Science.gov

Sample records for methylmercury exposure immunofluorescent

  1. Health risks from increases in methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Mottet, N K; Shaw, C M; Burbacher, T M

    1985-01-01

    Our present knowledge of the human health effects of methylmercury exposure is derived from study of major outbreaks of human poisonings in Japan and Iraq and experimental studies on primates. Methylmercury readily passes through such physiological barriers as the blood-brain barrier, blood-testes barrier, and the placenta. Its major pathological effects are on the nervous and reproductive systems and the developing embryo/fetus. The neurotoxicity of methylmercury is well established in both humans and non-human primates. Lesions in the cerebral and cerebellar gray matter consist of necrosis and lysis of neurons, phagocytosis and gliosis. The changes are most prominent in the deep sulci and may have a vascular component. A late effect is cerebral atrophy. At high dose levels the liver, kidneys, and other organs may also have degenerative changes. Although not yet described in humans, a major effect of exposure of female primates is an adverse effect on pregnancy. Maternal female M. fascicularis blood mercury levels above 1 ppm are associated with a decreased pregnancy rate and increased abortion rate. To date our experimental data lack sufficient numbers to detect infrequent pregnancy effects below 1 ppm. Preliminary studies also reveal that methylmercury may also decrease the number and function (swim speed) of sperm. Both human and primate studies demonstrate deleterious effects of methylmercury on the developing embryo/fetus. Autopsies on human and primate infants reveal retarded brain development and the occurrence of a cerebral palsy-like behavior in the newborns, whereas the mother may be free of signs and symptoms of methylmercury toxicity. The fetal blood level of mercury is higher than the maternal level.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 5. PMID:3908085

  2. Neurobehavioral effects of developmental methylmercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, S.G.; Grant-Webster, K.S.

    1995-09-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a global environmental problem and is listed by the International Program of Chemical Safety as one of the six most dangerous chemicals in the world`s environment. Human exposure to MeHg primarily occurs through the consumption of contaminated food such as fish, although catastrophic exposures due to industrial pollution have occurred. The fetus is particularly sensitive to MeHg exposure and adverse effects on infant development have been associated with levels of exposure that result in few, if any, signs of maternal clinical illness or toxicity. High levels of prenatal exposure in humans result in neurobehavioral effects such as cerebral palsy and severe mental retardation. Prenatal exposure to MeHg in communities with chronic low-level exposure is related to decreased birthweight and early sensorimotor dysfunction such as delayed onset of walking. Neurobehavioral alterations have also been documented in studies with non human primates and rodents. Available information on the developmental neurotoxic effects of MeHg, particularly the neurobehavioral effects, indicates that the fetus and infant are more sensitive to adverse effects of MEHg. It is therefore recommended that pregnant women and women of childbearing age be strongly advised to limit their exposure to potential sources of MeHg. Based on results from human and animal studies on the developmental neurotoxic effects of methylmercury, the accepted reference dose should be lowered to 0.025 to 0.06 MeHg {mu}g/kg/day. Continued research on the neurotoxic effects associated with low level developmental exposure is needed. 107 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Reducing uncertainty in risk modeling for methylmercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, R.; Egeland, G.; Middaugh, J.; Lee, R.

    1995-12-31

    The biomagnification and bioaccumulation of methylmercury in marine species represents a challenge for risk assessment related to the consumption of subsistence foods in Alaska. Because of the profound impact that food consumption advisories have on indigenous peoples seeking to preserve a way of life, there is a need to reduce uncertainty in risk assessment. Thus, research was initiated to reduce the uncertainty in assessing the health risks associated with the consumption of subsistence foods. Because marine subsistence foods typically contain elevated levels of methylmercury, preliminary research efforts have focused on methylmercury as the principal chemical of concern. Of particular interest are the antagonistic effects of selenium on methylmercury toxicity. Because of this antagonism, methylmercury exposure through the consumption of marine mammal meat (with high selenium) may not be as toxic as comparable exposures through other sources of dietary intake, such as in the contaminated bread episode of Iraq (containing relatively low selenium). This hypothesis is supported by animal experiments showing reduced toxicity of methylmercury associated with marine mammal meat, by the antagonistic influence of selenium on methylmercury toxicity, and by negative clinical findings in adult populations exposed to methylmercury through a marine diet not subject to industrial contamination. Exploratory model development is underway to identify potential improvements and applications of current deterministic and probabilistic models, particularly by incorporating selenium as an antagonist in risk modeling methods.

  4. Neurotoxicity from prenatal and postnatal exposure to methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Philippe; Weihe, Pal; Debes, Frodi; Choi, Anna L.; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2014-01-01

    The extent to which postnatal methylmercury exposure contributes to neurobehavioral delays is uncertain. Confounding may occur because the child's dietary exposure likely correlates with the mother's. This conundrum was examined in the Faroese birth cohort 1 born in 1986–1987. Exposure parameters included mercury concentrations in maternal hair at parturition, cord blood, and child blood and hair at the age-7 clinical examination (N = 923). In regression analyses, the child's current blood-mercury at age 7 (N = 694) showed only weak associations with the neuropsychological test variables, but visuospatial memory revealed a significant negative association. Mutual adjustment caused decreases of the apparent effect of the prenatal exposure. However, such adjustment may lead to underestimations due to the presence of correlated, error-prone exposure variables. In structural equation models, all methylmercury exposure parameters were instead entered into a latent exposure variable that reflected the total methylmercury load. This latent exposure showed significant associations with neurodevelopmental deficits, with prenatal exposure providing the main information. However, postnatal methylmercury exposure appeared to contribute to neurotoxic effects, in particular in regard to visuospatial processing and memory. Thus, addition in the regression analysis of exposure information obtained at a different point in time was not informative and should be avoided. Further studies with better information on exposure profiles are needed to characterize the effects of postnatal methylmercury exposure. PMID:24681285

  5. Rice methylmercury exposure and mitigation: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Sarah E; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Creswell, Joel E

    2014-08-01

    Rice cultivation practices from field preparation to post-harvest transform rice paddies into hot spots for microbial mercury methylation, converting less-toxic inorganic mercury to more-toxic methylmercury, which is likely translocated to rice grain. This review includes 51 studies reporting rice total mercury and/or methylmercury concentrations, based on rice (Orzya sativa) cultivated or purchased in 15 countries. Not surprisingly, both rice total mercury and methylmercury levels were significantly higher in polluted sites compared to non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p<0.001). However, rice percent methylmercury (of total mercury) did not differ statistically between polluted and non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p=0.35), suggesting comparable mercury methylation rates in paddy soil across these sites and/or similar accumulation of mercury species for these rice cultivars. Studies characterizing the effects of rice cultivation under more aerobic conditions were reviewed to determine the mitigation potential of this practice. Rice management practices utilizing alternating wetting and drying (instead of continuous flooding) caused soil methylmercury levels to spike, resulting in a strong methylmercury pulse after fields were dried and reflooded; however, it is uncertain whether this led to increased translocation of methylmercury from paddy soil to rice grain. Due to the potential health risks, it is advisable to investigate this issue further, and to develop separate water management strategies for mercury polluted and non-polluted sites, in order to minimize methylmercury exposure through rice ingestion.

  6. Rice methylmercury exposure and mitigation: a comprehensive review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rothenberg, Sarah E.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Creswell, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Rice cultivation practices from field preparation to post-harvest transform rice paddies into hot spots for microbial mercury methylation, converting less-toxic inorganic mercury to more-toxic methylmercury, which is likely translocated to rice grain. This review includes 51 studies reporting rice total mercury and/or methylmercury concentrations, based on rice (Orzya sativa) cultivated or purchased in 15 countries. Not surprisingly, both rice total mercury and methylmercury levels were significantly higher in polluted sites compared to non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p<0.001). However, rice percent methylmercury (of total mercury) did not differ statistically between polluted and non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p=0.35), suggesting comparable mercury methylation rates in paddy soil across these sites and/or similar accumulation of mercury species for these rice cultivars. Studies characterizing the effects of rice cultivation under more aerobic conditions were reviewed to determine the mitigation potential of this practice. Rice management practices utilizing alternating wetting and drying (instead of continuous flooding) caused soil methylmercury levels to spike, resulting in a strong methylmercury pulse after fields were dried and reflooded; however, it is uncertain whether this led to increased translocation of methylmercury from paddy soil to rice grain. Due to the potential health risks, it is advisable to investigate this issue further, and to develop separate water management strategies for mercury polluted and non-polluted sites, in order to minimize methylmercury exposure through rice ingestion.

  7. Rice Methylmercury Exposure and Mitigation: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Sarah E.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Creswell, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Rice cultivation practices from field preparation to post-harvest transform rice paddies into hot spots for microbial mercury methylation, converting less-toxic inorganic mercury to more-toxic methylmercury, which is likely translocated to rice grain. This review includes 51 studies reporting rice total mercury and/or methylmercury concentrations, based on rice cultivated or purchased in 15 countries. Not surprisingly, both rice total mercury and methylmercury levels were significantly higher in polluted sites compared to non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p<0.001). However, rice percent methylmercury (of total mercury) did not differ statistically between polluted and non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p=0.35), suggesting comparable mercury methylation rates in paddy soil across these sites and/or similar accumulation of mercury species for these rice cultivars. Studies characterizing the effect of rice cultivation under more aerobic conditions were reviewed to determine the mitigation potential of this practice. Rice management practices utilizing alternating wetting and drying (instead of continuous flooding) caused soil methylmercury levels to spike, resulting in a strong methylmercury pulse after fields were dried and reflooded; however, it is uncertain whether this led to increased translocation of methylmercury from paddy soil to rice grain. Due to the potential health risks, it is advisable to investigate this issue further, and to develop separate water management strategies for mercury polluted and non-polluted sites, which minimize methylmercury exposure through rice ingestion. PMID:24972509

  8. Rice methylmercury exposure and mitigation: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Sarah E; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Creswell, Joel E

    2014-08-01

    Rice cultivation practices from field preparation to post-harvest transform rice paddies into hot spots for microbial mercury methylation, converting less-toxic inorganic mercury to more-toxic methylmercury, which is likely translocated to rice grain. This review includes 51 studies reporting rice total mercury and/or methylmercury concentrations, based on rice (Orzya sativa) cultivated or purchased in 15 countries. Not surprisingly, both rice total mercury and methylmercury levels were significantly higher in polluted sites compared to non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p<0.001). However, rice percent methylmercury (of total mercury) did not differ statistically between polluted and non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p=0.35), suggesting comparable mercury methylation rates in paddy soil across these sites and/or similar accumulation of mercury species for these rice cultivars. Studies characterizing the effects of rice cultivation under more aerobic conditions were reviewed to determine the mitigation potential of this practice. Rice management practices utilizing alternating wetting and drying (instead of continuous flooding) caused soil methylmercury levels to spike, resulting in a strong methylmercury pulse after fields were dried and reflooded; however, it is uncertain whether this led to increased translocation of methylmercury from paddy soil to rice grain. Due to the potential health risks, it is advisable to investigate this issue further, and to develop separate water management strategies for mercury polluted and non-polluted sites, in order to minimize methylmercury exposure through rice ingestion. PMID:24972509

  9. Human milk as a source of methylmercury exposure in infants

    SciTech Connect

    Grandjean, P. ); Jorgensen, P.J. ); Weihe, P. )

    1994-01-01

    As methylmercury is excreted in human milk and infants are particularly susceptible to toxicity due to this compound, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible transfer of methylmercury to infants via breast-feeding. In a community with a high intake of seafood, 583 children from a birth cohort were followed. The duration of nursing was recorded, and hair samples were obtained for mercury analysis at approximately 12 months of age. The hair mercury concentrations increased with the length of the nursing period, and those nursed throughout the first year showed the highest geometric mean (9.0 nmol/g or 1.8 [mu]g/g). Human milk therefore seems to be an important source of methylmercury exposure in infants. As increasing time interval from weaning to hair sample collection was not associated with any detectable decrease in mercury concentrations. A slow or absent elimination of methylmercury during the first year after birth could explain this finding. In certain fishing communities, infants nursed for long periods may be at increased risk of developing methylmercury toxicity. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Exposures of dental professionals to elemental mercury and methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Jaclyn M; Chou, Hwai-Nan; Gruninger, Stephen E; Franzblau, Alfred; Basu, Niladri

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) exposure, a worldwide public health concern, predominantly takes two forms--methylmercury from fish consumption and elemental Hg from dental amalgam restorations. We recruited 630 dental professionals from an American Dental Association meeting to assess Hg body burden and primary sources of exposure in a dually exposed population. Participants described occupational practices and fish consumption patterns via questionnaire. Hg levels in biomarkers of elemental Hg (urine) and methylmercury (hair and blood) were measured with a Direct Mercury Analyzer-80 and were higher than the general US population. Geometric means (95% CI) were 1.28 (1.19-1.37) μg/l in urine, 0.60 (0.54-0.67) μg/g in hair and 3.67 (3.38-3.98) μg/l in blood. In multivariable linear regression, personal amalgams predicted urine Hg levels along with total years in dentistry, amalgams handled, working hours and sex. Fish consumption patterns predicted hair and blood Hg levels, which were higher among Asians compared with Caucasians. Five species contributed the majority of the estimated Hg intake from fish--swordfish, fresh tuna, white canned tuna, whitefish and king mackerel. When studying populations with occupational exposure to Hg, it is important to assess environmental exposures to both elemental Hg and methylmercury as these constitute a large proportion of total exposure. PMID:26329138

  11. Behavioral effects of developmental methylmercury drinking water exposure in rodents.

    PubMed

    Bisen-Hersh, Emily B; Farina, Marcelo; Barbosa, Fernando; Rocha, Joao B T; Aschner, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Early methylmercury (MeHg) exposure can have long-lasting consequences likely arising from impaired developmental processes, the outcome of which has been exposed in several longitudinal studies of affected populations. Given the large number of newborns at an increased risk of learning disabilities associated with in utero MeHg exposure, it is important to study neurobehavioral alterations using ecologically valid and physiologically relevant models. This review highlights the benefits of using the MeHg drinking water exposure paradigm and outlines behavioral outcomes arising from this procedure in rodents. Combination treatments that exacerbate or ameliorate MeHg-induced effects, and possible molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral impairment are also discussed.

  12. Assessing Sources of Human Methylmercury Exposure Using Stable Mercury Isotopes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Seafood consumption is the primary route of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure for most populations. Inherent uncertainties in dietary survey data point to the need for an empirical tool to confirm exposure sources. We therefore explore the utility of Hg stable isotope ratios in human hair as a new method for discerning MeHg exposure sources. We characterized Hg isotope fractionation between humans and their diets using hair samples from Faroese whalers exposed to MeHg predominantly from pilot whales. We observed an increase of 1.75‰ in δ202Hg values between pilot whale muscle tissue and Faroese whalers’ hair but no mass-independent fractionation. We found a similar offset in δ202Hg between consumed seafood and hair samples from Gulf of Mexico recreational anglers who are exposed to lower levels of MeHg from a variety of seafood sources. An isotope mixing model was used to estimate individual MeHg exposure sources and confirmed that both Δ199Hg and δ202Hg values in human hair can help identify dietary MeHg sources. Variability in isotopic signatures among coastal fish consumers in the Gulf of Mexico likely reflects both differences in environmental sources of MeHg to coastal fish and uncertainty in dietary recall data. Additional data are needed to fully refine this approach for individuals with complex seafood consumption patterns. PMID:24967674

  13. Human exposure to methylmercury from crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qian; Greenfield, Ben K; Dang, Fei; Zhong, Huan

    2016-02-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in aquatic food raises global concerns about human exposure to MeHg. Crayfish is the world's third largest farmed crustacean species and a favorite aquatic food in many countries. However, human health hazard due to MeHg exposure via crayfish consumption is unclear, partly because appropriate survey data are lacking. We report on mercury concentrations and speciation in edible tail muscle of crayfish collected from restaurants in 23 Chinese cities. On average, MeHg constituted 99.1 % of mercury in tail muscle, and MeHg concentrations were comparable with those reported for fish in China. Variation in MeHg concentrations was not attributable to broad geographic region (i.e., provinces) or tail length. For different populations, potential health risk (characterized by hazard quotient or HQ) of MeHg exposure through crayfish consumption depended largely on crayfish consumption rates. In particular, a health hazard (HQ > 1) was found for high-rate consumers (i.e., 95 %ile or higher) in some cities in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLYR), during the peak consumption season. Our results suggest that more attention should be paid to dietary MeHg intake via crayfish consumption in China, particularly for communities with high consumption in MLYR.

  14. Methylmercury exposure associated with reduced productivity in common loons.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Neil M; Meyer, Michael W

    2008-02-01

    Methylmercury can impair the reproduction of fish-eating wildlife. We measured lake pH, mercury (Hg) concentrations in small fish, blood Hg levels in adult male, female and juvenile common loons, and loon productivity from 120 lakes in Wisconsin, USA and New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada (Maritimes). Mean lake pH was higher in Wisconsin than in the Maritimes. Body masses of adult loons and Hg concentrations in the blood of loons and in small fish were greater in the Maritimes. Hg levels in fish increased with lake acidity. Abundance of small fish increased in acidic lakes in the Maritimes. Blood Hg concentrations in adult and juvenile loons decreased with lake pH and increased with Hg levels in fish prey. Hg levels in male, female and juvenile loons were 22, 16 and 2.3 times greater than those in small fish. Loon Hg exposure, measured either as Hg levels in female loon blood or in fish prey, appeared to impose an upper limit on loon productivity. Loon productivity decreased as Hg exposure increased. Quantile regression analysis indicated that maximum observed loon productivity dropped 50% when fish Hg levels were 0.21 ug/g (wet wt), and failed completely when fish Hg concentrations were 0.41 ug/g.

  15. Maternal fish consumption and prenatal methylmercury exposure: a review.

    PubMed

    Al-Ardhi, Fatma Mohammed Mahfoodh; Al-Ani, Majeed Rasheed

    2008-01-01

    The benefits of fish consumption have been known to be the prevention of certain heart disease, neurological disorders and a very important role in fetal brain development. However there has been, in the past, certain doubts on whether fish should be classified as a beneficial meat source as part of a pregnant woman's diet as it has been documented that fish contains harmful substances that could effect a child's cognitive and neuro development. Methylmercury (MeHg), in particular, has been singled out. As it turned-out, with the use of numerous literature reviews, MeHg is not as dangerous as we have been led to believe. It has been suggested that even during neonatal exposure to MeHg as a result of maternal fish consumption one can reverse the harmful effects of MeHg if, after birth, the child is exposed to a favorable environment and a nutritious diet. The role of antioxidants is also important as they can help in reducing the harmful effects of MeHg if administered in sufficient amounts during pregnancy. There are also many fish types that should be avoided during pregnancy, particularly predatory and dark-meat fish as they are associated with high amounts of MeHg. This review shows that the benefits of maternal fish consumption during pregnancy can outweigh the harmful effects of neonatal MeHg exposure.

  16. Selenomethionine reduces visual deficits due to developmental methylmercury exposures

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Daniel N.; Connaughton, Victoria P.; Dellinger, John A.; Klemer, David; Udvadia, Ava; Carvan, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Developmental exposures to methylmercury (MeHg) have life-long behavioral effects. Many micronutrients, including selenium, are involved in cellular defenses against oxidative stress and may reduce the severity of MeHg-induced deficits. Zebrafish embryos (<4 hours post fertilization, hpf) were exposed to combinations of 0.0-0.30 μM MeHg and/or selenomethionine (SeMet) until 24 hpf then placed in clean medium. Fish were tested as adults under low light conditions (~60 μW/m2) for visual responses to a rotating black bar. Dose-dependent responses to MeHg exposure were evident (ANOVA, P<0.001) as evidenced by reduced responsiveness, whereas SeMet did not induce deficits except at 0.3 μM,. Ratios of SeMet:MeHg of 1:1 or 1:3 resulted in responses that were indistinguishable from controls (ANOVA, P<0.001). No gross histopathologies were observed (H&E stain) in the retina or optic tectum at any MeHg concentration. Whole-cell, voltage-gated, depolarization-elicited outward K+ currents of bipolar cells in intact retina of slices adult zebrafish were recorded and outward K+ current amplitude was larger in bipolar cells of MeHg-treated fish. This was due to the intense response of cells expressing the delayed rectifying IK current; cells expressing the transient IA current displayed a slight trend for smaller amplitude among MeHg-treated fish. Developmental co-exposure to SeMet reduced but did not eliminate the increase in the MeHg-induced IK response, however, IA responses increased significantly over MeHg-treated fish to match control levels. Electrophysiological deficits parallel behavioral patterns in MeHg-treated fish, i.e., initial reactions to the rotating bar were followed by periods of inactivity and then a resumption of responses. PMID:17905328

  17. Country-specific estimates of the incidence of intellectual disability associated with prenatal exposure to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, David C; O'Leary, Keri; Rainis, Holly; Gibb, Herman J

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes country-specific estimates of the incidence of intellectual disability in children associated with prenatal exposure to methylmercury. A systematic review was undertaken to identify country-specific data on hair mercury concentrations in women of reproductive age. A variety of approaches were used to estimate biomarker concentrations for countries lacking such data. A dose-effect relationship derived on the basis of the data from three large prospective studies relating prenatal methylmercury exposure to IQ in children was used to estimate the country-specific incidences of mild, moderate, severe, and profound intellectual disability in children as a result of prenatal methylmercury exposure. The incidence of methylmercury-associated mild intellectual disability (IQ scores 50-70) varied nearly 40-fold across countries, with the greatest incidences generally in countries that are islands or that are coastal. Countries with high birth rates and greater consumption of foods that contribute most to methylmercury intake in humans (seafood, rice) can be expected to make the largest contributions to the worldwide burden of disease associated with methylmercury. The assumptions and limitations of the estimates are discussed. PMID:26874048

  18. [Methylmercury exposure in the general population; toxicokinetics; differences by gender, nutritional and genetic factors].

    PubMed

    González-Estecha, Montserrat; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Guillén-Pérez, José Jesús; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Ordóñez-Iriarte, José M; Trasobares-Iglesias, Elena M; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Martínez-Álvarez, Jesús Román; Farré-Rovira, Rosaura; Herráiz-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txantón; Calvo-Manuel, Elpidio; Sáinz-Martín, María; Bretón-Lesmes, Irene; Prieto-Menchero, Santiago; Llorente-Ballesteros, M Teresa; Martínez-García, M José; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; García-Donaire, José Antonio; Cuadrado-Cenzual, M Ángeles; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Arroyo-Fernández, Manuel; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso

    2014-11-01

    Mercury is an environmental toxicant that causes numerous adverse effects on human health and natural ecosystems. The factors that determine the existance of adverse effects, as well as their severity are, among others: the chemical form of mercury (elemental, inorganic, organic), dosis, age, period of exposure, pathways of exposure and environmental, nutritional and genetic factors. In the aquatic cycle of mercury, once it has been deposited, it is transformed into methylmercury due to the action of certain sulphate-reducing bacteria, which bioaccumulates in the aquatic organisms and moves into the food chain. The methylmercury content of large, long-lived fish such as swordfish, shark, tuna or marlin, is higher. Methylmercury binds to protein in fish and is therefore not eliminated by cleaning or cooking the fish. Fetuses and small children are more vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of methylmercury from the consumption of contaminated fish. Methylmercury is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and crosses the blood-brain barrier and the placenta. The intake of certain dietary components such as polyunsaturated fatty acids, selenium, fiber, thiol compounds, certain phytochemicals and other nutrients can modify methylmercury bioaccesibility and its toxicity. Apart from environmental factors, genetic factors can influence mercury toxicity and explain part of the individual vulnerability.

  19. [Methylmercury exposure in the general population; toxicokinetics; differences by gender, nutritional and genetic factors].

    PubMed

    González-Estecha, Montserrat; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Guillén-Pérez, José Jesús; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Ordóñez-Iriarte, José M; Trasobares-Iglesias, Elena M; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Martínez-Álvarez, Jesús Román; Farré-Rovira, Rosaura; Herráiz-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txantón; Calvo-Manuel, Elpidio; Sáinz-Martín, María; Bretón-Lesmes, Irene; Prieto-Menchero, Santiago; Llorente-Ballesteros, M Teresa; Martínez-García, M José; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; García-Donaire, José Antonio; Cuadrado-Cenzual, M Ángeles; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Arroyo-Fernández, Manuel; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is an environmental toxicant that causes numerous adverse effects on human health and natural ecosystems. The factors that determine the existance of adverse effects, as well as their severity are, among others: the chemical form of mercury (elemental, inorganic, organic), dosis, age, period of exposure, pathways of exposure and environmental, nutritional and genetic factors. In the aquatic cycle of mercury, once it has been deposited, it is transformed into methylmercury due to the action of certain sulphate-reducing bacteria, which bioaccumulates in the aquatic organisms and moves into the food chain. The methylmercury content of large, long-lived fish such as swordfish, shark, tuna or marlin, is higher. Methylmercury binds to protein in fish and is therefore not eliminated by cleaning or cooking the fish. Fetuses and small children are more vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of methylmercury from the consumption of contaminated fish. Methylmercury is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and crosses the blood-brain barrier and the placenta. The intake of certain dietary components such as polyunsaturated fatty acids, selenium, fiber, thiol compounds, certain phytochemicals and other nutrients can modify methylmercury bioaccesibility and its toxicity. Apart from environmental factors, genetic factors can influence mercury toxicity and explain part of the individual vulnerability. PMID:25365001

  20. Effect of mercuric chloride and methylmercury chloride exposure on tissue concentrations of six essential minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Bogden, J.D.; Kemp, F.W.; Troiano, R.A.; Jortner, B.S.; Timpone, C.; Giuliani, D.

    1980-04-01

    There are few data on the effects of mercury exposure on tissue concentrations of essential minerals. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to mercuric chloride and methylmercury chloride administered via the drinking water. Subsequently, the kidneys, spleen, liver, and brain were analyzed for mercury, calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, and zinc by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Significant differences from controls were found for brain copper, kidney copper, and kidney zinc in the mercuric chloride-exposed animals; and for brain iron, kidney copper, kidney iron, kidney magnesium, spleen magnesium, and liver manganese in the methylmercury chloride-exposed rats. There was a fivefold higher mean kidney copper concentration in the mercuric chloride-exposed group; this may be related to the induction of renal metallothionein synthesis by mercury. Increased kidney copper may be a manifestation of heavy metal-induced renal toxicity. Both inorganic and methylmercury exposure produce significant changes in tissue concentrations of some essential minerals.

  1. [Fish and seafood as a source of human exposure to methylmercury].

    PubMed

    Mania, Monika; Wojciechowska-Mazurek, Maria; Starska, Krystyna; Rebeniak, Małgorzata; Postupolski, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Fish and seafood are recommended diet constituents providing high quality protein, vitamins, minerals and omega-3 fatty acids, mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). However, these foodstuffs can also be the major source ofmethylmercury intake in humans. In general, more than 90% of the mercury in fish is found as methylmercury, but contents of methylmercury can vary considerably between species. Predatory species that are at the top of the food chain and live a long time, may accumulate higher levels of methylmercury. This paper contains information about sources of human exposure to organic compounds of mercury, toxicity, metabolism and transformation of mercury in the environment. Assessment of methylmercury by international risk assessment bodies such as the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) and U.S. National Research Council (NRC) were presented. Climate changes and their influence on the mercury cycle in the environment especially mercury methylation and concentrations of methylmercury in marine species were also presented. Consumer advice prepared by European Commission and Member States as regards consumption of predatory fishes such as swordfish, tuna, shark, marlin and pike, taking into account the most vulnerable groups of population e.g. women planning pregnancy, pregnant or breastfeeding women and children were presented. Mercury and methylmercury contamination of fishes and seafood on the basis of the literature references as well as intake of mercury with fish and fish products in Poland and other European country were discussed. The role of selenium as a factor which counteracts methylmercury toxicity and protects against some neurological effects of methylmercury exposure in humans, as well as information on potential etiological factors connected with autism disorder were also described. Attention has also been drawn to increasing number of notifications to Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed

  2. Patterns and Consequences of in ovo Exposure to Methylmercury in Common Loons, poster presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical component of a common loon/mercury (Hg) risk assessment model under development is the determination of the concentration of Hg in eggs that poses a population level risk. We conducted a field study to (1) characterize in ovo methylmercury (MeHg) exposure in Wisconsin...

  3. [Consensus document on the prevention of exposure to methylmercury in Spain].

    PubMed

    González-Estecha, Montserrat; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Guillén-Pérez, José Jesús; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Álvarez, Jesús Román; Herráiz-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Ordóñez-Iriarte, José M; Sáinz-Martín, María; Farré-Rovira, Rosaura; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txantón; García-Donaire, José Antonio; Calvo-Manuel, Elpidio; Bretón-Lesmes, Irene; Prieto-Menchero, Santiago; Llorente-Ballesteros, M Teresa; Martínez-García, M José; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Cuadrado-Cenzual, María Ángeles; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; Blanco Fuentes, María; Torres-Moreno, Miriam; Trasobares-Iglesias, Elena M; Barceló Martín, Bernardino; Arroyo-Fernández, Manuel; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso

    2014-11-21

    The beneficial effects of fish consumption in both children and adults are well known. However, the intake of methylmercury, mainly from contaminated fish and shellfish, can have adverse health effects. The study group on the prevention of exposure to methylmercury (GEPREM-Hg), made up of representatives from different Spanish scientific societies, has prepared a consensus document in a question and answer format, containing the group's main conclusions, recommendations and proposals. The objective of the document is to provide broader knowledge of factors associated with methylmercury exposure, its possible effects on health among the Spanish population, methods of analysis, interpretation of the results and economic costs, and to then set recommendations for fish and shellfish consumption. The group sees the merit of all initiatives aimed at reducing or prohibiting the use of mercury as well as the need to be aware of the results of contaminant analyses performed on fish and shellfish marketed in Spain. In addition, the group believes that biomonitoring systems should be set up in order to follow the evolution of methylmercury exposure in children and adults and perform studies designed to learn more about the possible health effects of concentrations found in the Spanish population, ta king into account the lifestyle, eating patterns and the Mediterranean diet.

  4. [Consensus document on the prevention of exposure to methylmercury in Spain].

    PubMed

    González-Estecha, Montserrat; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Guillén-Pérez, José Jesús; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Álvarez, Jesús Román; Herráiz-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Ordóñez-Iriarte, José M; Sáinz-Martín, María; Farré-Rovira, Rosaura; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txantón; García-Donaire, José Antonio; Calvo-Manuel, Elpidio; Bretón-Lesmes, Irene; Prieto-Menchero, Santiago; Llorente-Ballesteros, M Teresa; Martínez-García, M José; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Cuadrado-Cenzual, María Ángeles; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; Blanco Fuentes, María; Torres-Moreno, Miriam; Trasobares-Iglesias, Elena M; Barceló Martín, Bernardino; Arroyo-Fernández, Manuel; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial effects of fish consumption in both children and adults are well known. However, the intake of methylmercury, mainly from contaminated fish and shellfish, can have adverse health effects. The study group on the prevention of exposure to methylmercury (GEPREM-Hg), made up of representatives from different Spanish scientific societies, has prepared a consensus document in a question and answer format, containing the group's main conclusions, recommendations and proposals. The objective of the document is to provide broader knowledge of factors associated with methylmercury exposure, its possible effects on health among the Spanish population, methods of analysis, interpretation of the results and economic costs, and to then set recommendations for fish and shellfish consumption. The group sees the merit of all initiatives aimed at reducing or prohibiting the use of mercury as well as the need to be aware of the results of contaminant analyses performed on fish and shellfish marketed in Spain. In addition, the group believes that biomonitoring systems should be set up in order to follow the evolution of methylmercury exposure in children and adults and perform studies designed to learn more about the possible health effects of concentrations found in the Spanish population, ta king into account the lifestyle, eating patterns and the Mediterranean diet. PMID:25561095

  5. Methylmercury content of eggs in yellow perch related to maternal exposure in four Wisconsin lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammerschmidt, Chad R.; Wiener, James G.; Frazier, Brdaley E.; Rada, Ronald G.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the influence of maternal mercury and selected lacustrine variables on the mercury content of eggs from yellow perch (Perca flavescens). Total mercury, methylmercury, and inorganic mercury were determined in eggs and carcasses (less eggs) from three seepage lakes with a pH range of 6.1a??7.0 and a fourth lake in which pH was experimentally increased from 5.5 to 6.8 by addition of alkaline groundwater. The concentration of total mercury in eggs was strongly correlated with that in the maternal carcass. Concentrations and burdens of mercury in eggs and carcasses were inversely correlated with lake water pH, acid-neutralizing capacity, calcium, and dissolved organic carbon. In eggs containing more than 30 ng/g dry weight (4.5 ng/g wet weight) of total mercury, methylmercury averaged 91% of total mercury and ranged from 85% to 96%. Mean burdens of total mercury in individual eggs varied greatly among lakes (range, 2.3a??63 pg), and the egg mass averaged 1.9% of the whole-body burden. We conclude that exposure of the developing yellow perch embryo to methylmercury is strongly affected by maternal bioaccumulation, which can vary substantially among and within lakes; however, the toxicological significance of the observed exposure of embryos to methylmercury is unclear.

  6. Methylmercury content of eggs in yellow perch related to maternal exposure in four Wisconsin lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerschmidt, C.R.; Frazier, B.E.; Rada, R.G.; Wiener, J.G.

    1999-04-01

    The authors examined the influence of maternal mercury and selected lacustrine variables on the mercury content of eggs from yellow perch (Perca flavescens). Total mercury, methylmercury, and inorganic mercury were determined in eggs and carcasses (less eggs) from three seepage lakes with a pH range of 6.1--7.0 and a fourth lake in which pH was experimentally increased from 5.5 to 6.8 by addition of alkaline groundwater. The concentration of total mercury in eggs was strongly correlated with that in the material carcass. Concentrations and burdens of mercury in eggs and carcasses were inversely correlated with lake water pH, acid-neutralizing capacity, calcium, and dissolved organic carbon. In eggs containing more than 30 ng/g dry weight of total mercury, methylmercury averaged 91% of total mercury and ranged from 85% to 96%. Mean burdens of total mercury in individual eggs varied greatly among lakes and the egg mass averaged 1.9% of the whole-body burden. The authors conclude that exposure of the developing yellow perch embryo to methylmercury is strongly affected by maternal bioaccumulation, which can vary substantially among and within lakes; however, the toxicological significance of the observed exposure of embryos to methylmercury is unclear.

  7. Functional consequences of prenatal methylmercury exposure: effects on renal and hepatic responses to trophic stimuli and on renal excretory mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Kavlock, R.J.; Cowdery, T.; Orband, L.; Bartolome, M.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of prenatal exposure to methylmercury on the functional development of renal and hepatic response systems was examined in the developing rat. Methylmercury produced an elevation of basal activity of renal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, an enzyme involved in regulation of cellular maturation) and an eventual relative hypertrophy; liver ODC was reduced and hypertrophy was not evident. In contrast, the reactivity of liver ODC to trophic stimulants (vasopressin, isoproterenol) was markedly enhanced by prenatal methylmercury exposure, whereas renal ODC responses were much less affected (vasopressin) or actually reduced (isoproterenol). Targeted actions of methylmercury on renal excretory function were also prominent, with increased fractional excretions urea and electrolytes and an eventual reduction in glomerular filtration as assessed by creatinine clearance. These studies show that doses of methylmercury ordinarily associated with selective actions on development of neurobehavioral patterns also influence the functional ontogeny of other organ systems; furthermore, the fact that the target tissues are different for prenatal vs postnatal methylmercury exposure, indicates that the functional teratology of methylmercury exhibits critical periods of sensitivity.

  8. Alterations in the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) hepatic thiol-proteome after methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, O A; Sheehan, D; Goksøyr, A

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic studies in general have demonstrated that the most effective and thorough analysis of biological samples requires subfractionation and/or enrichment prior to downstream processing. In the present study, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) liver samples were fractionated using activated thiol sepharose to isolate hepatic proteins containing free/reactive cysteines. This subset of proteins is of special interest when studying the physiological effects attributed to methylmercury (MeHg) exposure. Methylmercury is a persistent environmental contaminant that has a potent affinity toward thiol groups, and can directly bind proteins via available cysteine residues. Further, alterations in the cod thiol-proteome following MeHg exposure (2 mg/kg body weight) were explored with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with downstream mass spectrometry analyses for protein identifications. Thirty-five protein spots were found to respond to MeHg exposure, and 13 of these were identified when searching cod-specific databases with acquired mass spectrometry data. Among the identified thiol-containing proteins, some are known to respond to MeHg treatment, including constituents of the cytoskeleton, and proteins involved in oxidative stress responses, protein synthesis, protein folding, and energy metabolism. Methylmercury also appeared to affect cod heme metabolism/turnover, producing significantly altered levels of hemoglobin and hemopexin in liver following metal exposure. The latter finding suggests that MeHg may also affect the hematological system in Atlantic cod.

  9. Endocrine disruption in white ibises (Eudocimus albus) caused by exposure to environmentally relevant levels of methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Jayasena, Nilmini; Frederick, Peter C; Larkin, Iskande L V

    2011-10-01

    Methylmercury is a globally distributed pollutant and upper trophic level aquatic fauna are at particularly high risk of exposure. Although methylmercury is known to have a number of neurological and developmental effects, relatively little is known about effects on endocrine disruption and reproduction in aquatic fauna, particularly in response to chronic exposure at low concentrations. We experimentally exposed captive white ibises for 3.5 years (2005-2008) to dietary methylmercury at three environmentally relevant concentrations (0.05, 0.1 and 0.3 ppm wet weight in diet). We measured fecal concentrations of estradiol and testosterone metabolites in two consecutive breeding seasons (2007 and 2008). When effects were controlled for stage of breeding, this resulted in altered estradiol and testosterone concentrations in adult breeders of both sexes. Changes in endocrine expression were not consistent over both years, and a clear dose-response relationship was not always present. Endocrine changes were, however, associated at all dose levels with changes in reproductive behavior, reduced reproductive success and altered mate choice in males. Male-male pairing and altered courtship behavior in males were related both to dose treatment and, in 2008, to a demasculinized pattern of endocrine expression. Changes in hormone concentrations of dosed homosexually paired males, when present, were in the same direction but at a higher magnitude than those in heterosexual dosed males. Dosed homosexual males showed decreased testosterone during nest-building and elevated testosterone during incubation when compared with their dosed heterosexual counterparts during the 2008 breeding season. In the same year, exposed males had elevated estradiol during courtship, but had decreased estradiol during other stages in comparison with controls. Dosed females generally showed decreased estradiol and testosterone concentrations compared to controls, albeit not with a clear dose

  10. Relation of Prenatal Methylmercury Exposure from Environmental Sources to Childhood IQ

    PubMed Central

    Muckle, Gina; Ayotte, Pierre; Dewailly, Éric

    2015-01-01

    Background Although prenatal methylmercury exposure has been linked to poorer intellectual function in several studies, data from two major prospective, longitudinal studies yielded contradictory results. Associations with cognitive deficits were reported in a Faroe Islands cohort, but few were found in a study in the Seychelles Islands. It has been suggested that co-exposure to another contaminant, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), may be responsible for the positive findings in the former study and that co-exposure to nutrients in methylmercury-contaminated fish may have obscured and/or protected against adverse effects in the latter. Objectives We aimed to determine the degree to which co-exposure to PCBs may account for the adverse effects of methylmercury and the degree to which co-exposure to docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may obscure these effects in a sample of Inuit children in Arctic Québec. Methods IQ was estimated in 282 school-age children from whom umbilical cord blood samples had been obtained and analyzed for mercury and other environmental exposures. Results Prenatal mercury exposure was related to poorer estimated IQ after adjustment for potential confounding variables. The entry of DHA into the model significantly strengthened the association with mercury, supporting the hypothesis that beneficial effects from DHA intake can obscure adverse effects of mercury exposure. Children with cord mercury ≥ 7.5 μg/L were four times as likely to have an IQ score < 80, the clinical cut-off for borderline intellectual disability. Co-exposure to PCBs did not alter the association of mercury with IQ. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to document an association of prenatal mercury exposure with poorer performance on a school-age assessment of IQ, a measure whose relevance for occupational success in adulthood is well established. This association was seen at levels in the range within which many U.S. children of Asian-American background are

  11. Foodborne exposure to pesticides and methylmercury in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Christopher A; Krometis, Leigh-Anne H; Al-Harthi, Suaad S; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2012-03-01

    As part of a comprehensive environmental health strategic planning project initiated by the government of Abu Dhabi, we assessed potential dietary exposure in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to methylmercury (in seafood) and pesticides (in fruits and vegetables) above international guideline levels. We present results for the UAE population by age, gender, and body mass index. Our results show very low daily risks of exposure to pesticides in fruits and vegetables at levels exceeding WHO guidelines even under the conservative assumption that no pesticides are removed during washing and food preparation. Thus, exposure to pesticides on fruits and vegetables does not appear to be a major public health concern in the UAE. The chances of exposure to methylmercury in seafood are much higher; our model estimates a mean 1 in 5 daily risk of exceeding the FAO/WHO provisional tolerable weekly intake. However, great caution should be used in interpreting these results, as we analyzed only the risks and not the substantial benefits of fish consumption. In fact, previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish can increase IQ in developing children, and it can substantially decrease the risk in adults of coronary heart disease and stroke. Further research is warranted to compare the risk of Me-Hg exposure from fish to the nutritional benefits of fish consumption in the UAE and to determine appropriate methods to communicate risk and benefit information to the UAE population.

  12. The effect of methylmercury exposure on early central nervous system development in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo.

    PubMed

    Hassan, S A; Moussa, E A; Abbott, L C

    2012-09-01

    Much attention is focused on environmental contamination by heavy metals. The heavy metal mercury is found worldwide and is ranked number 3 on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act substance list. We examined the effect of low-level methylmercury exposure on central nervous system development of wild-type zebrafish embryos (ZFEs) of the AB strain because methylmercury is the most common form of mercury to which humans are exposed in the environment. ZFEs were exposed to nine different concentrations of methylmercury [0 (negative control), 5, 10, 50, 80, 100, 200, 500 and 1000 parts per billion (μg l(-1) )] starting at 6 h post-fertilization, which is the time the neural tube is first beginning to form. ZFEs were exposed to 2% ethanol as positive controls (100% embryonic death). ZFEs were assessed at 30, 54, 72 and 96 h post-fertilization for changes in embryonic development, mortality, time of hatching and morphological deformities. No abnormalities were observed in ZFEs exposed to 5 μg l(-1) methylmercury. The time of hatching from the chorion was delayed in ZFEs exposed to methylmercury concentrations of 50 μg l(-1) or higher. Significantly more ZFEs exposed to 0, 5 or 10 μg l(-1) methylmercury successfully completed hatching compared with ZFEs exposed to 50 μg l(-1) or higher methylmercury. ZFEs exposed to more than 200 μg l(-1) methylmercury exhibited 100% embryonic mortality. The rate of cell proliferation within the neural tube was significantly decreased in embryos exposed to 10, 50 and 80 μg l(-1) methylmercury and there were no differences between these doses.

  13. Motor impairment induced by oral exposure to methylmercury in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Marcelo O; Mantese, Carlos E; Anjos, Gabriel Dos; Souza, Diogo O; Farina, Marcelo

    2005-01-01

    The effects of oral exposure to methylmercury chloride (MeHg) on locomotor control and activity in adult mice were investigated in the present study. MeHg was diluted in drinking water (0, 20 and 40mg/L - as methylmercury chloride) and locomotion (spontaneous locomotor activity) and motor impairment tests (beam walking, footprint and clasping) were performed at 7, 14 and 21 days after the beginning of the treatment. MeHg exposure caused a significant decrease in spontaneous locomotor activity and this effect was dose- and time-dependent. Significant dose- and duration-dependent increases in beam walking latency were observed following chronic MeHg exposure. Furthermore, dose- and duration-dependent locomotor deficits on footprint coordination were also observed. Taken together, these results show that MeHg-induced impairment on locomotor activity is not limited to exposures that take place during neural development. We discuss the possible relationship between our findings and the similar clinical signs observed in adult humans exposed to MeHg. PMID:21783473

  14. Short-term effect of severe exposure to methylmercury on atherosclerotic heart disease and hypertension mortality in Minamata.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Sachiko; Yorifuji, Takashi; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2012-02-15

    Recent studies suggest potential adverse effects of methylmercury exposure on myocardial infarction and hypertension, although the evidence is still limited. We thus evaluated this association using age-standardized mortality ratios (ASMRs) in Minamata, where severe methylmercury poisoning had occurred. We obtained mortality data from annual vital statistics and demographic statistics from census. We then compared mortality of atherosclerotic heart disease including degenerative heart disease and hypertension in Minamata-city with those in Kumamoto Prefecture, which includes Minamata city, as a control. We estimated ASMRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) during the period from 1953 to 1970. ASMRs of atherosclerotic heart disease were continuously decreased during the period from 1953 to 1967. In contrast, the ASMR of hypertension was significantly elevated during the period from 1963 to 1967 (SMR=1.38, CI; 1.06-1.80); but they decreased later. Although dilution is present in this ecological study, our study supports the notion that methylmercury exposure induces hypertension. PMID:22277149

  15. Short-term effect of severe exposure to methylmercury on atherosclerotic heart disease and hypertension mortality in Minamata.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Sachiko; Yorifuji, Takashi; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2012-02-15

    Recent studies suggest potential adverse effects of methylmercury exposure on myocardial infarction and hypertension, although the evidence is still limited. We thus evaluated this association using age-standardized mortality ratios (ASMRs) in Minamata, where severe methylmercury poisoning had occurred. We obtained mortality data from annual vital statistics and demographic statistics from census. We then compared mortality of atherosclerotic heart disease including degenerative heart disease and hypertension in Minamata-city with those in Kumamoto Prefecture, which includes Minamata city, as a control. We estimated ASMRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) during the period from 1953 to 1970. ASMRs of atherosclerotic heart disease were continuously decreased during the period from 1953 to 1967. In contrast, the ASMR of hypertension was significantly elevated during the period from 1963 to 1967 (SMR=1.38, CI; 1.06-1.80); but they decreased later. Although dilution is present in this ecological study, our study supports the notion that methylmercury exposure induces hypertension.

  16. Effects of early life exposure to methylmercury in Daphnia pulex on standard and reduced food ration

    PubMed Central

    Doke, Dzigbodi A.; Hudson, Sherri L.; Dawson, John A.; Gohlke, Julia M.

    2015-01-01

    As a well-known eco-toxicological model organism, Daphnia pulex may also offer advantages in human health research for assessing long-term effects of early life exposures to coupled stressors. Here, we examine consequences of early life exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) under standard and reduced food ration. We exposed Daphnia for 24 h in early life to varying concentrations of methylmercury(II) chloride (0, 200, 400, 800 and 1600 ng/L) and thereafter kept Daphnia on either a standard or a reduced food ration. The data suggests an additive effect of MeHg concentration and food ration on decreasing lifespan, although MeHg concentration does not affect survival linearly. Food ration and MeHg concentration were predictive of reduced reproduction, and there is some evidence of an interaction (p = 0.048). Multi-stressor work in alternative model systems may be useful for prioritizing research, taking into account potential antagonistic, additive or synergistic effects that nutritional status may have on chemical toxicity. PMID:25263226

  17. Neurodevelopmental effects of maternal nutritional status and exposure to methylmercury from eating fish during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Philip W; Strain, J J; Myers, Gary J; Thurston, Sally W; Bonham, Maxine P; Shamlaye, Conrad F; Stokes-Riner, Abbie; Wallace, Julie M W; Robson, Paula J; Duffy, Emeir M; Georger, Lesley A; Sloane-Reeves, Jean; Cernichiari, Elsa; Canfield, Richard L; Cox, Christopher; Huang, Li Shan; Janciuras, Joanne; Clarkson, Thomas W

    2008-09-01

    Fish contain nutrients that promote optimal brain growth and development but also contain methylmercury (MeHg) that can have toxic effects. The present study tested the hypothesis that the intake of selected nutrients in fish or measures of maternal nutritional status may represent important confounders when estimating the effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure on child development. The study took place in the Republic of Seychelles, an Indian Ocean archipelago where fish consumption is high. A longitudinal cohort study design was used. A total of 300 mothers were enrolled early in pregnancy. Nutrients considered to be important for brain development were measured during pregnancy along with prenatal MeHg exposure. The children were evaluated periodically to age 30 months. There were 229 children with complete outcome and covariate data for analysis. The primary endpoint was the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II (BSID-II), administered at 9 and 30 months of age. Combinations of four secondary measures of infant cognition and memory were also given at 5, 9 and 25 months. Cohort mothers consumed an average of 537 g of fish (nine meals containing fish) per week. The average prenatal MeHg exposure was 5.9 ppm in maternal hair. The primary analysis examined the associations between MeHg, maternal nutritional measures and children's scores on the BSID-II and showed an adverse association between MeHg and the mean Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI) score at 30 months. Secondary analyses of the association between the PDI and only MeHg alone or nutritional factors alone showed only a borderline significant association between MeHg and the PDI at 30 months and no associations with nutritional factors. One experimental measure at 5 months of age was positively associated with iodine status, but not prenatal MeHg exposure. These findings suggest a possible confounding role of maternal nutrition in studies examining associations between prenatal MeHg exposures and

  18. Effects of methylmercury and alcohol exposure in Drosophila melanogaster: Potential risks in neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ved; Chauhan, Abha

    2016-06-01

    Extensive evidence suggests the role of oxidative stress in autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders. In this study, we investigated whether methylmercury (MeHg) and/or alcohol exposure has deleterious effects in Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies). A diet containing different concentrations of MeHg in Drosophila induced free radical generation and increased lipid peroxidation (markers of oxidative stress) in a dose-dependent manner. This effect of MeHg on oxidative stress was enhanced by further exposure to alcohol. It was observed that alcohol alone could also induce free radical generation in flies. After alcohol exposure, MeHg did not affect the immobilization of flies, but it increased the recovery time in a concentration-dependent manner. MeHg significantly inhibited the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) in a dose-dependent manner. Linear regression analysis showed a significant negative correlation between ADH activity and recovery time upon alcohol exposure in the flies fed a diet with MeHg. This relationship between ADH activity and recovery time after alcohol exposure was confirmed by adding 4-methyl pyrazole (an inhibitor of ADH) to the diet for the flies. These results suggest that consumption of alcohol by pregnant mothers who are exposed to MeHg may lead to increased oxidative stress and to increased length of time for alcohol clearance, which may have a direct impact on the development of the fetus, thereby increasing the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27151262

  19. Effects of methylmercury exposure on the immune function of juvenile common loons (Gavia immer)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenow, K.P.; Grasman, K.A.; Hines, R.K.; Meyer, M.W.; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, A.; Spalding, M.G.; Gray, B.R.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a dose-response laboratory study to quantify the level of exposure to dietary Hg, delivered as methylmercury chloride (CH3HgCl), that is associated with suppressed immune function in captive-reared common loon (Gavia immer) chicks. We used the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin test to assess T-lymphocyte function and the sheep red blood cell (SRBC) hemagglutination test to measure antibody-mediated immunity. The PHA stimulation index among chicks receiving dietary Hg treatment did not differ significantly from those of chicks on the control diet (p = 0.15). Total antibody (immunoglobulin [Ig] M [primary antibody] + IgG [secondary response]) production to the SRBC antigen in chicks treated with dietary methylmercury (MeHg), however, was suppressed (p = 0.04) relative to chicks on control diets. Analysis indicated suppression of total Ig production (p = 0.025 with comparisonwise ?? level = 0.017) between control and 0.4 ??g Hg/g wet food intake treatment groups. Furthermore, the control group exhibited a higher degree of variability in antibody response compared to the Hg groups, suggesting that in addition to reducing the mean response, Hg treatment reduced the normal variation attributable to other biological factors. We observed bursal lymphoid depletion in chicks receiving the 1.2 ??g Hg/g treatment (p = 0.017) and a marginally significant effect (p = 0.025) in chicks receiving the 0.4 ??g Hg/g diet. These findings suggest that common loon chick immune systems may be compromised at an ecologically relevant dietary exposure concentration (0.4 ??g Hg/g wet wt food intake). We also found that chicks hatched from eggs collected from low-pH lakes exhibited higher levels of lymphoid depletion in bursa tissue relative to chicks hatched from eggs collected from neutral-pH lakes. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  20. Elevated prenatal methylmercury exposure in Nigeria: evidence from maternal and cord blood.

    PubMed

    Obi, Ejeatuluchukwu; Okafor, Charles; Igwebe, Anthony; Ebenebe, Joy; Afonne, Onyenmechi Johnson; Ifediata, Francis; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere; Nriagu, Jerome O; Basu, Niladri

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury is a neurodevelopmental toxicant that is globally distributed though little is known about prenatal exposures in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of the current study was to measure total mercury levels in cord blood and maternal blood from 95 mother-newborn pairs recruited from hospitals in Nnewi, Nigeria. The secondary aims of the study were to explore if demographic and dietary factors were associated with blood mercury levels, and to explore if mercury levels were associated with any self-reported health outcome and childbirth outcome. Maternal blood mercury levels averaged 3.6 μg L(-1) and ranged from 1.1 μg L(-1) to 9.5 μg L(-1). Cord blood mercury averaged 5.1 μg L(-1) and ranged from 1.2 μg L(-1) to 10.6 μg L(-1). The mean ratio of mercury in paired cord blood to maternal blood was 1.5 and it ranged from 0.4 to 3.2. Mercury in maternal and cord blood were significantly correlated (r=0.471). More than one-third of mothers reported eating fish at least once per day, and a weak (p=0.08) fish consumption-related increase in blood mercury was found. Cord blood mercury was positively and significantly associated with birth weight and length, and head and chest circumference. Mercury levels in 36% of the participants exceeded the biomonitoring guideline associated with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) reference dose for mercury. The study shows that pregnant women and their newborns are exposed to methylmercury and that their exposures are higher compared to general populations sampled from other regions of the world. PMID:25112573

  1. Gene expression changes in female zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain in response to acute exposure to methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, Catherine A.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Martyniuk, Chris; Knoebl, Iris; Pope, Marie; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxicant and endocrine disruptor that accumulates in aquatic systems. Previous studies have shown suppression of hormone levels in both male and female fish, suggesting effects on gonadotropin regulation in the brain. The gene expression profile in adult female zebrafish whole brain induced by acute (96 h) MeHg exposure was investigated. Fish were exposed by injection to 0 or 0.5(mu or u)g MeHg/g. Gene expression changes in the brain were examined using a 22,000-feature zebrafish microarray. At a significance level of pexposure. Individual genes exhibiting altered expression in response to MeHg exposure implicate effects on glutathione metabolism in the mechanism of MeHg neurotoxicity. Gene ontology (GO) terms significantly enriched among altered genes included protein folding, cell redox homeostasis, and steroid biosynthetic process. The most affected biological functions were related to nervous system development and function, as well as lipid metabolism and molecular transport. These results support the involvement of oxidative stress and effects on protein structure in the mechanism of action of MeHg in the female brain. Future studies will compare the gene expression profile induced in response to MeHg with that induced by other toxicants and will investigate responsive genes as potential biomarkers of MeHg exposure.

  2. Developmental neurotoxicity: methylmercury and prenatal exposure protection in the context of the Minamata Convention.

    PubMed

    Boischio, Ana

    2015-09-01

    Mercury is a global pollutant of public environmental health concern due to its long-range atmospheric distribution, environmental distribution, and neurotoxic effects. Following biological methylation, methylmercury (MeHg) can be un-evenly bioaccumulated within aquatic food chains. Fish consumption can be a significant route of human exposure to MeHg. MeHg exposure in the prenatal stage, at relatively low levels, has recently been established as harmful during neurological development, potentially leading to intellectual disability. The Minamata Convention on Mercury is a global agreement, currently under ratification, to protect human health and the environment from anthropogenic emissions and releases of mercury and mercury compounds. The resolution regarding the role of the World Health Organization and ministries of health in the implementation of the Convention includes protection of human health from critical exposures to MeHg. Riverside populations living in areas with artisanal small-scale gold mining, and relying heavily on fish consumption, have been identified as the most vulnerable population in terms of MeHg exposure and developmental neurotoxicity. This article focuses on the proper design and dissemination of fish advisories within the context of implementation of the Convention. PMID:26758003

  3. Neurodevelopmental Effects of Maternal Nutritional Status and Exposure to Methylmercury from Eating Fish during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Philip W.; Strain, J.J.; Myers, Gary J.; Thurston, Sally W.; Bonham, Maxine P.; Shamlaye, Conrad F.; Stokes-Riner, Abbie; Wallace, Julie M.W.; Robson, Paula J.; Duffy, Emeir M.; Georger, Lesley A.; Sloane-Reeves, Jean; Cernichiari, Elsa; Canfield, Richard L.; Cox, Christopher; Huang, Li Shan; Janciuras, Joanne; Clarkson, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Fish contain nutrients that promote optimal brain growth and development but also contain methylmercury (MeHg) that can have toxic effects. The present study tested the hypothesis that the intake of selected nutrients in fish or measures of maternal nutritional status may represent important confounders when estimating the effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure on child development. The study took place in the Republic of Seychelles, an Indian Ocean archipelago where fish consumption is high. A longitudinal cohort study design was used. A total of 300 mothers were enrolled early in pregnancy. Nutrients considered to be important for brain development were measured during pregnancy along with prenatal MeHg exposure. The children were evaluated periodically to age 30 months. There were 229 children with complete outcome and covariate data for analysis. The primary endpoint was the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II (BSID-II), administered at 9 and 30 months of age. Combinations of four secondary measures of infant cognition and memory were also given at 5, 9 and 25 months. Cohort mothers consumed an average of 537 gm of fish (9 meals containing fish) per week. The average prenatal MeHg exposure was 5.9 ppm in maternal hair. The primary analysis examined the associations between MeHg, maternal nutritional measures and children’s scores on the BSID-II and showed an adverse association between MeHg and the mean Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI) score at 30 months. Secondary analyses of the association between the PDI and only MeHg alone or nutritional factors alone showed only a borderline significant association between MeHg and the PDI at 30 months and no associations with nutritional factors. One experimental measure at 5 months of age was positively associated with iodine status, but not prenatal MeHg exposure. These findings suggest a possible confounding role of maternal nutrition in studies examining associations between prenatal MeHg exposures and

  4. Methylmercury and nutrition: adult effects of fetal exposure in experimental models.

    PubMed

    Newland, M Christopher; Paletz, Elliott M; Reed, Miranda N

    2008-09-01

    Human exposure to the life-span developmental neurotoxicant, methylmercury (MeHg), is primarily via the consumption of fish or marine mammals. Fish are also excellent sources of important nutrients, including selenium and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Laboratory models of developmental MeHg exposure can be employed to assess the roles of nutrients and MeHg and to identify potential mechanisms of action if the appropriate exposure measures are used. When maternal exposure is protracted, relationships between daily intake and brain mercury are consistent and orderly across species, even when large differences in blood:brain ratios exist. It is well established that low-level developmental MeHg produces sensory deficits. Recent studies also show that perseveration in reversal-learning tasks occurs after gestational exposures that produce low micromolar concentrations in the brain. A no-effect level has not been identified for this effect. These exposures do not affect the acquisition or performance of discrimination learning, set shifting (extradimensional shift), or memory. Reversal-learning deficits may be related to enhanced impact of reinforcers as measured using progressive ratio reinforcement schedules, an effect that could result in perseveration. Also reported is enhanced sensitivity to dopamine reuptake inhibitors and diminished sensitivity to pentobarbital, a GABA(A) agonist. Diets rich in PUFAs or selenium do not protect against MeHg's effects on reversal learning but, by themselves, may diminish variability in performance, enhance attention or psychomotor function and may confer some protection against age-related deficits in these areas. It is hypothesized that altered reward processing, dopamine and GABAergic neurotransmitter systems, and cortical regions associated with choice and perseveration are especially sensitive to developmental MeHg at low exposure levels. Human testing for MeHg's neurotoxicity

  5. Survival of White Ibises (Eudocimus albus) in response to chronic experimental methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Peter; Campbell, Ashley; Jayasena, Nilmini; Borkhataria, Rena

    2011-03-01

    Although methylated mercury (MeHg) is known to have neurological, immunological, reproductive, and endocrine effects on vertebrates at low environmental exposure levels, effects on survival of exposed birds have not been demonstrated in the wild. Here, we report on survival of the same group of White Ibises (Eudocimus albus) during exposure to 4 levels of dietary MeHg in captivity and later as depurated free-ranging animals. Ibises were chronically exposed in captivity to dietary MeHg in groups at 0 (control), 0.05 (Low), 0.1 (Medium) and 0.3 (High) ppm MeHg ww for 43 months. No differences in annualized survival among captive MeHg groups were seen within age classes. Survival of all ages taken together was significantly lower for Control birds than for Low or Medium dosed birds, but was not different from High dosed birds. While this might be evidence of a hormetic effect, none of the captive results support the prediction that MeHg impairs survival. Using a mark-recapture analysis we found no effects of dose group or of Hg exposure on survival or resight probabilities during the first 99 days post-release to the wild. The latter results suggest that there is no lasting, post-depuration effect of even high MeHg exposure (0.3 ppm ww dietary) on survival. While these results agree with a variety of studies of survival of free-ranging birds, we suggest many survival studies have been confounded by seasonal depuration through molt, and variation in exposure rates. We suggest future studies concentrate on evaluating survival effects during nonmolting periods in species for which methylmercury exposure is relatively constant.

  6. Sub-chronic exposure to methylmercury at low levels decreases butyrylcholinesterase activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Juliana; Vicentini, Juliana; Grotto, Denise; Tonello, Raquel; Garcia, Solange C; Barbosa, Fernando

    2010-02-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of low levels and sub-chronic exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) on butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activity in rats. Moreover, we examined the relationship between BuChE activity and oxidative stress biomarkers [delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (delta-ALA-D) and malondialdehyde levels (MDA)] in the same animals. Rats were separated into three groups (eight animals per group): (Group I) received water by gavage; (Group II) received MeHg (30 microg/kg/day) by gavage; (Group III) received MeHg (100 microg/kg/day). The time of exposure was 90 days. BuChE and ALA-D activities were measured in serum and blood, respectively; whereas MDA levels were measured in plasma. We found BuChE and ALA-D activities decreased in groups II and III compared to the control group. Moreover, we found an interesting negative correlation between plasmatic BuChE activity and MDA (r = -0.85; p < 0.01) and a positive correlation between plasmatic BuChE activity and ALA-D activities (r = 0.78; p < 0.01), thus suggesting a possible relationship between oxidative damage promoted by MeHg exposure and the decrease of BuChE activity. In conclusion, long-term exposure to low doses of MeHg decreases plasmatic BuChE activity. Moreover, the decrease in the enzyme is strongly correlated with the oxidative stress promoted by the metal exposure. This preliminary finding highlights a possible mechanism for MeHg to reduce BuChE activity in plasma. Additionally, this enzyme could be an auxiliary biomarker on the evaluation of MeHg exposure.

  7. Consensus document on the prevention of methylmercury exposure in Spain: Study group for the prevention of Me-Hg exposure in Spain (GEPREM-Hg).

    PubMed

    González-Estecha, Montserrat; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Guillén-Pérez, José Jesús; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Álvarez, Jesús Román; Herráiz-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Ordóñez-Iriarte, José M; Sáinz-Martín, María; Farré-Rovira, Rosaura; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txantón; García-Donaire, José Antonio; Calvo-Manuel, Elpidio; Bretón-Lesmes, Irene; Prieto-Menchero, Santiago; Llorente-Ballesteros, M Teresa; Martínez-García, M José; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Cuadrado-Cenzual, M Ángeles; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; Fuentes, María Blanco; Torres-Moreno, Miriam; Trasobares-Iglesias, Elena M; Martín, Bernardino Barceló; Arroyo-Fernández, Manuel; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso

    2015-10-01

    The beneficial effects of fish consumption in both children and adults are well known. However, the intake of methylmercury, mainly from contaminated fish and shellfish, can have adverse health effects. The study group on the prevention of exposure to methylmercury (GEPREM-Hg), made up of representatives from different Spanish scientific societies, has prepared a consensus document in a question and answer format, containing the group's main conclusions, recommendations and proposals. The objective of the document is to provide broader knowledge of factors associated with methylmercury exposure, its possible effects on health amongst the Spanish population, methods of analysis, interpretation of the results and economic costs, and to then set recommendations for fish and shellfish consumption. The group sees the merit of all initiatives aimed at reducing or prohibiting the use of mercury as well as the need to be aware of the results of contaminant analyses performed on fish and shellfish marketed in Spain. In addition, the group believes that biomonitoring systems should be set up in order to follow the evolution of methylmercury exposure in children and adults and perform studies designed to learn more about the possible health effects of concentrations found in the Spanish population, taking into account the lifestyle, eating patterns and the Mediterranean diet.

  8. Dietary selenium protect against redox-mediated immune suppression induced by methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Yin, Daqiang; Yin, Jiaoyang; Chen, Qiqing; Wang, Rui

    2014-10-01

    The antagonism between selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) has been widely recognized, however, the protective role of Se against methylmercury (MeHg) induced immunotoxicity and the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In the current study, MeHg exposure (0.01 mM via drinking water) significantly inhibited the lymphoproliferation and NK cells functions of the female Balb/c mice, while dietary Se supplementation (as Se-rich yeast) partly or fully recovered the observed immunotoxicity, indicating the protective role of Se against MeHg-induced immune suppression in mice. Besides, MeHg exposure promoted the generation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced the levels of nonenzymic and enzymic antioxidants in target organs, while dietary Se administration significantly diminished the MeHg-induced oxidative stress and subsequent cellular dysfunctions (lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation). Two possible mechanisms of Se's protective effects were further revealed. Firstly, the reduction of mercury concentrations (less than 25%, modulated by Se supplementation) in the target organs might contribute, but not fully explain the alleviated immune suppression. Secondly and more importantly, Se could help to maintain/or elevate the activities of several key antioxidants, therefore protect the immune cells against MeHg-induced oxidative damage.

  9. Assessing exposure risks for freshwater tilapia species posed by mercury and methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Hsien; Lin, Yi-Jun; You, Shu-Han; Yang, Ying-Fei; How, Chun Ming; Tseng, Yi-Ting; Chen, Wei-Yu; Liao, Chung-Min

    2016-08-01

    Waterborne and dietborne exposures of freshwater fish to mercury (Hg) in the forms of inorganic (Hg(II)) and organic (methylmercury or MeHg) affect their growth, development, and reproduction. However, an integrated mechanistic risk model framework to predict the impact of Hg(II)/MeHg on freshwater fish is lacking. Here, we integrated biokinetic, physiological and biogeographic data to calibrate and then establish key risk indices-hazardous quotient and exceedance risk-for freshwater tilapia species across geographic ranges of several major rivers in Taiwan. We found that Hg(II) burden was highest in kidney followed by gill, intestine, liver, blood, and muscle. Our results showed that Hg was less likely to pose mortality risk (mortality rate less than 5 %) for freshwater tilapia species. However, Hg is likely to pose the potential hazard to aquatic environments constrained by safety levels for aquatic organisms. Sensitivity analysis showed that amount of Hg accumulated in tilapia was most influenced by sediment uptake rate. Our approach opens up new possibilities for predicting future fish population health with the impacts of continued Hg exposure to provide information on which fish are deemed safe for human consumption. PMID:27207496

  10. Developmental exposure to methylmercury alters learning and induces depression-like behavior in male mice.

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, Natalia; Tamm, Christoffer; Vahter, Marie; Hökfelt, Tomas; Johnson, Jeffrey A; Johnson, Delinda A; Ceccatelli, Sandra

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the long-term effects of developmental exposure to methylmercury (MeHg), pregnant mice were exposed to at 0.5 mg MeHg/kg/day via drinking water from gestational day 7 until day 7 after delivery. The behavior of offspring was monitored at 5-15 and 26-36 weeks of age using an automated system (IntelliCage) designed for continuous long-term recording of the home cage behavior in social groups and complex analysis of basic activities and learning. In addition, spontaneous locomotion, motor coordination on the accelerating rotarod, spatial learning in Morris water maze, and depression-like behavior in forced swimming test were also studied. The analysis of behavior performed in the IntelliCage without social deprivation occurred to be more sensitive in detecting alterations in activity and learning paradigms. We found normal motor function but decreased exploratory activity in MeHg-exposed male mice, especially at young age. Learning disturbances observed in MeHg-exposed male animals suggest reference memory impairment. Interestingly, the forced swimming test revealed a predisposition to depressive-like behavior in the MeHg-exposed male offspring. This study provides novel evidence that the developmental exposure to MeHg can affect not only cognitive functions but also motivation-driven behaviors.

  11. A Hypothesis About How Early Developmental Methylmercury Exposure Disrupts Behavior in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Newland, M. Christopher; Reed, Miranda N.; Rasmussen, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Events that disrupt the early development of the nervous system have lifelong, irreversible behavioral consequences. The environmental contaminant, methylmercury (MeHg), impairs neural development with effects that are manifested well into adulthood and even into aging. Noting the sensitivity of the developing brain to MeHg, the current review advances an argument that one outcome of early MeHg exposure is a distortion in the processing of reinforcing consequences that results in impaired choice, poor inhibition of prepotent responding, and perseveration on discrimination reversals (in the absence of alteration of extradimensional shifts). Neurochemical correlates include increased sensitivity to dopamine agonists and decreased sensitivity to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists. This leads to a hypothesis that the prefrontal cortex or dopamine neurotransmission is especially sensitive to even subtle gestational MeHg exposure and suggests that public health assessments of MeHg based on intellectual performance may underestimate the impact of MeHg in public health. Finally, those interested in modeling neural development may benefit from MeHg as an experimental model. PMID:25795099

  12. The role of gut microbiota in fetal methylmercury exposure: Insights from a pilot study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rothenberg, Sarah E.; Keiser, Sharon; Ajami, Nadim J.; Wong, Matthew C.; Gesell, Jonathan; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Johs, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which gut microbiota contribute to methylmercury metabolism remain unclear. Among a cohort of pregnant mothers, the main objectives of our pilot study were to determine 1) associations between gut microbiota and mercury concentrations in biomarkers (stool, hair and cord blood) and 2) the contributions of gut microbial mercury methylation/demethylation to stool methylmercury. Moreover, for pregnant women (36-39 weeks gestation, n=17) donated hair and stool specimens, and cord blood was collected for a subset (n=7). The diversity of gut microbiota was determined using 16S rRNA gene profiling (n=17). For 6 stool samples with highest/lowest methylmercury concentrations, metagenomic wholemore » genome shotgun sequencing was employed to search for one mercury methylation gene (hgcA), and two mer operon genes involved in methylmercury detoxification (merA and merB). There were seventeen bacterial genera that were significantly correlated (increasing or decreasing) with stool methylmercury, stool inorganic mercury, or hair total mercury; however, aside from one genus, there was no overlap between biomarkers. No definitive matches for hgcA or merB, while merA were detected at low concentrations in all six samples. Proportional differences in stool methylmercury were not likely attributed to gut microbiota through methylation/demethylation. Gut microbiota potentially altered methylmercury metabolism using indirect pathways.« less

  13. Dietary selenium protects against selected signs of aging and methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Heath, John C; Banna, Kelly M; Reed, Miranda N; Pesek, Erin F; Cole, Nathan; Li, Jun; Newland, M Christopher

    2010-03-01

    Acute or short-term exposure to high doses of methylmercury (MeHg) causes a well-characterized syndrome that includes sensory and motor deficits. The environmental threat from MeHg, however, comes from chronic, low-level exposure, the consequences of which are poorly understood. Selenium (Se), an essential nutrient, both increases deposition of mercury (Hg) in neurons and mitigates some of MeHg's neurotoxicity in the short term, but it is unclear whether this deposition produces long-term adverse consequences. To investigate these issues, adult Long-Evans rats were fed a diet containing 0.06 or 0.6 ppm of Se as sodium selenite. After 100 days on these diets, the subjects began consuming 0.0, 0.5, 5.0, or 15 ppm of Hg as methylmercuric chloride in their drinking water for 16 months. Somatosensory sensitivity, grip strength, hindlimb cross (clasping reflex), flexion, and voluntary wheel-running in overnight sessions were among the measures examined. MeHg caused a dose- and time-dependent impairment in all measures. No effects appeared in rats consuming 0 or 0.5 ppm of Hg. Somatosensory function, grip strength, and flexion were among the earliest signs of exposure. Selenium significantly delayed or blunted MeHg's effects. Selenium also increased running in unexposed animals as they aged, a novel finding that may have important clinical implications. Nerve pathology studies revealed axonal atrophy or mild degeneration in peripheral nerve fibers, which is consistent with abnormal sensorimotor function in chronic MeHg neurotoxicity. Lidocaine challenge reproduced the somatosensory deficits but not hindlimb cross or flexion. Together, these results quantify the neurotoxicity of long-term MeHg exposure, support the safety and efficacy of Se in ameliorating MeHg's neurotoxicity, and demonstrate the potential benefits of Se during aging. PMID:20079371

  14. Aging, motor function, and sensitivity to calcium channel blockers: An investigation using chronic methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Shen, Andrew Nathanael; Cummings, Craig; Hoffman, Daniel; Pope, Derek; Arnold, Megan; Newland, M Christopher

    2016-12-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) neurotoxicity is thought to be mediated, in part, by dysregulation of calcium (Ca(2+)) homeostasis, a mechanism that may also slowly and progressively degrade neuronal function during normal aging. Longitudinal studies of MeHg exposure provide a powerful approach to studying neural and behavioral mechanisms by which both MeHg toxicity and aging affect motor function. Wheel-running and rotarod performance were assessed in two age groups of BALB/c mice chronically exposed to 0 or 1.2mg/kg/day MeHg and 0 or 20mg/kg/day nimodipine, a 1,4-dihyrdopyridine L-type calcium channel blocker (CCB), for approximately 8.5 months. Adults began exposure on postnatal day (PND) 72 and retired breeders on PND 296. A log-survivor bout analysis partitioned wheel-running into bouts that identified motor (within-bout rates) and motivational (bout-initiation rates) influences. Retired breeders ran farther, because of a higher bout-initiation rates, but performed more poorly on the rotarod than younger adults, a difference unaffected by nimodipine. MeHg produced relatively age-independent deficits in wheel-running and rotarod performance, whereas nimodipine afforded greater protection to adult mice than to retired breeders. Rotarod performance and within-bout response rate were more sensitive to and more reliable predictors of MeHg toxicity than bout-initiation rate, which was least affected by MeHg exposure. Thus the motivation to run was unimpaired as the ability to do so declined. While chronic MeHg exposure produced functionally similar behavior deficits between age groups, the age-dependent neuroprotection by nimodipine supports the notion that underlying neurobiological systems mediated by Ca(2+) signaling, are differentially affected in older adults. PMID:27481695

  15. Effects of methylmercury exposure on the behavior of captive-reared common loon (Gavia immer) chicks.

    PubMed

    Kenow, Kevin P; Hines, Randy K; Meyer, Michael W; Suarez, Sarah A; Gray, Brian R

    2010-06-01

    Behavioral effects resulting from exposure to dietary methylmercury (MeHg) have been reported in studies of several wildlife species. However, quantifying the impact of contaminant exposure on wild populations is complicated by the confounding effects of other environmental stressors. We controlled confounding stressors in a laboratory study to quantify the level of dietary MeHg exposure associated with negative effects on the fitness of captive-reared common loon (Gavia immer) chicks. We evaluated the effect of MeHg on loon chick behavior by employing several assays, including measures of righting reflexes, responsiveness to taped parental calls, reaction to frightening stimuli, and estimates of time activity budgets. Evidence suggested that as chicks aged, those exposed to nominal dietary dose levels of 0.4 and 1.2 microg Hg/g wet-weight in food (average estimated delivered dietary level of 0.55 and 1.94 microg Hg/g, respectively) were less likely (p < 0.01) to right themselves after being positioned on their backs during outdoor trials (> or =37 days old) compared to chicks on the control diet. We detected differences (p < 0.05) in several response variables with respect to source of eggs. Chicks from nests on low-pH lakes tended to spend more time on resting platforms, spent less time in the shade, were more likely to walk across a platform upon release and do it quicker, were less responsive to a frightening stimulus, and exhibited less intense response to parental wail calls than did chicks from neutral pH-lakes. Rapid MeHg excretion during feather growth likely provides loon chicks protection from MeHg toxicity and may explain the lack of behavioral differences with dietary intake. Lake source effects suggest that in ovo exposure to MeHg or other factors related to lake pH have consequences on chick behavior.

  16. Brain and tissue levels of mercury after chronic methylmercury exposure in the monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    Estimated half-lives of mercury following methylmercury exposure in humans are 52-93 d for whole body and 49-164 d for blood. In its most recent 1980 review, the World Health Organization concluded that there was no evidence to suggest that brain half-life differed from whole-body half-life. In the present study, female monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were dosed for at least 1.7 yr with 10, 25, or 50 micrograms/kg.d of mercury as methylmercuric chloride. Dosing was discontinued, and blood half-life was determined to be about 14 d. Approximately 230 d after cessation of dosing, monkeys were sacrificed and organ and regional brain total mercury levels determined. One monkey that died while still being dosed had brain mercury levels three times higher than levels in blood. Theoretical calculations were performed assuming steady-state brain:blood ratios of 3, 5, or 10. Brain mercury levels were at least three orders of magnitude higher than those predicted by assuming the half-life in brain to be the same as that in blood. Estimated half-lives in brain were between 56 (brain:blood ratio of 3) and 38 (brain:blood ratio of 10) d. In addition, there was a dose-dependent difference in half-lives for some brain regions. These data clearly indicate that brain half-life is considerably longer than blood half-life in the monkey under conditions of chronic dosing.

  17. Economic benefits of methylmercury exposure control in Europe: Monetary value of neurotoxicity prevention

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to global mercury pollution and the adverse health effects of prenatal exposure to methylmercury (MeHg), an assessment of the economic benefits of prevented developmental neurotoxicity is necessary for any cost-benefit analysis. Methods Distributions of hair-Hg concentrations among women of reproductive age were obtained from the DEMOCOPHES project (1,875 subjects in 17 countries) and literature data (6,820 subjects from 8 countries). The exposures were assumed to comply with log-normal distributions. Neurotoxicity effects were estimated from a linear dose-response function with a slope of 0.465 Intelligence Quotient (IQ) point reduction per μg/g increase in the maternal hair-Hg concentration during pregnancy, assuming no deficits below a hair-Hg limit of 0.58 μg/g thought to be safe. A logarithmic IQ response was used in sensitivity analyses. The estimated IQ benefit cost was based on lifetime income, adjusted for purchasing power parity. Results The hair-mercury concentrations were the highest in Southern Europe and lowest in Eastern Europe. The results suggest that, within the EU, more than 1.8 million children are born every year with MeHg exposures above the limit of 0.58 μg/g, and about 200,000 births exceed a higher limit of 2.5 μg/g proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO). The total annual benefits of exposure prevention within the EU were estimated at more than 600,000 IQ points per year, corresponding to a total economic benefit between €8,000 million and €9,000 million per year. About four-fold higher values were obtained when using the logarithmic response function, while adjustment for productivity resulted in slightly lower total benefits. These calculations do not include the less tangible advantages of protecting brain development against neurotoxicity or any other adverse effects. Conclusions These estimates document that efforts to combat mercury pollution and to reduce MeHg exposures will have very substantial

  18. Inherited effects of low-dose exposure to methylmercury in neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bose, Raj; Onishchenko, Natalia; Edoff, Karin; Janson Lang, Ann Marie; Ceccatelli, Sandra

    2012-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental contaminant with recognized neurotoxic effects, particularly to the developing nervous system. In the present study, we show that nanomolar concentrations of MeHg can induce long-lasting effects in neural stem cells (NSCs). We investigated short-term direct and long-term inherited effects of exposure to MeHg (2.5 or 5.0 nM) using primary cultures of rat embryonic cortical NSCs. We found that MeHg had no adverse effect on cell viability but reduced NSC proliferation and altered the expression of cell cycle regulators (p16 and p21) and senescence-associated markers. In addition, we demonstrated a decrease in global DNA methylation in the exposed cells, indicating that epigenetic changes may be involved in the mechanisms underlying the MeHg-induced effects. These changes were observed in cells directly exposed to MeHg (parent cells) and in their daughter cells cultured under MeHg-free conditions. In agreement with our in vitro data, a trend was found for decreased cell proliferation in the subgranular zone in the hippocampi of adult mice exposed to low doses of MeHg during the perinatal period. Interestingly, this impaired proliferation had a measurable impact on the total number of neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Importantly, this effect could be reversed by chronic antidepressant treatment. Our study provides novel evidence for programming effects induced by MeHg in NSCs and supports the idea that developmental exposure to low levels of MeHg may result in long-term consequences predisposing to neurodevelopmental disorders and/or neurodegeneration.

  19. Global methylmercury exposure from seafood consumption and risk of developmental neurotoxicity: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Thomas A; Navas-Acien, Ana; Breysse, Patrick N; McGready, John; Fox, Mary A

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine biomarkers of methylmercury (MeHg) intake in women and infants from seafood-consuming populations globally and characterize the comparative risk of fetal developmental neurotoxicity. Methods A search was conducted of the published literature reporting total mercury (Hg) in hair and blood in women and infants. These biomarkers are validated proxy measures of MeHg, a neurotoxin found primarily in seafood. Average and high-end biomarkers were extracted, stratified by seafood consumption context, and pooled by category. Medians for average and high-end pooled distributions were compared with the reference level established by a joint expert committee of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Findings Selection criteria were met by 164 studies of women and infants from 43 countries. Pooled average biomarkers suggest an intake of MeHg several times over the FAO/WHO reference in fish-consuming riparians living near small-scale gold mining and well over the reference in consumers of marine mammals in Arctic regions. In coastal regions of south-eastern Asia, the western Pacific and the Mediterranean, average biomarkers approach the reference. Although the two former groups have a higher risk of neurotoxicity than the latter, coastal regions are home to the largest number at risk. High-end biomarkers across all categories indicate MeHg intake is in excess of the reference value. Conclusion There is a need for policies to reduce Hg exposure among women and infants and for surveillance in high-risk populations, the majority of which live in low-and middle-income countries. PMID:24700993

  20. Human exposure to methylmercury through rice intake in mercury mining areas, Guizhou province, China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinbin; Li, Ping; Qiu, Guangle; Wang, Shaofeng; Li, Guanghui; Shang, Lihai; Meng, Bo; Jiang, Hongmei; Bai, Weiyang; Li, Zhonggen; Fu, Xuewu

    2008-01-01

    The toxicity of methylmercury (Me-Hg) has caused widespread public human concern as a result of several widely publicized disasters. Me-Hg is highly toxic, and the nervous system is its principal target tissue for humans. Although the general population is primarily exposed to Me-Hg through contaminated fish and marine mammals, in Hg mining areas a long history of mining activities can produce serious Hg pollution to the local environment In a study of 98 persons from the Wanshan Hg mining area, hair Me-Hg levels indicated Me-Hg exposure. Rice, the staple food of the local inhabitants also showed high total Hg (T-Hg) and Me-Hg levels. The geometric mean concentration of T-Hg and mean concentration of Me-Hg in rice samples collected from 3 villages in Wanshan Hg mining area were 36.2 (ranging from 4.9 to 214.7), and 8.5 (ranging from 1.9 to 27.6) microg/kg, respectively, which were significantly elevated compared to the rice samples collected from a reference area, where the mean T-Hg and Me-Hg concentrations were 7.0 (3.2-15.1) and 2.5 (0.8-4.3) microg/kg, respectively. Pork meat, vegetable, and drinking water samples collected in Wanshan Hg mining area contained highly elevated T-Hg, but very low levels of Me-Hg. The relationships between the estimated rice Me-Hg intake and hair Me-Hg levels (r = 0.65, p < 0.001) confirmed rice with high Me-Hg levels indeed was the main route of Me-Hg exposure for the local residents in the Wanshan Hg mining area. From our study, we can conclude that the main human exposure to Me-Hg via food consumption is not restricted to fish, but in some cases in mining areas of China to frequent rice meals.

  1. Effects of embryonic pre-exposure to methylmercury and Hg/sup 2 +/ on larval tolerance in Fundulus heteroclitus

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, P.; Weis, J.S.

    1983-11-01

    Many reports demonstrate enhanced metal tolerance as a result of previous exposure to low concentrations. Pretreatment of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) eggs with cadmium made the larvae more resistant to subsequent Cd treatment. Larvae of the flagfish, Jordanella floridae, initially exposed as embryos to Zn and to mixtures of Zn and Cd were much more tolerant than those not previously exposed, indicating acclimation during embryonic exposure. Acclimation to metals after pre-exposure was attributed to stimulation of the synthesis of metal-binding proteins, or metallothioneins, in the liver, which form a nontoxic complex with the metal. In this paper we report on the effects of embryonic pre-exposure to methylmercury(meHf) and Hg/sup 2 +/ on larval susceptibility to these toxicants in the killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus.

  2. Porphyrins as biomarkers of methylmercury and PCB exposure in experimental quail

    SciTech Connect

    Leonzio, C.; Fossi, M.C.; Casini, S.

    1996-02-01

    Chemicals such as heavy metals and polyhalogenated hydrocarbons have a high capacity to interfere with the enzymatic processes responsible for haem biosynthesis. These compounds can produce accumulation in tissues and organs and increased elimination of porphyrins in excreta. The development of fast and easy analytical methods and the wide variety of biological media in which porphynins can be detected have suggested their use as biomarkers of environmental pollution. The analysis of porphynins in the excreta is of special interest because it enables non-destructive monitoring of wild animals in the assessment of threatened or endangered species. Methylmercury and PCBs are ubiquitous global pollutants and there is evidence they accumulate in ternfuinal consumers, particularly those belonging to marine trophic chain. There have been some reports on methylmercury-induced and PCB-induced porphyria but little data on their combined effect. In order to investigate the quality of porphyrins as biomarkers we performed an experiment in which Japanese quail were fed a diet containing methylmercury and polychlorobyphenyls (PCBs as Arochlor 1260) individually or combined in different ratios. The present study aims to provide preliminary data on liver and fecal levels of porphynins in response to methylmercury and PCB administration, and on whether the indicator is sensitive to synergism or antagonism between the two compounds, administered simultaneously.

  3. Transcriptomic and Physiological Responses of the Green Microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during Short-Term Exposure to Subnanomolar Methylmercury Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Beauvais-Flück, Rebecca; Slaveykova, Vera I; Cosio, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    The effects of short-term exposure to subnanomolar methyl-mercury (MeHg) concentrations, representative of contaminated environments, on the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were assessed using both physiological end points and gene expression analysis. MeHg bioaccumulated and induced significant increase of the photosynthesis efficiency, while the algal growth, oxidative stress, and chlorophyll fluorescence were unaffected. At the molecular level, MeHg significantly dysregulated the expression of genes involved in motility, energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, metal transport, and antioxidant enzymes. Data suggest that the cells were able to cope with subnanomolar MeHg exposure, but this tolerance resulted in a significant cost to the cell energy and reserve metabolism as well as ample changes in the nutrition and motility of C. reinhardtii. The present results allowed gaining new insights on the effects and uptake mechanisms of MeHg at subnanomolar concentrations in aquatic primary producers. PMID:27254783

  4. EFFECTS OF SUBSCUTE EXPOSURE TO NANOMOLAR CONCENTRATIONS OF METHYLMERCURY ON VOLTAGE-GATES SODIUM AND CALCIUM CURRENTS IN PC12 CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylmercury (CH3Hg+) alters the function of voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels in neuronal preparations following acute, in vitro, exposure. Because the developing nervous system is particularly sensitive to CH3Hg+ neurotoxicity, effects on voltage-gated Na+ (INa) and Ca2+ (IC...

  5. Pathological effects of in utero methylmercury exposure on the cerebellum of the golden hamster: residual effects on the adult cerebellum-part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Reuhl, K.R.; Chang, L.W.; Townsend, J.W.

    1981-12-01

    The long-term effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure were studied in the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). Pregnant animals were either 10 mg/kg methylmercury on gestational day 10 or 2 mg/kg on gestational days 10-15. Animals from treated and control litters were sacrificed as adults and cerebella examined by light and electron microscopy. Focal areas of astrogliosis were observed in the molecular layer of treated animals. Sequellae of previous injury, characterized primarily by abundant residual bodies, were observed in the perikarya and dendrites of granule and Purkinje neurons. Degenerative change of myelinated axons was observed. Possible hypotheses for continued neuronal degeneration in prenatally exposed animals are discussed.

  6. Combined exposure to lead, inorganic mercury and methylmercury shows deviation from additivity for cardiovascular toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Wildemann, Tanja M; Weber, Lynn P; Siciliano, Steven D

    2015-08-01

    Environmental exposure to metal mixtures in the human population is common. Mixture risk assessments are often challenging because of a lack of suitable data on the relevant mixture. A growing number of studies show an association between lead or mercury exposure and cardiovascular effects. We investigated the cardiovascular effects of single metal exposure or co-exposure to methylmercury [MeHg(I)], inorganic mercury [Hg(II)] and lead [Pb(II)]. Male Wistar rats received four different metal mixtures for 28 days through the drinking water. The ratios of the metals were based on reference and environmental exposure values. Blood and pulse pressure, cardiac output and electrical activity of the heart were selected as end-points. While exposure to only MeHg(I) increased the systolic blood pressure and decreased cardiac output, the effects were reversed with combined exposures (antagonism). In contrast to these effects, combined exposures negatively affected the electrical activity of the heart (synergism). Thus, it appears that estimates of blood total Hg levels need to be paired with estimates of what species of mercury dominate exposure as well as whether lead co-exposure is present to link total blood Hg levels to cardiovascular effects. Based on current human exposure data and our results, there may be an increased risk of cardiac events as a result of combined exposures to Hg(II), MeHg(I) and Pb(II). This increased risk needs to be clarified by analyzing lead and Hg exposure data in relation to cardiac electrical activity in epidemiological studies.

  7. Effects of embryonic exposure to methylmercury on larval prey-capture ability in the mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, J.S. . Dept. of Biological Sciences); Weis, P. . Dept. of Anatomy, Cell Biology and Injury Science)

    1995-01-01

    Embryos of the mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) were exposed to 2, 5, or 10 [mu]g/L methylmercury (meHg) throughout development; these are concentrations below those which cause teratological effects in this species. After hatching, larvae were maintained in clean seawater and tested for pre-capture ability, using Artemia salina nauplii. Larvae that had been exposed to 10 [mu]g/L methylmercury initially exhibited slower prey-capture ability than did the other groups. This is an indication of a subtle functional impairment due to the toxicant (behavioral teratology). However, the effect was transitory, and by about 1 week after hatching the pre capture of these larvae equaled that of the controls and the other treated groups. Growth of these larvae was also comparable to that of controls. The exposure may have caused retardation of neurological development, which was subsequently compensated for, and therefore no long-lasting effects were produced. In the field, however, embryos exposed to toxicants would probably continue to be exposed as larvae, and might not have the opportunity to recover from the deleterious effects, but rather might have them augmented.

  8. Perturbation of myelin basic protein (Mbp) splice variant expression in developing rat cerebellum following perinatal exposure to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Bhaja K; Pelletier, Guillaume

    2012-09-18

    Myelin sheaths surrounding axons are essential for saltatory conduction of nerve impulse in the central nervous system. A major protein constituent of myelin sheaths is produced by the myelin basic protein (Mbp) gene, whose expression in oligodendrocytes is conserved across vertebrates. In rat, five Mbp splice variants resulting from alternative splicing of exons 2, 5 and/or 6 are characterized. We developed a PCR-based strategy to quantify individual Mbp splice variants and characterized a sixth Mbp splice variant lacking only exon 5. This newly identified splice variant is predominantly expressed in developing rat brain and has orthologs in mouse and human. Many neurotoxic chemicals can perturb myelination and Mbp gene expression. Regulation of Mbp gene expression at the post-transcriptional level was assessed following perinatal exposure to neurotoxic methylmercury (2 mg/kg b.w./day). Similar reductions in total and individual Mbp splice variant mRNA levels suggest that methylmercury-induced perturbation in Mbp gene expression occurred as a consequence of decreased oligodendrocyte cell population in absence of a significant impact on its post-transcriptional regulation.

  9. Early Developmental Low-Dose Methylmercury Exposure Alters Learning and Memory in Periadolescent but Not Young Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Albores-Garcia, Damaris; Hernandez, Alberto J.; Loera, Miriam J.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the effects of developmental methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on learning and memory at different ages. The possibility of the amelioration or worsening of the effects has not been sufficiently investigated. This study aimed to assess whether low-dose MeHg exposure in utero and during suckling induces differential disturbances in learning and memory of periadolescent and young adult rats. Four experimental groups of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were orally exposed to MeHg or vehicle from gestational day 5 to weaning: (1) control (vehicle), (2) 250 μg/kg/day MeHg, (3) 500 μg/kg/day MeHg, and (4) vehicle, and treated on the test day with MK-801 (0.15 mg/kg i.p.), an antagonist of the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor. The effects were evaluated in male offspring through the open field test, object recognition test, Morris water maze, and conditioned taste aversion. For each test and stage assessed, different groups of animals were used. MeHg exposure, in a dose-dependent manner, disrupted exploratory behaviour, recognition memory, spatial learning, and acquisition of aversive memories in periadolescent rats, but alterations were not observed in littermates tested in young adulthood. These results suggest that developmental low-dose exposure to MeHg induces age-dependent detrimental effects. The relevance of decreasing exposure to MeHg in humans remains to be determined. PMID:26885512

  10. Balancing the benefits of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the risks of methylmercury exposure from fish consumption

    PubMed Central

    Mahaffey, Kathryn R; Sunderland, Elsie M; Chan, Hing Man; Choi, Anna L; Grandjean, Philippe; Mariën, Koenraad; Oken, Emily; Sakamoto, Mineshi; Schoeny, Rita; Weihe, Pál; Yan, Chong-Huai; Yasutake, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Fish and shellfish are widely available foods that provide important nutrients, particularly n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), to many populations globally. These nutrients, especially docosahexaenoic acid, confer benefits to brain and visual system development in infants and reduce risks of certain forms of heart disease in adults. However, fish and shellfish can also be a major source of methylmercury (MeHg), a known neurotoxicant that is particularly harmful to fetal brain development. This review documents the latest knowledge on the risks and benefits of seafood consumption for perinatal development of infants. It is possible to choose fish species that are both high in n-3 PUFAs and low in MeHg. A framework for providing dietary advice for women of childbearing age on how to maximize the dietary intake of n-3 PUFAs while minimizing MeHg exposures is suggested. PMID:21884130

  11. Modeled methylmercury exposure and risk from rice consumption for vulnerable populations in a traditional fish-eating area in China.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yin-Dong; Ou, Lang-Bo; Chen, Long; Wang, Huan-Huan; Chen, Cen; Wang, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Qi-Guang

    2015-05-01

    The circulation of rice from contaminated areas could escalate exposure risk from a local problem to a national issue and affect a wider population beyond the region of origin, as confirmed by the "Poison Rice Incident" in May 2013 in Guangzhou, China. In the present study, the authors established a food chain model based on the aquivalence method to identify major sources of methylmercury (MeHg), estimate the levels of MeHg, and quantify exposure to MeHg via rice and aquatic food consumption. Different types of organism samples from the Haihe River also were collected to verify the calculated values. The MeHg intake in pregnant women was 1529.1 ng/d from the aquatic food chain and as high as 2804.0 ng/d from rice, although the intake varied among scenarios. The maximum possible MeHg concentration in the blood of pregnant women was 5.21 µg/L, higher than the threshold value of MeHg recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency (4.4 µg/L), which indicated that pregnant women could face risk from MeHg exposure. The authors also assessed the risk of MeHg exposure in pregnant women and their breastfed infants using a new index, HQEquivalent . In 4 scenarios, the HQEquivalent indices ranged from 0.42 to 1.18 for pregnant women and from 0.29 to 0.83 for breastfed infants.

  12. Modeled methylmercury exposure and risk from rice consumption for vulnerable populations in a traditional fish-eating area in China.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yin-Dong; Ou, Lang-Bo; Chen, Long; Wang, Huan-Huan; Chen, Cen; Wang, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Qi-Guang

    2015-05-01

    The circulation of rice from contaminated areas could escalate exposure risk from a local problem to a national issue and affect a wider population beyond the region of origin, as confirmed by the "Poison Rice Incident" in May 2013 in Guangzhou, China. In the present study, the authors established a food chain model based on the aquivalence method to identify major sources of methylmercury (MeHg), estimate the levels of MeHg, and quantify exposure to MeHg via rice and aquatic food consumption. Different types of organism samples from the Haihe River also were collected to verify the calculated values. The MeHg intake in pregnant women was 1529.1 ng/d from the aquatic food chain and as high as 2804.0 ng/d from rice, although the intake varied among scenarios. The maximum possible MeHg concentration in the blood of pregnant women was 5.21 µg/L, higher than the threshold value of MeHg recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency (4.4 µg/L), which indicated that pregnant women could face risk from MeHg exposure. The authors also assessed the risk of MeHg exposure in pregnant women and their breastfed infants using a new index, HQEquivalent . In 4 scenarios, the HQEquivalent indices ranged from 0.42 to 1.18 for pregnant women and from 0.29 to 0.83 for breastfed infants. PMID:25639888

  13. Exposure assessment of pregnant Portuguese women to methylmercury through the ingestion of fish: cross-sectional survey and biomarker validation.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Elisabete; Cavaco, Afonso; Carvalho, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) contamination is a critical public health problem in Portugal, where fish is an important component of the daily diet. The Portuguese are the third largest consumers in the world (after Japan and Iceland) but first in Europe. Prenatal exposure to MeHg is believed to be linked to fetal/child neurodevelopment and behavioral impairments due to the neurotoxicity of the compound. The objective of this study was to assess the exposure of pregnant Portuguese women to mercury (Hg) due to fish consumption, calculating the indices of risk and confirming exposure through analyses of a biomarker of exposure. The study consisted of a cross-sectional evaluation of 343 pregnant women recruited at their visit to two antenatal care units in Lisbon, Portugal. A food frequency questionnaire was used to estimate prenatal exposure. Total Hg levels in hair were analyzed by atomic absorption, in samples from 186 women. The average fish consumption was 3.1 meals per week. Median Hg level in the hair was 1.26 μg/g (range: 0.07-5.3 μg/g). The mean calculated risk index was 0.81; however, 28% of the pregnant women ingested levels above the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) level recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO; 1.6 mg/kg per body weight), indicating the possibility of risk due to MeHg exposure. Multiple linear regression analysis showed the risk index was reliably predicted from predatory fish species and number of fish meals consumed per week. Ingestion of black and silver scabbard fish as well as mixed predatory fish cooked in traditional dishes enhanced the toxicity risk. In conclusion, some exposure levels exceeded the reference value; therefore, nutritional counseling needs to be provided to populations at risk.

  14. Prenatal methylmercury exposure and language delay at three years of age in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Vejrup, Kristine; Schjølberg, Synnve; Knutsen, Helle Katrine; Kvalem, Helen Engelstad; Brantsæter, Anne Lise; Meltzer, Helle Margrete; Alexander, Jan; Magnus, Per; Haugen, Margaretha

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal methylmercury (MeHg) exposure and its possible neurodevelopmental effects in susceptible children are of concern. Studies of MeHg exposure and negative health outcomes have shown conflicting results and it has been suggested that co-exposure to other contaminants and/or nutrients in fish may confound the effect of MeHg. Our objective was to examine the association between prenatal exposure to MeHg and language and communication development at three years, adjusting for intake of fish, n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFAs) and co-exposure to dioxins and dioxin like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs). We used data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) collected between 2002 and 2008. The study sample consisted of 46,750 mother-child pairs. MeHg exposure was calculated from reported fish intake during pregnancy by a FFQ in mid-pregnancy. Children's language and communication skills were measured by maternal report on the Dale and Bishop grammar rating and the Ages and Stages communication scale (ASQ). We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using logistic regressions. Median MeHg exposure was 1.3μg/day, corresponding to 0.14μg/kgbw/week. An exposure level above the 90th percentile (>2.6μg/day, >0.29μg/kgbw/week) was defined as the high MeHg exposure. Results indicated an association between high MeHg exposure and unintelligible speech with an adjusted OR 2.22 (1.31, 3.72). High MeHg exposure was also associated with weaker communication skills adjusted OR 1.33 (1.03, 1.70). Additional adjustment for fish intake strengthened the associations, while adjusting for PCBs and n-3 LCPUFA from diet or from supplements had minor impact. In conclusion, significant associations were found between prenatal MeHg exposure above the 90th percentile and delayed language and communication skills in a generally low exposed population. PMID:27058928

  15. Milestone achievement and neurodevelopment of rural Amazonian toddlers (12 to 24 months) with different methylmercury and ethylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Dórea, José G; Marques, Rejane C; Abreu, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    Neurological outcomes (Gesell development schedules [GDS]), age of walking, and age of talking were studied in 299 toddlers (12 to 24 mo) in relation to environmental (fish consumption and tin mining) exposure. Exposure to fish methylmercury (MeHg) consumption and iatrogenic ethylmercury (EtHg) in Thimerosal-containing vaccines (TCV) was quantified in toddlers from two rural villages (n = 91, Itapuã; n = 218, Bom Futuro) respectively populated by fishers and cassiterite miners. Median total hair Hg (HHg) concentrations of infants from Itapuã (3.5 μg/g) were significantly higher than those of infants from Bom Futuro (2.2 μg/g). Median EtHg exposure from TCV was also significantly higher in toddlers from Itapuã (137.5 μg) than in those from Bom Futuro (112.5 μg). There were no significant differences between groups for any of the Gesell schedules; however, there were proportionally more compromised toddlers (GDS < 70) in Itapuã than Bom Futuro. Median age of talking was not statistically different but median age of walking was significantly higher in Bom Futuro. In toddlers from both villages, of fishers and miners, HHg concentrations were significantly correlated with family fish consumption. A logistic regression model was applied to all infants after classification into two groups: above or below the median Gesell schedules. Overall, there was no distinctive pattern of neurodevelopment associated with either HHg or EtHg exposure; however, nutritional status was significantly associated with GDS. In conclusion, milestone achievement was delayed in toddlers from tin-ore mining communities. Despite significantly higher exposure to both forms of organic Hg (MeHg from maternal fish consumption, and EtHg from TCV) in toddlers from the fishing village, significant differences were seen only among the proportions of most severely affected toddlers (GDS < 70).

  16. Mercury Isotope Study of Sources and Exposure Pathways of Methylmercury in Estuarine Food Webs in the Northeastern U.S.

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We measured mercury (Hg) isotope ratios in sediments and various estuarine organisms (green crab, blue mussel, killifish, eider) to investigate methylmercury (MMHg) sources and exposure pathways in five Northeast coast (U.S.) estuaries. The mass independent Hg isotopic compositions (MIF; Δ199Hg) of the sediments were linearly correlated with the sediment 1/Hg concentrations (Δ199Hg: r2 = 0.77, p < 0.05), but the mass dependent isotope compositions (MDF; δ202Hg) were not (r2 = 0.26, p = 0.16), reflecting inputs of anthropogenic Hg sources with varying δ202Hg. The estuarine organisms all display positive Δ199Hg values (0.21 to 0.98 ‰) indicating that MMHg is photodegraded to varying degrees (5–12%) prior to entry into the food web. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg values of most organisms can be explained by a mixture of MMHg and inorganic Hg from sediments. At one contaminated site mussels have anomalously high δ202Hg, indicating exposure to a second pool of MMHg, compared to sediment, crabs and fish. Eiders have similar Δ199Hg as killifish but much higher δ202Hg, suggesting that there is an internal fractionation of δ202Hg in birds. Our study shows that Hg isotopes can be used to identify multiple anthropogenic inorganic Hg and MMHg sources and determine the degree of photodegradation of MMHg in estuarine food webs. PMID:25116221

  17. Dietary Mercury Exposure Resulted in Behavioral Differences in Mice Contaminated with Fish-Associated Methylmercury Compared to Methylmercury Chloride Added to Diet

    PubMed Central

    Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Marumoto, Masumi; Yasutake, Akira; Fujimura, Masatake

    2012-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxin, and humans are mainly exposed to this pollutant through fish consumption. However, in classical toxicological studies, pure methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) is injected, given to drink or incorporated within feed assuming that its effects are identical to those of MeHg naturally associated to fish. In the present study, we wanted to address the question whether a diet containing MeHg associated to fish could result in observable adverse effects in mice as compared to a diet containing the same concentration of MeHg added pure to the diet and whether beneficial nutriments from fish were able to counterbalance the deleterious effects of fish-associated mercury, if any. After two months of feeding, the fish-containing diet resulted in significant observable effects as compared to the control and MeHg-containing diets, encompassing altered behavioral performances as monitored in a Y-shaped maze and an open field, and an increased dopamine metabolic turnover in hippocampus, despite the fact that the fish-containing diet was enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids and selenium compared to the fish-devoid diets. PMID:22899888

  18. Cognitive deficits and changes in gene expression of NMDA receptors after prenatal methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Baraldi, Mario; Zanoli, Paola; Tascedda, Fabio; Blom, Joan M C; Brunello, Nicoletta

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies showed learning and memory deficit in adult rats that were prenatally exposed to methylmercury chloride (MMC) in an advanced stage of pregnancy (15 days). Under these conditions, the cognitive deficits found at 60 days of age paralleled particularly changes in the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor characteristics. In the present study, we report the behavioral effects of a single oral dose of MMC (8 mg/kg) administered earlier at gestational day 8. The use of different learning and memory tests (passive avoidance, object recognition, water maze) showed a general cognitive impairment in the in utero-exposed rats tested at 60 days of age compared with matched controls. Considering the importance of the glutamatergic receptor system and its endogenous ligands in learning and memory process regulation, we surmised that MMC could affect the gene expression of NMDA receptor subtypes. The use of a sensitive RNase protection assay allowed the evaluation of gene expression of two families of NMDA receptors (NR-1 and NR-2 subtypes). The result obtained in 60-day-old rats prenatally exposed to MMC, showed increased mRNA levels of the NR-2B subunit in the hippocampus but not in the frontal cortex. The data suggest that the behavioral abnormalities of MMC-exposed rats might be ascribed to a neurotoxic effect of the metal that alters the gene expression of a specific NMDA receptor subunit in the hippocampus. PMID:12426146

  19. Poor psychometric scores of children living in isolated riverine and agrarian communities and fish-methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Márlon de F; Dórea, José G; Bastos, Wanderley R; Marques, Rejane C; Torres, João P M; Malm, Olaf

    2008-11-01

    Because of heavy dependence on fish, Amazonian riparian communities are chronically exposed to high levels of methylmercury (MeHg). We studied fish-MeHg exposure (total hair-Hg, HHg) as a determinant of neurocognitive scores of children living in two geographically distant, culturally distinct and isolated poor communities of non-urban environments: Amazonian riverines (Riparians, n=38) of the Puruzinho Lake community in the Rio Madeira Basin and rural agrarians from Iúna, Espírito Santo (Agrarians, n=32). Nutritional status was estimated by anthropometry (Z-scores) and individual cognitive abilities were assessed by the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III (WISC-III) and the Human Figure Drawings (HFD), both validated versions for Brazilian children. Anthropometric assessment showed slightly elevated Z-scores for the Agrarian children (not statistically significant) but median HHg concentrations were 14.4 and 0.25microgg(-1) respectively for Riparian and Agrarian children (p=0.000). Despite paradoxical MeHg exposures, both groups showed comparable HFD scores but very poor performance in WISC-III test battery; median of sum of WISC-III subtests scores (SigmaTOT) were 17.9 and 28.6 (p<0.000) for Riparian and Agrarian children, respectively (percentage scale). Spearman correlation between nutritional status (attained growth) and psychometric scores were statistically significant between height-for-age Z-score and Object Assembly subtest (r=0.269; p=0.043), SigmaTOT (r=0.319; p=0.016), Performance-IQ (r=0.311; p=0.019) and Perceptual Organization Index scores (r=0.302; p=0.023). In these isolated communities there are stronger determinants of neurocognitive poor performance than MeHg exposure. Global strategies for reducing human exposure to MeHg by curtailing fish consumption are unrealistic options for riverine subsistence populations and are not justifiable to prevent low cognitive scores.

  20. Neural stem cell apoptosis after low-methylmercury exposures in postnatal hippocampus produce persistent cell loss and adolescent memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Katie; Obiorah, Maryann; Robinson, Kelsey; McCandlish, Elizabeth; Buckley, Brian; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2013-12-01

    The developing brain is particularly sensitive to exposures to environmental contaminants. In contrast to the adult, the developing brain contains large numbers of dividing neuronal precursors, suggesting that they may be vulnerable targets. The postnatal day 7 (P7) rat hippocampus has populations of both mature neurons in the CA1-3 region as well as neural stem cells (NSC) in the dentate gyrus (DG) hilus, which actively produce new neurons that migrate to the granule cell layer (GCL). Using this well-characterized NSC population, we examined the impact of low levels of methylmercury (MeHg) on proliferation, neurogenesis, and subsequent adolescent learning and memory behavior. Assessing a range of exposures, we found that a single subcutaneous injection of 0.6 µg/g MeHg in P7 rats induced caspase activation in proliferating NSC of the hilus and GCL. This acute NSC death had lasting impact on the DG at P21, reducing cell numbers in the hilus by 22% and the GCL by 27%, as well as reductions in neural precursor proliferation by 25%. In contrast, non-proliferative CA1-3 pyramidal neuron cell number was unchanged. Furthermore, animals exposed to P7 MeHg exhibited an adolescent spatial memory deficit as assessed by Morris water maze. These results suggest that environmentally relevant levels of MeHg exposure may decrease NSC populations and, despite ongoing neurogenesis, the brain may not restore the hippocampal cell deficits, which may contribute to hippocampal-dependent memory deficits during adolescence.

  1. Perinatal methylmercury exposure perturbs the expression of Plp1 and Cnp splice variants in cerebellum of rat pups.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Bhaja K; Rosales, Marianela; Pelletier, Guillaume

    2015-05-01

    Early life exposure to environmental chemicals can interfere with myelin formation in the developing brain, leading to neurological disorders. The Proteolipid Protein 1 (Plp1), Myelin Basic Protein (Mbp) and 2',3'-Cyclic Nucleotide 3'Phosphodiesterase (Cnp) genes expressed in oligodendrocytes and involved in myelination processes can be useful biomarkers of potential developmental neurotoxicity. In an earlier study, we concluded that the reduction in the expression levels of Mbp splice variants in juvenile rat cerebellum following perinatal methylmercury (MeHg) exposure were compatible with an overall reduction of mature oligodendrocytes population. This observation prompted us to analyze the expression of Plp1 and Cnp in developing rat cerebellum to further confirm and investigate the toxic effects of MeHg on vulnerable oligodendrocytes. Splice variants of Plp1 in human and of Cnp in mouse are curated in NCBI RefSeq database, but not for rat. Lack of annotation of splice variants can pose significant challenge for the reliable quantification of gene expression levels in toxicological studies. Therefore, we applied a "comparative sequence analysis" approach, relying on annotated splice variants in human/mouse and on evolutionary conservation of intron-exon structures, to identify additional splice variants of Plp1 and Cnp in rat. Then, we confirmed their identity by nucleotide sequencing and characterized their temporal expression patterns during brain development by RT-PCR. The measurement of total transcripts and individual splice variants of Plp1 and Cnp in the cerebellum of MeHg-exposed rat pups revealed a relatively similar level of reduction in their expression levels. This study further confirms that perinatal exposure to MeHg can impact oligodendrocytes in pups. Based on these observations, we conclude that monitoring the expression of these oligodendrocyte-enriched genes can be useful to identify toxic chemicals affecting myelination.

  2. Effects of prenatal exposure to methylmercury on dopamine-mediated locomotor activity and dopamine D2 receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Daré, Elisabetta; Fetissov, Serguei; Hökfelt, Tomas; Hall, Håkan; Ogren, Sven Ove; Ceccatelli, Sandra

    2003-05-01

    In the present study we have investigated the neurotoxic effects of the exposure to a low dose (0.5 mg/kg/day) of methylmercury (MeHg) on the developing nervous system. Pregnant rats were treated with MeHg from day 7 of pregnancy to day 7 of lactation. At postnatal day 20 the offspring did not display prominent functional cerebellar alterations, as evaluated by the Rotarod performance. Motor activity (locomotion, rearing and motility) was tested in the 21-day-old rats after administration of apomorphine, an agonist of D(1), D(2), and D(3) dopamine receptors. A low dose of apomorphine (0.1 mg/kg) induced a significantly stronger increase in motility and locomotion in MeHg-treated rats as compared to controls. The same effect was also observed in rats injected with 1 mg/kg apomorphine. No changes were observed in rearing at either doses of the dopamine receptor agonist. The data suggest that changes in dopaminergic transmission are induced by exposure to MeHg in early life. The expression of the striatal dopamine D(1) and D(2) receptors was examined by in situ hybridization in the striatum of the 21-day-old rats. The analysis did not reveal any significant changes at the mRNA level. Ligand autoradiography experiments showed a significant reduction in dopamine D(2) receptor binding in the caudate putamen of MeHg-treated rats. Spatial learning ability was tested in 2-month-old rats using the Morris swim maze test. Changes in retention were shown in MeHg-treated rats, indicating that MeHg induced memory alterations. Taken together, these findings show that exposure to a very low dose of MeHg during development exerts neurotoxic effects on the dopaminergic system and that alterations of brain functions persist in adult life.

  3. In vitro estimation of exposure of Hong Kong residents to mercury and methylmercury via consumption of market fishes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Sheng; Xu, Wei-Feng; Chen, Zhuo-Jia; Cheng, Zhang; Ge, Li-Chen; Man, Yu-Bon; Giesy, John P; Du, Jun; Wong, Chris K C; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2013-03-15

    In order to evaluate effects of exposure to mercury (tHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) of Hong Kong residents via consumption of fish, total and bioaccessible concentrations of tHg and MeHg were measured in 10 freshwater and 10 marine fishes collected from markets in Hong Kong. Concentrations of tHg and MeHg in fishes ranged from 27.2 to 311ngg(-1) (median 88.9ngg(-1)) and ND to 116ngg(-1) (median 45.0ngg(-1)), respectively. Concentrations of MeHg in marine fishes (64.4±28.5ngg(-1)) were significantly greater than those in freshwater fishes (40.3±26.0ngg(-1)). Bioaccessibility tHg and MeHg was predicted for edible flesh of twenty fishes by use of an in vitro gastrointestinal assay. Bioaccessibilities of tHg and MeHg ranged from 21.4 to 51.7% (mean 37.4%) and 19.5 to 59.2% (mean 43.7%), respectively. Based on total concentrations, diets of 36% of adults and 51% of children exceeded the reference dose (RfD, 100ngkg(-1)bodymass(bm)d(-1)) for MeHg, but when bioaccessibility was considered, consumption of local market fish would not result in an EDIbio exceeded the RfD of MeHg for Hong Kong adults. These contradictory results suggested that risk assessments based on total concentrations would overestimate exposure because not all of contaminants consumed are bioaccessible. Furthermore, 9% of children had EDIbio for MeHg that exceeded the RfD, which suggests that more attention should be paid to consumption of local fish on health and development of children in Hong Kong.

  4. Gestational exposure to methylmercury and n-3 fatty acids: effects on high- and low-rate operant behavior in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Paletz, Elliott M; Craig-Schmidt, Margaret C; Newland, M Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Fish in the diet is the major source of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure, but eating fish also provides important nutrients. Many fish species contain essential long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 (or n-3) fatty acid, that is important for neural development and function. To examine interactions between MeHg and n-3 fatty acids, female Long-Evans rats were exposed, in utero, to 0, 0.5, or 5 ppm MeHg via drinking water, approximating exposures of 0, 40, and 400 mug/kg/day. They also received pre- and postnatal exposure to a diet containing either fish oil or coconut oil, creating a 2 (Diet)x3 (MeHg) full factorial design, with 6-8 rats per cell. The diets were high or marginal, respectively, in n-3 fatty acids but approximately equal in n-6 fatty acids. No exposure-related effects on developmental milestones or growth were noted. Behavior was evaluated using a series of rapidly increasing fixed ratio (FR) schedules of sucrose reinforcement; 1, 5, 25 and 75 lever presses were required for sucrose delivery, with three sessions provided at each requirement. This phase was followed by four sessions of a differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate-behavior (DRL) schedule, in which presses preceded by 10 s (or more) without a press were reinforced. Subsequently, several progressive ratio (PR) schedules that increased response requirements throughout a single session by a rate of 5%, 10%, or 20% were imposed. Rats exposed during gestation to MeHg had significantly higher response rates than controls under the large FR schedules, during the first session of DRL, and the PR 5% schedule, but neither fish oil nor coconut oil modified MeHg's effects. This finding is consistent with hypotheses that developmental MeHg exposure produced perseverative responding or altered the sensitivity of behavior to its reinforcing consequences and that certain reinforcement contingencies can unmask MeHg's effects.

  5. Differential gene expression associated with dietary methylmercury (MeHg) exposure in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Basu, Niladri; Goetz, Giles; Jiang, Nan; Hutz, Reinhold J; Tonellato, Peter J; Carvan, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and evaluate conserved biomarkers that could be used in most species of teleost fish at most life-stages. We investigated the effects of sublethal methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on developing rainbow trout and zebrafish. Juvenile rainbow trout and young adult zebrafish were fed food with MeHg added at 0, 0.5, 5, and 50 ppm. Atomic absorption spectrometry was applied to measure whole body total Hg levels, and pathologic analysis was performed to identify MeHg-induced toxicity. Fish at 6 weeks were sampled from each group for microarray analysis using RNA from whole fish. MeHg-exposed trout and zebrafish did not show overt signs of toxicity or pathology, nor were significant differences seen in mortality, length, mass, or condition factor. The accumulation of MeHg in trout and zebrafish exhibited dose- and time-dependent patterns during 6 weeks, and zebrafish exhibited greater assimilation of total Hg than rainbow trout. The dysregulated genes in MeHg-treated fish have multiple functional annotations, such as iron ion homeostasis, glutathione transferase activity, regulation of muscle contraction, troponin I binding and calcium-dependent protein binding. Genes were selected as biomarker candidates based on their microarray data and their expression was evaluated by QPCR. Unfortunately, these genes are not good consistent biomarkers for both rainbow trout and zebrafish from QPCR evaluation using individual fish. Our conclusion is that biomarker analysis for aquatic toxicant assessment using fish needs to be based on tissue-, sex- and species-specific consideration.

  6. Prenatal exposure to methylmercury and LCPUFA in relation to birth weight

    PubMed Central

    van Wijngaarden, E; Harrington, D; Kobrosly, R; Thurston, SW; O’Hara, T; McSorley, EM; Myers, GJ; Watson, GE; Shamlaye, CF; Strain, JJ; Davidson, PW

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic studies have been inconclusive regarding the impact of co-exposure to long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) and methyl mercury (MeHg) from fish consumption during pregnancy on measures of fetal development. Objectives We evaluated the association between birth weight and prenatal maternal LCPUFA status and MeHg exposure in the Republic of Seychelles. Methods We measured LCPUFA in maternal whole blood collected at 28 weeks of gestation and following delivery, and MeHg in maternal hair obtained at delivery. There were 230 births with complete data on birth weight and covariates. Multiple linear regression models controlled for infant sex, gestational age, maternal age, smoking during pregnancy, intrapartum weight gain, pre-pregnancy body mass index, maternal socioeconomic status, parity, gestational diabetes, and alcohol use during pregnancy. Results The average birth weight was 3,252 g (range 1654–4450) and the average gestational age was 39 weeks (range 34–41). Prenatal MeHg exposure and maternal LCPUFA status were not associated with birth weight. Infant sex and length of gestation were the only predictors, with male sex and increased gestational age consistently associated with greater birth weight. Conclusions These findings do not support a relationship between prenatal exposure to LCPUFA and/or MeHg from fish consumption and birth weight. PMID:24525104

  7. Prenatal methylmercury exposure hampers glutathione antioxidant system ontogenesis and causes long-lasting oxidative stress in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Stringari, James; Nunes, Adriana K C; Franco, Jeferson L; Bohrer, Denise; Garcia, Solange C; Dafre, Alcir L; Milatovic, Dejan; Souza, Diogo O; Rocha, João B T; Aschner, Michael; Farina, Marcelo

    2008-02-15

    During the perinatal period, the central nervous system (CNS) is extremely sensitive to metals, including methylmercury (MeHg). Although the mechanism(s) associated with MeHg-induced developmental neurotoxicity remains obscure, several studies point to the glutathione (GSH) antioxidant system as an important molecular target for this toxicant. To extend our recent findings of MeHg-induced GSH dyshomeostasis, the present study was designed to assess the developmental profile of the GSH antioxidant system in the mouse brain during the early postnatal period after in utero exposure to MeHg. Pregnant mice were exposed to different doses of MeHg (1, 3 and 10 mg/l, diluted in drinking water, ad libitum) during the gestational period. After delivery, pups were killed at different time points - postnatal days (PND) 1, 11 and 21 - and the whole brain was used for determining biochemical parameters related to the antioxidant GSH system, as well as mercury content and the levels of F(2)-isoprostane. In control animals, cerebral GSH levels significantly increased over time during the early postnatal period; gestational exposure to MeHg caused a dose-dependent inhibition of this developmental event. Cerebral glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities significantly increased over time during the early postnatal period in control animals; gestational MeHg exposure induced a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both developmental phenomena. These adverse effects of prenatal MeHg exposure were corroborated by marked increases in cerebral F(2)-isoprostanes levels at all time points. Significant negative correlations were found between F(2)-isoprostanes and GSH, as well as between F(2)-isoprostanes and GPx activity, suggesting that MeHg-induced disruption of the GSH system maturation is related to MeHg-induced increased lipid peroxidation in the pup brain. In utero MeHg exposure also caused a dose-dependent increase in the cerebral levels of mercury at

  8. Prenatal methylmercury exposure hampers glutathione antioxidant system ontogenesis and causes long-lasting oxidative stress in the mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Stringari, James; Nunes, Adriana K.C.; Franco, Jeferson L.; Bohrer, Denise; Garcia, Solange C.; Dafre, Alcir L.; Milatovic, Dejan; Souza, Diogo O.; Rocha, Joao B.T.; Aschner, Michael; Farina, Marcelo

    2008-02-15

    During the perinatal period, the central nervous system (CNS) is extremely sensitive to metals, including methylmercury (MeHg). Although the mechanism(s) associated with MeHg-induced developmental neurotoxicity remains obscure, several studies point to the glutathione (GSH) antioxidant system as an important molecular target for this toxicant. To extend our recent findings of MeHg-induced GSH dyshomeostasis, the present study was designed to assess the developmental profile of the GSH antioxidant system in the mouse brain during the early postnatal period after in utero exposure to MeHg. Pregnant mice were exposed to different doses of MeHg (1, 3 and 10 mg/l, diluted in drinking water, ad libitum) during the gestational period. After delivery, pups were killed at different time points - postnatal days (PND) 1, 11 and 21 - and the whole brain was used for determining biochemical parameters related to the antioxidant GSH system, as well as mercury content and the levels of F{sub 2}-isoprostane. In control animals, cerebral GSH levels significantly increased over time during the early postnatal period; gestational exposure to MeHg caused a dose-dependent inhibition of this developmental event. Cerebral glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities significantly increased over time during the early postnatal period in control animals; gestational MeHg exposure induced a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both developmental phenomena. These adverse effects of prenatal MeHg exposure were corroborated by marked increases in cerebral F{sub 2}-isoprostanes levels at all time points. Significant negative correlations were found between F{sub 2}-isoprostanes and GSH, as well as between F{sub 2}-isoprostanes and GPx activity, suggesting that MeHg-induced disruption of the GSH system maturation is related to MeHg-induced increased lipid peroxidation in the pup brain. In utero MeHg exposure also caused a dose-dependent increase in the cerebral levels of

  9. Mercury Exposure in a Riverside Amazon Population, Brazil: A Study of the Ototoxicity of Methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Ana; Pacheco-Ferreira, Heloisa; Sanches, Seisse Gabriela G.; Carvallo, Renata; Cardoso, Nathália; Perez, Maurício; Câmara, Volney de Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mercury poisoning causes hearing loss in humans and animals. Acute and long-term exposures produce irreversible peripheral and central auditory system damage, and mercury in its various forms of presentation in the environment is ototoxic. Objective We investigated the otoacoustic emissions responses in a riverside population exposed to environmental mercury by analyzing the inhibitory effect of the medial olivocochlear system (MOCS) on transient otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE). Methods The purpose of the research was to evaluate the entire community independently of variables of sex and age. All of the participants were born and lived in a riverside community. After otolaryngologic evaluation, participants were received tympanometry, evaluation of contralateral acoustic reflexes, pure tone audiometry, and recording of TEOAEs with nonlinear click stimulation. Hair samples were collect to measure mercury levels. Results There was no significant correlation between the inhibitory effect of the MOCS, age, and the level of mercury in the hair. Conclusions The pathophysiological effects of chronic exposure may be subtle and nonspecific and can have a long period of latency; therefore, it will be important to monitor the effects of mercury exposure in the central auditory system of the Amazon population over time. Longitudinal studies should be performed to determine whether the inhibitory effect of the MOCS on otoacoustic emissions can be an evaluation method and diagnostic tool in populations exposed to mercury. PMID:25992169

  10. Methylmercury exposure in a subsistence fishing community in Lake Chapala, Mexico: an ecological approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Elevated concentrations of mercury have been documented in fish in Lake Chapala in central Mexico, an area that is home to a large subsistence fishing community. However, neither the extent of human mercury exposure nor its sources and routes have been elucidated. Methods Total mercury concentrations were measured in samples of fish from Lake Chapala; in sections of sediment cores from the delta of Rio Lerma, the major tributary to the lake; and in a series of suspended-particle samples collected at sites from the mouth of the Lerma to mid-Lake. A cross-sectional survey of 92 women ranging in age from 18-45 years was conducted in three communities along the Lake to investigate the relationship between fish consumption and hair mercury concentrations among women of child-bearing age. Results Highest concentrations of mercury in fish samples were found in carp (mean 0.87 ppm). Sediment data suggest a pattern of moderate ongoing contamination. Analyses of particles filtered from the water column showed highest concentrations of mercury near the mouth of the Lerma. In the human study, 27.2% of women had >1 ppm hair mercury. On multivariable analysis, carp consumption and consumption of fish purchased or captured from Lake Chapala were both associated with significantly higher mean hair mercury concentrations. Conclusions Our preliminary data indicate that, despite a moderate level of contamination in recent sediments and suspended particulate matter, carp in Lake Chapala contain mercury concentrations of concern for local fish consumers. Consumption of carp appears to contribute significantly to body burden in this population. Further studies of the consequences of prenatal exposure for child neurodevelopment are being initiated. PMID:20064246

  11. Use of a 15 k gene microarray to determine gene expression changes in response to acute and chronic methylmercury exposure in the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas Rafinesque

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klaper, R.; Carter, Barbara J.; Richter, C.A.; Drevnick, P.E.; Sandheinrich, M.B.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the use of a 15 000 gene microarray developed for the toxicological model species, Pimephales promelas, in investigating the impact of acute and chronic methylmercury exposures in male gonad and liver tissues. The results show significant differences in the individual genes that were differentially expressed in response to each treatment. In liver, a total of 650 genes exhibited significantly (P < 0.05) altered expression with greater than two-fold differences from the controls in response to acute exposure and a total of 267 genes were differentially expressed in response to chronic exposure. A majority of these genes were downregulated rather than upregulated. Fewer genes were altered in gonad than in liver at both timepoints. A total of 212 genes were differentially expressed in response to acute exposure and 155 genes were altered in response to chronic exposure. Despite the differences in individual genes expressed across treatments, the functional categories that altered genes were associated with showed some similarities. Of interest in light of other studies involving the effects of methylmercury on fish, several genes associated with apoptosis were upregulated in response to both acute and chronic exposures. Induction of apoptosis has been associated with effects on reproduction seen in the previous studies. This study demonstrates the utility of microarray analysis for investigations of the physiological effects of toxicants as well as the time-course of effects that may take place. In addition, it is the first publication to demonstrate the use of this new 15 000 gene microarray for fish biology and toxicology. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  12. Hair-to-blood ratio and biological half-life of mercury: experimental study of methylmercury exposure through fish consumption in humans.

    PubMed

    Yaginuma-Sakurai, Kozue; Murata, Katsuyuki; Iwai-Shimada, Miyuki; Nakai, Kunihiko; Kurokawa, Naoyuki; Tatsuta, Nozomi; Satoh, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    The hair-to-blood ratio and biological half-life of methylmercury in a one-compartment model seem to differ between past and recent studies. To reevaluate them, 27 healthy volunteers were exposed to methylmercury at the provisional tolerable weekly intake (3.4 µg/kg body weight/week) for adults through fish consumption for 14 weeks, followed by a 15-week washout period after the cessation of exposure. Blood was collected every 1 or 2 weeks, and hair was cut every 4 weeks. Total mercury (T-Hg) concentrations were analyzed in blood and hair. The T-Hg levels of blood and hair changed with time (p < 0.001). The mean concentrations increased from 6.7 ng/g at week 0 to 26.9 ng/g at week 14 in blood, and from 2.3 to 8.8 µg/g in hair. The mean hair-to-blood ratio after the adjustment for the time lag from blood to hair was 344 ± 54 (S.D.) for the entire period. The half-lives of T-Hg were calculated from raw data to be 94 ± 23 days for blood and 102 ± 31 days for hair, but the half-lives recalculated after subtracting the background levels from the raw data were 57 ± 18 and 64 ± 22 days, respectively. In conclusion, the hair-to-blood ratio of methylmercury, based on past studies, appears to be underestimated in light of recent studies. The crude half-life may be preferred rather than the recalculated one because of the practicability and uncertainties of the background level, though the latter half-life may approximate the conventional one.

  13. The effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure on trace element and antioxidant levels in rats following 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal insult.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Moosa, Zulfiah; Daniels, Willie M U; Mabandla, Musa V

    2014-06-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a metal toxin found commonly in the environment. Studies have shown severe neurotoxic effects of MeHg poisoning especially during pregnancy where it crosses the foetoplacental and the blood brain barrier of the foetus leading to neurodevelopmental deficits in the offspring. These deficits may predispose offspring to neurodegenerative diseases later in life. In this study we investigated the effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure (2.5 mg/L in drinking water from GND 1-GND 21) on the trace element status in the brain of adolescent offspring (PND 28). Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was measured in their blood plasma. In a separate group of animals that was also exposed prenatally to MeHg, 6-hydroydopamine (6-OHDA) was administered at PND 60 as a model of neuronal insult. Trace element and TAC levels were compared before and after 6-OHDA exposure. Prenatal MeHg treatment alone resulted in significantly higher concentrations of zinc, copper, manganese and selenium in the brain of offspring at PND 28 (p < 0.05), when compared to controls. In contrast, brain iron levels in MeHg-exposed adolescent offspring were significantly lower than their controls (p < 0.05). Following 6-OHDA exposure, the levels of iron, zinc, copper and manganese were increased compared to sham-lesioned offspring (p < 0.05). Prenatal MeHg exposure further increased these trace element levels thereby promoting toxicity (p < 0.05). Total antioxidant capacity was not significantly different in MeHg and control groups prior to lesion. However, following 6-OHDA administration, MeHg-exposed animals had a significantly lower TAC than that of controls (p < 0.05). Brain TAC levels were higher in adult male rats than in female rats during adolescence however male rats that had been exposed to MeHg in utero failed to show this increase at PND 74. Prenatal MeHg exposure results in trace element dyshomeostasis in the brain of offspring and reduces total

  14. Neurotoxicity of methylmercury in the pigeon

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.L.; Garman, R.H.; Laties, V.G.

    1982-11-01

    Pigeons repeatedly exposed to sublethal doses of methylmercury (5-10 mg Hg/kg/wk, po, for 34-77 days) exhibited marked behavioral changes that were accompanied by only minor evidence of neuropathologic changes at the light microscopic level. Accuracy and rate of pecking for grain declined while food intake remained unchanged. Methylmercury produced permanent changes in posture and in motor coordination. The regional distribution of methylmercury within the nervous system was poorly correlated with the distribution of pathologic changes. Overt behavioral signs appeared after the brain accumulated more than about 12 to 16 ppm Hg. Data with pigeons support earlier evidence that the dose-response function for methylmercury is modulated by dose rate and duration of exposure, since the pattern of blood and tissue distribution of Hg is established in advance of the appearance of signs. The pigeon is more sensitive to methylmercury than are mice and rats, but less sensitive than primates.

  15. Reducing Periconceptional Methylmercury Exposure: Cost–Utility Analysis for a Proposed Screening Program for Women Planning a Pregnancy in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, Colin; Coyle, Doug

    2015-01-01

    Background The assessment of neurodevelopmental effects in children associated with prenatal methylmercury exposure, from contaminated fish and seafood in the maternal diet, has recently been strengthened by adjustment for the negative confounding resulting from co-exposure to beneficial polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Objectives We aimed to determine the cost-effectiveness of a periconceptional screening program of blood mercury concentration for women planning to become pregnant in Ontario, Canada. Fish intake recommendations would be provided for those found to have blood mercury levels above the intervention threshold. Methods Analysis was conducted using a combined decision tree/Markov model to compare the proposed screening intervention with standard care from a societal perspective over a lifetime horizon. We used the national blood mercury distributions of women 20–49 years of age reported in the Canadian Health Measures Survey from 2009 through 2011 to determine the cognitive deficits associated with prenatal methylmercury exposure for successful planned pregnancies. Outcomes modeled included the loss in quality of life and the remedial education costs. Value of information analysis was conducted to assess the underlying uncertainty around the model results and to identify which parameters contribute most to this uncertainty. Results The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained for the proposed screening intervention was estimated to be Can$18,051, and the expected value for a willingness to pay of Can$50,000/QALY to be Can$0.61. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the proposed periconceptional blood mercury screening program for women planning a pregnancy would be highly cost-effective from a societal perspective. The results of a value of information analysis confirm the robustness of the study’s conclusions. Citation Gaskin J, Rennie C, Coyle D. 2015. Reducing periconceptional methylmercury exposure: cost

  16. Perinatal exposure to low-dose methylmercury induces dysfunction of motor coordination with decreases in synaptophysin expression in the cerebellar granule cells of rats.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Masatake; Cheng, Jinping; Zhao, Wenchang

    2012-06-29

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental pollutant that is toxic to the developing central nervous system (CNS) in children, even at low exposure levels. Perinatal exposure to MeHg is known to induce neurological symptoms with neuropathological changes in the CNS. However, the relationship between the neurological symptoms and neuropathological changes induced in offspring as a result of exposure to low-dose MeHg is not well defined. In the present study, neurobehavioral analyses revealed that exposure to a low level of MeHg (5 ppm in drinking water) during developmental caused a significant deficit in the motor coordination of rats in the rotating rod test. In contrast, general neuropathological findings, including neuronal cell death and the subsequent nerve inflammation, were not observed in the region of the cerebellum responsible for regulating motor coordination. Surprisingly, the expression of synaptophysin (SPP), a marker protein for synaptic formation, significantly decreased in cerebellar granule cells. These results showed that perinatal exposure to low-dose MeHg causes neurobehavioral impairment without general neuropathological changes in rats. We demonstrated for the first time that exposure to low-dose MeHg during development induces the dysfunction of motor coordination due to changes of synaptic homeostasis in cerebellar granule cells.

  17. Methylmercury Poisoning in Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakir, F.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Discusses incidence of methylmercury poisoning throughout the world with increasing industrial and agricultural use of mercury compounds. Describes recent epidemic in Iraq resulting from use of wheat treated with methylmercurial fungicide. New data are presented on the toxicity of methylmercury and its metabolic fate in the human body. (JR)

  18. Maternal PUFA status but not prenatal methylmercury exposure is associated with children's language functions at age five years in the Seychelles.

    PubMed

    Strain, J J; Davidson, Philip W; Thurston, Sally W; Harrington, Donald; Mulhern, Maria S; McAfee, Alison J; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Shamlaye, Conrad F; Henderson, Juliette; Watson, Gene E; Zareba, Grazyna; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A; Lynch, Miranda; Wallace, Julie M W; McSorley, Emeir M; Bonham, Maxine P; Stokes-Riner, Abbie; Sloane-Reeves, Jean; Janciuras, Joanne; Wong, Rosa; Clarkson, Thomas W; Myers, Gary J

    2012-11-01

    Evidence from the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study suggests that maternal nutritional status can modulate the relationship between prenatal methylmercury (MeHg) exposure and developmental outcomes in children. The aim of this study was to investigate whether maternal PUFA status was a confounding factor in any possible associations between prenatal MeHg exposure and developmental outcomes at 5 y of age in the Republic of Seychelles. Maternal status of (n-3) and (n-6) PUFA were measured in serum collected at 28 wk gestation and delivery. Prenatal MeHg exposure was determined in maternal hair collected at delivery. At 5 y of age, the children completed a comprehensive range of sensitive developmental assessments. Complete data from 225 mothers and their children were available for analysis. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed Preschool Language Scale scores of the children improved with increasing maternal serum DHA [22:6(n-3)] concentrations and decreased with increasing arachidonic acid [20:4(n-6)] concentrations, albeit verbal intelligence improved with increasing (n-6) PUFA concentrations in maternal serum. There were no adverse associations between MeHg exposure and developmental outcomes. These findings suggest that higher fish consumption, resulting in higher maternal (n-3) PUFA status, during pregnancy is associated with beneficial developmental effects rather than detrimental effects resulting from the higher concomitant exposures of the fetus to MeHg. The association of maternal (n-3) PUFA status with improved child language development may partially explain the authors' previous finding of improving language scores, as prenatal MeHg exposure increased in an earlier mother-child cohort in the Seychelles where maternal PUFA status was not measured.

  19. Use of Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis with a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of methylmercury to estimate exposures in US women of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Allen, Bruce C; Hack, C Eric; Clewell, Harvey J

    2007-08-01

    A Bayesian approach, implemented using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis, was applied with a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of methylmercury (MeHg) to evaluate the variability of MeHg exposure in women of childbearing age in the U.S. population. The analysis made use of the newly available National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES) blood and hair mercury concentration data for women of age 16-49 years (sample size, 1,582). Bayesian analysis was performed to estimate the population variability in MeHg exposure (daily ingestion rate) implied by the variation in blood and hair concentrations of mercury in the NHANES database. The measured variability in the NHANES blood and hair data represents the result of a process that includes interindividual variation in exposure to MeHg and interindividual variation in the pharmacokinetics (distribution, clearance) of MeHg. The PBPK model includes a number of pharmacokinetic parameters (e.g., tissue volumes, partition coefficients, rate constants for metabolism and elimination) that can vary from individual to individual within the subpopulation of interest. Using MCMC analysis, it was possible to combine prior distributions of the PBPK model parameters with the NHANES blood and hair data, as well as with kinetic data from controlled human exposures to MeHg, to derive posterior distributions that refine the estimates of both the population exposure distribution and the pharmacokinetic parameters. In general, based on the populations surveyed by NHANES, the results of the MCMC analysis indicate that a small fraction, less than 1%, of the U.S. population of women of childbearing age may have mercury exposures greater than the EPA RfD for MeHg of 0.1 microg/kg/day, and that there are few, if any, exposures greater than the ATSDR MRL of 0.3 microg/kg/day. The analysis also indicates that typical exposures may be greater than previously estimated from food consumption surveys, but that the variability

  20. Recent evidence from epidemiological studies on methylmercury toxicity.

    PubMed

    Murata, Katsuyuki; Yoshida, Minoru; Sakamoto, Mineshi; Iwai-Shimada, Miyuki; Yaginuma-Sakurai, Kozue; Tatsuta, Nozomi; Iwata, Toyoto; Karita, Kanae; Nakai, Kunihiko

    2011-09-01

    More than fifty years have passed since the outbreak of Minamata disease, and large-scale methylmercury poisoning due to industrial effluents or methylmercury-containing fungicide intoxication has scarcely happened in developed countries. On the other hand, widespread environmental mercury contamination has occurred in gold and mercury mining areas of developing countries. In this article, we provided an overview of recent studies addressing human health effects of methylmercury, which we searched using the PubMed of the US National Library of Medicine. The following suggestions were obtained for low-level methylmercury exposure: (1) In recent years, the proportion of human studies addressing methylmercury has tended to decrease. (2) Prenatal exposure to methylmercury through fish intake, even at low levels, adversely affects child development after adjusting for polychlorinated biphenyls and maternal fish intake during pregnancy, whereas maternal seafood intake has some benefits. (3) Long-term methylmercury exposure through consumption of fish such as bigeye tuna and swordfish may pose a potential risk of cardiac events involving sympathovagal imbalance. (4) In measuring methylmercury levels in preserved umbilical cord collected from inhabitants born in Minamata areas between 1945 and 1989, the elevated concentrations (≥1 mg/g) were observed mainly in inhabitants born between 1947 and 1968, and the peak coincided with the peak of acetaldehyde production in Minamata. (5) Since some developing countries appear to be in similar situations to Japan in the past, attention should be directed toward early recognition of a risky agent and precautions should be taken against it.

  1. BRAIN DEVELOPMENT AND METHYLMERCURY: UNDERESTIMATION OF NEUROTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Philippe; Herz, Katherine T.

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury is now recognized as an important developmental neurotoxicant, though this insight developed slowly over many decades. Developmental neurotoxicity was first reported in a Swedish case report in 1952, and from a serious outbreak in Minamata, Japan a few years later. While the infant suffered congenital poisoning, the mother was barely harmed, thus reflecting a unique vulnerability of the developing nervous system. Nonetheless, exposure limits for this environmental chemical were based solely on adult toxicity until 50 years after the first report on developmental neurotoxicity. Even current evidence is affected by uncertainty, most importantly by imprecision of the exposure assessment in epidemiological studies. Detailed calculations suggest that the relative imprecision may be as much as 50%, or greater, thereby substantially biasing the results toward the null. In addition, as methylmercury exposure usually originates from fish and seafood that also contains essential nutrients, so-called negative confounding may occur. Thus, the beneficial effects of the nutrients may appear to dampen the toxicity, unless proper adjustment is included in the analysis to reveal the true extent of adverse effects. These problems delayed the recognition of low-level methylmercury neurotoxicity. However, such problems are not unique, and many other industrial compounds are thought to cause developmental neurotoxicity, mostly with less epidemiological support than methylmercury. The experience obtained with methylmercury should therefore be taken into account when evaluating the evidence for other substances suspected of being neurotoxic. PMID:21259267

  2. Low level postnatal methylmercury exposure in vivo alters developmental forms of short-term synaptic plasticity in the visual cortex of rat

    SciTech Connect

    Dasari, Sameera; Yuan, Yukun

    2009-11-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) has been previously shown to affect neurotransmitter release. Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) is primarily related to changes in the probability of neurotransmitter release. To determine if MeHg affects STP development, we examined STP forms in the visual cortex of rat following in vivo MeHg exposure. Neonatal rats received 0 (0.9% NaCl), 0.75 or 1.5 mg/kg/day MeHg subcutaneously for 15 or 30 days beginning on postnatal day 5, after which visual cortical slices were prepared for field potential recordings. In slices prepared from rats treated with vehicle, field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) evoked by paired-pulse stimulation at 20-200 ms inter-stimulus intervals showed a depression (PPD) of the second fEPSP (fEPSP2). PPD was also seen in slices prepared from rats after 15 day treatment with 0.75 or 1.5 mg/kg/day MeHg. However, longer duration treatment (30 days) with either dose of MeHg resulted in paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) of fEPSP2 in the majority of slices examined. PPF remained observable in slices prepared from animals in which MeHg exposure had been terminated for 30 days after completion of the initial 30 day MeHg treatment, whereas slices from control animals still showed PPD. MeHg did not cause any frequency- or region-preferential effect on STP. Manipulations of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e} or application of the GABA{sub A} receptor antagonist bicuculline could alter the strength and polarity of MeHg-induced changes in STP. Thus, these data suggest that low level postnatal MeHg exposure interferes with the developmental transformation of STP in the visual cortex, which is a long-lasting effect.

  3. Global transcriptome analysis of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) liver after in vivo methylmercury exposure suggests effects on energy metabolism pathways.

    PubMed

    Yadetie, Fekadu; Karlsen, Odd Andre; Lanzén, Anders; Berg, Karin; Olsvik, Pål; Hogstrand, Christer; Goksøyr, Anders

    2013-01-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a widely distributed contaminant polluting many aquatic environments, with health risks to humans exposed mainly through consumption of seafood. The mechanisms of toxicity of MeHg are not completely understood. In order to map the range of molecular targets and gain better insights into the mechanisms of toxicity, we prepared Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) 135k oligonucleotide arrays and performed global analysis of transcriptional changes in the liver of fish treated with MeHg (0.5 and 2 mg/kg of body weight) for 14 days. Inferring from the observed transcriptional changes, the main pathways significantly affected by the treatment were energy metabolism, oxidative stress response, immune response and cytoskeleton remodeling. Consistent with known effects of MeHg, many transcripts for genes in oxidative stress pathways such as glutathione metabolism and Nrf2 regulation of oxidative stress response were differentially regulated. Among the differentially regulated genes, there were disproportionate numbers of genes coding for enzymes involved in metabolism of amino acids, fatty acids and glucose. In particular, many genes coding for enzymes of fatty acid beta-oxidation were up-regulated. The coordinated effects observed on many transcripts coding for enzymes of energy pathways may suggest disruption of nutrient metabolism by MeHg. Many transcripts for genes coding for enzymes in the synthetic pathways of sulphur containing amino acids were also up-regulated, suggesting adaptive responses to MeHg toxicity. By this toxicogenomics approach, we were also able to identify many potential biomarker candidate genes for monitoring environmental MeHg pollution. These results based on changes on transcript levels, however, need to be confirmed by other methods such as proteomics.

  4. Inhibition of the Rho/ROCK pathway prevents neuronal degeneration in vitro and in vivo following methylmercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimura, Masatake; Usuki, Fusako; Kawamura, Miwako; Izumo, Shuji

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental neurotoxicant which induces neuropathological changes in both the central nervous and peripheral sensory nervous systems. Our recent study demonstrated that down-regulation of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), which is known to promote neuritic extension, preceded MeHg-induced damage in cultured cortical neurons, suggesting that MeHg-mediated axonal degeneration is due to the disturbance of neuritic extension. Therefore we hypothesized that MeHg-induced axonal degeneration might be caused by neuritic extension/retraction incoordination. This idea brought our attention to the Ras homolog gene (Rho)/Rho-associated coiled coil-forming protein kinase (ROCK) pathway because it has been known to be associated with the development of axon and apoptotic neuronal cell death. Here we show that inhibition of the Rho/ROCK pathway prevents MeHg-intoxication both in vitro and in vivo. A Rho inhibitor, C3 toxin, and 2 ROCK inhibitors, Fasudil and Y-27632, significantly protected against MeHg-induced axonal degeneration and apoptotic neuronal cell death in cultured cortical neuronal cells exposed to 100 nM MeHg for 3 days. Furthermore, Fasudil partially prevented the loss of large pale neurons in dorsal root ganglia, axonal degeneration in dorsal spinal root nerves, and vacuolar degeneration in the dorsal columns of the spinal cord in MeHg-intoxicated model rats (20 ppm MeHg in drinking water for 28 days). Hind limb crossing sign, a characteristic MeHg-intoxicated sign, was significantly suppressed in this model. The results suggest that inhibition of the Rho/ROCK pathway rescues MeHg-mediated neuritic extension/retraction incoordination and is effective for the prevention of MeHg-induced axonal degeneration and apoptotic neuronal cell death.

  5. Effects of methylmercury exposure on glutathione metabolism, oxidative stress, and chromosomal damage in captive-reared common loon (Gavia immer) chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenow, K.P.; Hoffman, D.J.; Hines, R.K.; Meyer, M.W.; Bickham, J.W.; Matson, C.W.; Stebbins, K.R.; Montagna, P.; Elfessi, A.

    2008-01-01

    We quantified the level of dietary mercury (Hg), delivered as methylmercury chloride (CH3HgCl), associated with negative effects on organ and plasma biochemistries related to glutathione (GSH) metabolism and oxidative stress, and chromosomal damage in captive-reared common loon (Gavia immer) chicks reared from hatch to 105 days. Mercury-associated effects related to oxidative stress and altered glutathione metabolism occurred at 1.2 :g Hg/g and 0.4 :g Hg/g, an ecologically relevant dietary mercury level, but not at 0.08 :g Hg/g. Among the variables that contributed most to dissimilarities in tissue chemistries between control and treatment groups were increased levels of oxidized glutathione (GSSG), GSH peroxidase, and the ratio of GSSG to GSH in brain tissue; increased levels of hepatic GSH; and decreased levels of hepatic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH). Our results also suggest that chronic exposure to environmentally relevant dietary Hg levels did not result in statistically significant somatic chromosomal damage in common loon chicks. Oxidative stress and altered glutathione metabolism were evident in common loon chicks exposed to >0.4 :g Hg as CH3HgCl per gram wet food intake.

  6. Associations between Prenatal and Recent Postnatal Methylmercury Exposure and Auditory Function at age 19 years in the Seychelles Child Development Study

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Mark S.; Dziorny, Adam C.; Harrington, Donald; Love, Tanzy; Shamlaye, Conrad F.; Watson, Gene E.; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Davidson, Philip W.; Myers, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine if prenatal or recent postnatal methylmercury (MeHg) exposure from consuming ocean fish and seafood is associated with auditory deficits in young adults. Some investigators have reported adverse associations while others have found no associations. Ocean fish is an important nutrient source for billions of people around the world. Consequently, determining if there is an adverse association with objective auditory measures is important in assessing whether a risk is present or not. Design The peripheral and central auditory function of 534 subjects in the Seychelles Child Development Study (SCDS) Main Cohort was examined at age 19 years. The auditory test battery included standard pure-tone audiometry, tympanometry, Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) latencies, and both click-evoked and distortion-product Otoacoustic Emissions (OAE). Associations with MeHg were evaluated with multiple linear regression models, adjusting for sex, recent postnatal MeHg exposure, and hearing loss. Results Bilateral hearing loss (defined as a mean pure-tone threshold of greater than 25 dB) was present in 1.1% of the subjects and was not associated with prenatal or recent postnatal MeHg exposure. As expected, absolute and interwave ABR latencies were shorter for women as compared to men, as the stimulus presentation rate decreased from 69.9 to 19.9 clicks/sec and as the stimulus intensity increased from 60 to 80 dBnHL. Similarly, larger OAE amplitudes were elicited in women as compared to men and in the right ears as compared to the left. There was no association of prenatal MeHg exposure with hearing loss, ABR absolute and interwave latencies or OAE amplitudes. As recent postnatal MeHg increased, some associations were found with a few ABR absolute and interwave latencies and a few OAE amplitudes. However, the direction of these associations was inconsistent. As recent postnatal MeHg levels increased the wave I absolute latencies were shorter at 80 dBnHL for all

  7. Low-level exposure to methylmercury modifies muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding characteristics in rat brain and lymphocytes: physiologic implications and new opportunities in biologic monitoring.

    PubMed Central

    Coccini, T; Randine, G; Candura, S M; Nappi, R E; Prockop, L D; Manzo, L

    2000-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) affects several parameters of cholinergic function. These alterations are thought to play a role in MeHg neurotoxicity. In vitro experiments have indicated that MeHg acts as a strong competitive inhibitor of radioligand binding to muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs) in rat brain. Furthermore, rat brain mAChRs share several pharmacologic characteristics of similar receptors present on lymphocytes. Using the muscarinic antagonist [(3)H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) to label receptors, we investigated the in vivo interactions of MeHg with rat brain mAChRs. We also investigated whether MeHg-induced central mAChR changes are reflected by similar alterations in splenic lymphocytes. Exposure to low doses of MeHg--0.5 or 2 mg/kg/day in drinking water--for 16 days significantly increased (20-44% of control) mAChRs density (B(max)) in the hippocampus and cerebellum without affecting receptor affinity (K(d)). The effect of MeHg did not occur immediately; it was not apparent until 2 weeks after the termination of treatment. No significant changes in [(3)H]QNB binding were observed in the cerebral cortex. In splenic lymphocytes, mAChR density was remarkably increased (95-198% of control) by day 14 of MeHg exposure and remained enhanced 14 days after the cessation of treatment. These results suggest up-regulation of mAChRs in selected brain regions (hippocampus and cerebellum) after prolonged low-level ingestion of MeHg in rats. These cerebral effects are delayed in onset and are preceded by a marked increase in density of mAChRs on lymphocytes. In chronic MeHg exposure, peripheral lymphocytes may represent a sensitive target for the interaction of MeHg with mAChRs and, therefore, may be predictive indicators of later adaptive response involving cerebral mAChRs. Additionally, the effect of MeHg on lymphocyte mAChRs in vivo indicates that this receptor system should be investigated further as a possible target for MeHg immunotoxicity. Images Figure 1

  8. Exposure of Arctic populations to methylmercury from consumption of marine food: an updated risk-benefit assessment.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jens C; Gilman, Andrew P

    2005-04-01

    Recent and powerful epidemiological studies have been used as a basis for revising international and domestic guidelines for human exposure to mercury. Long-range transport of mercury into the Arctic makes some Arctic peoples consuming traditional marine foods, especially newborns, children and pregnant women, very vulnerable to harmful exposures. The WHO, the USEPA and Health Canada have all recently revised their mercury intake guidelines as a result of neurological effects reported in children exposed in utero and adults. Guidance values are equivalent to 0.23 microg/kg-bw/d, 0.1 microg/kg-bw/d and 0.2 microg/kg-bw/d respectively. Differences between the numbers represent slight differences in the uncertainty factors applied, rather than in toxicological interpretation. More recent findings suggest that mercury may also be a factor in ischemic heart disease, which could lower guidance values in the future. Considering the benefits of marine fatty acids (n-3 fatty acids) and guidance that populations consume 300-400g fish/week, consumers face a reality that most open ocean and relatively 'unpolluted' fish species contain levels of mercury that would lead to exposures at current guidance levels. Clearly, there is no more room for further mercury pollution and there is an urgent need for international action to reduce mercury emissions. Concomitantly, while there may be a need for public health authorities to provide consumption advisories to some highly exposed populations, such as in the Arctic, there remains a need to better understand the interactions and benefits associated with marine foods that may reduce health risks associated with low-level mercury exposure. PMID:15945282

  9. Methylmercury and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... king crab, shrimp), or canned fish (including light tuna). Fish sticks and fast-food fish are likely ... with lower levels of methylmercury. Canned albacore (white) tuna and fresh tuna steaks typically have higher mercury ...

  10. Optimizing direct immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Odell, Ian D; Cook, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Immunofluorescence is a laboratory technique that utilizes a fluorophore-labeled antibody to detect immune complexes in tissue. Most of the labeled antibodies used in a clinical laboratory bind the conserved domains within each class of human antibodies, allowing them to detect a wide range of autoimmune complexes. Drawbacks to this technique mostly relate to proper handling of the specimen and the fluorophore-labeled antibodies. Therefore, having a basic understanding of fluorophores and antibodies is important for processing a specimen that yields a high signal-to-background ratio as well as troubleshooting problems, should they arise. PMID:25015144

  11. Somatosensory Psychophysical Losses in Inhabitants of Riverside Communities of the Tapajós River Basin, Amazon, Brazil: Exposure to Methylmercury Is Possibly Involved.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Eliana Dirce Torres; Souza, Givago da Silva; da Costa, Carlos Araújo; de Araújo, Amélia Ayako Kamogari; de Oliveira, Cláudia Simone Baltazar; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Pinheiro, Maria da Conceição Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the somatosensory system of methylmercury-exposed inhabitants living in the communities of the Tapajós river basin by using psychophysical tests and to compare with measurements performed in inhabitants of the Tocantins river basin. We studied 108 subjects from Barreiras and São Luiz do Tapajós, two communities of the Tapajós river basin, State of Pará, Amazon, Brazil, aged 13-53 years old. Mercury analysis was performed in head hair samples weighting 0.1-0.2 g by using atomic absorption spectrometry. Three somatosensory psychophysical tests were performed: tactile sensation threshold, vibration sensation duration, and two-point discrimination. Semmes-Weinstein 20 monofilaments with different diameters were used to test the tactile sensation in the lower lip, right and left breasts, right and left index fingers, and right and left hallux. The threshold was the thinner monofilament perceived by the subject. Vibration sensation was investigated using a 128 Hz diapason applied to the sternum, right and left radial sides of the wrist, and right and left outer malleoli. Two trials were performed at each place. A stopwatch recorded the vibration sensation duration. The two-point discrimination test was performed using a two-point discriminator. Head hair mercury concentration was significantly higher in mercury-exposed inhabitants of Tapajós than in non-exposed inhabitants of Tocantins (p < 0.01). When all subjects were divided in two groups independently of age-mercury-exposed and non-exposed-the following results were found: tactile sensation thresholds in mercury-exposed subjects were higher than in non-exposed subjects at all body parts, except at the left chest; vibration sensation durations were shorter in mercury-exposed than in non-exposed subjects, at all locations except in the upper sternum; two-point discrimination thresholds were higher in mercury-exposed than in non-exposed subjects at all body parts. There was

  12. Somatosensory Psychophysical Losses in Inhabitants of Riverside Communities of the Tapajós River Basin, Amazon, Brazil: Exposure to Methylmercury Is Possibly Involved

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Eliana Dirce Torres; Souza, Givago da Silva; da Costa, Carlos Araújo; de Araújo, Amélia Ayako Kamogari; de Oliveira, Cláudia Simone Baltazar; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Pinheiro, Maria da Conceição Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the somatosensory system of methylmercury-exposed inhabitants living in the communities of the Tapajós river basin by using psychophysical tests and to compare with measurements performed in inhabitants of the Tocantins river basin. We studied 108 subjects from Barreiras and São Luiz do Tapajós, two communities of the Tapajós river basin, State of Pará, Amazon, Brazil, aged 13–53 years old. Mercury analysis was performed in head hair samples weighting 0.1–0.2 g by using atomic absorption spectrometry. Three somatosensory psychophysical tests were performed: tactile sensation threshold, vibration sensation duration, and two-point discrimination. Semmes-Weinstein 20 monofilaments with different diameters were used to test the tactile sensation in the lower lip, right and left breasts, right and left index fingers, and right and left hallux. The threshold was the thinner monofilament perceived by the subject. Vibration sensation was investigated using a 128 Hz diapason applied to the sternum, right and left radial sides of the wrist, and right and left outer malleoli. Two trials were performed at each place. A stopwatch recorded the vibration sensation duration. The two-point discrimination test was performed using a two-point discriminator. Head hair mercury concentration was significantly higher in mercury-exposed inhabitants of Tapajós than in non-exposed inhabitants of Tocantins (p < 0.01). When all subjects were divided in two groups independently of age—mercury-exposed and non-exposed—the following results were found: tactile sensation thresholds in mercury-exposed subjects were higher than in non-exposed subjects at all body parts, except at the left chest; vibration sensation durations were shorter in mercury-exposed than in non-exposed subjects, at all locations except in the upper sternum; two-point discrimination thresholds were higher in mercury-exposed than in non-exposed subjects at all body parts

  13. Somatosensory Psychophysical Losses in Inhabitants of Riverside Communities of the Tapajós River Basin, Amazon, Brazil: Exposure to Methylmercury Is Possibly Involved.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Eliana Dirce Torres; Souza, Givago da Silva; da Costa, Carlos Araújo; de Araújo, Amélia Ayako Kamogari; de Oliveira, Cláudia Simone Baltazar; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Pinheiro, Maria da Conceição Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the somatosensory system of methylmercury-exposed inhabitants living in the communities of the Tapajós river basin by using psychophysical tests and to compare with measurements performed in inhabitants of the Tocantins river basin. We studied 108 subjects from Barreiras and São Luiz do Tapajós, two communities of the Tapajós river basin, State of Pará, Amazon, Brazil, aged 13-53 years old. Mercury analysis was performed in head hair samples weighting 0.1-0.2 g by using atomic absorption spectrometry. Three somatosensory psychophysical tests were performed: tactile sensation threshold, vibration sensation duration, and two-point discrimination. Semmes-Weinstein 20 monofilaments with different diameters were used to test the tactile sensation in the lower lip, right and left breasts, right and left index fingers, and right and left hallux. The threshold was the thinner monofilament perceived by the subject. Vibration sensation was investigated using a 128 Hz diapason applied to the sternum, right and left radial sides of the wrist, and right and left outer malleoli. Two trials were performed at each place. A stopwatch recorded the vibration sensation duration. The two-point discrimination test was performed using a two-point discriminator. Head hair mercury concentration was significantly higher in mercury-exposed inhabitants of Tapajós than in non-exposed inhabitants of Tocantins (p < 0.01). When all subjects were divided in two groups independently of age-mercury-exposed and non-exposed-the following results were found: tactile sensation thresholds in mercury-exposed subjects were higher than in non-exposed subjects at all body parts, except at the left chest; vibration sensation durations were shorter in mercury-exposed than in non-exposed subjects, at all locations except in the upper sternum; two-point discrimination thresholds were higher in mercury-exposed than in non-exposed subjects at all body parts. There was

  14. Gender differential effects of developmental exposure to methyl-mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls 126 or 153, or its combinations on motor activity and coordination.

    PubMed

    Cauli, Omar; Piedrafita, Blanca; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2013-09-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and methylmercury (MeHg) are persistent organic pollutants accumulating in the food chain. Pre- and neonatal exposure to these neurotoxicants may affect brain development and lead to long-lasting alterations in cerebral function, which can result in motor alterations in youth and/or adulthood. Some neurotoxicants induce gender specific effects. The aims of the present work were to: (1) assess the effects of developmental exposure to MeHg, PCB 153 or PCB 126 on spontaneous locomotor and vertical activity and motor coordination when the rats are 2-month old; (2) assess whether perinatal exposure to combinations of MeHg with PCB153 or PCB126 alter the effects of the individual neurotoxicants; (3) follow the progression of motor alterations when the rats are 3-, 5- and 7-month old; (4) assess if the effects are similar or different in males and females. Pregnant rats were treated with MeHg (0.5mg/kgday); PCB126 (100ng/kgday) or PCB153 (1mg/kgday) or with combinations of MeHg with each PCB, administered in food from gestational day 7 until weaning at post-natal day 21. PCB 126 impaired motor coordination at 2 months in males but not in females. PCB 153 impaired coordination both in males and females. Combinations of MeHg with PCB153 or PCB126 did not affect motor coordination, indicating that MeHg counteracts the effects of the PBCs. The combination of MeHg and PCB153 induces hypolocomotion at 2 months but hyperactivity at 7 months while the individual compounds did not induce any effect. PCB126 induced gender selective effects, reducing locomotor activity at 2 months in females but not in males. The combination of MeHg and PCB126 behaves as PCB126 alone. All compounds and combinations tested induce gender-selective alterations in vertical activity. The effects on locomotor and vertical activity change with age in the same rats. At 2 months all compounds and combinations reduce vertical activity in females but not in males. At 7 months

  15. Recent evidence from epidemiological studies on methylmercury toxicity.

    PubMed

    Murata, Katsuyuki; Yoshida, Minoru; Sakamoto, Mineshi; Iwai-Shimada, Miyuki; Yaginuma-Sakurai, Kozue; Tatsuta, Nozomi; Iwata, Toyoto; Karita, Kanae; Nakai, Kunihiko

    2011-09-01

    More than fifty years have passed since the outbreak of Minamata disease, and large-scale methylmercury poisoning due to industrial effluents or methylmercury-containing fungicide intoxication has scarcely happened in developed countries. On the other hand, widespread environmental mercury contamination has occurred in gold and mercury mining areas of developing countries. In this article, we provided an overview of recent studies addressing human health effects of methylmercury, which we searched using the PubMed of the US National Library of Medicine. The following suggestions were obtained for low-level methylmercury exposure: (1) In recent years, the proportion of human studies addressing methylmercury has tended to decrease. (2) Prenatal exposure to methylmercury through fish intake, even at low levels, adversely affects child development after adjusting for polychlorinated biphenyls and maternal fish intake during pregnancy, whereas maternal seafood intake has some benefits. (3) Long-term methylmercury exposure through consumption of fish such as bigeye tuna and swordfish may pose a potential risk of cardiac events involving sympathovagal imbalance. (4) In measuring methylmercury levels in preserved umbilical cord collected from inhabitants born in Minamata areas between 1945 and 1989, the elevated concentrations (≥1 mg/g) were observed mainly in inhabitants born between 1947 and 1968, and the peak coincided with the peak of acetaldehyde production in Minamata. (5) Since some developing countries appear to be in similar situations to Japan in the past, attention should be directed toward early recognition of a risky agent and precautions should be taken against it. PMID:21996768

  16. [Regeneration in two freshwater planarian species exposed to methylmercury compounds].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, I V

    2008-01-01

    The regeneration rate was studied by the morphometric method in planarians Polycelis tenuis and Dugesia lugubris after different periods of exposure on food substrates with high (0.30-0.50 mg/kg wet weight) and low (0.02-0.07 mg/kg) concentration of methylmercury compounds. The planarian growth and the ratio of regenerating tissue area to the total fragment area after transverse cutting were evaluated. The rate of size increment was lower in animals with high level than with low level of methylmercury than with low level of methylmercury. The highest relative and absolute body area increment after amputation was observed in D. lugubris and P. tenius, respectively. Thus, natural methylmercury compounds were shown to inhibit tissue regeneration in planarians in a dose-dependent manner.

  17. Negative Confounding by Essential Fatty Acids in Methylmercury Neurotoxicity Associations

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Anna L; Mogensen, Ulla B.; Bjerve, Kristian S.; Debes, Frodi; Weihe, Pal; Grandjean, Philippe; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2014-01-01

    Background Methylmercury, a worldwide contaminant of fish and seafood, can cause adverse effects on the developing nervous system. However, long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in seafood provide beneficial effects on brain development. Negative confounding will likely result in underestimation of both mercury toxicity and nutrient benefits unless mutual adjustment is included in the analysis. Methods We examined these associations in 176 Faroese children, in whom prenatal methylmercury exposure was assessed from mercury concentrations in cord blood and maternal hair. The relative concentrations of fatty acids were determined in cord serum phospholipids. Neuropsychological performance in verbal, motor, attention, spatial, and memory functions was assessed at 7 years of age. Multiple regression and structural equation models (SEMs) were carried out to determine the confounder-adjusted associations with methylmercury exposure. Results A short delay recall (in percent change) in the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) was associated with a doubling of cord blood methylmercury (−18.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = −36.3, −1.51). The association became stronger after the inclusion of fatty acid concentrations in the analysis (−22.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = −39.4, −4.62). In structural equation models, poorer memory function (corresponding to a lower score in the learning trials and short delay recall in CVLT) was associated with a doubling of prenatal exposure to methylmercury after the inclusion of fatty acid concentrations in the analysis (−1.94, 95% CI = −3.39, −0.49). Conclusions Associations between prenatal exposure to methylmercury and neurobehavioral deficits in memory function at school age were strengthened after fatty acid adjustment, thus suggesting that n-3 fatty acids need to be included in analysis of similar studies to avoid underestimation of the associations with methylmercury exposure. PMID:24561639

  18. Inhibition of implantation caused by methylmercury and mercuric chloride in mouse embryos in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kajiwara, Yuji; Inouye, Minoru

    1992-10-01

    Methylmercury, an environmental pollutant, produces a wide spectrum of fetotoxic effects in men and laboratory animals. Experimental studies have shown that the exposure to methylmercury in the gestation period causes fetal death, gross malformation, growth retardation of the fetuses, and stillbirth. Although the effects of methylmercury on fetuses have been well documented, only a few experiments have been performed on the embryo toxicity at the early gestation periods. Because the embryos at preimplantation period are known to be highly sensitive to methylmercury in vitro and in vivo, in the present experiment, the embryonic development after implantation was investigated following treatment with methylmercury during the preimplantation period. Since the previous report showed that methylmercury and inorganic mercury were different in their manifestation of toxicity on preimplantation and mercuric chloride on embryos were investigated in vivo in the present study. 22 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Adverse Effects of Methylmercury: Environmental Health Research Implications

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Philippe; Satoh, Hiroshi; Murata, Katsuyuki; Eto, Komyo

    2010-01-01

    Background The scientific discoveries of health risks resulting from methylmercury exposure began in 1865 describing ataxia, dysarthria, constriction of visual fields, impaired hearing, and sensory disturbance as symptoms of fatal methylmercury poisoning. Objective Our aim was to examine how knowledge and consensus on methylmercury toxicity have developed in order to identify problems of wider concern in research. Data sources and extraction We tracked key publications that reflected new insights into human methylmercury toxicity. From this evidence, we identified possible caveats of potential significance for environmental health research in general. Synthesis At first, methylmercury research was impaired by inappropriate attention to narrow case definitions and uncertain chemical speciation. It also ignored the link between ecotoxicity and human toxicity. As a result, serious delays affected the recognition of methylmercury as a cause of serious human poisonings in Minamata, Japan. Developmental neurotoxicity was first reported in 1952, but despite accumulating evidence, the vulnerability of the developing nervous system was not taken into account in risk assessment internationally until approximately 50 years later. Imprecision in exposure assessment and other forms of uncertainty tended to cause an underestimation of methylmercury toxicity and repeatedly led to calls for more research rather than prevention. Conclusions Coupled with legal and political rigidity that demanded convincing documentation before considering prevention and compensation, types of uncertainty that are common in environmental research delayed the scientific consensus and were used as an excuse for deferring corrective action. Symptoms of methylmercury toxicity, such as tunnel vision, forgetfulness, and lack of coordination, also seemed to affect environmental health research and its interpretation. PMID:20529764

  20. Methylmercury (MeHg)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methylmercury ( MeHg ) ; CASRN 22967 - 92 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarci

  1. Prenatal low-dose methylmercury exposure impairs neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression and suppresses TrkA pathway activity and eEF1A1 expression in the rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Masatake; Usuki, Fusako; Cheng, Jinping; Zhao, Wenchang

    2016-05-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a highly neurotoxic environmental chemical that can cause developmental impairments. Human fetuses and neonates are particularly susceptible to MeHg toxicity; however, the mechanisms governing its effects in the developing brain are unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of prenatal and lactational MeHg exposure on the developing cerebellum in rats. We demonstrated that exposure to 5ppm MeHg decreased postnatal expression of pre- and postsynaptic proteins, suggesting an impairment in synaptic development. MeHg exposure also reduced neurite outgrowth, as shown by a decrease in the expression of the neurite marker neurofilament H. These changes were not observed in rats exposed to 1ppm MeHg. In order to define the underlying mechanism, we investigated the effects of MeHg exposure on the tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk) A pathway, which plays important roles in neuronal differentiation and synapse formation. We demonstrated suppression of the TrkA pathway on gestation day 20 in rats exposed to 5ppm MeHg. In addition, down-regulation of eukaryotic elongation factor 1A1 (eEF1A1) was observed on postnatal day 1. eEF1A1 knockdown in differentiating PC12 cells impaired neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression, similar to the results of MeHg exposure in the cerebellum. These results suggest that suppression of the TrkA pathway and subsequent decreases in eEF1A1 expression induced by prenatal exposure to MeHg may lead to reduced neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression in the developing cerebellum.

  2. Recognizing and Preventing Overexposure to Methylmercury from Fish and Seafood Consumption: Information for Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Silbernagel, Susan M.; Carpenter, David O.; Gilbert, Steven G.; Gochfeld, Michael; Groth, Edward; Hightower, Jane M.; Schiavone, Frederick M.

    2011-01-01

    Fish is a valuable source of nutrition, and many people would benefit from eating fish regularly. But some people eat a lot of fish, every day or several meals per week, and thus can run a significant risk of overexposure to methylmercury. Current advice regarding methylmercury from fish consumption is targeted to protect the developing brain and nervous system but adverse health effects are increasingly associated with adult chronic low-level methylmercury exposure. Manifestations of methylmercury poisoning are variable and may be difficult to detect unless one considers this specific diagnosis and does an appropriate test (blood or hair analysis). We provide information to physicians to recognize and prevent overexposure to methylmercury from fish and seafood consumption. Physicians are urged to ask patients if they eat fish: how often, how much, and what kinds. People who eat fish frequently (once a week or more often) and pregnant women are advised to choose low mercury fish. PMID:21785592

  3. Mouse Cochlear Whole Mount Immunofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Omar; Lustig, Lawrence R.

    2016-01-01

    This protocol comprises the entire process of immunofluorescence staining on mouse cochlea whole mount, starting from tissue preparation to the mounting of the tissue. This technique provides “three-dimensional” views of the stained components in order to determine the localization of a protein of interest in the tissue in its natural state and environment. PMID:27547786

  4. Uptake of mercury by the hair of methylmercury-treated newborn mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Chenyang; Lane, A.T.; Clarkson, T.W. )

    1990-04-01

    Human hair has unique advantages in monitoring environmental exposures to methyl-mercury. Using newborn Balb/c mice as a model system, the incorporation of methylmercury into the hair was studied and compared with methylmercury distributions in other tissues. Newborn mice were given intraperitoneal injections of {sup 203}Hg-labeled methylmercury at designated times according to hair growth stages of the mouse. Animals were sacrificed 2 days after dosing. Distribution of mercury in pelt and other tissues was measured. The level of mercury in pelt was found to correlate with hair growth. The amount of mercury in pelt peaked when hair growth was most rapid and the total amount of mercury in pelt was significantly higher than that in other tissues, constituting 40% of the whole body burden. However, when the hair ceased growing, the amount of mercury in pelt dramatically dropped to 4% of whole body burden and mercury concentrations in other tissues except brain were elevated. Autoradiographic studies with tritium-labeled methylmercury demonstrated that methylmercury concentrated in hair follicles in the skin. Within hair follicles and hairs, methylmercury accumulated in regions that are rich in high-sulfur proteins. The uptake of inorganic mercury (administered as HgCl{sub 2}) by pelt was also compared with that of methylmercury. The amount of inorganic mercury found in pelt was less than one-half that of methylmercury in animals with growing hair. Cessation of hair growth did not decrease the inorganic mercury level in pelt to the same extent as in the case of methylmercury.

  5. Methylmercury risk assessment issues

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, F.W.; Saroff, L.

    1996-07-01

    This paper reviews the general background of health risks associated with mercury (Hg), primarily methylmercury (MeHg), with a view towards application to advanced technologies that could reduce any contributions from coal combustion. The need for accurate assessment of such risks is discussed, since Hg is now widely dispersed in the environment and cannot easily be eliminated. The primary pathway of MeHg intake is through eating contaminated fish. The issues of concern include identification of critical health outcomes (various neurological indices) and their confounding factors, accurate assessment of MeHg intake rates, and appropriate use of dose-response functions. Ultimately, such information will be used to evaluate alternative coal combustion systems.

  6. Quantitative studies of immunofluorescent staining

    PubMed Central

    Wick, G.; Beutner, E. H.

    1970-01-01

    The antiperinuclear factor (APF) is found in a high percentage of sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It can be demonstrated by direct immunofluorescence using the keratohyaline granules of human buccal mucosa as antigenic substrate. Mixing of some normal goat sera with an APF positive serum from a patient with rheumatoid arthritis resulted in an inhibition of the APF titre of the patient's serum. However, there was no clear cut correlation between the APF-positivity of normal goat sera and their inhibitory effect on the APF-reactivity of a human rheumatoid arthritis patient's serum. In reciprocal screening tests the human rheumatoid arthritis serum blocked only one of the APF-reactive goat sera. The reciprocal blocking activity of this goat serum and the patient's serum could be more exactly evaluated by the use of chessboard titrations in an indirect immunofluorescence blocking test. This test consisted of mixing equal volumes of serial dilutions of a goat serum and the patient's serum and subsequent examination of the mixtures for APF using an anti-human IgG conjugate and an anti-goat immunoglobulin conjugate, respectively. The results point to an antibody nature for the APF in preimmune, normal goat sera and to the value of chessboard titrations of this type in demonstrating the identity, non-identity, partial identity (or very close proximity of antigenic determinants) of the antibodies in different antisera which cannot be distinguished by their immunofluorescent staining patterns. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4913803

  7. Mercury in women exposed to methylmercury through fish consumption, and in their newborn babies and breast milk

    SciTech Connect

    Skerfving, S.

    1988-10-01

    The presence of methylmercury in fish is a major environmental problem. During the major epidemics of methylmercury poisoning through sea food in Minamata in Japan, and through dressed seed in Iraq, there was a high prevalence of infants, who developed cerebral palsy. This was generally assumed to be due to intrauterine methylmercury poisoning, as it is well known, that methylmercury is transferred through the placenta into the fetus. There is also a possibility that exposure occurred through breast milk, as high levels of mercury in breast milk have been reported in mothers from Minamata. Information on the relationship between methylmercury exposure, mercury levels in blood of mothers and their babies, and levels in breast milk are reported here.

  8. Mental retardation and prenatal methylmercury toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Trasande, L.; Schechter, C.B.; Haynes, K.A.; Landrigan, P.J.

    2006-03-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a developmental neurotoxicant; exposure results principally from consumption of seafood contaminated by mercury (Hg). In this analysis, the burden of mental retardation (MR) associated with methylmercury exposure in the 2000 U.S. birth cohort is estimated, and the portion of this burden attributable to mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants is identified. The aggregate loss in cognition associated with MeHg exposure in the 2000 U.S. birth cohort was estimated using two previously published dose-response models that relate increases in cord blood Hg concentrations with decrements in IQ. MeHg exposure was assumed not to be correlated with native cognitive ability. Previously published estimates were used to estimate economic costs of MR caused by MeHg. Downward shifts in IQ resulting from prenatal exposure to MeHg of anthropogenic origin are associated with 1,566 excess cases of MR annually (range: 376-14,293). This represents 3.2% of MR cases in the US (range: 0.8%-29.2%). The MR costs associated with decreases in IQ in these children amount to $2.0 billion/year (range: $0.5-17.9 billion). Hg from American power plants accounts for 231 of the excess MR cases year (range: 28-2,109), or 0.5% (range: 0.06%-4.3%) of all MR. These cases cost $289 million (range: $35 million-2.6 billion). Toxic injury to the fetal brain caused by Hg emitted from coal-fired power plants exacts a significant human and economic toll on American children.

  9. Methylmercury inhibits prolactin release in a cell line of pituitary origin.

    PubMed

    Maués, L A L; Macchi, B M; Crespo-López, M E; Nasciutti, L E; Picanço-Diniz, D L W; Antunes-Rodrigues, J; Nascimento, J L M do

    2015-08-01

    Heavy metals, such as methylmercury, are key environmental pollutants that easily reach human beings by bioaccumulation through the food chain. Several reports have demonstrated that endocrine organs, and especially the pituitary gland, are potential targets for mercury accumulation; however, the effects on the regulation of hormonal release are unclear. It has been suggested that serum prolactin could represent a biomarker of heavy metal exposure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of methylmercury on prolactin release and the role of the nitrergic system using prolactin secretory cells (the mammosomatotroph cell line, GH3B6). Exposure to methylmercury (0-100 μM) was cytotoxic in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with an LC50 higher than described for cells of neuronal origin, suggesting GH3B6 cells have a relative resistance. Methylmercury (at exposures as low as 1 μM for 2 h) also decreased prolactin release. Interestingly, inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by N-nitro-L-arginine completely prevented the decrease in prolactin release without acute neurotoxic effects of methylmercury. These data indicate that the decrease in prolactin production occurs via activation of the nitrergic system and is an early effect of methylmercury in cells of pituitary origin.

  10. Methylmercury inhibits prolactin release in a cell line of pituitary origin

    PubMed Central

    Maués, L.A.L.; Macchi, B.M.; Crespo-López, M.E.; Nasciutti, L.E.; Picanço-Diniz, D.L.W.; Antunes-Rodrigues, J.; do Nascimento, J.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals, such as methylmercury, are key environmental pollutants that easily reach human beings by bioaccumulation through the food chain. Several reports have demonstrated that endocrine organs, and especially the pituitary gland, are potential targets for mercury accumulation; however, the effects on the regulation of hormonal release are unclear. It has been suggested that serum prolactin could represent a biomarker of heavy metal exposure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of methylmercury on prolactin release and the role of the nitrergic system using prolactin secretory cells (the mammosomatotroph cell line, GH3B6). Exposure to methylmercury (0-100 μM) was cytotoxic in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with an LC50 higher than described for cells of neuronal origin, suggesting GH3B6 cells have a relative resistance. Methylmercury (at exposures as low as 1 μM for 2 h) also decreased prolactin release. Interestingly, inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by N-nitro-L-arginine completely prevented the decrease in prolactin release without acute neurotoxic effects of methylmercury. These data indicate that the decrease in prolactin production occurs via activation of the nitrergic system and is an early effect of methylmercury in cells of pituitary origin. PMID:26108095

  11. Behavioral teratology of methylmercury in fish

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, P.; Weis, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    Embryos of the mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, were exposed to 2, 5, or 10 ug/l methylmercury throughout development. These are concentrations below those that can cause teratological effects. After hatching, larvae were maintained in clean sea water and tested for prey capture ability, using Artemia nauplii as prey. Individual fish larvae were provided with five brine shrimp and their capture times recorded. In all experiments, larvae that had been exposed to 10 ug/l methylmercury initially exhibited slower prey capture ability than the other groups. This is an indication of a subtle functional impairment due to the toxicant (``behavioral teratology``). However, the effect was transitory, and by about one week after hatching the prey capture of these larvae equaled that of the controls and the other treated groups. Growth of these larvae also equaled that of controls and the other groups. The embryonic exposure may have caused retardation of neurological development, which was subsequently compensated for, and therefore no permanent effects were produced. In the field, however, embryos exposed to such toxicants would probably continue to be exposed as larvae, and would not have the opportunity to recover from the effects, but rather might have them reinforced.

  12. Intervention study on cardiac autonomic nervous effects of methylmercury from seafood.

    PubMed

    Yaginuma-Sakurai, Kozue; Murata, Katsuyuki; Shimada, Miyuki; Nakai, Kunihiko; Kurokawa, Naoyuki; Kameo, Satomi; Satoh, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    To scrutinize whether the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI, 3.4 microg/kg body weight/week) of methylmercury in Japan is safe for adults, we conducted an intervention study using heart rate variability (HRV) that has been considered to reflect cardiac events. Fifty-four healthy volunteers were recruited and divided into experimental and control groups. The experimental group was exposed to methylmercury at the PTWI level through consumption of bigeye tuna and swordfish for 14 weeks, and HRV parameters were compared between the two groups. In the experimental group, mean hair mercury levels, determined before and after the dietary methylmercury exposure and after 15-week wash-out period following the cessation of exposure, were 2.30, 8.76 and 4.90 microg/g, respectively. The sympathovagal balance index of HRV was significantly elevated after the exposure, and decreased to the baseline level at the end of this study. Still, such changes in HRV parameters were not found in the control group with a mean hair mercury level of around 2.1 microg/g. In conclusion, the PTWI does not appear to be safe for adult health, because methylmercury exposure from fish consumption induced a temporary sympathodominant state. Rather, long-term exposure to methylmercury may pose a potential risk for cardiac events involving sympathovagal imbalance among fish-consuming populations. PMID:19732823

  13. Immunofluorescence detection methods using microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szurdoki, Ferenc; Michael, Karri L.; Agrawal, Divya; Taylor, Laura C.; Schultz, Sandra L.; Walt, David R.

    1999-01-01

    Microsphere-based immunoassays were devised for compounds of agricultural and biomedical interest (e.g., digoxin, theophylline, and zearalenone). Commercially available microspheres with surface functional groups for chemical derivatization were used as solid carriers. After immobilizing the target substances, the surface of the haptenized microspheres was blocked by a protein to reduce aspecific binding. Competitive immunoassays were performed using the functionalized microspheres and antibodies labeled with horseradish peroxidase. Immunofluorescence signal amplification was achieved by enzyme-catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD). An epifluorescence microscope, a CCD camera interfaced with a computer, and microscopy image analysis software were employed for quantitative detection of fluorescent light emitted from individual microspheres. Integration of several such immunoassays and application of an optical encoding method enabled multianalyte determination. These immunoassays can also be utilized in an immunosensor array format. This immunoarray format could facilitate miniaturization and automation of multianalyte immunoassays.

  14. Assessing and managing methylmercury risks associated with power plant mercury emissions in the United States.

    PubMed

    Charnley, Gail

    2006-03-09

    Until the Clean Air Mercury Rule was signed in March 2005, coal-fired electric utilities were the only remaining, unregulated major source of industrial mercury emissions in the United States. Proponents of coal-burning power plants assert that methylmercury is not a hazard at the current environmental levels, that current technologies for limiting emissions are unreliable, and that reducing mercury emissions from power plants in the United States will have little impact on environmental levels. Opponents of coal-burning plants assert that current methylmercury exposures from fish are damaging to the developing nervous system of infants, children, and the fetus; that current technology can significantly limit emissions; and that reducing emissions will reduce exposure and risk. One concern is that local mercury emissions from power plants may contribute to higher local exposure levels, or "hot spots." The impact of the Mercury Rule on potential hot spots is uncertain due to the highly site-specific nature of the relationship between plant emissions and local fish methylmercury levels. The impact on the primary source of exposure in the United States, ocean fish, is likely to be negligible due to the contribution of natural sources and industrial sources outside the United States. Another debate centers on the toxic potency of methylmercury, with the scientific basis of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) recommended exposure limit questioned by some and defended by others. It is likely that the EPA's exposure limit may be appropriate for combined exposure to methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), but may be lower than the available data suggest is necessary to protect children from methylmercury alone. Mercury emissions from power plants are a global problem. Without a global approach to developing and implementing clean coal technologies, limiting US power plant emissions alone will have little impact.

  15. Evaluation of toxic effects of a diet containing fish contaminated with methylmercury in rats mimicking the exposure in the Amazon riverside population.

    PubMed

    Grotto, Denise; Valentini, Juliana; Serpeloni, Juliana Mara; Monteiro, Patrícia Alves Ponte; Latorraca, Elder Francisco; de Oliveira, Ricardo Santos; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Barbosa, Fernando

    2011-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of a diet rich in fish contaminated with MeHg, mimicking the typical diet of the Amazon riverside population, in rats. Animals were randomly assigned to one of three groups with eight rats in each group: Group I-control, received commercial ration; Group II-received a diet rich in uncontaminated fish; Group III-received a diet rich in fish contaminated with MeHg. Treatment time was 12 weeks. Oxidative stress markers were evaluated, as well as the effects of this diet on DNA stability, systolic blood pressure (SBP), nitric oxide (NO) levels and histological damage in different tissues. There was a significant increase in SBP values in rats fed with MeHg-contaminated fish diet after the 10th week of the treatment. As far as oxidative stress biomarkers are concerned, no differences were observed in reduced glutathione and protein carbonyl levels, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, superoxide dismutase or δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase activities between the groups of animals receiving contaminated and uncontaminated fish diets. On the other hand, malondialdehyde levels increased significantly in rats fed with contaminated fish. NO levels were similar in all groups. DNA migration showed augmented in rats exposed to contaminated fish and histopathological analyses showed weak but significant leukocyte infiltration. Thus, we conclude that the MeHg-contaminated fish diet induced a slight lipid peroxidation and genotoxicity. However, these effects seem to be much less pronounced than when rats are exposed to aqueous solution containing CH3HgCl. Our findings support the contention that the chemical form of MeHg in fish or fish nutrients such as polyunsaturated fatty acids, Se or vitamin E could minimize the toxic effects of MeHg exposure in fish-eating communities. PMID:22000760

  16. Neurotoxic actions of methylmercury on the primate visual system

    SciTech Connect

    Merigan, W.H.; Maurissen, J.P.J.; Weiss, B.; Eskin, T.; Lapham, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    Visual system consequences of exposure to methylmercury were studied in six adult, macaque monkeys. Visual field measures, visual thresholds, and morphological examination were used to determine the nature and possible reversibility of alterations in vision. Visual field constriction (especially in the inferior-nasal field) was an early and apparently reversible indicator of methylmercury intoxication. Such a field loss was found in the absence of either visual threeshold changes or morphologic alterations in visual cortex. More severe poisoning resulted in persistent field constriction, disruption of visual thresholds, and death. A single monkey showed a permanent, bilateral concentric constriction of visual fields. The locus of visual cortex pathology in this monkey corresponded to the projection of the peripheral visual field.

  17. Hormetic effect of methylmercury on Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Helmcke, Kirsten J; Aschner, Michael

    2010-10-15

    Research has demonstrated the toxic effects of methylmercury (MeHg), yet molecular mechanisms underlying its toxicity are not completely understood. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) offers a unique biological model to explore mechanisms of MeHg toxicity given many advantages associated with its ease of use and genetic power. Since our previous work indicated neurotoxic resistance of C. elegans to MeHg, the present study was designed to examine molecular mechanisms associated with this resistance. We hypothesized MeHg would induce expression of gst, hsp or mtl in vivo since glutathione (GSH), heat shock proteins (HSPs), and metallothioneins (MTs) have shown involvement in MeHg toxicity. Our studies demonstrated a modest, but significant increase in fluorescence in gst-4::GFP and mtl-1::GFP strains at an acute, low L1 MeHg exposure, whereas chronic L4 MeHg exposure induced expression of gst-4::GFP and hsp-4::GFP. Knockout gst-4 animals showed no alterations in lethality sensitivity compared to wildtype animals whereas mtl knockouts displayed increased sensitivity to MeHg exposure. GSH levels were increased by acute MeHg treatment and depleted with chronic exposure. We also demonstrate that MeHg induces hormesis, a phenotype whereby a sublethal exposure to MeHg rendered C. elegans resistant to subsequent exposure to the organometal. The involvement of gst-4, hsp-4, mtl-1, and mtl-2 in hormesis was examined. An increase in gst-4::GFP expression after a low-dose acute exposure to MeHg indicated that gst-4 may be involved in this response. Our results implicate GSH, HSPs, and MTs in protecting C. elegans from MeHg toxicity and show a potential role of gst-4 in MeHg-induced hormesis.

  18. Hormetic effect of methylmercury on Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Helmcke, Kirsten J. Aschner, Michael

    2010-10-15

    Research has demonstrated the toxic effects of methylmercury (MeHg), yet molecular mechanisms underlying its toxicity are not completely understood. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) offers a unique biological model to explore mechanisms of MeHg toxicity given many advantages associated with its ease of use and genetic power. Since our previous work indicated neurotoxic resistance of C. elegans to MeHg, the present study was designed to examine molecular mechanisms associated with this resistance. We hypothesized MeHg would induce expression of gst, hsp or mtl in vivo since glutathione (GSH), heat shock proteins (HSPs), and metallothioneins (MTs) have shown involvement in MeHg toxicity. Our studies demonstrated a modest, but significant increase in fluorescence in gst-4::GFP and mtl-1::GFP strains at an acute, low L1 MeHg exposure, whereas chronic L4 MeHg exposure induced expression of gst-4::GFP and hsp-4::GFP. Knockout gst-4 animals showed no alterations in lethality sensitivity compared to wildtype animals whereas mtl knockouts displayed increased sensitivity to MeHg exposure. GSH levels were increased by acute MeHg treatment and depleted with chronic exposure. We also demonstrate that MeHg induces hormesis, a phenotype whereby a sublethal exposure to MeHg rendered C. elegans resistant to subsequent exposure to the organometal. The involvement of gst-4, hsp-4, mtl-1, and mtl-2 in hormesis was examined. An increase in gst-4::GFP expression after a low-dose acute exposure to MeHg indicated that gst-4 may be involved in this response. Our results implicate GSH, HSPs, and MTs in protecting C. elegans from MeHg toxicity and show a potential role of gst-4 in MeHg-induced hormesis.

  19. Protective effect of selenium on methylmercury toxicity: a possible mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.W.; Suber, R.

    1982-09-01

    Young adult male Charles River rats were injected (i.p.) with 2.0 mg/kg b.w. methylmercury chloride (MeHg), with 2.0 mg/kg b.w. sodium selenite (Se), or with 2.0 mg/kg b.w. MeHg and 2.0 mg/kg b.w. Se. Erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity was determined and the rate of oxidation of NADPH with t-butyl-hydroperoxide as a substrate was followed at 340 nm and 25/sup 0/C. Toxic signs (crossing reflex of the hind limbs) were displayed by MeHg-treated animals by the 6th week of intoxication. By 8 weeks of the experiment, overt neurological signs (crossing reflex, ataxic gait, and weight loss) were observed in MeHg-treated animals. No observable toxic signs or symptoms were evident in the control animals (saline or Se-treated) and in the MeHg/Se treated rats. Results have confirmed that exposure to methyl-mercury suppresses the activity of glutathione peroxidase. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that with co-administration of selenium (sodium selenite), the inhibitory effect of MeHg on GSH-Px was totally alleviated. These findings suggest that the level of GSH-Px level is important in influencing the toxic consequences in MeHg-intoxicated animals and may be useful as a predictive indicator for methylmercury toxic conditions of the animals. (JMT)

  20. Methylmercury production in the marine water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, G.; Davies, I. M.

    1981-03-01

    Although the biosynthesis of methylmercury in sediments is well established1, this is not necessarily the exclusive natural source of methylmercury entering the marine food chain, particularly commercial fish and shellfish species for human consumption. An examination of mercury levels in freshwater fish2, collected from a lake with a history of industrial mercury contamination, suggested that levels in fish are controlled in part by mercury in suspension and it followed that methylation should occur in the water column. Although methylmercury is present in seawater in coastal areas receiving discharges of waste containing either inorganic mercury3 or methylmercury4 there is no evidence that methylmercury is actually formed in the water column. We now present data which demonstrate that inorganic mercury can be methylated in the water column and we compare this production with that known to occur in marine sediments.

  1. Effects of methylmercury and spatial complexity on foraging behavior and foraging efficiency in juvenile white ibises (Eudocimus albus).

    PubMed

    Adams, Evan M; Frederick, Peter C

    2008-08-01

    Methylmercury is a globally distributed neurotoxin, endocrine disruptor, and teratogen, the effects of which on wildlife at environmentally relevant levels are largely unknown. In birds, foraging efficiency and learning may be sensitive endpoints for sublethal methylmercury toxicity, and these endpoints also may be biologically relevant at the population level. In the present study, groups of wild-caught, prefledgling white ibises (Eudocimus albus) were raised in a free-flight, open-air aviary on diets that approximated the measured range of methylmercury exposure in the Everglades ecosystem (0, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.3 mg/kg/d). The effect of methylmercury exposure on group foraging efficiency was examined by allowing birds to forage on 200 fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) in artificial ponds for 15 min by straining the arenas' contents through a seine net and counting all remaining prey. Additionally, we varied the difficulty of foraging by these tactile feeding birds by adding multiple levels of structural complexity (e.g., increased vegetation and prey refugia) to the pond. Structural complexity affected both foraging efficiency and the rate of increase in efficiency over time (improvement). Methylmercury exposure affected foraging efficiency (p = 0.03). It did not affect foraging improvement in the face of increasingly challenging environments, however, and the dose-response relationship was nonlinear (e.g., the control and high-exposure groups were the least efficient foragers). Evidence for an effect of methylmercury on foraging efficiency therefore was inconclusive because of unpredicted results and no interaction with time or habitat complexity. These data suggest a nonlinear dose-response relationship at low levels of methylmercury exposure; future research is needed to verify this hypothesis. This appears to be the first experimental demonstration of the effects of habitat complexity on foraging efficiency in long-legged wading birds.

  2. Methylmercury in fish: a review of residue levels, fish consumption and regulatory action in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Tollefson, L.; Cordle, F.

    1986-09-01

    The dangers associated with the consumption of large amounts of methylmercury in fish are well recognized, and there is some evidence to suggest that methylmercury may be the cause of subtle neurological impairments when ingested at even low to moderate levels, particularly the prenatal and early childhood periods. This concern has prompted a continuing assessment of the risk of methylmercury toxicity among fish consumers in the US as well as other countries. The toxicokinetics of methylmercury in humans are reviewed and used to estimate body burdens associated with toxic effects. To determine seafood consumption patterns among the continental US population the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has analyzed data from a diary study commissioned by the Tuna Research Foundation. Mercury residue levels in domestic fish sampled by the FDA were used to determine the level of exposure to methylmercury. Until evidence is presented that substantially lowers the known body burden of methylmercury which causes toxicity, calculations indicate that the current 1.0 ppm regulatory level provides adequate protection for the average fish consumer, for young children, and for a significant number of consumers exceeding the acceptable daily intake. However, additional studies are being carried out in a continuing process to ensure that safe levels of prenatal exposure to mercury residues in fish are maintained.

  3. Effects of Injected Methylmercury on the Hatching of Common Loon (Gavia immer) Eggs

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the level of in ovo methylmercury (MeHg) exposure that results in detrimental effects on fitness and survival of loon embryos and hatched chicks, we conducted a field study in which we injected eggs with various doses of MeHg on day 4 of incubation. Eggs were collect...

  4. Methylmercury degradation by Pseudomonas putida V1.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Lucélia; Yu, Ri-Qing; Crane, Sharron; Giovanella, Patricia; Barkay, Tamar; Camargo, Flávio A O

    2016-08-01

    Environmental contamination of mercury (Hg) has caused public health concerns with focuses on the neurotoxic substance methylmercury, due to its bioaccumulation and biomagnification in food chains. The goals of the present study were to examine: (i) the transformation of methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercuric acetate and mercuric chloride by cultures of Pseudomonas putida V1, (ii) the presence of the genes merA and merB in P. putida V1, and (iii) the degradation pathways of methylmercury by P. putida V1. Strain V1 cultures readily degraded methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercury acetate, and reduced mercuric chloride into gaseous Hg(0). However, the Hg transformation in LB broth by P. putida V1 was influenced by the type of Hg compounds. The merA gene was detected in P. putida V1, on the other hand, the merB gene was not detected. The sequencing of this gene, showed high similarity (100%) to the mercuric reductase gene of other Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, tests using radioactive (14)C-methylmercury indicated an uncommon release of (14)CO2 concomitant with the production of Hg(0). The results of the present work suggest that P. putida V1 has the potential to remove methylmercury from contaminated sites. More studies are warranted to determine the mechanism of removal of methylmercury by P. putida V1. PMID:27062344

  5. Is Low Non-Lethal Concentration of Methylmercury Really Safe? A Report on Genotoxicity with Delayed Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Lopez, María Elena; Costa-Malaquias, Allan; Oliveira, Edivaldo H C; Miranda, Moysés S; Arrifano, Gabriela P F; Souza-Monteiro, José R; Sagica, Fernanda Espirito-Santo; Fontes-Junior, Enéas A; Maia, Cristiane S F; Macchi, Barbarella M; do Nascimento, José Luiz M

    2016-01-01

    Human exposure to relatively low levels of methylmercury is worrying, especially in terms of its genotoxicity. It is currently unknown as to whether exposure to low levels of mercury (below established limits) is safe. Genotoxicity was already shown in lymphocytes, but studies with cells of the CNS (as the main target organ) are scarce. Moreover, disturbances in the cell cycle and cellular proliferation have previously been observed in neuronal cells, but no data are presently available for glial cells. Interestingly, cells of glial origin accumulate higher concentrations of methylmercury than those of neuronal origin. Thus, the aim of this work was to analyze the possible genotoxicity and alterations in the cell cycle and cell proliferation of a glioma cell line (C6) exposed to a low, non-lethal and non-apoptotic methylmercury concentration. Biochemical (mitochondrial activity) and morphological (integrity of the membrane) assessments confirmed the absence of cell death after exposure to 3 μM methylmercury for 24 hours. Even without promoting cell death, this treatment significantly increased genotoxicity markers (DNA fragmentation, micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds). Changes in the cell cycle profile (increased mitotic index and cell populations in the S and G2/M phases) were observed, suggesting arrest of the cycle. This delay in the cycle was followed, 24 hours after methylmercury withdrawal, by a decrease number of viable cells, reduced cellular confluence and increased doubling time of the culture. Our work demonstrates that exposure to a low sublethal concentration of MeHg considered relatively safe according to current limits promotes genotoxicity and disturbances in the proliferation of cells of glial origin with sustained consequences after methylmercury withdrawal. This fact becomes especially important, since this cellular type accumulates more methylmercury than neurons and displays a vital role protecting the CNS, especially in

  6. Is Low Non-Lethal Concentration of Methylmercury Really Safe? A Report on Genotoxicity with Delayed Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Crespo-Lopez, María Elena; Costa-Malaquias, Allan; Oliveira, Edivaldo H. C.; Miranda, Moysés S.; Arrifano, Gabriela P. F.; Souza-Monteiro, José R.; Sagica, Fernanda Espirito-Santo; Fontes-Junior, Enéas A.; Maia, Cristiane S. F.; Macchi, Barbarella M.; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.

    2016-01-01

    Human exposure to relatively low levels of methylmercury is worrying, especially in terms of its genotoxicity. It is currently unknown as to whether exposure to low levels of mercury (below established limits) is safe. Genotoxicity was already shown in lymphocytes, but studies with cells of the CNS (as the main target organ) are scarce. Moreover, disturbances in the cell cycle and cellular proliferation have previously been observed in neuronal cells, but no data are presently available for glial cells. Interestingly, cells of glial origin accumulate higher concentrations of methylmercury than those of neuronal origin. Thus, the aim of this work was to analyze the possible genotoxicity and alterations in the cell cycle and cell proliferation of a glioma cell line (C6) exposed to a low, non-lethal and non-apoptotic methylmercury concentration. Biochemical (mitochondrial activity) and morphological (integrity of the membrane) assessments confirmed the absence of cell death after exposure to 3 μM methylmercury for 24 hours. Even without promoting cell death, this treatment significantly increased genotoxicity markers (DNA fragmentation, micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds). Changes in the cell cycle profile (increased mitotic index and cell populations in the S and G2/M phases) were observed, suggesting arrest of the cycle. This delay in the cycle was followed, 24 hours after methylmercury withdrawal, by a decrease number of viable cells, reduced cellular confluence and increased doubling time of the culture. Our work demonstrates that exposure to a low sublethal concentration of MeHg considered relatively safe according to current limits promotes genotoxicity and disturbances in the proliferation of cells of glial origin with sustained consequences after methylmercury withdrawal. This fact becomes especially important, since this cellular type accumulates more methylmercury than neurons and displays a vital role protecting the CNS, especially in

  7. Is Low Non-Lethal Concentration of Methylmercury Really Safe? A Report on Genotoxicity with Delayed Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Lopez, María Elena; Costa-Malaquias, Allan; Oliveira, Edivaldo H C; Miranda, Moysés S; Arrifano, Gabriela P F; Souza-Monteiro, José R; Sagica, Fernanda Espirito-Santo; Fontes-Junior, Enéas A; Maia, Cristiane S F; Macchi, Barbarella M; do Nascimento, José Luiz M

    2016-01-01

    Human exposure to relatively low levels of methylmercury is worrying, especially in terms of its genotoxicity. It is currently unknown as to whether exposure to low levels of mercury (below established limits) is safe. Genotoxicity was already shown in lymphocytes, but studies with cells of the CNS (as the main target organ) are scarce. Moreover, disturbances in the cell cycle and cellular proliferation have previously been observed in neuronal cells, but no data are presently available for glial cells. Interestingly, cells of glial origin accumulate higher concentrations of methylmercury than those of neuronal origin. Thus, the aim of this work was to analyze the possible genotoxicity and alterations in the cell cycle and cell proliferation of a glioma cell line (C6) exposed to a low, non-lethal and non-apoptotic methylmercury concentration. Biochemical (mitochondrial activity) and morphological (integrity of the membrane) assessments confirmed the absence of cell death after exposure to 3 μM methylmercury for 24 hours. Even without promoting cell death, this treatment significantly increased genotoxicity markers (DNA fragmentation, micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds). Changes in the cell cycle profile (increased mitotic index and cell populations in the S and G2/M phases) were observed, suggesting arrest of the cycle. This delay in the cycle was followed, 24 hours after methylmercury withdrawal, by a decrease number of viable cells, reduced cellular confluence and increased doubling time of the culture. Our work demonstrates that exposure to a low sublethal concentration of MeHg considered relatively safe according to current limits promotes genotoxicity and disturbances in the proliferation of cells of glial origin with sustained consequences after methylmercury withdrawal. This fact becomes especially important, since this cellular type accumulates more methylmercury than neurons and displays a vital role protecting the CNS, especially in

  8. Hair methylmercury levels of mummies of the Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Egeland, G.M. Ponce, Rafael Bloom, Nicolas S. Knecht, Rick Loring, Stephen Middaugh, John P.

    2009-04-15

    Ancient human hair specimens can shed light on the extent of pre-historic exposures to methylmercury and provide valuable comparison data with current-day exposures, particularly for Indigenous Peoples who continue to rely upon local traditional food resources. Human hair from ancient Aleutian Island Native remains were tested for total and methylmercury (Hg, MeHg) and were radiocarbon dated. The remains were approximately 500 years old (1450 A.D.). For four adults, the mean and median total hair mercury concentration was 5.8 ppm (SD=0.9). In contrast, MeHg concentrations were lower with a mean of 1.2 ppm (SD=1.8) and a median of 0.54 ppm (0.12-3.86). For the five infants, the mean and median MeHg level was 1.2 ppm (SD=1.8) and 0.20 ppm (0.007-4.61), respectively. Segmental analyses showed variations in MeHg concentrations in 1-cm segments, consistent with fluctuations in naturally occurring exposure to mercury through dietary sources. The levels are comparable to or lower than those found in fish and marine mammal-eating populations today who rely far less on subsistence food than pre-historic humans. The findings are, therefore, compatible with increased anthropogenic release of trace metals during the past several centuries.

  9. Evolution of our understanding of methylmercury as a health threat

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Chiho; Satoh, Hiroshi

    1996-04-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is recognized as one of the most hazardous environmental pollutants primarily due to endemic disasters that have occurred repeatedly. A review of the earlier literature on the Minamata outbreak shows how large-scale poisoning occurred and why it could not be prevented. With the repeated occurrences of MeHg poisoning, it gradually became clear that the fetus is much more susceptible to the toxicity of this compound than the adult. Thus, recent epidemiologic studies in several fish-eating populations have focused on the effects of in utero exposure to MeHg. Also, there have been many studies on neurobehavioral effects of in utero exposure to methylmercury in rodents and nonhuman primates. The results of these studies revealed that the effects encompass a wide range of behavioral categories without clear identification of the functional categories distinctively susceptible to MeHg. The overall neurotoxicity of MeHg in humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents appears to have similarities. However, several gaps exist between the human and animal studies. By using the large body of neurotoxicologic data obtained in human populations and filling in such gaps, we can use MeHg as a model agent for developing a specific battery of tests of animal behavior to predict human risks resulting from in utero exposure to other chemicals with unknown neurotoxicity. Approaches developing such a battery are also discussed. 69 refs., 1 fig., 13 tabs.

  10. Evolution of our understanding of methylmercury as a health threat.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, C; Satoh, H

    1996-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is recognized as one of the most hazardous environmental pollutants, primarily due to endemic disasters that have occurred repeatedly. A review of the earlier literature on the Minamata outbreak shows how large-scale poisoning occurred and why it could not be prevented. With the repeated occurrences of MeHg poisoning, it gradually became clear that the fetus is much more susceptible to the toxicity of this compound than the adult. Thus, recent epidemiologic studies in several fish-eating populations have focused on the effects of in utero exposure to MeHg. Also, there have been many studies on neurobehavioral effects of in utero exposure to methylmercury in rodents and nonhuman primates. The results of these studies revealed that the effects encompass a wide range of behavioral categories without clear identification of the functional categories distinctively susceptible to MeHg. The overall neurotoxicity of MeHg in humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents appears to have similarities. However, several gaps exist between the human and animal studies. By using the large body of neurotoxicologic data obtained in human populations and filling in such gaps, we can use MeHg as a model agent for developing a specific battery of tests of animal behavior to predict human risks resulting from in utero exposure to other chemicals with unknown neurotoxicity. Approaches developing such a battery are also discussed. PMID:9182044

  11. Potential sources of methylmercury in tree foliage.

    PubMed

    Tabatchnick, Melissa D; Nogaro, Géraldine; Hammerschmidt, Chad R

    2012-01-01

    Litterfall is a major source of mercury (Hg) and toxic methylmercury (MeHg) to forest soils and influences exposures of wildlife in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, the origin of MeHg associated with tree foliage is largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that leaf MeHg is influenced by root uptake and thereby related to MeHg levels in soils. Concentrations of MeHg and total Hg in deciduous and coniferous foliage were unrelated to those in soil at 30 urban and rural forested locations in southwest Ohio. In contrast, tree genera and trunk diameter were significant variables influencing Hg in leaves. The fraction of total Hg as MeHg averaged 0.4% and did not differ among tree genera. Given that uptake of atmospheric Hg(0) appears to be the dominant source of total Hg in foliage, we infer that MeHg is formed by in vivo transformation of Hg in proportion to the amount accumulated.

  12. Before You're Pregnant - Methylmercury

    MedlinePlus

    ... nutrients and it's low in fat. However, some fish contain high levels of methylmercury, which can harm ... a metal that can be found in certain fish, including swordfish , tilefish , king mackerel , and shark . Eating ...

  13. Methylmercury in hair fisherman for Turkish coasts

    SciTech Connect

    Vural, N.; Uenlue, H.

    1996-10-01

    Environmental methylmercury mainly arises from the methylation of inorganic mercury. The change in speciation of mercury from inorganic to methylated forms is the first step in the aquatic bioaccumulation processes. The bioconcentration factor of methylmercury in fish tissue to that in water is usually between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 5}. Among seafood, fish products are the main source of methylmercury absorbed by men from the environment. Since Minimata epidemic health injuries and deaths in relation to mercury pollution, environmental and biological monitoring of inorganic and organic mercury species has gained importance through out the world and many reports have been published on the health effects and biological monitoring of mercury compounds including some Mediterranean countries. This study focuses on methylmercury in hair of fisherman living in different geographical Turkish coasts and relationship to eating fish habit. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Mercury and Methylmercury in Water and Bottom Sediments of Wetlands at Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, North Dakota, 2003-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Johnson, Kevin M.; Lundgren, Robert F.; Emerson, Douglas G.

    2007-01-01

    Certain ecosystem types, particularly wetlands, have environmental characteristics that can make them particularly sensitive to mercury inputs and that can result in large mercury concentrations in fish or other aquatic biota. To provide information needed to make effective management decisions to decrease human and wildlife exposure to methylmercury in northern prairie pothole wetlands, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the North Dakota Department of Health, conducted a study to assess mercury and methylmercury concentrations in wetlands at the Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge (the Refuge) in northwest North Dakota. In April 2003 and 2004, water and bottom-sediment samples were collected from 44 individual wetlands that were classified as one of four wetland types. Many factors that may affect methylmercury production were considered in the study. The prairie pothole wetlands at the Refuge had large ranges in major environmental characteristics. Hydrologic differences, most notably semiannual wetting and drying cycles, that are intrinsic to prairie pothole wetlands affected methylmercury concentrations. This likely resulted from the stimulation of anaerobic microbial activity following reflooding of soils, particularly soils containing substantial organic carbon. Among the four wetland types considered for this study, seasonal and semipermanent wetlands generally had the largest methylmercury concentrations. Regardless of wetland type, however, methylmercury concentrations at the Refuge are large in relation to reported concentrations for natural aquatic systems.

  15. Methylmercury disrupts the balance between phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated cofilin in primary cultures of mice cerebellar granule cells A proteomic study

    SciTech Connect

    Vendrell, Iolanda; Carrascal, Montserrat; Abian, Joaquin

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury is an environmental contaminant that is particularly toxic to the developing central nervous system; cerebellar granule neurons are especially vulnerable. Here, primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) were continuously exposed to methylmercury for up to 16 days in vitro (div). LC50 values were 508 +- 199, 345 +- 47, and 243 +- 45 nM after exposure for 6, 11, and 16 div, respectively. Proteins from cultured mouse CGCs were separated by 2DE. Seventy-one protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF PMF and MALDI-TOF/TOF sequencing. Prolonged exposure to a subcytotoxic concentration of methylmercury significantly increased non-phosphorylated cofilin both in cell protein extracts (1.4-fold; p < 0.01) and in mitochondrial-enriched fractions (1.7-fold; p < 0.01). The decrease in P-cofilin induced by methylmercury was concentration-dependent and occurred after different exposure times. The percentage of P-cofilin relative to total cofilin significantly decreased to 49 +- 13% vs. control cells after exposure to 300 nM methylmercury for 5 div. The balance between the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated form of cofilin regulates actin dynamics and facilitates actin filament turnover. Filamentous actin dynamics and reorganization are responsible of neuron shape change, migration, polarity formation, regulation of synaptic structures and function, and cell apoptosis. An alteration of the complex regulation of the cofilin phosphorylation/dephosphorylation pathway could be envisaged as an underlying mechanism compatible with reported signs of methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity.

  16. Immunofluorescence Staining — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Direct immunofluorescence method is used to detect the deposit of immunoglobulins, complement components, fibrinogen, etc. in tissues. This technique is usually performed on frozen sections. The primary antibody is conjugated to fluorescein binds directly with the antigen and can be detected by the fluorescent tag using a fluorescent microscope.

  17. [Methylmercury: existing recommendations; methods of analysing and interpreting the results; economic evaluation].

    PubMed

    González-Estecha, Montserrat; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Martínez-García, María José; Trasobares-Iglesias, Elena M; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Ordóñez-Iriarte, José María; Llorente-Ballesteros, María Teresa; Prieto-Menchero, Santiago; Guillén-Pérez, José Jesús; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Cuadrado-Cenzual, María Ángeles; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Álvarez, Jesús Román; Calvo-Manuel, Elpidio; Farré-Rovira, Rosaura; Herráiz-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Bretón Lesmes, Irene; García-Donaire, José Antonio; Sáinz-Martín, María; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txantón; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Blanco Fuentes, María; Arroyo-Fernández, Manuel; Calle Pascual, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial effects of fish consumption are well- known. Nevertheless, there is worldwide concern regard methylmercury concentrations in fish, which is why many countries such as the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and numerous European countries have made fish consumption recommendations for their populations, particularly vulnerable groups, in order to México methylmercury intake. Blood and hair are the best biological samples for measuring methylmercury. The most widely-used method to analyse methylmercury is cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, although there are also direct methods based on the thermal decomposition of the sample. In recent years, the number of laboratories that measure mercury by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has increased. In addition, the different kinds of mercury can be distinguished by coupling chromatography methods of separation. Laboratories that analyse mercury in biological samples need to participate in external quality control programmes. Even if mercury emissions are reduced, mercury may remain in the environment for many years, so dietary recommendations are fundamental in order to reduce exposure. It is necessary to propose public health measures aimed at decreasing mercury exposure and to evaluate the benefits of such measures from the economic and social standpoints. PMID:25561094

  18. [Methylmercury: existing recommendations; methods of analysing and interpreting the results; economic evaluation].

    PubMed

    González-Estecha, Montserrat; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Martínez-García, María José; Trasobares-Iglesias, Elena M; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Ordóñez-Iriarte, José María; Llorente-Ballesteros, María Teresa; Prieto-Menchero, Santiago; Guillén-Pérez, José Jesús; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Cuadrado-Cenzual, María Ángeles; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Álvarez, Jesús Román; Calvo-Manuel, Elpidio; Farré-Rovira, Rosaura; Herráiz-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Bretón Lesmes, Irene; García-Donaire, José Antonio; Sáinz-Martín, María; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txantón; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Blanco Fuentes, María; Arroyo-Fernández, Manuel; Calle Pascual, Alfonso

    2014-11-04

    The beneficial effects of fish consumption are well- known. Nevertheless, there is worldwide concern regard methylmercury concentrations in fish, which is why many countries such as the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and numerous European countries have made fish consumption recommendations for their populations, particularly vulnerable groups, in order to México methylmercury intake. Blood and hair are the best biological samples for measuring methylmercury. The most widely-used method to analyse methylmercury is cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, although there are also direct methods based on the thermal decomposition of the sample. In recent years, the number of laboratories that measure mercury by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has increased. In addition, the different kinds of mercury can be distinguished by coupling chromatography methods of separation. Laboratories that analyse mercury in biological samples need to participate in external quality control programmes. Even if mercury emissions are reduced, mercury may remain in the environment for many years, so dietary recommendations are fundamental in order to reduce exposure. It is necessary to propose public health measures aimed at decreasing mercury exposure and to evaluate the benefits of such measures from the economic and social standpoints.

  19. DOE/FDA/EPA: Workshop on methylmercury and human health

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Saroff, L.; Bolger, M.; Cicmanec, J.; Durkee, S.

    1994-12-31

    In the US the general population is exposed to methylmercury (MeHg) principally through the consumption of fish. There is continuing discussion about the sources of this form of mercury (Hg), the magnitudes and trends in exposures to consumers, and the significance of the sources and their contributions to human health. In response to these discussions, the US Department of Energy, the US Food and Drug Administration, and the US Environmental Protection Agency cosponsored a two-day workshop to discuss data and methods available for characterizing the risk to human health presented by MeHg. This workshop was attended by 45 individuals representing various Federal and state organizations and interested stakeholders. The agenda covered: Agency interests; probabilistic approach to risk assessment; emission sources; atmospheric transport; biogeochemical cycling; exposure assessment; health effects of MeHg; and research needs.

  20. Methylmercury bioaccumulation in invertebrates of boreal streams in Norway: effects of aqueous methylmercury and diet retention.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Heleen A; Kainz, Martin J; Lindholm, Markus

    2012-05-01

    Transfer of aqueous methylmercury (MeHg) to primary consumers in aquatic foodwebs is poorly understood despite its importance for bioaccumulation of MeHg. We studied bioaccumulation of MeHg in simple aquatic food chains of two humic boreal streams in relation to streamwater chemistry, food web characteristics and dietary fatty acid (FA) biomarkers. Transfer of aqueous MeHg into primary consumers was similar in both streams, resulting in higher MeHg in consumers in the MeHg-rich stream. Trophic enrichment of MeHg and dietary retention of FA biomarkers was the same in both streams, suggesting that exposure to aqueous MeHg at the base of the food chain determined levels of MeHg in biota. In addition, contents of dietary biomarkers suggested that ingestion of algae reduced MeHg bioaccumulation, while ingestion of bacteria stimulated MeHg uptake. Dietary uptake of bacteria could thus be an important pathway for MeHg-transfer at the bottom of food chains in humic streams.

  1. EFFECTS OF METHYLMERCURY ON REPRODUCTION IN AMERICAN KESTRELS AND COMPARISON TO EFFECTS OBSERVED IN OTHER AVIAN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of the effects of methylmercury on reproduction in American kestrels was conducted in conjunction with the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center as part of a larger project to improve our understanding of the effects of mercury exposure in the environment to avian popula...

  2. FISH and immunofluorescence staining in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Uniacke, James; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Zerges, William

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe how to use fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence staining to determine the in situ distributions of specific mRNAs and proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This unicellular eukaryotic green alga is a major model organism in cell biological research. Chlamydomonas is well suited for these approaches because one can determine the cytological location of fluorescence signals within a characteristic cellular anatomy relative to prominent cytological markers. Moreover, FISH and IF staining offer practical alternatives to techniques involving fluorescent proteins, which are difficult to express and detect in Chlamydomonas. The main goal of this review is to describe these powerful tools and to facilitate their routine use in Chlamydomonas research.

  3. Morphine Protects against Methylmercury Intoxication: A Role for Opioid Receptors in Oxidative Stress?

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Malaquias, Allan; Almeida, Mauro B.; Souza Monteiro, José R.; Macchi, Barbarella de Matos; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.; Crespo-Lopez, María Elena

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is an extremely dangerous environmental contaminant responsible for episodes of human intoxication throughout the world. Methylmercury, the most toxic compound of this metal, mainly targets the central nervous system, accumulating preferentially in cells of glial origin and causing oxidative stress. Despite studies demonstrating the current exposure of human populations, the consequences of mercury intoxication and concomitant use of drugs targeting the central nervous system (especially drugs used in long-term treatments, such as analgesics) are completely unknown. Morphine is a major option for pain management; its global consumption more than quadrupled in the last decade. Controversially, morphine has been proposed to function in oxidative stress independent of the activation of the opioid receptors. In this work, a therapeutic concentration of morphine partially protected the cellular viability of cells from a C6 glioma cell line exposed to methylmercury. Morphine treatment also reduced lipid peroxidation and totally prevented increases in nitrite levels in those cells. A mechanistic study revealed no alteration in sulfhydryl groups or direct scavenging at this opioid concentration. Interestingly, the opioid antagonist naloxone completely eliminated the protective effect of morphine against methylmercury intoxication, pointing to opioid receptors as the major contributor to this action. Taken together, the experiments in the current study provide the first demonstration that a therapeutic concentration of morphine is able to reduce methylmercury-induced oxidative damage and cell death by activating the opioid receptors. Thus, these receptors may be a promising pharmacological target for modulating the deleterious effects of mercury intoxication. Although additional studies are necessary, our results support the clinical safety of using this opioid in methylmercury-intoxicated patients, suggesting that normal analgesic doses could confer an additional

  4. Evaluation of protective effects of fish oil against oxidative damage in rats exposed to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Grotto, Denise; Vicentini, Juliana; Angeli, José Pedro Friedmann; Latorraca, Elder Francisco; Monteiro, Patrícia Alves Pontes; Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael Mazzaron; Somacal, Sabrina; Emanuelli, Tatiana; Barbosa, Fernando

    2011-03-01

    The present study evaluates a possible protective effect of fish oil against oxidative damage promoted by methylmercury (MeHg) in sub-chronically exposed rats. Reduced glutathione peroxidase and catalase enzyme activity and reduced glutathione levels were observed in MeHg-exposed animals compared to controls. Methylmercury exposure was also associated with DNA damage. Administration of fish oil to the methylmercury-exposed animals did not ameliorate enzyme activity or glutathione levels. On the other hand, a significant DNA protective effect (about 30%) was observed with fish oil treatment. There were no differences in the total mercury concentration in rat liver, kidney, heart or brain after MeHg administration with or without fish oil co-administration. Histopathological analyses showed a significant leukocyte infiltration in rat tissues after MeHg exposure, but this effect was significantly reduced after co-administration of fish oil. Taken together, our findings demonstrate oxidative damage even after low-level MeHg exposure and the protective effect of fish oil. This protection seems not to be related to antioxidant defenses or mercury re-distribution in rat tissues. It is probably due to the anti-inflammatory effects of fish oil. PMID:20970192

  5. Mercury Exposure and Antinuclear Antibodies among Females of Reproductive Age in the United States: NHANES

    PubMed Central

    Ganser, Martha A.; Warren, Jeffrey S.; Basu, Niladri; Wang, Lu; Zick, Suzanna M.; Park, Sung Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Background Immune dysregulation associated with mercury has been suggested, although data in the general population are lacking. Chronic exposure to low levels of methylmercury (organic) and inorganic mercury is common, such as through fish consumption and dental amalgams. Objective We examined associations between mercury biomarkers and antinuclear antibody (ANA) positivity and titer strength. Methods Among females 16–49 years of age (n = 1,352) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2004, we examined cross-sectional associations between mercury and ANAs (indirect immunofluorescence; cutoff ≥ 1:80). Three biomarkers of mercury exposure were used: hair (available 1999–2000) and total blood (1999–2004) predominantly represented methylmercury, and urine (1999–2002) represented inorganic mercury. Survey statistics were used. Multivariable modeling adjusted for several covariates, including age and omega-3 fatty acids. Results Sixteen percent of females were ANA positive; 96% of ANA positives had a nuclear speckled staining pattern. Geometric mean (geometric SD) mercury concentrations were 0.22 (0.03) ppm in hair, 0.92 (0.05) μg/L blood, and 0.62 (0.04) μg/L urine. Hair and blood, but not urinary, mercury were associated with ANA positivity (sample sizes 452, 1,352, and 804, respectively), after adjusting for confounders: for hair, odds ratio (OR) = 4.10 (95% CI: 1.66, 10.13); for blood, OR = 2.32 (95% CI: 1.07, 5.03) comparing highest versus lowest quantiles. Magnitudes of association were strongest for high-titer (≥ 1:1,280) ANA: hair, OR = 11.41 (95% CI: 1.60, 81.23); blood, OR = 5.93 (95% CI: 1.57, 22.47). Conclusions Methylmercury, at low levels generally considered safe, was associated with subclinical autoimmunity among reproductive-age females. Autoantibodies may predate clinical disease by years; thus, methylmercury exposure may be relevant to future autoimmune disease risk. Citation Somers EC, Ganser MA, Warren

  6. Immunofluorescence and Confocal Microscopy of Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Lee-Ann H.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid recruitment of neutrophils to sites of infection and their ability to phagocytose and kill microbes is an important aspect of the innate immune response. Challenges associated with imaging of these cells include their short lifespan and small size and the fact that unstimulated cells are nonadherent. In addition, although cytoplasmic granules are plentiful, the abundance of many other organelles is diminished. Here we reprise methods for analysis of resting and activated cells using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, including kinetic analysis of phagosome maturation and degranulation, and detection of intraphagosomal superoxide accumulation. We describe approaches for rapid cell fixation and permeabilization that maximize antigen detection and discuss other variables that also affect data interpretation and image quality (such as cell spreading, degranulation, and phagocytosis). Finally, we show that these methods are also applicable to studies of neutrophil interactions with the extracellular matrix. PMID:24504957

  7. Risk assessment for methylmercury in fish from the Songhua River, China: 30 years after mercury-containing wastewater outfalls were eliminated.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Yan, Baixing; Cao, Huicong; Wang, Lixia

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the methylmercury contamination of fish from the Songhua River, China. A total of 328 fish representing various trophic levels were captured from ten reaches of the river and determined for methylmercury by gas chromatography method. Total mercury in fish, water and sediments from three typical reaches were analyzed simultaneously. Methylmercury concentrations in fish from the Second Songhua River and the mainstream of the Songhua River were 0.024 ± 0.016 and 0.015 ± 0.007 mg/kg fresh weight, respectively. The proportion of methylmercury to total mercury ranged from 21.8% to 69.7%, with the mean value of 42.6%. The observed methylmercury concentrations were much lower than the historical values and were generally within the reported literature range, and health hazard assessment showed no health risk from exposure to methylmercury by consuming fish from this river, demonstrating that mercury contamination of the Songhua River has been effectively controlled by nearly 30 years of environmental governance and natural purification.

  8. Cardiovascular responses to lead are biphasic, while methylmercury, but not inorganic mercury, monotonically increases blood pressure in rats.

    PubMed

    Wildemann, Tanja M; Mirhosseini, Naghmeh; Siciliano, Steven D; Weber, Lynn P

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, such as heart attack and stroke, are the major cause of death worldwide. It is well known that a high number of environmental and physiological risk factors contribute to the development of cardiovascular diseases. Although risk factors are additive, increased blood pressure (hypertension) is the greatest risk factor. Over the last two decades, a growing number of epidemiological studies associate environmental exposure to lead or mercury species with hypertension. However, cardiovascular effects beyond blood pressure are rarely studied and thresholds for effect are not yet clear. To explore effects of lead or mercury species on the cardiovascular system, normal male Wistar rats were exposed to a range of doses of lead, inorganic mercury or methylmercury through the drinking water for four weeks. High-resolution ultrasound was used to measure heart and vascular function (carotid artery blood flow) at baseline and at the end of the exposure, while blood pressure was measured directly in the femoral artery at the end of the 4-week exposure. After 4 weeks, blood pressure responses to lead were biphasic. Low lead levels decreased blood pressure, dilated the carotid artery and increased cardiac output. At higher lead doses, rats had increased blood pressure. In contrast, methylmercury-exposed rats had increased blood pressure at all doses despite dilated carotid arteries. Inorganic mercury did not show any significant cardiovascular effects. Based on the current study, the benchmark dose level 10% (BMDL10s) for systolic blood pressure for lead, inorganic mercury and methylmercury are 1.1, 1.3 and 1.0 μg/kg-bw/d, respectively. However, similar total mercury blood levels attributed to inorganic mercury or methylmercury produced strikingly different results with inorganic mercury having no observable effect on the cardiovascular system but methylmercury increasing systolic and pulse pressures. Therefore, adverse cardiovascular effects cannot be

  9. Dietary toxicity and tissue accumulation of methylmercury in American kestrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, Richard S.; French, John B.; Rossmann, Ronald; Haebler, Romona

    2009-01-01

    American kestrels (Falco sparverius) were fed meat diets containing 0, 3, 6, or 12 ppm (dry weight) methylmercury chloride. Birds fed the 12-ppm diet started to show signs of neurotoxicity after 26 days and all died in 39?49 days. One male kestrel fed the 6-ppm diet died after 75 days of exposure and several others showed signs of neurotoxicity after 45 days. None of the birds fed the 3-ppm diet died or showed signs of toxicity. After 59 days of exposure, mercury concentrations in the liver, kidney, and blood of nonreproducing kestrels increased with increasing dietary concentration. Tissue concentrations of mercury also steadily increased over time in birds fed diets with 6 ppm mercury, which were necropsied at 8, 15, 29, or 59 days of exposure, reaching mean total mercury concentrations of 57, 46, and 45 ppm (wet weight) at 59 days in the liver, kidney, and whole blood, respectively. Two pairs of kestrels at each dietary concentration were allowed to breed. Eggs averaged 8.3 and 18.1 ppm (wet weight) total mercury from birds fed 3- and 6-ppm diets, respectively. Feathers grown during mercury exposure contained high concentrations of mercury: Birds fed 3- and 6-ppm diets contained 275 and 542 ppm total mercury, respectively.

  10. Transport of pyruvate into mitochondria is involved in methylmercury toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Yong; Ishida, Yosuke; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Naganuma, Akira; Hwang, Gi-Wook

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the overexpression of enzymes involved in the production of pyruvate, enolase 2 (Eno2) and D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld3) renders yeast highly sensitive to methylmercury and that the promotion of intracellular pyruvate synthesis may be involved in intensifying the toxicity of methylmercury. In the present study, we showed that the addition of pyruvate to culture media in non-toxic concentrations significantly enhanced the sensitivity of yeast and human neuroblastoma cells to methylmercury. The results also suggested that methylmercury promoted the transport of pyruvate into mitochondria and that the increased pyruvate concentrations in mitochondria were involved in intensifying the toxicity of methylmercury without pyruvate being converted to acetyl-CoA. Furthermore, in human neuroblastoma cells, methylmercury treatment alone decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the addition of pyruvate led to a further significant decrease. In addition, treatment with N-acetylcysteine (an antioxidant) significantly alleviated the toxicity of methylmercury and significantly inhibited the intensification of methylmercury toxicity by pyruvate. Based on these data, we hypothesize that methylmercury exerts its toxicity by raising the level of pyruvate in mitochondria and that mitochondrial dysfunction and increased levels of reactive oxygen species are involved in the action of pyruvate. PMID:26899208

  11. Vitamins and monothiols efficacy in the restoration of adenosine nucleotide degradation enzymes altered during methylmercury intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, P.P.; Bapu, C.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    1995-12-31

    Male albino mice were intoxicated with a daily dose of 1 mg/kg of methylmercury chloride (MMC) for 7 days, and were treated thereafter with glutathione, N-acetyl-DL-homocysteine thiolactone, vitamin B complex, and vitamin E, either alone or in combinations for the next 7 days. The animals were sacrificed on the eighth day, with the exception of one group that was kept without toxic exposure for an additional 7 days and sacrificed on the fifteenth day. Brain, spinal cord, kidney, and liver of the animals were examined for changes in adenosine deaminase and 5{prime} nucleotidase. We found a severe inhibition of these enzymes during MMC intoxication and significant recovery during monothiols and vitamins administration, indicating the effectiveness of these agents in methylmercury detoxication. 26 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Effect of methylmercury on acetylcholinestrase and serum cholinesterase activity in monkeys, Macaca fascicularis

    SciTech Connect

    Petruccioli, L.; Turillazzi, P.G. )

    1991-05-01

    The consumption of fish and fish-derived products is the main pathway of human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg). Methylmercury levels vary widely in fish, depending on age, size, the position of the species in the food chain, and most of all, on pollution levels. MeHg affects the Acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE) and the serum Cholinesterase activity (BChE). Histoenzymatic studies showed that 100mg Methyoxyethylmercury chloride administered for 6 days to rats caused a reduction of AChE activity in the thalamus and an increase in different parts of the nervous central system. The present study aims at verifying whether the dose permitted by F.A.O. and doses 10 and 100 fold higher affect the Cholinesterase activity in primates, and whether there is a correlation between AChE and BChE.

  13. Effects of dietary methylmercury on liver and kidney histology in the neotropical fish Hoplias malabaricus.

    PubMed

    Mela, M; Randi, M A F; Ventura, D F; Carvalho, C E V; Pelletier, E; Oliveira Ribeiro, C A

    2007-11-01

    Methylmercury is a potent toxic present in Amazonian fish species due to gold mining activities. In the present work, we investigated the morphological effects of methylmercury in liver and kidney of Hoplias malabaricus feeding contaminated prey fish over 70 days. Two groups of nine mature fish (tested and control) were acclimatized for four weeks to laboratory conditions and then the tested group fed prey fish previously contaminated at an additional level of 0.075 microg MeHg g(-1) at 5-day intervals and over 14 successive intervals whereas control group fed uncontaminated fish. H. malabaricus specimens were then dissected for chemical and morphological analyses. The low and realistic level of MeHg in the prey fish induced a low increase of total mercury in liver (1.8-fold) and muscle (2.2-fold). The biomagnification factor (Hg in predator/Hg in prey) reached 142 in liver and 21 in muscle and was indicative of a relatively fast contamination of internal organs by dietary exposure. The liver of exposed individuals presented leukocyte infiltration, increased number of melano-macrophage centers, necrotic areas and lesions in Disse's space. Evident disorder and chaos in cytoskeleton organization suggest a strong toxic effect in hepatocytes, such as organelles positioning and movement, vesicles traffic and secretion. Head kidney showed large necrosis areas, increased number of melano-macrophages centers, phagocytic areas, intercellular space among parenquimal cells and atypical cells. Injuries and damages to tissues suggest too slow defense mechanisms to immobilize or eliminate ingested methylmercury, demonstrating that the sensitivity of fish cells to methylmercury exposure is higher than it has been previously described in the literature.

  14. [Environmental epidemiology research leads to a decrease of the exposure limit for mercury].

    PubMed

    Weihe, Pál; Debes, Froôi; White, Roberta F; Sørensen, Nicolina; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Keiding, Niels; Grandjean, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    The central nervous system is particularly vulnerable to prenatal exposure to methylmercury. Due to the widespread exposure to methylmercury from fish, several prospective environmental epidemiology studies have been initiated, in which the maternal exposure during the pregnancy is related to the neurobehavioural development of the children. We have studied a Faroese birth cohort prenatally exposed to methylmercury from maternal intake of contaminated pilot whale meat. At seven years of age, clear dose-response relationships were observed for deficits in attention, language, and memory. An increase in blood pressure was also associated with the prenatal exposure level. The exposure limit for mercury has therefore been decreased.

  15. Immunofluorescence and Immunohistochemical Detection of Keratins.

    PubMed

    Stumptner, Cornelia; Gogg-Kamerer, Margit; Viertler, Christian; Denk, Helmut; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Reliable detection of keratins in tissues is important for investigating their physiological role and for using keratin expression as a biomarker in medical diagnostics. A particular challenge for the detection of keratins by immunofluorescence microscopy or immunohistochemistry relates to the fact that keratin intermediate filaments are obligatory heteropolymers, which may result in dissociation between RNA and protein expression levels in the event that the homeostasis of the expression of the proper keratin partners is disturbed. Furthermore, variable accessibility of epitopes on keratin polypeptides due to conformational changes may lead to false negative results. Preanalytical effects, such as warm/cold ischemia, fixation, tissue processing, and embedding may result in false negative or inappropriate reactions. An experimental design for how to systematically test preanalytical effects and to validate immunohistochemistry protocols is presented. This kind of evaluation should be performed for each antigen and antibody since the various epitopes recognized by antibodies may behave differently. In this context, one has to be aware that different cell structures may be affected or modified differently by various preanalytical procedures and may thus require different preanalytical and staining protocols.

  16. Establishment of indirect immunofluorescence assay for rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Tao, J; Zhang, J; Liu, X; Jin, H; Jiang, C; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most frequent cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide and a significant cause of death in infants and young children, following severe diarrhea and dehydration. Rotavirus vaccines are considered the most effective way to prevent rotavirus infections. In the process of developing rotavirus vaccines, it is crucial to establish a reliable and standardized method to determine vaccine titer. In this study, we developed an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to determine the infectious titer of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus (LLR) vaccine grown in MA104 cells. The activating concentration of trypsin was 1 µg/ml for healthy monolayers of MA104 cells at 100% confluence. After incubation for 18 hr, a rabbit anti-SA11 polyclonal antibody, diluted at 1:800 in PBS, was added to all wells, followed by an Alexa-488-conjugated secondary antibody diluted at 1:500 in PBS. Cells were examined with a fluorescence microscope. Our results show that IFA was more reproducible, more sensitive, simpler, and more rapid than the log 50% cell culture infectious dose-ELISA (lgCCID50-ELISA) in measuring the rotavirus vaccines. IFA provided a reliable basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rotavirus, and the certification of rotavirus vaccine production.

  17. Establishment of indirect immunofluorescence assay for rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Tao, J; Zhang, J; Liu, X; Jin, H; Jiang, C; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most frequent cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide and a significant cause of death in infants and young children, following severe diarrhea and dehydration. Rotavirus vaccines are considered the most effective way to prevent rotavirus infections. In the process of developing rotavirus vaccines, it is crucial to establish a reliable and standardized method to determine vaccine titer. In this study, we developed an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to determine the infectious titer of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus (LLR) vaccine grown in MA104 cells. The activating concentration of trypsin was 1 µg/ml for healthy monolayers of MA104 cells at 100% confluence. After incubation for 18 hr, a rabbit anti-SA11 polyclonal antibody, diluted at 1:800 in PBS, was added to all wells, followed by an Alexa-488-conjugated secondary antibody diluted at 1:500 in PBS. Cells were examined with a fluorescence microscope. Our results show that IFA was more reproducible, more sensitive, simpler, and more rapid than the log 50% cell culture infectious dose-ELISA (lgCCID50-ELISA) in measuring the rotavirus vaccines. IFA provided a reliable basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rotavirus, and the certification of rotavirus vaccine production. PMID:26982471

  18. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    SciTech Connect

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks in the highest fish-consuming group ({approx}3 times

  19. Concentrations of methylmercury in invertebrates from wetlands of the Prairie Pothole Region of North America.

    PubMed

    Bates, Lara M; Hall, Britt D

    2012-01-01

    Prairie wetlands may be important sites of mercury (Hg) methylation resulting in elevated methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in water, sediments and biota. Invertebrates are an important food resource and may act as an indicator of MeHg exposure to higher organisms. In 2007-2008, invertebrates were collected from wetland ponds in central Saskatchewan, categorized into functional feeding groups (FFGs) and analyzed for total Hg (THg) and MeHg. Methylmercury and THg concentrations in four FFGs ranged from 0.2-393.5 ng · g(-1) and 9.7-507.1 ng · g(-1), respectively. Methylmercury concentrations generally increased from gastropods with significantly lower average MeHg concentrations compared to other invertebrate taxa. Surrounding land use (agricultural, grassland and organic agricultural) may influence MeHg concentrations in invertebrates, with invertebrate MeHg concentrations being higher from organic ponds (457.5 ± 156.7 ng · g(-1)) compared to those from grassland ponds (74.8 ± 14.6 ng · g(-1)) and ponds on agricultural lands (32.8 ± 6.2 ng · g(-1)).

  20. Single-neuron axonal pathfinding under geometric guidance: low-dose-methylmercury developmental neurotoxicity test.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lina; Sweeney, Andrew J; Sheng, Liyuan; Fang, Yu; Kindy, Mark S; Xi, Tingfei; Gao, Bruce Z

    2014-09-21

    Because the nervous system is most vulnerable to toxicants during development, there is a crucial need for a highly sensitive developmental-neurotoxicity-test model to detect potential toxicants at low doses. We developed a lab-on-chip wherein single-neuron axonal pathfinding under geometric guidance was created using soft lithography and laser cell-micropatterning techniques. After coating the surface with L1, an axon-specific member of the Ig family of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and optimizing microunit geometric parameters, we introduced low-dose methylmercury, a well-known, environmentally significant neurotoxicant, in the shared medium. Its developmental neurotoxicity was evaluated using a novel axonal pathfinding assay including axonal turning and branching rates at turning points in this model. Compared to the conventional neurite-outgrowth assay, this model's detection threshold for low-dose methylmercury was 10-fold more sensitive at comparable exposure durations. These preliminary results support study of developmental effects of known and potential neurotoxicants on axon pathfinding. This novel assay model would be useful to study neuronal disease mechanisms at the single-cell level. To our knowledge, the potential of methylmercury chloride to cause acute in vitro developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) at such a low dosage has not been reported. This is the first DNT test model with high reproducibility to use single-neuron axonal pathfinding under precise geometric guidance. PMID:25041816

  1. Determination of a site-specific reference dose for methylmercury for fish-eating populations.

    PubMed

    Shipp, A M; Gentry, P R; Lawrence, G; Van Landingham, C; Covington, T; Clewell, H J; Gribben, K; Crump, K

    2000-11-01

    Environmental risk-management decisions in the U.S. involving potential exposures to methylmercury currently use a reference dose (RfD) developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). This RfD is based on retrospective studies of an acute poisoning incident in Iraq in which grain contaminated with a methylmercury fungicide was inadvertently used in the baking of bread. The exposures, which were relatively high but lasted only a few months, were associated with neurological effects in both adults (primarily paresthesia) and infants (late walking, late talking, etc.). It is generally believed that the developing fetus represents a particularly sensitive subpopulation for the neurological effects of methylmercury. The USEPA derived an RfD of 0.1 microg/kg/day based on benchmark dose (BMD) modeling of the combined neurological endpoints reported for children exposed in utero. This RfD included an uncertainty factor of 10 to consider human pharmacokinetic variability and database limitations (lack of data on multigeneration effects or possible long-term sequelae of perinatal exposure). Alcoa signed an Administrative Order of Consent for the conduct of a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) at their Point Comfort Operations and the adjacent Lavaca Bay in Texas to address the effects of historical discharges of mercury-containing wastewater. In cooperation with the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission and USEPA Region VI, Alcoa conducted a baseline risk assessment to assess potential risk to human health and the environment. As a part of this assessment. Alcoa pursued the development of a site-specific RfD for methylmercury to specifically address the potential human health effects associated with the ingestion of contaminated finfish and shellfish from Lavaca Bay. Application of the published USEPA RfD to this site is problematic; while the study underlying the RfD represented acute exposure to relatively high concentrations of

  2. Determination of a site-specific reference dose for methylmercury for fish-eating populations.

    PubMed

    Shipp, A M; Gentry, P R; Lawrence, G; Van Landingham, C; Covington, T; Clewell, H J; Gribben, K; Crump, K

    2000-11-01

    Environmental risk-management decisions in the U.S. involving potential exposures to methylmercury currently use a reference dose (RfD) developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). This RfD is based on retrospective studies of an acute poisoning incident in Iraq in which grain contaminated with a methylmercury fungicide was inadvertently used in the baking of bread. The exposures, which were relatively high but lasted only a few months, were associated with neurological effects in both adults (primarily paresthesia) and infants (late walking, late talking, etc.). It is generally believed that the developing fetus represents a particularly sensitive subpopulation for the neurological effects of methylmercury. The USEPA derived an RfD of 0.1 microg/kg/day based on benchmark dose (BMD) modeling of the combined neurological endpoints reported for children exposed in utero. This RfD included an uncertainty factor of 10 to consider human pharmacokinetic variability and database limitations (lack of data on multigeneration effects or possible long-term sequelae of perinatal exposure). Alcoa signed an Administrative Order of Consent for the conduct of a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) at their Point Comfort Operations and the adjacent Lavaca Bay in Texas to address the effects of historical discharges of mercury-containing wastewater. In cooperation with the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission and USEPA Region VI, Alcoa conducted a baseline risk assessment to assess potential risk to human health and the environment. As a part of this assessment. Alcoa pursued the development of a site-specific RfD for methylmercury to specifically address the potential human health effects associated with the ingestion of contaminated finfish and shellfish from Lavaca Bay. Application of the published USEPA RfD to this site is problematic; while the study underlying the RfD represented acute exposure to relatively high concentrations of

  3. Possible physiological uptake mechanism of methylmercury by the marine bloodworm (Glycera dibranchiata)

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros, D.M.; Cadwell, L.L.; Preston, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of methylmercury by fish has been studied extensively. There have been some studies on marine invertebrates. These studies have been concerned with either the effect of methylmercury on viability or methylmercury distribution among body parts. The physiological uptake mechanisms of methylmercury in aquatic organisms have not been studied. The objective of this paper is to examine the uptake mechanism of methylmercury from water in a lower-food-chain organism, the marine bloodworm (Glycera dibranchi-ata).

  4. Methylmercury monitoring study in Karakuwacho peninsula area in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junxia; Inoue, Kayoko; Asakawa, Akihiro; Harada, Kouji H; Watanabe, Takao; Hachiya, Noriyuki; Koizumi, Akio

    2014-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a worldwide concern owing to its adverse health effects. To explore MeHg exposure burdens and the potential contributing factors in different subpopulations in a peninsula area (Karakuwacho) in Japan, a cross-sectional survey was performed. This study included 189 individuals from 102 families. The geometric means of total hair mercury (THg) were 5.74, 3.78 and 2.37 μg/g for adult males, females and children, respectively, of which 56.5 %, 30.9 % and 12.9 % had hair THg exceeding 5 μg/g, respectively. Tuna and mackerel were the common fish species that were positively correlated with hair THg levels in different subpopulations (standardized coefficient ranged from 0.20 to 0.58, p < 0.05). Frequent consumption of these fish species and a large amount of fish intake are likely major contributors of MeHg exposure in this area. Local-scale risk evaluation and risk communication should be highlighted in future studies.

  5. Characterization of the effects of methylmercury on Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Helmcke, Kirsten J.; Syversen, Tore; Miller, David M.; Aschner, Michael

    2009-10-15

    The rising prevalence of methylmercury (MeHg) in seafood and in the global environment provides an impetus for delineating the mechanism of the toxicity of MeHg. Deleterious effects of MeHg have been widely observed in humans and in other mammals, the most striking of which occur in the nervous system. Here we test the model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), for MeHg toxicity. The simple, well-defined anatomy of the C. elegans nervous system and its ready visualization with green fluorescent protein (GFP) markers facilitated our study of the effects of methylmercuric chloride (MeHgCl) on neural development. Although MeHgCl was lethal to C. elegans, induced a developmental delay, and decreased pharyngeal pumping, other traits including lifespan, brood size, swimming rate, and nervous system morphology were not obviously perturbed in animals that survived MeHgCl exposure. Despite the limited effects of MeHgCl on C. elegans development and behavior, intracellular mercury (Hg) concentrations ({<=} 3 ng Hg/mg protein) in MeHgCl-treated nematodes approached levels that are highly toxic to mammals. If MeHgCl reaches these concentrations throughout the animal, this finding indicates that C. elegans cells, particularly neurons, may be less sensitive to MeHgCl toxicity than mammalian cells. We propose, therefore, that C. elegans should be a useful model for discovering intrinsic mechanisms that confer resistance to MeHgCl exposure.

  6. Methylmercury monitoring study in Karakuwacho peninsula area in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junxia; Inoue, Kayoko; Asakawa, Akihiro; Harada, Kouji H; Watanabe, Takao; Hachiya, Noriyuki; Koizumi, Akio

    2014-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a worldwide concern owing to its adverse health effects. To explore MeHg exposure burdens and the potential contributing factors in different subpopulations in a peninsula area (Karakuwacho) in Japan, a cross-sectional survey was performed. This study included 189 individuals from 102 families. The geometric means of total hair mercury (THg) were 5.74, 3.78 and 2.37 μg/g for adult males, females and children, respectively, of which 56.5 %, 30.9 % and 12.9 % had hair THg exceeding 5 μg/g, respectively. Tuna and mackerel were the common fish species that were positively correlated with hair THg levels in different subpopulations (standardized coefficient ranged from 0.20 to 0.58, p < 0.05). Frequent consumption of these fish species and a large amount of fish intake are likely major contributors of MeHg exposure in this area. Local-scale risk evaluation and risk communication should be highlighted in future studies. PMID:24599146

  7. Dietary nimodipine delays the onset of methylmercury neurotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jordan M; Hutsell, Blake A; Newland, M Christopher

    2013-07-01

    Adult-onset methylmercury (MeHg) exposure is thought to result primarily in sensory and motor deficits but effects on learning are poorly understood. One mechanism by which chronic MeHg may exert its neurotoxicity is via sustained disruption of intracellular calcium homeostasis, with a consequent increase of intracellular Ca(2+) ions in vulnerable neurons. A biochemically heterogeneous group of compounds, calcium channel blockers, have been shown in vitro to attenuate MeHg's toxicity. To evaluate the role of calcium antagonism in MeHg toxicity in vivo, adult BALB/c mice were exposed chronically to 0 or 15 ppm of Hg (as MeHg) via drinking water and to nimodipine, a dihydropryidine, L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker with action in the CNS. Nimodipine was administered orally in diets (0, 20, or 200 ppm, producing approximately 0, 2, or 20 mg/kg/day of nimodipine). An incremental repeated acquisition (IRA) of response chains procedure was used to detect MeHg-induced deficits in learning or motoric function and to evaluate possible neuroprotection by nimodipine. MeHg impaired performance on the IRA task, and this was partially or completely blocked by dietary nimodipine, depending on dose. Measures of learning co-varied with measures of motoric function as indicated by overall response rate. Nimodipine delayed or prevented the behavioral toxicity of MeHg exposure as evidenced by IRA performance; effects on learning seemed secondary to response rate decreases.

  8. THE USE OF LOCAL MERCURY DEPOSITION MEASUREMENTS IN MODELING THE FATE, TRANSPORT AND BIOACCUMULATION OF METHYLMERCURY ON THE CHEYENNE RIVER SIOUX TRIBAL LANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Managed farm ponds on Sioux Tribal lands were monitored as a part of a two year study to address the variation in methylmercury bioaccumulation in fishes from 2003-2004. Initial tissue residue monitoring suggested that larger ponds posed less risk for human exposure to methylmer...

  9. SUB-ACUTE TREATMENT WITH METHYLMERCURY DURING DIFFERENTIATION OF PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELLS DOES NOT ALTER BINDING OF ION CHANNEL LIGANDS OR CELL MORPHOLOGY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We demonstrated recently that 6 days of exposure to nanomolar concentrations (3-10 nM) of methylmercury (MeHg) during nerve growth factor (NGF) induced PC12 cell differentiation reduced the amplitude and density of voltage-gated sodium and calcium currents. In the present study,...

  10. Methylmercury and the health of indigenous peoples: a risk management challenge for physical and social sciences and for public health policy.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, B; Wheatley, M A

    2000-10-01

    Methylmercury in aquatic ecosystems and bio-accumulated in aquatic biota, especially fish, is a major public health concern internationally. Precautionary efforts are currently underway internationally to reduce the anthropogenic release of mercury, which in turn, over time, will reduce human exposure. However, at the present time, it is important to address the issue of management of the risks of exposure as they exist now. Of particular concern are the impacts of methylmercury on indigenous populations which depend on fish as a subsistence food source, both in remote areas of developed countries, such as Canada, and in developing countries such as Brazil. Research into these impacts over the past two or three decades has shown that, other than in very severe pollution situations such as occurred in Minamata, Japan, the direct impacts on human health are difficult to prove. On the other hand, the indirect negative effects of methylmercury on health, mediated through the disruption of lifestyle and eating patterns and the associated socio-cultural and socio-economic consequences among the affected native populations, have, in many cases, been significant. These social factors have raised serious challenges in determining practical public health policies on the issue. Policy development relating to environmental contaminants has been presented, with the problem of assessing the role of the various factors which contribute to the impact on health as a result of socio-cultural disruption. These factors include changes in diet and lifestyle due to methylmercury in the environment and its real or perceived risk. The standard physical sciences risk assessment process, based on the lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL) or no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL) used in defining health policies may be seen as over-simplistic theoretical extrapolations when viewed in the context of the concerns of the social sciences. Both approaches, however, have relevance to

  11. Methylmercury and the health of indigenous peoples: a risk management challenge for physical and social sciences and for public health policy.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, B; Wheatley, M A

    2000-10-01

    Methylmercury in aquatic ecosystems and bio-accumulated in aquatic biota, especially fish, is a major public health concern internationally. Precautionary efforts are currently underway internationally to reduce the anthropogenic release of mercury, which in turn, over time, will reduce human exposure. However, at the present time, it is important to address the issue of management of the risks of exposure as they exist now. Of particular concern are the impacts of methylmercury on indigenous populations which depend on fish as a subsistence food source, both in remote areas of developed countries, such as Canada, and in developing countries such as Brazil. Research into these impacts over the past two or three decades has shown that, other than in very severe pollution situations such as occurred in Minamata, Japan, the direct impacts on human health are difficult to prove. On the other hand, the indirect negative effects of methylmercury on health, mediated through the disruption of lifestyle and eating patterns and the associated socio-cultural and socio-economic consequences among the affected native populations, have, in many cases, been significant. These social factors have raised serious challenges in determining practical public health policies on the issue. Policy development relating to environmental contaminants has been presented, with the problem of assessing the role of the various factors which contribute to the impact on health as a result of socio-cultural disruption. These factors include changes in diet and lifestyle due to methylmercury in the environment and its real or perceived risk. The standard physical sciences risk assessment process, based on the lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL) or no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL) used in defining health policies may be seen as over-simplistic theoretical extrapolations when viewed in the context of the concerns of the social sciences. Both approaches, however, have relevance to

  12. Comparison of mercury accumulation among the brain, liver, kidney, and the brain regions of rats administered methylmercury in various phases of postnatal development

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, M.; Nakano, A.

    1995-10-01

    Several animal studies have indicated that a developing organism in its prenatal and early postnatal stage may be at higher risk in toxic metal exposure than in adult stage. Many infants were congenitally affected by methylmercury in the epidemics in Japan and Iraq. The infants reported from Minamata, Japan, had severe cerebral palsy, whereas their mothers had mild or no manifestations of poisoning. Some of the high susceptibility in infants may resulted from the specific features of the methylmercury metabolism in the developing organisms. Prenatal or postnatal development is characterized by functional immaturity of organs, which may affect the mercury (Hg) accumulation among organs. It seems possible that the Hg distribution might, in fact, reflect the toxic effects of methylmercury during a given developing phase. Thus, its distribution deserves closer examination. In our previous study, when a toxic level of methylmercury was administered, the Hg distribution and its effects on body weight gain and neurological disorders were found to be different among the rat postnatal developing phases. In the present study the Hg distribution among organs and brain regions was investigated during the several development phases with a nontoxic level of methylmercury treatment. 24 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Role of methylmercury exposure (from fish consumption) on growth and neurodevelopment of children under 5 years of age living in a transitioning (tin-mining) area of the western Amazon, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rejane C; Dórea, José G; Leão, Renata S; Dos Santos, Verusca G; Bueno, Lucélia; Marques, Rayson C; Brandão, Katiane G; Palermo, Elisabete F A; Guimarães, Jean Remy D

    2012-02-01

    Human occupation of the Amazon region has recently increased, bringing deforestation for agriculture and open-cast mining, activities that cause environmental degradation and pollution. Families of new settlers in mining areas might have a diet less dependent on abundant fish and their children might also be impacted by exposures to mining environments. Therefore, there is compounded interest in assessing young children's nutritional status and neurobehavioral development with regard to family fish consumption. Anthropometric (z-scores, WHO standards) and neurologic [Gesell developmental scores (GDS)] development in 688 preschool children (1-59 months of age) was studied. Overall, the prevalence of malnutrition [i.e., moderate stunting (≤2 H/A-Z), underweight (≤2 W/A-Z), and wasting (≤2 W/H-Z) were respectively 0.3% (n = 2), 1.6% (n = 11), and 2.5% (n = 17). Children's mean hair Hg (HHg) concentration was 2.56 μg/g (SD = 1.67); only 14% of children had HHg concentrations lower than 1 μg/g and 1.7% had ≥5 μg/g. The biomarker of fish consumption was weakly but positively correlated with GDS (Spearman r = 0.080; p = 0.035). In the bivariate model, attained W/H-Z scores were not significantly correlated with GDS. A moderate level of GDS deficits (70-84%) was seen in 20% of children. There was significant correlation between family fish consumption and children's hair Hg (HHg) (Spearman r = 0.1756; p < 0.0001) but no significant correlation between children's HHg and W/H-Z scores. However, the multivariate model showed that breastfeeding, a fish consumption biomarker (HHg), maternal education, and child's age were statistically significant associated with specific domains (language and personal-social) of the Gesell scale. In this mining environment, family fish-eating did not affect children's linear growth, but it showed a positive influence (along with maternal variables) on neurodevelopment. Health hazards attendant on a high prevalence of moderate

  14. Interactions between methylmercury and selenomethionine injected into mallard eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klimstra, J.D.; Yee, J.L.; Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Stebbins, K.R.

    2012-01-01

    Methylmercury chloride and seleno-L-methionine were injected separately or in combinations into mallard eggs (Anas platyrhynchos), and embryo mortality and teratogenic effects (deformities) were modeled using a logistic regression model. Methylmercury was injected at doses that resulted in concentrations of 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 µg/g Hg in the egg on a wet weight basis and selenomethionine at doses that resulted in concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 µg/g Se in the egg, also on a wet weight basis. When selenomethionine and methylmercury were injected separately, hatching probability decreased in both cases. However, when methylmercury was injected at 1.6 µg/g in combination with selenomethionine at 0.2 µg/g, the presence of the methylmercury resulted in less embryo mortality than had been seen with 0.2 µg/g Se by itself, but it increased the number of deformed embryos and hatchlings. Selenomethionine appeared to be more embryotoxic than equivalent doses of methylmercury when injected into eggs, and both injected methylmercury and selenomethionine were more toxic to mallard embryos than when deposited naturally in the egg by the mother. The underlying mechanisms behind the interactions between methylmercury and selenomethionine and why methylmercury appeared to improve hatching probability of Se-dosed eggs yet increased deformities when the two compounds were combined are unclear. These findings warrant further studies to understand these mechanisms in both laboratory and field settings.

  15. Rapid diagnosis of mumps virus infections by immunofluorescence methods.

    PubMed

    Lennette, D A; Emmons, R W; Lennette, E H

    1976-08-01

    Mumps and its complications, particularly meningoencephalitis, is an important disease problem, and more rapid diagnostic methods are desirable. A study was made of immunofluorescence methods for the early detection of mumps virus isolated in cell cultures, or adsorbed directly from clinical specimens onto guinea pig erythrocytes. A specific diagnosis could be made in hours to 2 or 3 days utilizing immunofluorescence methods, in contrast to about 6 days by standard methods. Details of the direct immunofluorescence methods are presented, to encourage wider application in clinical virology laboratories. PMID:787002

  16. Assessment of the effects of acrylamide, methylmercury, and 2,5-hexanedione on motor functions in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, S.G.; Maurissen, J.P.J.

    1982-07-01

    Neurotoxic effects of acrylamide, methylmercury, and 2,5-hexanedione were studied in forty female BALB/c mice. Three control groups were used. The first received distilled water, the second received concentrated saccharin solution to assess the effects of reduced water intake, and the third was maintained on a reduced food diet. Motor functions were quantified by measuring landing foot-spread and rotarod performance. Baseline data were collected before dosing started. Mice were placed, twice weekly, on an accelerating rotarod, and their retention time was recorded. In the landing foot-spread test, the experimenter dropped mice from 15 cm onto a flat, smooth surface once a week. The hindlimb splay was then measured by the examiner. Both experimenter and examiner were unaware of the identity of each group (except of the food deprived group, in the case of the experimenter) during the first exposure. Decreased retention time and increased hindlimb splay were observed in mice after 12 d of exposure to acrylamide. Recovery followed treatment cessation. Increased hindlimb splay preceded an obvious decline of rotarod performance in the group receiving the 10 ppm of methylmercury solution. Mice receiving the 20 and 40 ppm of methylmercury solutions did not display any change in these tests before overt signs of toxicity. 2,5-Hexanedione produced a small decline in performance to a constant level after 85 d of exposure. After dosing termination, performance returned to baseline values.

  17. Hippocampal developmental vulnerability to methylmercury extends into prepubescence

    PubMed Central

    Obiorah, Maryann; McCandlish, Elizabeth; Buckley, Brian; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    The developing brain is sensitive to environmental toxicants such as methylmercury (MeHg), to which humans are exposed via contaminated seafood. Prenatal exposure in children is associated with learning, memory and IQ deficits, which can result from hippocampal dysfunction. To explore underlying mechanisms, we have used the postnatal day (P7) rat to model the third trimester of human gestation. We previously showed that a single low exposure (0.6 μg/gbw) that approaches human exposure reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) 24 h later, producing later proliferation and memory deficits in adolescence. Yet, the vulnerable stem cell population and period of developmental vulnerability remain undefined. In this study, we find that P7 exposure of stem cells has long-term consequences for adolescent neurogenesis. It reduced the number of mitotic S-phase cells (BrdU), especially those in the highly proliferative Tbr2+ population, and immature neurons (Doublecortin) in adolescence, suggesting partial depletion of the later stem cell pool. To define developmental vulnerability to MeHg in prepubescent (P14) and adolescent (P21) rats, we examined acute 24 h effects of MeHg exposure on mitosis and apoptosis. We found that low exposure did not adversely impact neurogenesis at either age, but that a higher exposure (5 μg/gbw) at P14 reduced the total number of neural stem cells (Sox2+) by 23% and BrdU+ cells by 26% in the DG hilus, suggesting that vulnerability diminishes with age. To determine whether these effects reflect changes in MeHg transfer across the blood brain barrier (BBB), we assessed Hg content in the hippocampus after peripheral injection and found that similar levels (~800 ng/gm) were obtained at 24 h at both P14 and P21, declining in parallel, suggesting that changes in vulnerability depend more on local tissue and cellular mechanisms. Together, we show that MeHg vulnerability declines with age, and that early exposure impairs later

  18. Development of an immunofluorescence focus assay for Ebola virus.

    PubMed Central

    Truant, A L; Regnery, R L; Kiley, M P

    1983-01-01

    A 48-h indirect immunofluorescence focus assay for the quantitation of Ebola virus was developed, utilizing HeLa-229 cell monolayers. The dose dependency and the sensitivity of this assay as compared with conventional assays are reported. This indirect immunofluorescence focus assay can be used as a rapid, quantitative test for the detection of Ebola virus, an agent from Africa known to cause hemorrhagic fever. Images PMID:6352735

  19. Flow cytometric immunofluorescence of rat anterior pituitary cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. Michael; Hymer, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    A flow cytometric immunofluorescence technique was developed for the quantification of growth hormone, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone producing cells. The procedure is based on indirect-immunofluorescence of intracellular hormone using an EPICS V cell sorter and can objectively count 50,000 cells in about 3 minutes. It can be used to study the dynamics of pituitary cell populations under various physiological and pharmacological conditions.

  20. Toxicity of ethylmercury (and Thimerosal): a comparison with methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Dórea, José G; Farina, Marcelo; Rocha, João B T

    2013-08-01

    Ethylmercury (etHg) is derived from the metabolism of thimerosal (o-carboxyphenyl-thio-ethyl-sodium salt), which is the most widely used form of organic mercury. Because of its application as a vaccine preservative, almost every human and animal (domestic and farmed) that has been immunized with thimerosal-containing vaccines has been exposed to etHg. Although methylmercury (meHg) is considered a hazardous substance that is to be avoided even at small levels when consumed in foods such as seafood and rice (in Asia), the World Health Organization considers small doses of thimerosal safe regardless of multiple/repetitive exposures to vaccines that are predominantly taken during pregnancy or infancy. We have reviewed in vitro and in vivo studies that compare the toxicological parameters among etHg and other forms of mercury (predominantly meHg) to assess their relative toxicities and potential to cause cumulative insults. In vitro studies comparing etHg with meHg demonstrate equivalent measured outcomes for cardiovascular, neural and immune cells. However, under in vivo conditions, evidence indicates a distinct toxicokinetic profile between meHg and etHg, favoring a shorter blood half-life, attendant compartment distribution and the elimination of etHg compared with meHg. EtHg's toxicity profile is different from that of meHg, leading to different exposure and toxicity risks. Therefore, in real-life scenarios, a simultaneous exposure to both etHg and meHg might result in enhanced neurotoxic effects in developing mammals. However, our knowledge on this subject is still incomplete, and studies are required to address the predictability of the additive or synergic toxicological effects of etHg and meHg (or other neurotoxicants).

  1. Ecological risk of methylmercury in Everglades National Park, Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Rumbold, D G; Lange, T R; Axelrad, D M; Atkeson, T D

    2008-10-01

    Dramatic declines in mercury levels have been reported in Everglades biota in recent years. Yet, methylmercury (MeHg) hot spots remain. This paper summarizes a risk assessment of MeHg exposure to three piscivorous wildlife species (bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus; wood stork, Mycteria americana; and great egret, Ardea albus) foraging at a MeHg hot spot in northern Everglades National Park (ENP). Available data consisted of literature-derived life history parameters and tissue concentrations measured in 60 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), 60 sunfish (Lepomis spp.), and three composite samples of mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) collected from 2003 to 2005. To assess risk, daily MeHg intake was estimated using Monte Carlo methods and compared to literature-derived effects thresholds. The results indicated the likelihood was very high, ranging from 98-100% probability, that these birds would experience exposures above the acceptable dose when foraging in northern ENP. Moreover, the likelihood that these birds would experience exposures above the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) ranged from a 14% probability for the wood stork to 56% probability for the eagle. Data from this study, along with the results from several other surveys suggest that biota in ENP currently contain the highest MeHg levels in South Florida and that these levels are similar to or greater than other known MeHg hot spots in the United States. Given these findings, this paper also outlines a strategic plan to obtain additional measured and modeled information to support risk-based management decisions in ENP. PMID:18679795

  2. Warming increases methylmercury production in an Arctic soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ziming; Fang, Wei; Lu, Xia; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Graham, David E; Liang, Liyuan; Wullschleger, Stan D; Gu, Baohua

    2016-07-01

    Rapid temperature rise in Arctic permafrost impacts not only the degradation of stored soil organic carbon (SOC) and climate feedback, but also the production and bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) toxin that can endanger humans, as well as wildlife in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Currently little is known concerning the effects of rapid permafrost thaw on microbial methylation and how SOC degradation is coupled to MeHg biosynthesis. Here we describe the effects of warming on MeHg production in an Arctic soil during an 8-month anoxic incubation experiment. Net MeHg production increased >10 fold in both organic- and mineral-rich soil layers at warmer (8 °C) than colder (-2 °C) temperatures. The type and availability of labile SOC, such as reducing sugars and ethanol, were particularly important in fueling the rapid initial biosynthesis of MeHg. Freshly amended mercury was more readily methylated than preexisting mercury in the soil. Additionally, positive correlations between mercury methylation and methane and ferrous ion production indicate linkages between SOC degradation and MeHg production. These results show that climate warming and permafrost thaw could potentially enhance MeHg production by an order of magnitude, impacting Arctic terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems by increased exposure to mercury through bioaccumulation and biomagnification in the food web. PMID:27131808

  3. Methylmercury in populations eating large quantities of marine fish

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.D.; Marsh, D.O.; Smith, J.C.; Inglis, J.B.; Clarkson, T.W.; Rubio, C.E.; Chiriboga, J.; Chiriboga, C.C.

    1980-11-01

    A Peruvian population was identified that was chronically exposed to methylmercury from the longterm consumption of ocean fish. The weekly fish intake averaged 10.1 kg per average family of 6.2 persons. Blood methylmercury concentrations ranged from 11 to 275 ng/ml, with a mean of 82 ng/ml. Paresthesias were reported by 29.5% of the population. In contrast, a nearby control population had a mean weekly fish consumption of 1.9 kg per average family of 6.4 persons. Their blood methylmercury levels were 3.3-25.1 ng/ml, with a mean of 9.9 ng/ml. Paresthesias were reported by 49.5% of this control group. No individual was identified with symptoms or signs that could be attributed to methylmercury intoxication.

  4. Methylmercury concentrations in broiler's meat and hen's meat and eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Kambamanoli-Dimou, A. ); Kilikidis, S.; Kamarianos, A. )

    1989-05-01

    The concentration of mercury in food has been considered to present the greatest toxicological danger to the average citizen. The presence of mercury in foods has been reported in several studies. Much of the research has been carried out on total mercury concentration in foods and not on methylmercury concentration and as it is known methylmercury is the most dangerous form of mercury. Methylmercury, which is highly resistant to biodegradation, can be synthesized from any other form of mercury in the aquatic biosphere, can be bioconcentrated in the aquatic food chain and through fish-meals can be transported and concentrated in animals and their products. Such food chains, together with the various terrestrial food chains would represent a serious risk for man. This study was undertaken to determine the methylmercury levels in broiler's meat, hen's meat and eggs.

  5. Uncertainties in the reference dose for methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Dourson, M L; Wullenweber, A E; Poirier, K A

    2001-10-01

    This paper critically examines the National Academy of Sciences and the National Research Council report on the toxicological effects of methyl mercury and the recently published US Environmental Protection Agency Reference Dose (RfD) for Methylmercury. Particular scrutiny is placed on the choice of the critical study and the underlining assumptions utilized in the selection of specific uncertainty factors (UFs) and the rationale for using a less-than-default factor of 10. The UFs that were utilized or considered by other agencies and organizations are also critically examined, explained and compared to one another. Based on these analyses, the authors suggest research that could be performed that would ameliorate the uncertainty of choosing a more precise partial UFor that may even provide completeness of database to allow for selecting of a UF for unity, thus improving the precision of the current published RfD.

  6. Phytoremediation of ionic and methylmercury pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, Richard B

    2010-04-28

    Our long-term goal is to enable highly productive plant species to extract, resist, detoxify, and sequester the toxic elemental pollutants, like the heavy metal mercury. Our current working hypothesis is that transgenic plants controlling the transport, chemical speciation, electrochemical state. volatilization, and aboveground binding of mercury will: a) tolerate mercury and grow rapidly in mercury contaminated environments; b) prevent methylmercury from entering the food chain; c) remove mercury from polluted soil and . water; and d) hyperaccumulate mercury in aboveground tissues for later harvest. Progress toward these specific aims is reported: to increase the transport of mercury into roots and to aboveground vegetative organs; to increase biochemical sinks and storage for mercury in leaves; to increase leaf cell vacuolar storage of mercury; and to demonstrate that several stacked transgenes, when functioning in concert, enhance mercury resistance and hyperaccumulation to high levels.

  7. A Physiologically-based Model for Methylmercury Uptake and Accumulation in Female American Kestrels

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based model was developed to describe the uptake, distribution, and elimination of methylmercury in female American Kestrels (Falco sparverius). The model was adapted from established models for methylmercury in rodents. Features unique to the model include meth...

  8. Effects of embryonic methylmercury exposure on larval behavior of mummichogs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, T.; Weis, J.S.; Weis, P.

    1995-12-31

    Fundulus heteroclitus embryos were exposed to 5 and 10 ug/l meHg throughout development. Larvae were maintained in clean seawater and tested regularly for prey capture and predator avoidance. Experimentals captured significantly fewer prey (Artemia nauplii) than controls, although differences disappeared after about one week. However, 2-wk posthatch larvae showed significantly more miscues than controls. Differences were seen between controls from different populations. Fish from Hg-polluted Piles Creek (Linden NJ) which have impaired predation as adults, showed higher prey capture rate as larvae, although they exhibited more miscues than the reference population (from East Hampton, NY). Differences were also seen in the response to meHg: Piles Creek fish, which were previously found to be more resistant to teratogenic effects of higher concentrations of meHg, appeared to be more resistant than the reference population to these behavioral effects as well. In other studies, meHg-exposed larvae (from the reference population) swam greater distances than controls in a test of swimming performance. This difference also disappeared over time. Despite their increased swimming performance, exposed larvae were more vulnerable to predation by the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, due perhaps to their higher overall level of activity.

  9. Immunofluorescence detection of pea protein in meat products.

    PubMed

    Petrášová, Michaela; Pospiech, Matej; Tremlová, Bohuslava; Javůrková, Zdeňka

    2016-08-01

    In this study we developed an immunofluorescence method to detect pea protein in meat products. Pea protein has a high nutritional value but in sensitive individuals it may be responsible for causing allergic reactions. We produced model meat products with various additions of pea protein and flour; the detection limit (LOD) of the method for pea flour was 0.5% addition, and for pea protein it was 0.001% addition. The repeatabilities and reproducibilities for samples both positive and negative for pea protein were all 100%. In a blind test with model products and commercial samples, there was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) between the declared concentrations of pea protein and flour and the immunofluorescence method results. Sensitivity was 1.06 and specificity was 1.00. These results show that the immunofluorescence method is suitable for the detection of pea protein in meat products. PMID:27441410

  10. Acute toxic responses of the freshwater planarian, Dugesia dorotocephala, to methylmercury

    SciTech Connect

    Best, J.B.; Morita, M.; Ragin, J.; Best, J. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Toxic responses of planaria to various aquatic habitat concentrations of methylmercury chloride (MMC) were investigated. One hundred percent lethality occurred within 5 h in 2 ppM MMC, 24 h in 1 ppM MMC, and 5 days in 0.5 ppM MMC. No deaths occurred in 0.2 ppM MMC over a 10 day period, however, non-lethal toxic responses were observed. Varying degrees of head resorption, progressing caudally from the snout were observed. With continuing exposure, partial head regeneration and recovery toward more normal appearance occurred by 10 days. Teratogenic effects were observed in surgical decapitation experiments. Head regeneration was retarded in 0.1 and 0.2 ppM MMC. Malformations, visible lesions, or gross behavioral abnormalities were produced by 2 week exposure of planaria to concentrations of 20 ppB MMC or lower. (RJC)

  11. New Evidence on Variations of Human Body Burden of Methylmercury from Fish Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Canuel, René; de Grosbois, Sylvie Boucher; Atikessé, Laura; Lucotte, Marc; Arp, Paul; Ritchie, Charles; Mergler, Donna; Chan, Hing Man; Amyot, Marc; Anderson, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies commonly use mercury (Hg) level in hair as a valid proxy to estimate human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) through fish consumption. This study presents the results yielded by a complete data set on fish consumption habits, Hg levels in edible fish resources, and corresponding Hg accumulation in hair, gathered in three distinct communities of eastern Canada. For one of these communities, the average hair Hg concentration was 14 times less than the expected value based on calculated daily oral exposure and current knowledge of MeHg metabolism. This finding could be explained by differences in specific genetic characteristics and/or interactive effects of other dietary components. PMID:16451872

  12. Immunofluorescence Microscopy of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Using Chemical Fixation.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Iain M

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the subcellular distribution of molecules of interest and the dynamics of their spatial control underpins all areas of cell and developmental biology. Although the ability to monitor the distribution of fluorescent fusion proteins has revolutionized cell and developmental biology, indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of fixed samples remains an essential complement to this approach. Immunofluorescence is often a more appropriate approach for the study of subcellular architecture. It avoids potential artifacts caused by studying fusion proteins, which might show altered function under stressful imaging conditions. Furthermore, the quantitative analysis of multiple cells in an unperturbed population by immunofluorescence invariably provides a more accurate assessment of the spatial and temporal control of a particular process than does the analysis of individual cells that is the hallmark of live-cell imaging. Parallel studies of living and fixed cells often provide complementary data sets, both of which can be considered necessary for a comprehensive understanding of molecular function. This protocol provides a method for the visualization of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe microtubule cytoskeleton by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy following chemical fixation with formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde. It includes discussion of common modifications used to monitor the distribution of other fission yeast antigens and forms a basis from which to develop protocols to localize new molecules of interest. PMID:27371599

  13. Detection by immunofluorescence of avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Karmysheva, V Y; Graevskaya, N A; Sito, A F; Sushko, L N

    1976-08-01

    Peripheral blood cells of avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV-(infected chickens were examined at various intervals post infection by immunofluorescence. AMV revertase was identified in pro- and myeloblasts; it was localized mainly in the perinuclear zone or throughout the cytoplasm. No revertase was found in erythrocytes or granulocytes. Blood cells from uninfected chickens of man contained no revertase.

  14. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3460 - Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents. 866.3460 Section 866.3460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3460...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3460 - Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents. 866.3460 Section 866.3460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3460...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3460 - Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents. 866.3460 Section 866.3460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3460...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3460 - Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents. 866.3460 Section 866.3460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3460...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3460 - Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents. 866.3460 Section 866.3460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3460...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  4. Methods of Immunohistochemistry and Immunofluorescence: Converting Invisible to Visible.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hidetoshi; Cardiff, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Observing changes in pathophysiological tissue samples often relies on immunohistochemical or immunofluorescence analysis. These techniques show target microanatomy by visualizing marker molecules on cells and their microenvironment. Here, we describe the "pros and cons" in each method, along with alternative procedures and the suggested imaging equipment. PMID:27581010

  5. Effects of dietary methylmercury on reproduction of fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammerschmidt, C.R.; Sandheinrich, M.B.; Wiener, J.G.; Rada, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    We examined effects of dietary methylmercury (MeHg) on reproduction of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Juvenile fish were fed one of four diets until sexual maturity (phase 1): a control diet (0.06 μg Hg g-1 dry weight) and three diets contaminated with MeHg at 0.88 (low), 4.11 (medium), and 8.46 μg Hg g-1 dry weight (high). At sexual maturity, male and female fish were paired, again fed one of the four diets, and allowed to reproduce (phase 2). To assess effects of MeHg during gametogenesis, some fish were fed diets during phase 2 that differed from those during phase 1. Spawning success of pairs fed the same diet during phases 1 and 2 was 75% for controls and 46%, 50%, and 36% for the low-, medium-, and high-MeHg treatments, respectively. Spawning success of pairs fed a contaminated diet during phase 1 and a control diet during phase 2 was 63%, 40%, and 14% for the low-, medium-, and high-MeHg treatments, respectively, whereas exposure to dietary MeHg only during phase 2 did not reduce spawning success. Dietary MeHg delayed spawning, and days to spawning was positively correlated with concentration of total mercury in the carcasses of test fish. MeHg reduced the instantaneous rate of reproduction of fish fed the same diets during phases 1 and 2. Both the gonadosomatic index and reproductive effort of female fish were inversely correlated with mercury in carcasses, whereas developmental and hatching success of embryos, 7-d survival, and 7-d growth of larvae were unrelated to mercury concentrations in parental fish or their diets. MeHg decreased reproduction of adult fathead minnows at dietary concentrations encountered by predatory fishes in aquatic systems with MeHg-contaminated food webs, implying that exposed fish populations could be adversely affected by this widespread contaminant.

  6. Effects of Diphenyl Diselenide on Methylmercury Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dalla Corte, Cristiane L.; Wagner, Caroline; Sudati, Jéssie H.; Comparsi, Bruna; Leite, Gerlania O.; Busanello, Alcindo; Soares, Félix A. A.; Aschner, Michael; Rocha, João B. T.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of diphenyl diselenide [(PhSe)2] in attenuating methylmercury- (MeHg-)induced toxicity in rats. Adult rats were treated with MeHg [5 mg/kg/day, intragastrically (i.g.)] and/ or (PhSe)2 [1 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally (i.p.)] for 21 days. Body weight gain and motor deficits were evaluated prior to treatment, on treatment days 11 and 21. In addition, hepatic and cerebral mitochondrial function (reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, total and nonprotein thiol levels, membrane potential (ΔΨm), metabolic function, and swelling), hepatic, cerebral, and muscular mercury levels, and hepatic, cerebral, and renal thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity were evaluated. MeHg caused hepatic and cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibited TrxR activity in liver (38,9%), brain (64,3%), and kidney (73,8%). Cotreatment with (PhSe)2 protected hepatic and cerebral mitochondrial thiols from depletion by MeHg but failed to completely reverse MeHg's effect on hepatic and cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction or hepatic, cerebral, and renal inhibition of TrxR activity. Additionally, the cotreatment with (PhSe)2 increased Hg accumulation in the liver (50,5%) and brain (49,4%) and increased the MeHg-induced motor deficits and body-weight loss. In conclusion, these results indicate that (PhSe)2 can increase Hg body burden as well as the neurotoxic effects induced by MeHg exposure in rats. PMID:24459674

  7. Mercury and methylmercury in reservoirs in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risch, Martin R.; Fredericksen, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury (reported as Hg) in fish-tissue samples collected for the State fish consumption advisory program was used to describe MeHg food-web accumulation and magnification in the reservoirs. The highest percentages of fish-tissue samples with Hg concentrations that exceeded the criterion of 0.30 milligram per kilogram for protection of human health were from Monroe Lake (38 percent) and Patoka Lake (33 percent). A review of the number and size of fish species caught from these two reservoirs resulted in two implications for fish consumption by humans. First, the highest numbers of fish harvested for potential human consumption were species more likely to have MeHg concentrations lower than the human-health criterion (crappie, bluegill, and catfish). Second, although largemouth bass were likely to have MeHg concentrations higher than the human-health criterion, they were caught and released more often than they were harvested. However, the average size largemouth bass (in both reservoirs) and above-average size walleye (in Monroe Lake) that were harvested for potential human consumption were likely to have MeHg concentrations higher than the human-health criterion.

  8. Phytoremediation of ionic and methylmercury pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2002-06-01

    Our long-term objective is to enable highly productive plant species to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic organic and heavy metal pollutants (Meagher, 2000) applying scientific strategies and technologies from a rapidly developing field called phytoremediation. The phytoremediation of toxic elemental and organic pollutants requires the use relatively different approaches (Meagher, 2000). Our current specific objectives are to use transgenic plants to control the chemical species, electrochemical state, and aboveground binding of mercury to (a) prevent methylmercury from entering the food-chain, (b) remove mercury from polluted sites, and (c) hyperaccumulate mercury in aboveground tissues for later harvest. Various parts of this strategy are being critically tested by examining different genes in model plants and field species and comparing the results to control plants as we recently reviewed (Meagher et al., 2000; Rugh et al., 2000). A positive spin-off from this work on mercury has been a strategy for the phytoremediation of arsenic (Dhankher et al., 2002) and cadmium.

  9. Phytoremediation of ionic and methylmercury pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2003-06-01

    Our long-term objective is to enable highly productive plant species to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic organic and heavy metal pollutants (Meagher, 2000) applying scientific strategies and technologies from a rapidly developing field called phytoremediation. The phytoremediation of toxic elemental and organic pollutants requires the use relatively different approaches (Meagher, 2000). Our current specific objectives are to use transgenic plants to control the chemical species, electrochemical state, and aboveground binding of mercury to (a) prevent methylmercury from entering the food-chain, (b) remove mercury from polluted sites, and (c) hyperaccumulate mercury in aboveground tissues for later harvest. Various parts of this strategy are being critically tested by examining different genes in model plants and field species and comparing the results to control plants as we recently reviewed (Meagher et al., 2000; Rugh et al., 2000). A positive spin-off from this work on mercury has been a strategy for the phytoremediation of arsenic (Dhankher et al., 2002) and cadmium.

  10. Occurrence of methylmercury in Lake Valencia, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, R.; Cai, Y.; West-Thomas, J.

    1997-12-31

    The presence of mercury in the environment has received renewed attention during recent years. This is in part due to the known human health and ecological effects of the highly toxic organomercury compounds, and to the fact that novel and improved analytical techniques such as atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (AFS) and capillary chromatography with AFS detection, have enhanced significantly the detection of trace amounts of mercury and organo mercurials in environmental samples. Such techniques have allowed for a better understanding of the biogeochemical cycle of mercury in the aquatic environment. This paper reports on the presence of methylmercury in the water column and sediments of a hyper-eutrophic lake. Lake Valencia is a freshwater lake located in North-Central Venezuela`s Aragua Valley. The lake`s surface area covers approximately 350 km{sup 2}, with a mean depth of 19 m and a maximum depth of 41 m. Due to the discharge of waste waters from the cities of Maracay and Valencia, as well as from other smaller villages and agricultural areas in its watershed, Lake Valencia has become hyper-eutrophic. The population of phytoplankton, particularly of blue-green algae, has increased dramatically during the last two decades resulting in anoxic conditions in the lower part of the water column during most of the year. In addition, concentrations of anthropogenic chemicals, including heavy metals, have increased in the Lake during the last four decades. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Estimation of the Biological Half-Life of Methylmercury Using a Population Toxicokinetic Model.

    PubMed

    Jo, Seongil; Woo, Hae Dong; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Oh, Se-Young; Park, Jung-Duck; Hong, Young-Seoub; Pyo, Heesoo; Park, Kyung Su; Ha, Mina; Kim, Ho; Sohn, Seok-Joon; Kim, Yu-Mi; Lim, Ji-Ae; Lee, Sang-Ah; Eom, Sang-Yong; Kim, Byoung-Gwon; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Jong-Hyeon; Hwang, Myung Sil; Kim, Jeongseon

    2015-07-31

    Methylmercury is well known for causing adverse health effects in the brain and nervous system. Estimating the elimination constant derived from the biological half-life of methylmercury in the blood or hair is an important part of calculating guidelines for methylmercury intake. Thus, this study was conducted to estimate the biological half-life of methylmercury in Korean adults. We used a one-compartment model with a direct relationship between methylmercury concentrations in the blood and daily dietary intake of methylmercury. We quantified the between-person variability of the methylmercury half-life in the population, and informative priors were used to estimate the parameters in the model. The population half-life of methylmercury was estimated to be 80.2 ± 8.6 days. The population mean of the methylmercury half-life was 81.6 ± 8.4 days for men and 78.9 ± 8.6 days for women. The standard deviation of the half-life was estimated at 25.0 ± 8.6 days. Using the direct relationship between methylmercury concentrations in blood and methylmercury intake, the biological half-life in this study was estimated to be longer than indicated by the earlier studies that have been used to set guideline values.

  12. Mechanisms of methylmercury transport across the blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Kerper, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    Methylmercury readily enters the brain of exposed individuals, and is highly neurotoxic. The goal of this research was to determine the mechanisms of methylmercury transport across both the luminal and abluminal membranes of brain capillary endothelial cells, the cells which comprise the blood-brain barrier. The rapid carotid injection technique was used in rats to investigate the uptake of methylmercury from blood into brain endothelial cells. Uptake of ([sup 203]Hg)-methylmercury complexed with L-cysteine (CH[sub 3] [sup 203]Hg-L-Cys) was more rapid than that of ([sup 203]Hg)-methylmercury complexed with D-cysteine or bovine serum albumin. Uptake of CH[sub 3][sup 203]Hg-L-Cys was saturable, and was inhibited by substrates for the L (alanine-preferring) carrier. Brain uptake of [sup 14]C-L-methionine was inhibited by CH[sub 3]Hg-L-Cys but not by CH[sub 3]HgCl. Uptake of [sup 203]Hg administered as CH[sub 3]Hg-L-Cys-glutathione (CH[sub 3][sup 203]Hg-GSH) was comparable to CH[sub 3][sup 203]Hg-L-Cys uptake at 2 [mu]M. L-Methionine and 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) inhibited [sup 203]Hg uptake administered as CH[sub 3][sup 203]Hg-GSH, whereas acivicin had no effect. This uptake was also inhibited by S-ethylglutathione when pH of the injection solution was allowed to rise to 8.5. In later experiments performed at pH 8.2, uptake of [sup 203]Hg administered as CH[sub 3][sup 203]Hg-GSH was inhibited only by BCH. To study mechanisms of methylmercury efflux from endothelial cells, a primary culture of bovine brain capillary endothelial cells was developed. Intracellular glutathione concentration was 2.6 [+-] 0.7 mM. Incubation of CH[sub 3][sup 203]HgCl-preloaded cells with GSH depletors decreased ([sup 203]Hg)-methylmercury efflux in a dose-dependent manner which correlated with intracellular GSH concentrations. ([sup 203]Hg)-Methylmercury efflux was also inhibited by GSH-S-conjugates an GSH analogs, but not by amino acids.

  13. Do recent data from the Seychelles Islands alter the conclusions of the NRC Report on the toxicological effects of methylmercury?

    PubMed

    Stern, Alan H; Jacobson, Joseph L; Ryan, Louise; Burke, Thomas A

    2004-01-30

    In 2000, the National Research Council (NRC), an arm of the National Academy of Sciences, released a report entitled, "Toxicological Effects of Methylmercury." The overall conclusion of that report was that, at levels of exposure in some fish- and marine mammal-consuming communities (including those in the Faroe Islands and New Zealand), subtle but significant adverse effects on neuropsychological development were occurring as a result of in utero exposure. Since the release of that report, there has been continuing discussion of the public health relevance of current levels of exposure to Methylmercury. Much of this discussion has been linked to the release of the most recent longitudinal update of the Seychelles Island study. It has recently been posited that these findings supercede those of the NRC committee, and that based on the Seychelles findings, there is little or no risk of adverse neurodevelopmental effects at current levels of exposure. In this commentary, members of the NRC committee address the conclusions from the NRC report in light of the recent Seychelles data. We conclude that no evidence has emerged since the publication of the NRC report that alters the findings of that report. PMID:14754462

  14. Combined toxicity of silica nanoparticles and methylmercury on cardiovascular system in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Duan, Junchao; Hu, Hejing; Li, Qiuling; Jiang, Lizhen; Zou, Yang; Wang, Yapei; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-06-01

    This study was to investigate the combined toxicity of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) and methylmercury (MeHg) on cardiovascular system in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Ultraviolet absorption analysis showed that the co-exposure system had high absorption and stability. The dosages used in this study were based on the NOAEL level. Zebrafish embryos exposed to the co-exposure of SiNPs and MeHg did not show any cardiovascular malformation or atrioventricular block, but had an inhibition effect on bradycardia. Using o-Dianisidine for erythrocyte staining, the cardiac output of zebrafish embryos was decreased gradually in SiNPs, MeHg, co-exposure groups, respectively. Co-exposure of SiNPs and MeHg enhanced the vascular endothelial damage in Tg(fli-1:EGFP) transgenic zebrafish line. Moreover, the co-exposure significantly activated the oxidative stress and inflammatory response in neutrophils-specific Tg(mpo:GFP) transgenic zebrafish line. This study suggested that the combined toxic effects of SiNPs and MeHg on cardiovascular system had more severe toxicity than the single exposure alone.

  15. RGB method in immunofluorescence investigations on stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Massimo; Resca, Elisa; Bertoni, Laura; Cavani, Francesco; Sena, Paola; Ferretti, Marzia; Baldini, Andrea; Palumbo, Carla; De Pol, Anto

    2011-03-01

    Colour is not related to a particular discipline, but it is transversely present in many circles and in almost all the aspects of life. It has a special value in art, but also as far as other disciplines are concerned, like the sciences, the colour is at the basis of some of their intrinsic significances and it often needed to allow the interpretation of some of their phenomena as well. As regards the development of cell biology knowledge, colour acquired more and more importance in revealing the observations of the researchers. A field in which the methods based on the colours are particularly employed is the immunofluorescence, used to identify specific proteins in cells and tissues. These techniques combine the fluorochrome properties with specific molecules, i.e. antibodies, directed against particular substances to investigate, for example a specific protein. In single immunofluorescence analysis, the signal from an excited fluorochrome corresponds to a particular protein. In multiple immunofluorescence analysis, two or more signals are simultaneously detected to show the localization of different proteins on the same sample. The three primary colours red, green and blue were currently assigned to the signals from immunofluorescence-processed samples and visualized by the RGB method. In the present work, different examples of RGB applications in immunocytochemical investigations are showed: the first concerns the multiple analysis of three markers, localized in different loci of the cell plasma membrane; the second is related to the co-localization of two signals in the same site of specific subcellular structures. In this case the secondary colours, obtained by overlapping the primary ones, demonstrate the specific co-presence of two proteins in the same site. With the present paper, the authors wish to underline the relevant role of colours also in those areas in which colours are the means not the end.

  16. Magneto immunofluorescence assay for diagnosis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kergaravat, Silvina V; Beltramino, Luis; Garnero, Nidia; Trotta, Liliana; Wagener, Marta; Fabiano, Silvia N; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Hernandez, Silvia R

    2013-10-10

    A magneto immunofluorescence assay for the detection of anti-transglutaminase antibodies (ATG2) in celiac disease was developed. The ATG2 were recognized by transglutaminase enzyme immobilized on the magnetic beads and then the immunological reaction was revealed by antibodies labeled with peroxidase. The fluorescent response of the enzymatic reaction with o-phenylenediamine and H2O2 as substrates was correlated with anti-transglutaminase titer, showing EC50 and LOD values of 1:11,600 and 1:74,500 of antibody titers, respectively. A total number of 29 sera samples from clinically confirmed cases of celiac disease and 19 negative control samples were tested by the novel magneto immunofluorescence assay. The data were submitted to the receiver-operating characteristic plot (ROC) analysis which indicated that 8.1 U was the most effective cut-off value to discriminate correctly between celiac and non-celiac patients. The immunofluorescence assay exhibited a sensitivity of 96.6%, a specificity of 89.5% and an efficiency 93.8% compared with the commercial optical ELISA kit. PMID:24070488

  17. Magneto immunofluorescence assay for diagnosis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kergaravat, Silvina V; Beltramino, Luis; Garnero, Nidia; Trotta, Liliana; Wagener, Marta; Fabiano, Silvia N; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Hernandez, Silvia R

    2013-10-10

    A magneto immunofluorescence assay for the detection of anti-transglutaminase antibodies (ATG2) in celiac disease was developed. The ATG2 were recognized by transglutaminase enzyme immobilized on the magnetic beads and then the immunological reaction was revealed by antibodies labeled with peroxidase. The fluorescent response of the enzymatic reaction with o-phenylenediamine and H2O2 as substrates was correlated with anti-transglutaminase titer, showing EC50 and LOD values of 1:11,600 and 1:74,500 of antibody titers, respectively. A total number of 29 sera samples from clinically confirmed cases of celiac disease and 19 negative control samples were tested by the novel magneto immunofluorescence assay. The data were submitted to the receiver-operating characteristic plot (ROC) analysis which indicated that 8.1 U was the most effective cut-off value to discriminate correctly between celiac and non-celiac patients. The immunofluorescence assay exhibited a sensitivity of 96.6%, a specificity of 89.5% and an efficiency 93.8% compared with the commercial optical ELISA kit.

  18. Mercury dynamics in hair of rats exposed to methylmercury by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shimojo, Nobuhiro; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Kumagai, Yoshito

    1997-05-02

    Two dimensional distribution of mercury (Hg) in hair samples of rats exposed to methylmercury (MeHg) was analyzed by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) imaging. Experiments with endogenous- and exogenous-model for MeHg exposure revealed that the metal level was obviously higher in the hair cortex after the former exposure whereas a dominant site that Hg distributed after the latter exposure was the cuticle. The method also provided us the Hg profile along the hair length with a single hair obtained by the endogenous model. Thus application of SR-XRF analysis to hair sample would facilitate biological monitoring to not only distinct Hg exposure but also determine its dynamics with only the specimen. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  19. The Engineered Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methylmercury Pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Meagher; Sarah Marshburn; Andrew Heaton; Anne Marie Zimer; Raoufa Rahman

    2003-06-24

    Our current specific objectives are to use transgenic plants to control the chemical species, electrochemical state, and above ground binding of mercury to (a) prevent methylmercury from entering the food-chain, (b) remove mercury from polluted sites, and (c) hyperaccumulate mercury in above ground tissues for later harvest.

  20. Transfer of methylmercury to hens' eggs after oral administration

    SciTech Connect

    Kambamanoli-Dimou, A. ); Kamarianos, A.; Kilikidis, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The present investigation was performed to elucidate the possibility of transport of methylmercury into eggs after its oral administration. Also, to determine the quantity of mercury excreted via eggs after oral administration of a certain quantity of this element once or in doses.

  1. Biomagnifications of mercury and methylmercury in tuna and mackerel.

    PubMed

    Hajeb, P; Jinap, S; Ahmad, I

    2010-12-01

    Seawater may be contaminated by harmful substances, including toxic elements released by human activities. The present study evaluates the total mercury and methylmercury concentrations and their correlations to fish body size in longtail tuna and short-bodied mackerel from Chendring, Kuantan, at east coast and Kuala Perlis at west costs of Peninsular Malaysia during May to November 2007. Total mercury and methylmercury in muscle tissue of 69 samples of longtail tuna and short-bodied mackerel, ranged from 0.180 to 1.460 μg/g and 0.0.169-0.973 μg/g and 0.251-1.470 μg/g and 0.202-1.352, whereas the methylmercury to total mercury ratio ranged from 70% to 83%, respectively. Samples of both species from the east coast showed higher levels of mercury compared to those from west coast. In all of the locations, significant positive correlations were found between fish body weight and mercury content (R(2) > 0.470). The estimated weekly intake of total mercury and methylmercury from the consumption 66.33 g/week of short-bodied mackerel and 18.34 g/week of longtail tuna (based on local dietry survey) was found to be lower than the maximum limit of 5 and 1.5 μg/kg bodyweight established by FAO/WHO and codex, respectively. PMID:20041345

  2. A Physiologically Based Model for Methylmercury in Female American Kestrels

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) model was developed to describe the uptake, distribution, and elimination of methylmercury (CH3Hg) in female American kestrels. The model consists of six tissue compartments corresponding to the brain, liver, kidney, gut, red blood cel...

  3. BACTERIAL METHYLMERCURY DEGRADATION IN FLORIDA EVERGLADES PEAT SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylmercury (MeHg) degradation was investigated along an eutrophication gradient in the Florida Everglades by quantifying 14CH4 and 14CO2 production after incubation of anaerobic sediments with [14C]MeHg. Degradation rate constants (k) were consistently <=0.1 d-1 and decreased ...

  4. Effects of methylmercury on primary cultured rat hepatocytes: Cell injury and inhibition of growth factor stimulated DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tanno, Keiichi; Fukazawa, Toshiyuki; Tajima, Shizuko; Fujiki, Motoo )

    1992-08-01

    Many more studies deal with the toxicity of methylmercury on nervous tissue than on its toxicity to the liver. Methylmercury accumulates in the liver in higher concentrations than brain and the liver has the primary function of detoxifying methylmercury. According to recent studies, hepatocyte mitochondrial membranes are destroyed by methylmercury and DNA synthesis is inhibited by methylmercury during hepatocyte regeneration. Methylmercury alters the membrane ion permeability of isolate skate hepatocytes, and inhibits the metal-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase of primary cultured rat hepatocytes. However, little is known about the effect of methylmercury on hepatocyte proliferation in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. We therefore used the primary cultured rat hepatocytes to investigate the effects of methylmercury on cell injury and growth factor stimulate DNA synthesis. The primary effect of methylmercury is to inhibit hepatocyte proliferation rather than to cause direct cell injury. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Absorption, distribution, and elimination of graded oral doses of methylmercury in juvenile white sturgeon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Susie Shih-Yin; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Fadel, James G; Lin, Pinpin; Liu, Tsung-Yun; Hung, Silas S O

    2012-10-15

    Mercury (Hg) is toxic and is released into the environment from a wide variety of anthropogenic sources. Methylmercury (MeHg), a product of microbial methylation, enables rapid Hg bioaccumulation and biomagnification in the biota. Methylmercury is sequestered and made available to the rest of the biota through the benthic-detrital component leading to the high risk of exposure to benthic fish species, such as white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). In the present study, a combined technique of stomach intubation, dorsal aorta cannulation, and urinary catheterization was utilized to characterize the absorption, distribution, and elimination of Hg in white sturgeon over a 48h exposure. Mercury, as methylmercury chloride, at either 0, 250, 500, or 1000 μg Hg/kg body weight, was orally intubated into white sturgeon, in groups of five. The blood was repeatedly sampled and urine collected from the fish over the 48h post intubation period, and at 48h, the fish were sacrificed for Hg tissue concentration and distribution determinations. The fractional rate of absorption (K), blood Hg concentration (μg/ml), tissue concentration (μg/g dry weight) and distribution (%), and urinary Hg elimination flux (μg/kg/h) are significantly different (p<0.05) among the MeHg doses. Complete blood uptake of Hg was observed in all MeHg treated fish by 12h. The maximal observed blood Hg concentration peaks are 0.56±0.02, 0.70±0.02, and 2.19±0.07 μg/ml (mean±SEM) for the 250, 500, and 1000 μgHg/kg body weight dose groups, respectively. Changes in blood Hg profiles can be described by a monomolecular function in all of the MeHg treated fish. The Hg concentration asymptote (A) and K are dose dependent. The relationship between A and the intubation dose, however, is nonlinear. Mercury levels in certain tissues are comparable to field data and longer-term study, indicating that the lower doses used in the current study are ecologically relevant for the species. Tissue Hg concentrations

  6. Methylmercury risk and awareness among American Indian women of childbearing age living on an inland northwest reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, Sandra W.; Hill, Wade G.; Linkenbach, Jeff W.; Lande, Gary; Larsson, Laura

    2009-08-15

    American Indian women and children may be the most overrepresented among the list of disparate populations exposed to methylmercury. American Indian people fish on home reservations where a state or tribal fishing license (a source of advisory messaging) is not required. The purpose of this study was to examine fish consumption, advisory awareness, and risk communication preferences among American Indian women of childbearing age living on an inland Northwest reservation. For this cross-sectional descriptive study, participants (N=65) attending a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinic were surveyed between March and June 2006. An electronic questionnaire adapted from Anderson et al. (2004) was evaluated for cultural acceptability and appropriateness by tribal consultants. Regarding fish consumption, approximately half of the women surveyed (49%) indicated eating locally caught fish with the majority signifying they consumed medium- and large-size fish (75%) that could result in exposure to methylmercury. In addition, a serendipitous discovery indicated that an unanticipated route of exposure may be fish provided from a local food bank resulting from sportsman's donations. The majority of women (80%) were unaware of tribal or state fish advisory messages; the most favorable risk communication preference was information coming from doctors or healthcare providers (78%). Since the population consumes fish and has access to locally caught potentially contaminated fish, a biomonitoring study to determine actual exposure is warranted.

  7. Binding Strength of Methylmercury to Aquatic NOM

    SciTech Connect

    Khwaja, A.; Bloom, P; Brezonik, P

    2010-01-01

    A competitive-ligand, equilibrium-dialysis technique using bromide measured methylmercury (MeHg{sup +}) binding to Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) and NOM from a lake and a bog in Minnesota. Distribution coefficients (K{sub OC}) and stability constants (K{prime}) varied only slightly over a range of [Br{sup -}] and ratios of MeHg{sup +} to reduced sulfur, S{sub re}, the putative NOM binding site. For SRFA at pH 3.0, K{sub OC} ranged from 10{sup 7.7} to 10{sup 8.2} and K{prime} ranged from 10{sup 15.5} to 10{sup 16.0} over MeHg{sup +}:S{sub re} ratios from 1:1220 to 1:12200 (well below S{sub re} saturation). The importance of pH depends on the calculation model for binding constants. Over pH 2.98-7.62, K{sub OC} had little pH dependence (slope = 0.2; r{sup 2} = 0.4; range 10{sup 7.7}-10{sup 9.1}), but K{prime} calculated using thiol ligands with pK{sub a} = 9.96 had an inverse relationship (slope = -0.8; r{sup 2} = 0.9; range 10{sup 15.6}-10{sup 12.3}). A pH-independent model was obtained only with thiol pK{sub a} {le} 4. The mean K{prime}{sub 4} for SRFA (K{prime} with thiol pK{sub a} = 4.2) was 10{sup 9.8} (range 10{sup 9.11}-10{sup 10.27}) and small slope (0.02). Similar values were found for Spring Lake NOM; bog S2 NOM had values one-tenth as large. These constants are generally similar to published values; differences reflect variations in methods, pH, types of NOM, and calculation models.

  8. Effects of zinc on fin regeneration in the mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, and its interaction with methylmercury

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, P.; Weis, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Methylmercury has been found to retard fin regeneration in the marsh killifish, Fundulus confluentus, and striped mullet, Mugil cephalus. Cadmium, which also retarded fin regeneration in killifhsh interacted antagonistically with methylmercury so that fish exposed simultaneously to the two metals exhibited growth rates comparable to controls. Current studies on the effects of zinc on regeneration in the mummichog, F. heteroclitus, and the effects of combinations of methylmercury and zinc on this process, are reported. The data indicate that in F. heteroclitus, zinc can accelerate regenerative growth, and, by so doing, can counteract the retarding effects of methylmercury. In this species, the regeneration rate of controls was similar in 3% and 1% salinity, and the methylmercury retarded growth at both salinities. This is in contrast to F. confluentus in which decreased salinities depressed the regeneration rate, thus masking the effects of methylmercury in water of .9% salinity.

  9. Quantitative Immunofluorescence Analysis of Nucleolus-Associated Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Dillinger, Stefan; Németh, Attila

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear distribution of eu- and heterochromatin is nonrandom, heterogeneous, and dynamic, which is mirrored by specific spatiotemporal arrangements of histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Here we describe a semiautomated method for the analysis of histone PTM localization patterns within the mammalian nucleus using confocal laser scanning microscope images of fixed, immunofluorescence stained cells as data source. The ImageJ-based process includes the segmentation of the nucleus, furthermore measurements of total fluorescence intensities, the heterogeneity of the staining, and the frequency of the brightest pixels in the region of interest (ROI). In the presented image analysis pipeline, the perinucleolar chromatin is selected as primary ROI, and the nuclear periphery as secondary ROI.

  10. Serological Detection of Capillaria hepatica by Indirect Immunofluorescence Assay

    PubMed Central

    Juncker-Voss, Martina; Prosl, Heinrich; Lussy, Helga; Enzenberg, Ulrike; Auer, Herbert; Nowotny, Norbert

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a serological assay for the detection of antibodies to Capillaria hepatica, a zoonotic parasite, is described. In the past, the only way of detecting Capillaria hepatica was to perform a liver biopsy. The indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay, based on liver sections of naturally infected mice and human serum samples, is suitable for detecting early stages of human infections and for screening purposes. No cross-reactivity with other parasitic infections was detected. We have applied the IIF assay to serum samples of 60 employees of the Zoological Garden of Vienna, Schönbrunn, Austria, and found one positive and one questionable sample. PMID:10618135

  11. Species differences in the sensitivity of avian embryos to methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Klimstra, J.D.; Stebbins, K.R.; Kondrad, S.L.; Erwin, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    We injected doses of methylmercury into the air cells of eggs of 26 species of birds and examined the dose-response curves of embryo survival. For 23 species we had adequate data to calculate the median lethal concentration (LC50). Based on the dose-response curves and LC50s, we ranked species according to their sensitivity to injected methylmercury. Although the previously published embryotoxic threshold of mercury in game farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) has been used as a default value to protect wild species of birds, we found that, relative to other species, mallard embryos are not very sensitive to injected methylmercury; their LC50 was 1.79 ug/g mercury on a wet-weight basis. Other species we categorized as also exhibiting relatively low sensitivity to injected methylmercury (their LC50s were 1 ug/g mercury or higher) were the hooded merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus), lesser scaup (Aythya affinis), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus), and laughing gull (Larus atricilla). Species we categorized as having medium sensitivity (their LC50s were greater than 0.25 ug/g mercury but less than 1 ug/g mercury) were the clapper rail (Rallus longirostris), sandhill crane (Grus canadensis), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), chicken (Gallus gallus), common grackle (Quiscalus quiscula), tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), herring gull (Larus argentatus), common tern (S terna hirundo), royal tern (Sterna maxima), Caspian tern (Sterna caspia), great egret (Ardea alba), brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), and anhinga (Anhinga anhinga). Species we categorized as exhibiting high sensitivity (their LC50s were less than 0.25 ug/g mercury) were the American kestrel (Falco sparverius), osprey (Pandion haliaetus), white ibis (Eudocimus albus), snowy egret (Egretta thula), and tri-colored heron (Egretta tricolor). For mallards, chickens, and ring-necked pheasants (all species for which we could compare the toxicity of our

  12. Species differences in the sensitivity of avian embryos to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Gary H; Hoffman, David J; Klimstra, Jon D; Stebbins, Katherine R; Kondrad, Shannon L; Erwin, Carol A

    2009-01-01

    We injected doses of methylmercury into the air cells of eggs of 26 species of birds and examined the dose-response curves of embryo survival. For 23 species we had adequate data to calculate the median lethal concentration (LC(50)). Based on the dose-response curves and LC(50)s, we ranked species according to their sensitivity to injected methylmercury. Although the previously published embryotoxic threshold of mercury in game farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) has been used as a default value to protect wild species of birds, we found that, relative to other species, mallard embryos are not very sensitive to injected methylmercury; their LC(50 )was 1.79 microg/g mercury on a wet-weight basis. Other species we categorized as also exhibiting relatively low sensitivity to injected methylmercury (their LC(50)s were 1 microg/g mercury or higher) were the hooded merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus), lesser scaup (Aythya affinis), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus), and laughing gull (Larus atricilla). Species we categorized as having medium sensitivity (their LC(50)s were greater than 0.25 microg/g mercury but less than 1 microg/g mercury) were the clapper rail (Rallus longirostris), sandhill crane (Grus canadensis), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), chicken (Gallus gallus), common grackle (Quiscalus quiscula), tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), herring gull (Larus argentatus), common tern (Sterna hirundo), royal tern (Sterna maxima), Caspian tern (Sterna caspia), great egret (Ardea alba), brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), and anhinga (Anhinga anhinga). Species we categorized as exhibiting high sensitivity (their LC(50)s were less than 0.25 microg/g mercury) were the American kestrel (Falco sparverius), osprey (Pandion haliaetus), white ibis (Eudocimus albus), snowy egret (Egretta thula), and tri-colored heron (Egretta tricolor). For mallards, chickens, and ring-necked pheasants (all species for which we

  13. Trace elements as paradigms of developmental neurotoxicants: Lead, methylmercury and arsenic.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Philippe; Herz, Katherine T

    2015-01-01

    Trace elements have contributed unique insights into developmental neurotoxicity and serve as paradigms for such adverse effects. Many trace elements are retained in the body for long periods and can be easily measured to assess exposure by inexpensive analytical methods that became available several decades ago so that past and cumulated exposures could be easily characterized through analysis of biological samples, e.g. blood and urine. The first compelling evidence resulted from unfortunate poisoning events that allowed scrutiny of long-term outcomes of acute exposures that occurred during early development. Pursuant to this documentation, prospective studies of children's cohorts that applied sensitive neurobehavioral methods supported the notion that the brain is uniquely vulnerable to toxic damage during early development. Lead, methylmercury, and arsenic thereby serve as paradigm neurotoxicants that provide a reference for other substances that may have similar adverse effects. Less evidence is available on manganese, fluoride, and cadmium, but experience from the former trace elements suggest that, with time, adverse effects are likely to be documented at exposures previously thought to be low and safe. PMID:25175507

  14. Trace elements as paradigms of developmental neurotoxicants: Lead, methylmercury and arsenic.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Philippe; Herz, Katherine T

    2015-01-01

    Trace elements have contributed unique insights into developmental neurotoxicity and serve as paradigms for such adverse effects. Many trace elements are retained in the body for long periods and can be easily measured to assess exposure by inexpensive analytical methods that became available several decades ago so that past and cumulated exposures could be easily characterized through analysis of biological samples, e.g. blood and urine. The first compelling evidence resulted from unfortunate poisoning events that allowed scrutiny of long-term outcomes of acute exposures that occurred during early development. Pursuant to this documentation, prospective studies of children's cohorts that applied sensitive neurobehavioral methods supported the notion that the brain is uniquely vulnerable to toxic damage during early development. Lead, methylmercury, and arsenic thereby serve as paradigm neurotoxicants that provide a reference for other substances that may have similar adverse effects. Less evidence is available on manganese, fluoride, and cadmium, but experience from the former trace elements suggest that, with time, adverse effects are likely to be documented at exposures previously thought to be low and safe.

  15. Trace elements as paradigms of developmental neurotoxicants: lead, methylmercury and arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Philippe; Herz, Katherine T.

    2014-01-01

    Trace elements have contributed unique insights into developmental neurotoxicity and serve as paradigms for such adverse effects. Many trace elements are retained in the body for long periods and can be easily measured to assess exposure by inexpensive analytical methods that became available several decades ago so that past and cumulated exposures could be easily characterized through analysis of biological samples, e.g. blood and urine. The first compelling evidence resulted from unfortunate poisoning events that allowed scrutiny of long-term outcomes of acute exposures that occurred during early development. Pursuant to this documentation, prospective studies of children's cohorts that applied sensitive neurobehavioral methods supported the notion that the brain is uniquely vulnerable to toxic damage during early development. Lead, methylmercury, and arsenic thereby serve as paradigm neurotoxicants that provide a reference for other substances that may have similar adverse effects. Less evidence is available on manganese, fluoride, and cadmium, but experience from the former trace elements suggest that, with time, adverse effects are likely to be documented at exposures previously thought to be low and safe. PMID:25175507

  16. Meeting Report: Methylmercury in Marine Ecosystems—From Sources to Seafood Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Celia Y.; Serrell, Nancy; Evers, David C.; Fleishman, Bethany J.; Lambert, Kathleen F.; Weiss, Jeri; Mason, Robert P.; Bank, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    Mercury and other contaminants in coastal and open-ocean ecosystems are an issue of great concern globally and in the United States, where consumption of marine fish and shellfish is a major route of human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg). A recent National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences–Superfund Basic Research Program workshop titled “Fate and Bioavailability of Mercury in Aquatic Ecosystems and Effects on Human Exposure,” convened by the Dartmouth Toxic Metals Research Program on 15–16 November 2006 in Durham, New Hampshire, brought together human health experts, marine scientists, and ecotoxicologists to encourage cross-disciplinary discussion between ecosystem and human health scientists and to articulate research and monitoring priorities to better understand how marine food webs have become contaminated with MeHg. Although human health effects of Hg contamination were a major theme, the workshop also explored effects on marine biota. The workgroup focused on three major topics: a) the biogeochemical cycling of Hg in marine ecosystems, b) the trophic transfer and bioaccumulation of MeHg in marine food webs, and c) human exposure to Hg from marine fish and shellfish consumption. The group concluded that current understanding of Hg in marine ecosystems across a range of habitats, chemical conditions, and ocean basins is severely data limited. An integrated research and monitoring program is needed to link the processes and mechanisms of MeHg production, bioaccumulation, and transfer with MeHg exposure in humans. PMID:19079724

  17. Impact of dietary selenium on methylmercury toxicity in juvenile Atlantic cod: a transcriptional survey.

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Amlund, Heidi; Sæle, Øystein; Ellingsen, Ståle; Skjaerven, Kaja H

    2015-02-01

    Selenium (Se) and its derivatives are known to have protective effects against mercury (Hg) toxicity in mammals. In this study we wanted to evaluate whether Se co-exposure affect the transcription of methylmercury (MeHg) toxicity-relevant genes in early life stages of fish. Juvenile Atlantic cod were exposed to regular feed (control), Se-spiked feed (3mg Se kg(-1)), MeHg-spiked feed (10mg Hg kg(-1)) or to Se- and MeHg-spiked feed (3mg Se kg(-1) and 10mg Hg kg(-1), respectively) for ten weeks. Liver tissue was harvested for transcriptional analysis when the fish were weighing 11.4 ± 3.2g. Accumulated levels of Hg in liver of the two groups of fish exposed to MeHg were 1.5mg Hg kg(-1) wet weight, or 44-fold higher than in the control group, while the Se concentrations differed with less than 2-fold between the fish groups. Selenium co-exposure had no effect on the accumulated levels of Hg in liver tissue; however, MeHg co-exposure reduced the accumulated level of Se. Dietary exposure to MeHg had no effect on fish growth. Interaction effects between Se and MeHg exposure were observed for the transcriptional levels of CAT, GPX1, GPX3, NFE2L2, UBA52, SEPP1 and DNMT1. Significant effects of MeHg exposure were seen for DNMT1 and PPARG, while effects of Se exposure were seen for GPX4B and SEPP1A, as well as for DNA methyltransferase activity. The transcriptional results suggest, by considering up-regulation as a proxy for negative impact and at the tested concentrations, a pro-oxidative effect of Se co-exposure with MeHg, rather than an antioxidative effect.

  18. Herpes simplex virus-cell interactions studied by low-fading contrasted immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Helle Lone; Norrild, Bodil

    2005-01-01

    The low-fading immunofluorescence with propidium iodide contrast described here is recommended for light and confocal viral antigen identification and other cell biology studies because: (1) it is a simple, rapid, sensitive, and reproducible technique; (2) phase-contrast microscopy is unnecessary; (3) contrast is optimal without blurring the fluorescent labeling; (4) autofluorescence is minimal, even in fixed cells; (5) background staining is minimal; (6) fading is invisible for at least 5-min exposures, even in preparations with weak antigen presentation; (7) fluorescence is stable after storage in the dark at -20 degrees C; (8) fluorochromes are small-sized markers without steric hindrance; and (9) there is no need for silver enhancement or substrate solutions, which increase the risk of diffusion and other artifacts.

  19. Mercury accumulation in mallards fed methylmercury with or without added DDE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    Adult female mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were fed a control diet or diets containing 1 ppm methylmercury chloride, 5 ppm methylmercury chloride, 1 ppm methylmercury chloride plus 5 ppm DDE, or 5 ppm methylmercury chloride plus 5 ppm DDE. The presence of DDE in the diet did not affect retention of mercury in breast muscle or eggs. There was a good correlation between the levels of mercury in the breast muscle of females and their eggs, and this correlation was unaffected by the presence of DDE in the diet. This correlation suggests that one could predict mercury levels in female mallards in the field when only eggs have been collected and vice versa.

  20. In situ production of methylmercury within a stream channel in northern California.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Martin Tsz Ki; Finlay, Jacques C; Balogh, Steven J; Nollet, Yabing H

    2010-09-15

    Natural stream ecosystems throughout the world are contaminated by methylmercury, a highly toxic compound that bioaccumulates and biomagnifies in aquatic food webs. Wetlands are widely recognized as hotspots for the production of methylmercury and are often assumed to be the main sources of this neurotoxin in downstream ecosystems. However, many streams lacking wetlands in their drainage basins (e.g., montane and semiarid regions in the western United States) have significant methylmercury contamination, and the sources of methylmercury in these streams remain largely unknown. In this study, we observed substantial production of methylmercury within a highly productive stream channel in northern California (South Fork Eel River) within a drainage basin lacking wetlands. We found that in situ methylmercury production is positively related to phosphorus removal and water temperature within the stream channel, supporting hypothesized biological mediation of in situ mercury transformation. Moreover, our data suggest that epiphytic microbial communities on a dominant filamentous alga (Cladophora glomerata) could play a role in in situ methylmercury production. Because peak in situ methylmercury production coincides with the period of the highest biological productivity during summer baseflow, methylmercury produced internally may be efficiently routed into local stream food webs. Our study provides strong evidence that stream channels, especially those associated with high primary productivity, can be important for regulating the bioavailability and toxicity of this global contaminant. PMID:20715863

  1. In situ production of methylmercury within a stream channel in northern California.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Martin Tsz Ki; Finlay, Jacques C; Balogh, Steven J; Nollet, Yabing H

    2010-09-15

    Natural stream ecosystems throughout the world are contaminated by methylmercury, a highly toxic compound that bioaccumulates and biomagnifies in aquatic food webs. Wetlands are widely recognized as hotspots for the production of methylmercury and are often assumed to be the main sources of this neurotoxin in downstream ecosystems. However, many streams lacking wetlands in their drainage basins (e.g., montane and semiarid regions in the western United States) have significant methylmercury contamination, and the sources of methylmercury in these streams remain largely unknown. In this study, we observed substantial production of methylmercury within a highly productive stream channel in northern California (South Fork Eel River) within a drainage basin lacking wetlands. We found that in situ methylmercury production is positively related to phosphorus removal and water temperature within the stream channel, supporting hypothesized biological mediation of in situ mercury transformation. Moreover, our data suggest that epiphytic microbial communities on a dominant filamentous alga (Cladophora glomerata) could play a role in in situ methylmercury production. Because peak in situ methylmercury production coincides with the period of the highest biological productivity during summer baseflow, methylmercury produced internally may be efficiently routed into local stream food webs. Our study provides strong evidence that stream channels, especially those associated with high primary productivity, can be important for regulating the bioavailability and toxicity of this global contaminant.

  2. Dermatitis Herpetiformis: A Review of Direct Immunofluorescence Findings.

    PubMed

    Barnadas, Maria A

    2016-04-01

    Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) findings in dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) are incompletely defined. The presence and localization of immune reactants in this disorder are reviewed. A retrospective study on 72 biopsies from 71 patients with DH was performed. Deposits of IgG, IgA, IgM, C'3, C1q, and fibrinogen in skin using a DIF test were analyzed. Granular IgA was observed at the dermal-epidermal junction in 65 biopsies and in the fibers of the papillary dermis in 72 samples. IgG, IgM, C'3, C1q, and fibrinogen were detected in the same locations in lower percentages. IgA was present in the vessels of the papillary dermis in 33 biopsies and in the reticular dermis in 10, followed by fibrinogen, C'3, IgM, and IgG. IgA and IgM were detected in the elastic fibers in 17 and 5 samples, respectively. IgA was observed in 19 cases in the arrector pili muscles, and in a few cases, C'3, IgM, and IgG. IgA and other immune reagents were present in the fibers around hair follicles and in the basement membrane of sweat glands and ducts. Immunofluorescence findings in routine DIF studies from skin biopsies of patients with DH cover a much wider spectrum than previously known. PMID:26630684

  3. Accumulation of dietary methylmercury in the testes of the adult brown norway rat: Impaired testicular and epididymal function

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, A.S.; Chen, H.; Zirkin, B.R.; Rabuck, L.D.

    1998-05-01

    The widespread consumption of fish containing elevated concentrations of methylmercury has prompted concern over the health effects of such a diet. Previous studies with rodents have indicated that exposure to dietary mercury (Hg) impairs male reproductive health. However, adverse effects were observed following doses in the range of milligrams per kilogram of body weight, whereas typical human consumption in the United States is in the range of micrograms per kilogram of body weight. This study examined the effects of dietary Hg on male rats using levels of the metal that are more similar to those typically consumed by humans. For 19 weeks, adult male Brown Norway rats were administered methylmercury twice weekly at 0.8, 8.0, or 80 {micro}g/kg. Intratesticular testosterone levels in the high-dose group were reduced by 44$, suggesting that steroidogenesis in these animals was dramatically impaired. Although sperm production was not significantly affected, numbers of sperm in the cauda epididymides of the high-dose group were reduced by 17%. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between fertility and testicular Hg content. These results raise the possibility that exposure to Hg at levels consumed by humans may result in steroidogenic impairment, reduced sperm counts, and fertility problems.

  4. Teratogenic efects of injected methylmercury on avian embryos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, Gary H.; Hoffman, David J.; Klimstra, Jon D.; Stebbins, Katherine R.; Kondrad, Shannon L.; Erwin, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Controlled laboratory studies with game farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and chickens (Gallus gallus) have demonstrated that methylmercury can cause teratogenic effects in birds, but studies with wild species of birds are lacking. To address this need, doses of methylmercury chloride were injected into the eggs of 25 species of birds, and the dead embryos and hatched chicks were examined for external deformities. When data for controls were summed across all 25 species tested and across all types of deformities, 24 individuals out of a total of 1,533 (a rate of 1.57%) exhibited at least one deformity. In contrast, when data for all of the mercury treatments and all 25 species were summed, 188 deformed individuals out of a total of 2,292 (8.20%) were found. Some deformities, such as lordosis and scoliosis (twisting of the spine), misshapen heads, shortening or twisting of the neck, and deformities of the wings, were seldom observed in controls but occurred in much greater frequency in Hg-treated individuals. Only 0.59% of individual control dead embryos and hatchlings exhibited multiple deformities versus 3.18% for Hg-dosed dead embryos and hatchlings. Methylmercury seems to have a widespread teratogenic potential across many species of birds.

  5. Methylmercury-induced changes in operant discrimination by the pigeon

    SciTech Connect

    Laties, V.G.; Evans, H.L.

    1980-01-01

    Pigeons were trained on a fixed consecutive number schedule of reinforcement, pecking eight or nine ties on one key (a run) before making the single response on a second key that was reinforced if the number requirement had been met. A run of fewer than eight or more than nine responses reset the response requirement. They then were given methylmercury chronically until behavioral signs of poisoning occurred. Where possible, recovery was followed. Percentage of reinforcers earned and rate at which the birds pecked both decreased, whereas variability of run length increased after enough methylmercury had been given to produce blood mercury concentrations between 13 and 27 ppM. Some birds also showed consistent shortening of run length throughout the time of maximum poisoning. Because ataxia was a common accompaniment of the changes in operant behavior, other methods of producing ataxia (hobbling one foot or dosing with ethanol) were also studied in some birds. The pattern of changes induced with these methods did not match that seen after methylmercury.

  6. [A modified immunofluorescence test to demonstrate toxoplasma antibodies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sylvester, B; Schöning, C; Neuhaus, B

    1975-01-01

    A modified test to demonstrate toxoplasma antibodies by immunofluorescence is described in detail. This test was used in more than 16 000 cases. The antibody content of a patient's serum is assessed from a single dilution of 1:4 by two criteria: 1. The number of toxoplasms in the assay is kept constant. The percentage of antibody loaded cells varies with the concentration of antibodies in the patient's serum. 2. The intensity of fluorescence is correlated to the antibody content of the serum and the latter can be determined by means of standard sera. The results of this method are expressed in degrees of brightness. We compared three different methods and found an identical behaviour of the FATOX III and the Sabin-Feldman test. Between the complement-fixation test and the FATOX III there is the same relation as between JFT and SFT. This is shown in tables presenting the results for 1621 sera. The method is described in detail.

  7. Immunofluorescence studies of disseminated Hantaan virus infection of suckling mice.

    PubMed

    Kurata, T; Tsai, T F; Bauer, S P; McCormick, J B

    1983-07-01

    Hantaan virus, the etiological agent of Korean hemorrhagic fever, was inoculated intracerebrally or intraperitoneally into suckling mice, and the course of the infection was followed by infectivity titration and immunofluorescence studies. Mice became ill and were moribund by 13 to 14 days postinfection. In mice inoculated either intracerebrally or intraperitoneally, virus antigen was present in brain, heart, lungs, liver, and kidney. Less consistently, specific fluorescence was observed in spleen, pituitary gland, thymus, lymph nodes, adrenal, pancreas, salivary glands, trigeminal ganglia, adipose tissue, intestine, and muscle. In all of these tissues, the primary target of infection was the capillary endothelium. In mice inoculated intracerebrally, virus antigen was present mainly in choroid plexus, hippocampal nuclei, and meninges, but in mice inoculated intraperitoneally, central nervous system infection was marked by antigen accumulation in cortical nuclei and thalamus.

  8. Rapid diagnosis of viral neuroinfections by immunofluorescent and immunoperoxidase technics.

    PubMed

    Maltseva, N; Manovich, Z; Seletskaya, T; Kaptsova, T; Nikulina, V

    1979-03-22

    The results of immunofluorescent (IF) and immunoperoxidase (IP) technics applied for the detection of antigen in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cells in patients with mumps, herpes zoster and herpes simplex meningitis and meningoencephalitis are presented. Thirty patients were under study. The detection of mumps and herpes zoster viral antigen in CSF cells was possible in 100% of cases investigated. Herpes simplex virus antigen was detected in four of seven cases with symptoms of severe meningoencephalitis. Complement fixation (CF) antibodies to herpes simplex virus (type I) and positive seroconversion were detected in the four latter patients. The diagnostic value of the methods used for the detection of mumps, herpes simplex and herpes zoster viral antigens in CSF cells of patients is discussed.

  9. Adaptive automatic segmentation of Leishmaniasis parasite in Indirect Immunofluorescence images.

    PubMed

    Ouertani, F; Amiri, H; Bettaib, J; Yazidi, R; Ben Salah, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the first steps for the automation of the serum titration process. In fact, this process requires an Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) diagnosis automation. We deal with the initial phase that represents the fluorescence images segmentation. Our approach consists of three principle stages: (1) a color based segmentation which aims at extracting the fluorescent foreground based on k-means clustering, (2) the segmentation of the fluorescent clustered image, and (3) a region-based feature segmentation, intended to remove the fluorescent noisy regions and to locate fluorescent parasites. We evaluated the proposed method on 40 IIF images. Experimental results show that such a method provides reliable and robust automatic segmentation of fluorescent Promastigote parasite. PMID:25571049

  10. Dermoscopy and direct immunofluorescence findings of elastosis perforans serpiginosa.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Bellver, J L; Bernárdez, C; Macías, E; Moya, L; Molina-Ruiz, A M; Cannata Ortiz, P; Requena, L

    2016-08-01

    Elastosis perforans serpiginosa (EPS) is a rare skin disorder characterized by transepidermal elimination of abnormal elastic fibres. We present a new case of D-penicillamine (DPA)-induced EPS, and describe the clinical, dermoscopic, histopathological and direct immunofluorescence (DIF) findings. A 33-year-old woman receiving treatment with DPA presented with annular skin lesions. Digital dermoscopy of the lesions showed a central area of pink and yellowish discolouration with keratotic papules in the periphery, surrounded by a white halo, disposed in a way that resembled the islands of an archipelago. Other lesions showed a white to yellow central colouration and 'chrysalides' surrounding the keratotic plugs. Linear and granular deposits of IgG attached to the abnormal elastic fibres were seen with DIF. Dermoscopy can be helpful in the diagnosis of EPS. Moreover, DIF findings in skin biopsies of this case support the immune-mediated pathogenesis of EPS. PMID:27378586

  11. Quantitative Immunofluorescence Analysis of Nucleolus-Associated Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Dillinger, Stefan; Németh, Attila

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear distribution of eu- and heterochromatin is nonrandom, heterogeneous, and dynamic, which is mirrored by specific spatiotemporal arrangements of histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Here we describe a semiautomated method for the analysis of histone PTM localization patterns within the mammalian nucleus using confocal laser scanning microscope images of fixed, immunofluorescence stained cells as data source. The ImageJ-based process includes the segmentation of the nucleus, furthermore measurements of total fluorescence intensities, the heterogeneity of the staining, and the frequency of the brightest pixels in the region of interest (ROI). In the presented image analysis pipeline, the perinucleolar chromatin is selected as primary ROI, and the nuclear periphery as secondary ROI. PMID:27576710

  12. Uptake dynamics of inorganic mercury and methylmercury by the earthworm Pheretima guillemi.

    PubMed

    Dang, Fei; Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-02-01

    Mercury uptake dynamics in the earthworm Pheretima guillemi, including the dissolved uptake rate constant (ku) from pore-water and assimilation efficiencies (AEs) from mercury-contaminated soil, was quantified in this study. Dissolved uptake rate constants were 0.087 and 0.553 L g(-1) d(-1) for inorganic mercury (IHg) and methylmercury (MeHg), respectively. Assimilation efficiency of IHg in field-contaminated soil was 7.2%, lower than 15.4% of spiked soil. In contrast, MeHg exhibited comparable AEs for both field-contaminated and spiked soil (82.4-87.2%). Within the framework of biodynamic model, we further modelled the exposure pathways (dissolved exposure vs soil ingestion) to source the accumulated mercury in Pheretima guillemi. The model showed that the relative importance of soil ingestion to mercury bioaccumulation depended largely on mercury partitioning coefficients (K(d)), and was also influenced by soil ingestion rate of earthworms. In the examined field-contaminated soil, almost (>99%) accumulated IHg and MeHg was predicted to derive from soil ingestion. Therefore, soil ingestion should be carefully considered when assessing mercury exposure risk to earthworms.

  13. Altered pairing behaviour and reproductive success in white ibises exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Peter; Jayasena, Nilmini

    2011-06-22

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is the most biologically available and toxic form of mercury, and can act as a powerful teratogen, neurotoxin and endocrine disruptor in vertebrates. However, mechanisms of endocrine impairment and net effects on demography of biota are poorly understood. Here, we report that experimental exposure of an aquatic bird over 3 years to environmentally relevant dietary MeHg concentrations (0.05-0.3 ppm wet weight) resulted in dose-related increases in male-male pairing behaviour (to 55% of males), and decreases in egg productivity (to 30%). Dosed males showed decreased rates of key courtship behaviours, and were approached less by courting females in comparison to control males. Within dosed groups, homosexual males showed a similar reduction when compared with dosed heterosexual males. We found an average 35 per cent decrease in fledgling production in high-dose birds over the study duration. These results are of interest because (i) MeHg exposure is experimentally tied to demographically important reproductive deficits, (ii) these effects were found at low, chronic exposure levels commonly experienced by wildlife, and (iii) effects on reproductive behaviour and sexual preference mediated by endocrine disruption represent a novel and probably under-reported mechanism by which contaminants may influence wild populations of birds.

  14. Maternal milk as methylmercury source for suckling mice: neurotoxic effects involved with the cerebellar glutamatergic system.

    PubMed

    Manfroi, C B; Schwalm, F D; Cereser, V; Abreu, F; Oliveira, A; Bizarro, L; Rocha, J B T; Frizzo, M E S; Souza, D O; Farina, M

    2004-09-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a highly neurotoxic compound and several studies have reported intoxication signs in children whose mothers were exposed to this environmental toxicant. Although it is well established that the in utero exposure to MeHg causes neurological deficits in animals and humans, there is no evidence of the exclusive contribution of lactational exposure to MeHg as a possible cause of neurotoxicity in the offspring. In this study, we investigated the exclusive contribution of MeHg exposure through maternal milk on biochemical parameters related to the glutamatergic homeostasis (glutamate uptake by slices) and to the oxidative stress (total and nonprotein sulfhydryl groups, nonprotein hydroperoxides, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities) in the cerebellum of suckling mice (Swiss albino). The same parameters were also evaluated in the cerebellum of mothers. Our results showed, for the first time, that lactational exposure to MeHg caused a high percent of inhibition (50%) on glutamate uptake by cerebellar slices in pups. Contrarily, this effect was not observed in mothers, which were submitted to a direct oral exposure to MeHg (15 mg/l in drinking water). In addition, behavioral/functional changes were observed in the weaning mice exposed to MeHg. It was observed an increase in the levels of nonprotein hydroperoxides in cerebellum, and this increase was negatively correlated to the glutamate uptake by cerebellar slices. This study indicates that (1) the exposure of lactating mice to MeHg causes inhibition of the glutamate uptake by cerebellar slices in the offspring; (2) this inhibitory effect seems to be related to increased levels of hydroperoxide. PMID:15201443

  15. Effects of environmental temperatures on the toxicity of methylmercury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, S.; Shimojo, N.; Sano, K.; Kano, K.; Hirota, Y.; Saisho, A.

    1984-05-01

    The study was designed to examine the influence of environmental temperatures on subacute (5 mg/kg/3 days) methylmercury toxicity in rats by observations of mortality, manifestation of the hindleg-crossing phenomenon, and measurement of total and methylmercury in tissue samples.

  16. A COMBINED PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOENERGETICS-BASED MODEL FOR METHYLMERCURY IN FEMALE AMERICAN KESTRELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of this combined dose-response and modeling effort will be used to improve effects characterizations for methylmercury in avian wildlife. This information will reduce uncertainty in risk assessments for methylmercury in the environment and contribute to the developme...

  17. Trophic transfer efficiency of methylmercury and inorganic mercury to lake trout Salvelinus namaycush from its prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenijian, C.P.; David, S.R.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2012-01-01

    Based on a laboratory experiment, we estimated the net trophic transfer efficiency of methylmercury to lake trout Salvelinus namaycush from its prey to be equal to 76.6 %. Under the assumption that gross trophic transfer efficiency of methylmercury to lake trout from its prey was equal to 80 %, we estimated that the rate at which lake trout eliminated methylmercury was 0.000244 day−1. Our laboratory estimate of methylmercury elimination rate was 5.5 times lower than the value predicted by a published regression equation developed from estimates of methylmercury elimination rates for fish available from the literature. Thus, our results, in conjunction with other recent findings, suggested that methylmercury elimination rates for fish have been overestimated in previous studies. In addition, based on our laboratory experiment, we estimated that the net trophic transfer efficiency of inorganic mercury to lake trout from its prey was 63.5 %. The lower net trophic transfer efficiency for inorganic mercury compared with that for methylmercury was partly attributable to the greater elimination rate for inorganic mercury. We also found that the efficiency with which lake trout retained either methylmercury or inorganic mercury from their food did not appear to be significantly affected by the degree of their swimming activity.

  18. Paraffin immunofluorescence in the renal pathology laboratory: more than a salvage technique.

    PubMed

    Messias, Nidia C; Walker, Patrick D; Larsen, Christopher P

    2015-06-01

    Immunofluorescence studies on paraffin-embedded tissue after Pronase digestion (paraffin immunofluorescence) is used as a salvage technique in renal pathology, when frozen tissue for routine immunofluorescence is inadequate. We have recently found that it is also useful in rare cases in which the immune deposits are 'masked' on routine immunofluorescence, giving false-negative staining by routine immunofluorescence and positive staining by paraffin immunofluorescence. This study aims to evaluate the role of paraffin immunofluorescence in clinical practice with emphasis on its utility to avoid misdiagnosis of cases with masked immune complex deposits. Paraffin immunofluorescence was used in 304 (6.1%) of 4969 native biopsies reviewed from our files. In 207 (68.1%) cases, paraffin immunofluorescence was used as a salvage technique. It was necessary for diagnosis in 24 (11.6%) and had a significant contribution in 63 (30.4%) of these cases. Paraffin immunofluorescence was used to evaluate masked deposits in 97 (31.9%) cases. In 61 (62.9%) of these cases it was used to evaluate masked immune complex glomerular deposits, and in 36 cases (37.1%) it was used to evaluate masked paraproteins. Of the cases where immune complex deposits were sought, paraffin immunofluorescence was necessary for diagnosis in 16 (26.2%) cases and had a significant contribution in 4 (6.6%) cases. Fourteen of the 20 cases with masked deposits had C3 dominant stain by routine immunofluorescence, which could have been misdiagnosed as C3 glomerulopathy. Overall, paraffin immunofluorescence was necessary or had a significant contribution to diagnosis in >1/3 of the cases and is a valuable technique in renal pathology.

  19. Effect of microbial life stages on the fate of methylmercury in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamoorthy, S.; Cheng, T.C.; Kushner, D.J.

    1982-08-01

    The transformations of methylmercury in water under a variety of conditions somewhat similar to those found in nature were studied. The transformations were studied primarily in Ottawa River water, to which had been added a natural organic-rich clay sediment, living or thermally killed bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) or the blue-green alga Anabaena flos-aquae. In addition, transformations of methylmercury caused by growing bacteria were studied. Results show that growing bacterial cells can transform mercury and methylmercury to volatile form which is readily lost to the aquatic environment. Living but non-growing bacterial and algal cells cause the demethylation of methylmercury to mercury and dead bacterial cells can lead to methylation of mercury to methylmercury. (JMT)

  20. Accumulation of dietary methylmercury and effects on growth and survival in two estuarine forage fish: Cyprinodon variegatus and Menidia beryllina.

    PubMed

    Stefansson, Emily S; Heyes, Andrew; Rowe, Christopher L

    2013-04-01

    Dietary methylmercury (MeHg) uptake by fish in relation to life stage, species, and level of exposure is poorly understood in lower trophic levels, particularly in estuarine species. The authors compared accumulation of dietary MeHg as well as sensitivity (survival and growth) to dietary MeHg exposure in two species of estuarine forage fish, Cyprinodon variegatus and Menidia beryllina. Fish were fed one of five dietary MeHg concentrations (ranging from 0.04 to 14 µg/g dry wt) over a period of 70 d. Growth rate and the level of dietary exposure influenced MeHg tissue concentrations in both species. Mercury in the diet exhibited a strong linear relationship with fish Hg tissue concentrations. Additionally, the authors found that M. beryllina was more sensitive to dietary MeHg exposure than C. variegatus. Both species showed some decreases in growth related to MeHg exposure, although these patterns were not consistent among treatments. Overall, C. variegatus and M. beryllina were found to have a high tolerance for dietary MeHg exposure. If fish occupying low trophic levels are capable of surviving with high Hg body burdens, this tolerance has important implications for Hg exposure of organisms occupying higher trophic levels.

  1. Methylmercury-induced changes in gene transcription associated with neuroendocrine disruption in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Richter, Catherine A; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Annis, Mandy L; Brumbaugh, William G; Chasar, Lia C; Denslow, Nancy D; Tillitt, Donald E

    2014-07-01

    Methyl-mercury (MeHg) is a potent neuroendocrine disruptor that impairs reproductive processes in fish. The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize transcriptomic changes induced by MeHg exposure in the female largemouth bass (LMB) hypothalamus under controlled laboratory conditions, (2) investigate the health and reproductive impacts of MeHg exposure on male and female largemouth bass (LMB) in the natural environment, and (3) identify MeHg-associated gene expression patterns in whole brain of female LMB from MeHg-contaminated habitats. The laboratory experiment was a single injection of 2.5 μg MeHg/g body weight for 96 h exposure. The field survey compared river systems in Florida, USA with comparably lower concentrations of MeHg (Wekiva, Santa Fe, and St. Johns Rivers) in fish and one river system with LMB that contained elevated concentrations of MeHg (St. Marys River). Microarray analysis was used to quantify transcriptomic responses to MeHg exposure. Although fish at the high-MeHg site did not show overt health or reproductive impairment, there were MeHg-responsive genes and pathways identified in the laboratory study that were also altered in fish from the high-MeHg site relative to fish at the low-MeHg sites. Gene network analysis suggested that MeHg regulated the expression targets of neuropeptide receptor and steroid signaling, as well as structural components of the cell. Disease-associated gene networks related to MeHg exposure, based upon expression data, included cerebellum ataxia, movement disorders, and hypercalcemia. Gene responses in the CNS are consistent with the documented neurotoxicological and neuroendocrine disrupting effects of MeHg in vertebrates. PMID:24694518

  2. Methylmercury-induced changes in gene transcription associated with neuroendocrine disruption in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, Catherine A.; Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Annis, Mandy L.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Chasar, Lia C.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    Methyl-mercury (MeHg) is a potent neuroendocrine disruptor that impairs reproductive processes in fish. The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize transcriptomic changes induced by MeHg exposure in the female largemouth bass (LMB) hypothalamus under controlled laboratory conditions, (2) investigate the health and reproductive impacts of MeHg exposure on male and female largemouth bass (LMB) in the natural environment, and (3) identify MeHg-associated gene expression patterns in whole brain of female LMB from MeHg-contaminated habitats. The laboratory experiment was a single injection of 2.5 μg MeHg/g body weight for 96 h exposure. The field survey compared river systems in Florida, USA with comparably lower concentrations of MeHg (Wekiva, Santa Fe, and St. Johns Rivers) in fish and one river system with LMB that contained elevated concentrations of MeHg (St. Marys River). Microarray analysis was used to quantify transcriptomic responses to MeHg exposure. Although fish at the high-MeHg site did not show overt health or reproductive impairment, there were MeHg-responsive genes and pathways identified in the laboratory study that were also altered in fish from the high-MeHg site relative to fish at the low-MeHg sites. Gene network analysis suggested that MeHg regulated the expression targets of neuropeptide receptor and steroid signaling, as well as structural components of the cell. Disease-associated gene networks related to MeHg exposure, based upon expression data, included cerebellum ataxia, movement disorders, and hypercalcemia. Gene responses in the CNS are consistent with the documented neurotoxicological and neuroendocrine disrupting effects of MeHg in vertebrates.

  3. Methylmercury-induced changes in gene transcription associated with neuroendocrine disruption in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Richter, Catherine A; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Annis, Mandy L; Brumbaugh, William G; Chasar, Lia C; Denslow, Nancy D; Tillitt, Donald E

    2014-07-01

    Methyl-mercury (MeHg) is a potent neuroendocrine disruptor that impairs reproductive processes in fish. The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize transcriptomic changes induced by MeHg exposure in the female largemouth bass (LMB) hypothalamus under controlled laboratory conditions, (2) investigate the health and reproductive impacts of MeHg exposure on male and female largemouth bass (LMB) in the natural environment, and (3) identify MeHg-associated gene expression patterns in whole brain of female LMB from MeHg-contaminated habitats. The laboratory experiment was a single injection of 2.5 μg MeHg/g body weight for 96 h exposure. The field survey compared river systems in Florida, USA with comparably lower concentrations of MeHg (Wekiva, Santa Fe, and St. Johns Rivers) in fish and one river system with LMB that contained elevated concentrations of MeHg (St. Marys River). Microarray analysis was used to quantify transcriptomic responses to MeHg exposure. Although fish at the high-MeHg site did not show overt health or reproductive impairment, there were MeHg-responsive genes and pathways identified in the laboratory study that were also altered in fish from the high-MeHg site relative to fish at the low-MeHg sites. Gene network analysis suggested that MeHg regulated the expression targets of neuropeptide receptor and steroid signaling, as well as structural components of the cell. Disease-associated gene networks related to MeHg exposure, based upon expression data, included cerebellum ataxia, movement disorders, and hypercalcemia. Gene responses in the CNS are consistent with the documented neurotoxicological and neuroendocrine disrupting effects of MeHg in vertebrates.

  4. Methylmercury-induced changes in gene transcription associated with neuroendocrine disruption in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    PubMed Central

    Annis, Mandy L.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Chasar, Lia C.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    Methyl-mercury (MeHg) is a potent neuroendocrine disruptor that impairs reproductive processes in fish. The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize transcriptomic changes induced by MeHg exposure in the female largemouth bass (LMB) hypothalamus under controlled laboratory conditions, (2) investigate the health and reproductive impacts of MeHg exposure on male and female largemouth bass (LMB) in the natural environment, and (3) identify MeHg-associated gene expression patterns in whole brain of female LMB from MeHg-contaminated habitats. The laboratory experiment was a single injection of 2.5 μg MeHg/g body weight for 96 h exposure. The field survey compared river systems in Florida, USA with comparably lower concentrations of MeHg (Wekiva, Santa Fe, and St. Johns Rivers) in fish and one river system with LMB that contained elevated concentrations of MeHg (St. Marys River). Microarray analysis was used to quantify transcriptomic responses to MeHg exposure. Although fish at the high-MeHg site did not show overt health or reproductive impairment, there were MeHg-responsive genes and pathways identified in the laboratory study that were also altered in fish from the high-MeHg site relative to fish at the low-MeHg sites. Gene network analysis suggested that MeHg regulated the expression targets of neuropeptide receptor and steroid signaling, as well as structural components of the cell. Disease-associated gene networks related to MeHg exposure, based upon expression data, included cerebellum ataxia, movement disorders, and hypercalcemia. Gene responses in the CNS are consistent with the documented neurotoxicological and neuroendocrine disrupting effects of MeHg in vertebrates. PMID:24694518

  5. The Role of skn-1 in methylmercury-induced latent dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Finley, Ebany J; Caito, Samuel; Slaughter, James C; Aschner, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a persistent environmental bioaccumulative metal, with developmental exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) resulting in long-term health effects. We examined the impact of early-life exposure to MeHg and knockdown of skn-1 on dopaminergic (DAergic) neurodegeneration in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. SKN-1, a the major stress-activated cytoprotective transcription factors, promotes the transcription of enzymes that scavenge free radicals, synthesizes glutathione and catalyzes reactions that increase xenobiotic excretion. Deletions or mutations in this gene suppress stress resistance. Thus, we hypothesized that the extent of MeHg's toxicity is dependent on intact skn-1 response; therefore skn-1 knockout (KO) worms would show heightened sensitivity to MeHg-induced toxicity compared to wildtype worms. In this study we identified the impact of early-life MeHg exposure on Hg content, stress reactivity and DAergic neurodegeneration in wildtype, and skn-1KO C. elegans. Hg content, measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, showed no strain-dependent differences. Reactive oxygen species generation was dramatically increased in skn-1KO compared to wildtype worms. Structural integrity of DAergic neurons was microscopically assessed by visualization of fluorescently-labeled neurons, and revealed loss of neurons in skn-1KO and MeHg exposed worms compared to wildtype controls. Dopamine levels detected by High-performance liquid chromatography, were decreased in response to MeHg exposure and decreased in skn-1KO worms, and functional behavioral assays showed similar findings. Combined, these studies suggest that knockdown of skn-1 in the nematode increases DAergic sensitivity to MeHg exposure following a period of latency. PMID:24194349

  6. Human Body Burden and Dietary Methylmercury Intake: The Relationship in a Rice-Consuming Population.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Feng, Xinbin; Chan, Hing-Man; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Du, Buyun

    2015-08-18

    Rice can be the main route of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure for rice-consuming populations living in area where mercury (Hg) is mined. However, the current risk assessment paradigm for MeHg exposure is based on epidemiological data collected from fish-consuming populations. This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between dietary MeHg intake and human body burden in a rice -consuming population from the Wanshan Hg mining area in China. Hair MeHg concentrations averaged 2.07 ± 1.79 μg/g, and the average blood MeHg concentration across the study area ranged from 2.20 to 9.36 μg/L. MeHg constituted 52.8 ± 17.5% and 71.7 ± 18.2% of total Hg (THg) on average in blood and hair samples, respectively. Blood and hair MeHg concentrations, rather than THg, can be used as a proxy of human MeHg exposure. Hair MeHg levels showed no significant monthly variation; however, hair THg can be impacted by inorganic Hg exposure. The toxicokinetic model of MeHg exposure based on fish consumption underestimated the human hair MeHg levels, and this may be a consequence of the high hair-to-blood MeHg ratio (361 ± 105) in the studied rice-consuming population. The use of risk assessment models based on fish consumption may not be appropriate for inland mining areas where rice is the staple food.

  7. Oxygen intrusion into anoxic fjords leads to increased methylmercury availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiteberg Braaten, Hans Fredrik; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Yakushev, Evgeniy

    2013-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) appears in the oxic surface waters of the oceans at low levels (sub ng/L). Because inorganic Hg can be methylated into the toxic and bioaccumulative specie methylmercury (MeHg) levels can be high at the top of the marine food chain. Even though marine sea food is considered the main risk driver for MeHg exposure to people most research up to date has focused on Hg methylation processes in freshwater systems. This study identifies the mechanisms driving formation of MeHg during oxygen depletion in fjords, and shows how MeHg is made available in the surface water during oxygen intrusion. Studies of the biogeochemical structure in the water column of the Norwegian fjord Hunnbunn were performed in 2009, 2011 and 2012. In autumn of 2011 mixing flushing events were observed and lead to both positive and negative effects on the ecosystem state in the fjord. The oxygenated water intrusions lead to a decrease of the deep layer concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia and phosphate. On the other hand the intrusion also raised the H2S boundary from 8 m to a shallower depth of just 4 m. Following the intrusion was also observed an increase at shallower depths of nutrients combined with a decrease of pH. Before flushing events were observed concentrations of total Hg (TotHg) increased from 1.3 - 1.7 ng/L in the surface layer of the fjord to concentrations ranging from 5.2 ng/L to 6.4 ng/L in the anoxic zone. MeHg increased regularly from 0.04 ng/L in the surface water to a maximum concentration of 5.2 ng/L in the deeper layers. This corresponds to an amount of TotHg present as MeHg ranging from 2.1 % to 99 %. The higher concentrations of MeHg in the deeper layer corresponds to an area where no oxygen is present and concentrations of H2S exceeds 500 µM, suggesting a production of MeHg in the anoxic area as a result of sulphate reducing bacteria activity. After flushing the concentrations of TotHg showed a similar pattern ranging from 0.6 ng/L in the

  8. Detection of CXCR2 cytokine receptor surface expression using immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Lam, Clarissa; Pavel, Mahmud Arif; Kashyap, Parul; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Valentino, Victoria; Yu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8) chemokine, also known as the neutrophil chemotactic factor, is a cytokine that plays a key role in inflammatory response, cell proliferation, migration, and survival. IL-8 expression is increased not only in inflammatory disorders, but also in many types of cancer, including prostate cancer. IL-8 acts as a ligand for the C-X-C chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2) protein present on the cell plasma membrane. Binding of the IL-8 ligand to the CXCR2 receptor results in an intracellular signaling pathway mediated by GTP binding proteins coupled to the receptor itself. Knowledge of the CXCR2 expression levels facilitates the understanding of the role and function of IL-8. In this chapter, we describe a protocol that uses the immunofluorescence method and confocal microscopy to analyze the CXCR2 surface expression in human prostate cancer cells. However, this protocol is easily adaptable to analyze the surface expression of other cytokine receptors in different cell types. PMID:24908306

  9. Multiplexed immunofluorescence delineates proteomic cancer cell states associated with metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Anup; Miller, Alexandra M.; Brogi, Edi; Sui, Yunxia; Armenia, Joshua; McDonough, Elizabeth; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Stamper, Aleksandra; Campos, Carl; Pang, Zhengyu; Li, Qing; Port, Elisa; Graeber, Thomas G.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Ginty, Fiona; Larson, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The phenotypic diversity of cancer results from genetic and nongenetic factors. Most studies of cancer heterogeneity have focused on DNA alterations, as technologies for proteomic measurements in clinical specimen are currently less advanced. Here, we used a multiplexed immunofluorescence staining platform to measure the expression of 27 proteins at the single-cell level in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples from treatment-naive stage II/III human breast cancer. Unsupervised clustering of protein expression data from 638,577 tumor cells in 26 breast cancers identified 8 clusters of protein coexpression. In about one-third of breast cancers, over 95% of all neoplastic cells expressed a single protein coexpression cluster. The remaining tumors harbored tumor cells representing multiple protein coexpression clusters, either in a regional distribution or intermingled throughout the tumor. Tumor uptake of the radiotracer 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose was associated with protein expression clusters characterized by hormone receptor loss, PTEN alteration, and HER2 gene amplification. Our study demonstrates an approach to generate cellular heterogeneity metrics in routinely collected solid tumor specimens and integrate them with in vivo cancer phenotypes. PMID:27182557

  10. Purification, characterization, and immunofluorescence localization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae capping protein.

    PubMed

    Amatruda, J F; Cooper, J A

    1992-06-01

    Capping protein binds the barbed ends of actin filaments and nucleates actin filament assembly in vitro. We purified capping protein from Saccharomyces cervisiae. One of the two subunits is the product of the CAP2 gene, which we previously identified as the gene encoding the beta subunit of capping protein based on its sequence similarity to capping protein beta subunits in chicken and Dictyostelium (Amatruda, J. F., J. F. Cannon, K. Tatchell, C. Hug, and J. A. Cooper. 1990. Nature (Lond.) 344:352-354). Yeast capping protein has activity in critical concentration and low-shear viscometry assays consistent with barbed-end capping activity. Like chicken capping protein, yeast capping protein is inhibited by PIP2. By immunofluorescence microscopy yeast capping protein colocalizes with cortical actin spots at the site of bud emergence and at the tips of growing buds and shmoos. In contrast, capping protein does not colocalize with actin cables or with actin rings at the site of cytokinesis. PMID:1315784

  11. Detection of CXCR2 cytokine receptor surface expression using immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Lam, Clarissa; Pavel, Mahmud Arif; Kashyap, Parul; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Valentino, Victoria; Yu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8) chemokine, also known as the neutrophil chemotactic factor, is a cytokine that plays a key role in inflammatory response, cell proliferation, migration, and survival. IL-8 expression is increased not only in inflammatory disorders, but also in many types of cancer, including prostate cancer. IL-8 acts as a ligand for the C-X-C chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2) protein present on the cell plasma membrane. Binding of the IL-8 ligand to the CXCR2 receptor results in an intracellular signaling pathway mediated by GTP binding proteins coupled to the receptor itself. Knowledge of the CXCR2 expression levels facilitates the understanding of the role and function of IL-8. In this chapter, we describe a protocol that uses the immunofluorescence method and confocal microscopy to analyze the CXCR2 surface expression in human prostate cancer cells. However, this protocol is easily adaptable to analyze the surface expression of other cytokine receptors in different cell types.

  12. Image based quantitative reader for Lateral flow immunofluorescence assay.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Kaushik Basak; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescence Lateral flow immunoassays (LFIA) have wide range of applications in point-of-care testing (POCT). An integrated, motion-free, accurate, reliable reader that performs automated quantitative analysis of LFIA is essential for POCT diagnosis. We demonstrate an image based quantitative method to read the lateral flow immunofluorescence test strips. The developed reader uses line laser diode module to illuminate the LFIA test strip having fluorescent dye. Fluorescence light coming from the region of interest (ROI) of the LFIA test strip was filtered using an emission filter and imaged using a camera following which images were processed in computer. A dedicated control program was developed that automated the entire process including illumination of the test strip using laser diode, capturing the ROI of the test strip, processing and analyzing the images and displaying of results. Reproducibility of the reader has been evaluated using few reference cartridges and HbA1c (Glycated haemoglobin) test cartridges. The proposed system can be upgraded to a compact reader for widespread testing of LFIA test strips. PMID:26736487

  13. Frequency of dense fine speckled pattern in immunofluorescence screening test

    PubMed Central

    Şener, Aslı Gamze; Afşar, İlhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), directed against intracellular antigens, is a distinctive feature of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs). The standard test for antinuclear antibody screening is the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). Anti-dense fine speckled 70 (anti-DFS70) antibodies were initially identified as an ANA IIF pattern from a patient with interstitial cystitis, but they were later associated with various other conditions. The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of anti-DFS70 antibodies in a cohort of patients undergoing routine ANA testing. Material and Methods From January 2011 to January 2012, a total of 5800 serum samples were screened for ANA by IIF (Euroimmune AG, Lübeck, Germany). DFS pattern was searched. Results ANA were present in 1302 (22.4%) of all patients. There were 16 (1.2%) anti-DFS70 antibody-positive patients. The number of females and males who have anti-DFS70 antibody was eleven and five, respectively. All of the samples presented a titer of ≥1/320. There was one patient with SARD from the rheumatology department. Another 15 patients were from gastroenterology, endocrinology, and general internal medicine. Conclusion Although a distinctive clinical association has not been reported, anti-DFS70 have been proposed as a significant biomarker for the exclusion of SARD. The present study is a preliminary study. There is a need for a reliable assay to ensure reactivity to DFS70 and screening large populations. PMID:27708940

  14. Machine-based method for multiplex in situ molecular characterization of tissues by immunofluorescence detection

    PubMed Central

    Yarilin, Dmitry; Xu, Ke; Turkekul, Mesruh; Fan, Ning; Romin, Yevgeniy; Fijisawa, Sho; Barlas, Afsar; Manova-Todorova, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Immunofluorescent staining is an informative tool that is widely used in basic research. Automation of immunostaining improves reproducibility and quality of the results. Up to now, use of automation in immunofluorescent staining was mostly limited to one marker. Here we present tyramide signal amplification based method of multiple marker immunofluorescent detection, including detection of antibodies, raised in the same species, in tissue sections and cultured cells. This method can be beneficial for both basic and clinical research. PMID:25826597

  15. Protective effects of niacin against methylmercury-induced genotoxicity and alterations in antioxidant status in rats.

    PubMed

    Silva de Paula, Eloisa; Carneiro, Maria Fernanda Hornos; Grotto, Denise; Hernandes, Lívia Cristina; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Barbosa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the potential beneficial effects of niacin (NA; vitamin B3) supplementation in rats chronically exposed to methylmercury (MeHg). Animals were randomly assigned to one of 4 groups (n = 6): Group I, control, received distilled water by gavage; Group II, received MeHg (100 µg/kg/d) by gavage; Group III, received NA (50 mg/kg/d) in drinking water; Group IV, received MeHg (100 µg/kg/d) by gavage + NA (50 mg/kg/d) in drinking water. Biochemical parameters levels of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol and fractions, and enzyme activities aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were determined. Further, oxidative stress markers activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) activity, as well as levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and nitric oxide, were examined, and the comet assay was performed, using blood/plasma. Hg levels were measured in blood, brain, and kidneys of animals. Our results demonstrated that NA reduced adverse effects produced by MeHg. The mechanism underlying these effects appears to be related to the intrinsic antioxidant potential of NA. Considering the beneficial effects attributed to NA following MeHg exposure and that fish are the main source of both NA and MeHg, future studies need to evaluate the potential counteractive effect of NA against the adverse consequences of MeHg exposure in fish-eating populations. PMID:26914397

  16. Effect of Bacopa monniera extract on methylmercury-induced behavioral and histopathological changes in rats.

    PubMed

    Christinal, Johnson; Sumathi, Thangarajan

    2013-10-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a well-recognized environmental contaminant with established health risk to human beings by fish and marine mammal consumption. Bacopa monniera (BM) is a perennial herb and is used as a nerve tonic in Ayurveda, a traditional medicine system in India. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of B. monniera extract (BME) on MeHg-induced toxicity in rat cerebellum. Male Wistar rats were administered with MeHg orally at a dose of 5 mg/kg b.w. for 21 days. Experimental rats were given MeHg and also administered with BME (40 mg/kg, orally) 1 h prior to the administration of MeHg for 21 days. After treatment period, MeHg exposure significantly decreases the body weight and also caused the following behavioral changes. Decrease tail flick response, longer immobility time, significant decrease in motor activity, and spatial short-term memory. BME pretreatment reverted the behavioral changes to normal. MeHg exposure decreases the DNA and RNA content in cerebellum and also caused some pathological changes in cerebellum. Pretreatment with BME restored all the changes to near normal. These findings suggest that BME has a potent efficacy to alleviate MeHg-induced toxicity in rat cerebellum.

  17. Photodemethylation of Methylmercury in Eastern Canadian Arctic Thaw Pond and Lake Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Girard, Catherine; Leclerc, Maxime; Amyot, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Permafrost thaw ponds of the warming Eastern Canadian Arctic are major landscape constituents and often display high levels of methylmercury (MeHg). We examined photodegradation potentials in high-dissolved organic matter (DOC) thaw ponds on Bylot Island (BYL) and a low-DOC oligotrophic lake on Cornwallis Island (Char Lake). In BYL, the ambient MeHg photodemethylation (PD) rate over 48 h of solar exposure was 6.1 × 10(-3) m(2) E(-1), and the rate in MeHg amended samples was 9.3 × 10(-3) m(2) E(-1). In contrast, in low-DOC Char Lake, PD was only observed in the first 12 h, which suggests that PD may not be an important loss process in polar desert lakes. Thioglycolic acid addition slowed PD, while glutathione and chlorides did not impact northern PD rates. During an ecosystem-wide experiment conducted in a covered BYL pond, there was neither net MeHg increase in the dark nor loss attributable to PD following re-exposure to sunlight. We propose that high-DOC Arctic thaw ponds are more prone to MeHg PD than nearby oligotrophic lakes, likely through photoproduction of reactive species rather than via thiol complexation. However, at the ecosystem level, these ponds, which are widespread through the Arctic, remain likely sources of MeHg for neighboring systems. PMID:26938195

  18. Protective effects of niacin against methylmercury-induced genotoxicity and alterations in antioxidant status in rats.

    PubMed

    Silva de Paula, Eloisa; Carneiro, Maria Fernanda Hornos; Grotto, Denise; Hernandes, Lívia Cristina; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Barbosa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the potential beneficial effects of niacin (NA; vitamin B3) supplementation in rats chronically exposed to methylmercury (MeHg). Animals were randomly assigned to one of 4 groups (n = 6): Group I, control, received distilled water by gavage; Group II, received MeHg (100 µg/kg/d) by gavage; Group III, received NA (50 mg/kg/d) in drinking water; Group IV, received MeHg (100 µg/kg/d) by gavage + NA (50 mg/kg/d) in drinking water. Biochemical parameters levels of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol and fractions, and enzyme activities aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were determined. Further, oxidative stress markers activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) activity, as well as levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and nitric oxide, were examined, and the comet assay was performed, using blood/plasma. Hg levels were measured in blood, brain, and kidneys of animals. Our results demonstrated that NA reduced adverse effects produced by MeHg. The mechanism underlying these effects appears to be related to the intrinsic antioxidant potential of NA. Considering the beneficial effects attributed to NA following MeHg exposure and that fish are the main source of both NA and MeHg, future studies need to evaluate the potential counteractive effect of NA against the adverse consequences of MeHg exposure in fish-eating populations.

  19. Factors affecting the toxicity of methylmercury injected into eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Kondrad, S.L.; Erwin, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    We developed a standardized protocol for comparing the sensitivities of the embryos of different bird species to methylmercury when methylmercury was injected into their eggs. During the course of developing this protocol, we investigated the effects of various factors on the toxicity of the injected methylmercury. Most of our experiments were done with chicken (Gallus domesticus), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) eggs, all of which were purchased in large numbers from game farms. A smaller amount of work was done with double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs collected from the wild. Several solvents were tested, and corn oil at a rate of 1 ??l/g egg contents was selected for the final standardized protocol because it had minimal toxicity to embryos and because methylmercury dissolved in corn oil yielded a dose-response curve in a range of egg concentrations that was similar to the range that causes reproductive impairment when the mother deposits methylmercury into her own eggs. The embryonic stage at which eggs were injected with corn oil altered mercury toxicity; at early stages, the corn oil itself was toxic. Therefore, in the final protocol we standardized the time of injection to occur when each species reached the morphologic equivalent of a 3-day-old chicken embryo. Although solvents can be injected directly into the albumen of an egg, high embryo mortality can occur in the solvent controls because of the formation of air bubbles in the albumen. Our final protocol used corn oil injections into the air cell, which are easier and safer than albumen injections. Most of the methylmercury, when dissolved in corn oil, injected into the air cell passes through the inner shell membrane and into the egg albumen. Most commercial incubators incubate eggs in trays with the air cell end of the egg pointing upward, but we discovered that mercury-induced mortality was too great when eggs were held in this

  20. Factors affecting the toxicity of methylmercury injected into eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Kondrad, S.L.; Erwin, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    We developed a standardized protocol for comparing the sensitivities of the embryos of different bird species to methylmercury when methylmercury was injected into their eggs. During the course of developing this protocol, we investigated the effects of various factors on the toxicity of the injected methylmercury. Most of our experiments were done with chicken (Gallus domesticus), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) eggs, all of which were purchased in large numbers from game farms. A smaller amount of work was done with double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs collected from the wild. Several solvents were tested, and corn oil at a rate of 1 :l/g egg contents was selected for the final standardized protocol because it had minimal toxicity to embryos and because methylmercury dissolved in corn oil yielded a dose?response curve in a range of egg concentrations that was similar to the range that causes reproductive impairment when the mother deposits methylmercury into her own eggs. The embryonic stage at which eggs were injected with corn oil altered mercury toxicity; at early stages, the corn oil itself was toxic. Therefore, in the final protocol we standardized the time of injection to occur when each species reached the morphologic equivalent of a 3-day-old chicken embryo. Although solvents can be injected directly into the albumen of an egg, high embryo mortality can occur in the solvent controls because of the formation of air bubbles in the albumen. Our final protocol used corn oil injections into the air cell, which are easier and safer than albumen injections. Most of the methylmercury, when dissolved in corn oil, injected into the air cell passes through the inner shell membrane and into the egg albumen. Most commercial incubators incubate eggs in trays with the air cell end of the egg pointing upward, but we discovered that mercury-induced mortality was too great when eggs were held in this orientation

  1. Methylmercury Bioaccumulation in Rice and Wetland Biota: employing integrated indices of processes that drive methylmercury risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagles-Smith, C.; Ackerman, J.; Windham-Myers, L.; Fleck, J.

    2013-12-01

    Wetlands often are associated with elevated methylmercury (MeHg) production and food web bioaccumulation, making them potentially important sources of Hg to surrounding waters and to wetland-dependent fish and wildlife. However, the cycling of MeHg through wetlands can vary markedly with wetland type. Agricultural wetlands such as rice fields can exhibit particularly pronounced MeHg concentrations and bioaccumulation because their biogeochemical, hydrological, and ecological characteristics facilitate the conversion of inorganic mercury (Hg) to MeHg. Rice fields are characterized by a series of seasonal extreme wetting and drying cycles, sulfate-containing fertilizers, and high levels of labile organic carbon, all of which are key processes in the Hg cycle. Rice fields comprise approximately 20% of freshwater habitats and 11% of cultivated land area globally, providing critical wildlife habitat while offering substantial economic, human health, and ecosystem benefits. Thus, there is strong impetus to better understand the drivers of Hg cycling in rice fields and to develop useful management approaches for minimizing Hg risk associated with rice agriculture without compromising rice production. We examined the role of rice wetlands on MeHg bioaccumulation through foodwebs by employing biosentinel caged fish as integrators of MeHg cycling processes. With experimental field studies in California's Central Valley, we placed biosentinel fishes into nine rice wetlands that were subjected to three different harvest strategies, and into nine managed wetlands that encompassed three different hydrological regimes. We simultaneously measured a suite of biogeochemical processes in surface water, sediment, and pore water in order to link the response in fish Hg bioaccumulation with within-field processes that regulate MeHg cycling. Our preliminary results indicate that fish Hg concentrations were 1.6 times higher in rice wetlands than in managed wetlands. Additionally, fish Hg

  2. Brain lesions in mallard ducklings from parents fed methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Locke, L.N.

    1976-01-01

    Methylmercury dicyandiamide was fed to mallard ducks at 3 ppm mercury. Mercury accumulated in the eggs to an average of 7.18 and 5.46 ppm on a wet-weight basis in 2 successive years. Mercury in the eggs is believed to have caused brain lesions in the hatched ducklings. Lesions included demyelination, neuron shrink-age, necrosis, and hemorrhage in the meninges overlying the cerebellum. Brains of dead ducklings contained an average of 6.17 and 5.19 ppm mercury on a wet-weight basis in 2 successive years.

  3. Inhibition of the thioredoxin system in the brain and liver of zebra-seabreams exposed to waterborne methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Branco, Vasco; Canário, João; Holmgren, Arne; Carvalho, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    Mercury compounds were recently found to interact in vitro with the thioredoxin system, inhibiting both Thioredoxin (Trx) and Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). In order to evaluate if Trx and TrxR are affected in vivo by methylmercury (MeHg), we exposed juvenile zebra-seabreams to different concentrations of this toxicant in water for 28days followed by a 14-day depuration period. Methylmercury accumulated to a larger extent in the kidney and liver of fishes, but decreased significantly during the depuration. During the exposure, MeHg percentage in the liver reached levels above 90% of total mercury (HgT) decreasing to 60% of HgT by the end of the depuration period. In the kidney, MeHg accounted for 50-70% of HgT. In the brain and muscle, mercury accumulated throughout the exposure with all mercury being MeHg. The total mercury kept increasing in these organs during the depuration period. However, in the brain, this increase in HgT was accompanied by a decrease in the MeHg percentage (~10%). In the liver, both Trx and TrxR activities were significantly reduced (TrxR--40%; Trx--70%) by the end of the exposure, but recovered to control levels (100%) during the depuration. In the brain, both enzymes where inhibited during the depuration period (TrxR--75%; Trx--70%) when some production of inorganic mercury was detected. Activity of glutathione reductase showed increased levels when TrxR activity was low, suggesting complementarity between both systems. These results indicate that in vivo the thioredoxin system is a toxicological target for MeHg with TrxR being particularly affected.

  4. Inhibition of the thioredoxin system in the brain and liver of zebra-seabreams exposed to waterborne methylmercury

    SciTech Connect

    Branco, Vasco; Canario, Joao; Holmgren, Arne; Carvalho, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    Mercury compounds were recently found to interact in vitro with the thioredoxin system, inhibiting both Thioredoxin (Trx) and Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). In order to evaluate if Trx and TrxR are affected in vivo by methylmercury (MeHg), we exposed juvenile zebra-seabreams to different concentrations of this toxicant in water for 28 days followed by a 14-day depuration period. Methylmercury accumulated to a larger extent in the kidney and liver of fishes, but decreased significantly during the depuration. During the exposure, MeHg percentage in the liver reached levels above 90% of total mercury (HgT) decreasing to 60% of HgT by the end of the depuration period. In the kidney, MeHg accounted for 50-70% of HgT. In the brain and muscle, mercury accumulated throughout the exposure with all mercury being MeHg. The total mercury kept increasing in these organs during the depuration period. However, in the brain, this increase in HgT was accompanied by a decrease in the MeHg percentage ({approx} 10%). In the liver, both Trx and TrxR activities were significantly reduced (TrxR - 40%; Trx - 70%) by the end of the exposure, but recovered to control levels (100%) during the depuration. In the brain, both enzymes where inhibited during the depuration period (TrxR - 75%; Trx - 70%) when some production of inorganic mercury was detected. Activity of glutathione reductase showed increased levels when TrxR activity was low, suggesting complementarity between both systems. These results indicate that in vivo the thioredoxin system is a toxicological target for MeHg with TrxR being particularly affected.

  5. [Microcosm Simulation Study and Methylmercury Forming Mechanism at Landscape Water of City].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Si, You-bin; Guo, Zi-wei; Du, Cheng-zhu; Zhu, Cong-cong

    2016-04-15

    Mercury is harmful to the environment, which has gradually become one of the research hotspots. Sediments, as a main repository of pollutants, have an important impact on water quality and the internal organisms, which deserves our research. In this paper, we focused on Hefei landscape water sediment and tried to investigate the status of inorganic mercury and methylmercury pollutions in the sediment. To study the conversion process from inorganic mercury to methylmercury and their enrichment levels and mechanism, we established the ecological chain of "sediment-water-grass-fish" through analog microcosm examination. The results were as follows: from ten water and sediment samples in Hefei landscape water sediment, we found that the contents of inorganic mercury and methylmercury ranged 11.74-13.12 µg · kg⁻¹ and 0.37-2.23 µg · kg⁻¹, respectively. The microcosm examination showed that: with increasing culture time, inorganic mercury in sediments gradually decreased. There was a phenomenon that the content of methylmercury increased at first and then decreased to reach the balance later. Both the inorganic mercury and methylmercury in water change showed an increasing trend. The enrichment contents of inorganic mercury in Egeria densa Planch, and golden mandarin fish (Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner) were low while their enrichment of methylmercury could he great. In addition, we found that both the bioaccumulation ability and the enrichment coefficient of methylmercury in the body of golden mandarin fish were the maximum during the same period.

  6. Methylmercury determination in biological samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after acid leaching extraction.

    PubMed

    Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Givianrad, Mohammad Hadi; Abroomand-Azar, Parviz

    2006-11-01

    An efficient and sensitive method for the determination of methylmercury in biological samples was developed based on acid leaching extraction of methylmercury into toluene. Methylmercury in the organic phase was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The methylmercury signal was enhanced and the reproducibility increased by formation of certain complexes and addition of Pd-DDC modifier. The complex of methylmercury with DDC produced the optimum analytical signal in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility compared to complexes with dithizone, cysteine, 1,10-phenanthroline, and diethyldithiocarbamate. Method performance was optimized by modifying parameters such as temperature of mineralization, atomization, and gas flow rate. The limit of detection for methylmercury determination was 0.015 mug g(-1) and the RSD of the whole procedure was 12% for human teeth samples (n=5) and 15.8% for hair samples (n=5). The method's accuracy was investigated by using NIES-13 and by spiking the samples with different amounts of methylmercury. The results were in good agreement with the certified values and the recoveries were 88-95%. PMID:16896613

  7. [Microcosm Simulation Study and Methylmercury Forming Mechanism at Landscape Water of City].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Si, You-bin; Guo, Zi-wei; Du, Cheng-zhu; Zhu, Cong-cong

    2016-04-15

    Mercury is harmful to the environment, which has gradually become one of the research hotspots. Sediments, as a main repository of pollutants, have an important impact on water quality and the internal organisms, which deserves our research. In this paper, we focused on Hefei landscape water sediment and tried to investigate the status of inorganic mercury and methylmercury pollutions in the sediment. To study the conversion process from inorganic mercury to methylmercury and their enrichment levels and mechanism, we established the ecological chain of "sediment-water-grass-fish" through analog microcosm examination. The results were as follows: from ten water and sediment samples in Hefei landscape water sediment, we found that the contents of inorganic mercury and methylmercury ranged 11.74-13.12 µg · kg⁻¹ and 0.37-2.23 µg · kg⁻¹, respectively. The microcosm examination showed that: with increasing culture time, inorganic mercury in sediments gradually decreased. There was a phenomenon that the content of methylmercury increased at first and then decreased to reach the balance later. Both the inorganic mercury and methylmercury in water change showed an increasing trend. The enrichment contents of inorganic mercury in Egeria densa Planch, and golden mandarin fish (Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner) were low while their enrichment of methylmercury could he great. In addition, we found that both the bioaccumulation ability and the enrichment coefficient of methylmercury in the body of golden mandarin fish were the maximum during the same period. PMID:27548953

  8. Immunologic classification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with micro-immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, S P; Holmes, K K; Knapp, J S; Ott, S; Kyzer, D D

    1977-09-01

    A reproducible immunologic classification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains has been achieved by the micro-immunofluorescence (Micro-IF)3 method by using formalinized whole organisms as test antigens and mouse antisera prepared by i.v. immunization with the whole organisms as antibody. Immunologic differences among Neisseria species were also distinct in this test system. Immunologic differences among gonococcal strains were not influenced by gonococcal colony type. Classification of gonococci was facilitated by use of antisera absorbed with an antigenically unique gonococcus strain. Of 180 gonococcal strains, 175 could be classified into three immunotypes: A, B, and C. Each type was further divided into subtypes designated A1, A2, A3, B1, B2, B3, C1, and C2. Minor antigenic differences still exist within each subtype. The two gonococcal isolates from each of 17 pairs of sexual contacts fell into the same subtype. Seventy-one of 73 isolates which required arginine, hypoxanthine, and uracil for growth (Arg-Hyx-Ura-) and seven of 107 other auxotypes belonged to subtypes A2 and A3. Marked geographical differences in distribution of gonococcal immunotypes were observed among those available for testing. Subtypes A2 and A3 were predominant in Seattle whereas types B and C were predominant in Southeast Asia. The only Arg-Hyx-Ura- isolates not belonging to subtypes A2 or A3 were the only two that were serum sensitive. This Micro-IF immunotyping appears potentially useful for future immunologic, epidemiologic, and genetic studies of N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:408415

  9. Fate and developmental effects of dietary uptake of methylmercury in Silurana tropicalis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Melissa A; Croteau, Maxine C; Millar, Catherine S; Trudeau, Vance L; Lean, David R S

    2011-01-01

    Adverse effects of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure during amphibian metamorphosis remain to be fully characterized. Most previous investigations determined effects of short-term exposure to elevated dose rates, without information on mercury (Hg) depuration and degradation pathways. Since metamorphosis is primarily controlled by thyroid hormones (TH), alterations in this process suggest a disruption of the TH endocrine axis. The aim of this research was to (1) characterize patterns of MeHg accumulation and depuration in tadpoles and (2) examine effects of MeHg accumulation on metamorphosis and the TH axis. Silurana tropicalis tadpoles were exposed to environmental levels of dietary MeHg until metamorphic climax. Whole-body MeHg and total Hg (THg) levels were measured, as well as the number of metamorphs, rate of metamorphosis, body size, and whole-body triiodothyronine (T3) levels at metamorphosis. Tadpoles exposed to a higher level of MeHg exhibited increased mortality and size, and reduced metamorphosis. At lower levels of MeHg, body burdens increased rapidly and eventually reached a plateau, whereas no plateau was reached at a higher level of MeHg exposure. T3 levels were not affected. Data indicate that at low and medium levels of exposure, depuration of MeHg may prevent toxicity in tadpoles. However, depuration mechanisms may be insufficient at high doses, producing disruption of metamorphosis and death. Although there were no marked effects of MeHg on whole-body T3 levels, further investigation of other components of the TH axis is warranted.

  10. Effects of methylmercury on epigenetic markers in three model species: mink, chicken and yellow perch

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Niladri; Head, Jessica; Nam, Dong-Ha; Pilsner, J. Richard; Carvan, Michael J; Chan, Hing Man; Goetz, Frederick W; Murphy, Cheryl A; Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti; Scheuhammer, Anton M

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that methylmercury (MeHg) exposure is associated with DNA hypomethylation in the brain stem of male polar bears. Here, we conveniently use archived tissues obtained from controlled laboratory exposure studies to look for evidence that MeHg can disrupt DNA methylation across taxa. Brain (cerebrum) tissues from MeHg-exposed mink (Neovison vison), chicken (Gallus gallus) and yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were analyzed for total Hg levels and global DNA methylation. Tissues from chicken and mink, but not perch, were also analyzed for DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity. In mink we observed significant reductions in global DNA methylation in an environmentally-relevant dietary exposure group (1ppm MeHg), but not in a higher group (2ppm MeHg). DNMT activity was significantly reduced in all treatment groups. In chicken or yellow perch, no statistically significant effects of MeHg were observed. Dose-dependent trends were observed in the chicken data but the direction of the change was not consistent between the two endpoints. Our results suggest that MeHg can be epigenetically active in that it has the capacity to affect DNA methylation in mammals. The variability in results across species may suggest inter-taxa differences in epigenetic responses to MeHg, or may be related to differences among the exposure scenarios used as animals were exposed to MeHg through different routes (dietary, egg injection), for different periods of time (19 – 89 days) and at different life stages (embryonic, juvenile, adult). PMID:23481557

  11. Methylmercury is the predominant form of mercury in bird eggs: a synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Joshua T; Herzog, Mark P; Schwarzbach, Steven E

    2013-02-19

    Bird eggs are commonly used in mercury monitoring programs to assess methylmercury contamination and toxicity to birds. However, only 6% of >200 studies investigating mercury in bird eggs have actually measured methylmercury concentrations in eggs. Instead, studies typically measure total mercury in eggs (both organic and inorganic forms of mercury), with the explicit assumption that total mercury concentrations in eggs are a reliable proxy for methylmercury concentrations in eggs. This assumption is rarely tested, but has important implications for assessing risk of mercury to birds. We conducted a detailed assessment of this assumption by (1) collecting original data to examine the relationship between total and methylmercury in eggs of two species, and (2) reviewing the published literature on mercury concentrations in bird eggs to examine whether the percentage of total mercury in the methylmercury form differed among species. Within American avocets (Recurvirostra americana) and Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri), methylmercury concentrations were highly correlated (R(2) = 0.99) with total mercury concentrations in individual eggs (range: 0.03-7.33 μg/g fww), and the regression slope (log scale) was not different from one (m = 0.992). The mean percentage of total mercury in the methylmercury form in eggs was 97% for American avocets (n = 30 eggs), 96% for Forster's terns (n = 30 eggs), and 96% among all 22 species of birds (n = 30 estimates of species means). The percentage of total mercury in the methylmercury form ranged from 63% to 116% among individual eggs and 82% to 111% among species means, but this variation was not related to total mercury concentrations in eggs, foraging guild, nor to a species life history strategy as characterized along the precocial to altricial spectrum. Our results support the use of total mercury concentrations to estimate methylmercury concentrations in bird eggs.

  12. Methylmercury is the predominant form of mercury in bird eggs: a synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Herzog, Mark P.; Schwarzbach, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Bird eggs are commonly used in mercury monitoring programs to assess methylmercury contamination and toxicity to birds. However, only 6% of >200 studies investigating mercury in bird eggs have actually measured methylmercury concentrations in eggs. Instead, studies typically measure total mercury in eggs (both organic and inorganic forms of mercury), with the explicit assumption that total mercury concentrations in eggs are a reliable proxy for methylmercury concentrations in eggs. This assumption is rarely tested, but has important implications for assessing risk of mercury to birds. We conducted a detailed assessment of this assumption by (1) collecting original data to examine the relationship between total and methylmercury in eggs of two species, and (2) reviewing the published literature on mercury concentrations in bird eggs to examine whether the percentage of total mercury in the methylmercury form differed among species. Within American avocets (Recurvirostra americana) and Forster’s terns (Sterna forsteri), methylmercury concentrations were highly correlated (R2 = 0.99) with total mercury concentrations in individual eggs (range: 0.03–7.33 μg/g fww), and the regression slope (log scale) was not different from one (m = 0.992). The mean percentage of total mercury in the methylmercury form in eggs was 97% for American avocets (n = 30 eggs), 96% for Forster’s terns (n = 30 eggs), and 96% among all 22 species of birds (n = 30 estimates of species means). The percentage of total mercury in the methylmercury form ranged from 63% to 116% among individual eggs and 82% to 111% among species means, but this variation was not related to total mercury concentrations in eggs, foraging guild, nor to a species life history strategy as characterized along the precocial to altricial spectrum. Our results support the use of total mercury concentrations to estimate methylmercury concentrations in bird eggs.

  13. Dietary selenomethionine influences the accumulation and depuration of dietary methylmercury in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Amlund, Heidi; Lundebye, Anne-Katrine; Boyle, David; Ellingsen, Ståle

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a toxicant of concern for aquatic food chains. In the present study, the assimilation and depuration of dietary MeHg and the influence of dietary selenium on MeHg toxicokinetics was characterised in zebrafish (Danio rerio). In a triplicate tank experimental design (n=3 tanks per treatment group), adult zebrafish were exposed to dietary MeHg (as methylmercury-cysteine) at 5 and 10 μg/g and with or without selenium (as selenomethionine) supplemented to the diets at a concentration of 5 μg/g for 8 weeks followed by a 4-week depuration period. Methylmercury accumulated in muscle, liver and brain of zebrafish; with higher mercury concentrations in liver and brain than in muscle following 8 weeks of exposure. In muscle, the mercury concentrations were 3.4±0.2 and 6.4±0.1 μg/g ww (n=3) in zebrafish fed the 5 and 10 μg Hg/g diets, respectively. During the depuration period, mercury concentrations were significantly reduced in muscle in both the 5 and 10 μg Hg/g diet groups with a greater reduction in the high dose group. After depuration, the mercury concentrations were 2.4±0.1 and 4.0±0.3 μg/g ww (n=3) for zebrafish fed the 5 and 10 μg Hg/g diets, respectively. Data also indicated that supplemented dietary selenium reduced accumulation of MeHg and enhanced the elimination of MeHg. Lower levels of mercury were found in muscle of zebrafish fed MeHg and SeMet compared with fish fed only MeHg after 8 weeks exposure; the mercury concentrations in muscle were 5.8±0.2 and 6.4±0.1 μg/g ww (n=3) for zebrafish fed the 10 μg Hg/g+5 μg Se/g diet and the 10 μg Hg/g diet, respectively. Furthermore, the elimination of MeHg from muscle during the 4-week depuration period was significantly greater in the fish fed the diet containing SeMet compared to a control diet; the mercury concentrations were 3.3±0.1 and 4.0±0.3 μg/g ww (n=3) for zebrafish fed the 5 μg Se/g and the control diets, respectively. In summary, dietary SeMet reduces the

  14. Differences in mortality among bobwhite fed methylmercury chloride dissolved in various carriers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spann, J.W.; Heinz, G.H.; Camardese, M.B.; Hill, E.F.; Moore, J.F.; Murray, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    Twelve-day-old bobwhite chicks were fed a diet containing 0, 5.4 or 20 ppm methylmercury chloride. The methylmercury chloride was added to the diet either in a dry, pulverized form or dissolved in acetone, propylene glycol or corn oil. Mortality was measured for 6 weeks, and samples of liver were saved for mercury analysis. Mortality was significantly lower in birds fed 20 ppm methylmercury chloride when acetone was the solvent. The reduced mortality could not be explained by effects of acetone on dietary level of mercury or on uptake of mercury into the body.

  15. Dissolved organic matter reduces algal accumulation of methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luengen, Allison C.; Fisher, Nicholas S.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) significantly decreased accumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) by the diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana in laboratory experiments. Live diatom cells accumulated two to four times more MeHg than dead cells, indicating that accumulation may be partially an energy-requiring process. Methylmercury enrichment in diatoms relative to ambient water was measured by a volume concentration factor (VCF). Without added DOM, the maximum VCF was 32 x 104, and the average VCF (from 10 to 72 h) over all experiments was 12.6 x 104. At very low (1.5 mg/L) added DOM, VCFs dropped by approximately half. At very high (20 mg/L) added DOM, VCFs dropped 10-fold. Presumably, MeHg was bound to a variety of reduced sulfur sites on the DOM, making it unavailable for uptake. Diatoms accumulated significantly more MeHg when exposed to transphilic DOM extracts than hydrophobic ones. However, algal lysate, a labile type of DOM created by resuspending a marine diatom in freshwater, behaved similarly to a refractory DOM isolate from San Francisco Bay. Addition of 67 μM L-cysteine resulted in the largest drop in VCFs, to 0.28 x 104. Although the DOM composition influenced the availability of MeHg to some extent, total DOM concentration was the most important factor in determining algal bioaccumulation of MeHg.

  16. Effects of perinatal coexposure to methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls on neurobehavioral development in mice.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Norio; Ohba, Takashi; Nakai, Kunihiko; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Keita; Kameo, Satomi; Shimada, Miyuki; Kurokawa, Naoyuki; Satoh, Chieko; Satoh, Hiroshi

    2008-06-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental pollutants that cause neurobehavioral deficits in humans. Because exposures to MeHg and PCBs occur through fish consumption, it is necessary to clarify the effects of the interaction of the two pollutants. Therefore, we investigated the effects of perinatal exposure to MeHg and PCBs on the neurobehavioral development in mice. Female mice (C57BL/6Cr) were divided into four groups according to the type of exposure: (1) vehicle control, (2) MeHg alone, (3) PCBs alone, and (4) MeHg + PCBs. The MeHg-exposed groups were fed with a diet containing 5 ppm MeHg (as Hg), from 4 weeks before mating, throughout pregnancy, and lactation. The PCB-exposed groups were given a commercial mixture of PCBs, Aroclor 1,254, at 18 mg/kg body weight in corn oil by gavage every 3 days from day 5 after breeding and continued until postnatal day (PND) 20. Before weaning, an assessment of eye opening showed the interactive effects between MeHg and PCBs on PND 12: The coexposure group showed a similar response to the control group, whereas the MeHg- and PCB-exposed groups showed a high response than the former two groups. We also observed delay in development of grasp reflex by MeHg exposure on PNDs 12 and 14. When the offspring mice were 8 weeks old, the group exposed to PCBs alone showed increases in the frequencies of excrement defecation and urine traces in an open-field test. Analysis of the latency revealed the antagonistic interaction between the MeHg and PCBs: The latency increased by either MeHg or PCB exposure was decreased by coexposure. Treatment with MeHg decreased the distance walked by the mice, and MeHg interacted with PCBs. Moris' water maze test showed that the MeHg-treated mice took a long time to reach the submerged platform; however, this MeHg exposure showed no interaction with PCB exposure. The spontaneous locomotion activity of the mice was not affected by the chemical exposure at 9 weeks of age

  17. The protein transportation pathway from Golgi to vacuoles via endosomes plays a role in enhancement of methylmercury toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Gi-Wook; Murai, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Naganuma, Akira

    2014-07-01

    Methylmercury causes serious damage to the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms of methylmercury toxicity are only marginally understood. In this study, we used a gene-deletion mutant library of budding yeast to conduct genome-wide screening for gene knockouts affecting the sensitivity of methylmercury toxicity. We successfully identified 31 genes whose deletions confer resistance to methylmercury in yeast, and 18 genes whose deletions confer hypersensitivity to methylmercury. Yeast genes whose deletions conferred resistance to methylmercury included many gene encoding factors involved in protein transport to vacuoles. Detailed examination of the relationship between the factors involved in this transport system and methylmercury toxicity revealed that mutants with loss of the factors involved in the transportation pathway from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the endosome, protein uptake into the endosome, and endosome-vacuole fusion showed higher methylmercury resistance than did wild-type yeast. The results of our genetic engineering study suggest that this vesicle transport system (proteins moving from the TGN to vacuole via endosome) is responsible for enhancing methylmercury toxicity due to the interrelationship between the pathways. There is a possibility that there may be proteins in the cell that enhance methylmercury toxicity through the protein transport system.

  18. Studies of micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities in red blood cells of Colossoma macropomum exposed to methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Carlos Alberto Machado; da Cunha, Lorena Araújo; da Silva Pinheiro, Raul Henrique; de Oliveira Bahia, Marcelo; Burbano, Rommel Mario Rodríguez

    2011-01-01

    The frequencies of micronuclei (MN) and morphological nuclear abnormalities (NA) in erythrocytes in the peripheral blood of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), treated with 2 mg.L−1 methylmercury (MeHg), were analyzed. Two groups (nine specimens in each) were exposed to MeHg for different periods (group A - 24 h; group B - 120 h). A third group served as negative control (group C, untreated; n = 9). Although, when compared to the control group there were no significant differences in MN frequency in the treated groups, for NA, the differences between the frequencies of group B (treated for 120 h) and the control group were extremely significant (p < 0.02), thus demonstrating the potentially adverse effects of MeHg on C. macropomum erythrocytes after prolonged exposure. PMID:22215976

  19. Toxicity of methylmercury injected into eggs of thick-billed murres and arctic terns.

    PubMed

    Braune, Birgit M; Scheuhammer, Anton M; Crump, Douglas; Jones, Stephanie; Porter, Emily; Bond, Della

    2012-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) has been increasing in some marine birds in the Canadian Arctic over the past several decades. To evaluate the potential reproductive impact of Hg exposure, eggs of two species of arctic-breeding seabirds, the thick-billed murre and arctic tern, were dosed with graded concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) and artificially incubated in the laboratory to determine species differences in sensitivity. Based on the dose-response curves, the median lethal concentrations (LC(50)) for thick-billed murre and arctic tern embryos were 0.48 and 0.95 μg g(-1) Hg on a wet-weight (ww) basis, respectively. Compared with published LC(50) values for other avian species, the murres and terns had a medium sensitivity to MeHg exposure. LC(50) values were also calculated for the actual Hg concentration measured in the embryos, that is, the maternally-deposited Hg plus the injected MeHg dose. This increased the LC(50) values to 0.56 μg g(-1) Hg ww in the thick-billed murre and to 1.10 μg g(-1) Hg ww in the arctic tern. Although muscarinic acetylcholine and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid glutamate receptor levels have been correlated with increasing Hg concentrations in brains of adult birds, no significant associations were found in brain tissue of the murre or tern embryos. The incidence of gross external anatomical deformities was 4.3 % in the murre embryos and 3.6 % in the tern embryos. However, given that the eggs were taken from wild populations, it is unlikely that the deformities observed in this study were due to MeHg exposure alone.

  20. A systems approach to risk assessment: Application to methylmercury from coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Saroff, L.; Lipfert, F.W.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) asked Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform a probabilistic assessment of the health risks associated with Hg from coal-fired power plants. The objective of the assessment is to estimate the incremental health risks that might ensue from a typical coal-fired power plant, together with their uncertainties, taking into account existing background levels and the actual adverse health effects that have previously been associated with exposure to various Hg species. Mercury has a long history of association with adverse neurological effects at high exposure levels. The most important current exposure pathway has been found to be ingestion of fish containing methylmercury (MeHg), which is the end product of bioconcentration moving up the aquatic food chain. Mercury can enter natural waters from either industrial discharges or from atmospheric deposition of various inorganic Ho. compounds. Because of the worldwide background and the existence of local emissions sources, Hg deposition must be considered on local, regional and global scales. The regulatory technical challenge presented by methy1mercury is to protect public health without foreclosing an appreciable a portion of the food supply or impacting on the lifestyles of North American native populations. This paper presents an abbreviated account of the DOE/BNL risk assessment, as viewed from a systems perspective. We review the structure of the model, the sources of data used, the assumptions that were made, and the interpretation of the findings. Since publication of the first risk assessment report, we have refined our estimates of local atmospheric dispersion and deposition and {open_quotes}calibrated{close_quotes} the pharmacokinetic portion of the model against observations.

  1. Changes in metabolic enzymes, cortisol and glucose concentrations of Beluga (Huso huso) exposed to dietary methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Gharaei, Ahmad; Ghaffari, Mostafa; Keyvanshokooh, Saeed; Akrami, Reza

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, effects of dietary methylmercury (MeHg) on several blood biochemical parameters including GLU (glucose), LDH (lactate dehydrogenase), AST (aspartate aminotransferase), ALT (alanine aminotransferase), ALP (alkaline phosphatase) and cortisol were investigated in the Beluga sturgeon (Huso huso). Beluga juveniles were fed for 32 days on four diets containing MeHg (control: 0.04 mg kg⁻¹; low: 0.76 mg kg⁻¹; medium: 7.88 mg kg⁻¹; and high 16.22 mg kg⁻¹ treatment). Significant increases (P < 0.05) were observed in all biochemical parameters, except ALP levels, which decreased significantly (P < 0.05) compared to the control group with either dose- or time-dependent effects. These results suggest that long-term dietary MeHg exposure may affect metabolic enzyme activity and glucose levels in Belugas. These findings provide useful information for environmental and fishery officials to apply in future decisions for managing fish resources in Caspian Sea.

  2. Aqueductal stenosis and development of hydrocephalus in prenatal methylmercury poisoning in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B.H.; Caple, M.; Espinosa, T.; Kim, D.; Song, D.

    1986-03-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant that can cause irreparable CNS damage, particularly upon the developing fetal CNS. As an ongoing study of the effects of MeHg upon the developing CNS, timed-pregnant C57BL/6J mice were poisoned by intraperitoneal injections of methylmercuric chloride (MMC), 12 mg/kg, in divided doses on E-14, 15 and 16. In another experiment, the pregnant animals were fed MMC (2 mg/kg/day) in their drinking water, starting on E-2 and continuing throughout gestation. The animals were allowed to come to term and the offspring sacrificed on postnatal days 5, 10, and 20. In both of these experiments, up to 9% of the offspring affected by prenatal MeHg poisoning developed marked hydrocephalus. Serial on ..mu..m sections of the aqueductus revealed severe stenosis associated with marked edema and spongy changes of ependymal cells and surrounding neuropil. No inflammatory or gliotic reactions of the periaqueductal tissue was seen. These changes are very similar to those observed in congenital hydrocephalus in humans and suggest that toxic damage to developing ependymal cells due to prenatal exposures of agents such as MeHg may have etiological role in some of the human congenital hydrocephalus. The details of the scanning and transmission electron microscopy along with demonstration of mercury grains in tissues will be presented.

  3. Periphyton biofilms influence net methylmercury production in an industrially contaminated system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olsen, Todd Andrew; Brandt, Craig C.; Brooks, Scott C.

    2016-09-12

    Mercury (Hg) methylation and methylmercury (MMHg) demethylation activity of periphyton biofilms from East Fork Poplar Creek, Tennessee, USA (EFPC) were measured during 2014-2015 using stable Hg isotopic rate assays. 201HgII and MM202Hg were added to intact periphyton samples and the formation of MM201Hg and loss of MM202Hg were monitored over time and used to calculate first-order rate constants for methylation and demethylation, respectively. The influence of location, temperature/season, light exposure and biofilm structure on methylation and demethylation were examined. Between-site differences in net methylation for samples collected from an upstream versus downstream location were driven by differences in the demethylationmore » rate constant (kd). In contrast, the within-site seasonal difference in net methylation was driven by changes in the methylation rate constant (km). Samples incubated in the dark had lower net methylation due to km values that were 60% less than those incubated in the light. Disrupting the biofilm structure decreased km by 50% and resulted in net demethylating conditions. Overall, the measured rates resulted in a net excess of MMHg generated which could account for 27-85% of the MMHg flux in EFPC and suggests intact, actively photosynthesizing periphyton biofilms harbor zones of MMHg production.« less

  4. Pharmacokinetics and distribution of dietary tributyltin and methylmercury in the snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio)

    SciTech Connect

    Rouleau, C.; Gobeil, C.; Tjaelve, H.

    1999-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics and distribution of a single 5-{micro}g dietary dose of radiolabeled [{sup 113}Sn]tributyltin (TBT) and [{sup 203}Hg]methylmercury (MeHg) were studied over 154 days in the snow crab, using in vivo gamma counting and whole-body autoradiography. Experiment was done under conditions typical of those encountered in the cold natural habitat of this crustacean. Retention efficiency was high for both compounds, and two kinetic pools could be distinguished. Elimination of the first pool proceeded within 20--80 days, but it accounted for 27--62% of the assimilated TBT, compared to 8--11% for MeHg. Biological half-life of the second pool was 33--187 days for TBT and 520--650 days for MeHg. Autoradiographic and dissection data revealed a less homogeneous distribution of the radiolabel and much higher radioactivity in gut lumen for TBT compared to MeHg. This suggests that the larger size of the first pool in the case of TBT resulted from metabolization in the hepatopancreas and fecal elimination of the metabolites. The whole-body biomagnification factor (BMF) that would result from the long-term chronic exposure of snow crab to TBT-contaminated food was estimated as 0.1--0.6. Although these BMF values were an order of magnitude lower than those estimated for MeHg, they are not negligible and indicate that uptake of TBT via food may be an important accumulation route.

  5. Selenomethionine protects against neuronal degeneration by methylmercury in the developing rat cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Mineshi; Yasutake, Akira; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Ryufuku, Masae; Chan, Hing Man; Yamamoto, Megumi; Oumi, Sanae; Kobayashi, Sayaka; Watanabe, Chiho

    2013-03-19

    Although many experimental studies have shown that selenium protects against methylmercury (MeHg) toxicity at different end points, the direct interactive effects of selenium and MeHg on neurons in the brain remain unknown. Our goal is to confirm the protective effects of selenium against neuronal degeneration induced by MeHg in the developing postnatal rat brain using a postnatal rat model that is suitable for extrapolating the effects of MeHg to the fetal brain of humans. As an exposure source of selenium, we used selenomethionine (SeMet), a food-originated selenium. Wistar rats of postnatal days 14 were orally administered with vehicle (control), MeHg (8 mg Hg/kg/day), SeMet (2 mg Se/kg/day), or MeHg plus SeMet coexposure for 10 consecutive days. Neuronal degeneration and reactive astrocytosis were observed in the cerebral cortex of the MeHg-group but the symptoms were prevented by coexposure to SeMet. These findings serve as a proof that dietary selenium can directly protect neurons against MeHg toxicity in the mammalian brain, especially in the developing cerebrum.

  6. Bioavailability of methylmercury to Sacramento blackfish (Orthodon microlepidotus): Dissolved organic carbon effects

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.H.; Cech, J.J. Jr.; Lagunas-Solar, M.C.

    1998-04-01

    The effect of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on methylmercury (MeHg) uptake across the gills of Sacramento blackfish (Orthodon microlepidotus) was investigated using the Hg-203 radioisotope. The efficiency of fish gills in extracting MeHg from water was measured using a McKim-type fish respirometer that separated exposure water from expired water. Blackfish gill ventilation and oxygen consumption rates remained constant, while Me{sup 203}Hg uptake was decreased significantly in the presence of DOC. Mean Me{sup 203}Hg extraction efficiency, uptake rate constant, and blood to inspired water ratio decreased 78%, 73%, and 63%, respectively, with 2 mg C/L of DOC, and 85%, 82%, and 70% with 5 mg C/L DOC, compared to the Me{sup 203}Hg reference treatment group. Because respiratory parameters remained unchanged, reductions in Me{sup 203}Hg uptake indicate strong interactions between DOC and Me{sup 203}Hg Methyl{sup 203}Hg levels in fish gills, kidney, and spleen from 2 and 5 mg C/L were significantly lower than those observed from the reference treatment group. These reductions in uptake (bioavailability) support the hypothesis that trans-gill transport of Me{sup 203}Hg is inhibited when it is complexed by DOC in the aqueous medium, decreasing Me{sup 203}Hg uptake and accumulation in fish organs.

  7. Factors affecting the bioaccessibility of methylmercury in several marine fish species.

    PubMed

    He, Mei; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2011-07-13

    Bioaccessibility refers to the maximum bioavailability of pollutant ingested with food, and its measurements can lead to a more accurate risk assessment as compared to the measurements of total concentrations of pollutant in food. This study examined the factors affecting the bioaccessibility of methylmercury (MeHg) in nine species of marine fish with an aim to identify ways of reducing MeHg bioaccessibility. MeHg bioaccessibility without any treatment in the nine species of marine fish ranged from 16.0 to 67.7%. Steaming, grilling, and frying reduced MeHg bioaccessibility by 29.4-77.4% for rabbitfish and 74.6-95.8% for grouper. Co-consumption of phytochemical-rich foods such as green tea decreased the bioaccessibility of MeHg by 72.2% for rabbitfish and 74.0% for grouper, whereas meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid increased it by 39.2-108% for rabbitfish and 45.3-75.7% for grouper. The bioaccessibilities of both MeHg and inorganic mercury were independent of the total Hg concentration and the exposure route (dietary vs dissolved). In eight of the nine species studied, bioaccessibility was negatively correlated with the extent to which MeHg was partitioned into the metal-rich granule fraction and the trophically available fraction. It was positively correlated with partitioning into the cellular debris fraction. This study demonstrated the important control of subcellular distribution in MeHg bioaccessibility.

  8. Effects of injected methylmercury on the hatching of common loon (Gavia immer) eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenow, Kevin P.; Meyer, Michael W.; Rossmann, Ronald; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette; Gray, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the level of in ovo methylmercury (MeHg) exposure that results in detrimental effects on fitness and survival of loon embryos and hatched chicks, we conducted a field study in which we injected eggs with various doses of MeHg on day 4 of incubation. Eggs were collected following about 23 days of natural incubation and artificially incubated to observe hatching. Reduced embryo survival was evident in eggs injected at a rate of ≥1.3 μg Hg/g wet-mass. When maternally deposited Hg and injected Hg were considered together, the median lethal concentration of Hg (LC50) was estimated to be 1.78 μg Hg/g wet-mass. Organ mass patterns from eggs of chicks injected at a rate of 2.9 μg Hg/g differed from that of controls and chicks from the 0.5 μg Hg/g treatment, largely related to a negative relation between yolk sac mass and egg mercury concentration. Chicks from eggs in the 2.9 μg Hg/g treatment were also less responsive to a frightening stimulus than controls and chicks from the 0.5 μg Hg/g treatment. We also found that the length of incubation period increased with increasing egg mercury concentration. Tissue Hg concentrations were strongly associated (r2 ≥ 0.80) with egg Hg concentration.

  9. Mercury in the blood and eggs of American kestrels fed methylmercury chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, J.B.; Bennett, R.S.; Rossmann, R.

    2010-01-01

    American kestrels (Falco sparverius) were fed diets containing methylmercury chloride (MeHg) at 0, 0.6, 1.7, 2.8, 3.9, or 5.0 ??g/g (dry wt) starting approximately eight weeks before the onset of egg laying. Dietary treatment was terminated after 12 to 14 weeks, and unhatched eggs were collected for Hg analysis. Blood samples were collected after four weeks of treatment and the termination of the study (i.e., 12-14 weeks of treatment). Clutch size decreased at dietary concentrations above 2.8 ??g/g. The average total mercury concentration in clutches of eggs and in the second egg laid (i.e., egg B) increased linearly with dietary concentration. Mercury concentrations in egg B were approximately 25% lower than in the first egg laid and similar in concentration to the third egg laid. Mercury concentrations in whole blood and plasma also increased linearly with dietary concentration. Total Hg concentrations in June blood samples were lower than those in April, despite 8 to 10 weeks of additional dietary exposure to MeHg in the diet. This is likely because of excretion of Hg into growing flight feathers beginning shortly after the start of egg production. The strongest relationships between Hg concentrations in blood and eggs occurred when we used blood samples collected in April before egg laying and feather molt. ?? 2010 SETAC.

  10. Methylmercury: Reproductive and behavioral effects on three generations of mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    Three generations of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) were fed either a control diet or a diet containing 0.5 ppm mercury in the form of methylmercury. The levels of mercury in adult tissues and eggs remained about the same over 3 generations. The methylmercury diet had no effect on adult weights or weight changes during the reproductive season. Females fed a diet containing 0.5 ppm mercury laid a greater percentage of their eggs outside their nestboxes than did controls, and also laid fewer eggs and produced fewer ducklings. Methylmercury in the diet appeared to result in a small amount of eggshell thinning. Ducklings from parents fed methylmercury were less responsive than, controls to tape-recorded maternal calls, but were hyper-responsive to a frightening stimulus in avoidance tests; there were no significant differences in locomotor activity in an open-field test.

  11. Effect of Lycium bararum polysaccharides on methylmercury-induced abnormal differentiation of hippocampal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jian-Ying; Chen, Wei-Wei; Cui, Jing; Wang, Hao; Chao, Ci; Lu, Zhi-Yan; Bi, Yong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the effects of a general extract of Lycium bararum polysaccharides (LBPs) on methylmercury (MeHg)-induced damage in hippocampus neural stem cells (hNSCs). The hippocampal tissues of embryonic day 16 Sprague-Dawley rats were extracted for the isolation, purification and cloning of hNSCs. Following passage and proliferation for 10 days, the cells were allocated at random into the following groups: Control, LBPs, MeHg and MeHg + LBPs. MTT and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2)/glial fibrillary acidic protein/Hoechst immunofluorescence tests were performed to detect the differentiation and growth of hNSCs in the various groups. The differentiation rate of MeHg-treated hNSCs and the perimeter of MAP-2-positive neurons were 3.632±0.63% and 62.36±5.58 µm, respectively, significantly lower compared with the control group values of 6.500±0.81% and 166±8.16 µm (P<0.05). Furthermore, the differentiation rate and the perimeter of MAP-2-positive neurons in LBPs groups cells was 7.75±0.59% and 253.3±11.21 µm, respectively, significantly higher compared with the control group (P<0.05). The same parameters in the MeHg + LBPs group were 5.92±0.98% and 111.9±6.07 µm, respectively, significantly higher than the MeHg group (P<0.05). The astrocyte differentiation rates in the MeHg and MeHg + LBPs group were 41.19±2.14 and 34.58±1.70, respectively (P<0.05). These results suggest that LBPs may promote the generation and development of new neurons and inhibit the MeHg-induced abnormal differentiation of astrocytes. Thus, LBPs may be considered to be a potential new treatment for MeHg-induced neurotoxicity in hNSCs. PMID:27446261

  12. Maternal transfer of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in aquatic and terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed

    Saxton, Heidi J; Goodman, James R; Collins, Jeffrey N; Black, Frank J

    2013-11-01

    The transfer of mercury from females to their offspring plays an important role in mercury accumulation and toxicity during early development. To quantify the transfer of inorganic mercury and methylmercury from female arthropods to their eggs, the authors collected and analyzed brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana), wolf spiders (Alopecosa spp.), and their attached eggs from aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA. Essentially all of the mercury in both the female brine shrimp and their eggs was methylmercury (94 ± 17% and 90 ± 21%, respectively). The brine shrimp eggs had methylmercury concentrations that were 84 ± 2% lower than in the females, reflecting the fact that females transferred 45 ± 4% of their total body mass but only 11 ± 3% of their methylmercury burden to their eggs. As a result of this sequestration, the concentration of methylmercury in the female brine shrimp increased by 62 ± 8% during egg formation. The percentage of the total mercury that was methylmercury in female wolf spiders (77 ± 21%) was similar to that in their egg masses (81 ± 19%), indicating similar maternal transfer efficiencies for inorganic mercury and methylmercury in these invertebrates. The concentration of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in the female spiders was the same as in their eggs. These arachnids transferred 48 ± 9% of their total body mass, 55 ± 13% of their inorganic mercury, and 50 ± 9% of their methylmercury to their egg masses. Thus, female wolf spiders do not have the ability to reduce the transfer of methylmercury to their eggs, nor does this process represent an important pathway for the depuration of mercury. The present study demonstrates that although some arthropods have mechanisms to minimize the transfer of methylmercury to their eggs and reduce the potential for mercury toxicity during early development, other arthropods do not. PMID:23939924

  13. Maternal transfer of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in aquatic and terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed

    Saxton, Heidi J; Goodman, James R; Collins, Jeffrey N; Black, Frank J

    2013-11-01

    The transfer of mercury from females to their offspring plays an important role in mercury accumulation and toxicity during early development. To quantify the transfer of inorganic mercury and methylmercury from female arthropods to their eggs, the authors collected and analyzed brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana), wolf spiders (Alopecosa spp.), and their attached eggs from aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA. Essentially all of the mercury in both the female brine shrimp and their eggs was methylmercury (94 ± 17% and 90 ± 21%, respectively). The brine shrimp eggs had methylmercury concentrations that were 84 ± 2% lower than in the females, reflecting the fact that females transferred 45 ± 4% of their total body mass but only 11 ± 3% of their methylmercury burden to their eggs. As a result of this sequestration, the concentration of methylmercury in the female brine shrimp increased by 62 ± 8% during egg formation. The percentage of the total mercury that was methylmercury in female wolf spiders (77 ± 21%) was similar to that in their egg masses (81 ± 19%), indicating similar maternal transfer efficiencies for inorganic mercury and methylmercury in these invertebrates. The concentration of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in the female spiders was the same as in their eggs. These arachnids transferred 48 ± 9% of their total body mass, 55 ± 13% of their inorganic mercury, and 50 ± 9% of their methylmercury to their egg masses. Thus, female wolf spiders do not have the ability to reduce the transfer of methylmercury to their eggs, nor does this process represent an important pathway for the depuration of mercury. The present study demonstrates that although some arthropods have mechanisms to minimize the transfer of methylmercury to their eggs and reduce the potential for mercury toxicity during early development, other arthropods do not.

  14. Investigation of immunofluorescence cross-reactions against Trichinella spiralis by western blot (immunoblot) analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Robert, F; Weil, B; Kassis, N; Dupouy-Camet, J

    1996-01-01

    Immunofluorescence cross-reactions in Trichinella spiralis serodiagnosis are sometimes difficult to identify. We compared the results of an indirect immunofluorescence assay and the profiles obtained by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis for three groups of patients: 10 T. spiralis-infected patients, 10 patients with autoimmune diseases, and 7 patients with parasitic diseases other than trichinellosis. The degree of immunofluorescence cross-reaction was variable. Western blotting allowed us to differentiate Trichinella infection from other parasitic diseases. In 3 of 10 serum samples from patients with autoimmune diseases, bands which had the same sizes as Trichinella bands were observed, and they could correspond to shared epitopes such as heat shock proteins. PMID:8877138

  15. Immunofluorescence for detection of viral antigen in mice infected with Sendai virus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, E; Kinoshita, K; Muto, T; Nakagawa, M; Imaizumi, K

    1982-04-01

    Sendai virus infection transmitted by contact from cagemates was followed by virus titration and immunofluorescence. The virus grew in the respiratory tract and caused macroscopic lesions in all contact mice. The virus grew to a higher titer in the lung than in the trachea. Tracheal smears, however, were found to be the most suitable for the diagnosis of Sendai virus infection by immunofluorescence, since they contained a large number of cells with intense fluorescence. Diagnosis of Sendai virus infection was made by immunofluorescence within a few hours after autopsy made at early stages of infection.

  16. A brain proteome profile in rats exposed to methylmercury or thimerosal (ethylmercury).

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Souza, Vanessa Cristina; de Marco, Kátia Cristina; Laure, Hélen Julie; Rosa, José Cesar; Barbosa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to organomercurials has been associated with harmful effects on the central nervous system (CNS). However, the mechanisms underlying organomercurial-mediated neurotoxic effects need to be elucidated. Exposure to toxic elements may promote cellular modifications such as alterations in protein synthesis in an attempt to protect tissues and organs from damage. In this context, the use of a "proteomic profile" is an important tool to identify potential early biomarkers or targets indicative of neurotoxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate potential modifications in rat cerebral cell proteome following exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) or ethylmercury (EtHg). For MeHg exposure, animals were administered by gavage daily 140 µg/kg/d of Hg (as MeHg) for 60 d and sacrificed 24 h after the last treatment. For EtHg exposure, 800 µg/kg/d of Hg (as EtHg) was given intramuscularly (im) in a single dose and rats were sacrificed after 4 h. Control groups received saline either by gavage or im. After extraction of proteins from whole brain samples and separation by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), 26 differentially expressed proteins were identified from exposed animals by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF). Both MeHg and EtHg exposure induced an overexpression of calbindin, a protein that acts as a neuroprotective agent by (1) adjusting the concentration of Ca(2+) within cells and preventing neurodegenerative diseases and (2) decreasing expression of glutamine synthetase, a crucial protein involved in regulation of glutamate concentration in synaptic cleft. In contrast, expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD), a protein involved in antioxidant defense, was elevated in brain of MeHg-exposed animals. Taken together, our data provide new valuable information on the possible molecular mechanisms associated with MeHg- and EtHg-mediated toxicity in cerebral tissue. These observed protein alterations may be considered as

  17. Why dissolved organic matter (DOM) enhances photodegradation of methylmercury

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yun; Yin, Xiangping Lisa; Brooks, Scott C; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is known to degrade photochemically, but it remains unclear what roles naturally dissolved organic matter (DOM) and complexing organic ligands play in MeHg photodegradation. Here we investigate the rates and mechanisms of MeHg photodegradation using DOM samples with varying oxidation states and origins as well as organic ligands with known molecular structures. All DOM and organic ligands increased MeHg photodegradation under solar irradiation, but the first-order rate constants varied depending on the oxidation state of DOM and the type and concentration of the ligands. Compounds containing both thiols and aromatics (e.g., thiosalicylate and reduced DOM) increased MeHg degradation rates far greater than those containing only aromatic or thiol functional groups (e.g., salicylate or glutathione). Our results suggest that, among other factors, the synergistic effects of thiolate and aromatic moieties in DOM greatly enhance MeHg photodegradation.

  18. Environmental management with knowledge of uncertainty: a methylmercury case study.

    PubMed

    Hope, Bruce K; Lut, Agnes; Aldrich, Greg; Rubin, Jared

    2007-01-01

    In Oregon's Willamette River Basin, health advisories currently limit consumption of fish that have accumulated methylmercury to levels posing a potential health risk for humans. Under the Clean Water Act, these advisories represent an impairment of the beneficial use of fish consumption and create the requirement for a mercury total maximum daily load. A percent load reduction for total mercury was determined by comparing mercury levels in surface water to a water column guidance value linked to the protection of specified beneficial uses. In this case study, we discuss how probabilistic (Monte Carlo) methods were used to quantify uncertainty in the water column guidance value, how they provided decision makers with knowledge as to the probability of any given water column guidance value affording human health protection for methylmercury, and how this knowledge affected decisions as to a mercury load reduction for the Willamette River Basin. Through consultations with stakeholders, a water column guidance value of 0.92 ng/L (a median for higher trophic level fish) was chosen from among a suite of values of differing probabilities. The selected water column guidance value, when compared with ambient total mercury levels, indicated that a 50% probability of achieving the tissue criterion would require a load reduction of about 26%. Having and working with an explicit knowledge of uncertainty was not easy for many decision makers or stakeholders. However, such knowledge gave them more informed choices, a better understanding of what a specific choice of water column guidance value could mean in terms of achieving protectiveness, and led to a lower load reduction than suggested by a purely deterministic analysis. Nonetheless, more attention must be given to developing management, communication, and regulatory frameworks that can effectively use the greater knowledge of uncertainty afforded by probabilistic methods. PMID:17283603

  19. Reproduction in mallards exposed to dietary concentrations of methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Gary H; Hoffman, David J; Klimstra, Jon D; Stebbins, Katherine R

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to use mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) tested under controlled conditions to determine how much harm to reproduction resulted from various concentrations of mercury in eggs. Breeding pairs of mallards were fed a control diet or diets containing 1, 2, 4, or 8 microg/g mercury, as methylmercury chloride. Mean concentrations of mercury in eggs laid by parents fed 0, 1, 2, 4, or 8 microg/g mercury were 0.0, 1.6, 3.7, 5.9, and 14 microg/g mercury on a wet-weight basis. There were no signs of mercury poisoning in the adults, and fertility and hatching success of eggs were not affected by mercury. Survival of ducklings and the number of ducklings produced per female were reduced by the 4 and 8-microg/g dietary mercury treatments (that resulted in 5.9 and 14 microg/g mercury in their eggs, respectively). Ducklings from parents fed the various mercury diets were just as heavy as controls at hatching, but by 6 days of age ducklings whose parents had been fed 4 or 8 microg/g mercury weighed less than controls. Because we do not know if absorption of mercury from our diets would be the same as absorption from natural foods, the mercury concentrations we report in eggs may be more useful in extrapolating to possible harmful effects in nature than are the dietary levels we fed. We conclude that mallard reproduction does not appear to be particularly sensitive to methylmercury.

  20. Reproduction in mallards exposed to dietary concentrations of methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, Gary H.; Hoffman, David J.; Klimstra, Jon D.; Stebbins, Katherine R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to use mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) tested under controlled conditions to determine how much harm to reproduction resulted from various concentrations of mercury in eggs. Breeding pairs of mallards were fed a control diet or diets containing 1, 2, 4, or 8 μg/g mercury, as methylmercury chloride. Mean concentrations of mercury in eggs laid by parents fed 0, 1, 2, 4, or 8 μg/g mercury were 0.0, 1.6, 3.7, 5.9, and 14 μg/g mercury on a wet-weight basis. There were no signs of mercury poisoning in the adults, and fertility and hatching success of eggs were not affected by mercury. Survival of ducklings and the number of ducklings produced per female were reduced by the 4 and 8-μg/g dietary mercury treatments (that resulted in 5.9 and 14 μg/g mercury in their eggs, respectively). Ducklings from parents fed the various mercury diets were just as heavy as controls at hatching, but by 6 days of age ducklings whose parents had been fed 4 or 8 μg/g mercury weighed less than controls. Because we do not know if absorption of mercury from our diets would be the same as absorption from natural foods, the mercury concentrations we report in eggs may be more useful in extrapolating to possible harmful effects in nature than are the dietary levels we fed. We conclude that mallard reproduction does not appear to be particularly sensitive to methylmercury.

  1. Modulation of methylmercury uptake by methionine: Prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction in rat liver slices by a mimicry mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Daniel Henrique; Puntel, Robson Luiz; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Bohrer, Denise; Rocha, João Batista T.; de Vargas Barbosa, Nilda B.

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an ubiquitous environmental pollutant which is transported into the mammalian cells when present as the methylmercury-cysteine conjugate (MeHg–Cys). With special emphasis on hepatic cells, due to their particular propensity to accumulate an appreciable amount of Hg after exposure to MeHg, this study was performed to evaluate the effects of methionine (Met) on Hg uptake, reactive species (RS) formation, oxygen consumption and mitochondrial function/cellular viability in both liver slices and mitochondria isolated from these slices, after exposure to MeHg or the MeHg–Cys complex. The liver slices were pre-treated with Met (250 μM) 15 min before being exposed to MeHg (25 μM) or MeHg–Cys (25 μM each) for 30 min at 37 °C. The treatment with MeHg caused a significant increase in the Hg concentration in both liver slices and mitochondria isolated from liver slices. Moreover, the Hg uptake was higher in the group exposed to the MeHg–Cys complex. In the DCF (dichlorofluorescein) assay, the exposure to MeHg and MeHg–Cys produced a significant increase in DFC reactive species (DFC-RS) formation only in the mitochondria isolated from liver slices. As observed with Hg uptake, DFC-RS levels were significantly higher in the mitochondria treated with the MeHg–Cys complex compared to MeHg alone. MeHg exposure also caused a marked decrease in the oxygen consumption of liver slices when compared to the control group, and this effect was more pronounced in the liver slices treated with the MeHg–Cys complex. Similarly, the loss of mitochondrial activity/cell viability was greater in liver slices exposed to the MeHg–Cys complex when compared to slices treated only with MeHg. In all studied parameters, Met pre-treatment was effective in preventing the MeHg-and/or MeHg–Cys-induced toxicity in both liver slices and mitochondria. Part of the protection afforded by Met against MeHg may be related to a direct interaction with MeHg or to the

  2. Modulation of methylmercury uptake by methionine: Prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction in rat liver slices by a mimicry mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Daniel Henrique; Puntel, Robson Luiz; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Bohrer, Denise; Rocha, Joao Batista T.; Vargas Barbosa, Nilda B. de

    2011-04-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an ubiquitous environmental pollutant which is transported into the mammalian cells when present as the methylmercury-cysteine conjugate (MeHg-Cys). With special emphasis on hepatic cells, due to their particular propensity to accumulate an appreciable amount of Hg after exposure to MeHg, this study was performed to evaluate the effects of methionine (Met) on Hg uptake, reactive species (RS) formation, oxygen consumption and mitochondrial function/cellular viability in both liver slices and mitochondria isolated from these slices, after exposure to MeHg or the MeHg-Cys complex. The liver slices were pre-treated with Met (250 {mu}M) 15 min before being exposed to MeHg (25 {mu}M) or MeHg-Cys (25 {mu}M each) for 30 min at 37 {sup o}C. The treatment with MeHg caused a significant increase in the Hg concentration in both liver slices and mitochondria isolated from liver slices. Moreover, the Hg uptake was higher in the group exposed to the MeHg-Cys complex. In the DCF (dichlorofluorescein) assay, the exposure to MeHg and MeHg-Cys produced a significant increase in DFC reactive species (DFC-RS) formation only in the mitochondria isolated from liver slices. As observed with Hg uptake, DFC-RS levels were significantly higher in the mitochondria treated with the MeHg-Cys complex compared to MeHg alone. MeHg exposure also caused a marked decrease in the oxygen consumption of liver slices when compared to the control group, and this effect was more pronounced in the liver slices treated with the MeHg-Cys complex. Similarly, the loss of mitochondrial activity/cell viability was greater in liver slices exposed to the MeHg-Cys complex when compared to slices treated only with MeHg. In all studied parameters, Met pre-treatment was effective in preventing the MeHg- and/or MeHg-Cys-induced toxicity in both liver slices and mitochondria. Part of the protection afforded by Met against MeHg may be related to a direct interaction with MeHg or to the competition

  3. A bout analysis reveals age-related methylmercury neurotoxicity and nimodipine neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Andrew Nathanael; Cummings, Craig; Pope, Derek; Hoffman, Daniel; Newland, M Christopher

    2016-09-15

    Age-related deficits in motor and cognitive functioning may be driven by perturbations in calcium (Ca(2+)) homeostasis in nerve terminals, mechanisms that are also thought to mediate the neurotoxicity of methylmercury (MeHg). Calcium-channel blockers (CCBs) protect against MeHg toxicity in adult mice, but little is known about their efficacy in other age groups. Two age groups of BALB/c mice were exposed to 0 or 1.2mg/kg/day MeHg and 0 or 20mg/kg/day of the CCB nimodipine for approximately 8.5 months. Adults began exposure on postnatal day (PND) 72 and the retired breeders on PND 296. High-rate operant behavior was maintained under a percentile schedule, which helped to decouple response rate from reinforcer rate. Responding was analyzed using a log-survivor bout analysis approach that partitioned behavior into high-rate bouts separated by pauses. MeHg-induced mortality did not depend on age but nimodipine neuroprotection was age-dependent, with poorer protection occurring in older mice. Within-bout response rate (a marker of sensorimotor function) was more sensitive to MeHg toxicity than bout-initiation rate (a marker of motivation). Within-bout rate declined almost 2 months prior to overt signs of toxicity for the MeHg-only retired breeders but not adults, suggesting greater delay to toxicity in younger animals. Motor-based decrements also appeared in relatively healthy adult MeHg+NIM animals. Aging appeared to alter the processes underlying Ca(2+) homeostasis thereby diminishing protection by nimodipine, even in mice that have not reached senescence. The study of MeHg exposure presents an experimental model by which to study potential mechanisms of aging. PMID:27196441

  4. Evidences for a role of glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4) in methylmercury induced neurotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zemolin, A P P; Meinerz, D F; de Paula, M T; Mariano, D O C; Rocha, J B T; Pereira, A B; Posser, T; Franco, J L

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated the activity and expression of antioxidant enzymes in the cerebellum and cortex of Swiss adult male mice exposed to methylmercury (MeHg) in drinking water (40mg/L) during 21 days. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) were determined spectrophotometrically. The expression (protein levels) of GPx1 and GPx4 isoforms, TrxR1 as well as heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) were evaluated using specific antibodies and normalized by actin levels. The exposure of mice to MeHg caused a significant impairment in locomotors performance in the open field test (crossings and rearing). This result was followed by a significant reduction of GPx and TrxR activities in the cerebellum and cortex when compared to untreated animals. We also observed a substantial decrease in GPx1, GPx4 and TrxR1 protein levels in the cerebellum, while in the cerebral cortex, only GPx4 and TrxR1 were decreased after MeHg treatment. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes GR, GST, CAT and SOD were increased in the cerebellum after MeHg administration to mice. In contrast, only CAT was increased in the cerebral cortex of MeHg-treated animals. The expression of HSP70 was up-regulated only in the cerebellum where MeHg-exposed mice showed a significant increase in the immunocontent of HSP70 when compared to controls. This is the first report showing a role for GPx4 in the neurotoxicity induced by MeHg in vivo. In addition, our data indicates that the selenoproteins GPx and TrxR as main targets during MeHg exposure, which may be considered in biomarker studies.

  5. Whole-lake nitrate addition for control of methylmercury in mercury-contaminated Onondaga Lake, NY.

    PubMed

    Matthews, David A; Babcock, David B; Nolan, John G; Prestigiacomo, Anthony R; Effler, Steven W; Driscoll, Charles T; Todorova, Svetoslava G; Kuhr, Kenneth M

    2013-08-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) strongly bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs resulting in exposure to humans and wildlife through consumption of fish. Production of MeHg is promoted by anaerobic conditions and the supply of inorganic Hg (Hg(2+)), sulfate (SO4(2-)), and labile organic carbon. The anaerobic sediments of stratified lakes are particularly active zones for methylation of Hg(2+) and can be an important source of MeHg to the water column during summer anoxia and fall turnover. Nitrate (NO3(-)) addition has recently been proposed as a novel approach for the control of MeHg accumulation in the hypolimnia of Hg-contaminated lakes. In 2011, a whole-lake NO3(-) addition pilot test was conducted in Hg-contaminated Onondaga Lake, NY with the objective of limiting release of MeHg from the pelagic sediments to the hypolimnion through maintenance of NO3(-)-N concentrations >1mgN/L. A liquid calcium-nitrate solution was added to the hypolimnion as a neutrally buoyant plume approximately three times per week during the summer stratification interval. Maximum hypolimnetic concentrations of MeHg and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) decreased 94% and 95% from 2009 levels, suggesting increased sorption to Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides in surficial sediments as the regulating mechanism. Increased MeHg concentrations in the upper waters during fall turnover, which had been a generally recurring pattern, did not occur in 2011, resulting in decreased exposure of aquatic organisms to MeHg. Over the 1992-2011 interval, the hypolimnetic NO3(-) supply explained 85% and 95% of the interannual variations in hypolimnetic accumulations of SRP and MeHg, respectively.

  6. Polychlorinated biphenyls and methylmercury act synergistically to reduce rat brain dopamine content in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bemis, J C; Seegal, R F

    1999-01-01

    Consumption of contaminated Great Lakes fish by pregnant women is associated with decreased birth weight and deficits in cognitive function in their infants and children. These fish contain many known and suspected anthropogenic neurotoxicants, making it difficult to determine which contaminant(s) are responsible for the observed deficits. We have undertaken a series of experiments to determine the relevant toxicants by comparing the neurotoxic effects of two of these contaminants--polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and methylmercury (MeHg)--both of which are recognized neurotoxicants. Striatal punches obtained from adult rat brain were exposed to PCBs only, MeHg only, or the two in combination, and tissue and media concentrations of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Exposure to PCBs only reduced tissue DA and elevated media DA in a dose-dependent fashion. Exposure to MeHg only did not significantly affect either measure. However, when striatal punches were simultaneously exposed to PCBs and MeHg, there were significantly greater decreases in tissue DA concentrations and elevations in media DA than those caused by PCBs only, in the absence of changes in media lactate dehydrogenase concentrations. Elevations in both tissue and media 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid concentrations were also observed. We suggest that the significant interactions between these two toxicants may be due to a common site of action (i.e., toxicant-induced increases in intracellular calcium and changes in second messenger systems) that influences DA function. The synergism between these contaminants suggests that future revisions of fish-consumption guidelines should consider contaminant interactions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10544155

  7. A bout analysis reveals age-related methylmercury neurotoxicity and nimodipine neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Andrew Nathanael; Cummings, Craig; Pope, Derek; Hoffman, Daniel; Newland, M Christopher

    2016-09-15

    Age-related deficits in motor and cognitive functioning may be driven by perturbations in calcium (Ca(2+)) homeostasis in nerve terminals, mechanisms that are also thought to mediate the neurotoxicity of methylmercury (MeHg). Calcium-channel blockers (CCBs) protect against MeHg toxicity in adult mice, but little is known about their efficacy in other age groups. Two age groups of BALB/c mice were exposed to 0 or 1.2mg/kg/day MeHg and 0 or 20mg/kg/day of the CCB nimodipine for approximately 8.5 months. Adults began exposure on postnatal day (PND) 72 and the retired breeders on PND 296. High-rate operant behavior was maintained under a percentile schedule, which helped to decouple response rate from reinforcer rate. Responding was analyzed using a log-survivor bout analysis approach that partitioned behavior into high-rate bouts separated by pauses. MeHg-induced mortality did not depend on age but nimodipine neuroprotection was age-dependent, with poorer protection occurring in older mice. Within-bout response rate (a marker of sensorimotor function) was more sensitive to MeHg toxicity than bout-initiation rate (a marker of motivation). Within-bout rate declined almost 2 months prior to overt signs of toxicity for the MeHg-only retired breeders but not adults, suggesting greater delay to toxicity in younger animals. Motor-based decrements also appeared in relatively healthy adult MeHg+NIM animals. Aging appeared to alter the processes underlying Ca(2+) homeostasis thereby diminishing protection by nimodipine, even in mice that have not reached senescence. The study of MeHg exposure presents an experimental model by which to study potential mechanisms of aging.

  8. Wheat germ agglutinin as a counterstain for immunofluorescence studies of equine hoof lamellae.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robert K; Galantino-Homer, Hannah L

    2014-09-01

    Equine laminitis is a common, painful, debilitating condition of the hoof that is a leading cause of disability in horses, often necessitating euthanasia. The equine hoof represents an extreme evolutionary adaptation of an epidermal structure homologous to the human or murine nail units. Immunohistochemistry is frequently utilized in the study of the pathophysiology of laminitis. The complex, multilayered, extensively interdigitated epidermal-dermal lamellar interface renders precise interpretation of immunofluorescence localization difficult, especially when effective technique and reagents render non-reactive tissues completely dark. Fluorescent-conjugated wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) selectively labels dermal extracellular matrix fibres and epidermal cell membranes in tissue sections of horse hoof lamellae, is compatible with indirect immunofluorescence and augments interpretation of indirect immunofluorescence antigen localization. The current report details the use of WGA as a rapid, simple, economical counterstain for immunofluorescence studies of the equine hoof and may have application to other complex epidermal tissue structures. PMID:25040657

  9. [Titration of antibodies to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus by the method of indirect immunofluorescence].

    PubMed

    Sheĭnbergas, M M; Vorob'eva, Z N

    1975-01-01

    Antibody to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was determined by the indirect immunofluorescence test in immune sera of guinea pigs and immune ascitic fluids of rats and mice. Among 135 patients with aseptic meningitis serum antibody was found in 11 patients in titers of 1 : 64 to 1 : 128 and in the cerebro-spinal fluid of these patients in considerably lower titers. By the indirect immunofluorescence test antibody in maximum titers was found early after the appearance of meningeal symptoms.

  10. Identification of Hog Cholera Viral Antigen by Immunofluorescence. Application as a Diagnostic and Assay Method.

    PubMed

    Mengeling, W L; Pirtle, E C; Torrey, J P

    1963-10-01

    In the absence of detectable cytologic changes in hog cholera virus-infected tissue culture cells, hog cholera viral antigen was readily detected by immunofluorescence. The ability to detect hog cholera viral antigen by this method allowed for determination of infectivity titers and also for titration of homologous antibody. Immunofluorescence made possible the identification, in tissue culture, of hog cholera virus from blood, serum, and spleen extracts of experimentally infected swine. Further applications of this method and its limitations are being investigated.

  11. Importance of anticomplement immunofluorescence antibody titration for diagnosing varicella-zoster virus infection in Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, S; Baba, M; Ogata, M; Nozaki, H; Okuaki, A; Nakamura, S

    1986-11-01

    Anticomplement Immunofluorescence was used for antibody titration against varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in 43 patients with peripheral facial palsy. Nine of 31 patients (29%) with Bell's palsy and eight of 12 patients (75%) with Ramsey-Hunt syndrome had anticomplement immunofluorescence antibody titres of greater than or equal to 1/10. On the other hand, none of 14 patients with herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection and 51 healthy adults showed anticomplement immunofluorescence antibody titres of greater than or equal to 1/10. The anticomplement immunofluorescence antibody titre in two patients with Ramsey-Hunt syndrome increased later and decreased sooner than the indirect immunofluorescence antibody titre, becoming undetectable at 66 and 104 days, respectively, after onset of the disease. There was no cross reaction between anti-VZV and anti-HSV antibodies in the patients who showed a positive antibody rise for VZV. As the acute stage of VZV infection is obscure in the patients with peripheral facial palsy without herpes the screening of anticomplement immunofluorescence antibody to VZV at titres greater than or equal to 1/10 may be useful for the diagnosis of VZV infection in patients with peripheral facial palsy.

  12. Variations of attractors and wavelet spectra of the immunofluorescence distributions for women in the pregnant period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galich, Nikolay E.

    2008-07-01

    Communication contains the description of the immunology data treatment. New nonlinear methods of immunofluorescence statistical analysis of peripheral blood neutrophils have been developed. We used technology of respiratory burst reaction of DNA fluorescence in the neutrophils cells nuclei due to oxidative activity. The histograms of photon count statistics the radiant neutrophils populations' in flow cytometry experiments are considered. Distributions of the fluorescence flashes frequency as functions of the fluorescence intensity are analyzed. Statistic peculiarities of histograms set for women in the pregnant period allow dividing all histograms on the three classes. The classification is based on three different types of smoothing and long-range scale averaged immunofluorescence distributions, their bifurcation and wavelet spectra. Heterogeneity peculiarities of long-range scale immunofluorescence distributions and peculiarities of wavelet spectra allow dividing all histograms on three groups. First histograms group belongs to healthy donors. Two other groups belong to donors with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Some of the illnesses are not diagnosed by standards biochemical methods. Medical standards and statistical data of the immunofluorescence histograms for identifications of health and illnesses are interconnected. Peculiarities of immunofluorescence for women in pregnant period are classified. Health or illness criteria are connected with statistics features of immunofluorescence histograms. Neutrophils populations' fluorescence presents the sensitive clear indicator of health status.

  13. Freshwater discharges drive high levels of methylmercury in Arctic marine biota.

    PubMed

    Schartup, Amina T; Balcom, Prentiss H; Soerensen, Anne L; Gosnell, Kathleen J; Calder, Ryan S D; Mason, Robert P; Sunderland, Elsie M

    2015-09-22

    Elevated levels of neurotoxic methylmercury in Arctic food-webs pose health risks for indigenous populations that consume large quantities of marine mammals and fish. Estuaries provide critical hunting and fishing territory for these populations, and, until recently, benthic sediment was thought to be the main methylmercury source for coastal fish. New hydroelectric developments are being proposed in many northern ecosystems, and the ecological impacts of this industry relative to accelerating climate changes are poorly characterized. Here we evaluate the competing impacts of climate-driven changes in northern ecosystems and reservoir flooding on methylmercury production and bioaccumulation through a case study of a stratified sub-Arctic estuarine fjord in Labrador, Canada. Methylmercury bioaccumulation in zooplankton is higher than in midlatitude ecosystems. Direct measurements and modeling show that currently the largest methylmercury source is production in oxic surface seawater. Water-column methylation is highest in stratified surface waters near the river mouth because of the stimulating effects of terrestrial organic matter on methylating microbes. We attribute enhanced biomagnification in plankton to a thin layer of marine snow widely observed in stratified systems that concentrates microbial methylation and multiple trophic levels of zooplankton in a vertically restricted zone. Large freshwater inputs and the extensive Arctic Ocean continental shelf mean these processes are likely widespread and will be enhanced by future increases in water-column stratification, exacerbating high biological methylmercury concentrations. Soil flooding experiments indicate that near-term changes expected from reservoir creation will increase methylmercury inputs to the estuary by 25-200%, overwhelming climate-driven changes over the next decade.

  14. Freshwater discharges drive high levels of methylmercury in Arctic marine biota

    PubMed Central

    Schartup, Amina T.; Balcom, Prentiss H.; Soerensen, Anne L.; Gosnell, Kathleen J.; Calder, Ryan S. D.; Mason, Robert P.; Sunderland, Elsie M.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of neurotoxic methylmercury in Arctic food-webs pose health risks for indigenous populations that consume large quantities of marine mammals and fish. Estuaries provide critical hunting and fishing territory for these populations, and, until recently, benthic sediment was thought to be the main methylmercury source for coastal fish. New hydroelectric developments are being proposed in many northern ecosystems, and the ecological impacts of this industry relative to accelerating climate changes are poorly characterized. Here we evaluate the competing impacts of climate-driven changes in northern ecosystems and reservoir flooding on methylmercury production and bioaccumulation through a case study of a stratified sub-Arctic estuarine fjord in Labrador, Canada. Methylmercury bioaccumulation in zooplankton is higher than in midlatitude ecosystems. Direct measurements and modeling show that currently the largest methylmercury source is production in oxic surface seawater. Water-column methylation is highest in stratified surface waters near the river mouth because of the stimulating effects of terrestrial organic matter on methylating microbes. We attribute enhanced biomagnification in plankton to a thin layer of marine snow widely observed in stratified systems that concentrates microbial methylation and multiple trophic levels of zooplankton in a vertically restricted zone. Large freshwater inputs and the extensive Arctic Ocean continental shelf mean these processes are likely widespread and will be enhanced by future increases in water-column stratification, exacerbating high biological methylmercury concentrations. Soil flooding experiments indicate that near-term changes expected from reservoir creation will increase methylmercury inputs to the estuary by 25–200%, overwhelming climate-driven changes over the next decade. PMID:26351688

  15. Freshwater discharges drive high levels of methylmercury in Arctic marine biota.

    PubMed

    Schartup, Amina T; Balcom, Prentiss H; Soerensen, Anne L; Gosnell, Kathleen J; Calder, Ryan S D; Mason, Robert P; Sunderland, Elsie M

    2015-09-22

    Elevated levels of neurotoxic methylmercury in Arctic food-webs pose health risks for indigenous populations that consume large quantities of marine mammals and fish. Estuaries provide critical hunting and fishing territory for these populations, and, until recently, benthic sediment was thought to be the main methylmercury source for coastal fish. New hydroelectric developments are being proposed in many northern ecosystems, and the ecological impacts of this industry relative to accelerating climate changes are poorly characterized. Here we evaluate the competing impacts of climate-driven changes in northern ecosystems and reservoir flooding on methylmercury production and bioaccumulation through a case study of a stratified sub-Arctic estuarine fjord in Labrador, Canada. Methylmercury bioaccumulation in zooplankton is higher than in midlatitude ecosystems. Direct measurements and modeling show that currently the largest methylmercury source is production in oxic surface seawater. Water-column methylation is highest in stratified surface waters near the river mouth because of the stimulating effects of terrestrial organic matter on methylating microbes. We attribute enhanced biomagnification in plankton to a thin layer of marine snow widely observed in stratified systems that concentrates microbial methylation and multiple trophic levels of zooplankton in a vertically restricted zone. Large freshwater inputs and the extensive Arctic Ocean continental shelf mean these processes are likely widespread and will be enhanced by future increases in water-column stratification, exacerbating high biological methylmercury concentrations. Soil flooding experiments indicate that near-term changes expected from reservoir creation will increase methylmercury inputs to the estuary by 25-200%, overwhelming climate-driven changes over the next decade. PMID:26351688

  16. Mercury Accumulation, Structural Damages, and Antioxidant and Immune Status Changes in the Gilthead Seabream (Sparus aurata L.) Exposed to Methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Guardiola, F A; Chaves-Pozo, E; Espinosa, C; Romero, D; Meseguer, J; Cuesta, A; Esteban, M A

    2016-05-01

    In aquatic systems, mercury (Hg) is an environmental contaminant that causes acute and chronic damage to multiple organs. In fish, practically all of the organic Hg found is in the form of methylmercury (MeHg), which has been associated with animal and human health problems. This study evaluates the impact of waterborne-exposure to sublethal concentrations of MeHg (10 μg L(-1)) in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata). Hg was seen to accumulate in liver and muscle, and histopathological damage to skin and liver was detected. Fish exposed to MeHg showed a decreased biological antioxidant potential and increased levels of the reactive oxygen molecules compared with the values found in control fish (nonexposed). Increased liver antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase and catalase) were detected in 2 day-exposed fish with respect to the values of control fish. However, fish exposed to MeHg for 10 days showed liver antioxidant enzyme levels similar to those of the control fish but had increased hepato-somatic index and histopathological alterations in liver and skin. Serum complement levels were higher in fish exposed to MeHg for 30 days than in control fish. Moreover, head-kidney leukocyte activities increased, although only phagocytosis and peroxidase activities showed a significant increase after 10 and 30 days, respectively. The data show that 30 days of exposure to waterborne MeHg provokes more significant changes in fish than a short-term exposure of 2 or 10 days. PMID:26906265

  17. Immunofluorescence on paraffin embedded renal biopsies: Experience of a tertiary care center with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Geetika; Singh, Lavleen; Ghosh, Ranajoy; Nath, Devajit; Dinda, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    AIM To describe the technique of immunofluorescence on paraffin embedded tissue sections and discuss the potential pitfalls with an in depth review of literature. METHODS Immunofluorescence is integral to diagnostic renal pathology. Immunofluorescence on paraffin embedded renal biopsies (IF-P) after enzyme treatment has been described in literature, however has not found widespread use in renal pathology laboratories. In our laboratory proteinase K digestion of paraffin embedded renal biopsy material was standardized and applied prospectively in cases where immunofluorescence on fresh frozen tissue was non contributory or not possible. Diagnostic utility was assessed and in a cohort of cases comparison of intensity of staining with routine immunofluorescence was performed. RESULTS Over the 5-year study period, of the 3141 renal biopsies received IF-P was performed on 246 cases (7.7%) and was interpretable with optimal digestion in 214 cases (6.8%). It was of diagnostic utility in the majority of cases, which predominantly included glomerular disease. Non-diagnostic IF-P was found in membranous nephropathy (2 of 11 cases), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (2 of 32 cases), lupus nephritis (1 of 25 cases), post infectious glomerulonephritis (1 of 11 cases) and chronic glomerulonephritis (3 of 8 cases). Comparing cases with both routine IF and IF-P, 35 of 37 showed either equal intensity or a minor difference in intensity of staining (1+) for the diagnostic immunoglobulin/complement. Technically assessment of immunofluorescence on the paraffin embedded tissue was found to be easier with clearly observed morphology, however a false positive staining pattern was observed in under-digested tissue. CONCLUSION As a “salvage” technique, immunofluorescence on paraffin embedded renal biopsies is of great diagnostic utility, however not without pitfalls. PMID:27648410

  18. Immunofluorescence on paraffin embedded renal biopsies: Experience of a tertiary care center with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Geetika; Singh, Lavleen; Ghosh, Ranajoy; Nath, Devajit; Dinda, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    AIM To describe the technique of immunofluorescence on paraffin embedded tissue sections and discuss the potential pitfalls with an in depth review of literature. METHODS Immunofluorescence is integral to diagnostic renal pathology. Immunofluorescence on paraffin embedded renal biopsies (IF-P) after enzyme treatment has been described in literature, however has not found widespread use in renal pathology laboratories. In our laboratory proteinase K digestion of paraffin embedded renal biopsy material was standardized and applied prospectively in cases where immunofluorescence on fresh frozen tissue was non contributory or not possible. Diagnostic utility was assessed and in a cohort of cases comparison of intensity of staining with routine immunofluorescence was performed. RESULTS Over the 5-year study period, of the 3141 renal biopsies received IF-P was performed on 246 cases (7.7%) and was interpretable with optimal digestion in 214 cases (6.8%). It was of diagnostic utility in the majority of cases, which predominantly included glomerular disease. Non-diagnostic IF-P was found in membranous nephropathy (2 of 11 cases), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (2 of 32 cases), lupus nephritis (1 of 25 cases), post infectious glomerulonephritis (1 of 11 cases) and chronic glomerulonephritis (3 of 8 cases). Comparing cases with both routine IF and IF-P, 35 of 37 showed either equal intensity or a minor difference in intensity of staining (1+) for the diagnostic immunoglobulin/complement. Technically assessment of immunofluorescence on the paraffin embedded tissue was found to be easier with clearly observed morphology, however a false positive staining pattern was observed in under-digested tissue. CONCLUSION As a “salvage” technique, immunofluorescence on paraffin embedded renal biopsies is of great diagnostic utility, however not without pitfalls.

  19. Reservoir stratification affects methylmercury levels in river water, plankton, and fish downstream from Balbina hydroelectric dam, Amazonas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Daniele; Forsberg, Bruce R; Amaral, João H F; Leitão, Rafael P; Py-Daniel, Sarah S; Bastos, Wanderley R; Malm, Olaf

    2014-01-21

    The river downstream from a dam can be more contaminated by mercury than the reservoir itself. However, it is not clear how far the contamination occurs downstream. We investigated the seasonal variation of methylmercury levels in the Balbina reservoir and how they correlated with the levels encountered downstream from the dam. Water, plankton, and fishes were collected upstream and at sites between 0.5 and 250 km downstream from the dam during four expeditions in 2011 and 2012. Variations in thermal stratification of the reservoir influenced the methylmercury levels in the reservoir and in the river downstream. Uniform depth distributions of methylmercury and oxygen encountered in the poorly stratified reservoir during the rainy season collections coincided with uniformly low methylmercury levels along the river downstream from the dam. During dry season collections, the reservoir was strongly stratified, and anoxic hypolimnion water with high methylmercury levels was exported downstream. Methylmercury levels declined gradually to 200 km downstream. In general, the methylmercury levels in plankton and fishes downstream from the dam were higher than those upstream. Higher methylmercury levels observed 200-250 km downstream from the dam during flooding season campaigns may reflect the greater inflow from tributaries and flooding of natural wetlands that occurred at this time.

  20. Measuring Temporal Variability of Methylmercury and Methane in the Pore Waters of a Chesapeake Bay Tidal Marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, K. R.; Oster, J.; Lapham, L.; Heyes, A.

    2015-12-01

    This study assesses the use of OsmoSampler technology to monitor methylmercury production in a tidal marsh and examines temporal variability of methylmercury in relation to controlling factors. We collected pore water samples in a Chesapeake Bay marsh using continuous pore-fluid sampling devices called OsmoSamplers. OsmoSampler technology has not previously been used to investigate mercury cycling. We designed systems using OsmoSamplers to collect pore water samples for methylmercury, methane, chloride, and sulfate analysis, sampling in a vegetated area and an area devegetated by clipping. Samples were collected over a 27 day period and stored in coils to create a temporal data set of in situ concentrations. This time series allows us to explore the methane-methylmercury connection and the effects of vegetation removal on methylmercury production. Some methanogens are known to methylate mercury, but the relative importance of the methane community in mercury methylation is not well understood. We hypothesized a positive correlation between methane and methylmercury production and a decrease in methylmercury production corresponding to vegetation removal. We also sought to demonstrate the feasibility of using OsmoSamplers to look at methylmercury flux in relation to these controls on mercury methylation. This study is a preliminary exploration of this technology in a marsh environment. Using our system we have successfully collected pore water samples. We present the temporal variability of measured concentrations with a discussion of adjustments for future long-term deployment.

  1. Sources of Mercury Exposure for U.S. Seafood Consumers: Implications for Policy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent policies attempting to reduce adverse effects of methylmercury exposure from fish consumption in the U.S. have targeted reductions in anthropogenic emissions from U.S. sources. Methods: We use models that simulate global atmospheric chemistry (GEOS-Chem); the fate, transp...

  2. Proteome profiling reveals regional protein alteration in cerebrum of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) exposed to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yueting; Yamamoto, Megumi; Figeys, Daniel; Ning, Zhibin; Chan, Hing Man

    2016-03-10

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is known to selectively damage the calcarine and precentral cortices along deep sulci and fissures in adult cases, but the detailed mechanism is still unclear. This study aims to identify and analyze the differential proteome expression in two regions of the cerebrum (the frontal lobe and the occipital lobe including the calcarine sulcus) of the common marmoset exposed to MeHg using a shot-gun proteomic approach. A total of 1045 and 1062 proteins were identified in the frontal lobe (FL) and occipital lobe (OL), of which, 62 and 89 proteins were found significantly changed with MeHg exposure. Functional enrichment/depletion analysis showed that the lipid metabolic process and proteolysis were affected in both two lobes. Functional changes in FL were characterized in cell cycle and cell division, sulfur compound metabolic process, microtubule-based process and glycerolipid metabolic process. In comparison, proteins were enriched in the functions of transport, carbohydrate metabolic process, chemical caused homeostasis and regulation of body fluid levels in OL. Pathway analysis predicted that vasopressin-regulated water reabsorption was disturbed in MeHg-treated FL. Our results showed that MeHg induced regional specific protein changes in FL and OL but with similar endpoint effects such as energy diminish and disruption of water transport. APOE and GPX1 were shown to be possible key proteins targeted by MeHg leading to multiple functional changes in OL. This is the first report of the whole proteome changes of primate cerebrum for MeHg neurotoxicity, and the results will contribute to the understanding of molecular basis of MeHg intoxication in humans. PMID:27012723

  3. Effects of photodemethylation on the methylmercury budget of boreal Norwegian lakes.

    PubMed

    Poste, Amanda E; Braaten, Hans Fredrik Veiteberg; de Wit, Heleen A; Sørensen, Kai; Larssen, Thorjørn

    2015-06-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in freshwater fish from southeastern Norway continue to increase, highlighting the need for a comprehensive understanding of MeHg sources, cycling, and degradation in the aquatic environment. The authors assessed the importance of photodemethylation in the MeHg budget of 4 Norwegian lakes. Photodemethylation rates were determined using incubation experiments with MeHg-spiked natural lake water. The authors determined full-spectrum exposure rates at all study sites and waveband-specific rates (photosynthetically active radiation, ultraviolet-A radiation, and ultraviolet-B radiation) at 1 clear-water (Sognsvann) and 1 humic (Langtjern) site. No significant differences in photodemethylation rates between the sites were found, and the authors' observed rates agreed with available literature for lake and wetland waters. The authors paired experimentally derived photodemethylation rates with lake-specific incident irradiation, light attenuation, and MeHg concentrations to estimate MeHg loss through photodemethylation for the study sites. For Langtjern, losses through photodemethylation equalled 27% of total annual inputs, highlighting the importance of photodemethylation in the MeHg budget. Furthermore, the authors assessed how changes in terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exported to freshwaters and climate-driven reductions in ice cover duration may affect MeHg losses through photodemethylation. Results suggest that future increases in DOC may lead to higher aqueous MeHg concentrations in boreal lakes due to increased DOC-associated MeHg inputs paired with significant decreases in the loss of MeHg through photodemethylation due to increased light attenuation.

  4. Methylmercury-induced inhibition of paraoxonase-1 (PON1)-implications for cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, G; Sonawane, B; Nath, R; Lewandowski, P

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) has been associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease in some but not all epidemiology studies. These inconsistent results may stem from the fact that exposure typically occurs in the context of fish consumption, which is also associated with cardioprotective factors such as omega-3 fatty acids. Mechanistic information may help to understand whether MeHg represents a risk to cardiovascular health. MeHg is a pro-oxidant that inactivates protein sulfhydryls. These biochemical effects may diminish critical antioxidant defense mechanism(s) involved in protecting against atherosclerosis. One such defense mechanism is paraoxonase-1 (PON1), an enzyme present on high-density lipoproteins and that prevents the oxidation of blood lipids and their deposition in vascular endothelium. PON1 is potentially useful as a clinical biomarker of cardiovascular risk, as well as a critical enzyme in the detoxification of certain organophosphate oxons. MeHg and other metals are known to inhibit PON1 activity in vitro. MeHg is associated with lowered serum PON1 activity in a fish-eating population. The implications of lowering PON1 are evaluated by predicting the shift in PON1 population distribution induced by various doses of MeHg. An MeHg dose of 0.3 μg/kg/d is estimated to decrease the population average PON1 level by 6.1% and to increase population risk of acute cardiovascular events by 9.7%. This evaluation provides a plausible mechanism for MeHg-induced cardiovascular risk and suggests means to quantify the risk. This case study exemplifies the use of upstream disease biomarkers to evaluate the additive effect of chemical toxicity with background disease processes in assessing human risk. PMID:25072822

  5. Identification and Prioritization of Management Practices to Reduce Methylmercury Exports from Wetlands and Irrigated Agricultural Lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, Stephen A.; Heim, Wesley A.

    2015-03-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta's (Delta) beneficial uses for humans and wildlife are impaired by elevated methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish. MeHg is a neurotoxin that bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs. The total maximum daily load (TMDL) implementation plan aimed at reducing MeHg in Delta fish obligates dischargers to conduct MeHg control studies. Over 150 stakeholders collaborated to identify 24 management practices (MPs) addressing MeHg nonpoint sources (NPS) in three categories: biogeochemistry (6), hydrology (14), and soil/vegetation (4). Land uses were divided into six categories: permanently and seasonally flooded wetlands, flooded and irrigated agricultural lands, floodplains, and brackish-fresh tidal marshes. Stakeholders scored MPs based on seven criteria: scientific certainty, costs, MeHg reduction potential, spatial applicability, technical capacity to implement, negative impacts to beneficial uses, and conflicting requirements. Semi-quantitative scoring for MPs applicable to each land use (totaling >400 individual scores) led to consensus-based prioritization. This process relied on practical experience from diverse and accomplished NPS stakeholders and synthesis of 17 previous studies. Results provide a comprehensive, stakeholder-driven prioritization of MPs for wetland and irrigated agricultural land managers. Final prioritization highlights the most promising MPs for practical application and control study, and a secondary set of MPs warranting further evaluation. MPs that address hydrology and soil/vegetation were prioritized because experiences were positive and implementation appeared more feasible. MeHg control studies will need to address the TMDL conundrum that MPs effective at reducing MeHg exports could both exacerbate MeHg exposure and contend with other management objectives on site.

  6. MRP2 involvement in renal proximal tubular elimination of methylmercury mediated by DMPS or DMSA

    SciTech Connect

    Zalups, Rudolfs K. Bridges, Christy C.

    2009-02-15

    2, 3-Dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonic acid (DMPS) and meso-2, 3-Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) are dithiols used to treat humans exposed to methylmercury (CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}). After treatment, significant amounts of mercury are eliminated rapidly from the kidneys and are excreted in urine. In the present study, we extended our previous studies by testing the hypothesis that MRP2 mediates the secretion of DMPS or DMSA S-conjugates of CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}. To test this hypothesis, the disposition of mercury was assessed in control and Mrp2-deficient (TR{sup -}) rats exposed intravenously to a 5.0-mg/kg dose of CH{sub 3}HgCl. Twenty-four and 28 h after exposure, groups of four control and four TR{sup -} rats were injected with saline, DMPS, or DMSA. Tissues were harvested 48 h later. Renal and hepatic contents of mercury were greater in saline-injected TR{sup -} rats than in controls. In contrast, the amounts of mercury excreted in urine and feces by TR{sup -} rats were less than those by controls. DMPS and DMSA significantly reduced the renal and hepatic content of mercury in both groups of rats, with the greatest reduction in controls. A significant increase in urinary and fecal excretion of mercury (which was greater in the controls) was also observed. Our findings in inside-out membrane vesicles prepared from hMRP2-transfected Sf9 cells show that uptake of DMPS and DMSA S-conjugates of CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} was greater in the vesicles containing hMRP2 than in control vesicles. Overall, these dispositional findings indicate that MRP2 does play a role in DMPS- and DMSA-mediated elimination of mercury from the kidney.

  7. Proteome profiling reveals regional protein alteration in cerebrum of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) exposed to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yueting; Yamamoto, Megumi; Figeys, Daniel; Ning, Zhibin; Chan, Hing Man

    2016-03-10

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is known to selectively damage the calcarine and precentral cortices along deep sulci and fissures in adult cases, but the detailed mechanism is still unclear. This study aims to identify and analyze the differential proteome expression in two regions of the cerebrum (the frontal lobe and the occipital lobe including the calcarine sulcus) of the common marmoset exposed to MeHg using a shot-gun proteomic approach. A total of 1045 and 1062 proteins were identified in the frontal lobe (FL) and occipital lobe (OL), of which, 62 and 89 proteins were found significantly changed with MeHg exposure. Functional enrichment/depletion analysis showed that the lipid metabolic process and proteolysis were affected in both two lobes. Functional changes in FL were characterized in cell cycle and cell division, sulfur compound metabolic process, microtubule-based process and glycerolipid metabolic process. In comparison, proteins were enriched in the functions of transport, carbohydrate metabolic process, chemical caused homeostasis and regulation of body fluid levels in OL. Pathway analysis predicted that vasopressin-regulated water reabsorption was disturbed in MeHg-treated FL. Our results showed that MeHg induced regional specific protein changes in FL and OL but with similar endpoint effects such as energy diminish and disruption of water transport. APOE and GPX1 were shown to be possible key proteins targeted by MeHg leading to multiple functional changes in OL. This is the first report of the whole proteome changes of primate cerebrum for MeHg neurotoxicity, and the results will contribute to the understanding of molecular basis of MeHg intoxication in humans.

  8. A physiologically based toxicokinetic model for methylmercury in female American kestrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.W.; Bennett, R.S.; Rossmann, R.; French, J.B.; Sappington, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) model was developed to describe the uptake, distribution, and elimination of methylmercury (CH 3Hg) in female American kestrels. The model consists of six tissue compartments corresponding to the brain, liver, kidney, gut, red blood cells, and remaining carcass. Additional compartments describe the elimination of CH3Hg to eggs and growing feathers. Dietary uptake of CH 3Hg was modeled as a diffusion-limited process, and the distribution of CH3Hg among compartments was assumed to be mediated by the flow of blood plasma. To the extent possible, model parameters were developed using information from American kestrels. Additional parameters were based on measured values for closely related species and allometric relationships for birds. The model was calibrated using data from dietary dosing studies with American kestrels. Good agreement between model simulations and measured CH3Hg concentrations in blood and tissues during the loading phase of these studies was obtained by fitting model parameters that control dietary uptake of CH 3Hg and possible hepatic demethylation. Modeled results tended to underestimate the observed effect of egg production on circulating levels of CH3Hg. In general, however, simulations were consistent with observed patterns of CH3Hg uptake and elimination in birds, including the dominant role of feather molt. This model could be used to extrapolate CH 3Hg kinetics from American kestrels to other bird species by appropriate reassignment of parameter values. Alternatively, when combined with a bioenergetics-based description, the model could be used to simulate CH 3Hg kinetics in a long-term environmental exposure. ?? 2010 SETAC.

  9. Simple analysis of total mercury and methylmercury in seafood using heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Keisuke; Anh, Hoang Thi Van; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Masaaki; Nakano, Atsuhiro; Yamamoto, Megumi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a simpler method for determining total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples by using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in the degreasing step. The fat in the samples was extracted by MIBK to the upper phase. T-Hg transferred into the water phase. This was followed by the extraction of MeHg from the water phase using HBr, CuCl2 and toluene. The MeHg fraction was reverse-extracted into L-cysteine-sodium acetate solution from toluene. The concentrations of T-Hg and MeHg were determined by heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry. Certified reference materials for T-Hg and MeHg in hair and fish were accurately measured using this method. This method was then applied to determine T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the muscle, liver and gonads of seafood for the risk assessment of MeHg exposure. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in squid eggs were 0.023 and 0.022 µg/g, and in squid nidamental glands 0.052 and 0.049 µg/g, respectively. The MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the eggs and nidamental glands of squid were 94.4% and 96.5%, respectively. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the gonads of sea urchins were 0.043 and 0.001 µg/g, respectively, with a MeHg/T-Hg ratio of 3.5%. We developed an efficient analytical method for T-Hg and MeHg using MIBK in the degreasing step. The new information on MeHg concentration and MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the egg or nidamental glands of squid and gonads of sea urchin will also be useful for risk assessment of mercury in seafood. PMID:27432235

  10. Tissue distribution and histopathological effects of dietary methylmercury in benthic grubby Myoxocephalus aenaeus

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, E.; Audet, C.

    1995-05-01

    There is a need to test deterministic models predicting the behavior and effects of chemicals on aquatic systems by conducting experiments with more than one trophic step at a time. This approach requires the set-up of an experimental food chain in pounds or mesocosm facilities which can be used for dietary uptake studies and assessment of sublethal stress induced by contaminated food. In the course of our current research program at the INRS marine mesocosms facilities, a model benthic food chain including inter- and sub-tidal species such as the mussel (Mytilus edulis), clam (Mya arenaria), starfish (Leptasterias polaris), polychaete (Nereis virens), amphipod (Gammarus sp.), gastropod (Buccinum undatum), and fishes (Pleuronectec americanus, Myoxocephalus aenaeus), is used for testing food uptake models and for the development of sublethal toxicity tests which could be used in the environmental assessment of coastal and estuarine waters. Among these test organisms, the grubby (M. aenaeus) is a small coastal fish (12-15 cm) characterized by a broad head. The grubby is tolerant of water temperature and salinity variations and lives on a wide variety of bottom strata at low depths. The grubby is carnivorous and consumes a wide variety of molluscs and the young of many species of fish. Because of its size, its estuarine and coastal distribution and its large spectrum of prey, this species was seen as an ideal fish to fit into our experimental food chain model. This paper reports a preliminary experiment designed to measure distribution of mercury in tissues and to test the response of various histopathological and biochemical stress indicators in grubby exposed to dietary contamination by methylmercury (MeHg) for a 20-day exposure period. MeHg was chosen because it is rapidly bioaccumulated by most living organisms and its toxicity has been studied for decades in numerous aquatic ecosystems. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. Identification and prioritization of management practices to reduce methylmercury exports from wetlands and irrigated agricultural lands.

    PubMed

    McCord, Stephen A; Heim, Wesley A

    2015-03-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta's (Delta) beneficial uses for humans and wildlife are impaired by elevated methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish. MeHg is a neurotoxin that bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs. The total maximum daily load (TMDL) implementation plan aimed at reducing MeHg in Delta fish obligates dischargers to conduct MeHg control studies. Over 150 stakeholders collaborated to identify 24 management practices (MPs) addressing MeHg nonpoint sources (NPS) in three categories: biogeochemistry (6), hydrology (14), and soil/vegetation (4). Land uses were divided into six categories: permanently and seasonally flooded wetlands, flooded and irrigated agricultural lands, floodplains, and brackish-fresh tidal marshes. Stakeholders scored MPs based on seven criteria: scientific certainty, costs, MeHg reduction potential, spatial applicability, technical capacity to implement, negative impacts to beneficial uses, and conflicting requirements. Semi-quantitative scoring for MPs applicable to each land use (totaling >400 individual scores) led to consensus-based prioritization. This process relied on practical experience from diverse and accomplished NPS stakeholders and synthesis of 17 previous studies. Results provide a comprehensive, stakeholder-driven prioritization of MPs for wetland and irrigated agricultural land managers. Final prioritization highlights the most promising MPs for practical application and control study, and a secondary set of MPs warranting further evaluation. MPs that address hydrology and soil/vegetation were prioritized because experiences were positive and implementation appeared more feasible. MeHg control studies will need to address the TMDL conundrum that MPs effective at reducing MeHg exports could both exacerbate MeHg exposure and contend with other management objectives on site. PMID:25566831

  12. Simple analysis of total mercury and methylmercury in seafood using heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Keisuke; Anh, Hoang Thi Van; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Masaaki; Nakano, Atsuhiro; Yamamoto, Megumi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a simpler method for determining total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples by using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in the degreasing step. The fat in the samples was extracted by MIBK to the upper phase. T-Hg transferred into the water phase. This was followed by the extraction of MeHg from the water phase using HBr, CuCl2 and toluene. The MeHg fraction was reverse-extracted into L-cysteine-sodium acetate solution from toluene. The concentrations of T-Hg and MeHg were determined by heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry. Certified reference materials for T-Hg and MeHg in hair and fish were accurately measured using this method. This method was then applied to determine T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the muscle, liver and gonads of seafood for the risk assessment of MeHg exposure. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in squid eggs were 0.023 and 0.022 µg/g, and in squid nidamental glands 0.052 and 0.049 µg/g, respectively. The MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the eggs and nidamental glands of squid were 94.4% and 96.5%, respectively. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the gonads of sea urchins were 0.043 and 0.001 µg/g, respectively, with a MeHg/T-Hg ratio of 3.5%. We developed an efficient analytical method for T-Hg and MeHg using MIBK in the degreasing step. The new information on MeHg concentration and MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the egg or nidamental glands of squid and gonads of sea urchin will also be useful for risk assessment of mercury in seafood.

  13. Sex and age differences in mercury distribution and excretion in methylmercury-administered mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hirayama, K.; Yasutake, A.

    1986-01-01

    Sex differences in mercury distribution and excretion after single administration of methylmercury chloride (MMC, 5 mg/kg were studied in mice. A sex difference in urinary mercury excretion was found in sexually mature mice (age of 7 wk) of C57BL/6N and BALB/cA strains. Males showed higher mercury levels in urine than females, though no significant difference was found in fecal mercury levels 24 h post exposure to MMC. The higher urinary excretion rates in males accounted for significant lowering of mercury levels in the brain, liver, and blood, but not in the kidney, which showed higher values. At 5 min, however, the sex difference was found only in the kidney, showing higher levels in males. Changes in mercury distribution with time were studied in C57BL/6N mice. The brain mercury increased in both sexes up to 3 d, and decreased only in males on d 5. Liver and blood mercury decreased with time in both sexes, and these were constantly higher in females than in males. Renal mercury in males decreased to similar levels to females on d 3. The sex differences at various ages were studied with C57BL/6N mice 24 h after dosing. Two-week-old mice did not show significant sex differences in the mercury distribution and excretion, and their urinary mercury levels were much lower as compared to the older mice. Urinary mercury excretion in both sexes increased at 4 wk of age and then decreased at 45 wk of age. At 4, 7, 10, and 45 wk of age, males showed higher urinary mercury levels than females. From these findings, it has been suggested that urinary mercury excretion may be related to sex hormones, especially androgens.

  14. Reconnaissance of mercury and methylmercury in the St. Croix River and selected tributaries, Minnesota and Wisconsin, July 2000 through October 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, G.A.; Hansen, Donald S.

    2003-01-01

    A reconnaissance-level assessment to characterize total mercury and methylmercury concentrations during summer lowflow conditions was conducted in the St. Croix River Basin during July 2000 through October 2001. Samples were collected at 6 main stem and 16 tributary sites. Loads of total mercury and methylmercury increased in the St. Croix River main stem between Nevers Dam and Franconia. Total mercury and methylmercury concentrations were greatest during July in the Namekagon River. Methylmercury yields in the Namekagon River and Rush Creek were greater than the yield for other tributary streams. Methylmercury concentrations and yields were greater in tributaries draining wetland/forest watersheds than in tributaries draining agricultural/forest watersheds.

  15. Beluga (Huso huso, Brandet 1869) bioenergetics under dietary methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Gharaei, A; Esmaili-Sari, A; Jafari-Shamoshaki, V; Ghaffari, M

    2008-12-01

    Recently, there have been reports of increasing amounts of mercury (Hg) in muscles of beluga (Huso huso, Brandet 1869) in the Caspian Sea which exceeds its guideline level for food in the UK. Our intensive effort was to investigate the effects of dietary methylmercury (MeHg) on Beluga bioenergetics. Beluga juveniles were fed with four diets containing MeHg (control: 0.04 mg kg(-1); low: 0.76 mg kg(-1); medium: 7.88 mg kg(-1); and high: 16.22 mg kg(-1)) for 70 days. There were significant differences in food consumption among the treatment groups. After 42 days, all individuals of the high dose died. After 35 and 70 days, all treatment groups (low, medium and high) showed a significant decline in their growth rate, unlike the control group. They also showed considerable lower specific growth rates (SGR) comparing to the control group. All treatment groups assimilated the dietary MeHg into their muscle tissue in a dose-dependent manner. Assimilation percent was significant among the treatment groups at days 35 and 70, but it was lower in the first 35 days than in the second 35 days. The data obtained from the dietary MeHg concentration and bioaccumulation rates were modeled for better natural resources management of the Caspian Sea.

  16. Chlorella suppresses methylmercury transfer to the fetus in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Uchikawa, Takuya; Maruyama, Isao; Kumamoto, Shoichiro; Ando, Yotaro; Yasutake, Akira

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the effects of chlorella on methylmercury (MeHg) transfer to the fetus during pregnancy, female C57BL/6N mice (aged 10 weeks) were housed for 7 to 8 weeks, from 4 weeks before mating to birth, with diets containing 0% or 10% chlorella powder (CP) and MeHg-containing drinking water (2 µg Hg/ml). The consumption volume of the MeHg-containing water was limited to 15 ml/mouse/week throughout the experiment. Distilled water and a basal diet (0% CP) was given to control mice. Except for the mating period, during the 5(th) week, mice were housed individually until parturition. Two neonates were randomly selected from each mother mouse within 24 hr after parturition for Hg analysis of the blood, brain, liver, and kidneys. Mother mice were sacrificed on the same day as neonates to obtain tissue samples for Hg analysis. The blood and brain Hg levels of both neonates and mothers in the CP diet group were significantly lower than those in the basal diet group. Although the hepatic and renal Hg levels were not significant in mothers between the two dietary groups, in neonates, the CP diet group showed significantly lower Hg levels in these tissues than the basal diet group. The results obtained here revealed that continuous CP intake suppressed MeHg transfer to the fetus, in addition to effective suppressing MeHg accumulation in brains of the mothers.

  17. Improvements of reliability for methylmercury determination in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan-Yi; Truong, Hoang-Yen Thi; Chen, Yu-Wei; Belzile, Nelson

    2009-02-01

    The determination of methylmercury (MeHg) in environmental samples by ethylation derivation-gas chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ED-GC-AFS) is associated with an intimate problem of water moisture accumulation introduced in the ethylation step, which enters the detection system and cause a spectroscopic interference. With a simple modification on the GC-AFS system, this problem was eliminated and the analytical quality of the measurements was significantly improved. The presence of dissolved sulfide in samples can also cause serious chemical interference in the ethylation step resulting in lower or total loss of the MeHg signal. It was found that a masking system of CuSO(4)-Na(2)C(2)O(4) was able to eliminate this interference. With this system, the accurate determination of trace amount of MeHg in high dissolved sulfide containing samples was achieved. Satisfactory analytical results were obtained with the certified reference sediment IAEA405, sulfate reducing bacteria culture and sulfide containing water samples. The limit of detection and quantitation of this masking system is 0.01 and 0.04ngL(-1) respectively. Other factors affecting ethylation are also discussed. PMID:19166718

  18. Warming increases methylmercury production in an Arctic soil

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Ziming; Fang, Wei; Lu, Xia; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Graham, David E.; Liang, Liyuan; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Gu, Baohua

    2016-04-29

    The rapid temperature rise in Arctic permafrost concerns not only the degradation of stored soil organic carbon (SOC) and climate feedback, but also the production and bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) that may endanger humans, as well as wildlife in terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems. Decomposition of SOC provides an energy source for microbial methylation, although little is known how rapid permafrost thaw affects Hg methylation and how SOC degradation is coupled to MeHg biosynthesis. We describe rates of MeHg production in Arctic soils from an 8-month warming microcosm experiment under anoxic conditions. MeHg production increased >10 fold in both organic-more » and the mineral-rich soil layers at a warmer temperature (8 C) compared to a sub-zero temperature ( 2 C). MeHg production was positively correlated to methane and ferrous ion concentrations, suggesting that Hg methylation is coupled with methanogenesis and iron reduction. Labile SOC, such as reducing sugars and alcohol, were particularly effective in fueling the initial rapid biosynthesis of MeHg. In freshly amended Hg we found that there was more bioavailable than existing Hg in the mineral soil. Finally, the data indicate that climate warming and permafrost thaw could greatly enhance MeHg production, thereby impacting Arctic aquatic and marine ecosystems through biomagnification in the food web.« less

  19. Flood hydrology and methylmercury availability in coastal plain rivers.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul M; Journey, Celeste A; Chapelle, Francis H; Lowery, Mark A; Conrads, Paul A

    2010-12-15

    Mercury (Hg) burdens in top-predator fish differ substantially between adjacent South Carolina Coastal Plain river basins with similar wetlands coverage. In the Congaree River, floodwaters frequently originate in the Blue Ridge and Piedmont regions, where wetlands coverage and surface water dissolved methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations are low. Piedmont-driven flood events can lead to downward hydraulic gradients in the Coastal Plain riparian wetland margins, inhibiting MeHg transport from wetland sediments, and decreasing MeHg availability in the Congaree River habitat. In the adjacent Edisto River basin, floodwaters originate only within Coastal Plain sediments, maintaining upward hydraulic gradients even during flood events, promoting MeHg transport to the water column, and enhancing MeHg availability in the Edisto River habitat. These results indicate that flood hydrodynamics contribute to the variability in Hg vulnerability between Coastal Plain rivers and that comprehensive regional assessment of the relationship between flood hydrodynamics and Hg risk in Coastal Plain streams is warranted.

  20. Production and retention of methylmercury in inundated boreal forest soils.

    PubMed

    Rolfhus, Kristofer R; Hurley, James P; Bodaly, Richard A Drew; Perrine, Gregory

    2015-03-17

    The Flooded Uplands Dynamics Experiment (FLUDEX) was an ecosystem-scale study examining the production of methylmercury (MeHg) and greenhouse gases from reservoirs constructed on an upland boreal forest landscape in order to quantify their dependence upon carbon stores. We detail the within-reservoir production and storage of MeHg before, during, and nine years after the experiment. The reservoirs were net MeHg producers during the first two years of flooding, and net demethylating systems afterward. During years 1-3, a rapid pulse of MeHg and total Hg was observed in floodwater, followed by substantial increases in MeHg in seston and sediment. Resampling of the dry reservoirs nine years after the experiment ended indicated that organic soil MeHg was still 8 to 52-fold higher than preflood conditions, and averaged 86% of the levels recorded at the end of the third flooding year. Both total Hg and MeHg retention in soil were a strong function of organic carbon content. The time scale of soil MeHg retention may help explain the decadal time lag frequently observed for the decrease of piscivorous fish Hg concentrations in new reservoirs. Predicted extreme precipitation events associated with climate change may serve to make landscapes more susceptible to this process.

  1. Collaborative study on determination of mono methylmercury in seafood.

    PubMed

    Valdersnes, Stig; Fecher, Peter; Maage, Amund; Julshamn, Kaare

    2016-03-01

    Eight laboratories participated in an inter-laboratory method-performance (collaborative) study of a method for the determination of mono methylmercury (MMHg) in foodstuffs of marine origin by gas chromatography inductively coupled plasma isotope dilution mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-IDMS) after dissolution, derivatisation and extraction of the species. The method was tested on seven seafood products covering both a wide concentration range and variations in the MMHg concentrations as well as matrix compositions. The samples were mussel tissue, squid muscle, crab claw meat, whale meat, cod muscle, Greenland halibut muscle and dogfish liver (NRCC DOLT-4), with MMHg concentrations ranging from 0.035 to 3.58mg/kg (as Hg) dry weight. Repeatability relative standard deviations (RSDr) for MMHg ranged from 2.1% to 8.7%. Reproducibility relative standard deviations (RSDR) ranged from 5.8% to 42%. All samples showed HorRat value below 1.0, except for the sample with the lowest MMHg content, mussel tissue, with a HorRat value of 1.6. PMID:26471575

  2. Production and retention of methylmercury in inundated boreal forest soils.

    PubMed

    Rolfhus, Kristofer R; Hurley, James P; Bodaly, Richard A Drew; Perrine, Gregory

    2015-03-17

    The Flooded Uplands Dynamics Experiment (FLUDEX) was an ecosystem-scale study examining the production of methylmercury (MeHg) and greenhouse gases from reservoirs constructed on an upland boreal forest landscape in order to quantify their dependence upon carbon stores. We detail the within-reservoir production and storage of MeHg before, during, and nine years after the experiment. The reservoirs were net MeHg producers during the first two years of flooding, and net demethylating systems afterward. During years 1-3, a rapid pulse of MeHg and total Hg was observed in floodwater, followed by substantial increases in MeHg in seston and sediment. Resampling of the dry reservoirs nine years after the experiment ended indicated that organic soil MeHg was still 8 to 52-fold higher than preflood conditions, and averaged 86% of the levels recorded at the end of the third flooding year. Both total Hg and MeHg retention in soil were a strong function of organic carbon content. The time scale of soil MeHg retention may help explain the decadal time lag frequently observed for the decrease of piscivorous fish Hg concentrations in new reservoirs. Predicted extreme precipitation events associated with climate change may serve to make landscapes more susceptible to this process. PMID:25668143

  3. Flood hydrology and methylmercury availability in Coastal Plain rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste A.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Lowery, Mark A.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) burdens in top-predator fish differ substantially between adjacent South Carolina Coastal Plain river basins with similar wetlands coverage. In the Congaree River, floodwaters frequently originate in the Blue Ridge and Piedmont regions, where wetlands coverage and surface water dissolved methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations are low. Piedmont-driven flood events can lead to downward hydraulic gradients in the Coastal Plain riparian wetland margins, inhibiting MeHg transport from wetland sediments, and decreasing MeHg availability in the Congaree River habitat. In the adjacent Edisto River basin, floodwaters originate only within Coastal Plain sediments, maintaining upward hydraulic gradients even during flood events, promoting MeHg transport to the water column, and enhancing MeHg availability in the Edisto River habitat. These results indicate that flood hydrodynamics contribute to the variability in Hg vulnerability between Coastal Plain rivers and that comprehensive regional assessment of the relationship between flood hydrodynamics and Hg risk in Coastal Plain streams is warranted.

  4. Effect of methylmercury on the rat mast cell degranulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graevskaya, E. E.; Yasutake, A.; Aramai, R.; Rubin, A. B.

    2003-05-01

    Methylmercury is the well-known neurotoxicant as weil as a modulator of the immune system. We investigated the effects of MeHg on the rat mast cell degranulation induced by nonimmunological stimuli (the selective liberator of histamine, compound 48/80, and calcium ionophore A23187) both in vivo and in vitro. In 8, 12 and 15 days afterthe final administration of MeHg we observed the suppression of calcium ionophore A23187-and 48/80-induced histamine release, which enhanced with time. In experiments in vitro incubation of peritoneal mast cells with MeHg alone in the dose range 10^{-8} to 10^{-6} did not induce mast cell degranulation, however modified the activation of mast cells by compound 48/80, and calcium ionophore A23187. We observed activation of stimulated secretion by preliminary incubation with low dose of MeHg 10^{-8} M and inhibition by dose of MeHg 10^{-6} M. These results show that MeHg treatment can modify mast cell function in vivo and in vitro and provide insight into the understanding what role this cell has in the pathogenesis of Minamata disease-comlected disorders.

  5. Methylmercury biomagnification in an Arctic pelagic food web.

    PubMed

    Ruus, Anders; Øverjordet, Ida B; Braaten, Hans Fredrik V; Evenset, Anita; Christensen, Guttorm; Heimstad, Eldbjørg S; Gabrielsen, Geir W; Borgå, Katrine

    2015-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that enters the biosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources, and emitted gaseous Hg enters the Arctic from lower latitudes by long-range transport. In aquatic systems, anoxic conditions favor the bacterial transformation of inorganic Hg to methylmercury (MeHg), which has a greater potential for bioaccumulation than inorganic Hg and is the most toxic form of Hg. The main objective of the present study was to quantify the biomagnification of MeHg in a marine pelagic food web, comprising species of zooplankton, fish, and seabirds, from the Kongsfjorden system (Svalbard, Norway), by use of trophic magnification factors. As expected, tissue concentrations of MeHg increased with increasing trophic level in the food web, though at greater rates than observed in several earlier studies, especially at lower latitudes. There was strong correlation between MeHg and total Hg concentrations through the food web as a whole. The concentration of MeHg in kittiwake decreased from May to October, contributing to seasonal differences in trophic magnification factors. The ecology and physiology of the species comprising the food web in question may have a large influence on the magnitude of the biomagnification. A significant linear relationship was also observed between concentrations of selenium and total Hg in birds but not in zooplankton, suggesting the importance of selenium in Hg detoxification for individuals with high Hg concentrations. PMID:26274519

  6. Methods for the preparation and analysis of solids and suspended solids for methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWild, John F.; Olund, Shane D.; Olson, Mark L.; Tate, Michael T.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents the methods and method performance data for the determination of methylmercury concentrations in solids and suspended solids. Using the methods outlined here, the U.S. Geological Survey's Wisconsin District Mercury Laboratory can consistently detect methylmercury in solids and suspended solids at environmentally relevant concentrations. Solids can be analyzed wet or freeze dried with a minimum detection limit of 0.08 ng/g (as-processed). Suspended solids must first be isolated from aqueous matrices by filtration. The minimum detection limit for suspended solids is 0.01 ng per filter resulting in a minimum reporting limit ranging from 0.2 ng/L for a 0.05 L filtered volume to 0.01 ng/L for a 1.0 L filtered volume. Maximum concentrations for both matrices can be extended to cover nearly any amount of methylmercury by limiting sample size.

  7. Effects of methylmercury on ontogeny of prey capture ability and growth in three populations of larval Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, T; Scali, R; Weis, J S

    2001-07-01

    We used three populations of mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus), one from a polluted site (Piles Creek [PC], New Jersey) and two from cleaner sites (Tuckerton [TK], New Jersey, and East Hampton [EH], New York), to study (1) whether embryonic, embryonic plus larval, or larval exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) altered larval prey capture ability and growth; and (2) whether there were differences in tolerance to MeHg-induced behavioral changes among the three populations. Eggs and sperm were obtained from mummichogs captured in the field, and their embryos and larvae were kept in clean sea water or MeHg solution (5, 10 microg/L). Larvae were then tested regularly for prey capture rates and prey capture efficiencies, and their lengths were measured. Embryonic exposure to MeHg induced transitory and recoverable impairments in larval prey capture ability, whereas larval exposure alone was relatively ineffective. When both embryos and larvae were treated, larval prey capture ability was affected at a lower concentration and a wider range of larval ages. In terms of growth and prey capture ability, response of larvae to embryonic or larval or exposure to both stages to MeHg varied with populations. TK fish were the most tolerant with respect to behavioral changes but were the most sensitive to MeHg in reduction of growth. EH fish were the most sensitive whenever embryos were treated, and PC fish were the most vulnerable after larval exposure. The population differences in response to MeHg intoxication may be due to pollution related factors or differences in behavioral-related genetic factors. PMID:11385589

  8. A Versatile Method for Immunofluorescent Staining of Cells Cultured on Permeable Membrane Inserts.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Jenni L; Anyah, Anwuli; Taylor, John M; Marlin, Jerry W; Taylor, Tracey A H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Obtaining high-quality images of cellular structures via immunofluorescence staining is critical for cellular localization studies. Often, these studies cannot be performed in parallel with certain oncology, virology, pharmacokinetic, and drug absorption studies due to model system technicalities requiring the cells to be cultured on porous membranes rather than glass or plastic. MATERIAL AND METHODS Here, we report a method of immunofluorescent staining of cells cultured on permeable membranes. RESULTS As proof of principle, HeLa cells grown on Transwell® membrane supports were stained with fluorescently labeled antibodies using this modified immunofluorescence staining method and visualized by fluorescent microscopy. CONCLUSIONS This protocol is a convenient alternative to staining cells on glass coverslips, thereby expanding the scope and applications of this important research tool. PMID:27616137

  9. A Versatile Method for Immunofluorescent Staining of Cells Cultured on Permeable Membrane Inserts

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Jenni L.; Anyah, Anwuli; Taylor, John M.; Marlin, Jerry W.; Taylor, Tracey A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obtaining high-quality images of cellular structures via immunofluorescence staining is critical for cellular localization studies. Often, these studies cannot be performed in parallel with certain oncology, virology, pharmacokinetic, and drug absorption studies due to model system technicalities requiring the cells to be cultured on porous membranes rather than glass or plastic. Material/Methods Here, we report a method of immunofluorescent staining of cells cultured on permeable membranes. Results As proof of principle, HeLa cells grown on Transwell® membrane supports were stained with fluorescently labeled antibodies using this modified immunofluorescence staining method and visualized by fluorescent microscopy. Conclusions This protocol is a convenient alternative to staining cells on glass coverslips, thereby expanding the scope and applications of this important research tool. PMID:27616137

  10. Toxicity of methylmercury injected into eggs when dissolved in water versus corn oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Klimstra, J.D.; Stebbins, K.R.; Kondrad, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study, the embryotoxicity of methylmercury dissolved in corn oil was compared among 26 species of birds. Corn oil is not soluble in the water-based matrix that constitutes the albumen of an egg. To determine whether the use of corn oil limited the usefulness of this earlier study, a comparison was made of the embryotoxicity of methylmercury dissolved in corn oil versus water. Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and chicken (Gallus gallus) eggs were injected with methylmercury chloride dissolved in corn oil or water to achieve concentrations of 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.6??g/g mercury in the egg on a wet weight basis. Hatching success at each dose of mercury was compared between the two solvents. For mallards, 16.4% of the eggs injected with 1.6??g/g mercury dissolved in water hatched, which was statistically lower than the 37.6% hatch rate of eggs injected with 1.6??g/g mercury dissolved in corn oil, but no differences in hatching success were observed between corn oil and water at any of the other doses. With chicken eggs, no significant differences occurred in percentage hatch of eggs between corn oil and water at any of the mercury doses. Methylmercury dissolved in corn oil seems to have a toxicity to avian embryos similar to that of does methylmercury dissolved in water. Consequently, the results from the earlier study that described the toxicity of methylmercury dissolved in corn oil to avian embryos were probably not compromised by the use of corn oil as a solvent. ?? 2011 SETAC.

  11. Retrospective study on temporal and regional variations of methylmercury concentrations in preserved umbilical cords collected from inhabitants of the Minamata area, Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Mineshi; Murata, Katsuyuki; Tsuruta, Kazuhito; Miyamoto, Kenichiro; Akagi, Hirokatsu

    2010-09-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the historical time-course changes and regional distribution of methylmercury concentrations in preserved umbilical cords collected from Minamata-area inhabitants born between 1947 and 1989. The data from Miyazaki, Tottori, Akita, Tsushima (Nagasaki), Fukuoka and Tokyo were used as controls. A total of 325 data were analyzed to estimate the temporal and spatial distribution of methylmercury among inhabitants born in the Minamata area. Elevated methylmercury concentrations (>or=1 microg/g) were mainly observed in inhabitants born between 1947 and 1968. That peak coincided with the peak of acetaldehyde production in Minamata. The methylmercury concentrations started to decrease in keeping with the decline of acetaldehyde production, which ceased in 1968, and thereafter the methylmercury levels gradually decreased to the control levels. Elevated methylmercury concentrations were first observed in the districts of Minamata, followed by Izumi, Tsunagi and Ashikita, indicating the time-course-dependent regional distributions of methylmercury pollution.

  12. Cytopathology induced by mercuric chloride and methylmercury in cultured renal cells of the Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella plagiodon).

    PubMed

    Wang, A; Pfeiffer, C J

    2001-01-01

    High mercury concentrations have been reported in various tissues of cetaceans, but the toxicological effects of mercury on cetaceans remain unclear. In vivo study is difficult due to the endangered status of these marine mammals and co-exposure to both mercury and selenium (antagonist of mercury) in the oceanic environment. The present data are the first ultrastructural information on dolphin renal cells exposed to mercury in vitro. Multiple organelle changes were observed in Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella plagiodon) renal cells treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl2) or methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl2). Mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticula were swollen after treatment with HgCl2 or MeHgCl. Mitochondrial dense bodies and small cytoplasmic spherical granules of high electron density were also observed after exposure to MeHgCl. Cytoplasmic vacuoles and myelin-like figures were induced by both HgCl2 and MeHgCl. Nuclear changes included karyolysis, nuclear buds, and a novel observation in mercury-treated cells, vacuolization of (micro-)nucleoli after treatment with HgCl2. These morphological changes (multiple organelle damage and nuclear budding) indicated mercury-treated dolphin renal cells underwent oncosis and necrosis, and supported earlier pathophysiologic findings of diverse toxic actions on genetic, respiratory and other cellular functions. PMID:11686411

  13. Carbon monoxide derived from heme oxygenase-2 mediates reduction of methylmercury toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells

    SciTech Connect

    Toyama, Takashi; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Sumi, Daigo; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2010-11-15

    We examined the contribution of carbon monoxide (CO), an enzymatic product of heme oxygenase (HO), to methylmercury (MeHg) cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells, because this gas molecule is reported to activate Nrf2, which plays a protective role against MeHg-mediated cell damage. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to CO gas resulted in protection against MeHg cytotoxicity, with activation of Nrf2. Interestingly, pretreatment with tin-protoporphyrin IX, a specific inhibitor of HO, caused a reduction in basal Nrf2 activity and thus enhanced sensitivity to MeHg. No induction of isoform 1 of HO (HO-1) was seen during MeHg exposure, but constitutive expression of isoform 2 (HO-2) occurred, suggesting that CO produced by HO-2 is the main participant in the protection against MeHg toxicity. Studies of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of HO-2 in the cells supported this possibility. Our results suggest that CO gas and its producing enzyme HO-2 are key molecules in cellular protection against MeHg, presumably through basal activation of Nrf2.

  14. Methylmercury Concentration in Fish and Risk-Benefit Assessment of Fish Intake among Pregnant versus Infertile Women in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Hsu, You-Wen; Chang, Tien-Chin; Chien, Ling-Chu

    2016-01-01

    This study examined methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish, the daily MeHg exposure dose, and the risk-benefit of MeHg, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) related to fish intake among pregnant and infertile women in Taiwan. The measured MeHg concentrations in fish did not exceed the Codex guideline level of 1 mg/kg. Swordfish (0.28 ± 0.23 mg/kg) and tuna (0.14 ± 0.13 mg/kg) had the highest MeHg concentrations. The MeHg concentration in the hair of infertile women (1.82 ± 0.14 mg/kg) was significantly greater than that of pregnant women (1.24 ± 0.18 mg/kg). In addition, 80% of infertile women and 68% of pregnant women had MeHg concentrations in hair that exceeded the USEPA reference dose (1 mg/kg). The MeHg concentrations in hair were significantly and positively correlated with the estimated daily MeHg exposure dose. Based on the risk-benefit evaluation results, this paper recommends consumption of fish species with a low MeHg concentration and high concentrations of DHA + EPA and ω-3 PUFA (e.g., salmon, mackerel, and greater amberjack). PMID:27187161

  15. Methylmercury Concentration in Fish and Risk-Benefit Assessment of Fish Intake among Pregnant versus Infertile Women in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Hsu, You-Wen; Chang, Tien-Chin; Chien, Ling-Chu

    2016-01-01

    This study examined methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish, the daily MeHg exposure dose, and the risk–benefit of MeHg, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) related to fish intake among pregnant and infertile women in Taiwan. The measured MeHg concentrations in fish did not exceed the Codex guideline level of 1 mg/kg. Swordfish (0.28 ± 0.23 mg/kg) and tuna (0.14 ± 0.13 mg/kg) had the highest MeHg concentrations. The MeHg concentration in the hair of infertile women (1.82 ± 0.14 mg/kg) was significantly greater than that of pregnant women (1.24 ± 0.18 mg/kg). In addition, 80% of infertile women and 68% of pregnant women had MeHg concentrations in hair that exceeded the USEPA reference dose (1 mg/kg). The MeHg concentrations in hair were significantly and positively correlated with the estimated daily MeHg exposure dose. Based on the risk–benefit evaluation results, this paper recommends consumption of fish species with a low MeHg concentration and high concentrations of DHA + EPA and ω-3 PUFA (e.g., salmon, mackerel, and greater amberjack). PMID:27187161

  16. Immunofluorescence on avian sarcoma virus-transformed cells: localization of the src gene product.

    PubMed

    Rohrschneider, L R

    1979-01-01

    The localization of the avian sarcoma virus src gene product (termed p60src) was examined by indirect immunofluorescence in cells transformed by the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus, subgroup D (SR-RSV-D). Antiserum to p60src was obtained from rabbits bearing SR-RSV-D-induced tumors, and immunofluorescence was performed on chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) transformed with SR-RSV-D, as well as normal rat kidney (NRK) cells transformed by the same virus (termed SR-RK cells). Both acetone and formaldehyde fixation were used for the immunofluorescence tests. The specificity of the anti-tumor serum was first demonstrated in both cell systems by gel electrophoresis of immunoprecipitates prepared from 35S--methionine-labeled cells. Anti-tumor serum precipitated p60src from SR-RSV-D-transformed CEF but not from CEF infected with a transformation-defective mutant of SR-RSV-D. All viral structural proteins and precursors contained in these immunoprecipitates could be eliminated by competition with unlabeled virus. Similar experiments on SR-RK cells indicated that no viral proteins other than p60src were expressed in these cells, and this observation was supported by immunofluorescence tests using antiserum to whole virus. For immunofluorescence localization of p60src, reactions with viral structural proteins were blocked with unlabeled virus. This presaturation step, obligatory for p60src detection in the SR-RSV-D-transformed CEF, was unnecessary when antitumor serum was tested on SR-RK cells, since p60src was the only viral protein detectable in these cells. With acetone-fixed cells, p60src-specific immunofluorescence revealed a characteristic fluorescence pattern which was similar in both cell systems. The principal pattern was diffuse and situated in the cytoplasm. A clear nuclear fluorescence was never observed. Immunofluorescence on formaldehyde-fixed cells also indicated the cytoplasmic location of p60src and revealed a specific subcytoplasmic concentration

  17. Methylmercury photodegradation in surface water of the Florida Everglades: importance of dissolved organic matter-methylmercury complexation.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chao; Li, Yanbin; Yin, Yongguang; Scinto, Leonard J; Jiang, Guibin; Cai, Yong

    2014-07-01

    Photodegradation is the major pathway of methylmercury (MeHg) degradation in many surface waters. However, the mechanism of MeHg photodegradation is still not completely understood. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is expected to play a critical role in MeHg photodegradation. By using several techniques, including N2/O2 purging and the addition of stable isotope (Me(201)Hg), scavengers, competing ligands, and a singlet oxygen ((1)O2) generator, the role played by MeHg-DOM complexation in MeHg photodegradation of Everglades surface water was investigated. DOM appeared to be involved in MeHg photodegradation via the formation MeHg-DOM complexes based on three findings: (1) MeHg was quickly photodegraded in solutions containing DOM extracts; (2) degradation of MeHg did not occur in deionized water; and (3) addition of competing complexation reagents (dithiothreitol-DTT) dramatically prohibited the photodegradation of MeHg in Everglades water. Further experiments indicated that free radicals/reactive oxygen species, including hydroxyl radical (·OH), (1)O2, triplet excited state of DOM ((3)DOM*), and hydrated electron (e(-)aq), played a minor role in MeHg photodegradation in Everglades water, based on the results of scavenger addition, (1)O2 generator addition and N2/O2 purging. A pathway, involving direct photodegradation of MeHg-DOM complexes via intramolecular electron transfer, is proposed as the dominant mechanism for MeHg photodegradation in Everglades water.

  18. Total Mercury and Methylmercury Dynamics; stream export in an upland forested watershed in the Adirondack region of New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleton, W.; Vidon, P.; Mitchell, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Although levels of mercury and acid rain deposition have greatly declined in recent years due to legislation controls on industry emissions, their legacy has had a lasting effect on the Adirondack region of New York State. This historical mercury deposition is of concern because of the high chance for methylmercury production and export to occur. The impact of forested uplands on methylmercury export remains poorly understood in relation to other ecosystems. Research indicates that sulfate dynamics play a large role in regulating the production of methylmercury in the presence of inorganic mercury; however the relationship between methylmercury production and nitrate availability at various times of the year is less understood, yet, hypothesized to potentially impact sulfate reduction and ultimately methylmercury production in a variety of ecosystems. In this study, mercury and water quality (including sulfate and nitrate) will be monitored in spring, summer and fall of 2012 at 7 locations in Arbutus Watershed, Adirondacks, NY. Proxies (UV absorbance, Fluorescence indices) for total mercury and methylmercury will be utilized to predict export. The main objectives of this research are to determine the relevance of forested uplands in methylmercury export, as well as gain further understanding of mercury dynamics and associated proxies in relation to nitrate and sulfate availability. Photo courtesy of the Adirondack Ecological Center

  19. Bacterial methylmercury degradation in Florida Everglades peat sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) degradation was investigated along an eutrophication gradient in the Florida Everglades by quantifying 14CH4 and 14CO2 production after incubation of anaerobic sediments with [14C]MeHg. Degradation rate constants (k) were consistently ???0.1 d-1 and decreased with sediment depth. Higher k values were observed when shorter incubation times and lower MeHg amendment levels were used, and k increased 2-fold as in-situ MeHg concentrations were approached. The average floc layer k was 0.046 ?? 0.023 d-1 (n = 17) for 1-2 day incubations. In-situ degradation rates were estimated to be 0.02-0.5 ng of MeHg (g of dry sediment)-1 d-1, increasing from eutrophied to pristine areas. Nitrate-respiring bacteria did not demethylate MeHg, and NO3- addition partially inhibited degradation in some cases. MeHg degradation rates were not affected by PO43- addition. 14CO2 production in all samples indicated that oxidative demethylation (OD) was an important degradation mechanism. OD occurred over 5 orders of magnitude of applied MeHg concentration, with lowest limits [1-18 ng of MeHg (g of dry sediment)-1] in the range of in-situ MeHg levels. Sulfate reducers and methanogens were the primary agents of anaerobic OD, although it is suggested that methanogens dominate degradation at in-situ MeHg concentrations. Specific pathways of OD by these two microbial groups are proposed.Methylmercury (MeHg) degradation was investigated along an eutrophication gradient in the Florida Everglades by quantifying 14CH4 and 14CO2 production after incubation of anaerobic sediments with [14C]MeHg. Degradation rate constants (k) were consistently ???0.1 d-1 and decreased with sediment depth. Higher k values were observed when shorter incubation times and lower MeHg amendment levels were used, and k increased 2-fold as in-situ MeHg concentrations were approached. The average floc layer k was 0.046??0.023 d-1 (n = 17) for 1-2 day incubations. In-situ degradation rates were estimated to be 0

  20. Histopathological alterations of juvenile green (Acipenser medirostris) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) exposed to graded levels of dietary methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Jae-Won; De Riu, Nicola; Moniello, Giuseppe; Hung, Silas S O

    2012-03-01

    Triplicate groups of juvenile green and white sturgeon (average weight of 30 ± 2 g) were exposed to one of four concentrations of dietary methylmercury (MeHg; 0, 25, 50, and 100 mg MeHg/kg diet) for 8 weeks to determine and compare the sensitivity of the two sturgeon species from a histopathological perspective. After 4- and 8-week exposure, histological changes were examined in the kidney, liver, gill, skeletal muscle, and heart muscle of both species using light microscopy. Marked abnormalities were observed in the kidney and liver of both sturgeon species after each exposure period; the abnormalities showed progressive histological alterations in severity with increasing doses and duration of exposure. Renal lesions included tubular epithelium degeneration and necrosis, renal corpuscular disintegration, and interstitial tissue degeneration. The changes observed in the livers of both sturgeon species were glycogen depletion and vacuolar degeneration. In the gill and skeletal and heart muscle of green and white sturgeon fed MeHg-added diets, mild histological changes were observed but did not show pronounced difference between the two species. Although the lowest observed effect concentration in both species was the 25 mg MeHg/kg diet, the histological changes in the kidney and liver were more pronounced at all treatments groups of green sturgeon than those of white sturgeon. The current results on structural changes of kidney and liver (i.e., more severe glycogen depletion and tubular epithelium degeneration in green sturgeon) confirmed our previous results, in that green sturgeon exhibited a higher mortality, lower growth rate, and lower protein, lipid, and energy contents in their whole body than white sturgeon under the same MeHg exposures.

  1. A microstructural analysis distinguishes motor and motivational influences over voluntary running in animals chronically exposed to methylmercury and nimodipine.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Daniel J; Newland, M Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Adult-onset methylmercury (MeHg) exposure produces sensorimotor impairment and related changes in behavior. The present study investigated MeHg effects on the microstructure of spontaneous wheel running in adult BALB/c mice chronically exposed to 0ppm or 15ppm MeHg via daily drinking water. To test the hypothesis that MeHg neurotoxicity is related to impaired calcium homeostasis, MeHg-exposed mice received 0, 20, or 200ppm of the L-type calcium-channel blocker nimodipine in their daily chow diet. To examine MeHg-related changes in the microstructure of running, we partitioned spontaneous wheel running into activity epochs using a change-point algorithm and derived estimates of the within-bout response rate (primarily a motor-function measure), the duration of pausing between bouts (primarily a motivation measure), and the length of response bouts (a hybrid measure) from those epochs. Mice also performed regular rotarod sessions, providing a second measure of motor coordination. MeHg impaired rotarod performance and nimodipine dose-dependently mitigated that effect. MeHg decreased the distance run and within-bout running rate, especially during the final weeks of exposure and nimodipine attenuated and delayed that impairment. The interbout interval was only slightly but significantly affected by MeHg with no evidence of decline at the end of exposure and no influence of nimodipine. Despite the presence of impaired running, there was no evidence of fatigue through the course of long, three-hour sessions. These findings suggest that the microstructure of behavior provides sensitive and interpretable measures of MeHg effects, support the utility of bout analysis for separating motor and motivational effects of drug and toxicant exposure, and show selective neuroprotection by nimodipine.

  2. Bioconcentration of methylmercury in microzooplankton in a temperate river.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunji; Noh, Seam; Kim, Eunhee; Poopal, Rama Krishnan; Lee, Hak Young; Han, Seunghee

    2011-12-01

    To understand the bioconcentration of methylmercury (MeHg) at the base of the riverine food chain, we determined levels of dissolved organic carbon, microseston, Hg, and MeHg in surface water in relation to the microzooplankton MeHg from Yeongsan River. The spatial distribution of unfiltered Hg (0.29-3.1 ng/L) and dissolved Hg (0.15-0.74 ng/L) closely followed the microseston distribution. The spatial distribution of unfiltered MeHg (0.0078-0.077 ng/L) and dissolved MeHg (0.0069-0.018 ng/L) increased with increasing distance from the river mouth and appeared to arise from the shallow wetlands surrounding the upper riverbanks and then to be transported downstream. The logarithm of the MeHg bioconcentration factor for microzooplankton ranged from 5.3 to 6.0 (5.7 ± 0.18), and for microseston ranged from 4.0 to 5.4 (4.9 ± 0.35). Linear correlation statistics comparing microzooplankton MeHg and river water characteristics revealed that microzooplankton MeHg concentration was most significantly correlated with unfiltered MeHg (r = 0.83) and particulate MeHg (r = 0.80) levels. This result suggests that MeHg in unfiltered river water, which is relatively easy to determine, can be used as a surrogate for MeHg in microzooplankton that may influence MeHg levels in higher-trophic-level organisms.

  3. Sulfate threshold target to control methylmercury levels in wetland ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Corrales, Juliana; Naja, Ghinwa M; Dziuba, Catherine; Rivero, Rosanna G; Orem, William

    2011-05-01

    Sulfate contamination has a significant environmental implication through the stimulation of toxic hydrogen sulfide and methylmercury (MeHg) production. High levels of MeHg are a serious problem in many wetland ecosystems worldwide. In the Florida Everglades, it has been demonstrated that increasing MeHg occurrence is due to a sulfate contamination problem. A promising strategy of lowering the MeHg occurrence is to reduce the amount of sulfate entering the ecosystem. High surface water sulfate concentrations in the Everglades are mainly due to discharges from the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) canals. Water and total sulfur mass balances indicated that total sulfur released by soil oxidation, Lake Okeechobee and agricultural application were the major sources contributing 49,169, 35,217 and 11,775mtonsyear(-1), respectively. Total sulfur loads from groundwater, levees, and atmospheric deposition contributed to a lesser extent: 4055; 5858 and 4229mtonsyear(-1), respectively. Total sulfur leaving the EAA into Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) through canal discharge was estimated at 116,360mtonsyear(-1), and total sulfur removed by sugarcane harvest accounted for 23,182mtonsyear(-1). Furthermore, a rise in the mineral content and pH of the EAA soil over time, suggested that the current rates of sulfur application would increase as the buffer capacity of the soil increases. Therefore, a site specific numeric criterion for sulfate of 1mgL(-1) was recommended for the protection of the Everglades; above this level, mercury methylation is enhanced. In parallel, sulfide concentrations in the EAA exceeded the 2μgL(-1) criterion for surface water already established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

  4. Selenium prevents downregulation of antioxidant selenoprotein genes by methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Penglase, S; Hamre, K; Ellingsen, S

    2014-10-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential nutrient required by Se-dependent proteins, termed selenoproteins. The selenoprotein family is small but diverse and includes key proteins in antioxidant, redox signaling, thyroid hormone metabolism, and protein folding pathways. Methylmercury (MeHg) is a toxic environmental contaminant that affects seafood safety. Selenium can reduce MeHg toxicity, but it is unclear how selenoproteins are affected in this interaction. In this study we explored how Se and MeHg interact to affect the mRNA expression of selenoprotein genes in whole zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Embryos were obtained from adult zebrafish fed MeHg with or without elevated Se in a 2×2 factorial design. The embryo mRNA levels of 30 selenoprotein genes were then measured. These genes cover most of the selenoprotein families, including members of the glutathione peroxidase (GPX), thioredoxin reductase, iodothyronine deiodinase, and methionine sulfoxide reductase families, along with selenophosphate synthetase 2 and selenoproteins H, J-P, T, W, sep15, fep15, and fam213aa. GPX enzyme activity and larval locomotor activity were also measured. We found that around one-quarter of the selenoprotein genes were downregulated by elevated MeHg. These downregulated genes were dominated by selenoproteins from antioxidant pathways that are also susceptible to Se-deficiency-induced downregulation. MeHg also decreased GPX activity and induced larval hypoactivity. Elevated Se partially prevented MeHg-induced disruption of selenoprotein gene mRNA levels, GPX activity, and larval locomotor activity. Overall, the MeHg-induced downregulation and subsequent rescue by elevated Se levels of selenogenes regulated by Se status suggest that Se deficiency is a contributing factor to MeHg toxicity.

  5. Methylmercury in diverse stream ecosystems across the United States (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigham, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    Mercury methylation, conversion of inorganic mercury (Hg) to methylmercury (MeHg), is an important biogeochemical process, resulting in MeHg bioaccumulation in fish that inhabit natural waters. Fish can accumulate high MeHg levels even in waters that receive Hg only through atmospheric deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey measured MeHg as part of a national survey that consisted of one-time sampling of 291 streams, and in detailed temporal studies of 10 streams covering a range of seasons and hydrologic conditions. Both studies spanned important gradients relative to the Hg cycle, including wet Hg deposition rate and wetland density. Both within regions of similar Hg atmospheric deposition, and among all streams nationally, wetland density was an important influence on MeHg in stream water and in fish. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that the source of MeHg to streams is Hg methylation that occurs predominantly within wetlands and subsequent transport to the stream. Within streams, MeHg in stream water typically increases as streamflow and dissolved organic carbon increase. MeHg production within the stream channel, in streambed sediment, is measurable, but appears to be a minor contributor to MeHg in stream water. Implications of this work are that changes in Hg atmospheric deposition would likely produce the greatest changes in MeHg levels in fish in streams that drain a watersheds with a high density of wetlands. Other ecosystem disturbances, such as sulfate loading and wet and dry cycles, that affect Hg methylation will also likely have a greater impact in ecosystems with a higher density of wetlands in the watershed than in low-wetland-density ecosystems.

  6. Influence of nutrient level on methylmercury content in water spinach.

    PubMed

    Greger, Maria; Dabrowska, Beata

    2010-08-01

    Widely consumed vegetables are often cultivated in sewage waters with high nutrient levels. They can contain high levels of methylmercury (MeHg), because they can form MeHg from inorganic Hg in their young shoots. We determined whether the MeHg uptake and the MeHg formation in the shoots of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) were affected by the presence of a high nutrient level in the growth medium. Water spinach shoots were rooted and pretreated in growth medium containing 7% (low) or 70% (high) Hoagland nutrient solution; thereafter, the plants were treated with either 0.02 microM MeHg or 0.2 microM HgCl2 for 3 d. Half the plants were then analyzed for total Hg and MeHg. The remaining plants were transferred to mercury-free medium with low or high nutrient levels and posttreated for 3 days before analysis of total Hg and MeHg in order to measure MeHg formation in the absence of external Hg. The results indicate that nutrient level did not influence MeHg uptake, but that a high nutrient level reduced the distribution of MeHg to the shoots 2.7-fold versus low nutrient level. After treatment with HgCl2, MeHg was found in roots and new shoots but not in old shoots. The MeHg:total-Hg ratio was higher in new shoots than in roots, being 13 times higher at high versus low nutrient levels. Thus, MeHg formation was the same in new shoots independent of inorganic Hg concentration, since the total Hg level decreased at a high nutrient level.

  7. Facilitated cell export and desorption of methylmercury by anaerobic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, B.; Lu, X.; Liu, Y.; Lin, H.

    2015-12-01

    Neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg), formed by certain anaerobic bacteria, is shown to be rapidly excreted from the cell, but the mechanism of this process is unclear. Using both G. sulfurreducens PCA and D. desulfuricans ND132 strains, we investigated the factors affecting export and distribution of MeHg in mercury [Hg(II)] methylation as well as MeHg sorption and desorption assays. Thiols, such as cysteine, were found to greatly facilitate desorption and export of MeHg, particularly by G. sulfurreducens PCA cells. In short-term cysteine-free assays, we found that >90% of the synthesized MeHg was associated with PCA, among which ~73% was sorbed on the cell surface and 19% remained inside the cells, leaving only a small fraction in the phosphate buffered solution. However, MeHg export by PCA increased with increasing cysteine concentrations (0.05-50 mM), and nearly 100% of the MeHg was in solution in the presence of 50 mM cysteine. In comparison, ND132 cells were much more efficient than PCA in producing and exporting MeHg. In the absence of cysteine, a majority of the MeHg (~70%) was exported in 4 h, leaving about 20% of the MeHg sorbed on the surface and 10% inside the cells. When MeHg was directly added to the cell suspensions, ND132 adsorbed much lower MeHg than PCA cells; however, ND132 cells took up more MeHg (20%) inside cells than PCA did (8%). Taken together, our results demonstrate that MeHg export efficiency is bacteria strain-specific and is influenced by the ligand concentration and complexation, which could be important in facilitating MeHg synthesis and bioavailability in anoxic water and sediments.

  8. Methylmercury production in a Chesapeake Bay salt marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Carl P. J.; Gilmour, Cynthia C.

    2008-06-01

    In a detailed study of the biogeochemical factors affecting the methylation of mercury in a Chesapeake Bay salt marsh, we examined relationships between mercury methylation and numerous variables, including sulfate reduction rates, organic carbon mineralization rates, iron and sulfur chemistry, and the character of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Our data show that salt marshes are important sites of de novo methylmercury (MeHg) production in coastal ecosystems. Some of the controls on MeHg production that have been well-described in other ecosystems also impacted MeHg production in this salt marsh, specifically the effect of sulfide accumulation on mercury bioavailability. We observed some novel biogeochemical relationships with Hg(II)-methylation and MeHg accumulation, particularly the positive association of Hg(II)-methylation with zones of microbial iron reduction. On the basis of this relationship, we suggest caution in wetland and groundwater remediation approaches involving iron additions. Aqueous phase Hg complexation appeared to be the dominant control on Hg bioavailability across the marsh sites examined, rather than Hg partitioning behavior. A detailed examination of DOM character in the marsh suggested a strong positive association between Hg(II)-methylation rate constants and increasing DOM molecular weight. Overall, our results indicate that net MeHg production is controlled by a balance between microbial activity and geochemical effects on mercury bioavailability, but that a significant zone of MeHg production can persist in near surface salt marsh soils. Production of MeHg in coastal marshes may negatively impact ecosystems via export to adjacent estuaries or through direct bioaccumulation in birds, fish and amphibians that feed in these highly productive ecosystems.

  9. Sulfate threshold target to control methylmercury levels in wetland ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corrales, J.; Naja, G.M.; Dziuba, C.; Rivero, R.G.; Orem, W.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfate contamination has a significant environmental implication through the stimulation of toxic hydrogen sulfide and methylmercury (MeHg) production. High levels of MeHg are a serious problem in many wetland ecosystems worldwide. In the Florida Everglades, it has been demonstrated that increasing MeHg occurrence is due to a sulfate contamination problem. A promising strategy of lowering the MeHg occurrence is to reduce the amount of sulfate entering the ecosystem. High surface water sulfate concentrations in the Everglades are mainly due to discharges from the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) canals. Water and total sulfur mass balances indicated that total sulfur released by soil oxidation, Lake Okeechobee and agricultural application were the major sources contributing 49,169, 35,217 and 11,775mtonsyear-1, respectively. Total sulfur loads from groundwater, levees, and atmospheric deposition contributed to a lesser extent: 4055; 5858 and 4229mtonsyear-1, respectively. Total sulfur leaving the EAA into Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) through canal discharge was estimated at 116,360mtonsyear-1, and total sulfur removed by sugarcane harvest accounted for 23,182mtonsyear-1. Furthermore, a rise in the mineral content and pH of the EAA soil over time, suggested that the current rates of sulfur application would increase as the buffer capacity of the soil increases. Therefore, a site specific numeric criterion for sulfate of 1mgL-1 was recommended for the protection of the Everglades; above this level, mercury methylation is enhanced. In parallel, sulfide concentrations in the EAA exceeded the 2??gL-1 criterion for surface water already established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Effects of methylmercury on reproduction in American kestrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, P.H.; Koterba, M.T.; Rossmann, R.; Link, W.A.; French, J.B.; Bennett, R.S.; Bauer, W.C.

    2007-01-01

    Sixty breeding pairs of captive American kestrels (Falco sparverius) were exposed to a range of sublethal dietary concentrations of mercury (Hg), in the form of methylmercuric chloride, and their subsequent reproduction was measured. Egg production, incubation performance, and the number and percent of eggs hatched decreased markedly between 3.3 and 4.6 mg/kg dry weight of Hg (1.2 and 1.7 mg/kg wet wt), in the diet. The number of fledglings and the percent of nestlings fledged were reduced markedly at 0.7 mg/kg dry weight (0.3 mg/kg wet wt) and declined further between 2 and 3.3 mg/kg dry weight (0.7 and 1.2 mg/kg wet wt). Dietary concentrations of ?4.6 mg/kg dry weight (1.7 mg/kg wet wt) were associated with total fledging failure. The estimated decline in fledged young per pair (24%, Bayesian regression) for kestrels consuming 0.7 mg/kg dry weight (0.3 mg/ kg wet wt) raises concerns about population maintenance in areas subject to high inputs of anthropogenic Hg. Mercury concentrations in 20 second-laid eggs collected from all groups were related to dietary concentrations of Hg, and the Hg concentrations in 19 of these eggs were related to eggs laid and young fledged. Concentrations of Hg in eggs from the highest diet group (5.9 mg/kg dry wt; 2.2 mg/kg wet wt) were higher than egg concentrations reported for either wild birds or for captive birds (nonraptors) fed dry commercial food containing 5 mg/kg methylmercury. Accumulation ratios of Hg from diets to eggs were higher than those reported for feeding studies with other species.

  11. Bacterial methylmercury degradation in Florida Everglades peat sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin-Dipasquale, M.C.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-09-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) degradation was investigated along an eutrophication gradient in the Florida Everglades by quantifying {sup 14}CH{sub 4} and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production after incubation of anaerobic sediments with [{sup 14}C]MeHg. Degradation rate constants (k) were consistently {le}0.1 d{sup {minus}1} and decreased with sediment depth. Higher k values were observed when shorter incubation times and lower MeHg amendment levels were used, and k increased 2-fold as in-situ MeHg concentrations were approached. The average floc layer k was 0.046 {+-} 0.023 d{sup {minus}1} (n = 17) for 1--2 day incubations. In-situ degradation rates were estimated to be 0.02--0.5 ng of MeHg (g of dry sediment){sup {minus}1} d{sup {minus}1}, increasing from eutrophied to pristine areas. Nitrate-respiring bacteria did not demethylate MeHg, and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} addition partially inhibited degradation in some cases. MeHg degradation rates were not affected by PO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}} addition. {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production in all samples indicated that oxidative demethylation (OD) was an important degradation mechanism. OD occurred over 5 orders of magnitude of applied MeHg concentration, with lowest limits in the range of in-situ MeHg levels. Sulfate reducers and methanogens were the primary agents of anaerobic OD, although it is suggested that methanogens dominate degradation at in-situ MeHg concentrations. Specific pathways of OD by these two microbial groups are proposed.

  12. Elevated methylmercury concentrations and loadings during flooding in Minnesota rivers.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Steven J; Swain, Edward B; Nollet, Yabing H

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have identified flooded landscapes (e.g., wetlands, impoundments) as sites of elevated methylmercury (MeHg) production. Here we report MeHg and total Hg (THg) concentrations and mass loadings in rivers in Minnesota during major flooding episodes in the summer of 2002. Frequent intense precipitation events throughout the summer resulted in extraordinarily wet conditions in east-central and northwestern Minnesota. Streamflow remained at record-setting high levels in many rivers and streams in these regions for several weeks. We observed high concentrations of MeHg (>1.4 ng/L) accompanied by high MeHg/THg ratios (0.39 to 0.50) in the Roseau River in northwestern Minnesota and in the Elk and Rum Rivers in east-central Minnesota. Very high MeHg mass loadings were observed in the Mississippi River just upstream of Minneapolis on July 17 (51 g MeHg/day) and July 23 (42 g MeHg/day), when MeHg concentrations at this site were 0.89 and 0.99 ng/L, respectively. The elevated MeHg concentrations in the Roseau River were associated with low dissolved oxygen and high dissolved reactive phosphorus concentrations, both of which are characteristic of anoxic waters. These rivers drain landscapes containing varying amounts of wetlands, and some of the MeHg discharged is thought to have been flushed from anoxic wetland soils. In addition, the flooding of vast areas of normally dry land surfaces probably also resulted in increased MeHg production, adding to the quantities of MeHg exported from these watersheds. Changing climate patterns are expected to result in more frequent heavy precipitation and flooding events in Minnesota. Our results suggest that as flooding and wet conditions in this region increase, the production of MeHg and its export from terrestrial areas to surface waters will increase also.

  13. Mercury exposure and children's health.

    PubMed

    Bose-O'Reilly, Stephan; McCarty, Kathleen M; Steckling, Nadine; Lettmeier, Beate

    2010-09-01

    Acute or chronic mercury exposure can cause adverse effects during any period of development. Mercury is a highly toxic element; there is no known safe level of exposure. Ideally, neither children nor adults should have any mercury in their bodies because it provides no physiological benefit. Prenatal and postnatal mercury exposures occur frequently in many different ways. Pediatricians, nurses, and other health care providers should understand the scope of mercury exposures and health problems among children and be prepared to handle mercury exposures in medical practice. Prevention is the key to reducing mercury poisoning. Mercury exists in different chemical forms: elemental (or metallic), inorganic, and organic (methylmercury and ethyl mercury). Mercury exposure can cause acute and chronic intoxication at low levels of exposure. Mercury is neuro-, nephro-, and immunotoxic. The development of the child in utero and early in life is at particular risk. Mercury is ubiquitous and persistent. Mercury is a global pollutant, bio-accumulating, mainly through the aquatic food chain, resulting in a serious health hazard for children. This article provides an extensive review of mercury exposure and children's health.

  14. BLIND TRIALS EVALUATING IN VITRO INFECTIVITY OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS USING CELL CULTURE IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An optimized cell culture-immunofluorescence (IFA) procedure, using the HCT-8 cell line, was evaluated in 'blind' trials to determine the sensitivity and reproducibility for measuring infectivity of flow cytometry prepared inocula of C. parvum oocysts. In separate trials, suspens...

  15. Periodic Acid-Schiff Staining Parallels the Immunoreactivity Seen By Direct Immunofluorescence in Autoimmune Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Abreu Velez, Ana Maria; Upegui Zapata, Yulieth Alexandra; Howard, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Background: In many countries and laboratories, techniques such as direct immunofluorescence (DIF) are not available for the diagnosis of skin diseases. Thus, these laboratories are limited in the full diagnoses of autoimmune skin diseases, vasculitis, and rheumatologic diseases. In our experience with these diseases and the patient's skin biopsies, we have noted a positive correlation between periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and immunofluorescence patterns; however, these were just empiric observations. In the current study, we aim to confirm these observations, given the concept that the majority of autoantibodies are glycoproteins and should thus be recognized by PAS staining. Aims: To compare direct immunofluorescent and PAS staining, in multiple autoimmune diseases that are known to exhibit specific direct immunofluorescent patterns. Materials and Methods: We studied multiple autoimmune skin diseases: Five cases of bullous pemphigoid, five cases of pemphigus vulgaris, ten cases of cutaneous lupus, ten cases of autoimmune vasculitis, ten cases of lichen planus (LP), and five cases of cutaneous drug reactions (including one case of erythema multiforme). In addition, we utilized 45 normal skin control specimens from plastic surgery reductions. Results: We found a 98% positive correlation between DIF and PAS staining patterns over all the disease samples. Conclusion: We recommend that laboratories without access to DIF always perform PAS staining in addition to hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, for a review of the reactivity pattern. PMID:27114972

  16. Formalinized Chlamydia trachomatis organisms as antigen in the micro-immunofluorescence test.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S P; Kuo, C C; Grayston, J T

    1979-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis organisms grown in HeLa 229 cell cultures were purified and formalinized for use in the micro-immunofluorescence test. As test antigens, they were stable when stored unfrozen at 4 degrees C for a long period of time without loss of type specificity and sensitivity. PMID:389953

  17. Detection of Specific Strains and Variants of Streptococcus cremoris in Mixed Cultures by Immunofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Veldkamp, Hans; Konings, Wil N.

    1987-01-01

    Antisera against four different strains of Streptococcus cremoris were raised by injecting rabbits with washed suspensions of whole cells. These antisera interacted specifically with the corresponding strain in a mixture of up to nine different S. cremoris strains. The antisera could be used for analyzing the composition of mixed cultures containing these strains by immunofluorescence. Competition experiments were performed in batch and continuous cultures under amino acid limitation. A bacteriophage-sensitive variant of S. cremoris SK11 (SK1128) could be distinguished from a bacteriophage-resistant variant (SK1143) by the same immunofluorescence technique. The competition between the two variants and the stability of both variants in pure cultures were followed with the specific antibodies. Antibodies against the purified proteolytic system of S. cremoris Wg2 were used to determine the presence of proteases by immunofluorescence in several S. cremoris strains under different culture conditions. The described immunofluorescence methods can be used to analyze complex mixed starter cultures common in the dairy industry as the strains and variants present in these mixtures can be recognized microscopically. Images PMID:16347256

  18. Combined tyramide signal amplification and quantum dots for sensitive and photostable immunofluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ness, Jayne M; Akhtar, Rizwan S; Latham, Cecelia B; Roth, Kevin A

    2003-08-01

    Conventional immunofluorescence detection of biologically relevant proteins and antigens in tissue sections is often limited by relatively weak signals that fade rapidly on illumination. We have developed an immunohistochemical protocol that combines the sensitivity of tyramide signal amplification with the photostability of quantum dots to overcome these limitations. This simple method provides a sensitive and stable fluorescence immunohistochemical alternative to standard chromogen detection.

  19. Does methylmercury-induced hypercholesterolemia play a causal role in its neurotoxicity and cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Moreira, Eduardo Luiz; de Oliveira, Jade; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto; Goldfeder, Eliane Maria; de Bem, Andreza Fabro; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Aschner, Michael; Farina, Marcelo

    2012-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental pollutant that biomagnifies throughout the aquatic food chain, thus representing a toxicological concern for humans subsiding on fish for their dietary intake. Although the developing brain is considered the critical target organ of MeHg toxicity, recent evidence indicates that the cardiovascular system may be the most sensitive in adults. However, data on the mechanisms mediating MeHg-induced cardiovascular toxicity are scarce. Based on the close relationship between cardiovascular disease and dyslipidemia, this study was designed to investigate the effects of long-term MeHg exposure on plasma lipid levels in mice, as well as their underlying mechanisms and potential relationships to MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. Our major finding was that long-term MeHg exposure induced dyslipidemia in rodents. Specifically, Swiss and C57BL/6 mice treated for 21 days with a drinking solution of MeHg (40 mg/l, ad libitum) diluted in tap water showed increased total and non-HDL plasma cholesterol levels. MeHg-induced hypercholesterolemia was also observed in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr⁻/⁻) mice, indicating that this effect was not related to decreased LDLr-mediated cholesterol transport from blood to other tissues. Although the hepatic synthesis of cholesterol was unchanged, significant signs of nephrotoxicity (glomerular shrinkage, tubular vacuolization, and changed urea levels) were observed in MeHg-exposed mice, indicating that the involvement of nephropathy in MeHg-induced lipid dyshomeostasis may not be ruled out. Notably, Probucol (a lipid-lowering drug) prevented the development of hypercholesterolemia when coadministered with MeHg. Finally, hypercholesterolemic LDLr⁻/⁻ mice were more susceptible to MeHg-induced cerebellar glial activation, suggesting that hypercholesterolemia in itself may pose a risk factor in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. Overall, based on the strong and graded positive association between

  20. Interference of ethanol and methylmercury in the developing central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Maia, Cristiane do Socorro Ferraz; Lucena, Greice Maria Rodrigues de Souza; Corrêa, Pollyanna Barbosa Farias; Serra, Raphael Borges; Matos, Robson Willian de Melo; Menezes, Flávia da Cunha; Santos, Setsuko Noro dos; Sousa, João Batista de; Costa, Edmar Tavares da; Ferreira, Vania Maria Moraes

    2009-01-01

    Studies involving alcohol and its interactions with other neurotoxicants represent the focus of several works of research due to the fact that the use of alcohol can sometimes leads to serious health problems. Fetal exposure to alcohol and mercury has a high incidence in some regions of Brazil, where there are pregnant women who are alcoholics and live in mining areas. This work was conducted to examine the effects of combined exposure to ethanol (EtOH) and methylmercury (MeHg) in rats during the development of the central nervous system (CNS). Experimental behavioral animal models/tests were used in order to examine locomotion, anxiety, depression and memory. Pregnant rats received tap water or EtOH 22.5% w/v (6.5 g/kg per day), by gavage) during pregnancy and breast-feeding. On the 15th day of pregnancy, some groups received 8 mg/kg of MeHg (by gavage). The groups were as follows: control, EtOH, MeHg and EtOH+MeHg. The experimental results showed that the EtOH, MeHg and EtOH+MeHg groups reduced the percentage of frequency and time spent in the open arms entries of the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test, when compared to the control group. This result suggests an anxiogenic behavioral response. The MeHg group increased locomotor activity in the arena and the immobility time in the forced swimming test, suggestive of depression-like behavior. The EtOH+MeHg group showed greater reductions in the percentages of frequency and time spent in the open arms entries in the EPM test, suggesting a sedative-behavior since the frequency of enclosed arm entries was affected. In the inhibitory avoidance task, the EtOH+MeHg group reduced the latency of the step-down response onto the grid floor, suggesting a cognitive and behavior dysfunctions. Taken together, the results suggest that EtOH and/or MeHg intoxication during the developing CNS may be a risk for deficits related to locomotor impairment, anxiety, depression and neurocognitive functions. There is a possibility that EtOH may

  1. Serum/plasma methylmercury determination by isotope dilution gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Douglas C; Faarinen, Mikko; Österlund, Heléne; Rodushkin, Ilia; Christensen, Morten

    2011-09-01

    A method for the determination of methylmercury in plasma and serum samples was developed. The method uses isotope dilution with (198)Hg-labeled methylmercury, extraction into dichloromethane, back-extraction into water, aqueous-phase ethylation, purge and trap collection, thermal desorption, separation by gas chromatography, and mercury isotope specific detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. By spiking 2 mL sample with 1.2 ng tracer, measurements in a concentration interval of (0.007-2.9) μg L(-1) could be performed with uncertainty amplification factors <2. A limit of quantification of 0.03 μg L(-1) was estimated at 10 times the standard deviation of concentrations measured in preparation blanks. Within- and between-run relative standard deviations were <10% at added concentration levels of 0.14 μg L(-1), 0.35 μg L(-1) and 2.8 μg L(-1), with recoveries in the range 82-110%. Application of the method to 50 plasma/serum samples yielded a median (mean; range) concentration of methylmercury of 0.081 (0.091; <0.03-0.19) μg L(-1). This is the first time methylmercury has been directly measured in this kind of specimen, and is therefore the first estimate of a reference range.

  2. Hormesis associated with a low dose of methylmercury injected into mallard eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, Gary H.; Hoffman, David J.; Klimstra, Jon D.; Stebbins, Katherine R.; Kondrad, Shannon L.; Erwin, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    We injected mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) eggs with methylmercury chloride at doses of 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6, 3.2, and 6.4 μg mercury/g egg contents on a wet-weight basis. A case of hormesis seemed to occur because hatching success of eggs injected with 0.05 μg mercury (the lowest dose) was significantly greater (93.3%) than that of controls (72.6%), whereas hatching success decreased at progressively greater doses of mercury. Our finding of hormesis when a low dose of methylmercury was injected into eggs agrees with a similar observation in a study in which a group of female mallards was fed a low dietary concentration of methylmercury and hatching of their eggs was significantly better than that of controls. If methylmercury has a hormetic effect at low concentrations in avian eggs, these low concentrations may be important in a regulatory sense in that they may represent a no-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL).

  3. Total mercury, methylmercury and ethylmercury in marine fish and marine fishery products sold in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju-Sung; Jung, So-Young; Son, Yeo-Joon; Choi, Su-Jeong; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Jeong-Gon; Park, So-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Me; Chae, Young-Zoo; Kim, Min-Young

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, a survey of 177 samples of fish and fishery products from the markets in Seoul was carried out to investigate total mercury and organic mercury (methylmercury) concentrations and to establish a correlation, if any, between total and organic mercury levels. Concentrations of total and organic mercury in canned tuna ranged 0.001-2.581 and 0.003-1.307 mg/kg, respectively; those for fish, such as cod or salmon, ranged 0.012-2.529 and 0.021-0.507 mg/kg, respectively. Ethylmercury was not detected. More than 50% of total mercury in the samples existed as organic mercury. The correlation coefficients (r(2)) between total mercury and methylmercury concentrations of fish and fishery products found to have methylmercury were 0.844 and 0.976, respectively, which was statistically significant. There was a higher correlation in fishery products than in fish. Although there was no product in which mercury exceeded the standard set by the Food Code in 2008, with the exception of marlin steak, a processed food, which contained 1.307 mg/kg methylmercury. None exceeded the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) for mercury. Collectively, the results indicate that fish or fishery products marketed in Seoul, with the exception of marlin, have low levels of total or organic mercury and, thus, intake of these products is not a risk to public health. PMID:24786250

  4. ACCUMULATION OF METHYLMERCURY OR POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS IN IN VITRO MODELS OF RAT NEURONAL TISSUE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript reports data examining the accumulation of PCBs or methylmercury into the tissue of three commonly used in vitro neuronal models.

    ? The results demonstrate that these lipophilic compounds can accumulate to levels 5 to 100 fold higher than the surrounding s...

  5. Phytoremediation Of Mercury And Methylmercury Contaminated Sediments By Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoremediation has potential to be implemented at mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) contaminated sites. Water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) were investigated for their ability to assimilate Hg and MeHg into plant biomass, in both aquatic and sediment-associated f...

  6. Distribution and characteristics of methylmercury in surface sediment in Minamata Bay.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Akito; Yano, Shinichiro; Hisano, Akihiro; Kindaichi, Michiaki; Sonoda, Ikuko; Tada, Akihide; Akagi, Hirokatsu

    2016-08-15

    This study was carried out to evaluate the present-day chemical properties of methylmercury in surface sediment in Minamata Bay where a dredging project was completed 28years ago. Present-day sediment from Minamata Bay consists of sandy silt, and the average loss-on-ignition in surface sediment was 7.0±2.3%. The average methylmercury concentrations in the upper sediment layers were significantly higher than those in the lower sediment layers. Currently, the concentrations in sediments in Minamata Bay do not exceed the Japanese regulatory standard value for mercury. The average concentration of methylmercury in Minamata Bay surface sediment was 1.74±1.0ng/g on a dry weight basis (n=107). The methylmercury concentration in Minamata Bay surface sediment was almost 16 times higher than that in surface sediment from Isahaya Bay surface sediment, which was 0.11±0.045ng/g on a dry weight basis (n=5).

  7. Differential effects of methylmercury, thiols, and vitamins on galactosidases of nervous and non-nervous tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayalakshmi, K.; Bapu, C.; Sood, P.P.

    1992-07-01

    A rational pharmacological attack on heavy metal poisoning has only been possible with the advent of non-toxic binding of chelating agents. In the recent past, a number of chelators have been used to detoxicate the mercury content from the body. When all the well known chelators were subjected for their therapeutic capacities in the central nervous system, most of the findings were discouraging. In a recent study we have demonstrated the superiority of vitamins over thiol compounds in methylmercury mobilization, which otherwise has been considered difficult and often an impossible task for clinicians as well as toxicologists. Biochemical lesions are considered to be the most primary effects of methylmercury toxication, and lysosomes are the critical cellular organelles which are easily ruptured and release enzymes. In the present study, the biochemical analyses of two lysosomal enzymes (alpha and beta-galactosidases) in various nervous and non-nervous tissues of mice during methylmercury toxication as well as detoxication with vitamins and thiols have been studied in the light of previous investigation related to methylmercury mobilization with these agents. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Mercury and Methylmercury concentrations and loads in Cache Creek Basin, California, January 2000 through May 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, Joseph L.; Alpers, Charles N.; Slotton, Darrell G.; Suchanek, Thomas H.; Ayers, Shaun M.

    2004-01-01

    Concentrations and mass loads of total mercury and methylmercury in streams draining abandoned mercury mines and near geothermal discharge in Cache Creek Basin, California, were measured during a 17-month period from January 2000 through May 2001. Rainfall and runoff averages during the study period were lower than long-term averages. Mass loads of mercury and methylmercury from upstream sources to downstream receiving waters, such as San Francisco Bay, were generally the highest during or after winter rainfall events. During the study period, mass loads of mercury and methylmercury from geothermal sources tended to be greater than those from abandoned mining areas because of a lack of large precipitation events capable of mobilizing significant amounts of either mercury-laden sediment or dissolved mercury and methylmercury from mine waste. Streambed sediments of Cache Creek are a source of mercury and methylmercury to downstream receiving bodies of water such as the Delta of the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers. Much of the mercury in these sediments was deposited over the last 150 years by erosion and stream discharge from abandoned mines or by continuous discharges from geothermal areas. Several geochemical constituents were useful as natural tracers for mining and geothermal areas. These constituents included aqueous concentrations of boron, chloride, lithium, and sulfate, and the stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water. Stable isotopes of water in areas draining geothermal discharges were enriched with more oxygen-18 relative to oxygen-16 than meteoric waters, whereas the enrichment by stable isotopes of water from much of the runoff from abandoned mines was similar to that of meteoric water. Geochemical signatures from stable isotopes and trace-element concentrations may be useful as tracers of total mercury or methylmercury from specific locations; however, mercury and methylmercury are not conservatively transported. A distinct mixing trend of

  9. The fatty acid profile of rainbow trout liver cells modulates their tolerance to methylmercury and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Ferain, Aline; Bonnineau, Chloé; Neefs, Ineke; Rees, Jean François; Larondelle, Yvan; Schamphelaere, Karel A C De; Debier, Cathy

    2016-08-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition of fish tissues, which generally reflects that of the diet, affects various cellular properties such as membrane structure and fluidity, energy metabolism and susceptibility to oxidative stress. Since these cellular parameters can play an important role in the cellular response to organic and inorganic pollutants, a variation of the PUFA supply might modify the toxicity induced by such xenobiotics. In this work, we investigated whether the cellular fatty acid profile has an impact on the in vitro cell sensitivity to two environmental pollutants: methylmercury and cadmium. Firstly, the fatty acid composition of the rainbow trout liver cell line RTL-W1 was modified by enriching the growth medium with either alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) or docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5n-6). These modified cells and their control (no PUFA enrichment) were then challenged for 24h with increasing concentrations of methylmercury or cadmium. We observed that (i) the phospholipid composition of the RTL-W1 cells was profoundly modulated by changing the PUFA content of the growth medium: major modifications were a high incorporation of the supplemented PUFA in the cellular phospholipids, the appearance of direct elongation and desaturation metabolites in the cellular phospholipids as well as a change in the gross phospholipid composition (PUFA and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) levels and n-3/n-6 ratio); (ii) ALA, EPA and DPA enrichment significantly protected the RTL-W1 cells against both methylmercury and cadmium; (iv) DHA enrichment significantly protected the cells against cadmium but not methylmercury; (v) AA and LA enrichment had no impact on the cell tolerance to both methylmercury and cadmium; (vi) the abundance of 20:3n-6, a metabolite of the n-6 biotransformation pathway, in

  10. Mercury and methylmercury concentrations and loads in the Cache Creek watershed, California.

    PubMed

    Domagalski, Joseph L; Alpers, Charles N; Slotton, Darell G; Suchanek, Thomas H; Ayers, Shaun M

    2004-07-01

    Concentrations and loads of total mercury and methylmercury were measured in streams draining abandoned mercury mines and in the proximity of geothermal discharge in the Cache Creek watershed of California during a 17-month period from January 2000 through May 2001. Rainfall and runoff were lower than long-term averages during the study period. The greatest loading of mercury and methylmercury from upstream sources to downstream receiving waters, such as San Francisco Bay, generally occurred during or after winter rainfall events. During the study period, loads of mercury and methylmercury from geothermal sources tended to be greater than those from abandoned mining areas, a pattern attributable to the lack of large precipitation events capable of mobilizing significant amounts of either mercury-laden sediment or dissolved mercury and methylmercury from mine waste. Streambed sediments of Cache Creek are a significant source of mercury and methylmercury to downstream receiving bodies of water. Much of the mercury in these sediments is the result of deposition over the last 100-150 years by either storm-water runoff, from abandoned mines, or continuous discharges from geothermal areas. Several geochemical constituents were useful as natural tracers for mining and geothermal areas, including the aqueous concentrations of boron, chloride, lithium and sulfate, and the stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water. Stable isotopes of water in areas draining geothermal discharges showed a distinct trend toward enrichment of (18)O compared with meteoric waters, whereas much of the runoff from abandoned mines indicated a stable isotopic pattern more consistent with local meteoric water.

  11. Dietary interaction between methylmercury, selenium, arsenic, and sulfur amino acids in Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    El-Begearmi, M M; Ganther, H E; Sunde, M L

    1982-02-01

    Three experiments were conducted using Japanese quail to study the effect of arsenic (As) on the detoxifying role of selenium (Se) in methylmercury (Hg) toxicity and to test the possibility that arsenic could independently modify Hg toxicity. The possible role of sulfur-containing amino acids in Hg toxicity was also investigated. Methylmercuric chloride (10 ppm) had no significant effect on weight gain of the quail. However, it seriously decreased the survival of the quail and of their offspring when they were fed the control diet for 1 week after hatching. The addition of arsenic (up to 30 ppm as NaAsO2), methionine (.3%), cystine (.3%), or their combinations did not affect the survival of mercury-fed quail or their offspring. However, the addition of selenium (6 ppm as Na2SeO3) to the mercury diet, alone or combined with cystine, methionine, arsenic, or their combination significantly prolonged the survival time of Japanese quail compared to those fed the mercury alone. Although As improved the effectiveness of Se in prolonged survival of quail given methylmercury, As decreased the effectiveness of Se in protecting the offspring of such quail. Methylmercury also decreased egg production slightly, and fertility considerably. Addition of cystine, methionine, As (up to 15 ppm), or the combination of methionine and As to the mercury-containing diet usually improved egg production. The damaging effect of mercury on fertility was corrected by supplementing the mercury diet with Se, methionine, As, or a combination of these three. This study provides evidence that As added alone in the form of arsenite has little effect on methylmercury toxicity but altered the ability of selenite to modify methylmercury toxicity. The biological mechanism of the interactions between mercury, selenium, and arsenic are not yet understood.

  12. Mercury and methylmercury concentrations and loads in the Cache Creek watershed, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, J.L.; Alpers, C.N.; Slotton, D.G.; Suchanek, T.H.; Ayers, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Concentrations and loads of total mercury and methylmercury were measured in streams draining abandoned mercury mines and in the proximity of geothermal discharge in the Cache Creek watershed of California during a 17-month period from January 2000 through May 2001. Rainfall and runoff were lower than long-term averages during the study period. The greatest loading of mercury and methylmercury from upstream sources to downstream receiving waters, such as San Francisco Bay, generally occurred during or after winter rainfall events. During the study period, loads of mercury and methylmercury from geothermal sources tended to be greater than those from abandoned mining areas, a pattern attributable to the lack of large precipitation events capable of mobilizing significant amounts of either mercury-laden sediment or dissolved mercury and methylmercury from mine waste. Streambed sediments of Cache Creek are a significant source of mercury and methylmercury to downstream receiving bodies of water. Much of the mercury in these sediments is the result of deposition over the last 100-150 years by either storm-water runoff, from abandoned mines, or continuous discharges from geothermal areas. Several geochemical constituents were useful as natural tracers for mining and geothermal areas, including the aqueous concentrations of boron, chloride, lithium and sulfate, and the stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water. Stable isotopes of water in areas draining geothermal discharges showed a distinct trend toward enrichment of 18O compared with meteoric waters, whereas much of the runoff from abandoned mines indicated a stable isotopic pattern more consistent with local meteoric water. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparison of the teratogenicity of methylmercury and selenomethionine injected into bird eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, Gary H.; Hoffman, David J.; Klimstra, Jon D.; Stebbins, Katherine R.

    2012-01-01

    Methylmercury chloride and seleno-L-methionine were injected separately or in combinations into the fertile eggs of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), chickens (Gallus gallus), and double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), and the incidence and types of teratogenic effects were recorded. For all three species,selenomethionine alone caused more deformities than did methylmercury alone. When mallard eggs were injected with the lowest dose of selenium (Se) alone (0.1 μg/g), 28 of 44 embryos and hatchlings were deformed, whereas when eggs were injected with the lowest dose of mercury (Hg) alone (0.2 μg/g), only 1 of 56 embryos or hatchlings was deformed. Mallard embryos seemed to be more sensitive to the teratogenic effects of Se than chicken embryos:0 of 15 chicken embryos or hatchlings from eggs injected with 0.1 μg/g Se exhibited deformities. Sample sizes were small with double-crested cormorant eggs, but they also seemed to be less sensitive to the teratogenic effects of Se than mallard eggs. There were no obvious differences among species regarding Hg-induced deformities. Overall, few interactions were apparent between methylmercury and selenomethionine with respect to the types of deformities observed. However, the deformities spina bifida and craniorachischisis were observed only when Hg and Se were injected in combination. One paradoxical finding was that some doses of methylmercury seemed to counteract the negative effect selenomethionine had on hatching of eggs while at the same time enhancing the negative effect selenomethionine had on creating deformities. When either methylmercury or selenomethionine is injected into avian eggs, deformities start to occur at much lower concentrations than when the Hg or Se is deposited naturally in the egg by the mother.

  14. The oral bioavailability and toxicokinetics of methylmercury in common loon (Gavia immer) chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, F.; Karasov, W.H.; Kenow, K.P.; Meyer, M.W.; Hines, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    We compared the toxicokinetics of methylmercury in captive common loon chicks during two time intervals to assess the impact of feather growth on the kinetics of mercury. We also determined the oral bioavailability of methylmercury during these trials to test for age-related changes. The blood concentration-time curves for individuals dosed during feather development (initiated 35 days post hatch) were best described by a one-compartment toxicokinetic model with an elimination half-life of 3 days. The data for birds dosed following completion of feather growth (84 days post hatch) were best fitted by a two-compartment elimination model that includes an initial rapid distribution phase with a half-life of 0.9 days, followed by a slow elimination phase with a half-life of 116 days. We determined the oral bioavailability of methylmercury during the first dosing interval by comparing the ratios of the area under the blood concentration-time curves (AUC0→∞) for orally and intravenously dosed chicks. The oral bioavailability of methylmercury during the first dosing period was 0.83. We also determined bioavailability during both dosing periods using a second measure because of irregularities with intravenous results in the second period. This second bioavailability measure estimated the percentage of the dose that was deposited in the blood volume (f), and the results show that there was no difference in bioavailability among dosing periods. The results of this study highlight the importance of feather growth on the toxicokinetics of methylmercury.

  15. A comparison of the teratogenicity of methylmercury and selenomethionine injected into bird eggs.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Gary H; Hoffman, David J; Klimstra, Jon D; Stebbins, Katherine R

    2012-04-01

    Methylmercury chloride and seleno-L-methionine were injected separately or in combinations into the fertile eggs of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), chickens (Gallus gallus), and double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), and the incidence and types of teratogenic effects were recorded. For all three species, selenomethionine alone caused more deformities than did methylmercury alone. When mallard eggs were injected with the lowest dose of selenium (Se) alone (0.1 μg/g), 28 of 44 embryos and hatchlings were deformed, whereas when eggs were injected with the lowest dose of mercury (Hg) alone (0.2 μg/g), only 1 of 56 embryos or hatchlings was deformed. Mallard embryos seemed to be more sensitive to the teratogenic effects of Se than chicken embryos: 0 of 15 chicken embryos or hatchlings from eggs injected with 0.1 μg/g Se exhibited deformities. Sample sizes were small with double-crested cormorant eggs, but they also seemed to be less sensitive to the teratogenic effects of Se than mallard eggs. There were no obvious differences among species regarding Hg-induced deformities. Overall, few interactions were apparent between methylmercury and selenomethionine with respect to the types of deformities observed. However, the deformities spina bifida and craniorachischisis were observed only when Hg and Se were injected in combination. One paradoxical finding was that some doses of methylmercury seemed to counteract the negative effect selenomethionine had on hatching of eggs while at the same time enhancing the negative effect selenomethionine had on creating deformities. When either methylmercury or selenomethionine is injected into avian eggs, deformities start to occur at much lower concentrations than when the Hg or Se is deposited naturally in the egg by the mother. PMID:22042039

  16. Hydrologic Controls On Methylmercury Availability In Coastal Plain Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. M.; Brigham, M. E.; Burns, D. A.; Button, D. T.; Lutz, M. A.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Riva-Murray, K.; Journey, C.

    2011-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) in streams is often attributed to methylation in up-gradient wetland areas, with episodic flood events maximizing wetland-stream hydrologic connectivity and dominating MeHg supply to the stream habitat. A number of studies have demonstrated that Coastal Plain streams in the southeastern United States are particularly vulnerable to high MeHg bioaccumulation and have attributed this vulnerability to wetland abundance and strong hydrologic connectivity between wetland areas and adjacent stream aquatic habitat. Because characteristically coarse-grained Coastal Plain sediments favor vertical infiltration with little surface runoff, flood events attributable to Coastal Plain precipitation are driven by rising groundwater, promoting efficient transport of MeHg from wetland/floodplain source areas to the stream habitat and increasing in-stream availability. Several observations at McTier Creek, South Carolina, however, suggest that good hydrologic connectivity and efficient MeHg transport in Coastal Plain systems are not limited to flood conditions. Close correspondence between stream and shallow-groundwater water levels at McTier indicate good hydrologic connectivity exists prior to flood conditions. Dissolved MeHg concentrations do not increase under flood conditions. Thus, we assessed the flux of water and dissolved mercury (Hg) species (FMeHg and total Hg (FTHg)) from surface water and groundwater sources in a short reach at McTier Creek during separate events in April and July 2009, to determine the importance of shallow groundwater Hg transport from floodplain areas to the stream under non-flood conditions. Mass balance assessments indicated that, under non-flood conditions, the primary supply of water, FMeHg, and FTHg within the reach (excluding upstream surface-water influx) was groundwater discharge, rather than tributary transport from wetlands, in-stream MeHg production, or atmospheric deposition. The results indicate efficient transport of

  17. Determination of methylmercury in marine biota samples: method validation.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia

    2014-05-01

    Regulatory authorities are expected to measure concentration of contaminants in foodstuffs, but the simple determination of total amount cannot be sufficient for fully judging its impact on the human health. In particular, the methylation of metals generally increases their toxicity; therefore validated analytical methods producing reliable results for the assessment of methylated species are highly needed. Nowadays, there is no legal limit for methylmercury (MeHg) in food matrices. Hence, no standardized method for the determination of MeHg exists within the international jurisdiction. Contemplating the possibility of a future legislative limit, a method for low level determination of MeHg in marine biota matrixes, based on aqueous-phase ethylation followed by purge and trap and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to pyrolysis-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (Py-AFS) detection, has been developed and validated. Five different extraction procedures, namely acid and alkaline leaching assisted by microwave and conventional oven heating, as well as enzymatic digestion, were evaluated in terms of their efficiency to extract MeHg from Scallop soft tissue IAEA-452 Certified Reference Material. Alkaline extraction with 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol, microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) with 5M HCl and enzymatic digestion with protease XIV yielded the highest extraction recoveries. Standard addition or the introduction of a dilution step were successfully applied to overcome the matrix effects observed when microwave-assisted extraction using 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol or 25% (w/v) aqueous TMAH were used. ISO 17025 and Eurachem guidelines were followed to perform the validation of the methodology. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration curve, linearity (0.9995), working range (1-800pg), recovery (97%), precision, traceability, limit of detection (0.45pg), limit of quantification (0.85pg) and expanded uncertainty (15.86%, k=2) were assessed with Fish protein Dorm-3 Certified

  18. Oral bioaccessibility of arsenic, mercury and methylmercury in marine species commercialized in Catalonia (Spain) and health risks for the consumers.

    PubMed

    Cano-Sancho, German; Perelló, Gemma; Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Marques, António; Nadal, Martí; Domingo, José L

    2015-12-01

    This study was aimed at characterizing the bioaccessibility of arsenic (As), mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in commercial fish and seafood species widely consumed by the population of Catalonia (Spain). An accurate evaluation on how bioaccessibility estimations may affect the outcomes of exposure assessment studies was also conducted. The concentrations of As, Hg, and MeHg in samples of fish and seafood incubated in a 3-compartmental (mouth, stomach, and small intestine) in vitro gastrointestinal model, were quantified and compared with the levels of these elements in cooked samples. Arsenic showed a high bioaccessibility in all the fish and seafood species, ranging from 72% (mackerel) to 89% (sardine). In contrast, the bioaccessibility of Hg was rather lower, being <50% for most species, while MeHg could be only quantified in swordfish and tuna. This study elucidates the potential overestimation of health risks to consumers, when the effects of bioaccessibility and cooking procedures are not taken into account in the risk assessment. Unlike As, whose risk is not generally overestimated, Hg and MeHg showed a lower and variable bioaccessibility in marine species, meaning an overestimation of health risks for the adult population. Further studies should assess the bioaccessibility of mercurial species for children. PMID:26409124

  19. Low-Dose Methylmercury-Induced Apoptosis and Mitochondrial DNA Mutation in Human Embryonic Neural Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinjin; Yan, Mengling; Zhao, Lina; Wu, Qing; Wu, Chunhua; Chang, Xiuli; Zhou, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a long-lasting organic pollutant primarily found in the aquatic environment. The developing brain is particularly sensitive to MeHg due to reduced proliferation of neural stem cell. Although several mechanisms of MeHg-induced apoptosis have been defined in culture models, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation is involved in the toxic effect of MeHg, especially in the neural progenitor cells. In the present study, the ReNcell CX cell, a human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) line, was exposed to nanomolar concentrations of MeHg (≤50 nM). We found that MeHg altered mitochondrial metabolic function and induced apoptosis. In addition, we observed that MeHg induced ROS production in a dose-dependent manner in hNPCs cells, which was associated with significantly increased expressions of ND1, Cytb, and ATP6. To elucidate the mechanism underlying MeHg toxicity on mitochondrial function, we examined the ATP content and mitochondrial membrane potential in MeHg-treated hNPCs. Our study showed that MeHg exposure led to decreased ATP content and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, which failed to match the expansion in mtDNA copy number, suggesting impaired mtDNA. Collectively, these results demonstrated that MeHg induced toxicity in hNPCs through altering mitochondrial function and inducing oxidative damage to mtDNA. PMID:27525052

  20. Protective effects of the flavonoid chrysin against methylmercury-induced genotoxicity and alterations of antioxidant status, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Manzolli, Eduardo Scandinari; Serpeloni, Juliana Mara; Grotto, Denise; Bastos, Jairo Kennup; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Barbosa Junior, Fernando; Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael Mazzaron

    2015-01-01

    The use of phytochemicals has been widely used as inexpensive approach for prevention of diseases related to oxidative damage due to its antioxidant properties. One of dietary flavonoids is chrysin (CR), found mainly in passion fruit, honey, and propolis. Methylmercury (MeHg) is a toxic metal whose main toxic mechanism is oxidative damage. Thus, the study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant effects of CR against oxidative damage induced by MeHg in Wistar rats. Animals were treated with MeHg (30 µg/kg/bw) in presence and absence of CR (0.10, 1.0, and 10 mg/kg/bw) by gavage for 45 days. Glutathione (GSH) in blood was quantified spectrophotometrically and for monitoring of DNA damage, comet assay was used in leukocytes and hepatocytes. MeHg led to a significant increase in the formation of comets; when the animals were exposed to the metal in the presence of CR, higher concentrations of CR showed protective effects. Moreover, exposure to MeHg decreased the levels of GSH and GSH levels were restored in the animals that received CR plus MeHg. Taken together the findings of the present work indicate that consumption of flavonoids such as CR may protect humans against the adverse health effects caused by MeHg. PMID:25810809

  1. ACCUMULATION OF THE PERSISTENT ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANTS METHYLMERCURY OR POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS IN IN VITRO MODELS OF RAT NEURONAL TISSUE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and methylmercury (CH3Hg+) are known toxicants which persist in the environment and accumulate in tissue. Studies to identify mechanisms of action associated with these toxicants have largely been conducted in vitro, and dosimetry comparisons acro...

  2. Methylmercury degradation and exposure pathways in streams and wetlands impacted by historical mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donovan, Patrick M.; Blum, Joel D.; Singer, Michael B.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Tsui, Martin T.K.

    2016-01-01

    Monomethyl mercury (MMHg) and total mercury (THg) concentrations and Hg stable isotope ratios (δ202Hg and Δ199Hg) were measured in sediment and aquatic organisms from Cache Creek (California Coast Range) and Yolo Bypass (Sacramento Valley). Cache Creek sediment had a large range in THg (87 to 3870 ng/g) and δ202Hg (−1.69 to −0.20‰) reflecting the heterogeneity of Hg mining sources in sediment. The δ202Hg of Yolo Bypass wetland sediment suggests a mixture of high and low THg sediment sources. Relationships between %MMHg (the percent ratio of MMHg to THg) and Hg isotope values (δ202Hg and Δ199Hg) in fish and macroinvertebrates were used to identify and estimate the isotopic composition of MMHg. Deviation from linear relationships was found between %MMHg and Hg isotope values, which is indicative of the bioaccumulation of isotopically distinct pools of MMHg. The isotopic composition of pre-photodegraded MMHg (i.e., subtracting fractionation from photochemical reactions) was estimated and contrasting relationships were observed between the estimated δ202Hg of pre-photodegraded MMHg and sediment IHg. Cache Creek had mass dependent fractionation (MDF; δ202Hg) of at least −0.4‰ whereas Yolo Bypass had MDF of +0.2 to +0.5‰. This result supports the hypothesis that Hg isotope fractionation between IHg and MMHg observed in rivers (−MDF) is unique compared to +MDF observed in non-flowing water environments such as wetlands, lakes, and the coastal ocean.

  3. Determinants of polychlorinated biphenyls and methylmercury exposure in inuit women of childbearing age.

    PubMed Central

    Muckle, G; Ayotte, P; Dewailly E; Jacobson, S W; Jacobson, J L

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to to identify maternal characteristics associated with traditional food consumption and to examine food items associated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury body burden in pregnant Inuit women from Northern Québec. We interviewed women from three communities at mid-pregnancy and at 1 and 11 months postpartum. We measured PCBs, Hg, and selenium in maternal blood; Hg was also measured in maternal hair. The women reported eating significant amounts of fish, beluga muktuk/fat, seal meat, and seal fat. Although consumption of fish and seal was associated with lower socioeconomic status, consumption of beluga whale was uniform across strata. Fish and seal meat consumption was associated with increased Hg concentrations in hair. Traditional food intake during pregnancy was unrelated to PCB body burden, which is more a function of lifetime consumption. This study corroborated previous findings relating marine mammal and fish consumption to increased Hg and selenium body burden. Despite widespread knowledge regarding the presence of these contaminants in traditional foods, a large proportion of Inuit women increased their consumption of these foods during pregnancy, primarily because of pregnancy-related changes in food preferences and the belief that these foods are beneficial during pregnancy. PMID:11673127

  4. Methylmercury degradation and exposure pathways in streams and wetlands impacted by historical mining.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Patrick M; Blum, Joel D; Singer, Michael Bliss; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Tsui, Martin T K

    2016-10-15

    Monomethyl mercury (MMHg) and total mercury (THg) concentrations and Hg stable isotope ratios (δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg) were measured in sediment and aquatic organisms from Cache Creek (California Coast Range) and Yolo Bypass (Sacramento Valley). Cache Creek sediment had a large range in THg (87 to 3870ng/g) and δ(202)Hg (-1.69 to -0.20‰) reflecting the heterogeneity of Hg mining sources in sediment. The δ(202)Hg of Yolo Bypass wetland sediment suggests a mixture of high and low THg sediment sources. Relationships between %MMHg (the percent ratio of MMHg to THg) and Hg isotope values (δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg) in fish and macroinvertebrates were used to identify and estimate the isotopic composition of MMHg. Deviation from linear relationships was found between %MMHg and Hg isotope values, which is indicative of the bioaccumulation of isotopically distinct pools of MMHg. The isotopic composition of pre-photodegraded MMHg (i.e., subtracting fractionation from photochemical reactions) was estimated and contrasting relationships were observed between the estimated δ(202)Hg of pre-photodegraded MMHg and sediment IHg. Cache Creek had mass dependent fractionation (MDF; δ(202)Hg) of at least -0.4‰ whereas Yolo Bypass had MDF of +0.2 to +0.5‰. This result supports the hypothesis that Hg isotope fractionation between IHg and MMHg observed in rivers (-MDF) is unique compared to +MDF observed in non-flowing water environments such as wetlands, lakes, and the coastal ocean. PMID:27234290

  5. Bioenergetic and pharmacokinetic model for exposure of common loon (Gavia immer) chicks to methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karasov, W.H.; Kenow, K.P.; Meyer, M.W.; Fournier, F.

    2007-01-01

    A bioenergetics model was used to predict food intake of common loon (Gavia immer) chicks as a function of body mass during development, and a pharmacokinetics model, based on first-order kinetics in a single compartment, was used to predict blood Hg level as a function of food intake rate, food Hg content, body mass, and Hg absorption and elimination. Predictions were tested in captive growing chicks fed trout (Salmo gairdneri) with average MeHg concentrations of 0.02 (control), 0.4, and 1.2 ??g/g wet mass (delivered as CH3HgCl). Predicted food intake matched observed intake through 50 d of age but then exceeded observed intake by an amount that grew progressively larger with age, reaching a significant overestimate of 28% by the end of the trial. Respiration in older, nongrowing birds probably was overestimated by using rates measured in younger, growing birds. Close agreement was found between simulations and measured blood Hg, which varied significantly with dietary Hg and age. Although chicks may hatch with different blood Hg levels, their blood level is determined mainly by dietary Hg level beyond approximately two weeks of age. The model also may be useful for predicting Hg levels in adults and in the eggs that they lay, but its accuracy in both chicks and adults needs to be tested in free-living birds. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  6. Measuring NLR Oligomerization II: Detection of ASC Speck Formation by Confocal Microscopy and Immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Beilharz, Michael; De Nardo's, Dominic; Latz, Eicke; Franklin, Bernardo S

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasome assembly results in the formation of a large intracellular protein scaffold driven by the oligomerization of the adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC). Following inflammasome activation, ASC polymerizes to form a large singular structure termed the ASC "speck," which is crucial for recruitment of caspase-1 and its inflammatory activity. Hence, due to the considerably large size of these structures, ASC specks can be easily visualized by microscopy as a simple upstream readout for inflammasome activation. Here, we provide two detailed protocols for imaging ASC specks: by (1) live-cell imaging of monocyte/macrophage cell lines expressing a fluorescently tagged version of ASC and (2) immunofluorescence of endogenous ASC in cell lines and human immune cells. In addition, we outline a protocol for increasing the specificity of ASC antibodies for use in immunofluorescence. PMID:27221487

  7. Immunofluorescence staining for the detection of immunoglobulins and complement (C3) in dogs with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Aresu, L; Pregel, P; Bollo, E; Palmerini, D; Sereno, A; Valenza, F

    2008-12-01

    Renal cortical biopsies from 74 dogs with different degrees of renal failure were studied by immunofluorescence to assess the frequency and extent of the deposition of immunoglobulins G, M and A (IgG, IgM, IgA) and complement C3. The dogs were divided into two groups on the basis of their clinical signs, and standard histological and electron microscopical examinations, according to whether their disease was an immune-mediated nephropathy (IMN) or a non-immune-mediated nephropathy (NIMN). In the dogs with an imn there was strong immunofluorescence due to IgG in the mesangium and the glomerular basement membrane and to IgM in the mesangium. The mechanism of immune complex trapping in the glomerulus also resulted in positive reactions to IgM in the dogs with an NIMN.

  8. Local country food sources of methylmercury, selenium and omega-3 fatty acids in Nunavik, Northern Quebec.

    PubMed

    Lemire, M; Kwan, M; Laouan-Sidi, A E; Muckle, G; Pirkle, C; Ayotte, P; Dewailly, E

    2015-03-15

    Country foods are central to Inuit culture and replete in selenium (Se) and long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA). However, some marine country foods bioaccumulate high concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg). Se and n-3 are associated with several health benefits in Nunavik, Northern Quebec, but, recent studies show that prenatal MeHg exposure is associated with visual, cognitive and behavioral deficit later in childhood. The study objectives are to identify contemporary country food sources of MeHg, Se and long-chain n-3 PUFA in Nunavik, particularly among childbearing-age women, taking into account regional differences in consumption profiles. The contribution of different country foods to daily MeHg, Se, long-chain n-3 PUFA intake (μg/kg body weight/day) was estimated using: (i) country food consumption and blood biomarkers data from the 2004 Nunavik Health Survey (387 women, 315 men), and (ii) data on MeHg, Se, long-chain n-3 PUFA concentrations found in Nunavik wildlife species. In the region where most traditional beluga hunting takes place in Nunavik, the prevalence of at-risk blood Hg (≥ 8 μg/L) in childbearing-age women was 78.4%. While most country foods presently consumed contain low MeHg, beluga meat, not a staple of the Inuit diet, is the most important contributor to MeHg: up to two-thirds of MeHg intake in the beluga-hunting region (0.66 of MeHg intake) and to about one-third in other regions. In contrast, seal liver and beluga mattaaq - beluga skin and blubber - only mildly contributed to MeHg (between 0.06 and 0.15 of MeHg intake), depending on the region. Beluga mattaaq also highly contributed to Se intake (0.30 of Se intake). Arctic char, beluga blubber and mattaaq, and seal blubber contributed to most long-chain n-3 PUFA intake. This study highlights the importance of considering interconnections between local ecosystems and dietary habits to develop recommendations and interventions promoting country foods' benefits

  9. Influence of food, aquatic humus, and alkalinity on methylmercury uptake by Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, B.A.; Brezonik, P.L.

    1999-03-01

    Six-day-old Daphnia magna were exposed to low concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) in synthetic freshwater and synthetic food. Uptake kinetics were determined in 24- to 72-h experiments, measuring both the loss of Hg from water and accumulation in D. magna. Dose-uptake response was linear for MeHg concentrations up to 4.0 ng/L; an initial concentration of 2.0 ng/L was used when other factors were varied. Concentrations of total Hg and MeHg in water and D. magna were measured in treatments with varied hardness and alkalinity, aquatic humus (AH), and food spiked with MeHg versus water spiked with MeHg. Uptake rate coefficients were derived from two versions of a first-order, two-compartment model. The first version assumed constant MeHg concentration; the second accounted for changing MeHg concentration in water over time. Both models accounted for a nonzero starting concentration of MeHg in plankton. Fitted rate coefficients were higher for the second model than the first: the uptake coefficient (k{sub u}) was nine times higher; the depuration coefficient (k{sub d}) was twice as high. Assuming a constant MeHg concentration for a one-time spike thus underestimated the rate coefficient. The source of MeHg was compared by exposing D. magna for 48 h to MeHg at 2 ng/L in food or water. Daphnia magna accumulated significantly more inorganic Hg (i.e., Hg{sup 2+}) from spiked food than from spiked water, but accumulation of MeHg was the same from both sources. A similar response was found when D. magna were exposed to a lake water extraction of AH at concentrations of C at 3 and 10 mg/L. At the higher AH concentration, total Hg in daphnids was higher, but MeHg was lower, suggesting that AH was a source of inorganic Hg but reduced the bioavailability of MeHg. Exposure of D. magna to MeHg at 2 ng/L in hard or soft water adjusted to pH 6.7 showed no significant difference in MeHg uptake, supporting an argument that hardness and alkalinity per se do not affect MeHg uptake by

  10. Museum Preserved Bivalves as Indicators of Long-term Trends in Methylmercury Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengen, A. C.; Foslund, H. M.; Greenfield, B. K.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the many efforts to reduce mercury concentrations in the environment, there are relatively few datasets on long-term trends in mercury in biota, especially for the bioavailable form, methylmercury (MeHg). This study used museum preserved bivalves (stored in ethanol) to look at MeHg trends in the Asian date mussel Musculista senhousia and the Asian clam Potamocorbula amurensis, collected from San Francisco Bay, California between 1975 and 2012. For each sampling date, 4 to 15 individuals were obtained from museum collections (N = 156 total specimens), freeze-dried, weighed, homogenized, digested, and individually analyzed for MeHg using trace metal clean techniques. The bivalves were also analyzed for δ13C and δ15N to look for changes in food web structure. P. amurensis specimens were only available from 1988 to 2012, and an increase in MeHg was observed during that time. In contrast, M. senhousia specimens were available for the entire 37 year period and exhibited a significant decline in MeHg in the southern reach of the estuary (South Bay). The median MeHg concentration in M. senhousia was highest at 239 ng/g dw in October 1975. That year was the last year of operations for the New Almaden Mercury Mining District, which drained into South Bay. By the 1990s, MeHg concentrations in M. senhousia dropped significantly to a median of 37 ng/g dw. Isotopic δ15N values did not support a hypothesis of reduced trophic position causing the MeHg decline. Over the study duration, δ15N increased in M. senhousia, which we attributed to a baseline shift. We also observed a decline in δ13C since 2000, which may represent a shift in bivalve carbon towards greater utilization of planktonic sources. To validate the use of museum specimens, we ran a preservation study, where we collected fresh bivalves, fixed them in ethanol or formalin, and then transferred them to ethanol for long-term storage. Although MeHg concentrations increased after 1 week, they stabilized over

  11. In situ identification of bacterial species in marine microfouling films by using an immunofluorescence technique.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; Huber, P S; Meyer, A E; Slots, J; Fornalik, M S; Baier, R E

    1984-01-01

    An immunofluorescence technique was developed for the in situ identification of specific bacteria in marine microfouling films. Microorganisms adherent to glass plates after 30 days of immersion in a synthetic seawater system were cultured and classified by biochemical tests, flagellar arrangement, and the API 20E system. All isolates were gram-negative aerobic or facultative motile rods, predominantly Pseudomonas spp. Rabbit antisera to the five dominant organisms including Achromobacter spp., Comamonas terrigena, P. putrefaciens, a yellow-pigmented Pseudomonas sp., and Vibrio alginolyticus were prepared. These antisera were shown to be species specific in indirect immunofluorescence assays against a battery of 26 marine isolates from 14 bacterial species, with the exception of antisera to the Pseudomonas spp, which cross-reacted with each other but not with test bacteria of other genera. These immunofluorescent reagents enabled the in situ identification of all five bacterial species in microfouling films. Low-surface-energy test plates had smaller numbers of adherent bacteria in microfouling films than medium-surface-energy test plates, suggesting that the degree of microfouling may be influenced by the surface energy. In addition, the reagents could identify up to 39% of the attached bacteria in microfouling films spontaneously formed on steel plates in flow cells deployed in different areas of the Atlantic Ocean. The microbial composition of the ocean-formed films varied with the geographical area of their formation. The present results indicate that immunofluorescence techniques may provide a rapid and reliable means to identify, in situ, specific bacteria in marine microfouling films. PMID:6393875

  12. The serological diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection: a comparison of complement fixation, haemagglutination and immunofluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, S. A.; Tettmar, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A total of 193 sera were examined for antibody to Mycoplasma pneumoniae by three techniques - complement fixation (CF), haemagglutination (HA) and immunofluorescence (IF), the last method being used to assess IgM, IgG and IgA antibodies. The most reliable single test for diagnosis was HA, and the most useful combination of tests was HA with IF (IgM and IgG). The IgA IF was not found to be diagnostically helpful. PMID:3934260

  13. Surface bound or cytoplasmic immunoglobulins: interpretation of the immunofluorescence observed in cytocentrifuge slides of human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Schuit, H R; Hijmans, W; Jansen, J

    1984-01-01

    Results of immunofluorescence observations in the study of normal and malignant blood lymphocytes are described. Data which support the proposition that most membrane bound immunoglobulin molecules are stable enough to remain intact during cytocentrifuge slide preparation are presented. Therefore not all positive cells in a fixed cytocentrifuge slide should be considered as containing cytoplasmic immunoglobulins. A correct interpretation is essential because of its bearing on our concepts of B lymphocyte differentiation. Images Fig. 3 PMID:6378456

  14. Evaluating the potential efficacy of mercury total maximum daily loads on aqueous methylmercury levels in four coastal watersheds.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Sarah E; Ambrose, Richard F; Jay, Jennifer A

    2008-08-01

    Of the approximately 780 U.S. EPA approved mercury total maximum daily loads (TMDLs), most specify a reduction in total mercury (Hg(T)) loads to reduce methylmercury levels in fish tissue, assuming a 1:1 correspondence. However, mercury methylation is more complex, and therefore, proposed load reductions may not be adequate. Using multiple regression with microlevel and macrolevel variables, the potential efficacy of mercury TMDLs on decreasing aqueous methylmercury levels was investigated in four coastal watersheds: Mugu Lagoon (CA), San Francisco Bay Estuary, Long Island Sound, and south Florida. Hg(T) and methylmercury levels were positively correlated in all watersheds except in Long Island Sound, where spatial differences explained over 40% of the variability in methylmercury levels. A mercury TMDL would be least effective in Long Island Sound due to spatial heterogeneity but most effective in south Florida, where the ratio between aqueous Hg(T) and methylmercury levels was close to 1 and the 95% confidence interval was narrow, indicating a probable reduction in aqueous methylmercury levels if Hg(T) loads were reduced.

  15. Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction and liquid chromatographic separation with electrochemical detection of methylmercury from biological samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, N.S.

    1997-01-01

    Using the coupled methods presented in this paper, methylmercury can be accurately and rapidly extracted from biological samples by modified supercritical fluid carbon dioxide and quantitated using liquid chromatography with reductive electrochemical detection. Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide modified with methanol effectively extracts underivatized methylmercury from certified reference materials Dorm-1 (dogfish muscle) and Dolt-2 (dogfish liver). Calcium chloride and water, with a ratio of 5:2 (by weight), provide the acid environment required for extracting methylmercury from sample matrices. Methylmercury chloride is separated from other organomercury chloride compounds using HPLC. The acidic eluent, containing 0.06 mol L-1 NaCl, insures the presence of methylmercury chloride and facilitates the reduction of mercury on a glassy carbon electrode. If dual glassy carbon electrodes are used, a positive peak is observed at -0.65 to -0.70 V and a negative peak is observed at -0.90V with the organomercury compounds that were tested. The practical detection limit for methylmercury is 5 X 10-8 mol L-1 (1 X 10-12 tool injected) when a 20 ??L injection loop is used.

  16. Localization of Lipoxygenases 1 and 2 in Germinating Soybean Seeds by an Indirect Immunofluorescence Technique 1

    PubMed Central

    Vernooy-Gerritsen, Marjan; Bos, Adri L. M.; Veldink, Gerrit A.; Vliegenthart, Johannes F. G.

    1983-01-01

    Lipoxygenases 1 and 2 were localized in etiolated germinating soybean seeds (Glycine max [L.]. Merr. var. Williams) by an indirect immunofluorescence staining technique. Sections of paraffin-embedded seedlings were stained with affinity-purified antibodies directed against lipoxygenase 1 or 2. The specificity of the immunofluorescence technique was examined by use of nonimmune serum or immunoglobulin G preparations after total adsorption with the appropriate lipoxygenase coupled to Sepharose 4B. After immunofluorescence staining with antilipoxygenase 1 or 2 IgG storage tissues of cotyledons fluoresce strongly the first days of germination. After 3 days, the abaxial hypodermis, the epidermis, and the vascular bundle sheaths show fluorescence, especially after incubation with antilipoxygenase 2 IgG. Fluorescence in cortex and pith of the hypocotyl migrates to the vascular cylinder during germination. In primary leaves, all tissues show fluorescence after 1 day of germination. In storage tissues of cotyledons, cytoplasm around the protein bodies fluoresces, whereas in other tissues protein bodies or other large cell organelles fluoresce. It is reasonable to suggest that lipoxygenase exerts its function in cells at the time that rigorous changes in metabolism take place, namely at the start of mobilization of reserves in storage tissues and start of biosynthesis of chloroplastids in several tissues. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16663205

  17. Characterization of Antibodies to Products of Proinsulin Processing Using Immunofluorescence Staining of Pancreas in Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Ali; Bruin, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    The efficient processing of proinsulin into mature insulin and C-peptide is often compromised under conditions of beta cell stress, including diabetes. Impaired proinsulin processing has been challenging to examine by immunofluorescence staining in pancreas tissue because the characterization of antibodies specific for proinsulin, proinsulin intermediates, processed insulin and C-peptide has been limited. This study aimed to identify and characterize antibodies that can be used to detect products of proinsulin processing by immunofluorescence staining in pancreata from different species (mice, rats, dog, pig and human). We took advantage of several knockout mouse lines that lack either an enzyme involved in proinsulin processing or an insulin gene. Briefly, we report antibodies that are specific for several proinsulin processing products, including: a) insulin or proinsulin that has been appropriately processed at the B-C junction; b) proinsulin with a non-processed B-C junction; c) proinsulin with a non-processed A-C junction; d) rodent-specific C-peptide 1; e) rodent-specific C-peptide 2; and f) human-specific C-peptide or proinsulin. In addition, we also describe two ‘pan-insulin’ antibodies that react with all forms of insulin and proinsulin intermediates, regardless of the species. These antibodies are valuable tools for studying proinsulin processing by immunofluorescence staining and distinguishing between proinsulin products in different species. PMID:26216140

  18. Anticomplement immunofluorescence for the titration of antibody to varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, S; Baba, M; Ogata, M; Iijima, S; Murai, C

    1981-01-01

    Anticomplement immunofluorescence (ACIF) was tested for its use for the titration of antibody against varicella-zoster virus (VZV). ACIF antibody responses of patients with VZV infection were specific for VZV antigen and heterotypic responses to herpes simplex virus type-1 and cytomegalovirus antigens were not observed. Comparative studies of ACIF, membrane immunofluorescence (MIF) and indirect immunofluorescence (IF), using acetone-fixed antigen, were carried out with nonimmune sera and convalescent sera of patients who had recovered from varicella, herpes zoster and Rumsey Hunt disease. Nonspecific staining occurred with some nonimmune sera at a 1:4 dilution in the MIF and IF tests, after freezing and thawing of the serum, but not in the ACIF test. The antibody titers in convalescent sera agreed well in these three methods and the highest titer was obtained by MIF. The titers in ACIF and IF were similar but the ACIF antibody decreased earlier than the IF antibody during convalescence. On the other hand there was a discrepancy between the titers of ACIF and those of MIF and IF antibody in the sera of healthy adults, all sera with titers higher than 10 in the MIF and IF tests had titers below 10 in the ACIF test. The average titer of ACIF antibody declined to less than 10 with increasing age (13 to more than 20 years), whereas the MIF antibody increased during the same period of life.

  19. Characterization of Antibodies to Products of Proinsulin Processing Using Immunofluorescence Staining of Pancreas in Multiple Species.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Ali; Bruin, Jennifer E; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2015-08-01

    The efficient processing of proinsulin into mature insulin and C-peptide is often compromised under conditions of beta cell stress, including diabetes. Impaired proinsulin processing has been challenging to examine by immunofluorescence staining in pancreas tissue because the characterization of antibodies specific for proinsulin, proinsulin intermediates, processed insulin and C-peptide has been limited. This study aimed to identify and characterize antibodies that can be used to detect products of proinsulin processing by immunofluorescence staining in pancreata from different species (mice, rats, dog, pig and human). We took advantage of several knockout mouse lines that lack either an enzyme involved in proinsulin processing or an insulin gene. Briefly, we report antibodies that are specific for several proinsulin processing products, including: a) insulin or proinsulin that has been appropriately processed at the B-C junction; b) proinsulin with a non-processed B-C junction; c) proinsulin with a non-processed A-C junction; d) rodent-specific C-peptide 1; e) rodent-specific C-peptide 2; and f) human-specific C-peptide or proinsulin. In addition, we also describe two 'pan-insulin' antibodies that react with all forms of insulin and proinsulin intermediates, regardless of the species. These antibodies are valuable tools for studying proinsulin processing by immunofluorescence staining and distinguishing between proinsulin products in different species.

  20. Technical report: immunofluorescence and TUNEL staining of celloidin embedded human temporal bone tissues.

    PubMed

    Markaryan, Adam; Nelson, Erik G; Tretiakova, Maria; Hinojosa, Raul

    2008-07-01

    The large archival human temporal bone collections of the world have been fixed in formalin and embedded in celloidin. These treatments have created challenges to the use of contemporary probes, which are routinely used in the evaluation of fresh and frozen tissues, for the analysis of archival temporal bone tissues. Formalin alters the configuration of proteins and can obscure antigens by modifying the epitopes recognized by antibodies. Celloidin embedding provides superior support of the delicate membranous structures of the inner ear to maintain tissue integrity during sectioning, however, inadequate removal of celloidin may limit tissue permeability resulting in poor penetration of large molecules. Methods are described in this manuscript that have allowed reproducible immunofluorescence and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling) staining results in these archival tissues. To our knowledge, successful immunofluorescence staining of type I collagen, immunofluorescence staining of cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COX III), and TUNEL staining in archival human temporal bone tissues with confocal microscopy has not been previously reported. These results demonstrate the utility of developing techniques to evaluate the existing collections of archival temporal bones which remain our greatest source of tissue for investigating the causes of ear diseases.

  1. Distribution and transport of total mercury and methylmercury in mercury-contaminated sediments in reservoirs and wetlands of the Sudbury River, east-central Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, John A.; Waldron, Marcus C.; Breault, Robert F.; Lent, Robert M.

    1999-01-01

    Total mercury and methylmercury were measured in 4 reservoir cores and 12 wetland cores from Sudbury River. The distribution of total mercury and methylmercury in these cores was evaluated to determine the potential for total mercury and methylmercury transport from reservoir and wetlands sediments to the water column. Concentrations of methylmercury were corrected for an analytical artifact introduced during the separation distillation used in the analysis procedure. Corrected methylmercury concentrations correlated with total mercury concentrations in bulk sediment from below the top layers of reservoir and wetland cores; methylmercury concentrations at the top layers of cores were relatively high, however, and were not correlated with total mercury concentrations. Concentrations of methylmercury in pore water were positively correlated with methylmercury concentrations in the bulk sediment. High concentrations of total mercury and methylmercury in sediment (73 and 0.047 micrograms per gram dry-weight basis, respectively) contributed less to the water column in the reservoir than in the wetlands probably because of burial by low concentration sediment and differences in the processes available to transport mercury from the sediments to the water in the reservoirs, as compared to the wetlands .

  2. Sulfur and Methylmercury in the Florida Everglades - the Biogeochemical Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orem, W. H.; Gilmour, C. C.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Aiken, G.

    2011-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a serious environmental problem in aquatic ecosystems worldwide because of its toxicity and tendency to bioaccumulate. The Everglades receives some of the highest levels of atmospheric mercury deposition and has some of the highest levels of MeHg in fish in the USA, posing a threat to pisciverous wildlife and people through fish consumption. USGS studies show that a combination of biogeochemical factors make the Everglades especially susceptible to MeHg production and bioaccumulation: (1) vast wetland area with anoxic soils supporting anaerobic microbial activity, (2) high rates of atmospheric mercury deposition, (3) high levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that complexes and stabilizes mercury in solution for transport to sites of methylation, and (4) high sulfate loading in surface water that drives microbial sulfate reduction and mercury methylation. The high levels of sulfate in the Everglades represent an unnatural condition. Background sulfate levels are estimated to be <1 mg/L, but about 60% of the Everglades has surface water sulfate concentrations exceeding background. Highly sulfate-enriched marshes in the northern Everglades have average sulfate levels of 60 mg/L. Sulfate loading to the Everglades is principally a result of land and water management in south Florida. The highest concentrations of sulfate, averaging 60-70 mg/L, are in canal water in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA). Geochemical data and a preliminary sulfur mass balance for the EAA are consistent with sulfur currently used in agriculture, and sulfur released by oxidation of organic EAA soils (including legacy agricultural applications and natural sulfur) as the primary sources of sulfate enrichment to the canals and ecosystem. Sulfate loading increases microbial sulfate reduction and MeHg production in soils. The relationship between sulfate loading and MeHg production, however, is complex. Sulfate levels up to about 20-30 mg/L increase mercury

  3. Production and Cycling of Methylmercury in High Arctic Wetland Ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnherr, I.; St. Louis, V. L.

    2010-12-01

    Some species of freshwater fish in the Canadian high Arctic contain levels of methylmercury (MeHg) that pose health risks to the northern Inuit peoples that harvest these species as a traditional food source. In temperate regions, wetlands are known natural sites of MeHg production and hence significant MeHg sources to downstream ecosystems. However, the importance of wetlands to Hg methylation in the Arctic is unclear and the sources of MeHg to arctic freshwater ecosystems are still largely unidentified. Our research is demonstrating that some shallow and warm wetland ponds on the Arctic landscape contain high MeHg concentrations compared to nearby deep and cold lakes. We used a mass-balance approach to measure the net in-pond production of MeHg in two warm wetland ponds (Ponds 1 and 2) near Lake Hazen, Ellesmere Island, Nunavut (81° N latitude). We quantified external inputs and outputs of MeHg to and from the ponds, as well as the accumulation of MeHg in the water column during the summers of 2005 and 2008. Any changes in water column MeHg concentrations that could not be accounted for by external inputs or sinks were attributed to in-pond production. The principal external input and sink of MeHg was, respectively, wet atmospheric deposition and water-column MeHg photodemethylation. For 2005, we estimate that the net flux of MeHg from sediments into the water column was 0.015 μg m-2 d-1 in Pond 1 and 0.0016 μg m-2 d-1 in Pond 2. Compared to sediment-water MeHg fluxes measured in Alaskan tundra lakes (0.0015-0.0045 μg m-2 d-1), Pond 1 sediments are a greater source of MeHg while Pond 2 is similar to the Alaskan lakes. Furthermore, the accumulation of MeHg in the water column of Pond 1 (0.0061 μg m-2 d-1) was similar to the net yield of MeHg from temperate boreal wetlands (0.0005-0.006 μg m-2 d-1), demonstrating that these Arctic wetlands are important sites of MeHg production. In addition, we used mercury stable-isotope tracers to quantify methylation and

  4. Gene expression, glutathione status and indicators of hepatic oxidative stress in laughing gull (Larus atricilla) hatchlings exposed to methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenko, Kathryn; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Hoffman, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive studies of methylmercury (MeHg) toxicity in birds, molecular effects on birds are poorly characterized. To improve our understanding of toxicity pathways and identify novel indicators of avian exposure to Hg, the authors investigated genomic changes, glutathione status, and oxidative status indicators in liver from laughing gull (Larus atricilla) hatchlings that were exposed in ovo to MeHg (0.05–1.6 µg/g). Genes involved in the transsulfuration pathway, iron transport and storage, thyroid-hormone related processes, and cellular respiration were identified by suppression subtractive hybridization as differentially expressed. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) identified statistically significant effects of Hg on cytochrome C oxidase subunits I and II, transferrin, and methionine adenosyltransferase RNA expression. Glutathione-S-transferase activity and protein-bound sulfhydryl levels decreased, whereas glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity increased dose-dependently. Total sulfhydryl concentrations were significantly lower at 0.4 µg/g Hg than in controls. T ogether, these endpoints provided some evidence of compensatory effects, but little indication of oxidative damage at the tested doses, and suggest that sequestration of Hg through various pathways may be important for minimizing toxicity in laughing gulls. This is the first study to describe the genomic response of an avian species to Hg. Laughing gulls are among the less sensitive avian species with regard to Hg toxicity, and their ability to prevent hepatic oxidative stress may be important for surviving levels of MeHg exposures at which other species succumb.

  5. Rapid increases in mercury concentrations in the eggs of mallards fed methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, Gary H.; Hoffman, David J.; Klimstra, Jon D.; Stebbins, Katherine R.

    2009-01-01

    To determine how quickly breeding birds would have to feed in a mercury-contaminated area before harmful concentrations of mercury, as methylmercury, built up in their eggs, we fed female mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) a control diet or diets containing 0.5, 1, 2, 4, or 8 μg/g mercury (on what was close to a dry weight basis) as methylmercury chloride for 23 d. After 18 d on their respective mercury diets, the eggs of mallards fed 0.5, 1, 2, 4, or 8 μg/g mercury contained 97.8, 86.0, 89.9, 88.9, and 85.9%, respectively, of the peak concentrations reached after 23 d. Depending on the dietary concentration of mercury, no more than approximately a week may be required for harmful concentrations (0.5–0.8 μg/g, wet weight) to be excreted into eggs.

  6. Direct immunofluorescence of the outer root sheath in anagen and telogen hair in pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus.

    PubMed

    Tanasilovic, Srdjan; Medenica, Ljiljana; Popadic, Svetlana

    2014-11-01

    Direct immunofluorescence of peri-lesional skin is the gold standard in the diagnosis of pemphigus. A specific immunofluorescence pattern may also be demonstrated in the outer root sheath of anagen and telogen hair. We demonstrated an intercellular reticular deposition of immunoglobulin G in the outer root sheath of plucked anagen and telogen hair in all pemphigus vulgaris patients with active disease and for the first time in all patients with active pemphigus foliaceus. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that plucked hair samples may be kept at -20°C for at least 2 weeks before immunofluorescent staining and analysis.

  7. Assessment of neurotoxic effects and brain region distribution in rat offspring prenatally co-exposed to low doses of BDE-99 and methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenchang; Cheng, Jinping; Gu, Jinmin; Liu, Yuanyuan; Fujimura, Masatake; Wang, Wenhua

    2014-10-01

    Exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ether (PDBE) and methylmercury (MeHg) can occur simultaneously as both contaminants are found in the same food sources, especially fish, seafood, marine mammals and milk. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of exposure to low levels of MeHg (2.0 μg mL(-1) in drinking water) and BDE-99 (0.2 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) from gestational day 6 to postnatal day (PND) 21, alone and in combination, on neurobehavioral development and redox responses in offspring. The present study demonstrated an interaction due to co-exposure with low doses of MeHg and BDE-99 enhanced developmental neurotoxic effects. These effects were manifested as the delayed appearance of negative geotaxis reflexes, impaired motor coordination, and induction of oxidative stress in the cerebellum. In particular, the cerebellum may be a sensitive target for combined MeHg and BDE-99 toxicity. The neurotoxicity of low dose MeHg was exacerbated by the presence of low dose of BDE-99. It is concluded that prenatal co-exposure to MeHg and BDE-99 causes oxidative stress in the cerebellum of offspring by altering the activity of different antioxidant enzymes and producing free radicals. Hg retention was not affected by co-exposure to BDE-99. However, MeHg co-exposure seemed to increase BDE-99 concentrations in selected brain regions in pups compared to pups exposed to BDE-99 only. These results showed that the adverse effects following prenatal co-exposure to MeHg and BDE-99 were associated with tissue concentrations very close to the current human body burden of this persistent bioaccumulative compound.

  8. [Regeneration of photoreceptor organs in freshwater planarians at different levels of accumulation of natural methylmercury compounds].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, I V; Gremiachikh, V A; Zheltov, S V; Bogdanenko, O V; Aksenova, I A

    2006-01-01

    The effects of natural methylmercury compounds on regeneration of photoreceptor organs were studied in three freshwater planarians: Polycelis tenuis, Dugesia lugubris, and D. tigrina. Accumulation of methyl mercury in the planarian body suppressed regeneration of P. tenuis with numerous photoreceptor organs to a greater extent than in two other planarians that have only two eyes. High methyl mercury concentrations inhibited the restoration of photoreceptor organs in asexual and sexual D. tigrina races.

  9. Methylmercury chloride and selenomethionine interactions on health and reproduction in mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were fed a control diet or diets containing 10 ppm mercury as methylmercury chloride, 10 ppm selenium as seleno-DL-methionine, or 10 ppm mercury plus 10 ppm selenium. One of 12 adult males fed 10 ppm mercury died and 8 others suffered from paralysis of their legs by the time the study was terminated. However, when the diet contained 10 ppm selenium in addition to the 10 ppm mercury, none of 12 males became sick. In contrast to the protective effect of selenium against mercury poisoning in males, selenium plus mercury was worse than selenium or mercury alone for some measurements of reproductive success. Both selenium and mercury lowered duckling production through reductions in hatching success and survival of ducklings, but the combination of mercury plus selenium was worse than either mercury or selenium alone. Controls produced an average of 7.6 young per female, females fed 10 ppm selenium produced an average of 2.8 young, females fed 10 ppm mercury produced 1.1 young, and females fed both mercury and selenium produced 0.2 young. Teratogenic effects also were worse for the combined mercury plus selenium treatment; deformities were recorded in 6.1% of the embryos of controls, 16.4% for methylmercury chloride, 36.2% for selenomethionine, and 73.4% for the combination of methylmercury chloride and selenomethionine. The presence of methylmercury in the diet greatly enhanced the storage of selenium in tissues. The livers of males fed 10 ppm selenium contained a mean of 9.6 ppm selenium, whereas the livers of males fed 10 ppm selenium plus 10 ppm mercury contained a mean of 114 ppm selenium. However, selenium did not enhance the storage of mercury. The results show that mercury and selenium may be antagonistic to each other for adults and synergistic to young, even within the same experiment.

  10. Comparison of direct mercury analyzer and FIA-CV-AAS in determination of methylmercury in fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, J. C.; Hortellani, M. A.; Sarkis, J. E. S.; Nakatsubo, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) has been determined in fish reference materials by direct mercury analyzer (DMA 80) and FIA-CV-AAS. In order to evaluate accuracy, certified reference materials (Fish protein, NRCC - Dorm 4 and fish material, Ipen - Dourada 1) were analyzed after extraction and separation of mercury species. Good agreement of the results have been obtained (relative error of the determination between the methods varied from 1.5% to 39%). The repeatability of the results varied from 4% to 26%.

  11. Accumulation of methylmercury in the earthworm, Eisenia foetida, and its effect on regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, W.N.; Cromartie, E.; Moment, G.B.

    1985-08-01

    Earthworms provide an appropriate model for evaluating the environmental hazards of metals in soil, and they are also excellent organisms for studying the process of regeneration. Two studies have found that concentrations of mercury in earthworms were higher than those in the soil where they lived. This study investigates the accumulation of methylmercury in the earthworm, Eisenia foetida (Savigny), and its effect on regeneration after excision of the caudal end.

  12. Simultaneous determination of trace levels of ethylmercury and methylmercury in biological samples and vaccines using sodium tetra(n-propyl)borate as derivatizing agent.

    PubMed

    Gibicar, Darija; Logar, Martina; Horvat, Nusa; Marn-Pernat, Andreja; Ponikvar, Rafael; Horvat, Milena

    2007-05-01

    Because of increasing awareness of the potential neurotoxicity of even low levels of organomercury compounds, analytical techniques are required for determination of low concentrations of ethylmercury (EtHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples. An accurate and sensitive method has been developed for simultaneous determination of methylmercury and ethylmercury in vaccines and biological samples. MeHg and EtHg were isolated by acid leaching (H2SO4-KBr-CuSO4), extraction of MeHg and EtHg bromides into an organic solvent (CH2Cl2), then back-extraction into Milli-Q water. MeHg and EtHg bromides were derivatized with sodium tetrapropylborate (NaBPr4), collected at room temperature on Tenax, separated by isothermal gas chromatography (GC), pyrolysed, and detected by cold-vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV AFS). The repeatability of results from the method was approximately 5-10% for EtHg and 5-15% for MeHg. Detection limits achieved were 0.01 ng g-1 for EtHg and MeHg in blood, saliva, and vaccines and 5 ng g-1 for EtHg and MeHg in hair. The method presented has been shown to be suitable for determination of background levels of these contaminants in biological samples and can be used in studies related to the health effects of mercury and its species in man. This work illustrates the possibility of using hair and blood as potential biomarkers of exposure to thiomersal.

  13. Immunohistochemical identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum by monoclonal antibodies in paraffin-embedded tissues of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.), using paired immunoenzyme and paired immunofluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Evensen, O; Dale, O B; Nilsen, A

    1994-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum was identified in situ by immunoenzymatic and immunofluorescence techniques in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens collected during a natural outbreak of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) and from an experimental infection in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 4D3 and 2G5 were used in this study, both specific for the 57-58-kD outer membrane protein (p57) of the bacterium. Both MAbs revealed positive staining in ethanol-fixed tissue specimens, but only the epitope identified by MAb 4D3 was formalin resistant. Pretreatment with trypsin did not reestablish the antigenicity for the epitope identified by Mab 2G5. Paired immunoenzymatic staining for identification of the bacterium in sequential incubation steps on ethanol-fixed tissue specimens using an avidin-biotin-peroxidase system was obtained after serial dilution of the Mab (2G5) or the chromagen, amino ethyl carbazole, in the first sequence. Paired immunofluorescence staining with well-balanced color mixing was easily obtained on ethanol-fixed tissue specimens using sequential incubations. Single exposures gave blue (aminomethyl coumarin acetic acid) and green (fluorescein isothiocyanate) fluorescence for MAbs 2G5 and biotinylated 4D3, respectively. Color mixing was revealed as a turquoise staining. Studies on method sensitivity was performed by incorporating a known amount of a protein preparation of p57 into an inert matrix, creating an artificial test substrate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Prenatal Exposures to Environmental Chemicals and Children's Neurodevelopment: An Update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review surveys the recent literature on the neurodevelopmental impacts of chemical exposures during pregnancy. The review focuses primarily on chemicals of recent concern, including phthalates, bisphenol-A, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and perfluorinated compounds, but also addresses chemicals with longer histories of investigation, including air pollutants, lead, methylmercury, manganese, arsenic, and organophosphate pesticides. For some chemicals of more recent concern, the available literature does not yet afford strong conclusions about neurodevelopment toxicity. In such cases, points of disagreement among studies are identified and suggestions provided for approaches to resolution of the inconsistencies, including greater standardization of methods for expressing exposure and assessing outcomes. PMID:23515885

  15. Elevated mercu