivatable, are labeled with /sup 125/I at high specific activity, completely incorporate into synthetic vesicles, and spontaneously transfer between membranes. When an excess of acceptor vesicles or red blood cells (RBC) was mixed with a population of donor vesicles containing the /sup 125/I-N/sub 3/-phospholipids, approximately 40% of the analogues transferred to the acceptor population. After transfer in the dark to RBC, all of the /sup 125/I-N/sub 3/-PC incorporated into the cells could be removed by washing with serum, whereas the /sup 125/I-N/sub 3/-PS could not. After photolabeling of intact RBC, approx.50% of the PC and 20% of the PS cross-linked to membrane proteins as determined by their insolubility in CHCl/sub 3//MeOH. Analysis of probe distribution by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that /sup 125/I-N/sub 3/-PS preferentially labeled a M/sub r/ 30,000 peptide which contained approx.30% of the protein-bound label.

  11. ATP11C mutation is responsible for the defect in phosphatidylserine uptake in UPS-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Takada, Naoto; Takatsu, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Rie; Nakayama, Kazuhisa; Shin, Hye-Won

    2015-11-01

    Type IV P-type ATPases (P4-ATPases) translocate phospholipids from the exoplasmic to the cytoplasmic leaflets of cellular membranes. We and others previously showed that ATP11C, a member of the P4-ATPases, translocates phosphatidylserine (PS) at the plasma membrane. Twenty years ago, the UPS-1 (uptake of fluorescent PS analogs) cell line was isolated from mutagenized Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells with a defect in nonendocytic uptake of nitrobenzoxadiazole PS. Due to its defect in PS uptake, the UPS-1 cell line has been used in an assay for PS-flipping activity; however, the gene(s) responsible for the defect have not been identified to date. Here, we found that the mRNA level of ATP11C was dramatically reduced in UPS-1 cells relative to parental CHO-K1 cells. By contrast, the level of ATP11A, another PS-flipping P4-ATPase at the plasma membrane, or CDC50A, which is essential for delivery of most P4-ATPases to the plasma membrane, was not affected in UPS-1 cells. Importantly, we identified a nonsense mutation in the ATP11C gene in UPS-1 cells, indicating that the intact ATP11C protein is not expressed. Moreover, exogenous expression of ATP11C can restore PS uptake in UPS-1 cells. These results indicate that lack of the functional ATP11C protein is responsible for the defect in PS uptake in UPS-1 cells and ATP11C is crucial for PS flipping in CHO-K1 cells.

  12. EGF domain of coagulation factor IX is conducive to exposure of phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Hidai, Chiaki; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Kokubun, Shinichiro; Kitano, Hisataka

    2017-04-01

    Lipid rafts are an initiation site for many different signals. Recently, we reported that an EGF domain in activated coagulation factor IX (EGF-F9) increases lipid raft formation and accelerates cell migration. However, the detailed mechanism is not well understood. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of EGF-F9 on the cell membrane. A431 cells (derived from human squamous cell carcinoma) were treated with recombinant EGF-F9. Cells were immunocytochemically stained with probes for lipid rafts or phosphatidylserine (PS). After 3 min of treatment with EGF-F9, cholera toxin subunit B (CTxB) binding domains emerged at the adhesive tips of filopodia. Subsequently, CTxB staining was observed on the filopodial shaft. Finally, large clusters of CTxB domains were observed at the edge of cell bodies. Markers for lipid rafts, such as caveolin-1 and a GPI anchored protein, co-localized with CTxB. Staining with annexin V and XII revealed that PS was exposed at the tips of filopodia, translocated on filopodial shafts, and co-localized with CTxB at the rafts. Immunocytochemistry showed that scramblase-1 protein was present at the filopodial tips. Our data indicates that EGF-F9 accelerates PS exposure around the filopodial adhesion complex and induces clustering of lipid rafts in the cell body. PS exposure is thought to occur on cells undergoing apoptosis. Further study of the function of the EGF-F9 motif in mediating signal transduction is necessary because it is shared by a number of proteins.

  13. Pleiotropic actions of forskolin result in phosphatidylserine exposure in primary trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Meghan R; Winkler-Lowen, Bonnie; Jiang, Yanyan; Davidge, Sandra T; Guilbert, Larry J

    2013-01-01

    Forskolin is an extract of the Coleus forskholii plant that is widely used in cell physiology to raise intracellular cAMP levels. In the field of trophoblast biology, forskolin is one of the primary treatments used to induce trophoblastic cellular fusion. The syncytiotrophoblast (ST) is a continuous multinucleated cell in the human placenta that separates maternal from fetal circulations and can only expand by fusion with its stem cell, the cytotrophoblast (CT). Functional investigation of any aspect of ST physiology requires in vitro differentiation of CT and de novo ST formation, thus selecting the most appropriate differentiation agent for the hypothesis being investigated is necessary as well as addressing potential off-target effects. Previous studies, using forskolin to induce fusion in trophoblastic cell lines, identified phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization to be essential for trophoblast fusion and showed that widespread PS externalization is present even after fusion has been achieved. PS is a membrane phospholipid that is primarily localized to the inner-membrane leaflet. Externalization of PS is a hallmark of early apoptosis and is involved in cellular fusion of myocytes and macrophages. We were interested to examine whether PS externalization was also involved in primary trophoblast fusion. We show widespread PS externalization occurs after 72 hours when fusion was stimulated with forskolin, but not when stimulated with the cell permeant cAMP analog Br-cAMP. Using a forskolin analog, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, which stimulates membrane transporters but not adenylate cyclase, we found that widespread PS externalization required both increased intracellular cAMP levels and stimulation of membrane transporters. Treatment of primary trophoblasts with Br-cAMP alone did not result in widespread PS externalization despite high levels of cellular fusion. Thus, we concluded that widespread PS externalization is independent of trophoblast fusion and, importantly

  14. Snake Cytotoxins Bind to Membranes via Interactions with Phosphatidylserine Head Groups of Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Konshina, Anastasia G.; Boldyrev, Ivan A.; Utkin, Yuri N.; Omel'kov, Anton V.; Efremov, Roman G.

    2011-01-01

    The major representatives of Elapidae snake venom, cytotoxins (CTs), share similar three-fingered fold and exert diverse range of biological activities against various cell types. CT-induced cell death starts from the membrane recognition process, whose molecular details remain unclear. It is known, however, that the presence of anionic lipids in cell membranes is one of the important factors determining CT-membrane binding. In this work, we therefore investigated specific interactions between one of the most abundant of such lipids, phosphatidylserine (PS), and CT 4 of Naja kaouthia using a combined, experimental and modeling, approach. It was shown that incorporation of PS into zwitterionic liposomes greatly increased the membrane-damaging activity of CT 4 measured by the release of the liposome-entrapped calcein fluorescent dye. The CT-induced leakage rate depends on the PS concentration with a maximum at approximately 20% PS. Interestingly, the effects observed for PS were much more pronounced than those measured for another anionic lipid, sulfatide. To delineate the potential PS binding sites on CT 4 and estimate their relative affinities, a series of computer simulations was performed for the systems containing the head group of PS and different spatial models of CT 4 in aqueous solution and in an implicit membrane. This was done using an original hybrid computational protocol implementing docking, Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. As a result, at least three putative PS-binding sites with different affinities to PS molecule were delineated. Being located in different parts of the CT molecule, these anion-binding sites can potentially facilitate and modulate the multi-step process of the toxin insertion into lipid bilayers. This feature together with the diverse binding affinities of the sites to a wide variety of anionic targets on the membrane surface appears to be functionally meaningful and may adjust CT action against different types of

  15. Differential effects of zinc and magnesium ions on mineralization activity of phosphatidylserine calcium phosphate complexes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Licia N Y; Genge, Brian R; Wuthier, Roy E

    2009-07-01

    Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) are present in the mineral of matrix vesicles (MVs) and biological apatites, and are known to influence the onset and progression of mineral formation by amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and hydroxyapatite (HAP). However, neither has been studied systematically for its effect on mineral formation by phosphatidylserine-Ca(2+)-Pi complexes (PS-CPLX), an important constituent of the MV nucleation core. Presented here are studies on the effects of increasing levels of Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) on the process of mineral formation, either when present in synthetic cartilage lymph (SCL), or when incorporated during the formation of PS-CPLX. Pure HAP and PS-CPLX proved to be powerful nucleators, but ACP took much longer to induce mineral formation. In SCL, Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) had significantly different inhibitory effects on the onset and amount of mineral formation; HAP and PS-CPLX were less affected than ACP. Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) caused similar reductions in the rate and length of rapid mineral formation, but Zn(2+) was a more potent inhibitor on a molar basis. When incorporated into PS-CPLX, Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) caused significantly different effects than when present in SCL. Even low, subphysiological levels of Mg(2+) altered the inherent structure of PS-CPLX and markedly reduced its ability to induce and propagate mineral formation. Incorporated Zn(2+) caused significantly less effect, low (<20 microM) levels causing almost no inhibition. Levels of Zn(2+) present in MVs do not appear to inhibit their nucleational activity.

  16. Effect of calcium and magnesium on phosphatidylserine membranes: experiments and all-atomic simulations.

    PubMed

    Martín-Molina, Alberto; Rodríguez-Beas, César; Faraudo, Jordi

    2012-05-02

    It is known that phosphatidylserine (PS(-)) lipids have a very similar affinity for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) cations, as revealed by electrokinetic and stability experiments. However, despite this similar affinity, experimental evidence shows that the presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) induces very different aggregation behavior for PS(-) liposomes as characterized by their fractal dimensions. Also, turbidity measurements confirm substantial differences in aggregation behavior depending on the presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) cations. These puzzling results suggest that although these two cations have a similar affinity for PS(-) lipids, they induce substantial structural differences in lipid bilayers containing each of these cations. In other words, these cations have strong ion-specific effects on the structure of PS(-) membranes. This interpretation is supported by all-atomic molecular-dynamics simulations showing that Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) cations have different binding sites and induce different membrane hydration. We show that although both ions are incorporated deep into the hydrophilic region of the membrane, they have different positions and configurations at the membrane. Absorbed Ca(2+) cations present a peak at a distance ~2 nm from the center of the lipid bilayer, and their most probable binding configuration involves two oxygen atoms from each of the charged moieties of the PS molecule (phosphate and carboxyl groups). In contrast, the distribution of absorbed Mg(2+) cations has two different peaks, located a few angstroms before and after the Ca(2+) peak. The most probable configurations (corresponding to these two peaks) involve binding to two oxygen atoms from carboxyl groups (the most superficial binding peak) or two oxygen atoms from phosphate groups (the most internal peak). Moreover, simulations also show differences in the hydration structure of the membrane: we obtained a hydration of 7.5 and 9 water molecules per lipid in simulations with Ca(2+) and Mg(2

  17. Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidylethanolamine Bind to Protein Z Cooperatively and with Equal Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Tanusree; Manoj, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Protein Z (PZ) is an anticoagulant that binds with high affinity to Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) and accelerates the rate of ZPI-mediated inhibition of factor Xa (fXa) by more than 1000-fold in the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipids. PZ promotion of the ZPI-fXa interaction results from the anchoring of the Gla domain of PZ onto phospholipid surfaces and positioning the bound ZPI in close proximity to the Gla-anchored fXa, forming a ternary complex of PZ/ZPI/fXa. Although interaction of PZ with phospholipid membrane appears to be absolutely crucial for its cofactor activity, little is known about the binding of different phospholipids to PZ. The present study was conceived to understand the interaction of different phospholipids with PZ. Experiments with both soluble lipids and model membranes revealed that PZ binds to phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) with equal affinity (Kd~48 μM); further, PS and PE bound to PZ synergistically. Equilibrium dialysis experiments revealed two lipid-binding sites for both PS and PE. PZ binds with weaker affinity to other phospholipids, e.g., phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and binding of these lipids is not synergistic with respect to PS. Both PS and PE -containing membranes supported the formation of a fXa-PZ complex. PZ protection of fXa from antithrombin inhibition were also shown to be comparable in presence of both PS: PC and PE: PC membranes. These findings are particularly important and intriguing since they suggest a special affinity of PZ, in vivo, towards activated platelets, the primary membrane involved in blood coagulation process. PMID:27584039

  18. Nonideal mixing of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylcholine in the fluid lamellar phase.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Swanson, J E; Dibble, A R; Hinderliter, A K; Feigenson, G W

    1993-01-01

    The mixing of phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) in fluid bilayer model membranes was studied by measuring binding of aqueous Ca2+ ions. The measured [Ca2+]aq was used to derive the activity coefficient for PS, gamma PS, in the lipid mixture. For (16:0, 18:1) PS in binary mixtures with either (16:0, 18:1)PC, (14:1, 14:1)PC, or (18:1, 18:1)PC, gamma PS > 1; i.e., mixing is nonideal, with PS and PC clustered rather than randomly distributed, despite the electrostatic repulsion between PS headgroups. To understand better this mixing behavior, Monte Carlo simulations of the PS/PC distributions were performed, using Kawasaki relaxation. The excess energy was divided into an electrostatic term Uel and one adjustable term including all other nonideal energy contributions, delta Em. Uel was calculated using a discrete charge theory. Kirkwood's coupling parameter method was used to calculate the excess free energy of mixing, delta GEmix, hence In gamma PS,calc. The values of In gamma PS,calc were equalized by adjusting delta Em in order to find the simulated PS/PC distribution that corresponded to the experimental results. We were thus able to compare the smeared charge calculation of [Ca2+]surf with a calculation ("masked evaluation method") that recognized clustering of the negatively charged PS: clustering was found to have a modest effect on [Ca2+]surf, relative to the smeared charge model. Even though both PS and PC tend to cluster, the long-range nature of the electrostatic repulsion reduces the extent of PS clustering at low PS mole fraction compared to PC clustering at an equivalent low PC mole fraction. PMID:8457667

  19. The Effects of Phosphatidylserine and Omega-3 Fatty Acid-Containing Supplement on Late Life Depression

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Teruhisa

    2015-01-01

    Late life depression is often associated with a poor response to antidepressants; therefore an alternative strategy for therapy is required. Although several studies have reported that phosphatidylserine (PS) may be effective for late life depression and that omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA have also proven beneficial for many higher mental functions, including depression, no concrete conclusion has been reached. This study was performed to clarify the effect of PS and omega-3 fatty acid-containing supplement for late life depression by not only clinical evaluation but also salivary cortisol levels. Eighteen elderly subjects with major depression were selected for the study. In all, insufficient improvement had been obtained by antidepressant therapy for at least 6 months. The exclusion criteria from prior brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) included the presence of structural MRI findings compatible with stroke or other gross brain lesions or malformations, but not white matter hypersensitivities. They took a supplement containing PS 100 mg, DHA 119 mg and EPA 70 mg three times a day for 12 weeks. The effects of the supplement were assessed using the 17-item Hamilton depression scale (HAM-D17) and the basal levels and circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol. The study adopted them as indices because: salivary cortisol levels are high in patients with depression, their circadian rhythm related to salivary cortisol is often irregular, and these symptoms are alleviated as depression improves. The mean HAM-D17 in all subjects taking the supplement was significantly improved after 12 weeks of taking the supplement. These subjects were divided into 10 non-responders and 8 responders. The basal levels and circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol were normalized in the responders while not in non-responders. PS and omega-3 fatty acids, or other elements of the supplement, may be effective for late life depression, associated with the correction of basal levels and circadian

  20. Millimeter wave induced reversible externalization of phosphatidylserine molecules in cells exposed in vitro.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Imre; Kappelmayer, Janos; Alekseev, Stanislav I; Ziskin, Marvin C

    2006-04-01

    In vitro exposure of refrigerated samples (4 degrees C) of anti-coagulated blood with millimeter waves (MMWs) at incident power densities (IPDs) between 0.55 and 1.23 W/cm2 has been found to induce clot formation. We found a small but statistically significant change in clot size with increasing IPD value. MMW exposure of blood samples starting at room temperature (22 degrees C) did not induce blood coagulation; neither did conventional heating at temperatures up to 40 degrees C. Since cell-free plasma did not clot upon MMW exposure, the role of blood cells was particularly analyzed. Experiments on various mixtures of blood cells with plasma revealed an important role of red blood cells (RBC) in the coagulation process. Plasma coagulation also developed within the MMW beam above dense keratinocyte (HaCaT) monolayers suggesting it lacked cell-type specificity. We hypothesized that alteration of the membrane surface in exposed cells might be responsible for the circumscribed coagulation. The thrombogenic role of externalized phosphatidylserine (PS) molecules is well known. Therefore, we carried out experiments for immunolabeling PS molecules with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated Annexin V on exposed cells. Fluorescence microscopy of the adherent human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and murine melanoma cells (B16F10) showed that MMW exposure at an IPD of 1.23 W/cm2 is capable of inducing reversible externalization of PS molecules in cells within the beam area without detectable membrane damage. Nonadherent Jurkat cells exposed to MMW at an IPD of 34.5 mW/cm2 also showed reversible PS externalization with flow cytometry, whether the cell temperature was held constant or permitted to rise. These results suggest that certain biological effects induced by MMWs could be initiated by membrane changes in exposed cells.

  1. Strain differences in arsenic-induced oxidative lesion via arsenic biomethylation between C57BL/6J and 129X1/SvJ mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ruirui; Wu, Xiafang; Wang, Huihui; Fang, Xin; Li, Yongfang; Gao, Lanyue; Sun, Guifan; Pi, Jingbo; Xu, Yuanyuan

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic is a common environmental and occupational toxicant with dramatic species differences in its susceptibility and metabolism. Mouse strain variability may provide a better understanding of the arsenic pathological profile but is largely unknown. Here we investigated oxidative lesion induced by acute arsenic exposure in the two frequently used mouse strains C57BL/6J and 129X1/SvJ in classical gene targeting technique. A dose of 5 mg/kg body weight arsenic led to a significant alteration of blood glutathione towards oxidized redox potential and increased hepatic malondialdehyde content in C57BL/6J mice, but not in 129X1/SvJ mice. Hepatic antioxidant enzymes were induced by arsenic in transcription in both strains and many were higher in C57BL/6J than 129X1/SvJ mice. Arsenic profiles in the liver, blood and urine and transcription of genes encoding enzymes involved in arsenic biomethylation all indicate a higher arsenic methylation capacity, which contributes to a faster hepatic arsenic excretion, in 129X1/SvJ mice than C57BL/6J mice. Taken together, C57BL/6J mice are more susceptible to oxidative hepatic injury compared with 129X1/SvJ mice after acute arsenic exposure, which is closely associated with arsenic methylation pattern of the two strains. PMID:28303940

  2. Strain differences in arsenic-induced oxidative lesion via arsenic biomethylation between C57BL/6J and 129X1/SvJ mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ruirui; Wu, Xiafang; Wang, Huihui; Fang, Xin; Li, Yongfang; Gao, Lanyue; Sun, Guifan; Pi, Jingbo; Xu, Yuanyuan

    2017-03-01

    Arsenic is a common environmental and occupational toxicant with dramatic species differences in its susceptibility and metabolism. Mouse strain variability may provide a better understanding of the arsenic pathological profile but is largely unknown. Here we investigated oxidative lesion induced by acute arsenic exposure in the two frequently used mouse strains C57BL/6J and 129X1/SvJ in classical gene targeting technique. A dose of 5 mg/kg body weight arsenic led to a significant alteration of blood glutathione towards oxidized redox potential and increased hepatic malondialdehyde content in C57BL/6J mice, but not in 129X1/SvJ mice. Hepatic antioxidant enzymes were induced by arsenic in transcription in both strains and many were higher in C57BL/6J than 129X1/SvJ mice. Arsenic profiles in the liver, blood and urine and transcription of genes encoding enzymes involved in arsenic biomethylation all indicate a higher arsenic methylation capacity, which contributes to a faster hepatic arsenic excretion, in 129X1/SvJ mice than C57BL/6J mice. Taken together, C57BL/6J mice are more susceptible to oxidative hepatic injury compared with 129X1/SvJ mice after acute arsenic exposure, which is closely associated with arsenic methylation pattern of the two strains.

  3. Determination of phosphatidylserine in milk-based nutritional products using online derivatization high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qi; Zhang, Jie; Pei, Weijie; Zhang, Chunyan; Yew, Jia Le

    2015-02-13

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) has received interest for its ability to improve cognitive abilities and behaviors. A new method for determining PS in milk-based nutritional products has been developed. The method includes a quick and simple sample preparation procedure, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fluorescence detection (FLD) with an on-line 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (FMOC) derivatization. The method allows PS to be determined in raw materials, milk powder and liquid milk products. The day-to-day (n=3 days) average recovery of over spike-in (at 100% PS content level) was 100%, and the method quantification limit is 53 mg per kg milk powder.

  4. Inhibition of Binding of β2-Glycoprotein 1 to Phosphatidylserine by Polymyxin B, a Lupus-Like Anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Uchman, Boguslaw; Triplett, Douglas A

    2015-09-01

    Polymyxin B is a cationic peptide that inhibits phospholipid-dependent coagulation tests including activated partial thromboplastin time and to a lesser degree prothrombin time. Thrombin clotting time is insensitive to polymyxin B. β2-glycoprotein 1 (β2GP1) is a cofactor of antiphospholipid antibodies. Antiphospholipid autoantibodies also poses lupus anticoagulant activity through interactions with β2GP1. Using affinity chromatography, polymyxin B can effectively decrease the binding of β2GP1 to immobilize phosphatidylserine. Since then, anticoagulant effect of polymyxin B is most likely due to the binding to negatively charged phospholipids, preventing formation of coagulation complexes.

  5. Oxidative lipidomics of hyperoxic acute lung injury: mass spectrometric characterization of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Kaynar, A. Murat; Kapralova, Valentyna I.; Wasserloos, Karla; Li, Jin; Mosher, Mackenzie; Wright, Lindsay; Wipf, Peter; Watkins, Simon; Pitt, Bruce R.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been shown to play a significant role in hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury, in part, by inducing apoptosis of pulmonary endothelium. However, the signaling roles of phospholipid oxidation products in pulmonary endothelial apoptosis have not been studied. Using an oxidative lipidomics approach, we identified individual molecular species of phospholipids involved in the apoptosis-associated peroxidation process in a hyperoxic lung. C57BL/6 mice were killed 72 h after exposure to hyperoxia (100% oxygen). We found that hyperoxia-induced apoptosis (documented by activation of caspase-3 and -7 and histochemical terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP-mediated nick-end labeling staining of pulmonary endothelium) was accompanied by nonrandom oxidation of pulmonary lipids. Two anionic phospholipids, mitochondria-specific cardiolipin (CL) and extramitochondrial phosphatidylserine (PS), were the two major oxidized phospholipids in hyperoxic lung. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, we identified several oxygenation products in CL and PS. Quantitative assessments revealed a significant decrease of CL and PS molecular species containing C18:2, C20:4, C22:5, and C22:6 fatty acids. Similarly, exposure of mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (MLEC) to hyperoxia (95% oxygen; 72 h) resulted in activation of caspase-3 and -7 and significantly decreased the content of CL molecular species containing C18:2 and C20:4 as well as PS molecular species containing C22:5 and C22:6. Oxygenated molecular species were found in the same two anionic phospholipids, CL and PS, in MLEC exposed to hyperoxia. Treatment of MLEC with a mitochondria-targeted radical scavenger, a conjugate of hemi-gramicidin S with nitroxide, XJB-5-131, resulted in significantly lower oxidation of both CL and PS and a decrease in hyperoxia-induced changes in caspase-3 and -7 activation. We speculate that cytochrome c driven oxidation of CL and PS is associated with the signaling

  6. Phosphatidylserine-induced factor Xa dimerization and binding to factor Va are competing processes in solution.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Rinku; Koklic, Tilen; Rezaie, Alireza R; Lentz, Barry R

    2013-01-08

    A soluble, short chain phosphatidylserine, 1,2-dicaproyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (C6PS), binds to discrete sites on FXa, FVa, and prothrombin to alter their conformations, to promote FXa dimerization (K(d) ~ 14 nM), and to enhance both the catalytic activity of FXa and the cofactor activity of FVa. In the presence of calcium, C6PS binds to two sites on FXa, one in the epidermal growth factor-like (EGF) domain and one in the catalytic domain; the latter interaction is sensitive to Na(+) binding and probably represents a protein recognition site. Here we ask whether dimerization of FXa and its binding to FVa in the presence of C6PS are competitive processes. We monitored FXa activity at 5, 20, and 50 nM FXa while titrating with FVa in the presence of 400 μM C6PS and 3 or 5 mM Ca(2+) to show that the apparent K(d) of FVa-FXa interaction increased with an increase in FXa concentration at 5 mM Ca(2+), but the K(d) was only slightly affected at 3 mM Ca(2+). A mixture of 50 nM FXa and 50 nM FVa in the presence of 400 μM C6PS yielded both Xa homodimers and Xa·Va heterodimers, but no FXa dimers bound to FVa. A mutant FXa (R165A) that has reduced prothrombinase activity showed both weakened dimerization (K(d) ~ 147 nM) and weakened FVa binding (apparent K(d) values of 58, 92, and 128 nM for 5, 20, and 50 nM R165A FXa, respectively). Native gel electrophoresis showed that the GLA-EGF(NC) fragment of FXa (lacking the catalytic domain) neither dimerized nor formed a complex with FVa in the presence of 400 μM C6PS and 5 mM Ca(2+). Our results demonstrate that the dimerization site and FVa-binding site are both located in the catalytic domain of FXa and that these sites are linked thermodynamically.

  7. Phosphorus-31 and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of divalent cation binding to phosphatidylserine membranes. Use of cobalt as a paramagnetic probe

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    The paramagnetic divalent cation cobalt has large and well-understood effects on NMR signals from ligands bound in the first coordination sphere, i.e., inner-sphere ligands, and the authors have used these effects to identify divalent cation binding sites at the surface of phosphatidylserine membranes. /sup 31/P NMR results show that 13% of the bound cobalt ions are involved in inner-sphere complexes with the phosphodiester group, while /sup 13/C NMR results show that 54% of the bound cobalt ions are involved in unidentate inner sphere complexes with the carboxyl group. No evidence is found for cobalt binding to the carbonyl groups, but proton release studies suggest that 32% of the bound cobalt ions are involved in chelate complexes that contain both the carboxyl and the amine groups. All of the bound cobalt ions can thus be accounted for in terms of inner sphere complexes with the phosphodiester group or the carboxyl group. They suggest that the unidentate inner-sphere complex between cobalt and the carboxyl group of phosphatidylserine and the inner-sphere complex between cobalt and the phosphodiester group of phosphatidylserine provide reasonable models for complexes between alkaline earth cations and phosphatidylserine membranes.

  8. Phosphorus-31 and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of divalent cation binding to phosphatidylserine membranes: use of cobalt as a paramagnetic probe

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, A.C.

    1982-09-28

    The paramagnetic divalent cation cobalt has large and well-understood effects on NMR signals from ligands bound in the first coordination sphere, i.e., inner-sphere ligands, and we have used these effects to identify divalent cation binding sites at the surface of phosphatidylserine membranes. /sup 31/P NMR results show that 13% of the bound cobalt ions are involved in inner-sphere complexes with the phosphodiester group, while /sup 13/C NMR results show that 54% of the bound cobalt ions are involved in unidentate inner sphere complexes with the carboxyl group. No evidence is found for cobalt binding to the carbonyl groups, but proton release studies suggest that 32% of the bound cobalt ions are involved in chelate complexes that contain both the carboxyl and the amine groups. All (i.e., 13% + 54% + 32% = 99%) of the bound cobalt ions can thus be accounted for in terms of inner sphere complexes with the phosphodiester group or the carboxyl group. We suggest that the unidentate inner-sphere complex between cobalt and the carboxyl group of phosphatidylserine and the inner-sphere complex between cobalt and the phosphodiester group of phosphatidylserine provide reasonable models for complexes between alkaline earth cations and phosphatidylserine membranes.

  9. 4.1R-deficient human red blood cells have altered phosphatidylserine exposure pathways and are deficient in CD44 and CD47 glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Jeremy, Kris P.; Plummer, Zoe E.; Head, David J.; Madgett, Tracey E.; Sanders, Kelly L.; Wallington, Amanda; Storry, Jill R.; Gilsanz, Florinda; Delaunay, Jean; Avent, Neil D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein 4.1R is an important component of the red cell membrane skeleton. It imparts structural integrity and has transmembrane signaling roles by direct interactions with transmembrane proteins and other membrane skeletal components, notably p55 and calmodulin. Design and Methods Spontaneous and ligation-induced phosphatidylserine exposure on erythrocytes from two patients with 4.1R deficiency were studied, using CD47 glycoprotein and glycophorin C as ligands. We also looked for protein abnormalities in the 4.1R - based multiprotein complex. Results Phosphatidylserine exposure was significantly increased in 4.1R-deficient erythrocytes obtained from the two different individuals when ligands to CD47 glycoprotein were bound. Spontaneous phosphatidylserine exposure was normal. 4.1R, glycophorin C and p55 were missing or sharply reduced. Furthermore there was an alteration or deficiency of CD47 glycoprotein and a lack of CD44 glycoprotein. Based on a recent study in 4.1R-deficient mice, we found that there are clear functional differences between interactions of human red cell 4.1R and its murine counterpart. Conclusions Glycophorin C is known to bind 4.1R, and we have defined previously that it also binds CD47. From our evidence, we suggest that 4.1R plays a role in the phosphatidylserine exposure signaling pathway that is of fundamental importance in red cell turnover. The linkage of CD44 to 4.1R may be relevant to this process. PMID:19794081

  10. Aspirin induces cell death and caspase-dependent phosphatidylserine externalization in HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, E; Dalmau, M; Barragán, M; Pueyo, G; Bartrons, R; Gil, J

    1999-01-01

    The induction of cell death by aspirin was analysed in HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. Aspirin induced two hallmarks of apoptosis: nuclear chromatin condensation and increase in phosphatidylserine externalization. However, aspirin did not induce either oligonucleosomal fragmentation of DNA, decrease in DNA content or nuclear fragmentation. The effect of aspirin on Annexin V binding was inhibited by the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD.fmk, indicating the involvement of caspases in the apoptotic action of aspirin. However, aspirin did not induce proteolysis of PARP, suggesting that aspirin does not increase nuclear caspase 3-like activity in HT-29 cells. This finding may be related with the ‘atypical’ features of aspirin-induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10496355

  11. Involvement of sodium in early phosphatidylserine exposure and phospholipid scrambling induced by P2X7 purinoceptor activation in thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Courageot, Marie-Pierre; Lépine, Sandrine; Hours, Michel; Giraud, Françoise; Sulpice, Jean-Claude

    2004-05-21

    Extracellular ATP (ATP(ec)), a possible effector in thymocyte selection, induces thymocyte death via purinoceptor activation. We show that ATP(ec) induced cell death by apoptosis, rather than lysis, and early phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and phospholipid scrambling in a limited thymocyte population (35-40%). PS externalization resulted from the activation of the cationic channel P2X7 (formerly P2Z) receptor and was triggered in all thymocyte subsets although to different proportions in each one. Phospholipid movement was dependent on ATP(ec)-induced Ca(2+) and/or Na(+) influx. At physiological external Na(+) concentration, without external Ca(2+), PS was exposed in all ATP(ec)-responsive cells. In contrast, without external Na(+), physiological external Ca(2+) concentration promoted a submaximal response. Altogether these data show that Na(+) influx plays a major role in the rapid PS exposure induced by P2X7 receptor activation in thymocytes.

  12. Docosahexaenoic acid and phosphatidylserine improves the antioxidant activities in vitro and in vivo and cognitive functions of the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Chaung, Hso-Chi; Chang, Chin-Dong; Chen, Pi-Hang; Chang, Chia-Jung; Liu, Shyh-Hwa; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Fish oil during early postnatal period may modulate the impact of oxidative stress in the developing brain and thus improve memory and cognitive behaviour. This study investigated the impacts of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6, n-3) and/or phosphatidylserine (PS) on antioxidant activities in vitro, and the beneficial effects of feeding with DHA and/or PS on antioxidant activities in brain and liver tissues and on the cognitive functions of the developing brain. Results indicated that DHA and/or PS significantly enhanced antioxidant activities and increased cell viabilities in vitro. Feeding with DHA and/or PS supplementation not only significantly improved escape latency of animals, but it also improved the oxidative parameters in the brain, enhanced glutathione peroxidase activity as well as reduced nitric mono-oxide levels in the liver. DHA and PS may serve to protect cells from oxidative stress and further improve learning and memory ability in vivo.

  13. Simulations of nanopore formation and phosphatidylserine externalization in lipid membranes subjected to a high-intensity, ultrashort electric pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Joshi, R. P.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2005-09-01

    A combined MD simulator and time dependent Laplace solver are used to analyze the electrically driven phosphatidylserine externalization process in cells. Time dependent details of nanopore formation at cell membranes in response to a high-intensity (100kV/cm) , ultrashort (10ns) electric pulse are also probed. Our results show that nanosized pores could typically be formed within about 5ns . These predictions are in very good agreement with recent experimental data. It is also demonstrated that defect formation and PS externalization in membranes should begin on the anode side. Finally, the simulations confirm that PS externalization is a nanopore facilitated event, rather than the result of molecular translocation across the trans-membrane energy barrier.

  14. 31P and 19F NMR studies of glycophorin-reconstituted membranes: preferential interaction of glycophorin with phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Glycophorin A, a major glycoprotein of the erythrocyte membrane, has been incorporated into small unilamellar vesicles composed of a variety of pure and mixed phospholipids. Nuclear spin labels including 31P and 19F have been used at natural abundance or have been synthetically incorporated in lipids to act as probes of lipid-protein interaction. Interactions produce broadening of resonances in several cases and it can be used to demonstrate preferential interaction of certain lipids with glycophorin. 31P and 19F probes show a strong preferential interaction of glycophorin with phosphatidylserine over phosphatidylcholine. There is some evidence that interactions are more pronounced at the inner surface of the bilayer and these results are rationalized in terms of the asymmetric distribution of protein and lipid.

  15. Methyl salicylate overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) is a chemical that smells like wintergreen. It is used in many over- ... muscle ache creams. It is related to aspirin. Methyl salicylate overdose occurs when someone swallows a dangerous amount ...

  16. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: Binding of nitroxide analogs of a local anesthetic and a photoactivatable analog of phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Electron spin resonance was used to contrast the accessibility of tertiary and quaternary amine local anesthetics to their high affinity binding site in the desensitized Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (AchR). Preincubation of AchR-rich membranes with agonist resulted in a substantial reduction in the initial association of the quaternary amine local anesthetic C6SLMEI with the receptor. The time-dependent reduction in association follows a biphasic exponential function having rate constants of 0.19 min{sup {minus}1} and 0.03 min{sup {minus}1}. In contrast, agonist preincubation did not produce a comparable decrease in the association of C6SL, a tertiary amine analog, with the AchR. The results are modeled in two ways: (1) A charge gate near the channel mouth in the desensitized receptor limits access of the permanently charged cationic local anesthetic (C6SLMEI), but not for the uncharged form of the tertiary amine anesthetic C6SL. (2) A hydrophobic pathway, possibly through a corridor in the annular lipid surrounding receptor subunits, allows the uncharged form of C6SL to reach the high affinity binding site in the AchR. A photoactivatable analog of phosphatidylserine {sup 125}I 4-azido salicylic acid-phosphatidylserine ({sup 125}I ASA-PS) was use to label both Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor-rich membranes and reconstituted AchR membranes. All four subunits of the AchR were found to incorporate label, with the {alpha} subunit incorporating approximately twice as much as each of the other subunits on a per mole basis. The regions of the AchR {alpha} subunit that incorporate {sup 125}I ASA-PS were mapped by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion. Eighty-one per cent of the incorporated label was localized to 11.7 and 10.1 kdal V8 cleavage fragments.

  17. Modulated mechanism of phosphatidylserine on the catalytic activity of Naja naja atra phospholipase A2 and Notechis scutatus scutatus notexin.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Yi-Ling; Lin, Shinne-Ren; Hu, Wan-Ping; Chang, Long-Sen

    2014-12-15

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization is a hallmark for apoptotic death of cells. Previous studies showed that Naja naja atra phospholipase A2 (NnaPLA2) and Notechis scutatus scutatus notexin induced apoptosis of human cancer cells. However, NnaPLA2 and notexin did not markedly disrupt the integrity of cellular membrane as evidenced by membrane permeability of propidium iodide. These findings reflected that the ability of NnaPLA2 and notexin to hydrolyze membrane phospholipids may be affected by PS externalization. To address that question, this study investigated the membrane-interacted mode and catalytic activity of NnaPLA2 and notexin toward outer leaflet (phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin/cholesterol, PC/SM/Chol) and inner leaflet (phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylethanolamine/cholesterol, PS/PE/Chol) of plasma membrane-mimicking vesicles. PS incorporation promoted enzymatic activity of NnaPLA2 and notexin on PC and PC/SM vesicles, but suppressed NnaPLA2 and notexin activity on PC/SM/Chol and PE/Chol vesicles. PS incorporation increased the membrane fluidity of PC vesicles but reduced membrane fluidity of PC/SM, PC/SM/Chol and PE/Chol vesicles. PS increased the phospholipid order of all the tested vesicles. Moreover, PS incorporation did not greatly alter the binding affinity of notexin and NnaPLA2 with phospholipid vesicles. Acrylamide quenching studies and trinitrophenylation of Lys residues revealed that membrane-bound mode of notexin and NnaPLA2 varied with the targeted membrane compositions. The fine structure of catalytic site in NnaPLA2 and notexin in all the tested vesicles showed different changes. Collectively, the present data suggest that membrane-inserted PS modulates PLA2 interfacial activity via its effects on membrane structure and membrane-bound mode of NnaPLA2 and notexin, and membrane compositions determine the effect of PS on PLA2 activity.

  18. Properties of mixtures of cholesterol with phosphatidylcholine or with phosphatidylserine studied by (13)C magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Epand, Richard M; Bain, Alex D; Sayer, Brian G; Bach, Diana; Wachtel, Ellen

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of cholesterol is different in mixtures with phosphatidylcholine as compared with phosphatidylserine. In (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, resonance peaks of the vinylic carbons of cholesterol are a doublet in samples containing 0.3 or 0.5 mol fraction cholesterol with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylserine (POPS) or in cholesterol monohydrate crystals, but a singlet with mixtures of cholesterol and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC). At these molar fractions of cholesterol with POPS, resonances of the C-18 of cholesterol appear at the same chemical shifts as in pure cholesterol monohydrate crystals. These resonances do not appear in samples of POPS with 0.2 mol fraction cholesterol or with POPC up to 0.5 mol fraction cholesterol. In addition, there is another resonance from the cholesterol C18 that appears in all of the mixtures of phospholipid and cholesterol but not in pure cholesterol monohydrate crystals. Using direct polarization, the fraction of cholesterol present as crystallites in POPS with 0.5 mol fraction cholesterol is found to be 80%, whereas with the same mol fraction of cholesterol and POPC none of the cholesterol is crystalline. After many hours of incubation, cholesterol monohydrate crystals in POPS undergo a change that results in an increase in the intensity of certain resonances of cholesterol monohydrate in (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, indicating a rigidification of the C and D rings of cholesterol but not other regions of the molecule. PMID:12324423

  19. Possible involvement of aiPLA2 in the phosphatidylserine-containing liposomes induced production of PGE2 and PGD2 in microglia.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Fumiko; Wu, Zhou; Ma, Hong Mei; Okada, Ryo; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2013-09-15

    Liposomes containing phosphatidylserine (PSL) produce PGE2 after being phagocytosed by microglia, but the precise underlying mechanism behind it still remains unclear. Here, we showed that liposomes consisting of phosphatidylserine and lysophosphatidylcholine, a lipolysis product of phosphatidylcholine by PLA2, were phagocytosed by microglia, but failed to induce secretion of PGE2. Furthermore, PSL-induced PGE2 secretion was significantly inhibited by MJ33, an aiPLA2 inhibitor, but not by AACOCF3, a cPLA2 inhibitor. PSL also produced PGD2 and 15d-PGJ2 in microglia. We thus hypothesize that free arachidonic acid is supplied through aiPLA2-mediated lipolysis of phagocytosed phosphatidylcholine, leading to the production of PGH2 and its downstream metabolites.

  20. Fluorescent detection of apoptotic cells using a family of zinc coordination complexes with selective affinity for membrane surfaces that are enriched with phosphatidylserine.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Bradley D.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Lakshmi, C.; Hanshaw, Roger, G.

    2005-03-01

    The appearance of phosphatidylserine on the membrane surface of apoptotic cells (Jurkat, CHO, HeLa) is monitored by using a family of bis(Zn{sup 2+}-2,2{prime}-dipicolylamine) coordination compounds with appended fluorescein or biotin groups as reporter elements. The phosphatidylserine affinity group is also conjugated directly to a CdSe/CdS quantum dot to produce a probe suitable for prolonged observation without photobleaching. Apoptosis can be detected under a wide variety of conditions, including variations in temperature, incubation time, and binding media. Binding of each probe appears to be restricted to the cell membrane exterior, because no staining of organelles or internal membranes is observed.

  1. Association between body mass index and arsenic methylation efficiency in adult women from southwest U.S. and northwest Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Rubio, Paulina; Roberge, Jason; Arendell, Leslie; Harris, Robin B.; O'Rourke, Mary K.; Chen, Zhao; Cantu-Soto, Ernesto; Meza-Montenegro, Maria M.; Billheimer, Dean; Lu Zhenqiang; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2011-04-15

    Human arsenic methylation efficiency has been consistently associated with arsenic-induced disease risk. Interindividual variation in arsenic methylation profiles is commonly observed in exposed populations, and great effort has been put into the study of potential determinants of this variability. Among the factors that have been evaluated, body mass index (BMI) has not been consistently associated with arsenic methylation efficiency; however, an underrepresentation of the upper BMI distribution was commonly observed in these studies. This study investigated potential factors contributing to variations in the metabolism of arsenic, with specific interest in the effect of BMI where more than half of the population was overweight or obese. We studied 624 adult women exposed to arsenic in drinking water from three independent populations. Multivariate regression models showed that higher BMI, arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) genetic variant 7388, and higher total urinary arsenic were significantly associated with low percentage of urinary arsenic excreted as monomethylarsonic acid (%uMMA) or high ratio between urinary dimethylarsinic acid and uMMA (uDMA/uMMA), while AS3MT genetic variant M287T was associated with high %uMMA and low uDMA/uMMA. The association between BMI and arsenic methylation efficiency was also evident in each of the three populations when studied separately. This strong association observed between high BMI and low %uMMA and high uDMA/uMMA underscores the importance of BMI as a potential arsenic-associated disease risk factor, and should be carefully considered in future studies associating human arsenic metabolism and toxicity.

  2. Histone Arginine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Alessandra Di; Bedford, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Arginine methylation is a common posttranslational modification (PTM). This type of PTM occurs on both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins, and is particularly abundant on shuttling proteins. In this review, we will focus on one aspect of this PTM: the diverse roles that arginine methylation of the core histone tails play in regulating chromatin function. A family of nine protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) catalyze methylation reactions, and a subset target histones. Importantly, arginine methylation of histone tails can promote or prevent the docking of key transcriptional effector molecules, thus playing a central role in the orchestration of the histone code. PMID:21074527

  3. [DNA methylation and epigenetics].

    PubMed

    Vaniushin, B F

    2006-09-01

    In eukaryotic cells, nuclear DNA is subject to enzymatic methylation with the formation of 5-methylcytosine residues, mostly within the CG and CNG sequences. In plants and animals this DNA methylation is species-, tissue-, and organelle-specific. It changes (decreases) with age and is regulated by hormones. On the other hand, genome methylation can control hormonal signal. Replicative and post-replicative DNA methylation types are distinguished. They are mediated by multiple DNA methyltransferases with different site-specificity. Replication is accompanied by the appearance of hemimethylated DNA sites. Pronounced asymmetry of the DNA strand methylation disappears to the end of the cell cycle. A model of methylation-regulated DNA replication is proposed. DNA methylation controls all genetic processes in the cell (replication, transcription, DNA repair, recombination, and gene transposition). It is the mechanism of cell differentiation, gene discrimination and silencing. In animals, suppression of DNA methylation stops development (embryogenesis), switches on apoptosis, and is usually lethal. Disruption of DNA methylation pattern results in the malignant cell transformation and serves as one of the early diagnostic features of carcinogenesis. In malignant cell the pattern of DNA methylation, as well as the set of DNA methyltransferase activities, differs from that in normal cell. In plants inhibition of DNA methylation is accompanied by the induction of seed storage and florescence genes. In eukaryotes one and the same gene can be simultaneously methylated both at cytosine and adenine residues. It can be thus suggested, that the plant cell contains at least two different, and probably, interdependent systems of DNA methylation. The first eukaryotic adenine DNA methyltransferase was isolated from plants. This enzyme methylates DNA with the formation of N6-methyladenine residues in the sequence TGATCA (TGATCA-->TGm6ATCA). Plants possess AdoMet-dependent endonucleases

  4. Elevated levels of antibodies against phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex and/or cardiolipin associated with infection and recurrent purpura in a child: a forme fruste of antiphospholipid syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yuri; Mayumi, Nobuko; Inaba, Motoyuki; Igarashi, Touru; Katagiri, Ichigen; Kawana, Seiji

    2015-07-15

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the occurrence of venous and arterial thrombosis, as well as morbidity in pregnancy, in the presence of anti-phospholipid antibodies. The diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome is usually established based on clinical and laboratory findings by strictly following the 2006 Sapporo classification. However, the diagnosis remains challenging owing to the ongoing debates on the serological criteria. We report a case we describe as forme fruste antiphospholipid syndrome in which these criteria were not fulfilled. Purpura appeared repeatedly in a female infant starting from the age of 6 months and following episodes of upper respiratory infections and vaccinations. The levels of anti-cardiolipin IgG antibodies and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex antibodies were elevated in accordance with these events. Histopathological evaluation revealed multiple small vessel thrombi in the dermis and adipose tissue. After 2 weeks of treatment with aspirin and heparin, the cutaneous symptoms subsided. Infection has long been associated with antiphospholipid syndrome, and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies are considered a new marker for the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome. Forme fruste antiphospholipid syndrome should be considered even if the antiphospholipid syndrome diagnostic criteria are not completely fulfilled, especially in the presence of elevated levels of anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies and known preceding infections.

  5. Phosphatidylserine receptor Tim-4 is essential for the maintenance of the homeostatic state of resident peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kit; Valdez, Patricia A; Tan, Christine; Yeh, Sherry; Hongo, Jo-Anne; Ouyang, Wenjun

    2010-05-11

    Tim-4 is a phosphatidylserine (PS) receptor that is expressed on various macrophage subsets. It mediates phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by peritoneal macrophages. The in vivo functions of Tim-4 in phagocytosis and immune responses, however, are still unclear. In this study, we show that Tim-4 quickly forms punctate caps on contact with apoptotic cells, in contrast to its normal diffused expression on the surface of phagocytes. Despite its expression in marginal zone and tingible body macrophages, Tim-4 deficiency only minimally affects outcomes of several acute immune challenges, including the trapping of apoptotic cells in the marginal zone, the clearance apoptotic cells by tingible body macrophages, and the formation of germinal centers and elicitation of antibody responses against sheep red blood cells (SRBCs). In addition, Tim-4(-/-) resident peritoneal macrophages (rPMs) phagocytose necrotic cells and other opsonized targets normally. However, their ability to bind and engulf apoptotic cells is significantly compromised both in vitro and in vivo. Most importantly, Tim-4 deficiency results in increased cellularity in the peritoneum. Resting rPMs produce higher TNF-alpha in culture. Their response to LPS, on the contrary, is dampened. Our data support an indispensible role of Tim-4 in maintaining the homeostasis of rPMs.

  6. Unconventional apoptosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN): staurosporine delays exposure of phosphatidylserine and prevents phagocytosis by MΦ-2 macrophages of PMN

    PubMed Central

    Franz, S; Muñoz, L E; Heyder, P; Herrmann, M; Schiller, M

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and subsequent ‘silent’ removal represents an important check-point for the resolution of inflammation. Failure in PMN clearance resulting in secondary necrosis-driven tissue damage has been implicated in conditions of chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Apoptotic PMN undergo profound biophysical changes that warrant their efficient recognition and uptake by phagocytes before fading to secondary necrosis. In this study, we demonstrate that staurosporine (STS), a non-selective but potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase and protein kinase C, exerts a drastic impact on PMN apoptosis. PMN treated with STS underwent an unconventional form of cell death characterized by a delayed exposure of aminophospholipids, including phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine and an increased exposure of neo-glycans. STS caused an impaired cellular fragmentation and accelerated DNA fragmentation. Phagocytosis of STS-treated PMN lacking PS on their surfaces was decreased significantly, which highlights the importance of PS for the clearance of apoptotic PMN. Specific opsonization with immune complexes completely restored phagocytosis of STS-treated PMN, demonstrating the efficiency of back-up clearance pathways in the absence of PS exposure. PMID:24995908

  7. p85α recruitment by the CD300f phosphatidylserine receptor mediates apoptotic cell clearance required for autoimmunity suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Linjie; Choi, Seung-Chul; Murakami, Yousuke; Allen, Joselyn; Morse, Herbert C., III; Qi, Chen-Feng; Krzewski, Konrad; Coligan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell (AC) clearance is essential for immune homeostasis. Here we show that mouse CD300f (CLM-1) recognizes outer membrane-exposed phosphatidylserine, and regulates the phagocytosis of ACs. CD300f accumulates in phagocytic cups at AC contact sites. Phosphorylation within CD300f cytoplasmic tail tyrosine-based motifs initiates signals that positively or negatively regulate AC phagocytosis. Y276 phosphorylation is necessary for enhanced CD300f-mediated phagocytosis through the recruitment of the p85α regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). CD300f-PI3K association leads to activation of downstream Rac/Cdc42 GTPase and mediates changes of F-actin that drive AC engulfment. Importantly, primary macrophages from CD300f-deficient mice have impaired phagocytosis of ACs. The biological consequence of CD300f deficiency is predisposition to autoimmune disease development, as FcγRIIB-deficient mice develop a systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease at a markedly accelerated rate if CD300f is absent. In this report we identify the mechanism and role of CD300f in AC phagocytosis and maintenance of immune homeostasis.

  8. Novel function of stabilin-2 in myoblast fusion: the recognition of extracellular phosphatidylserine as a “fuse-me” signal

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Go-Woon; Park, Seung-Yoon; Kim, In-San

    2016-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is important for skeletal muscle formation. Even though the knowledge of myoblast fusion mechanism has accumulated over the years, the initial signal of fusion is yet to be elucidated. Our study reveals the novel function of a phosphatidylserine (PS) receptor, stabilin-2 (Stab2), in the modulation of myoblast fusion, through the recognition of PS exposed on myoblasts. During differentiation of myoblasts, Stab2 expression is higher than other PS receptors and is controlled by calcineurin/NFAT signaling on myoblasts. The forced expression of Stab2 results in an increase in myoblast fusion; genetic ablation of Stab2 in mice causes a reduction in muscle size, as a result of impaired myoblast fusion. After muscle injury, muscle regeneration is impaired in Stab2-deficient mice, resulting in small myofibers with fewer nuclei, which is due to reduction of fusion rather than defection of myoblast differentiation. The fusion-promoting role of Stab2 is dependent on its PS-binding motif, and the blocking of PS-Stab2 binding impairs cell-cell fusion on myoblasts. Given our previous finding that Stab2 recognizes PS exposed on apoptotic cells for sensing as an “eat-me” signal, we propose that PS-Stab2 binding is required for sensing of a “fuse-me” signal as the initial signal of myoblast fusion. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 303-304] PMID:27174501

  9. Identification of lipid-phosphatidylserine (PS) as the target of unbiasedly selected cancer specific peptide-peptoid hybrid PPS1

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Tanvi J.; Toombs, Jason E.; Minna, John D.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Udugamasooriya, Damith Gomika

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an anionic phospholipid maintained on the inner-leaflet of the cell membrane and is externalized in malignant cells. We previously launched a careful unbiased selection targeting biomolecules (e.g. protein, lipid or carbohydrate) distinct to cancer cells by exploiting HCC4017 lung cancer and HBEC30KT normal epithelial cells derived from the same patient, identifying HCC4017 specific peptide-peptoid hybrid PPS1. In this current study, we identified PS as the target of PPS1. We validated direct PPS1 binding to PS using ELISA-like assays, lipid dot blot and liposome based binding assays. In addition, PPS1 recognized other negatively charged and cancer specific lipids such as phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylglycerol. PPS1 did not bind to neutral lipids such as phosphatidylethanolamine found in cancer and phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin found in normal cells. Further we found that the dimeric version of PPS1 (PPS1D1) displayed strong cytotoxicity towards lung cancer cell lines that externalize PS, but not normal cells. PPS1D1 showed potent single agent anti-tumor activity and enhanced the efficacy of docetaxel in mice bearing H460 lung cancer xenografts. Since PS and anionic phospholipid externalization is common across many cancer types, PPS1 may be an alternative to overcome limitations of protein targeted agents. PMID:27120792

  10. Low level of lead can induce phosphatidylserine exposure and erythrophagocytosis: a new mechanism underlying lead-associated anemia.

    PubMed

    Jang, Won-Hee; Lim, Kyung-Min; Kim, Keunyoung; Noh, Ji-Yoon; Kang, Seojin; Chang, Youn-Kyeong; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2011-07-01

    Anemia is probably one of the most well-known toxic effects of lead. Previously, lead-induced anemia was considered to be from the inhibition of δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase participating in the heme biosynthesis. However, little is known whether lead could affect the destruction of erythrocyte, another important factor for anemia. In the present study, we demonstrated that lead could accelerate the splenic sequestration of erythrocytes through phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and subsequently increased erythrophagocytosis. In freshly isolated human erythrocytes, Pb(2+)- induced PS exposure at relatively low concentrations (∼0.1 μM) by inhibiting flippase, a key aminophospholipid translocase for the maintenance of PS asymmetry and adenosine triphosphate depletion appeared to underlie this phenomenon. Abnormal shape changes of erythrocytes and microvesicle generation and other triggers for the erythrophagocytosis were also observed in the Pb(2+)-exposed erythrocytes. In vitro data showed that human macrophage indeed recognized and phagocytosis PS-exposed erythrocytes. In good accordance with these in vitro results, the oral administration of Pb(2+) increased PS exposure on erythrocytes in rat in vivo. In addition, reduction of hematocrit and hemoglobin and increased spleen weight were observed along with enhanced splenic sequestration of erythrocytes in the rats exposed to Pb(2+) subchronically for 4 weeks through drinking water. In conclusion, these results suggest that Pb(2+)-induced anemia may be explained at least in part by increased PS exposure on erythrocytes, erythrophagocytosis, and splenic sequestration.

  11. Highly specific PET imaging of prostate tumors in mice with an iodine-124-labeled antibody fragment that targets phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Jason H; Hao, Guiyang; Best, Anne M; Sun, Xiankai; Thorpe, Philip E

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an attractive target for imaging agents that identify tumors and assess their response to therapy. PS is absent from the surface of most cell types, but becomes exposed on tumor cells and tumor vasculature in response to oxidative stresses in the tumor microenvironment and increases in response to therapy. To image exposed PS, we used a fully human PS-targeting antibody fragment, PGN635 F(ab')2, that binds to complexes of PS and β2-glycoprotein I. PGN635 F(ab')2 was labeled with the positron-emitting isotope iodine-124 ((124)I) and the resulting probe was injected into nude mice bearing subcutaneous or orthotopic human PC3 prostate tumors. Biodistribution studies showed that (124)I-PGN635 F(ab')2 localized with remarkable specificity to the tumors with little uptake in other organs, including the liver and kidneys. Clear delineation of the tumors was achieved by PET 48 hours after injection. Radiation of the tumors with 15 Gy or systemic treatment of the mice with 10 mg/kg docetaxel increased localization in the tumors. Tumor-to-normal (T/N) ratios were inversely correlated with tumor growth measured over 28 days. These data indicate that (124)I-PGN635 F(ab')2 is a promising new imaging agent for predicting tumor response to therapy.

  12. Nanopore-facilitated, voltage-driven phosphatidylserine translocation in lipid bilayers—in cells and in silico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernier, P. Thomas; Ziegler, Matthew J.; Sun, Yinghua; Gundersen, Martin A.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2006-12-01

    Nanosecond, megavolt-per-meter pulses—higher power but lower total energy than the electroporative pulses used to introduce normally excluded material into biological cells—produce large intracellular electric fields without destructively charging the plasma membrane. Nanoelectropulse perturbation of mammalian cells causes translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS) to the outer face of the cell, intracellular calcium release, and in some cell types a subsequent progression to apoptosis. Experimental observations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of membranes in pulsed electric fields presented here support the hypothesis that nanoelectropulse-induced PS externalization is driven by the electric potential that appears across the lipid bilayer during a pulse and is facilitated by the poration of the membrane that occurs even during pulses as brief as 3 ns. MD simulations of phospholipid bilayers in supraphysiological electric fields show a tight association between PS externalization and membrane pore formation on a nanosecond time scale that is consistent with experimental evidence for electropermeabilization and anode-directed PS translocation after nanosecond electric pulse exposure, suggesting a molecular mechanism for nanoelectroporation and nanosecond PS externalization: electrophoretic migration of the negatively charged PS head group along the surface of nanometer-diameter electropores initiated by field-driven alignment of water dipoles at the membrane interface.

  13. Melanoma cell surface-expressed phosphatidylserine as a therapeutic target for cationic anticancer peptide, temporin-1CEa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Che; Chen, Yin-Wang; Zhang, Liang; Gong, Xian-Ge; Zhou, Yang; Shang, De-Jing

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that temporin-1CEa, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, exerts preferential cytotoxicity toward cancer cells. However, the exact molecular mechanism for this cancer-selectivity is still largely unknown. Here, we found that the negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS) expressed on cancer cell surface serves as a target for temporin-1CEa. Our results indicate that human A375 melanoma cells express 50-fold more PS than non-cancerous HaCaT cells. The expression of cell surface PS in various cancer cell lines closely correlated with their ability to be recognized, bound and killed by temporin-1CEa. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of temporin-1CEa against A375 cells can be ameliorated by annexin V, which binds to cell surface PS with high affinity. Moreover, the data of isothermal titration calorimetry assay further confirmed a direct binding of temporin-1CEa to PS, at a ratio of 1:5 (temporin-1CEa:PS). Interestingly, the circular dichroism spectra analysis using artificial biomembrane revealed that PS not only provides electrostatic attractive sites for temporin-1CEa but also confers the membrane-bound temporin-1CEa to form α-helical structure, therefore, enhances the affinity and membrane disrupting ability of temporin-1CEa. In summary, these findings suggested that the melanoma cells expressed PS may serve as a promising target for temporin-1CEa or other cationic anticancer peptides.

  14. Antibody-Mediated Phosphatidylserine Blockade Enhances the Antitumor Responses to CTLA-4 and PD-1 Antibodies in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Freimark, Bruce D; Gong, Jian; Ye, Dan; Gray, Michael J; Nguyen, Van; Yin, Shen; Hatch, Michaela M S; Hughes, Christopher C W; Schroit, Alan J; Hutchins, Jeff T; Brekken, Rolf A; Huang, Xianming

    2016-06-01

    In tumor-bearing animals, the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) suppresses immune responses, suggesting that PS signaling could counteract the antitumor effect of antibody-driven immune checkpoint blockade. Here, we show that treating melanoma-bearing mice with a PS-targeting antibody enhances the antitumor activity of downstream checkpoint inhibition. Combining PS-targeting antibodies with CTLA-4 or PD-1 blockade resulted in significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth than did single-agent therapy. Moreover, combination therapy enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte numbers; elevated the fraction of cells expressing the proinflammatory cytokines IL2, IFNγ, and TNFα; and increased the ratio of CD8 T cells to myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells in tumors. Similar changes in immune cell profiles were observed in splenocytes. Taken together, these data show that antibody-mediated PS blockade enhances the antitumor efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibition. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 531-40. ©2016 AACR.

  15. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of (lyso)phosphatidic acids, (lyso)phosphatidylserines and other lipid classes.

    PubMed

    Cífková, Eva; Hájek, Roman; Lísa, Miroslav; Holčapek, Michal

    2016-03-25

    The goal of this work is a systematic optimization of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) separation of acidic lipid classes (namely phosphatidic acids-PA, lysophosphatidic acids-LPA, phosphatidylserines-PS and lysophosphatidylserines-LPS) and other lipid classes under mass spectrometry (MS) compatible conditions. The main parameters included in this optimization are the type of stationary phases used in HILIC, pH of the mobile phase, the type and concentration of mobile phase additives. Nine HILIC columns with different chemistries (unmodified silica, modified silica using diol, 2-picolylamine, diethylamine and 1-aminoanthracene and hydride silica) are compared with the emphasis on peak shapes of acidic lipid classes. The optimization of pH is correlated with the theoretical calculation of acidobasic equilibria of studied lipid classes. The final method using the hydride column, pH 4 adjusted by formic acid and the gradient of acetonitrile and 40 mmol/L of aqueous ammonium formate provides good peak shapes for all analyzed lipid classes including acidic lipids. This method is applied for the identification of lipids in real samples of porcine brain and kidney extracts.

  16. Novel function of stabilin-2 in myoblast fusion: the recognition of extracellular phosphatidylserine as a "fuse-me" signal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Go-Woon; Park, Seung-Yoon; Kim, In-San

    2016-06-01

    Myoblast fusion is important for skeletal muscle formation. Even though the knowledge of myoblast fusion mechanism has accumulated over the years, the initial signal of fusion is yet to be elucidated. Our study reveals the novel function of a phosphatidylserine (PS) receptor, stabilin-2 (Stab2), in the modulation of myoblast fusion, through the recognition of PS exposed on myoblasts. During differentiation of myoblasts, Stab2 expression is higher than other PS receptors and is controlled by calcineurin/NFAT signaling on myoblasts. The forced expression of Stab2 results in an increase in myoblast fusion; genetic ablation of Stab2 in mice causes a reduction in muscle size, as a result of impaired myoblast fusion. After muscle injury, muscle regeneration is impaired in Stab2- deficient mice, resulting in small myofibers with fewer nuclei, which is due to reduction of fusion rather than defection of myoblast differentiation. The fusion-promoting role of Stab2 is dependent on its PS-binding motif, and the blocking of PS-Stab2 binding impairs cell-cell fusion on myoblasts. Given our previous finding that Stab2 recognizes PS exposed on apoptotic cells for sensing as an "eat-me" signal, we propose that PS-Stab2 binding is required for sensing of a "fuse-me" signal as the initial signal of myoblast fusion. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 303-304].

  17. Activation of protein kinase C by phorbol ester increases red blood cell scramblase activity and external phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Barber, Latorya A; Palascak, Mary B; Qi, Xiaoyang; Joiner, Clinton H; Franco, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    Externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) is thought to contribute to sickle cell disease (SCD) pathophysiology. The red blood cell (RBC) aminophospholipid translocase (APLT) mediates the transport of PS from the outer to the inner RBC membrane leaflet to maintain an asymmetric distribution of PL, while phospholipid scramblase (PLSCR) equilibrates PL across the RBC membrane, promoting PS externalization. We previously identified an association between PS externalization level and PLSCR activity in sickle RBC under basal conditions. Other studies showed that activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by PMA (phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate) causes increased external PS on RBC. Therefore, we hypothesized that PMA-activated PKC stimulates PLSCR activity in RBC and thereby contributes to increased PS externalization. In the current studies, we show that PMA treatment causes immediate and variable PLSCR activation and subsequent PS externalization in control and sickle RBC. While TfR+ sickle reticulocytes display some endogenous PLSCR activity, we observed a robust activation of PLSCR in sickle reticulocytes treated with PMA. The PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine (Chel), significantly inhibited PMA-dependent PLSCR activation and PS externalization. Chel also inhibited endogenous PLSCR activity in sickle reticulocytes. These data provide evidence that PKC mediates PS externalization in RBC through activation of PLSCR.

  18. Detection of phosphatidylserine with a modified polar head group in human keratinocytes exposed to the radical generator AAPH.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Elisabete; Neves, Bruno M; Santinha, Deolinda; Reis, Ana; Domingues, Pedro; Teresa Cruz, M; Pitt, Andrew R; Spickett, Corinne M; Domingues, M Rosário M

    2014-04-15

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is preferentially located in the inner leaflet of the cell membrane, and translocation of PS oxidized in fatty acyl chains to the outside of membrane has been reported as signaling to macrophage receptors to clear apoptotic cells. It was recently shown that PS can be oxidized in serine moiety of polar head-group. In the present work, a targeted lipidomic approach was applied to detecting OxPS modified at the polar head-group in keratinocytes that were exposed to the radical generator AAPH. Glycerophosphoacetic acid derivatives (GPAA) were found to be the major oxidation products of OxPS modified at the polar head-group during oxidation induced by AAPH-generated radicals, similarly to previous observations for the oxidation induced by OH radical. The neutral loss scan of 58Da and a novel precursor ion scan of m/z 137.1 (HOPO3CH2COOH) allowed the recognition of GPAA derivatives in the total lipid extracts obtained from HaCaT cells treated with AAPH. The positive identification of serine head group oxidation products in cells under controlled oxidative conditions opens new perspectives and justifies further studies in other cellular environments in order to understand fully the role of PS polar head-group oxidation in cell homeostasis and disease.

  19. Phosphatidylserine-dependent ingestion of apoptotic cells promotes TGF-β1 secretion and the resolution of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Mai-Lan N.; Fadok, Valerie A.; Henson, Peter M.

    2002-01-01

    Ingestion of apoptotic cells in vitro by macrophages induces TGF-β1 secretion, resulting in an anti-inflammatory effect and suppression of proinflammatory mediators. Here, we show in vivo that direct instillation of apoptotic cells enhanced the resolution of acute inflammation. This enhancement appeared to require phosphatidylserine (PS) on the apoptotic cells and local induction of TGF-β1. Working with thioglycollate-stimulated peritonea or LPS-stimulated lungs, we examined the effect of apoptotic cell uptake on TGF-β1 induction. Viable or opsonized apoptotic human Jurkat T cells, or apoptotic PLB-985 cells, human monomyelocytes that do not express PS during apoptosis, failed to induce TGF-β1. PS liposomes, or PS directly transferred onto the PLB-985 surface membranes, restored the TGF-β1 induction. Apoptotic cell instillation into LPS-stimulated lungs reduced proinflammatory chemokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Additionally, total inflammatory cell counts in the BALF were markedly reduced 1–5 days after apoptotic cell instillation, an effect that could be reversed by opsonization or coinstillation of TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody. This reduction resulted from early decrease in neutrophils and later decreases in lymphocytes and macrophages. In conclusion, apoptotic cell recognition and clearance, via exposure of PS and ligation of its receptor, induce TGF-β1 secretion, resulting in accelerated resolution of inflammation. PMID:11781349

  20. Noninvasive in vivo multispectral optoacoustic imaging of apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer using indocyanine green conjugated phosphatidylserine monoclonal antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannadorai, Ravi Kumar; Udumala, Sunil Kumar; Sidney, Yu Wing Kwong

    2016-12-01

    Noninvasive and nonradioactive imaging modality to track and image apoptosis during chemotherapy of triple negative breast cancer is much needed for an effective treatment plan. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is a biomarker transiently exposed on the outer surface of the cells during apoptosis. Its externalization occurs within a few hours of an apoptotic stimulus by a chemotherapy drug and leads to presentation of millions of phospholipid molecules per apoptotic cell on the cell surface. This makes PS an abundant and accessible target for apoptosis imaging. In the current work, we show that PS monoclonal antibody tagged with indocyanine green (ICG) can help to track and image apoptosis using multispectral optoacoustic tomography in vivo. When compared to saline control, the doxorubicin treated group showed a significant increase in uptake of ICG-PS monoclonal antibody in triple negative breast tumor xenografted in NCr nude female mice. Day 5 posttreatment had the highest optoacoustic signal in the tumor region, indicating maximum apoptosis and the tumor subsequently shrank. Since multispectral optoacoustic imaging does not involve the use of radioactivity, the longer the circulatory time of the PS antibody can be exploited to monitor apoptosis over a period of time without multiple injections of commonly used imaging probes such as Tc-99m Annexin V or F-18 ML10. The proposed apoptosis imaging technique involving multispectral optoacoustic tomography, monoclonal antibody, and near-infrared absorbing fluorescent marker can be an effective tool for imaging apoptosis and treatment planning.

  1. Deoxygenation-induced and Ca(2+) dependent phosphatidylserine externalisation in red blood cells from normal individuals and sickle cell patients.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Erwin; Cytlak, Urszula M; Rees, David C; Osei, Anna; Gibson, John S

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is usually confined to the inner leaflet of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane. It may become externalised in various conditions, however, notably in RBCs from patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) where exposed PS may contribute to anaemic and ischaemic complications. PS externalisation requires both inhibition of the aminophospholipid translocase (or flippase) and activation of the scramblase. Both may follow from elevation of intracellular Ca(2+). Flippase inhibition occurs at low [Ca(2+)](i), about 1μM, but [Ca(2+)](i) required for scrambling is reported to be much higher (around 100μM). In this work, FITC-labelled lactadherin and FACS were used to measure externalised PS, with [Ca(2+)](i) altered using bromo-A23187 and EGTA/Ca(2+) mixtures. Two components of Ca(2+)-induced scrambling were apparent, of high (EC(50) 1.8±0.3μM) and low (306±123μM) affinity, in RBCs from normal individuals and the commonest SCD genotypes, HbSS and HbSC. The high affinity component was lost in the presence of unphysiologically high [Mg(2+)] but was unaffected by high K(+) (90mM) or vanadate (1mM). The high affinity component accounted for PS scrambling in ≥2/3rd RBCs. It is likely to be most significant in vivo and may be involved in the pathophysiology of SCD or other conditions involving eryptosis.

  2. Comparative Study of EPA-enriched Phosphatidylcholine and EPA-enriched Phosphatidylserine on Lipid Metabolism in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Wang, Dan; Zhou, Miaomiao; Du, Lei; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Wang, Yuming

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that EPA enriched PLs have beneficial effects on lipid metabolism. Our previous study has demonstrated that the anti-obesity and hypolipidemic effects of EPA-PL were superior to DHA-PL. In the present study, we comparatively evaluated the effects of EPA-enriched phosphatidylcholine (EPA-PC) and EPA-enriched phosphatidylserine (EPA-PS) on lipid metabolism in mice. Both 2% dietary EPA-PC and EPA-PS significantly improved serum and hepatic lipid levels in mice. The HDL-c level in mice on EPA-PC diet was significantly higher than the other two groups. The level of DHA in hepatic TG and PL were significantly increased in both EPA-PC and EPA-PS fed groups (98.3 and 117.8%, respectively; p < 0.05). Notably, the proportion of DHA in EPA-PS group was significantly higher than the EPA-PC group. EPA-PC and EPA-PS suppressed hepatic SREBP-1c mediated lipogenesis and activated PPARα mediated fatty acid β-oxidation in the liver. These data are the first to indicate that EPA-PS has beneficial effects on lipid metabolism.

  3. A secreted salivary inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase from a blood-feeding insect: allosteric activation by soluble phosphoinositides and phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Andersen, John F; Ribeiro, José M C

    2006-05-02

    Type II inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases (IPPs) act on both soluble inositol phosphate and phosphoinositide substrates. In many cases, these enzymes occur as multidomain proteins in which the IPP domain is linked to lipid-binding or additional catalytic domains. Rhodnius prolixus IPPRp exists as an isolated IPP domain which is secreted into the saliva of this blood-feeding insect. It shows selectivity for soluble and lipid substrates having a 1,4,5-trisphosphate substitution pattern while only poorly hydrolyzing substrates containing a D3 phosphate. With soluble diC8 PI(4,5)P(2) as a substrate, sigmoidal kinetics were observed, suggesting the presence of allosteric activation sites. Surprisingly, IPPRp-mediated hydrolysis of PI(4,5)P(2) and PI(3,4,5)P(3) was also stimulated up to 100-fold by diC8 PI(4)P and diC8 phosphatidylserine (PS). The activation kinetics were again sigmoidal, demonstrating that the allosteric sites recognize nonsubstrate phospholipids. Activation was positively cooperative, and analysis by the Hill equation suggests that at least three to four allosteric sites are present. In a vesicular system, hydrolysis of PI(4,5)P(2) followed a surface dilution kinetic model, and as expected, PS was found to be strongly stimulatory. If allosteric activation of type II IPPs by PI(4)P and PS is a widespread feature of the group, it may represent a novel regulatory mechanism for these important enzymes.

  4. p85α recruitment by the CD300f phosphatidylserine receptor mediates apoptotic cell clearance required for autoimmunity suppression

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Linjie; Choi, Seung-Chul; Murakami, Yousuke; Allen, Joselyn; Morse, Herbert C.; Qi, Chen-Feng; Krzewski, Konrad; Coligan, John E

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell (AC) clearance is essential for immune homeostasis. Here we show that mouse CD300f (CLM-1) recognizes outer membrane-exposed phosphatidylserine, and regulates the phagocytosis of ACs. CD300f accumulates in phagocytic cups at AC contact sites. Phosphorylation within CD300f cytoplasmic tail tyrosine-based motifs initiates signals that positively or negatively regulate AC phagocytosis. Y276 phosphorylation is necessary for enhanced CD300f-mediated phagocytosis through the recruitment of the p85α regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). CD300f-PI3K association leads to activation of downstream Rac/Cdc42 GTPase and mediates changes of F-actin that drive AC engulfment. Importantly, primary macrophages from CD300f-deficient mice have impaired phagocytosis of ACs. The biological consequence of CD300f deficiency is predisposition to autoimmune disease development, as FcγRIIB-deficient mice develop a systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease at a markedly accelerated rate if CD300f is absent. In this report we identify the mechanism and role of CD300f in AC phagocytosis and maintenance of immune homeostasis. PMID:24477292

  5. Gem1 and ERMES do not directly affect phosphatidylserine transport from ER to mitochondria or mitochondrial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tammy T; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Choi, Jae-Yeon; Markgraf, Daniel F; Junker, Mirco; Bilgin, Mesut; Ejsing, Christer S; Voelker, Dennis R; Rapoport, Tom A; Shaw, Janet M

    2012-06-01

    In yeast, a protein complex termed the ER-Mitochondria Encounter Structure (ERMES) tethers mitochondria to the endoplasmic reticulum. ERMES proteins are implicated in a variety of cellular functions including phospholipid synthesis, mitochondrial protein import, mitochondrial attachment to actin, polarized mitochondrial movement into daughter cells during division, and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The mitochondrial-anchored Gem1 GTPase has been proposed to regulate ERMES functions. Here, we show that ERMES and Gem1 have no direct role in the transport of phosphatidylserine (PS) from the ER to mitochondria during the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), as PS to PE conversion is not affected in ERMES or gem1 mutants. In addition, we report that mitochondrial inheritance defects in ERMES mutants are a secondary consequence of mitochondrial morphology defects, arguing against a primary role for ERMES in mitochondrial association with actin and mitochondrial movement. Finally, we show that ERMES complexes are long-lived, and do not depend on the presence of Gem1. Our findings suggest that the ERMES complex may have primarily a structural role in maintaining mitochondrial morphology.

  6. 14-3-3ζ regulates the mitochondrial respiratory reserve linked to platelet phosphatidylserine exposure and procoagulant function

    PubMed Central

    Schoenwaelder, Simone M.; Darbousset, Roxane; Cranmer, Susan L.; Ramshaw, Hayley S.; Orive, Stephanie L.; Sturgeon, Sharelle; Yuan, Yuping; Yao, Yu; Krycer, James R.; Woodcock, Joanna; Maclean, Jessica; Pitson, Stuart; Zheng, Zhaohua; Henstridge, Darren C.; van der Wal, Dianne; Gardiner, Elizabeth E.; Berndt, Michael C.; Andrews, Robert K.; James, David E.; Lopez, Angel F.; Jackson, Shaun P.

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 family of adaptor proteins regulate diverse cellular functions including cell proliferation, metabolism, adhesion and apoptosis. Platelets express numerous 14-3-3 isoforms, including 14-3-3ζ, which has previously been implicated in regulating GPIbα function. Here we show an important role for 14-3-3ζ in regulating arterial thrombosis. Interestingly, this thrombosis defect is not related to alterations in von Willebrand factor (VWF)–GPIb adhesive function or platelet activation, but instead associated with reduced platelet phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and procoagulant function. Decreased PS exposure in 14-3-3ζ-deficient platelets is associated with more sustained levels of metabolic ATP and increased mitochondrial respiratory reserve, independent of alterations in cytosolic calcium flux. Reduced platelet PS exposure in 14-3-3ζ-deficient mice does not increase bleeding risk, but results in decreased thrombin generation and protection from pulmonary embolism, leading to prolonged survival. Our studies define an important role for 14-3-3ζ in regulating platelet bioenergetics, leading to decreased platelet PS exposure and procoagulant function. PMID:27670677

  7. Calorimetric and spectroscopic studies of the thermotropic phase behavior of lipid bilayer model membranes composed of a homologous series of linear saturated phosphatidylserines.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R N; McElhaney, R N

    2000-01-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior of lipid bilayer model membranes composed of the even-numbered, N-saturated 1,2-diacyl phosphatidylserines was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and by Fourier-transform infrared and (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At pH 7.0, 0.1 M NaCl and in the absence of divalent cations, aqueous dispersions of these lipids, which have not been incubated at low temperature, exhibit a single calorimetrically detectable phase transition that is fully reversible, highly cooperative, and relatively energetic, and the transition temperatures and enthalpies increase progressively with increases in hydrocarbon chain length. Our spectroscopic observations confirm that this thermal event is a lamellar gel (L(beta))-to-lamellar liquid crystalline (L(alpha)) phase transition. However, after low temperature incubation, the L(beta)/L(alpha) phase transition of dilauroyl phosphatidylserine is replaced by a higher temperature, more enthalpic, and less cooperative phase transition, and an additional lower temperature, less enthalpic, and less cooperative phase transition appears in the longer chain phosphatidylserines. Our spectroscopic results indicate that this change in thermotropic phase behavior when incubated at low temperatures results from the conversion of the L(beta) phase to a highly ordered lamellar crystalline (L(c)) phase. Upon heating, the L(c) phase of dilauroyl phosphatidylserine converts directly to the L(alpha) phase at a temperature slightly higher than that of its original L(beta)/L(alpha) phase transition. Calorimetrically, this process is manifested by a less cooperative but considerably more energetic, higher-temperature phase transition, which replaces the weaker L(beta)/L(alpha) phase transition alluded to above. However, with the longer chain compounds, the L(c) phase first converts to the L(beta) phase at temperatures some 10-25 degrees C below that at which the L(beta) phase converts to the L(alpha) phase

  8. Evaluation of phosphatidylserine-dependent antiprothrombin antibody testing for the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome: results of an international multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Amengual, O; Forastiero, R; Sugiura-Ogasawara, M; Otomo, K; Oku, K; Favas, C; Delgado Alves, J; Žigon, P; Ambrožič, A; Tomšič, M; Ruiz-Arruza, I; Ruiz-Irastorza, G; Bertolaccini, M L; Norman, G L; Shums, Z; Arai, J; Murashima, A; Tebo, A E; Gerosa, M; Meroni, P L; Rodriguez-Pintó, I; Cervera, R; Swadzba, J; Musial, J; Atsumi, T

    2017-03-01

    Objective A task force of scientists at the International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies recognized that phosphatidylserine-dependent antiprothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) might contribute to a better identification of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Accordingly, initial and replication retrospective, cross-sectional multicentre studies were conducted to ascertain the value of aPS/PT for APS diagnosis. Methods In the initial study (eight centres, seven countries), clinical/laboratory data were retrospectively collected. Serum/plasma samples were tested for IgG aPS/PT at Inova Diagnostics (Inova) using two ELISA kits. A replication study (five centres, five countries) was carried out afterwards. Results In the initial study ( n = 247), a moderate agreement between the IgG aPS/PT Inova and MBL ELISA kits was observed ( k = 0.598). IgG aPS/PT were more prevalent in APS patients (51%) than in those without (9%), OR 10.8, 95% CI (4.0-29.3), p < 0.0001. Sensitivity, specificity, positive (LR+) and negative (LR-) likelihood ratio of IgG aPS/PT for APS diagnosis were 51%, 91%, 5.9 and 0.5, respectively. In the replication study ( n = 214), a moderate/substantial agreement between the IgG aPS/PT results obtained with both ELISA kits was observed ( k = 0.630). IgG aPS/PT were more prevalent in APS patients (47%) than in those without (12%), OR 6.4, 95% CI (2.6-16), p < 0.0001. Sensitivity, specificity, LR + and LR- for APS diagnosis were 47%, 88%, 3.9 and 0.6, respectively. Conclusions IgG aPS/PT detection is an easily performed laboratory parameter that might contribute to a better and more complete identification of patients with APS.

  9. Taxol induces concentration-dependent phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization and cell cycle arrest in ASTC-a-1 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wen-jing; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2010-02-01

    Taxol (Paclitaxel) is an important natural product for the treatment of solid tumors. Different concentrations of taxol can trigger distinct effects on both the cellular microtubule network and biochemical pathways. Apoptosis induced by low concentrations (5-30 nM) of taxol was associated with mitotic arrest, alteration of microtubule dynamics and/or G2/M cell cycle arrest, whereas high concentrations of this drug (0.2-30 μM) caused significant microtubule damage, and was found recently to induce cytoplasm vacuolization in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. In present study, cell counting kit (CCK-8) assay, confocal microscope, and flow cytometry analysis were used to analyze the cell death form induced by 35 nM and 70 μM of taxol respectively in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. After treatment of 35 nM taxol for 48 h, the OD450 value was 0.80, and 35 nM taxol was found to induce dominantly cell death in apoptotic pathway such as phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, G2/M phase arrest after treatment for 24 h, and nuclear fragmentation after treatment for 48 h. After 70 μM taxol treated the cell for 24 h, the OD450 value was 1.01, and 70 μM taxol induced cytoplasm vacuolization programmed cell death (PCD) and G2/M phase as well as the polyploidy phase arrest in paraptotic-like cell death. These findings imply that the regulated signaling pathway of cell death induced by taxol is dependent on taxol concentration in ASTC-a-1 cells.

  10. Human lactoferricin derived di-peptides deploying loop structures induce apoptosis specifically in cancer cells through targeting membranous phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Sabrina; Leber, Regina; Rinner, Beate; Schaider, Helmut; Lohner, Karl; Zweytick, Dagmar

    2015-11-01

    Host defense-derived peptides have emerged as a novel strategy for the development of alternative anticancer therapies. In this study we report on characteristic features of human lactoferricin (hLFcin) derivatives which facilitate specific killing of cancer cells of melanoma, glioblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma compared with non-specific derivatives and the synthetic peptide RW-AH. Changes in amino acid sequence of hLFcin providing 9-11 amino acids stretched derivatives LF11-316, -318 and -322 only yielded low antitumor activity. However, the addition of the repeat (di-peptide) and the retro-repeat (di-retro-peptide) sequences highly improved cancer cell toxicity up to 100% at 20 μM peptide concentration. Compared to the complete parent sequence hLFcin the derivatives showed toxicity on the melanoma cell line A375 increased by 10-fold and on the glioblastoma cell line U-87mg by 2-3-fold. Reduced killing velocity, apoptotic blebbing, activation of caspase 3/7 and formation of apoptotic DNA fragments proved that the active and cancer selective peptides, e.g. R-DIM-P-LF11-322, trigger apoptosis, whereas highly active, though non-selective peptides, such as DIM-LF11-318 and RW-AH seem to kill rapidly via necrosis inducing membrane lyses. Structural studies revealed specific toxicity on cancer cells by peptide derivatives with loop structures, whereas non-specific peptides comprised α-helical structures without loop. Model studies with the cancer membrane mimic phosphatidylserine (PS) gave strong evidence that PS only exposed by cancer cells is an important target for specific hLFcin derivatives. Other negatively charged membrane exposed molecules as sialic acid, heparan and chondroitin sulfate were shown to have minor impact on peptide activity.

  11. Phospholipids chiral at phosphorus. Steric course of the reactions catalyzed by phosphatidylserine synthase from Escherichia coli and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Raetz, C.R.H.; Carman, G.M.; Dowhan, W.; Jiang, R.T.; Waszkuc, W.; Loffredo, W.; Tsai, M.D.

    1987-06-30

    The steric courses of the reactions catalyzed by phosphatidylserine (PS) synthase from Escherichia coli and yeast were elucidated by the following procedure. R/sub P/ and S/sub P/ isomers of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-(/sup 17/O, /sup 18/O)phosphoethanolamine ((/sup 17/O, /sup 18/O)DPPE) were synthesized and converted to (R/sub P/)- and (S/sub P/)-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-(/sup 16/O, /sup 17/O, /sup 18/O)DPPA), respectively, by incubating with phospholipase D. Condensation of (/sup 16/O, /sup 17/O, /sup 18/O)DPPA with cytidine 5'-monophosphomorpholidate in pyridine gave the desired substrate for PS synthase, (/sup 17/O, /sup 18/O)cytidine 5'-diphospho-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol ((/sup 17/O,/sup 18/O)CDP-DPG), as a mixture of several isotopic and configurational isomers. Incubation of (/sup 17/O, /sup 18/O)CDP-DPG), as a mixture of several isotopic and configurational isomers. Incubation of (/sup 17/O, /sup 18/O) CDP-DPG with a mixture of L-serine, PS synthase and PS decarboxylase gave (/sup 17/O, /sup 18/O)DPPE. The configuration and isotopic enrichments of the starting (/sup 17/O, /sup 18/O)DPPE and the product were analyzed by /sup 31/P NMR following trimethylsilylation of the DPPE. The results indicate that the reaction of E. coli PS synthase proceeds with retention of configuration at phosphorus, which suggests a two-step mechanism involving a phosphatidyl-enzyme intermediate, while the yeast PS synthase catalyzes the reaction with inversion of configuration, which suggests a single-displacement mechanism. Such results lend strong support to the ping-pong mechanism proposed for the E. coli enzyme and the sequential Bi-Bi mechanism proposed for the yeast enzyme, both based on previous isotopic exchange experiments.

  12. Evaluation of oxidation and glyco-oxidation of 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-phosphatidylserine by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Elisabete; Faria, Renata; Santinha, Deolinda; Domingues, M Rosário M; Domingues, Pedro

    2013-06-15

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an aminophospholipid found mainly in the plasma membranes of all mammalians cells, playing important roles in biological processes such as apoptosis and cell signaling. Due to the presence of a free amine group, under hyperglycemic conditions, PS can undergo glycation reaction, which may increase the susceptibility to oxidation. However, far too little attention has been paid to glycation and oxidation of PS. In this work we studied the oxidation, glycation and glyco-oxidation of 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (PAPS). PAPS and glycated PAPS were oxidized through a Fenton reaction and the oxidation products were monitored by ESI-MS in negative mode. Also, we developed a new sensitive liquid chromatography method coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to provide a complete profile of oxidized and glyco-oxidized PS. We were able to separate and identify several oxidation products of PAPS and glycated PAPS with modifications in unsaturated fatty acyl chain as long chain oxidation product (hydroxy and mono to tetra-hydroperoxy derivatives), and short chain products with a shortened fatty acyl chain with C5 and C8 length and aldehyde or carboxylic terminal. We have also observed oxidation products arising from structural changes in the serine polar head, which lead to oxidation products with an acetic acid terminal (glycerophosphoacetic acid derivatives) and lysoPS species. Oxidation of glycated PAPS gave rise to several products involving oxidative cleavages of the glucose moiety, mainly between C1 and C2 of the sugar unit. These oxidation products with different polar head groups have shown distinct neutral loss fragmentation patterns. Simultaneous oxidative modifications of the polar head and the fatty acyl chains were also observed. The findings from this study contribute to an ongoing effort to detect PS oxidation and glyco-oxidation products in biological systems.

  13. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Shabbir A.; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Sen, Prosenjit; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF) decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF. PMID:27348126

  14. Calpain-controlled detachment of major glycoproteins from the cytoskeleton regulates adhesive properties of activated phosphatidylserine-positive platelets.

    PubMed

    Artemenko, Elena O; Yakimenko, Alena O; Pichugin, Alexey V; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-02-15

    In resting platelets, adhesive membrane glycoproteins are attached to the cytoskeleton. On strong activation, phosphatidylserine(PS)-positive and -negative platelet subpopulations are formed. Platelet activation is accompanied by cytoskeletal rearrangement, although the glycoprotein attachment status in these two subpopulations is not clear. We developed a new, flow cytometry-based, single-cell approach to investigate attachment of membrane glycoproteins to the cytoskeleton in cell subpopulations. In PS-negative platelets, adhesive glycoproteins integrin αIIbβ3, glycoprotein Ib and, as shown for the first time, P-selectin were associated with the cytoskeleton. In contrast, this attachment was disrupted in PS-positive platelets; it was retained to some extent only in the small convex regions or 'caps'. It correlated with the degradation of talin and filamin observed only in PS-positive platelets. Calpain inhibitors essentially prevented the disruption of membrane glycoprotein attachment in PS-positive platelets, as well as talin and filamin degradation. With the suggestion that detachment of glycoproteins from the cytoskeleton may affect platelet adhesive properties, we investigated the ability of PS-positive platelets to resist shear-induced breakaway from the immobilized fibrinogen. Shear rates of 500/s caused PS-positive platelet breakaway, but their adhesion stability increased more than 10-fold after pretreatment of the platelets with calpain inhibitor. In contrast, the ability of PS-positive platelets to adhere to immobilized von Willebrand's factor at 100/s was low, but this was not affected by the preincubation of platelets with a calpain inhibitor. Our data suggest that calpain-controlled detachment of membrane glycoproteins is a new mechanism that is responsible for the loss of ability of the procoagulant platelets to resist detachment from thrombi by high shear stress.

  15. Genetic association between intronic variants in AS3MT and arsenic methylation efficiency is focused on a large linkage disequilibrium cluster in chromosome 10.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Rubio, Paulina; Meza-Montenegro, Maria M; Cantu-Soto, Ernesto; Klimecki, Walter T

    2010-04-01

    Differences in arsenic metabolism are known to play a role in individual variability in arsenic-induced disease susceptibility. Genetic variants in genes relevant to arsenic metabolism are considered to be partially responsible for the variation in arsenic metabolism. Specifically, variants in arsenic (3+ oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT), the key gene in the metabolism of arsenic, have been associated with increased arsenic methylation efficiency. Of particular interest is the fact that different studies have reported that several of the AS3MT single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are in strong linkage-disequilibrium (LD), which also extends to a nearby gene, CYP17A1. In an effort to characterize the extent of the region in LD, we genotyped 46 SNPs in a 347,000 base region of chromosome 10 that included AS3MT in arsenic-exposed subjects from Mexico. Pairwise LD analysis showed strong LD for these polymorphisms, represented by a mean r(2) of 0.82, spanning a region that includes five genes. Genetic association analysis with arsenic metabolism confirmed the previously observed association between AS3MT variants, including this large cluster of linked polymorphisms, and arsenic methylation efficiency. The existence of a large genomic region sharing strong LD with polymorphisms associated with arsenic metabolism presents a predicament because the observed phenotype cannot be unequivocally assigned to a single SNP or even a single gene. The results reported here should be carefully considered for future genomic association studies involving AS3MT and arsenic metabolism.

  16. ENZYMOLOGY OF ARSENIC METHYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enzymology of Arsenic Methylation

    David J. Thomas, Pharmacokinetics Branch, Experimental Toxicology Division, National
    Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park...

  17. DNA methylation and differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Michalowsky, L A; Jones, P A

    1989-01-01

    The methylation of specific cytosine residues in DNA has been implicated in regulating gene expression and facilitating functional specialization of cellular phenotypes. Generally, the demethylation of certain CpG sites correlates with transcriptional activation of genes. 5-Azacytidine is an inhibitor of DNA methylation and has been widely used as a potent activator of suppressed genetic information. Treatment of cells with 5-azacytidine results in profound phenotypic alterations. The drug-induced hypomethylation of DNA apparently perturbs DNA-protein interactions that may consequently alter transcriptional activity and cell determination. The inhibitory effect of cytosine methylation may be exerted via altered DNA-protein interactions specifically or may be transduced by a change in the conformation of chromatin. Recent studies have demonstrated that cytosine methylation also plays a central role in parental imprinting, which in turn determines the differential expression of maternal and paternal genomes during embryogenesis. In other words, methylation is the mechanism whereby the embryo retains memory of the gametic origin of each component of genetic information. A memory of this type would probably persist during DNA replication and cell division as methylation patterns are stable and heritable. PMID:2466640

  18. Quantification of phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid and free fatty acids in an ultrasound contrast agent by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Hvattum, Erlend; Uran, Steinar; Sandbaek, Anne Gunvor; Karlsson, Anders A; Skotland, Tore

    2006-10-11

    Sonazoid is a new contrast agent for ultrasound imaging. The product is an aqueous suspension of perfluorobutane microbubbles coated with phospholipids obtained from hydrogenated egg phosphatidylserine (H-EPS). A normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with evaporative light scattering detection was developed for quantification of free fatty acids, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid in H-EPS and Sonazoid. Separation of the lipids was carried out on an HPLC diol column and a gradient of chloroform and methanol with 0.2% formic acid titrated to pH 7.5 with ammonia. The calibration standards contained stearic acid, distearoyl-phosphatidic acid (DSPA) and distearoyl-phosphatidylserine (DSPS) in the concentration range of 0.016-1.0mg/ml (0.4-25microg injected). The method was validated with a limit of quantification of the three lipids set to 0.4microg (approximately 20-60microM). The best fit of the three calibration curves were obtained when the logarithmic transformed theoretical lipid concentration was plotted against the logarithmic transformed area under the peak and fitted to a second order polynomial equation. Stearic acid, DSPA and DSPS were analysed with an intermediate precision ranging from 4.4% to 5.3% R.S.D. and they were extracted from an aqueous suspension with a recovery ranging from 103.3% to 113.3%. The sum of total phospholipid concentration determined in H-EPS ranged from 96.4% to 103.2% of the theoretical values. The lipids in the ultrasound product were quantitated with a repeatability ranging from 6.2% to 11.7% R.S.D.

  19. Specific detection and quantification of palmitoyl-stearoyl-phosphatidylserine in human blood using normal-phase liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hvattum, E; Larsen, A; Uran, S; Michelsen, P M; Skotland, T

    1998-09-25

    A narrow-bore normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for separation of phospholipid classes using an HPLC diol column and a gradient of chloroform and methanol with 0.2% formic acid titrated to pH 5.3 with ammonia. The HPLC system was coupled on-line with an electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) or electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ES-MS-MS) system and the separation of several major phospholipid classes was shown. The molecular species of some phospholipid classes in human blood were qualitatively determined. A method was further developed for specific determination of a molecular species from phosphatidylserine, palmitoyl-stearoyl-phosphatidylserine (PSPS), in human blood using HPLC-ES-MS. The analyses were performed by single ion monitoring of the [M-H]- molecular ions of PSPS and an internal standard, dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylserine. The limit of quantification of the method was 1.2 ng of PSPS. The calibration curve ranged from 0.12 to 5.81 microg/ml of PSPS dissolved in the mobile phase. The curve was fitted to a second-order polynomial equation and found to be highly reproducible. Analysis of control samples was found to be reproducible with a between-series precision below 9.2% R.S.D. The amount of endogenous PSPS in human blood was determined in 13 subjects and found to range from 1.73 to 3.09 microg/ml. The identity of endogenous PSPS was confirmed by HPLC-ES-MS-MS.

  20. Transbilayer movement of phosphatidylserine n erythrocytes: inhibition of transport and preferential labeling of a 31,000-dalton protein by sulfhydryl reactive reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J.; Schroit, A.J.

    1988-02-09

    A series of /sup 125/I-labeled thiolation reagents were synthesized on the basis of the parent structure pyridyldithioethylamine (PDA). These compounds specifically and reversibly inhibit the active intrabilayer transport of phosphatidylserine (PS) in human blood cells. The binding of PDA to cells can be quantified since the thiol-disulfide exchange reaction yields a chromophore. In addition, the presence of a primary amine makes it amenable to derivatization with a variety of compounds. An iodinated derivative of PDA preferentially labeled a 31,000-dalton red blood cell peptide. The labeled component, which may represent the PS transporter, comigrated with integral membrane protein band 7.

  1. DNA methylation profiling identifies CG methylation clusters in Arabidopsis genes.

    PubMed

    Tran, Robert K; Henikoff, Jorja G; Zilberman, Daniel; Ditt, Renata F; Jacobsen, Steven E; Henikoff, Steven

    2005-01-26

    Cytosine DNA methylation in vertebrates is widespread, but methylation in plants is found almost exclusively at transposable elements and repetitive DNA. Within regions of methylation, methylcytosines are typically found in CG, CNG, and asymmetric contexts. CG sites are maintained by a plant homolog of mammalian Dnmt1 acting on hemi-methylated DNA after replication. Methylation of CNG and asymmetric sites appears to be maintained at each cell cycle by other mechanisms. We report a new type of DNA methylation in Arabidopsis, dense CG methylation clusters found at scattered sites throughout the genome. These clusters lack non-CG methylation and are preferentially found in genes, although they are relatively deficient toward the 5' end. CG methylation clusters are present in lines derived from different accessions and in mutants that eliminate de novo methylation, indicating that CG methylation clusters are stably maintained at specific sites. Because 5-methylcytosine is mutagenic, the appearance of CG methylation clusters over evolutionary time predicts a genome-wide deficiency of CG dinucleotides and an excess of C(A/T)G trinucleotides within transcribed regions. This is exactly what we find, implying that CG methylation clusters have contributed profoundly to plant gene evolution. We suggest that CG methylation clusters silence cryptic promoters that arise sporadically within transcription units.

  2. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. 173.193 Section 173.193 Transportation Other Regulations... bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. (a) Bromoacetone must be...) Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide mixtures, chloropicrin and methyl...

  3. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. 173.193 Section 173.193 Transportation Other Regulations... bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. (a) Bromoacetone must be...) Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide mixtures, chloropicrin and methyl...

  4. Escherichia coli α-Hemolysin Triggers Shrinkage of Erythrocytes via KCa3.1 and TMEM16A Channels with Subsequent Phosphatidylserine Exposure*

    PubMed Central

    Skals, Marianne; Jensen, Uffe B.; Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Kunzelmann, Karl; Leipziger, Jens; Praetorius, Helle A.

    2010-01-01

    α-Hemolysin from Escherichia coli (HlyA) readily lyse erythrocytes from various species. We have recently demonstrated that this pore-forming toxin provokes distinct shrinkage and crenation before it finally leads to swelling and lysis of erythrocytes. The present study documents the underlying mechanism for this severe volume reduction. We show that HlyA-induced shrinkage and crenation of human erythrocytes occur subsequent to a significant rise in [Ca2+]i. The Ca2+-activated K+ channel KCa3.1 (or Gardos channel) is essential for the initial shrinkage, because both clotrimazole and TRAM-34 prevent the shrinkage and potentiate hemolysis produced by HlyA. Notably, the recently described Ca2+-activated Cl− channel TMEM16A contributes substantially to HlyA-induced cell volume reduction. Erythrocytes isolated from TMEM16A−/− mice showed significantly attenuated crenation and increased lysis compared with controls. Additionally, we found that HlyA leads to acute exposure of phosphatidylserine in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. This exposure was considerably reduced by KCa3.1 antagonists. In conclusion, this study shows that HlyA triggers acute erythrocyte shrinkage, which depends on Ca2+-activated efflux of K+ via KCa3.1 and Cl− via TMEM16A, with subsequent phosphatidylserine exposure. This mechanism might potentially allow HlyA-damaged erythrocytes to be removed from the bloodstream by macrophages and thereby reduce the risk of intravascular hemolysis. PMID:20231275

  5. Interaction of caldesmon with endoplasmic reticulum membrane: effects on the mobility of phospholipids in the membrane and on the phosphatidylserine base-exchange reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, P; Makuch, R; Sikorski, A F; Jezierski, A; Pikula, S; Dabrowska, R

    1997-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated by tryptophan fluorescence the interaction of caldesmon with anionic phospholipid vesicles [Czurylo, Zborowski and Dabrowska (1993) Biochem. J. 291, 403-408]. In the present work we investigated the interaction of caldesmon with natural-membrane (rat liver endoplasmic reticulum) phospholipids by co-sedimentation assay. The results indicate that 1 mol of caldesmon binds approx. 170 mol of membrane phospholipids with a binding affinity constant of 7.3 x 10(6) M-1. The caldesmon-membrane phospholipid complex dissociates with increasing salt concentration and in the presence of Ca2+/calmodulin. As indicated by EPR measurements of membrane lipids labelled with 5-doxyl stearate and TEMPO-phosphatidylethanolamine, binding of caldesmon results in an increase in mobility of the acyl chains (in the region of carbon 5) and a decrease in polar headgroup mobility of phospholipids. Interaction of caldesmon with phospholipids is accompanied by inhibition of phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis via a phospholipid base-exchange reaction, with phosphatidylserine as substrate. This shows that, of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane phospholipids, the main target of caldesmon is phosphatidylserine. PMID:9371708

  6. Kapok oil methyl esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increased need for biodiesel feedstocks has caused various vegetable oils to be examined for this purpose. In the present work, the methyl esters of kapok (Ceiba pentandra) oil were prepared. The essential fuel properties were comprehensively determined and evaluated in comparison to specificati...

  7. Nutrients and DNA Methylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epigenetics is a new mechanism responsible for development, aging, and disease process such as cancer development. One major epigenetic phenomenon is DNA methylation, which attributes to gene expression and integrity. Deepening the knowledge on one-carbon metabolism is very important to understandin...

  8. Chloromethyl methyl ether (CMME)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chloromethyl methyl ether ( CMME ) ; CASRN 107 - 30 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments fo

  9. Thiophanate-methyl

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Thiophanate - methyl ; CASRN 23564 - 05 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  10. Haloxyfop-methyl

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Haloxyfop - methyl ; CASRN 69806 - 40 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  11. Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 03 / 002 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE ( CAS No . 108 - 10 - 1 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) March 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordan

  12. Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA 635 / R - 03 / 009 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHYL ETHYL KETONE ( CAS No . 78 - 93 - 3 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been r

  13. Kenaf methyl esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Additional or alternative feedstocks are one of the major areas of interest regarding biodiesel. In this paper, for the first time, the fuel properties of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seed oil methyl esters are comprehensively reported. This biodiesel is also relatively unique by containing small ...

  14. Pirimiphos-methyl

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Pirimiphos - methyl ; CASRN 29232 - 93 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  15. DNA Methylation and Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Delpu, Yannick; Cordelier, Pierre; Cho, William C.; Torrisani, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification that is strongly involved in the physiological control of genome expression. DNA methylation patterns are largely modified in cancer cells and can therefore be used to distinguish cancer cells from normal tissues. This review describes the main technologies available for the detection and the discovery of aberrantly methylated DNA patterns. It also presents the different sources of biological samples suitable for DNA methylation studies. We discuss the interest and perspectives on the use of DNA methylation measurements for cancer diagnosis through examples of methylated genes commonly documented in the literature. The discussion leads to our consideration for why DNA methylation is not commonly used in clinical practice through an examination of the main requirements that constitute a reliable biomarker. Finally, we describe the main DNA methylation inhibitors currently used in clinical trials and those that exhibit promising results. PMID:23873296

  16. DNA Methylation within Transcribed Regions

    PubMed Central

    To, Taiko K.; Saze, Hidetoshi; Kakutani, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation within transcribed genes is commonly found in diverse animals and plants. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances and the remaining mystery regarding intragenic DNA methylation. PMID:26143255

  17. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. 173.193 Section 173.193 Transportation Other Regulations... bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. (a) Bromoacetone must be... Group I performance level. (b) Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide...

  18. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. 173.193 Section 173.193 Transportation Other Regulations... bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc. (a) Bromoacetone must be... Group I performance level. (b) Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide...

  19. DNA methylation dynamics in neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqin; Tang, Beisha; He, Yuquan; Jin, Peng

    2016-03-01

    Neurogenesis is not limited to the embryonic stage, but continually proceeds in the adult brain throughout life. Epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation, histone modification and noncoding RNA, play important roles in neurogenesis. For decades, DNA methylation was thought to be a stable modification, except for demethylation in the early embryo. In recent years, DNA methylation has proved to be dynamic during development. In this review, we summarize the latest understanding about DNA methylation dynamics in neurogenesis, including the roles of different methylation forms (5-methylcytosine, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine), as well as their 'writers', 'readers' and interactions with histone modifications.

  20. Antibodies to phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex in suspected antiphospholipid syndrome in the absence of antibodies to cardiolipin or Beta-2-glycoprotein I.

    PubMed

    Sanfelippo, M J; Joshi, A; Schwartz, Sl; Meister, J A; Goldberg, J W

    2013-11-01

    Antibodies to phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) complex were measured in 728 serum specimens from patients suspected of having antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), but without diagnostic elevations in the levels of antibodies to cardiolipin or Beta-2 Glycoprotein 1 (β2-GP1). Of the 728 specimens, 41 had elevated levels of aPS/PT. Thrombotic events occurred in 11 of the 22 patients with accessible medical histories. Six of the patients with accessible medical records also had laboratory evidence of the lupus anticoagulant. The identification of aPS/PT in patients without evidence of antibodies to cardiolipin, β2-GP1, or the lupus anticoagulant can contribute to the identification of APS in patients that may go undetected with current testing methods.

  1. Improvement of short-term memory performance in aged beagles by a nutraceutical supplement containing phosphatidylserine, Ginkgo biloba, vitamin E, and pyridoxine

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Joseph A.; Landsberg, Gary M.; Milgram, Norton W.; Miolo, Alda

    2008-01-01

    Aged dogs demonstrate cognitive decline that is linked to brain aging. The purpose of the present study was to examine if a commercially available nutraceutical supplement that may be neuroprotective and contains phosphatidylserine, Ginkgo biloba, vitamin E, and pyridoxine could improve cognitive function in aged beagles. Nine aged beagles were tested on performance on a delayed-non-matching-to-position task, which is a neuropsychological test of short-term visuospatial memory. All subjects were tested on 5 baseline sessions; then, to assess the supplement, a crossover design was used in which 1 group received the supplement and the other a control substance in the 1st phase, with treatment conditions being reversed in the 2nd phase. Performance accuracy was significantly improved in supplemented dogs compared with control dogs and the effect was long lasting. These findings suggest that the nutraceutical supplement can improve memory in aged dogs. PMID:18481547

  2. Comparison of patient-derived high and low phosphatidylserine-exposing colorectal carcinoma cells in their interaction with anti-cancer peptides.

    PubMed

    Wilms, Dominik; Andrä, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Current cancer treatment is frequently compromised by severe adverse effects on healthy cells and tissues as well as by the increasing burden of (multi-)drug resistances. Some representatives of small, amphipathic peptides known as host defense peptides possess the potential to overcome these limitations and to evolve as future anti-cancer therapeutics. Peptide NK-2, derived from porcine NK-lysin, was originally discovered due to its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities. Today, also potent anti-cancer activity is proven and accompanied by low toxicity towards normal human cells. The molecular basis underlying this target selectivity remains rather elusive. Nevertheless, it is presumptive that preferential peptide interactions with surface factors non-abundant on healthy human cells play a key role. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of peptide NK-2 and structurally improved anti-cancer variants thereof against two patient-derived colorectal cancer cell lines, exposing high and low levels of phosphatidylserine on their cell surfaces, respectively. Concluding from a range of in vitro tests involving cellular as well as lipid vesicle-based methods, it is proposed that the magnitude of the accessible membrane surface charge is not a primarily decisive factor for selective peptide interactions. Instead, it is suggested that the level of membrane surface-exposed phosphatidylserine is of crucial importance for the activity of peptide NK-2 and enhanced variants thereof in terms of their cancer cell selectivity, the overall efficacy, as well as the underlying mode of action and kinetics. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Soluble Phosphatidylserine Binds to Two Sites on Human Factor IXa in a Ca2+ Dependent Fashion to Specifically Regulate Structure and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Rinku; Cole, Daud; Chattopadhyay, Rima; Biswas, Subir; Monroe, Dougald; Lentz, Barry R.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated a correlation between elevated levels of FIX and the risk of coronary heart disease, while reduced plasma FIX causes hemophilia B. FIXa interacts with FVIIIa in the presence of Ca2+ and phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes to form a factor X-activating complex (Xase) that is key to propagation of the initiated blood coagulation process in human. We test the hypothesis that PS in these membranes up-regulates the catalytic activity of this essential enzyme. We used a soluble form of phosphatidylserine, 1, 2-dicaproyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (C6PS), as a tool to do so. C6PS and PS in membranes are reported to regulate the homologous FXa nearly identically. FIXa binds a molecule of C6PS at each of with two sites with such different affinities (∼100-fold) that these appear to be independent. A high affinity C6PS binding site (Kd∼1.4 µM) regulates structure, whereas a low-affinity binding site (Kd∼140 µM) regulates activity. Equilibrium dialysis experiments were analyzed globally with four other data sets (proteolytic and amidolytic activities, intrinsic fluorescence, ellipticity) to unequivocally demonstrate stoichiometries of one for both sites. Michaelis-Menten parameters for FIXa proteolytic activity were the same in the presence of C6PS or PS/PC membranes. We conclude that the PS molecule and not a membrane surface is the key regulator of both factors Xa and IXa. Despite some minor differences in the details of regulation of factors Xa and IXa, the similarities we found suggest that lipid regulation of these two proteases may be similar, a hypothesis that we continue to test. PMID:24979705

  4. Soluble phosphatidylserine binds to two sites on human factor IXa in a Ca2+ dependent fashion to specifically regulate structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Rinku; Koklic, Tilen; Sengupta, Tanusree; Cole, Daud; Chattopadhyay, Rima; Biswas, Subir; Monroe, Dougald; Lentz, Barry R

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated a correlation between elevated levels of FIX and the risk of coronary heart disease, while reduced plasma FIX causes hemophilia B. FIXa interacts with FVIIIa in the presence of Ca2+ and phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes to form a factor X-activating complex (Xase) that is key to propagation of the initiated blood coagulation process in human. We test the hypothesis that PS in these membranes up-regulates the catalytic activity of this essential enzyme. We used a soluble form of phosphatidylserine, 1, 2-dicaproyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (C6PS), as a tool to do so. C6PS and PS in membranes are reported to regulate the homologous FXa nearly identically. FIXa binds a molecule of C6PS at each of with two sites with such different affinities (∼100-fold) that these appear to be independent. A high affinity C6PS binding site (Kd∼1.4 µM) regulates structure, whereas a low-affinity binding site (Kd∼140 µM) regulates activity. Equilibrium dialysis experiments were analyzed globally with four other data sets (proteolytic and amidolytic activities, intrinsic fluorescence, ellipticity) to unequivocally demonstrate stoichiometries of one for both sites. Michaelis-Menten parameters for FIXa proteolytic activity were the same in the presence of C6PS or PS/PC membranes. We conclude that the PS molecule and not a membrane surface is the key regulator of both factors Xa and IXa. Despite some minor differences in the details of regulation of factors Xa and IXa, the similarities we found suggest that lipid regulation of these two proteases may be similar, a hypothesis that we continue to test.

  5. Methylation profiling using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation and tiling array hybridization.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Hoi-Hung; Lee, Tin-Lap; Rennert, Owen M; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that regulates development and plays a role in the pathophysiology of many diseases. It is dynamically changed during germline development. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) is an efficient, cost-effective method for locus-specific and genome-wide analysis. Methylated DNA fragments are enriched by a 5-methylcytidine-recognizing antibody, therefore allowing the analysis of both CpG and non-CpG methylation. The enriched DNA fragments can be amplified and hybridized to tiling arrays covering CpG islands, promoters, or the entire genome. Comparison of different methylomes permits the discovery of differentially methylated regions that might be important in disease- or tissue-specific expression. Here, we describe an established MeDIP protocol and tiling array hybridization method for profiling methylation of testicular germ cells.

  6. Genetic effects of methylation diets.

    PubMed

    Van den Veyver, Ignatia B

    2002-01-01

    DNA methylation at cytosines in CpG dinucleotides can lead to changes in gene expression and function without altering the primary sequence of the DNA. Methylation can be affected by dietary levels of methyl-donor components, such as folic acid. This may be an important mechanism for environmentally induced changes in gene expression. Recent literature supports a role for DNA-methylation changes in a number of adult-onset disorders and during development. These changes may be significant for better understanding certain birth defects (e.g., neural tube defects) and the long-term consequences of early environmental influences on gene expression (metabolic programming). Optimal "methylation diets" should be investigated as part of the prevention and treatment of all these conditions, as well as in disorders such as Rett syndrome, whose primary defects may lie in DNA methylation-dependent gene regulation.

  7. Differential scanning calorimetric and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of the effects of cholesterol on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of a homologous series of linear saturated phosphatidylserine bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    McMullen, T P; Lewis, R N; McElhaney, R N

    2000-10-01

    We have examined the effects of cholesterol on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of aqueous dispersions of a homologous series of linear disaturated phosphatidylserines by high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. We find that the incorporation of increasing quantities of cholesterol progressively reduces the temperature, enthalpy, and cooperativity of the gel-to-liquid-crystalline phase transition of the host phosphatidylserine bilayer, such that a cooperative chain-melting phase transition is completely or almost completely abolished at 50 mol % cholesterol, in contrast to the results of previous studies. We are also unable to detect the presence of a separate anhydrous cholesterol or cholesterol monohydrate phase in our binary mixtures, again in contrast to previous reports. We further show that the magnitude of the reduction in the phase transition temperature induced by cholesterol addition is independent of the hydrocarbon chain length of the phosphatidylserine studied. This result contrasts with our previous results with phosphatidylcholine bilayers, where we found that cholesterol increases or decreases the phase transition temperature in a chain length-dependent manner (1993. Biochemistry, 32:516-522), but is in agreement with our previous results for phosphatidylethanolamine bilayers, where no hydrocarbon chain length-dependent effects were observed (1999. Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 1416:119-234). However, the reduction in the phase transition temperature by cholesterol is of greater magnitude in phosphatidylethanolamine as compared to phosphatidylserine bilayers. We also show that the addition of cholesterol facilitates the formation of the lamellar crystalline phase in phosphatidylserine bilayers, as it does in phosphatidylethanolamine bilayers, whereas the formation of such phases in phosphatidylcholine bilayers is inhibited by the presence of cholesterol. We ascribe the limited

  8. Managing Nematodes without Methyl Bromide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide is an effective pre-plant soil fumigant used to control nematodes in many high-input, high-value production systems including vegetables, nurseries, ornamentals, tree fruits, strawberries, and grapes. Because methyl bromide has provided a reliable return on investment for nematode c...

  9. Catalase plays an important role in a genotoxic pathway of methylated arsenicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a common contaminant of drinking water in many parts of the world. Consumption of arsenic-contaminated drinking water has been implicated in both cancerous and non-cancerous health conditions. However, the pathways that lead to arsenic-induced health conditions have no...

  10. Methods of DNA methylation detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Wusi Chen (Inventor); Filanoski, Brian John (Inventor); Mishra, Nirankar (Inventor); Rastogi, Shiva (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides for methods of DNA methylation detection. The present invention provides for methods of generating and detecting specific electronic signals that report the methylation status of targeted DNA molecules in biological samples.Two methods are described, direct and indirect detection of methylated DNA molecules in a nano transistor based device. In the direct detection, methylated target DNA molecules are captured on the sensing surface resulting in changes in the electrical properties of a nano transistor. These changes generate detectable electronic signals. In the indirect detection, antibody-DNA conjugates are used to identify methylated DNA molecules. RNA signal molecules are generated through an in vitro transcription process. These RNA molecules are captured on the sensing surface change the electrical properties of nano transistor thereby generating detectable electronic signals.

  11. Methyl Halide Production by Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, G. D.; Varner, R. K.; Blanchard, R. O.; Sive, B. C.; Crill, P. M.

    2005-12-01

    Methyl chloride (CH3Cl), methyl bromide (CH3Br) and methyl iodide (CH3I) are methyl halide gases that contribute significant amounts of halogen radicals to the atmosphere. In an effort to better understand the global budget of methyl halides and their impact on the atmosphere, we need to identify the natural sources in addition to the known anthropogenic sources of these compounds. We are investigating the role of fungi in the production of methyl halides in the soils and wetlands in southern New Hampshire, USA. Previous research has shown that wood decay fungi and ectomycorrhizal fungi, which are within a group of fungi called basidiomycetes, emit methyl halides. In our study, measurements of headspace gas extracted from flasks containing fungi grown in culture demonstrate that a variety of fungi, including basidiomycetes and non-basidiomycetes, emit methyl halides. Our research sites include four ecosystems: an agricultural field, a temperate forest, a fresh water wetland, and coastal salt marshes. We have collected and isolated fungi at each site by culturing tissue samples of fruiting bodies and plant material, by using wood baits, and from the direct culture of soil. We compared the rates of methyl halide emissions from the fungi in the four ecosystems. In addition, we measured emissions from previously assayed fungal isolates after reintroducing them to sterilized soils that were collected from their original environments. Fungal biomass was determined by substrate-induced respiration (SIR). The emission rate by the fungus was determined by a linear regression of the concentration of methyl halide in the sample headspace over time divided by the fungal biomass.

  12. DNA methylation pathways and their crosstalk with histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiamu; Johnson, Lianna M.; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of DNA and of histone 3 at Lys 9 (H3K9) are highly correlated with gene silencing in eukaryotes from fungi to humans. Both of these epigenetic marks need to be established at specific regions of the genome and then maintained at these sites through cell division. Protein structural domains that specifically recognize methylated DNA and methylated histones are key for targeting enzymes that catalyse these marks to appropriate genome sites. Genetic, genomic, structural and biochemical data reveal connections between these two epigenetic marks, and these domains mediate much of the crosstalk. PMID:26296162

  13. A role of phosphatidylserine externalization in clearance of erythrocytes exposed to stress but not in eliminating aging populations of erythrocyte in mice.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Sanjay; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2008-08-01

    Age dependent changes in phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization were studied in mouse erythrocytes of different age groups (range 1-55 days) by using a newly developed double in vivo biotinylation (DIB) technique. Around 3-4% of the erythrocytes freshly released in the circulation were PS(+) but this proportion fell rapidly to 1% or less and did not increase at later time points. Blocking erythrocyte clearance from the circulation by in vivo depletion of macrophages (by treatment with clodronate loaded liposomes) for up to 7 days did not result in accumulation of PS(+) erythrocytes in the circulation indicating that the low percentage of PS(+) cells within old erythrocytes (age >40 days) was not related to the clearance of PS(+) erythrocytes by macrophages. In vitro treatment with stress inducing agents like deoxyglucose or Ca(++)/calcium ionophore resulted in a marked induction of PS externalization in mouse erythrocytes and this effect was most prominent in the youngest erythrocyte population (age <10 days). Kinetics of clearance of different age groups of stress exposed erythrocytes after intravenous infusion into recipient mice indicated that the young erythrocytes were cleared at fastest rate from the circulation as compared to erythrocytes of older age groups. Within young erythrocytes exposed to stress, PS(+) erythrocytes were preferentially cleared. Taken together our results suggest that PS externalization is unlikely to have a role in the removal of old erythrocytes from blood circulation but may have a role in the clearance of stressed and damaged young erythrocytes in blood circulation.

  14. Binding of Alphaherpesvirus Glycoprotein H to Surface α4β1-Integrins Activates Calcium-Signaling Pathways and Induces Phosphatidylserine Exposure on the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Gramatica, Andrea; Herrmann, Andreas; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular signaling connected to integrin activation is known to induce cytoplasmic Ca2+ release, which in turn mediates a number of downstream signals. The cellular entry pathways of two closely related alphaherpesviruses, equine herpesviruses 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), are differentially regulated with respect to the requirement of interaction of glycoprotein H (gH) with α4β1-integrins. We show here that binding of EHV-1, but not EHV-4, to target cells resulted in a rapid and significant increase in cytosolic Ca2+ levels. EHV-1 expressing EHV-4 gH (gH4) in lieu of authentic gH1 failed to induce Ca2+ release, while EHV-4 with gH1 triggered significant Ca2+ release. Blocking the interaction between gH1 and α4β1-integrins, inhibiting phospholipase C (PLC) activation, or blocking binding of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) to its receptor on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) abrogated Ca2+ release. Interestingly, phosphatidylserine (PS) was exposed on the plasma membrane in response to cytosolic calcium increase after EHV-1 binding through a scramblase-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of both Ca2+ release from the ER and scramblase activation blocked PS scrambling and redirected virus entry to the endocytic pathway, indicating that PS may play a role in facilitating virus entry directly at the plasma membrane. PMID:26489864

  15. Inhibitors of second messenger pathways and Ca(2+)-induced exposure of phosphatidylserine in red blood cells of patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gbotosho, O T; Cytlak, U M; Hannemann, A; Rees, D C; Tewari, S; Gibson, J S

    2014-07-01

    The present work investigates the contribution of various second messenger systems to Ca(2+)-induced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure in red blood cells (RBCs) from sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. The Ca(2+) dependence of PS exposure was confirmed using the Ca(2+) ionophore bromo-A23187 to clamp intracellular Ca(2+) over 4 orders of magnitude in high or low potassium-containing (HK or LK) saline. The percentage of RBCs showing PS exposure was significantly increased in LK over HK saline. This effect was reduced by the Gardos channel inhibitors, clotrimazole and charybdotoxin. Nevertheless, although Ca(2+) loading in the presence of an outwardly directed electrochemical gradient for K(+) stimulated PS exposure, substantial exposure still occurred in HK saline. Under the conditions used inhibitors of other second messenger systems (ABT491, quinacrine, acetylsalicylic acid, 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin, GW4869 and zVAD-fmk) did not inhibit the relationship between [Ca(2+)] and PS exposure. Inhibitors of phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase, platelet-activating factor, sphingomyelinase and caspases, therefore, were without effect on Ca(2+)-induced PS exposure in RBCs, incubated in either HK or LK saline.

  16. Identification of the Ca²⁺ entry pathway involved in deoxygenation-induced phosphatidylserine exposure in red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Cytlak, U M; Hannemann, A; Rees, D C; Gibson, J S

    2013-11-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure in red blood cells (RBCs) from sickle cell disease (SCD) patients is increased compared to levels in normal individuals and may participate in the anaemic and ischaemic complications of SCD. Exposure is increased by deoxygenation and occurs with elevation of intracellular Ca²⁺ to low micromolar levels. The Ca²⁺ entry step has not been defined but a role for the deoxygenation-induced pathway, Psickle, is postulated. Partial Psickle inhibitors 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (SITS), 4,4'-dithiocyano-2,2'-stilbene-disulphonic acid (DIDS) and dipyridamole inhibited deoxygenation-induced PS exposure (DIDS IC50, 118 nM). Inhibitors and activators of other pathways (including these stimulated by depolarisation, benzodiazepines, glutamate and stretch) were without effect. Zn²⁺ and Gd³⁺ stimulated PS exposure to high levels. In the case of Zn²⁺, this effect was independent of oxygen (and hence HbS polymerisation and RBC sickling) but required extracellular Ca²⁺. The effect was completely abolished when Zn²⁺ (100 μM) was added to RBCs suspended in autologous plasma, implying a requirement of high levels of free Zn²⁺.

  17. Docosahexaenoic acid and phosphatidylserine supplementations improve antioxidant activities and cognitive functions of the developing brain on pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shyh-Hwa; Chang, Chin-Dong; Chen, Pi-Hang; Su, Jheng-Ren; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Chaung, Hso-Chi

    2012-04-27

    Epilepsy provoked by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) is caused by an abnormal excitatory postsynaptic potential, which results in increased production of reactive oxygen species, and finally reducing cognitive functions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with DHA and PS, administered either alone or in combination, on oxidative stress and behavioral and cognitive spatial memory in neonatal rats with PTZ-induced epileptic seizure. In this study, rat pups received repetitive doses of PTZ for induction of epileptic seizure and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6, n-3) and phosphatidylserine (PS) were orally administrated alone or together to the PTZ-induced epileptic animals daily for 36 d. The spatial memory, nitric mono-oxide (NO) production, and enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in brain and liver tissues were determined. PTZ administration significantly reduced the cell numbers in the hippocampus, shortened the escape latency in the safe target region, decreased activities of SOD and catalase, but increased NO content in both brain and liver tissues, while DHA and PS significantly extended the escape latency, reversed the oxidative parameters observed in the brain, and enhanced SOD activity in the liver. Dietary supplementation with DHA and PS may protect brain tissue from the oxidative stress caused by epileptic seizures and could serve to improve learning and memory ability in vivo.

  18. Both TMEM16F-dependent and TMEM16F-independent pathways contribute to phosphatidylserine exposure in platelet apoptosis and platelet activation.

    PubMed

    van Kruchten, Roger; Mattheij, Nadine J A; Saunders, Christine; Feijge, Marion A H; Swieringa, Frauke; Wolfs, Jef L N; Collins, Peter W; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Bevers, Edouard M

    2013-03-07

    Scott syndrome, a bleeding disorder caused by defective phospholipid scrambling, has been associated with mutations in the TMEM16F gene. The role of TMEM16F in apoptosis- or agonist-induced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure was studied in platelets from a Scott syndrome patient and control subjects. Whereas stimulation of control platelets with the BH3-mimetic ABT737 resulted in 2 distinct fractions with moderate and high PS exposure, the high PS-exposing fraction was markedly delayed in Scott platelets. High, but not moderate, PS exposure in platelets was suppressed by chelation of intracellular Ca(2+), whereas caspase inhibition completely abolished ABT737-induced PS exposure in both Scott and control platelets. On the other hand, high PS exposure induced by the Ca(2+)-mobilizing agonists convulxin/thrombin fully relied on mitochondrial depolarization and was virtually absent in Scott platelets. Finally, PS exposure induced by collagen/thrombin was partly affected in Scott platelets, and the residual PS positive fraction was insensitive to inhibition of caspases or mitochondrial depolarization. In conclusion, TMEM16F is not required for, but enhances, caspase-dependent PS exposure; convulxin-/thrombin-induced PS exposure is entirely dependent on TMEM16F, whereas collagen/thrombin-induced PS exposure results from 2 distinct pathways, one of which involves mitochondrial depolarization and is mediated by TMEM16F.

  19. The effects of acute and chronic administration of phosphatidylserine on cell proliferation and survival in the dentate gyrus of adult and middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Maragno, Heloisa; Rodella, Patricia; Silva Freitas, Josiane da; Fernando Takase, Luiz

    2015-06-03

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an acidic phospholipid that is widely used as an alternative and/or complementary treatment of cognitive impairments. We hypothesize that these changes may be attributable, at least in part, to alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute and chronic PS administration on hippocampal cell proliferation and survival in adult (5 months old) and middle-aged (12 months old) male Wistar rats. PS was injected daily (50mg/kg, i.p.) during 7 days (acute experiment) or 21 days (chronic experiment). To label newly generated cells, rats received a single BrdU injection (200mg/kg, i.p.) one day before PS treatment. The object recognition test was performed, and the rats were perfused. The brains were removed and processed with immunohistochemistry techniques for Ki-67 (cell proliferation) and BrdU (cell survival). The acute and chronic regimens were unable to promote cognitive improvement in either age group in the object recognition test. The analysis of cell proliferation showed a significant increase in the number of Ki-67-positive cells after acute and chronic PS administration in both age groups. The analysis of cell survival showed that acute and chronic PS administration increased the number of BrdU-positive cells only in adult animals.

  20. Extracellular Vesicles Present in Human Ovarian Tumor Microenvironments Induce a Phosphatidylserine-Dependent Arrest in the T-cell Signaling Cascade.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Raymond J; Balu-Iyer, Sathy; Loyall, Jenni; Sacca, Anthony J; Shenoy, Gautam N; Peng, Peng; Iyer, Vandana; Fathallah, Anas M; Berenson, Charles S; Wallace, Paul K; Tario, Joseph; Odunsi, Kunle; Bankert, Richard B

    2015-11-01

    The identification of immunosuppressive factors within human tumor microenvironments, and the ability to block these factors, would be expected to enhance patients' antitumor immune responses. We previously established that an unidentified factor, or factors, present in ovarian tumor ascites fluids reversibly inhibited the activation of T cells by arresting the T-cell signaling cascade. Ultracentrifugation of the tumor ascites fluid has now revealed a pellet that contains small extracellular vesicles (EV) with an average diameter of 80 nm. The T-cell arrest was determined to be causally linked to phosphatidylserine (PS) that is present on the outer leaflet of the vesicle bilayer, as a depletion of PS-expressing EV or a blockade of PS with anti-PS antibody significantly inhibits the vesicle-induced signaling arrest. The inhibitory EV were also isolated from solid tumor tissues. The presence of immunosuppressive vesicles in the microenvironments of ovarian tumors and our ability to block their inhibition of T-cell function represent a potential therapeutic target for patients with ovarian cancer.

  1. Na/sup +/ and H/sup +/ dependent Mn/sup 2 +/ binding to phosphatidylserine vesicles as a test of the Gouy-Chapman-Stern theory

    SciTech Connect

    Puskin, J.S.; Coene, M.T.

    1980-01-01

    Mn/sup 2 +/ binding to phosphatidylserine (PS) vesicles was measured by EPR as a function of (Na/sup +/) and pH. At nearly physiological monovalent salt concentration the apparent Mn/sup 2 +/ affinity (K/sub a/) increased monitonically over the pH range 5.7 to 8.35, with K/sub a/ roughly ..cap alpha.. (H/sup +/)-/sup 1/ above pH 7.3. It was found, moreover, that K/sub a/ fell off more rapidly with added NaCl at pH 6.1 than at pH 7.87. Qualitatively, these results are consistent with two types of Mn/sup 2 +/-PS binding: (i) simple adsorption and (ii) adsorption with the release of an amino proton from PS. The existence of Mn/sup 2 +/-induced H/sup +/ displacement from PS was vertified through titration measurements, employing a pH electrode. When H/sup +/ displacement is taken into account, the variation in K/sub a/ with (Na/sup +/) observed at pH 6.1 is found to be in reasonably good agreement with that expected from the Gouy-Chapman-Stern theory of ionic binding to charged surfaces.

  2. Sub-chronic (13-week) oral toxicity study, preceded by an in utero exposure phase and genotoxicity studies with fish source phosphatidylserine in rats.

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, Y; Levi, L; Eyal, I; Cohen, T; Tessler, S

    2015-12-01

    The safety of fish phosphatidylserine (PS) conjugated to DHA (InCog™) was examined in a series of toxicology studies as first step to support future use in infants and general population using in vitro genotoxicity tests and in a sub-chronic toxicity study with an in-utero exposure phase. PS is a major lipid in the cell membrane, active in various membrane-mediated processes. PS-DHA, present in human milk, has been suggested to be important for early brain development. Rats were exposed to diets containing 1.5%, 3% or 4.5% InCog or two control diets. Parental (F0) animals were fed throughout mating, gestation and lactation. Subsequently, a subchronic, 13-week study was conducted on the F1 animals followed by 4 weeks of recovery. The genotoxicity tests showed no mutagenicity potential. No significant toxicological findings were found in the F0 rats or the F1 pups. In the 13-weeks study, an increase in the presence of renal minimal-mild multifocal corticomedullary mineralization was noted in nine females of the high-dose group. This change was not associated with any inflammatory or degenerative changes in the kidneys. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) in the present study was placed at 3% in the diet (mid-dose group), equivalent to an overall intake of at least 2.1 g InCog/kg bw/day in the F1 generation.

  3. Procoagulant activity induced by transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects is associated with exposure of phosphatidylserine on microparticles, platelets and red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wenbo; Kou, Junjie; Meng, Huan; Kou, Yan; He, Zhangxiu; Cao, Muhua; Wang, Lixiu; Bi, Yayan; Thatte, Hemant S; Shi, Jialan

    2015-08-01

    The mechanism of hypercoagulable state following transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects (ASDs) remains unclear. We evaluated the exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on released microparticles (MPs) and also the cells of their origin from peripheral blood, and the associated increase in procoagulant activity (PCA) following transcatheter ASD closure. We demonstrate that PS(+) MP levels were elevated immediately after device implantation (P <0.002), peaked at 24hour (P <0.002), and persisted at high levels for 1-week post procedure (P <0.002). Flow cytometry analysis indicated that PS(+) MPs were mainly derived from platelets, endothelial cells, and the red blood cells (RBCs). Concomittantly, PS(+) platelet and RBC count also increased after transcatheter closure of ASDs, while PS(+) leukocytes levels remained the same. Compared to the baseline, coagulation time of PS(+) MPs, platelets, and RBCs at 24hours post procedure decreased by about 18.7% (P <0.004), 21.5% (P <0.001), and 26.8% (P <0.001), respectively. Intrinsic factor Xa and prothrombinase were produced abundantly by platelets, RBCs, and MPs leading to materialization of fibrin by 24hours. Additionally, Xase complex formation and thrombin generation was inhibited by about 74% by the addition of lactadherin to the assays. Our results thus demonstrate that PS exposure on MPs, platelets, and RBCs play an important role in hypercoagulability following transcatheter ASD closure.

  4. Purification and characterization of a membrane bound neutral pH optimum magnesium-dependent and phosphatidylserine-stimulated sphingomyelinase from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Hassler, D F; Smith, G K; Weaver, K; Hannun, Y A

    1998-12-18

    Sphingomyelin hydrolysis and ceramide generation catalyzed by sphingomyelinases (SMase) are key components of the signaling pathways in cytokine- and stress-induced cellular responses. In this study, we report the partial purification and characterization of the membrane bound, neutral pH optimal, and magnesium-dependent SMase (N-SMase) from rat brain. Proteins from Triton X-100 extract of brain membrane were purified sequentially with DEAE-Sephacel, heparin-Sepharose, ceramic hydroxyapatite, Mono Q, phenyl-Superose, and Superose 12 column chromatography. After eight purification steps, the specific activity of the enzyme increased by 3030-fold over the brain homogenate. The enzyme hydrolyzed sphingomyelin but not phosphatidylcholine and its activity was dependent upon magnesium with an optimal pH of 7.5 and a native pI of 5.2. Delipidation of the enzyme through chromatographic purification or by extraction with 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonic acid followed by gel filtration revealed that the enzyme became increasingly dependent on phosphatidylserine (PS). Up to 20-fold stimulation was observed with PS whereas other lipids examined were either ineffective or only mildly stimulatory. The Km of the enzyme for substrate sphingomyelin (3.4 mol %) was not affected by PS. The highly purified enzyme was inhibited by glutathione with a >95% inhibition observed with 3 mM glutathione and with a Hill number calculated at approximately 8. The significance of these results to the regulation of N-SMase is discussed.

  5. Methylation of cysteine in hemoglobin following exposure to methylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, E.; Connors, T.A.; Farmer, P.B.; Gorf, S.M.; Rickard, J.

    1981-06-01

    In addition to reacting with biologically important nucleophilic sites in DNA, alkylating agents also interact with amino acids in proteins. Measurements of the extent of formation of these alkyl amino acids may be used as a means of determining exposure to these compounds. The degree of S-methylation of cysteine in hemoglobin was studied following in vivo exposure of rats to methyl methanesulfonate, dimethylnitrosamine, and 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide. A linear dose-response curve was observed for methyl methanesulfonate over a 100-fold dose range. For dimethylnitrosamine, there was a threshold of doses where no methylation could be detected, and a curved dose-response curve was obtained. At high doses, the degree of methylation of hemoglobin cysteine was 7-fold lower than that with methyl methanesulfonate. In vivo, no alkylation could be observed with 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide; however, the existence of naturally occurring S-methylcysteine in the rat hemoglobin may have overshadowed small increases in alkylation arising from exposure to this compound. The natural occurrence of S-methylcysteine was studied in 13 species, and amounts ranging from 5.6 nmol/g globin (hamster) to 481 nmol/g globin (partridge) were observed. The reason for its occurrence is unknown but is under investigation.

  6. Whole genome methylation profiling by immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    I provide a protocol for DNA methylation profiling based on immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA using commercially available monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize 5-methylcytosine. Quantification of the level of enrichment of the resulting DNA enables DNA methylation to be assayed for any genomic locus, including entire chromosomes or genomes if appropriate microarray or high-throughput sequencing platforms are used. In previous studies (1, 2), I have used hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays from Roche Nimblegen Inc, which allow any genomic region of interest to be interrogated, dependent on the array design. For example, using modern tiling arrays comprising millions of oligonucleotide probes, several complete human chromosomes can be assayed at densities of one probe per 100 bp or greater, sufficient to yield high-quality data. However, other methods such as quantitative real-time PCR or high-throughput sequencing can be used, giving either measurement of methylation at a single locus or across the entire genome, respectively. While the data produced by single locus assays is relatively simple to analyze and interpret, global assays such as microarrays or high-throughput sequencing require more complex statistical approaches in order to effectively identify regions of differential methylation, and a brief outline of some approaches is given.

  7. Levels of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaf Phosphatidic Acids, Phosphatidylserines, and Most Trienoate-Containing Polar Lipid Molecular Species Increase during the Dark Period of the Diurnal Cycle.

    PubMed

    Maatta, Sara; Scheu, Brad; Roth, Mary R; Tamura, Pamela; Li, Maoyin; Williams, Todd D; Wang, Xuemin; Welti, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that plant leaf polar lipid fatty acid composition varies during the diurnal (dark-light) cycle. Fatty acid synthesis occurs primarily during the light, but fatty acid desaturation continues in the absence of light, resulting in polyunsaturated fatty acids reaching their highest levels toward the end of the dark period. In this work, Arabidopsis thaliana were grown at constant (21°C) temperature with 12-h light and 12-h dark periods. Collision induced dissociation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) demonstrated that 16:3 and 18:3 fatty acid content in membrane lipids of leaves are higher at the end of the dark than at the end of the light period, while 16:1, 16:2, 18:0, and 18:1 content are higher at the end of the light period. Lipid profiling of membrane galactolipids, phospholipids, and lysophospholipids by electrospray ionization triple quadrupole MS indicated that the monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylcholine classes include molecular species whose levels are highest at end of the light period and others that are highest at the end of the dark period. The levels of phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylserine classes were higher at the end of the dark period, and molecular species within these classes either followed the class pattern or were not significantly changed in the diurnal cycle. Phospholipase D (PLD) is a family of enzymes that hydrolyzes phospholipids to produce PA. Analysis of several PLD mutant lines suggests that PLDζ2 and possibly PLDα1 may contribute to diurnal cycling of PA. The polar lipid compositional changes are considered in relation to recent data that demonstrate phosphatidylcholine acyl editing.

  8. Appearance of phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cells requires calcium-mediated nonspecific flip-flop and is enhanced by loss of the aminophospholipid translocase.

    PubMed

    Bratton, D L; Fadok, V A; Richter, D A; Kailey, J M; Guthrie, L A; Henson, P M

    1997-10-17

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), ordinarily sequestered in the plasma membrane inner leaflet, appears in the outer leaflet during apoptosis, where it triggers non-inflammatory phagocytic recognition of the apoptotic cell. The mechanism of PS appearance during apoptosis is not well understood but has been associated with loss of aminophospholipid translocase activity and nonspecific flip-flop of phospholipids of various classes. The human leukemic cell line HL-60, the T cell line Jurkat, and peripheral blood neutrophils, undergoing apoptosis induced either with UV irradiation or anti-Fas antibody, were probed in the cytofluorograph for (i) surface PS using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled annexin V, (ii) PS uptake by the aminophospholipid translocase using [6-[(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino] caproyl] (NBD)-labeled PS, (iii) nonspecific uptake of phospholipids (as a measure of transbilayer flip-flop) using NBD-labeled phosphatidylcholine, and (iv) the appearance of hypodiploid DNA. In all three types of cells undergoing apoptosis, the appearance of PS followed loss of aminophospholipid translocase and was accompanied by nonspecific phospholipid flip-flop. Importantly, however, in the absence of extracellular calcium, the appearance of PS was completely inhibited despite DNA fragmentation and loss of aminophospholipid translocase activity, the latter demonstrating that loss of the translocase is insufficient for PS appearance during apoptosis. Furthermore, while both the appearance of PS and nonspecific phospholipid uptake demonstrated identical extracellular calcium requirements with an ED50 of nearly 100 microM, the magnitude of PS appearance depended on the level of aminophospholipid translocase activity. Taken together, the data strongly suggest that while nonspecific flip-flop is the driving event for PS appearance in the plasma membrane outer leaflet, aminophospholipid translocase activity ultimately modulates its appearance.

  9. CD36 is required for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by human macrophages that use either a phosphatidylserine receptor or the vitronectin receptor (alpha v beta 3).

    PubMed

    Fadok, V A; Warner, M L; Bratton, D L; Henson, P M

    1998-12-01

    In vivo, apoptotic cells are efficiently removed by professional or nonprofessional phagocytes, a process thought to be essential for tissue remodeling and resolution of inflammation. Macrophages recognize apoptotic cells by several mechanisms, including recognition of exposed phosphatidylserine (PS); however, PS recognition on apoptotic cells has not been identified as a feature of human macrophages. The purpose of this study was to determine whether human monocyte-derived macrophages could be stimulated to recognize PS, defined as inhibition of phagocytosis by PS-containing liposomes. We also assessed the potential roles for scavenger receptors, CD14, and lectins. Uptake of apoptotic neutrophils into unstimulated macrophages was blocked about 50% by Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser and anti-alpha(v), and up to 20% by oxidized low density lipoprotein and N-acetylglucosamine, implying a major role for integrin and minor roles for scavenger and lectin receptors. Uptake into macrophages stimulated with beta-1,3-glucan was blocked 50% by PS liposomes and 40% by oxidized low density lipoprotein, suggesting that the macrophages had switched from using integrin to recognition of PS. MEM-18 and 61D3 (anti-CD14 mAbs) were poor inhibitors of apoptotic neutrophil uptake, but good inhibitors of apoptotic lymphocyte uptake. The switch to PS recognition was accompanied by down-regulation of alpha(v)beta3 expression and function. Anti-CD36 blocked uptake into unstimulated or stimulated macrophages, suggesting CD36 involvement not only with the alpha(v)beta3 integrin mechanism (as previously reported) but also with PS recognition. A maximum of 70% inhibition was achieved by combining anti-CD36 with either anti-a(v) or PS liposomes.

  10. The Tip of the Four N-Terminal α-Helices of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin Contains the Interaction Site with Membrane Phosphatidylserine Facilitating Small GTPases Glucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Varela Chavez, Carolina; Haustant, Georges Michel; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Chenal, Alexandre; Pauillac, Serge; Blondel, Arnaud; Popoff, Michel-Robert

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL) is a powerful virulence factor responsible for severe toxic shock in man and animals. TcsL belongs to the large clostridial glucosylating toxin (LCGT) family which inactivates small GTPases by glucosylation with uridine-diphosphate (UDP)-glucose as a cofactor. Notably, TcsL modifies Rac and Ras GTPases, leading to drastic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton and cell viability. TcsL enters cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the N-terminal glucosylating domain (TcsL-cat) into the cytosol. TcsL-cat was found to preferentially bind to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes and to increase the glucosylation of Rac anchored to the lipid membrane. We have previously reported that the N-terminal four helical bundle structure (1–93 domain) recognizes a broad range of lipids, but that TcsL-cat specifically binds to PS and phosphatidic acid. Here, we show using mutagenesis that the PS binding site is localized on the tip of the four-helix bundle which is rich in positively-charged amino acids. Residues Y14, V15, F17, and R18 on loop 1, between helices 1 and 2, in coordination with R68 from loop 3, between helices 3 and 4, form a pocket which accommodates L-serine. The functional PS-binding site is required for TcsL-cat binding to the plasma membrane and subsequent cytotoxicity. TcsL-cat binding to PS facilitates a high enzymatic activity towards membrane-anchored Ras by about three orders of magnitude as compared to Ras in solution. The PS-binding site is conserved in LCGTs, which likely retain a common mechanism of binding to the membrane for their full activity towards membrane-bound GTPases. PMID:27023605

  11. Anti-prothrombin (aPT) and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) antibodies and the risk of thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sciascia, Savino; Sanna, Giovanni; Murru, Veronica; Roccatello, Dario; Khamashta, Munther A; Bertolaccini, Maria Laura

    2014-02-01

    Antibodies to prothrombin are detected by directly coating prothrombin on irradiated ELISA plates (aPT) or by using the phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex as antigen (aPS/PT). Although these antibodies have both been associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and a correlation between the two assays have been reported, it seems that aPT and aPS/PT belong to different populations of autoantibodies. It was our objective to systematically review the available evidence on aPT and aPS/PT antibodies and the risk of thrombosis in APS. Medline-reports published between 1988 and 2013 investigating aPT and aPS/PT as a risk factor for thrombosis were included. Whenever possible, antibody isotype(s) and site of thrombosis were analysed. This systematic review is based on available data from more than 7,000 patients and controls from 38 studies analysing aPT and 10 aPS/PT. Antibodies to prothrombin (both aPT and aPS/PT) increased the risk of thrombosis (odds ratio [OR] 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.72-3.5). aPS/PT seemed to represent a stronger risk factor for thrombosis, both arterial and/or venous than aPT (OR 5.11; 95%CI 4.2-6.3 and OR 1.82; 95%CI 1.44-2.75, respectively). In conclusion, routine measurement of aPS/PT (but not aPT) might be useful in establishing the thrombotic risk of patients with previous thrombosis and/or systemic lupus erythematosus. Their inclusion as laboratory criteria for the APS should be indisputably further explored.

  12. The exocytotic signaling pathway induced by nerve growth factor in the presence of lyso-phosphatidylserine in rat peritoneal mast cells involves a type D phospholipase.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, J; Westenberger, K; Elgeti, T; Ziegler, A; Schütze, S

    2001-12-15

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been previously shown to induce exocytosis in rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs) in the presence of lyso-phosphatidylserine (lysoPS) by interacting with high-affinity NGF receptors of the TrkA-type. In RPMCs, type D phosphatidylcholine-selective phospholipases (PLDs) have been postulated to be involved in some exocytotic signaling pathways induced by different agonists. The aim of the present study was to assess a putative functional role of PLD for NGF/lysoPS-induced exocytosis in RPMCs. In 1-[14C]palmitoyl-2-lyso-3-phosphatidylcholine-labelled RPMCs, NGF/lysoPS stimulated the formation of diacylglycerol (DAG) and, in the presence of ethanol (1% [v/v]), phosphatidylethanol (PEtOH). These data indicate PLD-activation by NGF/lysoPS in RPMCs. Preincubation of RPMCs for 2 min with ethanol, an inhibitor of PLD-derived DAG-formation, dose-dependently (IC(50): 0.6% [v/v]) and agonist-selectively inhibited the NGF/lysoPS induced release of [3H]serotonin ([3H]5-HT) in [3H]5-HT-loaded RPMCs, confirming the functional importance of PLD-action. Exocytosis and PEtOH-production was potently inhibited by the broad-spectrum serine/threonine kinase inhibitor staurosporine and activated by the protein kinase C(PKC)-activator PMA (phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate) suggesting a role for PKC as mediator for NGF/lysoPS-induced activation of PLD.

  13. The Tip of the Four N-Terminal α-Helices of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin Contains the Interaction Site with Membrane Phosphatidylserine Facilitating Small GTPases Glucosylation.

    PubMed

    Varela Chavez, Carolina; Haustant, Georges Michel; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Chenal, Alexandre; Pauillac, Serge; Blondel, Arnaud; Popoff, Michel-Robert

    2016-03-25

    Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL) is a powerful virulence factor responsible for severe toxic shock in man and animals. TcsL belongs to the large clostridial glucosylating toxin (LCGT) family which inactivates small GTPases by glucosylation with uridine-diphosphate (UDP)-glucose as a cofactor. Notably, TcsL modifies Rac and Ras GTPases, leading to drastic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton and cell viability. TcsL enters cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the N-terminal glucosylating domain (TcsL-cat) into the cytosol. TcsL-cat was found to preferentially bind to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes and to increase the glucosylation of Rac anchored to the lipid membrane. We have previously reported that the N-terminal four helical bundle structure (1-93 domain) recognizes a broad range of lipids, but that TcsL-cat specifically binds to PS and phosphatidic acid. Here, we show using mutagenesis that the PS binding site is localized on the tip of the four-helix bundle which is rich in positively-charged amino acids. Residues Y14, V15, F17, and R18 on loop 1, between helices 1 and 2, in coordination with R68 from loop 3, between helices 3 and 4, form a pocket which accommodates L-serine. The functional PS-binding site is required for TcsL-cat binding to the plasma membrane and subsequent cytotoxicity. TcsL-cat binding to PS facilitates a high enzymatic activity towards membrane-anchored Ras by about three orders of magnitude as compared to Ras in solution. The PS-binding site is conserved in LCGTs, which likely retain a common mechanism of binding to the membrane for their full activity towards membrane-bound GTPases.

  14. Depletion of Bcl-2 by an antisense oligonucleotide induces apoptosis accompanied by oxidation and externalization of phosphatidylserine in NCI-H226 lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koty, Patrick P; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Li, Shang-Xi; Kagan, Valerian E

    2002-01-01

    Oxidant-induced apoptosis involves oxidation of many different and essential molecules including phospholipids. As a result of this non-specific oxidation, any signaling role of a particular phospholipid-class of molecules is difficult to elucidate. To determine whether preferential oxidation of phosphatidylserine (PS) is an early event in apoptotic signaling related to PS externalization and is independent of direct oxidant exposure, we chose a genetic-based induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced in the lung cancer cell line NCI-H226 by decreasing the amount of Bcl-2 protein expression by preventing the translation of bcl-2 mRNA using an antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide. Peroxidation of phospholipids was assayed using a fluorescent technique based on metabolic integration of an oxidation-sensitive and fluorescent fatty acid, cis-parinaric acid (PnA), into cellular phospholipids and subsequent HPLC separation of cis-PnA-labeled phospholipids. We found a decrease in Bcl-2 was associated with a selective oxidation of PS in a sub-population of the cells with externalized PS. No significant difference in oxidation of cis-PnA-labeled phospholipids was observed in cells treated with medium alone or a nonsense oligonucleotide. Treatment with either nonsensc or antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotides was not associated with changes in the pattern of individual phospholipid classes as determined by HPTLC. These metabolic and topographical changes in PS arrangement in plasma membrane appear to be early responses to antisense bcl-2 exposure that trigger a PS-dependent apoptotic signaling pathway. This observed externalization of PS may facilitate the 'labeling' of apoptotic cells for recognition by macrophage scavenger receptors and subsequent phagocytic clearance.

  15. Tumor-specific targeting by Bavituximab, a phosphatidylserine-targeting monoclonal antibody with vascular targeting and immune modulating properties, in lung cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, David E; Hao, Guiyang; Watkins, Linda; Stafford, Jason H; Anderson, Jon; Holbein, Blair; Öz, Orhan K; Mathews, Dana; Thorpe, Philip E; Hassan, Gedaa; Kumar, Amit; Brekken, Rolf A; Sun, Xiankai

    2015-01-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody with immune modulating and tumor-associated vascular disrupting properties demonstrated in models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular target of Bavituximab, phosphatidylserine (PS), is exposed on the outer leaflet of the membrane bi-layer of malignant vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells to a greater extent than on normal tissues. We evaluated the tumor-targeting properties of Bavituximab for imaging of NSCLC xenografts when radiolabeled with 111In through conjugation with a bifunctional chelating agent, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). In vitro binding of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab to PS was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Biodistribution of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab was conducted in normal rats, which provided data for dosimetry calculation. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging was performed in athymic nude rats bearing A549 NSCLC xenografts. At the molar conjugation ratio of 0.54 DOTA per Bavituximab, the PS binding affinity of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab was comparable to that of unmodified Bavituximab. Based on the quantitative SPECT/CT imaging data analysis, 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab demonstrated tumor-specific uptake as measured by the tumor-tomuscle ratio, which peaked at 5.2 at 72 hr post-injection. In contrast, the control antibody only presented a contrast of 1.2 at the same time point.These findings may underlie the diagnostic efficacy and relative low rates of systemic vascular and immune-related toxicities of this immunoconjugate. Future applications of 111In-DOTA-bavituximab may include prediction of efficacy, indication of tumor immunologic status, or characterization of radiographic findings. PMID:26550540

  16. Selective phosphorylation of cationic polypeptide aggregated with phosphatidylserine/diacylglycerol/Ca2+/detergent mixed micelles by Ca(2+)-independent but not Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C isozymes.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, C W; Huang, K P

    1995-03-14

    Mixed micelles containing Nonidet P40 (NP-40) (829 microM or 4.8 mM), phosphatidylserine (PS) (14.5 or 8 mol%), and 1,2-diacylglycerol (DG) (0.5 or 1 mol%) when preincubated with protein kinase C (PKC) assay mixture containing cationic substrate and CaCl2 (400 microM) formed aggregates in a time-, temperature-, and substrate concentration-dependent manner with a t1/2 approximately 3-12 min (22 degrees C). Concomitant with the formation of these aggregates there was a substantial loss of substrate phosphorylation catalyzed by the Ca(2+)-dependent PKC alpha, beta, and gamma but not the Ca(2+)-independent PKC, delta and epsilon. All cationic PKC substrates tested, neurogranin peptide analog, neurogranin, and histone III-S, formed aggregates with PS/DG/NP-40/Ca2+ mixed micelles in a time-dependent fashion. The poly(cationic-anionic) PKC substrate protamine sulfate also forms aggregates with the mixed micelles in the presence of Ca2+, but without affecting the substrate phosphorylation by the kinase. Under similar conditions, but at 4 degrees C, neither aggregation nor loss of cationic substrate phosphorylation was observed. Another nonionic detergent, octyl glucoside, behaved similarly to NP-40. Phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylglycerol like PS, were effective in forming aggregates with NP-40/cationic polypeptide/DG/Ca2+ as monitored by light scattering, yet without affecting substrate phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of cationic substrates by M-kinase, derived from trypsinized PKC beta, was also greatly diminished by the aggregation. In contrast, [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate binding to PKC beta was unaffected. Formation of the aggregates that were selectively utilized by the Ca(2+)-independent PKCs was dependent on the ratio of cationic substrate to the number of mixed micelles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. PCMdb: Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Gandharva; Sharma, Minakshi; Kumar, Shailesh; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most aggressive malignancy and urgently requires new biomarkers to facilitate early detection. For providing impetus to the biomarker discovery, we have developed Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database (PCMDB, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/pcmdb/), a comprehensive resource dedicated to methylation of genes in pancreatic cancer. Data was collected and compiled manually from published literature. PCMdb has 65907 entries for methylation status of 4342 unique genes. In PCMdb, data was compiled for both cancer cell lines (53565 entries for 88 cell lines) and cancer tissues (12342 entries for 3078 tissue samples). Among these entries, 47.22% entries reported a high level of methylation for the corresponding genes while 10.87% entries reported low level of methylation. PCMdb covers five major subtypes of pancreatic cancer; however, most of the entries were compiled for adenocarcinomas (88.38%) and mucinous neoplasms (5.76%). A user-friendly interface has been developed for data browsing, searching and analysis. We anticipate that PCMdb will be helpful for pancreatic cancer biomarker discovery.

  18. Alcohol, DNA Methylation, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Varela-Rey, Marta; Woodhoo, Ashwin; Martinez-Chantar, Maria-Luz; Mato, José M.; Lu, Shelly C.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most significant diseases associated with chronic alcohol consumption, and chronic drinking is a strong risk factor for cancer, particularly of the upper aerodigestive tract, liver, colorectum, and breast. Several factors contribute to alcohol-induced cancer development (i.e., carcinogenesis), including the actions of acetaldehyde, the first and primary metabolite of ethanol, and oxidative stress. However, increasing evidence suggests that aberrant patterns of DNA methylation, an important epigenetic mechanism of transcriptional control, also could be part of the pathogenetic mechanisms that lead to alcohol-induced cancer development. The effects of alcohol on global and local DNA methylation patterns likely are mediated by its ability to interfere with the availability of the principal biological methyl donor, S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), as well as pathways related to it. Several mechanisms may mediate the effects of alcohol on DNA methylation, including reduced folate levels and inhibition of key enzymes in one-carbon metabolism that ultimately lead to lower SAMe levels, as well as inhibition of activity and expression of enzymes involved in DNA methylation (i.e., DNA methyltransferases). Finally, variations (i.e., polymorphisms) of several genes involved in one-carbon metabolism also modulate the risk of alcohol-associated carcinogenesis. PMID:24313162

  19. Methyl chloroform and the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Ravishankara, A.R.; Albritton, D.L.

    1995-07-14

    The atmospheric abundance of methyl chloroform, CH{sub 3}CCl{sub 3}, a compound of only anthropogenic origin, is actually decreasing because of emission reductions in compliance with the United Nations Montreal Protocol and its subsequent amendments. This observation, reported by Prinn and co-workers elsewhere in this issue, is based on data from surface-level monitoring stations. The observed trends in methyl chloroform abundance have a few straightforward scientific consequences and substantial policy relevance as discussed in this article. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Histone Methylation by Temozolomide; A Classic DNA Methylating Anticancer Drug

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Amanda J.; Diaz, Anthony Joseph; Mura, Hugo; Nyuwen, Lila; Coello, Daniel; Sheva, Saif; Maria, Nava; Gallo, James M.; Wang, Tieli

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim The alkylating agent, temozolomide (TMZ), is considered the standard-of-care for high-grade astrocytomas –known as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)– an aggressive type of tumor with poor prognosis. The therapeutic benefit of TMZ is attributed to formation of DNA adducts involving the methylation of purine bases in DNA. We investigated the effects of TMZ on arginine and lysine amino acids, histone H3 peptides and histone H3 proteins. Materials and Methods Chemical modification of amino acids, histone H3 peptide and protein by TMZ was performed in phosphate buffer at physiological pH. The reaction products were examined by mass spectrometry and western blot analysis. Results Our results showed that TMZ following conversion to a methylating cation, can methylate histone H3 peptide and histone H3 protein, suggesting that TMZ exerts its anticancer activity not only through its interaction with DNA, but also through alterations of protein post-translational modifications. Conclusion The possibility that TMZ can methylate histones involved with epigenetic regulation of protein indicates a potentially unique mechanism of action. The study will contribute to the understanding the anticancer activity of TMZ in order to develop novel targeted molecular strategies to advance the cancer treatment. PMID:27354585

  1. 40 CFR 180.437 - Methyl 2-(4-isopropyl-4-methyl-5-oxo-2-imidazolin-2-yl)-p-toluate and methyl 6-(4-isopropyl-4...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-imidazolin-2-yl)-p-toluate and methyl 6-(4-isopropyl-4-methyl-5-oxo-2-imidazolin-2-yl)-m-toluate; tolerances... Tolerances § 180.437 Methyl 2-(4-isopropyl-4-methyl-5-oxo-2-imidazolin-2-yl)-p-toluate and methyl 6-(4... for the combined residues of the herbicide methyl...

  2. 75 FR 3233 - Sulfometuron Methyl Amendment to Reregistration Eligibility Decision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... herbicide sulfometuron methyl. EPA conducted this reassessment of the Sulfometuron Methyl RED in response to... methyl concludes EPA's reregistration eligibility decision making process for this herbicide....

  3. 49 CFR 173.193 - Bromoacetone, methyl bromide, chloropicrin and methyl bromide or methyl chloride mixtures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... pounds) water capacity (nominal). This capacity does not apply to shipments of methyl bromide. (c) Methyl... metal cans containing not over one pound each, or inside metal cans with a minimum wall thickness of...

  4. Dietary administration of sodium arsenite to rats: Relations between dose and urinary concentrations of methylated and thio-metabolites and effects on the rat urinary bladder epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shugo; Arnold, Lora L.; Pennington, Karen L.; Chen, Baowei; Naranmandura, Hua; Le, X. Chris; Cohen, Samuel M.

    2010-04-15

    Based on epidemiological data, chronic exposure to high levels of inorganic arsenic in drinking water is carcinogenic to humans, inducing skin, urinary bladder and lung tumors. In vivo, inorganic arsenic is metabolized to organic methylated arsenicals including the highly toxic dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}). Short-term treatment of rats with 100 mug/g trivalent arsenic (As{sup III}) as sodium arsenite in the diet or in drinking water induced cytotoxicity and necrosis of the urothelial superficial layer, with increased cell proliferation and hyperplasia. The objectives of this study were to determine if these arsenic-induced urothelial effects are dose responsive, the dose of arsenic at which urothelial effects are not detected, and the urinary concentrations of the arsenical metabolites. We treated female F344 rats for 5 weeks with sodium arsenite at dietary doses of 0, 1, 10, 25, 50, and 100 ppm. Cytotoxicity, cell proliferation and hyperplasia of urothelial superficial cells were increased in a dose-responsive manner, with maximum effects found at 50 ppm As{sup III}. There were no effects at 1 ppm As{sup III}. The main urinary arsenical in As{sup III}-treated rats was the organic arsenical dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}). The thio-metabolites dimethylmonothioarsinic acid (DMMTA{sup V}) and monomethylmonothioarsinic acid (MMMTA{sup V}) were also found in the urine of As{sup III}-treated rats. The LC{sub 50} concentrations of DMMTA{sup V} for rat and human urothelial cells in vitro were similar to trivalent oxygen-containing arsenicals. These data suggest that dietary As{sup III}-induced urothelial cytotoxicity and proliferation are dose responsive, and the urothelial effects have a threshold corresponding to the urinary excretion of measurable reactive metabolites.

  5. Methods of DNA methylation analysis.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this review was to provide guidance for investigators who are new to the field of DNA methylation analysis. Epigenetics is the study of mitotically heritable alterations in gene expression potential that are not mediated by changes in DNA sequence. Recently, it has become clear that n...

  6. Gene methylation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yiping; Dang, Siwen; Hou, Peng

    2013-09-23

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Over 70% of new cases and deaths occur in developing countries. In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research mainly focuses on genetic alterations, including gastric cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms are essential for normal development and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression patterns in mammals. Disruption of epigenetic processes can lead to altered gene function and malignant cellular transformation. Recent advancements in the rapidly evolving field of cancer epigenetics have shown extensive reprogramming of every component of the epigenetic machinery in cancer, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, noncoding RNAs, and microRNAs. Aberrant DNA methylation in the promoter regions of gene, which leads to inactivation of tumor suppressor and other cancer-related genes in cancer cells, is the most well-defined epigenetic hallmark in gastric cancer. The advantages of gene methylation as a target for detection and diagnosis of cancer in biopsy specimens and non-invasive body fluids such as serum and gastric washes have led to many studies of application in gastric cancer. This review focuses on the most common and important phenomenon of epigenetics, DNA methylation, in gastric cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field.

  7. DNA methylation in endometriosis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    KOUKOURA, OURANIA; SIFAKIS, STAVROS; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is defined by the presence and growth of functional endometrial tissue, outside the uterine cavity, primarily in the ovaries, pelvic peritoneum and rectovaginal septum. Although it is a benign disease, it presents with malignant characteristics, such as invasion to surrounding tissues, metastasis to distant locations and recurrence following treatment. Accumulating evidence suggests that various epigenetic aberrations may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Aberrant DNA methylation represents a possible mechanism repsonsible for this disease, linking gene expression alterations observed in endometriosis with hormonal and environmental factors. Several lines of evidence indicate that endometriosis may partially be due to selective epigenetic deregulations influenced by extrinsic factors. Previous studies have shed light into the epigenetic component of endometriosis, reporting variations in the epigenetic patterns of genes known to be involved in the aberrant hormonal, immunologic and inflammatory status of endometriosis. Although recent studies, utilizing advanced molecular techniques, have allowed us to further elucidate the possible association of DNA methylation with altered gene expression, whether these molecular changes represent the cause or merely the consequence of the disease is a question which remains to be answered. This review provides an overview of the current literature on the role of DNA methylation in the pathophysiology and malignant evolution of endometriosis. We also provide insight into the mechanisms through which DNA methylation-modifying agents may be the next step in the research of the pharmaceutical treatment of endometriosis. PMID:26934855

  8. Desoxyhemigossypol-6-methyl-ether

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Desoxyhemigossypol-6-methyl ether is an antimicrobial compound produced by the cotton plant in response to attack by pathogens. For the first time, we now report the crystal structure of this compound. This may prove useful in studies on the interaction of the compound with pathogenic fungal cells...

  9. Lacinilene C 7-methyl ether

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lacinilene C 7-methyl ether is an antimicrobial compound produced by the cotton plant in response to attack by pathogens. For the first time, we now report the crystal structure of this compound. This may prove useful in studies on the interaction of the compound with pathogenic fungal cells....

  10. p-Chlorophenyl methyl sulfoxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    p - Chlorophenyl methyl sulfoxide ; CASRN 934 - 73 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  11. p-Chlorophenyl methyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    p - Chlorophenyl methyl sulfide ; CASRN 123 - 09 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for N

  12. p-Chlorophenyl methyl sulfone

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    p - Chlorophenyl methyl sulfone ; CASRN 98 - 57 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for No

  13. RNA Methylation Clears the Way.

    PubMed

    Kontur, Cassandra; Giraldez, Antonio

    2017-03-13

    During the maternal-to-zygotic transition, maternal mRNAs are cleared by multiple distinct but interrelated pathways. A recent study in Nature by Zhao et al. (2017) finds that YTHDF2, a reader of N(6)- methylation, facilitates maternal mRNA decay, introducing an additional facet of control over transcript fate and developmental reprogramming.

  14. Isopropyl methyl phosphonic acid (IMPA)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Isopropyl methyl phosphonic acid ( IMPA ) ; CASRN 1832 - 54 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assess

  15. Laboratory evaluation of anti-phospholipid syndrome: a preliminary prospective study of phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies in an at-risk patient cohort

    PubMed Central

    Heikal, N M; Jaskowski, T D; Malmberg, E; Lakos, G; Branch, D W; Tebo, A E

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)G/IgM autoantibodies to phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) were evaluated individually and in combination with criteria anti-phospholipid (aPL) tests in a prospectively ascertained cohort of patients at risk for anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS). One hundred and sixty (160) consecutive requests for lupus anti-coagulant (LAC) from the University of Utah Health Sciences Center were identified during 8 weeks. Of these, 104 unique patients had additional requests for cardiolipin (aCL) and/or beta2 glycoprotein I (aβ2GPI) IgG and/or IgM; samples were retained and analysed for aPS/PT, aCL and/or aβ2GPI IgG and IgM antibodies. Following testing, a comprehensive chart review was performed and patients categorized according to their clinical diagnosis. Individual and combined sensitivities, specificities, odd ratios (OR), diagnostic accuracy for specific tests or combinations by receiver operating characteristic (ROC), area under the curve (AUC) analyses and correlations between test results were determined. The sensitivities of aPS/PT IgG/IgM (54·6/45·5%) were lower than LAC (81·8%) but higher relative to aCL IgG/IgM (27·3/0%) or aβ2GPI IgG/IgM (27·3/0%). The best correlation between LAC and any aPL test was observed with aPS/PT (P = 0·002). There was no significant difference in the diagnostic accuracies for any panel with LAC: LAC/aβ2GPI IgG/aCL IgG [AUC 0·979, OR 475·4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 23·1–9056·5, P = 0·0001 and LAC/aβ2GPI IgG/aPS/PT IgG or LAC/aPS/PT IgG/aCL IgG (AUC 0·962, OR 265·3, 14·2–4958·2, P = 0·0001). The high correlation between LAC and aPS/PT IgG/IgM in this preliminary study suggest that this marker may be useful in the evaluation of APS. More studies to determine the optimal aPL antibody tests combination are needed. PMID:25522978

  16. Live-cell imaging to detect phosphatidylserine externalization in brain endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation: implications for the treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenjun; Johnson, Michael S; Chen, Biyi; Grace, Michael; Ukath, Jaysree; Lee, Vivienne S; McRobb, Lucinda S; Sedger, Lisa M; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established intervention for brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The processes of AVM vessel occlusion after SRS are poorly understood. To improve SRS efficacy, it is important to understand the cellular response of blood vessels to radiation. The molecular changes on the surface of AVM endothelial cells after irradiation may also be used for vascular targeting. This study investigates radiation-induced externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) on endothelial cells using live-cell imaging. METHODS An immortalized cell line generated from mouse brain endothelium, bEnd.3 cells, was cultured and irradiated at different radiation doses using a linear accelerator. PS externalization in the cells was subsequently visualized using polarity-sensitive indicator of viability and apoptosis (pSIVA)-IANBD, a polarity-sensitive probe. Live-cell imaging was used to monitor PS externalization in real time. The effects of radiation on the cell cycle of bEnd.3 cells were also examined by flow cytometry. RESULTS Ionizing radiation effects are dose dependent. Reduction in the cell proliferation rate was observed after exposure to 5 Gy radiation, whereas higher radiation doses (15 Gy and 25 Gy) totally inhibited proliferation. In comparison with cells treated with sham radiation, the irradiated cells showed distinct pseudopodial elongation with little or no spreading of the cell body. The percentages of pSIVA-positive cells were significantly higher (p = 0.04) 24 hours after treatment in the cultures that received 25- and 15-Gy doses of radiation. This effect was sustained until the end of the experiment (3 days). Radiation at 5 Gy did not induce significant PS externalization compared with the sham-radiation controls at any time points (p > 0.15). Flow cytometric analysis data indicate that irradiation induced growth arrest of bEnd.3 cells, with cells accumulating in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. CONCLUSIONS Ionizing radiation

  17. Kinetic study of the aggregation and lipid mixing produced by alpha-sarcin on phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylserine vesicles: stopped-flow light scattering and fluorescence energy transfer measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Mancheño, J. M.; Gasset, M.; Lacadena, J.; Ramón, F.; Martínez del Pozo, A.; Oñaderra, M.; Gavilanes, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    alpha-Sarcin is a fungal cytotoxic protein that inactivates the eukaryotic ribosomes. A kinetic study of the aggregation and lipid mixing promoted by this protein on phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylserine (PS) vesicles has been performed. Egg yolk PG, bovine brain PS, dimyristoyl-PG (DMPG) and dimyristoyl-PS (DMPS) vesicles have been considered. The initial rates of the vesicle aggregation induced by the protein have been measured by stopped-flow 90 degrees light scattering. The formation of a vesicle dimer as the initial step of this process was deduced from the second-order dependence of the initial rates on phospholipid concentration. The highest alpha-sarcin concentration studied did not inhibit the vesicle aggregation, indicating that many protein molecules are involved in the vesicle cross-linking. These are common characteristics of the initial steps of the aggregation produced by alpha-sarcin in the four types of phospholipid vesicles considered. However, the kinetics of the scattering values revealed that more complex changes occurred in the later steps of the aggregation process of egg PG and brain PS vesicles than in those of their synthetic counterparts. alpha-Sarcin produced lipid mixing in vesicles composed of DMPG or DMPS, which was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays. A delay in the onset of the process, dependent on the protein concentration, was observed. Measurement of the rates of lipid mixing revealed that the process is first order on phospholipid concentration. Egg PG and brain PS vesicles did not show lipid mixing, although they avidly aggregated. However, alpha-sarcin was able to promote lipid mixing in heterogeneous systems composed of egg PG+DMPG or brain PS+DMPS vesicles. The dilution of the fluorescence probes was faster when these were incorporated into the bilayers made of synthetic phospholipids than were present in those made of natural phospholipids. The bilayer destabilization produced by the

  18. Divalent cation-induced lipid mixing between phosphatidylserine liposomes studied by stopped-flow fluorescence measurements: effects of temperature, comparison of barium and calcium, and perturbation by DPX.

    PubMed

    Walter, A; Siegel, D P

    1993-04-06

    To understand the mechanism of membrane fusion, it is important to study the processes that mix the lipids of two apposed membranes. We measured the rates of divalent cation-induced aggregation and lipid mixing of bovine brain phosphatidylserine (BBPS) LUV, using light scattering and a resonance energy transfer assay. The lipid and divalent cation solutions were combined by stopped-flow mixing, which permitted measuring the half-times of aggregation and lipid mixing between pairs of liposomes. The collisional quencher DPX [p-xylene-bis(pyridinium bromide)], used in a liposome contents-mixing assay, lowered the main transition temperature (Tm) of BBPS by about 10 degrees C and decreased the temperature threshold for lipid mixing. Since DPX was inside the liposomes for the latter measurements, this implies that perturbations to the inner monolayer affect the reactivity of the liposome. When palmitoyl-oleoyl-PS (POPS) was substituted for BBPS, little or no lipid mixing occurred. Ca(2+)- and Ba(2+)-induced BBPS aggregation and lipid mixing were compared as a function of temperature and divalent cation concentration. Aggregation rates were nearly insensitive to temperature and correlated with the percent of PS bound to either Ba2+ or Ca2+. Above Tm, lipid-mixing rates increased with the Ba2+ and Ca2+ concentrations and temperature, even above the Tm of the Ba2+/PS complex. Arrhenius plots were linear for both ions. The temperature dependence was greater for Ca(2+)- than Ba(2+)-induced reactions, and the slopes were independent of divalent cation concentration. When equivalent fractions of PS were bound with divalent cation at, and above, 20 degrees C, the lipid-mixing rate was greater with Ca2+ than with Ba2+. The faster rate may reflect greater activation entropies and/or greater attempt frequencies at one or more steps in the Ca(2+)-induced process. We conclude that stopped-flow mixing permits better characterization of initial interaction between liposomes, that

  19. Methylation analyses in liquid biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lissa, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recent implementation of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening is predicted to lead to diagnosis of lung cancer at an earlier stage, with survival benefit. However, there is still a pressing need for biomarkers that will identify individuals eligible for screening, as well as improve the diagnostic accuracy of LDCT. In addition, biomarkers for prognostic stratification of patients with early stage disease, and those that can be used as surrogates to monitor tumor evolution, will greatly improve clinical management. Molecular alterations found in the DNA of tumor cells, such as mutations, translocations and methylation, are reflected in DNA that is released from the tumor into the bloodstream. Thus, in recent years, circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) has gained increasing attention as a noninvasive alternative to tissue biopsies and potential surrogate for the entire tumor genome. Activating gene mutations found in ctDNA have been proven effective in predicting response to targeted therapy. Analysis of ctDNA is also a valuable tool for longitudinal follow-up of cancer patients that does not require serial biopsies and may anticipate the acquisition of resistance. DNA methylation has also emerged as a promising marker for early detection, prognosis and real-time follow-up of tumor dynamics that is independent of the genomic composition of the primary tumor. This review summarizes the various investigational applications of methylated ctDNA in lung cancer reported to date. It also provides a brief overview of the technologies for analysis of DNA methylation in liquid biopsies, and the challenges that befall the implementation of methylated ctDNA into routine clinical practice. PMID:27826530

  20. Electronic transport in methylated fragments of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, M. L.; Oliveira, J. I. N.; Lima Neto, J. X.; Gomes, C. E. M.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.; Lyra, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of methylated deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) strands, a biological system in which methyl groups are added to DNA (a major epigenetic modification in gene expression), sandwiched between two metallic platinum electrodes. Our theoretical simulations apply an effective Hamiltonian based on a tight-binding model to obtain current-voltage curves related to the non-methylated/methylated DNA strands. The results suggest potential applications in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  1. Electronic transport in methylated fragments of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, M. L. de; Oliveira, J. I. N.; Lima Neto, J. X.; Gomes, C. E. M.; Fulco, U. L. Albuquerque, E. L.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Moura, F. A. B. F. de; Lyra, M. L.

    2015-11-16

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of methylated deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) strands, a biological system in which methyl groups are added to DNA (a major epigenetic modification in gene expression), sandwiched between two metallic platinum electrodes. Our theoretical simulations apply an effective Hamiltonian based on a tight-binding model to obtain current-voltage curves related to the non-methylated/methylated DNA strands. The results suggest potential applications in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  2. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  3. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  4. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  5. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  6. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  7. ELUCIDATING THE PATHWAY FOR ARSENIC METHYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enzymatically-catalyzed methylation of arsenic is part of a metabolic pathway that converts inorganic arsenic into methylated products. Hence, in humans chronically exposed to inorganic arsenic, methyl and dimethyl arsenic account for most of the arsenic that is excreted in the ...

  8. Quantitative DNA Methylation Profiling in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ammerpohl, Ole; Haake, Andrea; Kolarova, Julia; Siebert, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms including DNA methylation are fundamental for the regulation of gene expression. Epigenetic alterations can lead to the development and the evolution of malignant tumors as well as the emergence of phenotypically different cancer cells or metastasis from one single tumor cell. Here we describe bisulfite pyrosequencing, a technology to perform quantitative DNA methylation analyses, to detect aberrant DNA methylation in malignant tumors.

  9. Arsenic-induced dysfunction in relaxation of blood vessels.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moo-Yeol; Jung, Byung-In; Chung, Seung-Min; Bae, Ok-Nam; Lee, Joo-Young; Park, Jung-Duck; Yang, Ji-Sun; Lee, Hyomin; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2003-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have suggested that exposure to arsenic is strongly correlated with the development of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. To determine whether arsenic affects vasomotor tone in blood vessels, we investigated the effect of arsenic on vasorelaxation using isolated rat aortic rings in an organ-bath system. Treatment with arsenite inhibited acetylcholine-induced relaxation of the aortic rings in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas several other arsenic species did not have any effect. Consistent with these findings, the levels of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in the aortic rings were significantly reduced by arsenite treatment. In cultured human aortic endothelial cells, treatment with arsenite resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In addition, higher concentrations of arsenite decreased the relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside (an NO donor) and 8-Br-cGMP (a cGMP analog) in aortic rings without endothelium. These in vitro results indicate that arsenite is capable of suppressing relaxation in blood vessels by inhibiting eNOS activity in endothelial cells and by impairing the relaxation machinery in smooth muscle cells. In vivo studies revealed that the reduction of blood pressure by acetylcholine infusion was significantly suppressed after arsenite was administered intravenously to rats. These data suggest that an impairment of vasomotor tone due to arsenite exposure may be a contributing factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. PMID:12676608

  10. FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES ARSENIC-INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Folate deficiency increases background levels of DNA damage and can enhance the mutagenicity of chemical agents. Duplicate experiments were performed to investigate the effect of dietary folate deficiency on arsenic induction of micronuclei (MN) in peripheral blood cells. Male C5...

  11. Arsenic-induced bladder cancer in an animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Samuel M. Ohnishi, Takamasa Arnold, Lora L. Le, X. Chris

    2007-08-01

    Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}) is carcinogenic to the rat urinary bladder, but not in mice. The carcinogenic mode of action involves cytotoxicity followed by regenerative cell proliferation. Dietary DMA{sup V} does not produce urinary solids or significant alterations in urinary composition. The cytotoxicity is due to formation of a reactive metabolite, likely dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}), concentrated and excreted in the urine. Urinary concentrations of DMA{sup III} are dose-dependent, and the urinary concentrations are at cytotoxic levels based on in vitro studies. The no observed effect level (NOEL) in these rat dietary studies for detectable levels of DMA{sup III}, cytotoxicity, and proliferation is 2 ppm, with marginal changes at 10 ppm. The tumorigenic dose is 100 ppm. Recent investigations have demonstrated that arsenicals administered to the rat result in binding to a specific cysteine in the hemoglobin alpha chain as DMA{sup III}, regardless of the arsenical being administered. Monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) is not carcinogenic in rats or mice. In short term experiments ({<=} 10 weeks), sodium arsenate in the drinking water induces significant cytotoxicity and regenerative proliferation. There is little evidence that the cytotoxicity produced following administration of arsenicals is caused by oxidative damage, as antioxidants show little inhibitory activity of the cytotoxicity of the various arsenicals either in vitro or in vivo. In summary, the mode of action for DMA{sup V}-induced bladder carcinogenesis in the rat involves generation of a reactive metabolite (DMA{sup III}) leading to cytotoxicity and regenerative proliferation, is a non-linear process, and likely involves a threshold. Extrapolation to human risk needs to take this into account along with the significant differences in toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics that occur between different species.

  12. Identification of endometrial cancer methylation features using combined methylation analysis methods

    PubMed Central

    Trimarchi, Michael P.; Yan, Pearlly; Groden, Joanna; Bundschuh, Ralf; Goodfellow, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    Background DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic mark that is frequently altered in tumors. DNA methylation features are attractive biomarkers for disease states given the stability of DNA methylation in living cells and in biologic specimens typically available for analysis. Widespread accumulation of methylation in regulatory elements in some cancers (specifically the CpG island methylator phenotype, CIMP) can play an important role in tumorigenesis. High resolution assessment of CIMP for the entire genome, however, remains cost prohibitive and requires quantities of DNA not available for many tissue samples of interest. Genome-wide scans of methylation have been undertaken for large numbers of tumors, and higher resolution analyses for a limited number of cancer specimens. Methods for analyzing such large datasets and integrating findings from different studies continue to evolve. An approach for comparison of findings from a genome-wide assessment of the methylated component of tumor DNA and more widely applied methylation scans was developed. Methods Methylomes for 76 primary endometrial cancer and 12 normal endometrial samples were generated using methylated fragment capture and second generation sequencing, MethylCap-seq. Publically available Infinium HumanMethylation 450 data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were compared to MethylCap-seq data. Results Analysis of methylation in promoter CpG islands (CGIs) identified a subset of tumors with a methylator phenotype. We used a two-stage approach to develop a 13-region methylation signature associated with a “hypermethylator state.” High level methylation for the 13-region methylation signatures was associated with mismatch repair deficiency, high mutation rate, and low somatic copy number alteration in the TCGA test set. In addition, the signature devised showed good agreement with previously described methylation clusters devised by TCGA. Conclusion We identified a methylation signature for a

  13. Transgene-induced CCWGG methylation does not alter CG methylation patterning in human kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Taras; Kretzner, Leo; Munson, Kristofer; Axume, John; Clark, Jarrod; Dyachenko, Olga V; Caudill, Marie; Buryanov, Yaroslav; Smith, Steven S

    2005-01-01

    Several reports suggest that C(m)CWGG methylation tends not to co-exist with (m)CG methylation in human cells. We have asked whether or not methylation at CCWGG sites can influence CG methylation. DNA from cells expressing an M.EcoRII-GFP fusion was actively methylated at CCWGG sites. CG methylation as measured by R.HpaII/R.MspI ratios was unchanged in cells expressing the transgene. Cloned representatives of C(m)CWGG methylated DNA often contained, or were adjacent to an ALU repeat, suggesting that M.EcoRII-GFP actively methylated gene-rich R-band DNA. The transgenic methyltransferase applied C(m)CWGG methylation to a representative human promoter that was heavily methylated at CG dinucleotides (the SERPINB5 promoter) and to a representative promoter that was essentially unmethylated at CG dinucleotides (the APC promoter). In each case, the CG methylation pattern remained in its original state, unchanged by the presence of neighboring C(m)CWGG sites. Q-PCR measurements showed that RNA expression from the APC gene was not significantly altered by the presence of C(m)CWGG in its promoter. Kinetic studies suggested that an adjacent C(m)CWGG methylation site influences neither the maintenance nor the de novo methylation activities of purified human Dnmt1. We conclude that C(m)CWGG methylation does not exert a significant effect on CG methylation in human kidney cells.

  14. Methods in DNA methylation profiling.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Tao; Tycko, Benjamin; Liu, Ta-Ming; Lin, Juey-Jen L; Huang, Tim H-M

    2009-12-01

    Metastable and somatically heritable patterns of DNA methylation provide an important level of genomic regulation. In this article, we review methods for analyzing these genome-wide epigenetic patterns and offer a perspective on the ever-expanding literature, which we hope will be useful for investigators who are new to this area. The historical aspects that we cover will be helpful in interpreting this literature and we hope that our discussion of the newest analytical methods will stimulate future progress. We emphasize that no single approach can provide a complete view of the overall methylome, and that combinations of several modalities applied to the same sample set will give the clearest picture. Given the unexpected epigenomic patterns and new biological principles, as well as new disease markers, that have been uncovered in recent studies, it is likely that important discoveries will continue to be made using genome-wide DNA methylation profiling.

  15. Altered DNA methylation in PAH deficient phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Steven F; Lyons-Weiler, James; Spridik, Kayla; Biery, Amy; Breck, Jane; Vockley, Jerry; Yatsenko, Svetlana; Sultana, Tamanna

    2015-01-01

    While phenylalanine (PHE) is the toxic insult in phenylketonuria (PKU), mechanisms underlying PHE toxicity remain ill-defined. Altered DNA methylation in response to toxic exposures is well-recognized. DNA methylation patterns were assessed in blood and brain from PKU patients to determine if PHE toxicity impacts methylation. Methylome assessment, utilizing methylated DNA immunoprecipitation and paired-end sequencing, was performed in DNA obtained from brain tissue of classical PKU patients, leukocytes from poorly controlled PKU patients, leukocytes from well controlled PKU patients, and appropriate control tissues. In PKU brain tissue, expression analysis determined the impact of methylation on gene function. Differential methylation was observed in brain tissue of PKU patients and expression studies identified downstream impact on gene expression. Altered patterns of methylation were observed in leukocytes of well controlled and poorly controlled patients with more extensive methylation in patients with high PHE exposure. Differential methylation of noncoding RNA genes was extensive in patients with high PHE exposure but minimal in well controlled patients. Methylome repatterning leading to altered gene expression was present in brain tissue of PKU patients, suggesting a role in neuropathology. Aberrant methylation is observed in leukocytes of PKU patients and is influenced by PHE exposure. DNA methylation may provide a biomarker relating to historic PHE exposure.

  16. Increased DNA methylation in the suicide brain.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Fatemeh; Xin, Yurong; Chanrion, Benjamin; O'Donnell, Anne H; Ge, Yongchao; Dwork, Andrew J; Arango, Victoria; Mann, J John

    2014-09-01

    Clinical studies find that childhood adversity and stressful life events in adulthood increase the risk for major depression and for suicide. The predispositions to either major depression or suicide are thought to depend on genetic risk factors or epigenetic effects. We investigated DNA methylation signatures postmortem in brains of suicides with diagnosis of major depressive disorder. DNA methylation levels were determined at single C-phosphate-G (CpG) resolution sites within ventral prefrontal cortex of 53 suicides and nonpsychiatric controls, aged 16 to 89 years. We found that DNA methylation increases throughout the lifespan. Suicides showed an 8-fold greater number of methylated CpG sites relative to controls (P < 2.2 x 10(-16)), with greater DNA methylation changes over and above the increased methylation observed in normal aging. This increased DNA methylation may be a significant contributor to the neuropathology and psychopathology underlying the risk of suicide in depression.

  17. Microbial mercury methylation in Antarctic sea ice.

    PubMed

    Gionfriddo, Caitlin M; Tate, Michael T; Wick, Ryan R; Schultz, Mark B; Zemla, Adam; Thelen, Michael P; Schofield, Robyn; Krabbenhoft, David P; Holt, Kathryn E; Moreau, John W

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric deposition of mercury onto sea ice and circumpolar sea water provides mercury for microbial methylation, and contributes to the bioaccumulation of the potent neurotoxin methylmercury in the marine food web. Little is known about the abiotic and biotic controls on microbial mercury methylation in polar marine systems. However, mercury methylation is known to occur alongside photochemical and microbial mercury reduction and subsequent volatilization. Here, we combine mercury speciation measurements of total and methylated mercury with metagenomic analysis of whole-community microbial DNA from Antarctic snow, brine, sea ice and sea water to elucidate potential microbially mediated mercury methylation and volatilization pathways in polar marine environments. Our results identify the marine microaerophilic bacterium Nitrospina as a potential mercury methylator within sea ice. Anaerobic bacteria known to methylate mercury were notably absent from sea-ice metagenomes. We propose that Antarctic sea ice can harbour a microbial source of methylmercury in the Southern Ocean.

  18. DNA methylation profiling of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Begtrup, Amber Hogart

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mark that is essential for properly functioning hematopoietic stem cells. Determining where functionally relevant DNA methylation marks exist in the genome is crucial to understanding the role that methylation plays in hematopoiesis. This chapter describes a method to profile DNA methylation by selectively enriching methylated DNA sequences that are bound in vitro by methyl-binding domain (MBD) proteins. The MBD-pulldown approach selects for DNA sequences that have the potential to be "read" by the endogenous machinery involved in epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, this approach is feasible with very small quantities of DNA, and is compatible with the use of any downstream high-throughput sequencing approach. This technique offers a reliable, simple, and powerful tool for exploration of the role of DNA methylation in hematopoietic stem cells.

  19. Conventional and nanotechniques for DNA methylation profiling.

    PubMed

    Shanmuganathan, Rajasree; Basheer, Nazeema B; Amirthalingam, Laxmi; Muthukumar, Harshiny; Kaliaperumal, Rajendran; Shanmugam, Kumaran

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is critical for gene silencing and is associated with the incidence of many diseases, including cancer. Underlying molecular mechanisms of human diseases and tissue-specific gene expression have been elucidated based on DNA methylation studies. This review highlights the advantages and drawbacks of various methylation screening techniques: blotting, genomic sequencing, bisulfite sequencing, methylation-specific PCR, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation, microarray analysis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, nanowire transistor detection procedure, quantum dot-based nanoassay, single-molecule real-time detection, fluorimetric assay, electrochemical detection, and atomic force spectroscopy. The review provides insight for selecting a method or a combination of methods for DNA methylation analysis. Convergence of conventional and contemporary nanotechniques to enumerate methylation at specific CpG sites of oncogene would fill the gap in diagnosis of cancer.

  20. First evidence of DNA methylation in insect Tribolium castaneum: environmental regulation of DNA methylation within heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Feliciello, Isidoro; Parazajder, Josip; Akrap, Ivana; Ugarković, Durđica

    2013-05-01

    DNA methylation has been studied in many eukaryotic organisms, in particular vertebrates, and was implicated in developmental and phenotypic variations. Little is known about the role of DNA methylation in invertebrates, although insects are considered as excellent models for studying the evolution of DNA methylation. In the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Tenebrionidae, Coleoptera), no evidence of DNA methylation has been found till now. In this paper, a cytosine methylation in Tribolium castaneum embryos was detected by methylation sensitive restriction endonucleases and immuno-dot blot assay. DNA methylation in embryos is followed by a global demethylation in larvae, pupae and adults. DNA demethylation seems to proceed actively through 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, most probably by the action of TET enzyme. Bisulfite sequencing of a highly abundant satellite DNA located in pericentromeric heterochromatin revealed similar profile of cytosine methylation in adults and embryos. Cytosine methylation was not only restricted to CpG sites but was found at CpA, CpT and CpC sites. In addition, complete cytosine demethylation of heterochromatic satellite DNA was induced by heat stress. The results reveal existence of DNA methylation cycling in T. castaneum ranging from strong overall cytosine methylation in embryos to a weak DNA methylation in other developmental stages. Nevertheless, DNA methylation is preserved within heterochromatin during development, indicating its role in heterochromatin formation and maintenance. It is, however, strongly affected by heat stress, suggesting a role for DNA methylation in heterochromatin structure modulation during heat stress response.

  1. Protein Methylation in Full Length Chlamydomonas Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Sloboda, Roger D.; Howard, Louisa

    2010-01-01

    Post-translational protein modification occurs extensively in eukaryotic flagella. Here we examine protein methylation, a protein modification that has only recently been reported to occur in flagella (Schneider et al. 2008). The cobalamin (vitamin B12) independent form of the enzyme methionine synthase (MetE), which catalyzes the final step in methionine production, is localized to flagella. Here we demonstrate, using immunogold scanning electron microscopy, that MetE is bound to the outer doublets of the flagellum. Methionine can be converted to S-adenosyl methionine, which then serves as the methyl donor for protein methylation reactions. Using antibodies that recognize symmetrically or asymmetrically methylated arginine residues, we identify three highly methylated proteins in intact flagella: two symmetrically methylated proteins of about 30 and 40 kDa, and one asymmetrically methylated protein of about 75 kDa. Several other relatively less methylated proteins could also be detected. Fractionation and immunoblot analysis shows that these proteins are components of the flagellar axoneme. Immunogold thin section electron microscopy indicates that the symmetrically methylated proteins are located in the central region of the axoneme, perhaps as components of the central pair complex and the radial spokes, while the asymmetrically methylated proteins are associated with the outer doublets. PMID:19472373

  2. Rotational spectra of methyl ethyl and methyl propyl nitrosamines. Conformational assignment, internal rotation and quadrupole coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. R. Hight; Lou, Qi; Bohn, Robert K.; Novick, Stewart E.

    1995-02-01

    A structural determination of two carcinogenic nitrosamines, methyl ethyl and methyl propyl nitrosamine, was performed. Microwave spectra were gathered from both a Stark cell spectrometer and a pulsed jet Fabry-Perot Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Each rotational transition is split into quadrupole hyperfine components by two nitrogen nuclei. This quadrupole pattern is doubled by a low barrier methyl rotor which produces resolvable A and E states. Rotational spectra were assigned for one conformer of methyl ethyl nitrosamine and two conformers of methyl propyl nitrosamine. The lowest energy conformers of each compound, according to empirical force field calculations, were assigned. The structure found for methyl ethyl nitrosamine has the nitrosyl oxygen on the methyl side with the terminal methyl group of the ethyl chain in the gauche position (OMG). Both conformers of methyl propyl nitrosamine have the same skeletal structure as the methyl ethyl compound; one conformer has the terminal methyl of the propyl group in the anti position (OMGA) while the other conformer has this methyl in the gauche position (OMGG -). Rotational constants and quadrupole coupling constants are reported for each assigned species. A barrier to internal rotation of the N-methyl group in each compound is also reported.

  3. In vitro Assays of Inorganic Arsenic Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Drobna, Zuzana; Styblo, Miroslav; Thomas, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is extensively metabolized to produce mono-, di-, and trimethylated products. The formation of these metabolites produces a variety of intermediates that differ from inorganic arsenic in terms of patterns of distribution and retention and in toxic effects. In order to elucidate the pathway for arsenic methylation, it was necessary to develop a reliable in vitro assay system in which the formation of methylated metabolites could be monitored. Here, in vitro assay system that uses the postmicrosomal supernate from rat liver is used as the source of the enzymatic activity that catalyzes methylation reactions. This system can be used to study the requirements for methylation reactions (e.g., identifying the donor of methyl groups) and for screening of compounds as potential activators or inhibitors of arsenic methylation. PMID:20440380

  4. Wp specific methylation of highly proliferated LCLs

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Shim, Sung-Mi; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Joon-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee; Lee, Suman . E-mail: suman@cha.ac.kr

    2007-06-29

    The epigenetic regulation of viral genes may be important for the life cycle of EBV. We determined the methylation status of three viral promoters (Wp, Cp, Qp) from EBV B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by pyrosequencing. Our pyrosequencing data showed that the CpG region of Wp was methylated, but the others were not. Interestingly, Wp methylation was increased with proliferation of LCLs. Wp methylation was as high as 74.9% in late-passage LCLs, but 25.6% in early-passage LCLs. From two Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines, Wp specific hypermethylation was also found (>80%). Interestingly, the expression of EBNA2 gene which located directly next to Wp was associated with its methylation. Our data suggested that Wp specific methylation may be important for the indicator of the proliferation status of LCLs, and the epigenetic viral gene regulation of EBNA2 gene by Wp should be further defined possibly with other biological processes.

  5. Hypoxic radiosensitization by the antimicrobial methyl paraben

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, G.P.; Sade, N.

    1984-08-01

    The antimicrobial preservative, methyl paraben (methyl-4-hydroxybenzoate) sensitizes anoxic buffered suspensions of Staphylococcus aureus to gamma-radiation. The maximal response at an 0.5 mM concentration represents a 150 percent increase in response over that for deoxygenated suspensions without additive, and 80 percent of the response for aerated suspensions alone. Methyl paraben is not toxic to the test organism under the present test conditions.

  6. DNA Methylation of BDNF Gene in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Çöpoğlu, Ümit Sertan; Igci, Mehri; Bozgeyik, Esra; Kokaçya, M Hanifi; İğci, Yusuf Ziya; Dokuyucu, Recep; Ari, Mustafa; Savaş, Haluk A

    2016-02-06

    BACKGROUND Although genetic factors are risk factors for schizophrenia, some environmental factors are thought to be required for the manifestation of disease. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate gene functions without causing a change in the nucleotide sequence of DNA. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that regulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. It has been suggested that BDNF may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. It is established that methylation status of the BDNF gene is associated with fear learning, memory, and stressful social interactions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the DNA methylation status of BDNF gene in patients with schizophrenia. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study included 49 patients (33 male and 16 female) with schizophrenia and 65 unrelated healthy controls (46 male and 19 female). Determination of methylation pattern of CpG islands was based on the principle that bisulfite treatment of DNA results in conversion of unmethylated cytosine residues into uracil, whereas methylated cytosine residues remain unmodified. Methylation-specific PCR was performed with primers specific for either methylated or unmethylated DNA. RESULTS There was no significant difference in methylated or un-methylated status for BDNF promoters between schizophrenia patients and controls. The mean duration of illness was significantly lower in the hemi-methylated group compared to the non-methylated group for BDNF gene CpG island-1 in schizophrenia patients. CONCLUSIONS Although there were no differences in BDNF gene methylation status between schizophrenia patients and healthy controls, there was an association between duration of illness and DNA methylation.

  7. DNA Methylation of BDNF Gene in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Çöpoğlu, Ümit Sertan; İğci, Mehri; Bozgeyik, Esra; Kokaçya, M. Hanifi; İğci, Yusuf Ziya; Dokuyucu, Recep; Arı, Mustafa; Savaş, Haluk A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although genetic factors are risk factors for schizophrenia, some environmental factors are thought to be required for the manifestation of disease. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate gene functions without causing a change in the nucleotide sequence of DNA. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that regulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. It has been suggested that BDNF may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. It is established that methylation status of the BDNF gene is associated with fear learning, memory, and stressful social interactions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the DNA methylation status of BDNF gene in patients with schizophrenia. Material/Methods The study included 49 patients (33 male and 16 female) with schizophrenia and 65 unrelated healthy controls (46 male and 19 female). Determination of methylation pattern of CpG islands was based on the principle that bisulfite treatment of DNA results in conversion of unmethylated cytosine residues into uracil, whereas methylated cytosine residues remain unmodified. Methylation-specific PCR was performed with primers specific for either methylated or unmethylated DNA. Results There was no significant difference in methylated or un-methylated status for BDNF promoters between schizophrenia patients and controls. The mean duration of illness was significantly lower in the hemi-methylated group compared to the non-methylated group for BDNF gene CpG island-1 in schizophrenia patients. Conclusions Although there were no differences in BDNF gene methylation status between schizophrenia patients and healthy controls, there was an association between duration of illness and DNA methylation. PMID:26851233

  8. MAGI: Methylation analysis using genome information.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Douglas D; Doerge, R W

    2014-05-01

    By incorporating annotation information into the analysis of next-generation sequencing DNA methylation data, we provide an improvement in performance over current testing procedures. Methylation analysis using genome information (MAGI) is applicable for both unreplicated and replicated data, and provides an effective analysis for studies with low sequencing depth. When compared with current tests, the annotation-informed tests provide an increase in statistical power and offer a significance-based interpretation of differential methylation.

  9. Direct synthesis of methyl phosphoramidates in carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Dhurandhare, Vijay M; Mishra, Girija Prasad; Lam, Sarah; Wang, Cheng-Chung

    2015-09-28

    A direct installation of a methyl phosphoramidate group by using methyl benzylphosphoramidochloridate into carbohydrates and amino acid is described. This one-step synthesis is efficient for both primary and secondary alcohols and exhibited excellent regioselectivity and functional group compatibility. Formation of a single diastereomer is observed in certain cases. The N-benzyl protecting group on methyl phosphoramidates is easily removed under mild conditions.

  10. Inhibition of phosphatidylserine synthesis during Jurkat T cell activation. The phosphatase inhibitor, sodium ortho-vanadate bypasses the CD3/T cell receptor-induced second messenger signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pelassy, C; Breittmayer, J P; Aussel, C

    2000-02-01

    Sodium ortho-vanadate (Na3VO4), an inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatase, induces a rapid (15 min) and strong inhibition of phosphatidylserine synthesis with an IC50 = 100 microM. The mode of action of Na3VO4 was compared to that of CD3 mAbs. It was found that Na3VO4 bypasses the major CD3-induced T cell activation signals including protein tyrosine phosphorylation, p56lck activation and the generation of second messengers including inositol phosphates and its subsequent Ca2+ mobilization as well as diacylglycerol production. These facts were confirmed by using a panel of Jurkat clones that differs by the expression of either tyrosine kinases involved in the CD3-induced T cell activation pathway such as p56lck, p72syk and ZAP-70 or some cell surface receptors such as the CD3/TCR complex or the CD45 phosphatase.

  11. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Biodiesel Components Methyl Stearate and Methyl Oleate

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, C; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2010-01-22

    New chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms are developed for two of the five major components of biodiesel fuel, methyl stearate and methyl oleate. The mechanisms are produced using existing reaction classes and rules for reaction rates, with additional reaction classes to describe other reactions unique to methyl ester species. Mechanism capabilities were examined by computing fuel/air autoignition delay times and comparing the results with more conventional hydrocarbon fuels for which experimental results are available. Additional comparisons were carried out with measured results taken from jet-stirred reactor experiments for rapeseed methyl ester fuels. In both sets of computational tests, methyl oleate was found to be slightly less reactive than methyl stearate, and an explanation of this observation is made showing that the double bond in methyl oleate inhibits certain low temperature chain branching reaction pathways important in methyl stearate. The resulting detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism includes more approximately 3500 chemical species and more than 17,000 chemical reactions.

  12. Genistein alters methylation patterns in mice.

    PubMed

    Day, J Kevin; Bauer, Andrew M; DesBordes, Charles; Zhuang, Yi; Kim, Byung-Eun; Newton, Leslie G; Nehra, Vedika; Forsee, Kara M; MacDonald, Ruth S; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Huang, Tim Hui-Ming; Lubahn, Dennis B

    2002-08-01

    In this study we examine the effect of the phytoestrogen genistein on DNA methylation. DNA methylation is thought to inhibit transcription of genes by regulating alterations in chromatin structure. Estrogenic compounds have been reported to regulate DNA methylation in a small number of studies. Additionally, phytoestrogens are believed to affect progression of some human diseases, such as estrogen-dependent cancers, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Specifically, our working hypothesis is that certain soy phytoestrogens, such as genistein, may be involved in preventing the development of certain prostate and mammary cancers by maintaining a protective DNA methylation profile. The objective of the present study is to use mouse differential methylation hybridization (DMH) arrays to test for changes in the methylation status of the cytosine guanine dinucleotide (CpG) islands in the mouse genome by examining how these methylation patterns are affected by genistein. Male mice were fed a casein-based diet (control) or the same diet containing 300 mg genistein/kg according to one of four regimens: control diet for 4 wk, genistein diet for 4 wk, control diet for 2 wk followed by genistein diet for 2 wk and genistein diet for 2 wk followed by control diet for 2 wk. DNA from liver, brain and prostate were then screened with DMH arrays. Clones with methylation differences were sequenced and compared with known sequences. In conclusion, consumption of genistein diet was positively correlated with changes in prostate DNA methylation at CpG islands of specific mouse genes.

  13. Druggability of methyl-lysine binding sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, C.; Nguyen, K.; Schapira, M.

    2011-12-01

    Structural modules that specifically recognize—or read—methylated or acetylated lysine residues on histone peptides are important components of chromatin-mediated signaling and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms is associated with disease conditions, and antagonists of acetyl-lysine binding bromodomains are efficacious in animal models of cancer and inflammation, but little is known regarding the druggability of methyl-lysine binding modules. We conducted a systematic structural analysis of readers of methyl marks and derived a predictive druggability landscape of methyl-lysine binding modules. We show that these target classes are generally less druggable than bromodomains, but that some proteins stand as notable exceptions.

  14. RNA-directed DNA methylation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Aufsatz, Werner; Mette, M. Florian; van der Winden, Johannes; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2002-01-01

    In plants, double-stranded RNA that is processed to short RNAs ≈21–24 nt in length can trigger two types of epigenetic gene silencing. Posttranscriptional gene silencing, which is related to RNA interference in animals and quelling in fungi, involves targeted elimination of homologous mRNA in the cytoplasm. RNA-directed DNA methylation involves de novo methylation of almost all cytosine residues within a region of RNA–DNA sequence identity. RNA-directed DNA methylation is presumed to be responsible for the methylation observed in protein coding regions of posttranscriptionally silenced genes. Moreover, a type of transcriptional gene silencing and de novo methylation of homologous promoters in trans can occur if a double-stranded RNA contains promoter sequences. Although RNA-directed DNA methylation has been described so far only in plants, there is increasing evidence that RNA can also target genome modifications in other organisms. To understand how RNA directs methylation to identical DNA sequences and how changes in chromatin configuration contribute to initiating or maintaining DNA methylation induced by RNA, a promoter double-stranded RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing system has been established in Arabidopsis. A genetic analysis of this system is helping to unravel the relationships among RNA signals, DNA methylation, and chromatin structure. PMID:12169664

  15. Microwave-accelerated methylation of starch.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vandana; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2008-01-14

    A novel microwave-accelerated method for methylating soluble starch is described. Soluble starch could be fully methylated in 72% yield within 4.66 min using iodomethane and 30% potassium hydroxide under microwave irradiation. The completely methylated starch thus obtained was hydrolyzed with 60% HCO(2)H for 1.5 min under 80% MW power, followed by 0.05 M H(2)SO(4) for 2.0 min under 100% MW power. The partially methylated monosaccharides were separated by preparative paper chromatography and identified by their melting points and optical rotations.

  16. Methylation – an uncommon modification of glycans*

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Erika

    2013-01-01

    A methyl group on a sugar residue is a rarely reported event. Until now this kind of modification has been found in the kingdom of animals only in worms and molluscs, whereas it is more frequently present in some species of bacteria, fungi, algae and plants, but not in mammals. The monosaccharides involved as well as the positions of the methyl groups on the sugar vary with the species. Methylation seems to play a role in some recognition events but details are still unknown. This review summarises the current knowledge on methylation of sugars in all kinds of organism. PMID:22944672

  17. DNA Methylation Landscapes of Human Fetal Development.

    PubMed

    Slieker, Roderick C; Roost, Matthias S; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Suchiman, H Eka D; Tobi, Elmar W; Carlotti, Françoise; de Koning, Eelco J P; Slagboom, P Eline; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M

    2015-10-01

    Remodelling the methylome is a hallmark of mammalian development and cell differentiation. However, current knowledge of DNA methylation dynamics in human tissue specification and organ development largely stems from the extrapolation of studies in vitro and animal models. Here, we report on the DNA methylation landscape using the 450k array of four human tissues (amnion, muscle, adrenal and pancreas) during the first and second trimester of gestation (9,18 and 22 weeks). We show that a tissue-specific signature, constituted by tissue-specific hypomethylated CpG sites, was already present at 9 weeks of gestation (W9). Furthermore, we report large-scale remodelling of DNA methylation from W9 to W22. Gain of DNA methylation preferentially occurred near genes involved in general developmental processes, whereas loss of DNA methylation mapped to genes with tissue-specific functions. Dynamic DNA methylation was associated with enhancers, but not promoters. Comparison of our data with external fetal adrenal, brain and liver revealed striking similarities in the trajectory of DNA methylation during fetal development. The analysis of gene expression data indicated that dynamic DNA methylation was associated with the progressive repression of developmental programs and the activation of genes involved in tissue-specific processes. The DNA methylation landscape of human fetal development provides insight into regulatory elements that guide tissue specification and lead to organ functionality.

  18. Raf-1 kinase possesses distinct binding domains for phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid regulates the translocation of Raf-1 in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-stimulated Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Strum, J C; Sciorra, V A; Daniel, L; Bell, R M

    1996-04-05

    Previous studies demonstrated that the cysteine-rich amino-terminal domain of Raf-1 kinase interacts selectively with phosphatidylserine (Ghosh, S., Xie, W. Q., Quest, A. F. G., Mabrouk, G. M., Strum, J. C., and Bell, R. M. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 10000-10007). Further analysis showed that full-length Raf-1 bound to both phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid (PA). Specifically, a carboxyl-terminal domain of Raf-1 kinase (RafC; residues 295 648 of human Raf-1) interacted strongly with phosphatidic acid. The binding of RafC to PA displayed positive cooperativity with Hill numbers between 3.3 and 6.2; the apparent Kd ranged from 4.9 +/- 0.6 to 7.8 +/- 0.9 mol % PA. The interaction of RafC with PA displayed a pH dependence distinct from the interaction between the cysteine-rich domain of Raf-1 and PA. Also, the RafC-PA interaction was unaffected at high ionic strength. Of all the lipids tested, only PA and cardiolipin exhibited high affinity binding; other acidic lipids were either ineffective or weakly effective. By deletion mutagenesis, the PA binding site within RafC was narrowed down to a 35-amino acid segment between residues 389 and 423. RafC did not bind phosphatidyl alcohols; also, inhibition of PA formation in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells by treatment with 1% ethanol significantly reduced the translocation of Raf-1 from the cytosol to the membrane following stimulation with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. These results suggest a potential role of the lipid second messenger, PA, in the regulation of translocation and subsequent activation of Raf-1 in vivo.

  19. Chiral methyl-branched pheromones.

    PubMed

    Ando, Tetsu; Yamakawa, Rei

    2015-07-01

    Insect pheromones are some of the most interesting natural products because they are utilized for interspecific communication between various insects, such as beetles, moths, ants, and cockroaches. A large number of compounds of many kinds have been identified as pheromone components, reflecting the diversity of insect species. While this review deals only with chiral methyl-branched pheromones, the chemical structures of more than one hundred non-terpene compounds have been determined by applying excellent analytical techniques. Furthermore, their stereoselective syntheses have been achieved by employing trustworthy chiral sources and ingenious enantioselective reactions. The information has been reviewed here not only to make them available for new research but also to understand the characteristic chemical structures of the chiral pheromones. Since biosynthetic studies are still limited, it might be meaningful to examine whether the structures, particularly the positions and configurations of the branched methyl groups, are correlated with the taxonomy of the pheromone producers and also with the function of the pheromones in communication systems.

  20. 21 CFR 177.2000 - Vinylidene chloride/methyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate polymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... methacrylate polymers. 177.2000 Section 177.2000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic.../methyl methacrylate polymers. The vinylidene chloride/methyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate polymers...

  1. 21 CFR 177.2000 - Vinylidene chloride/methyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate polymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... methacrylate polymers. 177.2000 Section 177.2000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.2000 Vinylidene chloride/methyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate polymers. The vinylidene chloride/methyl...

  2. 21 CFR 177.2000 - Vinylidene chloride/methyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate polymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... methacrylate polymers. 177.2000 Section 177.2000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.2000 Vinylidene chloride/methyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate polymers. The vinylidene chloride/methyl...

  3. 21 CFR 177.2000 - Vinylidene chloride/methyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate polymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... methacrylate polymers. 177.2000 Section 177.2000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.2000 Vinylidene chloride/methyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate polymers. The vinylidene chloride/methyl...

  4. 21 CFR 177.2000 - Vinylidene chloride/methyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate polymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... methacrylate polymers. 177.2000 Section 177.2000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.2000 Vinylidene chloride/methyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate polymers. The vinylidene chloride/methyl...

  5. Methylation Linear Discriminant Analysis (MLDA) for identifying differentially methylated CpG islands

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wei; Teodoridis, Jens M; Graham, Janet; Zeller, Constanze; Huang, Tim HM; Yan, Pearlly; Vass, J Keith; Brown, Robert; Paul, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Background Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands is strongly correlated to transcriptional gene silencing and epigenetic maintenance of the silenced state. As well as its role in tumor development, CpG island methylation contributes to the acquisition of resistance to chemotherapy. Differential Methylation Hybridisation (DMH) is one technique used for genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. The study of such microarray data sets should ideally account for the specific biological features of DNA methylation and the non-symmetrical distribution of the ratios of unmethylated and methylated sequences hybridised on the array. We have therefore developed a novel algorithm tailored to this type of data, Methylation Linear Discriminant Analysis (MLDA). Results MLDA was programmed in R (version 2.7.0) and the package is available at CRAN [1]. This approach utilizes linear regression models of non-normalised hybridisation data to define methylation status. Log-transformed signal intensities of unmethylated controls on the microarray are used as a reference. The signal intensities of DNA samples digested with methylation sensitive restriction enzymes and mock digested are then transformed to the likelihood of a locus being methylated using this reference. We tested the ability of MLDA to identify loci differentially methylated as analysed by DMH between cisplatin sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. MLDA identified 115 differentially methylated loci and 23 out of 26 of these loci have been independently validated by Methylation Specific PCR and/or bisulphite pyrosequencing. Conclusion MLDA has advantages for analyzing methylation data from CpG island microarrays, since there is a clear rational for the definition of methylation status, it uses DMH data without between-group normalisation and is less influenced by cross-hybridisation of loci. The MLDA algorithm successfully identified differentially methylated loci between two classes of samples analysed by DMH

  6. The Synthesis of Methyl Salicylate: Amine Diazotization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanger, Murray; McKee, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Notes that this experiment takes safety and noncarcinogenic reactants into account. Demonstrates the use of diazonium salts for the replacement of an aromatic amine group by a phenolic hydroxyl. Involves two pleasant-smelling organic compounds, methyl anthranilate (grape) and methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen). (MVL)

  7. Effects of DNA methylation on nucleosome stability.

    PubMed

    Collings, Clayton K; Waddell, Peter J; Anderson, John N

    2013-03-01

    Methylation of DNA at CpG dinucleotides represents one of the most important epigenetic mechanisms involved in the control of gene expression in vertebrate cells. In this report, we conducted nucleosome reconstitution experiments in conjunction with high-throughput sequencing on 572 KB of human DNA and 668 KB of mouse DNA that was unmethylated or methylated in order to investigate the effects of this epigenetic modification on the positioning and stability of nucleosomes. The results demonstrated that a subset of nucleosomes positioned by nucleotide sequence was sensitive to methylation where the modification increased the affinity of these sequences for the histone octamer. The features that distinguished these nucleosomes from the bulk of the methylation-insensitive nucleosomes were an increase in the frequency of CpG dinucleotides and a unique rotational orientation of CpGs such that their minor grooves tended to face toward the histones in the nucleosome rather than away. These methylation-sensitive nucleosomes were preferentially associated with exons as compared to introns while unmethylated CpG islands near transcription start sites became enriched in nucleosomes upon methylation. The results of this study suggest that the effects of DNA methylation on nucleosome stability in vitro can recapitulate what has been observed in the cell and provide a direct link between DNA methylation and the structure and function of chromatin.

  8. Optical biosensing strategies for DNA methylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Nazmul Islam, Md; Yadav, Sharda; Hakimul Haque, Md; Munaz, Ahmed; Islam, Farhadul; Al Hossain, Md Shahriar; Gopalan, Vinod; Lam, Alfred K; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A

    2017-06-15

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification of DNA, where a methyl group is added at the fifth carbon of the cytosine base to form 5 methyl cytosine (5mC) without altering the DNA sequences. It plays important roles in regulating many cellular processes by modulating key genes expression. Alteration in DNA methylation patterns becomes particularly important in the aetiology of different diseases including cancers. Abnormal methylation pattern could contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer either by silencing key tumor suppressor genes or by activating oncogenes. Thus, DNA methylation biosensing can help in the better understanding of cancer prognosis and diagnosis and aid the development of therapies. Over the last few decades, a plethora of optical detection techniques have been developed for analyzing DNA methylation using fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), electrochemiluminescence and colorimetric readouts. This paper aims to comprehensively review the optical strategies for DNA methylation detection. We also present an overview of the remaining challenges of optical strategies that still need to be focused along with the lesson learnt while working with these techniques.

  9. The origins of atmospheric methyl mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Prestbo, E.M.; Bloom, N.S.

    1995-12-31

    Methyl Hg in precipitation shows strong regional patterns, with highest volume weighted mean values (0.4 ng/L) in the Pacific Northwest and lowest values in Florida (<0.01 ng/l). Over most of the North Central region, average values range from 0.05 to 0.2 ng/L. Several potential sources of methyl Hg to the atmosphere have been investigated, including direct anthropogenic emissions, atmospheric methylation of Hg{sup o} or Hg(II), and emissions of methyl or dimethyl Hg from natural surfaces (oceans, bogs, or forests). Direct measurements of major total Hg sources such as coal and waste combustors, and sewage treatment facilities suggest that direct anthropogenic emissions are an insignificant source of methyl Hg to the atmosphere. The gas phase reaction of methyl halides with Hg{sup o} also appears to be an insignificant source of methyl Hg to the atmosphere. Recent laboratory experiments have provided a likely mechanism for atmospheric Hg methylation via a complex reaction involving acetate, sulfite, and iron. From a series of field measurements, another source appears to be the degradation of dimethyl mercury emitted by the upwelling of deep ocean water.

  10. Electrochemical biosensing strategies for DNA methylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Tanvir; Mahmudunnabi, Golam; Masud, Mostafa Kamal; Islam, Md Nazmul; Ooi, Lezanne; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Martinac, Boris; Alici, Gursel; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A

    2017-02-17

    DNA methylation is one of the key epigenetic modifications of DNA that results from the enzymatic addition of a methyl group at the fifth carbon of the cytosine base. It plays a crucial role in cellular development, genomic stability and gene expression. Aberrant DNA methylation is responsible for the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancers. Over the past several decades, many methodologies have been developed to detect DNA methylation. These methodologies range from classical molecular biology and optical approaches, such as bisulfite sequencing, microarrays, quantitative real-time PCR, colorimetry, Raman spectroscopy to the more recent electrochemical approaches. Among these, electrochemical approaches offer sensitive, simple, specific, rapid, and cost-effective analysis of DNA methylation. Additionally, electrochemical methods are highly amenable to miniaturization and possess the potential to be multiplexed. In recent years, several reviews have provided information on the detection strategies of DNA methylation. However, to date, there is no comprehensive evaluation of electrochemical DNA methylation detection strategies. Herein, we address the recent developments of electrochemical DNA methylation detection approaches. Furthermore, we highlight the major technical and biological challenges involved in these strategies and provide suggestions for the future direction of this important field.

  11. INDUCTION OF GENOTOXIC DAMAGE IS NOT HIGHLY CORRELATED WITH THE ABILITY OT METHYLATE ARSENITE IN VITRO IN THE LEUKOCYTES OF 4 MAMMALIAN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Abstract

    Arsenic is a natural drinking water contaminant that impacts the health of large populations of people throughout the world; however, the mode or mechanism by which arsenic induces cancer is unclear. In a series of in vitro studies, we exposed leukocytes from...

  12. Identifying DNA methylation in a nanochannel

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoyin; Yasui, Takao; Yanagida, Takeshi; Kaji, Noritada; Rahong, Sakon; Kanai, Masaki; Nagashima, Kazuki; Kawai, Tomoji; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic modification, which is well known to be involved in gene expression regulation. In general, however, analyzing DNA methylation requires rather time consuming processes (24–96 h) via DNA replication and protein modification. Here we demonstrate a methodology to analyze DNA methylation at a single DNA molecule level without any protein modifications by measuring the contracted length and relaxation time of DNA within a nanochannel. Our methodology is based on the fact that methylation makes DNA molecules stiffer, resulting in a longer contracted length and a longer relaxation time (a slower contraction rate). The present methodology offers a promising way to identify DNA methylation without any protein modification at a single DNA molecule level within 2 h. PMID:27877910

  13. Protein methylation reactions in intact pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Post-translational protein methylation was investigated in Pisum sativum chloroplasts. Intact pea chloroplasts were incubated with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine under various conditions. The chloroplasts were then separated into stromal and thylakoid fractions and analyzed for radioactivity transferred to protein. Light enhanced the magnitude of labeling in both fractions. One thylakoid polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa was labeled only in the light. Several other thylakoid and stromal proteins were labeled in both light and dark-labeling conditions. Both base-labile methylation, carboxy-methylesters and base-stable groups, N-methylations were found. Further characterization of the methyl-transfer reactions will be presented.

  14. DNA methylation as a universal biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Levenson, Victor V

    2010-01-01

    Cell-free circulating DNA carries not only tumor-specific changes in its sequence but also distinctive epigenetic marks, namely DNA methylation, in certain GC-rich fragments. These fragments are usually located within the promoters and first exons of many genes, comprising CpG islands. Analysis of DNA methylation using cell-free circulating DNA can facilitate development of very accurate biomarkers for detection, diagnosis, prediction of response to therapy and prognosis of outcomes. Recent data suggest that benign and inflammatory diseases have very specific methylation patterns within cell-free circulating DNA, which are different from the pattern of a malignant tumor of the same organ. In addition, specific methylation patterns have been detected for cancers of different organs, so a differential diagnosis of site-specific cancer appears feasible. Currently, cancer-related applications dominate the field, although methylation-based biomarkers may also be possible for other diseases, including neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. PMID:20465502

  15. Global Proteomics Analysis of Protein Lysine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xing-Jun; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2017-01-01

    Lysine methylation is a common protein post-translational modification dynamically mediated by protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and demethylases (PKDMs). Beyond histone proteins, lysine methylation on non-histone proteins play substantial roles in a variety of functions in cells, and is closely associated with diseases such as cancer. A large body of evidence indicates that the dysregulation of some PKMTs lead to tumorigenesis via their non-histone substrates. However, more studies on other PKMTs have made slow progress owing to the lack of the approaches for extensive screening of lysine methylation sites. Recently a series of publications to perform large-scale analysis of protein lysine methylation have emerged. In this unit, we introduce a protocol for the global analysis of protein lysine methylation in cells by means of immunoaffinity enrichment and mass spectrometry. PMID:27801517

  16. Mercury methylation by fish intestinal contents.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, J W; Furutani, A; Turner, M A

    1980-01-01

    A new radiochemical method has been applied to the examination of mercury methylation in fish intestinal contents. Intestinal contents of six freshwater fish species were found capable of converting 203Hg2+ to CH3203Hg+. This activity was observed in fish from five of six lakes tested whether or not there was mercury pollution. Bacterial activity in the intestinal contents is most likely responsible for this methylation. Methylating activity of piscivors increased with decreasing quantity of intestinal contents. Generally, pike and walleye intestinal contents methylated a larger fraction of 203Hg2+ than those of whitefish and suckers. These data contradict the previous general conclusion that there is no mercury methylation in fish. PMID:7425625

  17. Methylation-Sensitive Melt Curve Analysis of the Reprimo Gene Methylation in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Junzhong; Luo, Qianping; Ke, Huican; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Reprimo (RPRM) is a p53-induced tumor suppressor gene. Its aberrant DNA methylation is correlated with carcinogenesis and may be used as a surrogate marker for the early detection of gastric cancer. However, the detail information regarding its DNA methylation has not been revealed. Here, we investigated the RPRM gene methylation in gastric cancer tumor and plasma samples by methylation-sensitive melt curve analysis (MS-MCA) and bisulfite sequencing in depth. We developed a semi-quantitative method based on MS-MCA for detecting DNA methylation and unraveled the RPRM gene methylation pattern in gastric cancer. This study provides a solid foundation for the future application of detecting RPRM gene methylation in human plasma or serum samples to help diagnose gastric cancer or for prognosis evaluation. PMID:27992600

  18. Whole-genome DNA methylation profiling using MethylCap-seq.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Arie B; Simmer, Femke; Ma, Kelong; Kaan, Anita; Zhu, Jingde; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G

    2010-11-01

    MethylCap-seq is a robust procedure for genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation. The approach consists of the capture of methylated DNA using the MBD domain of MeCP2, and subsequent next-generation sequencing of eluted DNA. Elution of the captured methylated DNA is done in steps using a salt gradient, which stratifies the genome into fractions with different CpG density. The enrichment reached within the individual eluates allows for cost-effective deep sequence coverage. The profiles together yield a detailed genome-wide map of methylated regions and readily allows detection of DNA methylation in known and novel regions. Here, we describe principles and details of the MethylCap-seq procedure using different sources of starting material.

  19. DNA methylation profiling using the methylated-CpG island recovery assay (MIRA).

    PubMed

    Rauch, Tibor A; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2010-11-01

    The methylated-CpG island recovery assay (MIRA) exploits the intrinsic specificity and the high affinity of a methylated-CpG-binding protein complex (MBD2B and MBD3L1) to methylated CpG dinucleotides in genomic DNA. The MIRA approach works on double-stranded DNA and does not depend on the application of methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. It can be performed on a few hundred nanograms of genomic DNA. Recently, the MIRA technique has been used to profile DNA methylation patterns at a resolution of 100 base pairs along the entire genome of normal human B-lymphocytes. The MIRA method is compatible with microarray and next generation DNA sequencing approaches. We describe the principles and details of this method applied for methylation profiling of genomes containing methylated CpG sequences.

  20. Profiling genome-wide DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Yong, Wai-Shin; Hsu, Fei-Man; Chen, Pao-Yang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays an important role in regulating gene expression and therefore a broad range of biological processes and diseases. DNA methylation is tissue-specific, dynamic, sequence-context-dependent and trans-generationally heritable, and these complex patterns of methylation highlight the significance of profiling DNA methylation to answer biological questions. In this review, we surveyed major methylation assays, along with comparisons and biological examples, to provide an overview of DNA methylation profiling techniques. The advances in microarray and sequencing technologies make genome-wide profiling possible at a single-nucleotide or even a single-cell resolution. These profiling approaches vary in many aspects, such as DNA input, resolution, genomic region coverage, and bioinformatics analysis, and selecting a feasible method requires knowledge of these methods. We first introduce the biological background of DNA methylation and its pattern in plants, animals and fungi. We present an overview of major experimental approaches to profiling genome-wide DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation and then extend to the single-cell methylome. To evaluate these methods, we outline their strengths and weaknesses and perform comparisons across the different platforms. Due to the increasing need to compute high-throughput epigenomic data, we interrogate the computational pipeline for bisulfite sequencing data and also discuss the concept of identifying differentially methylated regions (DMRs). This review summarizes the experimental and computational concepts for profiling genome-wide DNA methylation, followed by biological examples. Overall, this review provides researchers useful guidance for the selection of a profiling method suited to specific research questions.

  1. Maternal Methyl-Group Donor Intake and Global DNA (Hydroxy)Methylation before and during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, Sara; Duca, Radu Corneliu; Devlieger, Roland; Freson, Kathleen; Straetmans, Dany; Van Herck, Erik; Huybrechts, Inge; Koppen, Gurdun; Godderis, Lode

    2016-01-01

    It is still unclear to which extent methyl-group intake during pregnancy can affect maternal global DNA (hydroxyl)methylation. Pregnancy methylation profiling and its link with methyl-group intake in a healthy population could enhance our understanding of the development of pregnancy related disorders. One hundred forty-eight women were enrolled in the MANOE (MAternal Nutrition and Offspring’s Epigenome) study. Thiry-four women were enrolled before pregnancy and 116 during the first trimester of pregnancy. Global DNA (hydroxy)methylation in blood using LC-MS/MS and dietary methyl-group intake (methionine, folate, betaine, and choline) using a food-frequency questionnaire were estimated pre-pregnancy, during each trimester, and at delivery. Global DNA (hydroxy)methylation levels were highest pre-pregnancy and at weeks 18–22 of pregnancy. We observed a positive relation between folic acid and global DNA methylation (p = 0.04) and hydroxymethylation (p = 0.04). A high intake of methionine pre-pregnancy and in the first trimester showed lower (hydroxy)methylation percentage in weeks 11–13 and weeks 18–22, respectively. Choline and betaine intake in the first weeks was negatively associated with hydroxymethylation. Women with a high intake of these three methyl groups in the second and third trimester showed higher hyrdoxymethylation/methylation levels in the third trimester. To conclude, a time trend in DNA (hydroxy)methylation was found and women with higher methyl-group intake showed higher methylation in the third trimester, and not in earlier phases of pregnancy. PMID:27509522

  2. 40 CFR 180.439 - Thifensulfuron methyl; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... residues of thifensulfuron methyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on the commodities... established for residues of thifensulfuron methyl, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on...

  3. Targeting DNA methylation with green tea catechins.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulou, Eugenia C

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant epigenetic alterations in the genome such as DNA methylation play a significant role in cancer development. Green tea catechins have been reported to modulate epigenetic processes. This review aims to synthesize evidence on the modulation of DNA methylation by green tea catechins. Green tea catechins have been reported to reverse DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes and increase transcription of these genes. Green tea catechins and especially epigallocatechin gallate modulate DNA methylation by attenuating the effect of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). However, the exact mechanism of DNMT1 inhibition is not delineated. Suggested mechanisms include direct enzymatic inhibition, indirect enzymatic inhibition, reduced DNMT1 expression and translation. The possible effect of green tea catechins on other pathways of DNA methylation, i.e. methyl-CpG binding domain proteins, has not been investigated. Furthermore, the link between redox properties and epigenetic modulation by green tea catechins has not been defined either. Since green tea catechins are natural compounds with a rather acceptable safety profile, further research on their action as inhibitors of DNA methylation seems worthwhile.

  4. Relationship between nucleosome positioning and DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Chodavarapu, Ramakrishna K.; Feng, Suhua; Bernatavichute, Yana V.; Chen, Pao-Yang; Stroud, Hume; Yu, Yanchun; Hetzel, Jonathan; Kuo, Frank; Kim, Jin; Cokus, Shawn J.; Casero, David; Bernal, Maria; Huijser, Peter; Clark, Amander T.; Krämer, Ute; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    Nucleosomes compact and regulate access to DNA in the nucleus, and are composed of approximately 147 bases of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer1, 2. Here we report a genome-wide nucleosome positioning analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana utilizing massively parallel sequencing of mononucleosomes. By combining this data with profiles of DNA methylation at single base resolution, we identified ten base periodicities in the DNA methylation status of nucleosome-bound DNA and found that nucleosomal DNA was more highly methylated than flanking DNA. These results suggest that nucleosome positioning strongly influences DNA methylation patterning throughout the genome and that DNA methyltransferases preferentially target nucleosome-bound DNA. We also observed similar trends in human nucleosomal DNA suggesting that the relationships between nucleosomes and DNA methyltransferases are conserved. Finally, as has been observed in animals, nucleosomes were highly enriched on exons, and preferentially positioned at intron-exon and exon-intron boundaries. RNA Pol II was also enriched on exons relative to introns, consistent with the hypothesis that nucleosome positioning regulates Pol II processivity. DNA methylation is enriched on exons, consistent with the targeting of DNA methylation to nucleosomes, and suggesting a role for DNA methylation in exon definition. PMID:20512117

  5. Neurological manifestation of methyl bromide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Suwanlaong, Kanokrat; Phanthumchinda, Kammant

    2008-03-01

    Methyl bromide is a highly toxic gas with poor olfactory warning properties. It is widely used as insecticidal fumigant for dry foodstuffs and can be toxic to central and peripheral nervous systems. Most neurological manifestations of methyl bromide intoxication occur from inhalation. Acute toxicity characterized by headache, dizziness, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and visual disturbances. Tremor, convulsion, unconsciousness and permanent brain damage may occur in severe poisoning. Chronic exposure can cause neuropathy, pyramidal and cerebellar dysfunction, as well as neuropsychiatric disturbances. The first case of methyl bromide intoxication in Thailand has been described. The patient was a 24-year-old man who worked in a warehouse of imported vegetables fumigated with methyl bromide. He presented with unstable gait, vertigo and paresthesia of both feet, for two weeks. He had a history of chronic exposure to methyl bromide for three years. His fourteen co-workers also developed the same symptoms but less in severity. Neurological examination revealed ataxic gait, decreased pain and vibratory sense on both feet, impaired cerebellar signs and hyperactive reflex in all extremities. The serum concentration of methyl bromide was 8.18 mg/dl. Electrophysilogical study was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain (MRI) revealed bilateral symmetrical lesion of abnormal hypersignal intensity on T2 and fluid-attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences at bilateral dentate nuclei of cerebellum and periventricular area of the fourth ventricle. This incident stresses the need for improvement of worker education and safety precautions during all stages of methyl bromide fumigation.

  6. Exercise effects on methylation of ASC gene.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, K; Takeoka, M; Mori, M; Hashimoto, S; Sakurai, A; Nose, H; Higuchi, K; Itano, N; Shiohara, M; Oh, T; Taniguchi, S

    2010-09-01

    Chronic moderate exercise has been reported to reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines. To analyze the molecular mechanisms by which training exerts these effects, the epigenetic influences of age and exercise on the ASC gene, which is responsible for IL-1beta and IL-18 secretion, were investigated by ASC gene methylation. Further, the relationship between carcinogenesis and exercise, and methylation of the P15 tumor suppressive gene was also analyzed. High-intensity interval walking exercise, consisting of 3 min low-intensity walking at 40% of peak aerobic capacity followed by a 3 min high-intensity walking period above 70% of peak aerobic capacity, was continued for 6 months. Peripheral blood DNA extracts from young control (n=34), older control (n=153), and older exercise (n=230) groups were then analyzed by pyrosequencing for DNA methylation. Methylation of ASC decreased significantly with age (young control vs. older control, p<0.01), which is indicative of an age-dependent increase in ASC expression. Compared to the older control group, the degree of ASC methylation was higher in the older exercise group (older control vs. older exercise: p<0.01), and presumably lower ASC expression. Neither exercise nor age affected the methylation of the P15. In summary, chronic moderate exercise appears to attenuate the age-dependent decrease in ASC methylation, implying suppression of excess pro-inflammatory cytokines through reduction of ASC expression.

  7. Targeting histone methylation for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Lin, Chengyuan; Zhong, Linda L. D.; Zhao, Ling; Zhang, Ge; Lu, Aiping; Wu, Jiang; Bian, Zhaoxiang

    2016-01-01

    As a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, colorectal cancer (CRC) results from accumulation of both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Disruption of epigenetic regulation in CRC, particularly aberrant histone methylation mediated by histone methyltransferases (HMTs) and demethylases (HDMs), have drawn increasing interest in recent years. In this paper, we aim to review the roles of histone methylation and associated enzymes in the pathogenesis of CRC, and the development of small-molecule modulators to regulate histone methylation for treating CRC. Multiple levels of evidence suggest that aberrant histone methylations play important roles in CRC. More than 20 histone-methylation enzymes are found to be clinically relevant to CRC, including 17 oncoproteins and 8 tumor suppressors. Inhibitors of EZH2 and DOT1L have demonstrated promising therapeutic effects in preclinical CRC treatment. Potent and selective chemical probes of histone-methylation enzymes are required for validation of their functional roles in carcinogenesis and clinical translations as CRC therapies. With EZH2 inhibitor EPZ-6438 entering into phase I/II trials for advanced solid tumors, histone methylation is emerging as a promising target for CRC. PMID:28286564

  8. DNA Methylation Signatures of the Plant Chromomethyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Baulcombe, David C.

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation in plants is traditionally partitioned into CG, CHG and CHH contexts (with H any nucleotide but G). By investigating DNA methylation patterns in trinucleotide contexts in four angiosperm species, we show that such a representation hides spatial and functional partitioning of different methylation pathways and is incomplete. CG methylation (mCG) is largely context-independent whereas, at CHG motifs, there is under-representation of mCCG in pericentric regions of A. thaliana and tomato and throughout the chromosomes of maize and rice. In A. thaliana the biased representation of mCCG in heterochromatin is related to specificities of H3K9 methyltransferase SUVH family members. At CHH motifs there is an over-representation of different variant forms of mCHH that, similarly to mCCG hypomethylation, is partitioned into the pericentric regions of the two dicots but dispersed in the monocot chromosomes. The over-represented mCHH motifs in A. thaliana associate with specific types of transposon including both class I and II elements. At mCHH the contextual bias is due to the involvement of various chromomethyltransferases whereas the context-independent CHH methylation in A. thaliana and tomato is mediated by the RNA-directed DNA methylation process that is most active in the gene-rich euchromatin. This analysis therefore reveals that the sequence context of the methylome of plant genomes is informative about the mechanisms associated with maintenance of methylation and the overlying chromatin structure. PMID:27997534

  9. A genetic sensor for strong methylating compounds

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Felix; Horwitz, Andrew; Chen, Jacinto; Lim, Wendell A.; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Methylating chemicals are common in industry and agriculture and are often toxic, partly due to their propensity to methylate DNA. The Escherichia coli Ada protein detects methylating compounds by sensing aberrant methyl adducts on the phosphoester backbone of DNA. We characterize this system as a genetic sensor and engineer it to lower the detection threshold. By overexpressing Ada from a plasmid, we improve the sensor’s dynamic range to 350-fold induction and lower its detection threshold to 40 µM for methyl iodide. In eukaryotes, there is no known sensor of methyl adducts on the phosphoester backbone of DNA. By fusing the N-terminal domain of Ada to the Gal4 transcriptional activation domain, we built a functional sensor for methyl phosphotriester adducts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This sensor can be tuned to variable specifications by altering the expression level of the chimeric sensor and changing the number of Ada operators upstream of the Gal4-sensitive reporter promoter. These changes result in a detection threshold of 28 µM and 5.2-fold induction in response to methyl iodide. When the yeast sensor is exposed to different SN1 and SN2 alkylating compounds, its response profile is similar to that observed for the native Ada protein in E. coli, indicating that its native function is retained in yeast. Finally, we demonstrate that the specifications achieved for the yeast sensor are suitable for detecting methylating compounds at relevant concentrations in environmental samples. This work demonstrates the movement of a sensor from a prokaryotic to eukaryotic system and its rational tuning to achieve desired specifications. PMID:24032656

  10. Cellular uptake, subcellular distribution and toxicity of arsenic compounds in methylating and non-methylating cells.

    PubMed

    Dopp, E; von Recklinghausen, U; Diaz-Bone, R; Hirner, A V; Rettenmeier, A W

    2010-07-01

    Arsenic is a known human carcinogen, inducing tumors of the skin, urinary bladder, liver and lung. Inorganic arsenic, existing in highly toxic trivalent and significantly less toxic pentavalent forms, is methylated to mono- and di-methylated species mainly in the liver. Due to the low toxicity of pentavalent methylated species, methylation has been regarded as a detoxification process for many years; however, recent findings of a high toxicity of trivalent methylated species have indicated the contrary. In order to elucidate the role of speciation and methylation for the toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenic, systematic studies were conducted comparing cellular uptake, subcellular distribution as well as toxic and genotoxic effects of organic and inorganic pentavalent and trivalent arsenic species in both non-methylating (urothelial cells and fibroblasts) and methylating cells (hepatocytes). The membrane permeability was found to be dependent upon both the arsenic species and the cell type. Uptake rates of trivalent methylated species were highest and exceeded those of their pentavalent counterparts by several orders of magnitude. Non-methylating cells (urothelial cells and fibroblasts) seem to accumulate higher amounts of arsenic within the cell than the methylating hepatocytes. Cellular uptake and extrusion seem to be faster in hepatocytes than in urothelial cells. The correlation of uptake with toxicity indicates a significant role of membrane permeability towards toxicity. Furthermore, cytotoxic effects are more distinct in hepatocytes. Differential centrifugation studies revealed that elevated concentrations of arsenic are present in the ribosomal fraction of urothelial cells and in nucleic and mitochondrial fractions of hepatic cells. Further studies are needed to define the implications of the observed enrichment of arsenic in specific cellular organelles for its carcinogenic activity. This review summarizes our recent research on cellular uptake

  11. Sunflower oil methyl ester as diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, D.J.; Hasan, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Methyl ester formation represents one approach to overcome the problems associated with the relatively high viscosity of sunflower oil when used as a diesel fuel replacement. Sunflower oil methyl ester is being prepared at the University of North Dakota Engieering Experiment Station. Physical and chemical properties of this material at varying levels of refinement and purity will be used to define fuel properties. Engine testing is being carried out to determine if the fouling characteristics of methyl ester are significantly less than those of sunflower oil. 1 figure, 1 table.

  12. Proteomic and ultrastructural analysis of the effect of a new nitazoxanide-N-methyl-1H-benzimidazole hybrid against Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Matadamas-Martínez, Félix; Castillo, Rafael; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Méndez-Cuesta, Carlos; de Souza, Wanderley; Gadelha, Ana Paula; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; Hernández, José Manuel; Yépez-Mulia, Lilián

    2016-04-01

    In an effort to develop alternative drugs for the treatment of giardiasis our research group has synthesized and evaluated a novel nitazoxanide and N-methyl-1H-benzimidazole hybrid molecule, named CMC-20. It showed an IC50 of 0.010 μM on Giardia intestinalis, lower than the IC50 values of 0.015, 0.037 and 1.224 μM for nitazoxanide, albendazole and metronidazole, respectively. In addition, we report studies carried out on its mechanism of action and effect at the ultrastructural level on G. intestinalis. The proteomic analysis of trophozoites treated with CMC-20 revealed significant changes in the expression level of proteins of the cytoskeleton, alpha and beta tubulin, alpha-1, beta giardin and axoneme-associated protein, among other molecules. Ultrastructural studies demonstrated that CMC-20 induces morphological changes on the parasite that loses its characteristic pear shape. Uncommon large bulbous structure at the flagella end, and parasites showing flange membrane bending and a concave depression in the ventral region, resembling an encystation process, were also observed. In addition, some apoptotic and autophagic-like features, such as membrane blebbing, intense vacuolation, chromatin condensation and multilamellar bodies were detected. Phosphatidylserine externalization was determined as an apoptotic marker by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy; however, a typical ladder-like DNA fragmentation profile was not detected. Although it was found that CMC-20 triggers the encystation process, damage to the cyst wall indicates loss of viability.

  13. Conformations and Barriers to Methyl Group Internal Rotation in Two Asymmetric Ethers: Propyl Methyl Ether and Butyl Methyl Ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, B. E.; Dechirico, F.; Cooke, S. A.

    2012-06-01

    The conformational preferences of the O-C-C-C unit are important in many biological systems with the unit generally preferring a gauche configuration compared to an anti configuration. Butyl methyl ether and propyl methyl ether provide very simple systems for this phenomenom to manifest. Pure rotational spectra of the title molecules have been recorded using chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (CP-FTMW). In the case of butyl methyl ether, only one conformer has been observed. This conformer has torsional angles of COCC = 180°, OCCC = 62° and CCCC = 180° (anti-gauche-anti) and rotational constants of A = 10259.4591(33) MHz, B = 1445.6470(13) MHz, and C = 1356.2944(14) MHz. The rotational spectrum was doubled and has been analyzed to produce an effective barrier to methyl group internal rotation of 780(35) cm-1. A prior rotational spectroscopic study on propyl methyl ether had focused only on the high energy anti-anti conformer. We have analyzed spectra from the lowest energy anti-gauche conformer and the spectroscopic constants will be presented. A summary of the differences in conformational energies and methyl group internal rotation barriers for the class of aliphatic asymmetric ethers will be presented. K. N. Houk, J. E. Eksterowicz, Y.-D. Wu, C. D. Fuglesang, D. B. Mitchell. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 115 (4170), 1993. Hiroshi Kato, Jun Nakagawa, Michiro Hayashi. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 80 (272), 1980.

  14. Studies on in vitro S-methylation of naturally occurring thiol compounds with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and methyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Trezl, L.; Park, K.S.; Kim, S.; Paik, W.K.

    1987-08-01

    N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) were found to rapidly methylate glutathione (GSH) in vitro yielding S-methyl glutathione, as verified and quantitated by high-performance liquid chromatography and thin-layer chromatography. Formation of S-methylcysteine in the acid-hydrolyzate of the methylated GSH further confirmed the formation of S-methyl glutathione. Other naturally occurring thiol compounds such as cystein and homocysteine were also methylated by MNU. The observed pH dependency of GSH methylation by MNU suggests that the sulfide anion form of the thiol may represent the favored methyl acceptor. The high reactivity of GSH toward MNU and MMS may be of biological significance in that it could compete with macromolecular cellular components as a target for alkylation.

  15. Histone lysine methylation and chromatin replication.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Carlos; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Almouzni, Geneviève; Loyola, Alejandra

    2014-12-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, the replication of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are critical to maintain genome integrity. Chromatin components, such as histone variants and histone post-translational modifications, along with the higher-order chromatin structure, impact several DNA metabolic processes, including replication, transcription, and repair. In this review we focus on lysine methylation and the relationships between this histone mark and chromatin replication. We first describe studies implicating lysine methylation in regulating early steps in the replication process. We then discuss chromatin reassembly following replication fork passage, where the incorporation of a combination of newly synthesized histones and parental histones can impact the inheritance of lysine methylation marks on the daughter strands. Finally, we elaborate on how the inheritance of lysine methylation can impact maintenance of the chromatin landscape, using heterochromatin as a model chromatin domain, and we discuss the potential mechanisms involved in this process.

  16. Emission of methyl bromide from biomass burning

    SciTech Connect

    Manoe, S.; Andreae, M.O. )

    1994-03-04

    Bromine is, per atom, far more efficient than chlorine in destroying stratospheric ozone, and methyl bromide is the single largest source of stratospheric bromine. The two main previously known sources of this compound are emissions from the ocean and from the compound's use as an agricultural pesticide. Laboratory biomass combustion experiments showed that methyl bromide was emitted in the smoke from various fuels tested. Methyl bromide was also found in smoke plumes from wildfires in savannas, chaparral, and boreal forest. Global emissions of methyl bromide from biomass burning are estimated to be in the range of 10 to 50 gigagrams per year, which is comparable to the amount produced by ocean emission and pesticide use and represents a major contribution ([approximately]30 percent) to the stratospheric bromine budget.

  17. Methyl Ethyl Ketoxime; Final Test Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is issuing this final test rule under section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), requiring manufacturers and processors of methyl ethyl ketoxime (MEKO, CAS No. 96-29-7) to perform testing for health effects.

  18. Chirped Pulse Microwave Spectroscopy on Methyl Butanoate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Castillo, Alicia O.; Hays, Brian M.; Abeysekera, Chamara; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2016-06-01

    The microwave spectrum of methyl butanoate has been taken from 8-18 GHz using a chirped pulse spectrometer. This molecule is a model biofuel, and its thermal decomposition products are of interest due to its many dissociation channels. As a preliminary step before such pyrolysis studies, we have examined the jet cooled spectrum of methyl butanoate in a chirped pulse spectrometer, which shows a very rich spectrum. Several conformers have been identified, each with tunneling splittings in the methyl ester group due to internal rotation. These spectra have been fit to obtain rotational constants, relative populations, and methyl rotor barriers for each conformational isomer. The results of these studies are compared to high level calculations.

  19. Degradation of methyl bromide in anaerobic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G.; Strohmaler, F.E.

    1994-01-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) was anaerobically degraded in saltmarsh sediments after reaction with sulfide. The product of this nucleophilic substitution reaction was methanethiol, which underwent further chemical and bacterial reactions to form dimethyl sulfide. These two gases appeared transiently during sediment incubations because they were metabolized by methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A second, less significant reaction of MeBr was the exchange with chloride, forming methyl chloride, which was also susceptible to attack by sulfide. Incubation of 14C-labeled methyl iodide as an analogue of MeBr resulted in the formation of 14CH4 and 14CO2 and also indicated that sulfate-reducing bacteria as well as methanogens metabolized the methylated sulfur intermediates. These results suggest that exposed sediments with abundant free sulfide, such as coastal salt-marshes, may constitute a sink for atmospheric MeBr.

  20. A systematic comparison of quantitative high-resolution DNA methylation analysis and methylation-specific PCR

    PubMed Central

    Claus, Rainer; Wilop, Stefan; Hielscher, Thomas; Sonnet, Miriam; Dahl, Edgar; Galm, Oliver; Jost, Edgar; Plass, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of DNA methylation has become a critical factor for the identification, development and application of methylation based biomarkers. Here we describe a systematic comparison of a quantitative high-resolution mass spectrometry-based approach (MassARRAY), pyrosequencing and the broadly used methylation-specific PCR (MSP) technique analyzing clinically relevant epigenetically silenced genes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). By MassARRAY and pyrosequencing, we identified significant DNA methylation differences at the ID4 gene promoter and in the 5′ region of members of the SFRP gene family in 62 AML patients compared with healthy controls. We found a good correlation between data obtained by MassARRAY and pyrosequencing (correlation coefficient R2 = 0.88). MSP-based assessment of the identical samples showed less pronounced differences between AML patients and controls. By direct comparison of MSP-derived and MassARRAY-based methylation data as well as pyrosequencing, we could determine overestimation of DNA methylation data by MSP. We found sequence-context dependent highly variable cut-off values of quantitative DNA methylation values serving as discriminator for the two MSP methylation categories. Moreover, good agreements between quantitative methods and MSP could not be achieved for all investigated loci. Significant correlation of the quantitative assessment but not of MSP-derived methylation data with clinically important characteristics in our patient cohort demonstrated clinical relevance of quantitative DNA methylation assessment. Taken together, while MSP is still the most commonly applied technique for DNA methylation assessment, our data highlight advantages of quantitative approaches for precise characterization and reliable biomarker use of aberrant DNA methylation in primary patient samples, particularly. PMID:22647397

  1. DNA Methylation Profiling Reveals Correlation of Differential Methylation Patterns with Gene Expression in Human Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Fu, Xinwei; Peng, Xi; Xiao, Zheng; Li, Zhonggui; Chen, Guojun; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-05-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in regulating gene expression and has been reported to be related with epilepsy. This study aimed to define differential DNA methylation patterns in drug-refractory epilepsy patients and to investigate the role of DNA methylation in human epilepsy. We performed DNA methylation profiling in brain tissues from epileptic and control patients via methylated-cytosine DNA immunoprecipitation microarray chip. Differentially methylated loci were validated by bisulfite sequencing PCR, and the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of candidate genes were evaluated by reverse transcriptase PCR. We found 224 genes that showed differential DNA methylation between epileptic patients and controls. Among the seven candidate genes, three genes (TUBB2B, ATPGD1, and HTR6) showed relative transcriptional regulation by DNA methylation. TUBB2B and ATPGD1 exhibited hypermethylation and decreased mRNA levels, whereas HTR6 displayed hypomethylation and increased mRNA levels in the epileptic samples. Our findings suggest that certain genes become differentially regulated by DNA methylation in human epilepsy.