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Sample records for methylococcus capsulatus bath

  1. Membrane-associated methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, J A; DiSpirito, A A

    1996-01-01

    An active preparation of the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was isolated by ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography using dodecyl beta-D-maltoside as the detergent. The active preparation consisted of three major polypeptides with molecular masses of 47,000, 27,000, and 25,000 Da. Two of the three polypeptides (those with molecular masses of 47,000 and 27,000 Da) were identified as the polypeptides induced when cells expressing the soluble MMO are switched to culture medium in which the pMMO is expressed. The 27,000-Da polypeptide was identified as the acetylene-binding protein. The active enzyme complex contained 2.5 iron atoms and 14.5 copper atoms per 99,000 Da. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of the enzyme showed evidence for a type 2 copper center (g perpendicular = 2.057, g parallel = 2.24, and magnitude of A parallel = 172 G), a weak high-spin iron signal (g = 6.0), and a broad low-field (g = 12.5) signal. Treatment of the pMMO with nitric oxide produced the ferrous-nitric oxide derivative observed in the membrane fraction of cells expressing the pMMO. When duroquinol was used as a reductant, the specific activity of the purified enzyme was 11.1 nmol of propylene oxidized.min-1.mg of protein-1, which accounted for approximately 30% of the cell-free propylene oxidation activity. The activity was stimulated by ferric and cupric metal ions in addition to the cytochrome b-specific inhibitors myxothiazol and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide. PMID:8576034

  2. Computational and Experimental Analysis of the Secretome of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    PubMed Central

    Indrelid, Stine; Mathiesen, Geir; Jacobsen, Morten; Lea, Tor; Kleiveland, Charlotte R.

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) was recently demonstrated to abrogate inflammation in a murine model of inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting interactions with cells involved in maintaining mucosal homeostasis and emphasizing the importance of understanding the many properties of M. capsulatus. Secreted proteins determine how bacteria may interact with their environment, and a comprehensive knowledge of such proteins is therefore vital to understand bacterial physiology and behavior. The aim of this study was to systematically analyze protein secretion in M. capsulatus (Bath) by identifying the secretion systems present and the respective secreted substrates. Computational analysis revealed that in addition to previously recognized type II secretion systems and a type VII secretion system, a type Vb (two-partner) secretion system and putative type I secretion systems are present in M. capsulatus (Bath). In silico analysis suggests that the diverse secretion systems in M.capsulatus transport proteins likely to be involved in adhesion, colonization, nutrient acquisition and homeostasis maintenance. Results of the computational analysis was verified and extended by an experimental approach showing that in addition an uncharacterized protein and putative moonlighting proteins are released to the medium during exponential growth of M. capsulatus (Bath). PMID:25479164

  3. The Soil Bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus Bath Interacts with Human Dendritic Cells to Modulate Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Indrelid, Stine; Kleiveland, Charlotte; Holst, René; Jacobsen, Morten; Lea, Tor

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased in Western countries during the course of the twentieth century, and is evolving to be a global disease. Recently we showed that a bacterial meal of a non-commensal, non-pathogenic methanotrophic soil bacterium, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath prevents experimentally induced colitis in a murine model of IBD. The mechanism behind the effect has this far not been identified. Here, for the first time we show that M. capsulatus, a soil bacterium adheres specifically to human dendritic cells, influencing DC maturation, cytokine production, and subsequent T cell activation, proliferation and differentiation. We characterize the immune modulatory properties of M. capsulatus and compare its immunological properties to those of another Gram-negative gammaproteobacterium, the commensal Escherichia coli K12, and the immune modulatory Gram-positive probiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in vitro. M. capsulatus induces intermediate phenotypic and functional DC maturation. In a mixed lymphocyte reaction M. capsulatus-primed monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) enhance T cell expression of CD25, the γ-chain of the high affinity IL-2 receptor, supports cell proliferation, and induce a T cell cytokine profile different from both E. coli K12 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. M. capsulatus Bath thus interacts specifically with MoDC, affecting MoDC maturation, cytokine profile, and subsequent MoDC directed T cell polarization. PMID:28293233

  4. Structure and Protein–Protein Interactions of Methanol Dehydrogenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the initial steps of their metabolic pathway, methanotrophic bacteria oxidize methane to methanol with methane monooxygenases (MMOs) and methanol to formaldehyde with methanol dehydrogenases (MDHs). Several lines of evidence suggest that the membrane-bound or particulate MMO (pMMO) and MDH interact to form a metabolic supercomplex. To further investigate the possible existence of such a supercomplex, native MDH from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) has been purified and characterized by size exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering and X-ray crystallography. M. capsulatus (Bath) MDH is primarily a dimer in solution, although an oligomeric species with a molecular mass of ∼450–560 kDa forms at higher protein concentrations. The 2.57 Å resolution crystal structure reveals an overall fold and α2β2 dimeric architecture similar to those of other MDH structures. In addition, biolayer interferometry studies demonstrate specific protein–protein interactions between MDH and M. capsulatus (Bath) pMMO as well as between MDH and the truncated recombinant periplasmic domains of M. capsulatus (Bath) pMMO (spmoB). These interactions exhibit KD values of 833 ± 409 nM and 9.0 ± 7.7 μM, respectively. The biochemical data combined with analysis of the crystal lattice interactions observed in the MDH structure suggest a model in which MDH and pMMO associate not as a discrete, stoichiometric complex but as a larger assembly scaffolded by the intracytoplasmic membranes. PMID:25185034

  5. Nitrogen isotopomer site preference of N2O produced by Nitrosomonas europaea and Methylococcus capsulatus Bath.

    PubMed

    Sutka, R L; Ostrom, N E; Ostrom, P H; Gandhi, H; Breznak, J A

    2003-01-01

    The relative importance of individual microbial pathways in nitrous oxide (N(2)O) production is not well known. The intramolecular distribution of (15)N in N(2)O provides a basis for distinguishing biological pathways. Concentrated cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus Bath and Nitrosomonas europaea were used to investigate the site preference of N(2)O by microbial processes during nitrification. The average site preference of N(2)O formed during hydroxylamine oxidation by M. capsulatus Bath (5.5 +/- 3.5 per thousand) and N. europaea (-2.3 +/- 1.9 per thousand) and nitrite reduction by N. europaea (-8.3 +/- 3.6 per thousand) differed significantly (ANOVA, f((2,35)) = 247.9, p = 0). These results demonstrate that the mechanisms for hydroxylamine oxidation are distinct in M. capsulatus Bath and N. europaea. The average delta(18)O-N(2)O values of N(2)O formed during hydroxylamine oxidation for M. capsulatus Bath (53.1 +/- 2.9 per thousand) and N. europaea (-23.4 +/- 7.2 per thousand) and nitrite reduction by N. europaea (4.6 +/- 1.4 per thousand) were significantly different (ANOVA, f((2,35)) = 279.98, p = 0). Although the nitrogen isotope value of the substrate, hydroxylamine, was similar in both cultures, the observed fractionation (delta(15)N) associated with N(2)O production via hydroxylamine oxidation by M. capsulatus Bath and N. europaea (-2.3 and 26.0 per thousand, respectively) provided evidence that differences in isotopic fractionation were associated with these two organisms. The site preferences in this study are the first measured values for isolated microbial processes. The differences in site preference are significant and indicate that isotopomers provide a basis for apportioning biological processes producing N(2)O.

  6. Oxidation of hydroxylamine by cytochrome P-460 of the obligate methylotroph Methylococcus capsulatus Bath.

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, J A; Duncan, C; DiSpirito, A A

    1994-01-01

    An enzyme capable of the oxidation of hydroxylamine to nitrite was isolated from the obligate methylotroph Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. The absorption spectra in cell extracts, electron paramagnetic resonance spectra, molecular weight, covalent attachment of heme group to polypeptide, and enzymatic activities suggest that the enzyme is similar to cytochrome P-460, a novel iron-containing protein previously observed only in Nitrosomonas europaea. The native and subunit molecular masses of the M. capsulatus Bath protein were 38,900 and 16,390 Da, respectively; the isoelectric point was 6.98. The enzyme has approximately one iron and one copper atom per subunit. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of the protein showed evidence for a high-spin ferric heme. In contrast to the enzyme from N. europaea, a 13-nm blue shift in the soret band of the ferrocytochrome (463 nm in cell extracts to 450 nm in the final sample) occurred during purification. The amino acid composition and N-terminal amino acid sequence of the enzyme from M. capsulatus Bath was similar but not identical to those of cytochrome P-460 of N. europaea. In cell extracts, the identity of the biological electron acceptor is as yet unestablished. Cytochrome c-555 is able to accept electrons from cytochrome P-460, although the purified enzyme required phenazine methosulfate for maximum hydroxylamine oxidation activity (specific activity, 366 mol of O2 per s per mol of enzyme). Hydroxylamine oxidation rates were stimulated approximately 2-fold by 1 mM cyanide and 1.5-fold by 0.1 mM 8-hydroxyquinoline. Images PMID:7928947

  7. The Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) Secreted Protein, MopE*, Binds Both Reduced and Oxidized Copper

    PubMed Central

    Ve, Thomas; Mathisen, Karina; Helland, Ronny; Karlsen, Odd A.; Fjellbirkeland, Anne; Røhr, Åsmund K.; Andersson, K. Kristoffer; Pedersen, Rolf-Birger; Lillehaug, Johan R.; Jensen, Harald B.

    2012-01-01

    Under copper limiting growth conditions the methanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) secrets essentially only one protein, MopE*, to the medium. MopE* is a copper-binding protein whose structure has been determined by X-ray crystallography. The structure of MopE* revealed a unique high affinity copper binding site consisting of two histidine imidazoles and one kynurenine, the latter an oxidation product of Trp130. In this study, we demonstrate that the copper ion coordinated by this strong binding site is in the Cu(I) state when MopE* is isolated from the growth medium of M. capsulatus. The conclusion is based on X-ray Near Edge Absorption spectroscopy (XANES), and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies. EPR analyses demonstrated that MopE*, in addition to the strong copper-binding site, also binds Cu(II) at two weaker binding sites. Both Cu(II) binding sites have properties typical of non-blue type II Cu (II) centres, and the strongest of the two Cu(II) sites is characterised by a relative high hyperfine coupling of copper (A|| = 20 mT). Immobilized metal affinity chromatography binding studies suggests that residues in the N-terminal part of MopE* are involved in forming binding site(s) for Cu(II) ions. Our results support the hypothesis that MopE plays an important role in copper uptake, possibly making use of both its high (Cu(I) and low Cu(II) affinity properties. PMID:22916218

  8. Presence of methyl sterol and bacteriohopanepolyol in an outer-membrane preparation from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Stan-Lotter, Helga; Kato, Katharine; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1992-01-01

    Cytoplasmic/intracytoplasmic and outer membrane preparations of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) were isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation of a total membrane fraction prepared by disruption using a French pressure cell. The cytoplasmic and/or intracytoplasmic membrane fraction consisted of two distinct bands, Ia and Ib (buoyant densities 1.16 and 1.18 g ml (exp -1), respectively) that together contained 57% of the protein, 68% of the phospholipid, 73% of the ubiquinone and 89% of the CN-sensitive NADH oxidase activity. The only apparent difference between these two cytoplasmic bands was a much higher phospholipid content for Ia. The outer membrane fraction (buoyant density 1.23-1.24 g ml (exp -1)) contained 60% of the lipopolysaccharide-associated, beta-hydroxypalmitic acid, 74% of the methylsterol, and 66% of the bacteriohopanepolyol (BHP); phospholipid to methyl sterol or BHP ratios were 6:1. Methanol dehydrogenase activity and a c-type cytochrome were also present in this outer membrane fraction. Phospholipase A activity was present in borh the cytoplasmic membrane and outer membrane fractions. The unique distribution of cyclic triterpenes may reflect a specific role in conferring outer membrane stability in this methanotrophic bacterium.

  9. Structure of the redox sensor domain of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) MmoS‡

    PubMed Central

    Ukaegbu, Uchechi E.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2009-01-01

    MmoS from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) is the multidomain sensor protein of a two component signaling system proposed to play a role in the copper-mediated regulation of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO). MmoS binds an FAD cofactor within its N-terminal tandem Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domains, suggesting that it functions as a redox sensor. The crystal structure of the MmoS tandem PAS domains, designated PAS-A and PAS-B, has been determined to 2.34 Å resolution. Both domains adopt the typical PAS domain α/β topology and are structurally similar. The two domains are linked by a long α helix and do not interact with one another. The FAD cofactor is housed solely within PAS-A and is stabilized by an extended hydrogen bonding network. The overall fold of PAS-A is similar to other flavin-containing PAS domains, but homodimeric interactions in other structures are not observed in the MmoS sensor, which crystallized as a monomer. The structure both provides new insight into the architecture of tandem PAS domains and suggests specific residues that may play a role in MmoS FAD redox chemistry and subsequent signal transduction. PMID:19271777

  10. Presence of methyl sterol and bacteriohopanepolyol in an outer-membrane preparation from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Stan-Lotter, Helga; Kato, Katharine; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1992-01-01

    Cytoplasmic/intracytoplasmic and outer membrane preparations of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) were isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation of a total membrane fraction prepared by disruption using a French pressure cell. The cytoplasmic and/or intracytoplasmic membrane fraction consisted of two distinct bands, Ia and Ib (buoyant densities 1.16 and 1.18 g ml (exp -1), respectively) that together contained 57% of the protein, 68% of the phospholipid, 73% of the ubiquinone and 89% of the CN-sensitive NADH oxidase activity. The only apparent difference between these two cytoplasmic bands was a much higher phospholipid content for Ia. The outer membrane fraction (buoyant density 1.23-1.24 g ml (exp -1)) contained 60% of the lipopolysaccharide-associated, beta-hydroxypalmitic acid, 74% of the methylsterol, and 66% of the bacteriohopanepolyol (BHP); phospholipid to methyl sterol or BHP ratios were 6:1. Methanol dehydrogenase activity and a c-type cytochrome were also present in this outer membrane fraction. Phospholipase A activity was present in borh the cytoplasmic membrane and outer membrane fractions. The unique distribution of cyclic triterpenes may reflect a specific role in conferring outer membrane stability in this methanotrophic bacterium.

  11. Oxidation of ultrafast radical clock substrate probes by the soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Valentine, A M; LeTadic-Biadatti, M H; Toy, P H; Newcomb, M; Lippard, S J

    1999-04-16

    Radical clock substrate probes were used to assess the viability of a discrete substrate radical species in the mechanism of hydrocarbon oxidation by the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). New substituted cyclopropane probes were used with very fast ring-opening rate constants and other desirable attributes, such as the ability to discriminate between radical and cationic intermediates. Oxidation of these substrates by a reconstituted sMMO system resulted in no rearranged products, allowing an upper limit of 150 fs to be placed on the lifetime of a putative radical species. This limit strongly suggests that there is no such substrate radical intermediate. The two enantiomers of trans-1-methyl-2-phenyl-cyclopropane were prepared, and the regioselectivity of their oxidation to the corresponding cyclopropylmethanol and cyclopropylphenol products was determined. The results are consistent with selective orientation of the two enantiomeric substrates in the hydrophobic cavity at the active site of sMMO, specific models for which were examined by molecular modeling.

  12. Inactivation of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) by acetylene.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh D; Lin, Ya-Ping; Van Vuong, Quan; Nagababu, Penumaka; Chang, Brian T-A; Ng, Kok Yaoh; Chen, Chein-Hung; Han, Chau-Chung; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Li, Mai Suan; Yu, Steve S-F; Chan, Sunney I

    2015-12-01

    Acetylene (HCCH) has a long history as a mechanism-based enzyme inhibitor and is considered an active-site probe of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Here, we report how HCCH inactivates pMMO in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) by using high-resolution mass spectrometry and computational simulation. High-resolution MALDI-TOF MS of intact pMMO complexes has allowed us to confirm that the enzyme oxidizes HCCH to the ketene (C2H2O) intermediate, which then forms an acetylation adduct with the transmembrane PmoC subunit. LC-MS/MS analysis of the peptides derived from in-gel proteolytic digestion of the protein subunit identifies K196 of PmoC as the site of acetylation. No evidence is obtained for chemical modification of the PmoA or PmoB subunit. The inactivation of pMMO by a single adduct in the transmembrane PmoC domain is intriguing given the complexity of the structural fold of this large membrane-protein complex as well as the complicated roles played by the various metal cofactors in the enzyme catalysis. Computational studies suggest that the entry of hydrophobic substrates to, and migration of products from, the catalytic site of pMMO are controlled tightly within the transmembrane domain. Support of these conclusions is provided by parallel experiments with two related alkynes: propyne (CH3CCH) and trifluoropropyne (CF3CCH). Finally, we discuss the implication of these findings to the location of the catalytic site in pMMO.

  13. Component interactions in the soluble methane monooxygenase system from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Gassner, G T; Lippard, S J

    1999-09-28

    The soluble methane monooxygenase system of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) includes three protein components: a 251-kDa non-heme dinuclear iron hydroxylase (MMOH), a 39-kDa iron-sulfur- and FAD-containing reductase (MMOR), and a 16-kDa regulatory protein (MMOB). The thermodynamic stability and kinetics of formation of complexes between oxidized MMOH and MMOB or MMOR were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy at temperatures ranging from 3.3 to 45 degrees C. The results, in conjunction with data from equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation studies of MMOR and MMOB, indicate that free MMOR and MMOB exist as monomers in solution and bind MMOH with 2:1 stoichiometry. The role of component interactions in the catalytic mechanism of sMMO was investigated through simultaneous measurement of oxidase and hydroxylase activities as a function of varied protein component concentrations during steady-state turnover. The partitioning of oxidase and hydroxylase activities of sMMO is highly dependent on both the MMOR concentration and the nature of the organic substrate. In particular, NADH oxidation is significantly uncoupled from methane hydroxylation at MMOR concentrations exceeding 20% of the hydroxylase concentration but remains tightly coupled to propylene epoxidation at MMOR concentrations ranging up to the MMOH concentration. The steady-state kinetic data were fit to numerical simulations of models that include both the oxidase activities of free MMOR and of MMOH/MMOR complexes and the hydroxylase activity of MMOH/MMOB complexes. The data were well described by a model in which MMOR and MMOB bind noncompetitively at distinct interacting sites on the hydroxylase. MMOB manifests its regulatory effects by differentially accelerating intermolecular electron transfer from MMOR to MMOH containing bound substrate and product in a manner consistent with its activating and inhibitory effects on the hydroxylase.

  14. Structure and protein–protein interactions of methanol dehydrogenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    SciTech Connect

    Culpepper, Megen A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2014-10-07

    In the initial steps of their metabolic pathway, methanotrophic bacteria oxidize methane to methanol with methane monooxygenases (MMOs) and methanol to formaldehyde with methanol dehydrogenases (MDHs). Several lines of evidence suggest that the membrane-bound or particulate MMO (pMMO) and MDH interact to form a metabolic supercomplex. To further investigate the possible existence of such a supercomplex, native MDH from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) has been purified and characterized by size exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering and X-ray crystallography. M. capsulatus (Bath) MDH is primarily a dimer in solution, although an oligomeric species with a molecular mass of ~450–560 kDa forms at higher protein concentrations. The 2.57 Å resolution crystal structure reveals an overall fold and α₂β₂ dimeric architecture similar to those of other MDH structures. In addition, biolayer interferometry studies demonstrate specific protein–protein interactions between MDH and M. capsulatus (Bath) pMMO as well as between MDH and the truncated recombinant periplasmic domains of M. capsulatus (Bath) pMMO (spmoB). These interactions exhibit KD values of 833 ± 409 nM and 9.0 ± 7.7 μM, respectively. The biochemical data combined with analysis of the crystal lattice interactions observed in the MDH structure suggest a model in which MDH and pMMO associate not as a discrete, stoichiometric complex but as a larger assembly scaffolded by the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  15. The effects of growth temperature on the methyl sterol and phospholipid fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.

    1992-01-01

    Growth of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) at temperatures ranging from 30 to 50 degrees C resulted in changes to the whole cell lipid constituents. As temperature was lowered, the overall proportion of hexadecenoic acid (C16:1) increased, and the relative proportions of the delta 9, delta 10 and delta 11 C16:1 double bond positional isomers changed. Methyl sterol content also increased as the growth temperature was lowered. The highest amounts of methyl sterol were found in 30 degrees C cells and the lowest in 50 degrees C cells (sterol-phospholipid ratios of 0.077 and 0.013, respectively). The data are consistent with a membrane modulating role for the sterol produced by this prokaryotic organism.

  16. The effects of growth temperature on the methyl sterol and phospholipid fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.

    1992-01-01

    Growth of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) at temperatures ranging from 30 to 50 C resulted in changes to the whole cell lipid constituents. As temperature was lowered, the overall proportion of hexadecenoic acid (C16:1) increased, and the relative proportions of the Delta9, Delta10, and Delta11 C16:1 double bond positional isomers changed. Methyl sterol content also increased as the growth temperature was lowered. The highest amounts of methyl sterol were found in 30 C cells and the lowest in 50 C cells (sterol-phospholipid ratios of 0.077 and 0.013, respectively). The data are consistent with a membrane modulating role for the sterol produced by this prokaryotic organism.

  17. The effects of growth temperature on the methyl sterol and phospholipid fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.

    1992-01-01

    Growth of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) at temperatures ranging from 30 to 50 degrees C resulted in changes to the whole cell lipid constituents. As temperature was lowered, the overall proportion of hexadecenoic acid (C16:1) increased, and the relative proportions of the delta 9, delta 10 and delta 11 C16:1 double bond positional isomers changed. Methyl sterol content also increased as the growth temperature was lowered. The highest amounts of methyl sterol were found in 30 degrees C cells and the lowest in 50 degrees C cells (sterol-phospholipid ratios of 0.077 and 0.013, respectively). The data are consistent with a membrane modulating role for the sterol produced by this prokaryotic organism.

  18. The effects of growth temperature on the methyl sterol and phospholipid fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.

    1992-01-01

    Growth of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) at temperatures ranging from 30 to 50 C resulted in changes to the whole cell lipid constituents. As temperature was lowered, the overall proportion of hexadecenoic acid (C16:1) increased, and the relative proportions of the Delta9, Delta10, and Delta11 C16:1 double bond positional isomers changed. Methyl sterol content also increased as the growth temperature was lowered. The highest amounts of methyl sterol were found in 30 C cells and the lowest in 50 C cells (sterol-phospholipid ratios of 0.077 and 0.013, respectively). The data are consistent with a membrane modulating role for the sterol produced by this prokaryotic organism.

  19. Temperature Affects Fatty Acids In Methylococcus Capsulatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.

    1993-01-01

    According to report, temperature of growth of thermotolerant, methane-oxidizing bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) affects both proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids and cis/trans ratio of these acids in cell membrane. Because suboptimum growth temperature is potential stress factor, it may be possible to use such cis/trans ratios as indices of stresses upon methane-oxidizing microbial communities. Research in microbiology of methanotrophs increasing because of possible commercial exploitation of these organisms as biocatalysts or as sources of useful polymers; knowledge of effect of temperature on ability of methanotrophs to utilize methane useful in optimization of conditions of growth.

  20. Temperature Affects Fatty Acids In Methylococcus Capsulatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.

    1993-01-01

    According to report, temperature of growth of thermotolerant, methane-oxidizing bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) affects both proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids and cis/trans ratio of these acids in cell membrane. Because suboptimum growth temperature is potential stress factor, it may be possible to use such cis/trans ratios as indices of stresses upon methane-oxidizing microbial communities. Research in microbiology of methanotrophs increasing because of possible commercial exploitation of these organisms as biocatalysts or as sources of useful polymers; knowledge of effect of temperature on ability of methanotrophs to utilize methane useful in optimization of conditions of growth.

  1. Kinetic and spectroscopic characterization of intermediates and component interactions in reactions of methane monooxygenase from methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.E.; Valentine, A.M.; Salifoglou, A.; Lippard, S.J.; Wang, D.; Huynh, B.H.; Edmondson, D.E.

    1995-10-18

    We describe mechanistic studies of the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) enzyme system from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). Interactions among the three sMMO components, the hydroxylase (H), reductase (R), and protein B (B), were investigated by monitoring conversion of nitrobenzene to nitrophenol under both single turnover and catalytic conditions. During catalytic turnover, hydroxylation occurs to afford 3-nitrophenol (43%) and 4-nitrophenol (57%), whereas hydroxylation takes place exclusively (> 95%) to give 4-nitrophenol under single turnover conditions in the absence of reductase. Protein B exerts a strong influence on single turnover reactions of nitrobenzene, with optimal rate constants and yields obtained by using 1.5-2 equiv of protein R per equivalent of hydroxylase. The temperature dependence of these kinetic values was determined. Changes in dioxygen concentration and pH, as well as exchange of solvent accessible protons with D{sub 2}O, did not significantly affect the rate constants for either of these processes, the implications of which for the kinetic mechanism are discussed. From the present and related evidence, structures for H{sub peroxo} and Q are proposed. 54 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Tritiated chiral alkanes as substrates for soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath): Probes for the mechanism of hydroxylation

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, A.M.; Liu, K.E.; Komar-Panicucci, S.; Lippard, S.J.; Wilkinson, B.; Priestley, N.D.; Floss, H.G.; Williams, P.G.; Morimoto, Hiromi

    1997-02-26

    The tritiated chiral alkanes (S)-[1-{sup 2}H{sub 1}, 1-{sup 3}H]ethane, (R)-[1-{sup 2}H{sub 1},1-{sup 3}H]ethane, (S)-[1-{sup 2}H{sub 1},1-{sup 3}H]butane, (R)-[1-{sup 2}H{sub 1}, 1-{sup 3}H]butane, (S)-[2-{sup 3}H]butane, (R)-[2-{sup 3}H]butane, and racemic [2-{sup 3}H]butane were oxidized by soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), and the absolute stereochemistry of the resulting product alcohols was determined in order to probe the mechanism of substrate hydroxylation. When the hydroxylations were performed with purified hydroxylase but only a partially purified cellular extract for the coupling and reductase proteins, different product distributions were observed. These apparently anomalous results could be explained by invoking exchange of hydrogen atoms at the {alpha} carbon of the product alcohols. The characteristics of this exchange reaction are discussed. Together with the mechanistic information available from a range of substrate probes, the results are best accounted for by a nonsynchronous concerted process involving attack on the C-H bond by one or more of several pathways discussed in the text. 65 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. The noncommensal bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) ameliorates dextran sulfate (Sodium Salt)-Induced Ulcerative Colitis by influencing mechanisms essential for maintenance of the colonic barrier function.

    PubMed

    Kleiveland, Charlotte R; Hult, Lene T Olsen; Spetalen, Signe; Kaldhusdal, Magne; Christofferesen, Trine Eker; Bengtsson, Oskar; Romarheim, Odd Helge; Jacobsen, Morten; Lea, Tor

    2013-01-01

    Dietary inclusion of a bacterial meal has recently been shown to efficiently abolish soybean meal-induced enteritis in Atlantic salmon. The objective of this study was to investigate whether inclusion of this bacterial meal in the diet could abrogate disease development in a murine model of epithelial injury and colitis and thus possibly have therapeutic potential in human inflammatory bowel disease. C57BL/6N mice were fed ad libitum a control diet or an experimental diet containing 254 g/kg of body weight BioProtein, a bacterial meal consisting of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), together with the heterogenic bacteria Ralstonia sp., Brevibacillus agri, and Aneurinibacillus sp. At day 8, colitis was induced by 3.5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) ad libitum in the drinking water for 6 days. Symptoms of DSS treatment were less profound after prophylactic treatment with the diet containing the BioProtein. Colitis-associated parameters such as reduced body weight, colon shortening, and epithelial damage also showed significant improvement. Levels of acute-phase reactants, proteins whose plasma concentrations increase in response to inflammation, and neutrophil infiltration were reduced. On the other, increased epithelial cell proliferation and enhanced mucin 2 (Muc2) transcription indicated improved integrity of the colonic epithelial layer. BioProtein mainly consists of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) (88%). The results that we obtained when using a bacterial meal consisting of M. capsulatus (Bath) were similar to those obtained when using BioProtein in the DSS model. Our results show that a bacterial meal of the noncommensal bacterium M. capsulatus (Bath) has the potential to attenuate DSS-induced colitis in mice by enhancing colonic barrier function, as judged by increased epithelial proliferation and increased Muc2 transcription.

  4. Structural characterization by EXAFS spectroscopy of the binuclear iron center in protein A of methane monooxygenase from methylococcus capsulatus (bath)

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, A.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Green, J.; Dalton, H.; Bentsen, J.G.; Beer, R.H.; Lippard, S.J.

    1988-03-30

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) activates dioxygen for incorporation into a remarkable variety of substrates including methane, which is required for bacterial growth (eq 1). MMO is a three component CH/sub 4/ + NADH + H/sup +/ + O/sub 2/ /sup MMO/ ..-->.. CH/sub 3/OH + NAD/sup +/ + H/sub 2/O (1) enzyme. Protein A (M/sub r/ 210,000), believed to be the oxygenase component, contains two iron atoms. Protein B (M/sub r/ 15,700) serves a regulatory function and lacks prosthetic groups, while protein C, the reductase component of the enzyme, is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein (M/sub r/ 42,000) responsible for electron transfer from NADH to protein A. Recently, a binuclear iron center was postulated to occur in protein A based on the finding that one-electron reduction gives rise to electron spin resonance (ESR) signals (g 1.95, 1.88, 1.78) very similar to those observed for the binuclear mixed-valence Fe/sub 2/(III,II) centers in semimet hemerythrin (Hr) and purple acid phosphatase (PAP). In conjunction with model studies, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful method for identifying bridged binuclear iron centers in Hr, ribonucleotide reductase (RR), and PAP. Here the authors report iron K-edge EXAFS results on semireduced protein A of MMO which support the occurrence of a binuclear iron center (Fe-Fe distance, 3.41 A), with no short ..mu..-oxo bridge.

  5. Comparison of EPR-visible Cu(2+) sites in pMMO from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and Methylomicrobium album BG8.

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, S S; Perille Collins, M L; Eaton, S S; Eaton, G R; Antholine, W E

    2000-01-01

    X-band (9.1 GHz) and S-band (3.4 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra for particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in whole cells from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) grown on (63)Cu and (15)N were obtained and compared with previously reported spectra for pMMO from Methylomicrobium album BG8. For both M. capsulatus (Bath) and M. album BG8, two nearly identical Cu(2+) EPR signals with resolved hyperfine coupling to four nitrogens are observed. The EPR parameters for pMMO from M. capsulatus (Bath) (g( parallel) = 2.244, A( parallel) = 185 G, and A(N) = 19 G for signal one; g( parallel) = 2.246, A( parallel) = 180 G, and A(N) = 19 G for signal two) and for pMMO from M. album BG8 (g( parallel) = 2.243, A( parallel) = 180 G, and A(N) = 18 G for signal one; g( parallel) = 2. 251, A( parallel) = 180 G, and A(N) = 18 G for signal two) are very similar and are characteristic of type 2 Cu(2+) in a square planar or square pyramidal geometry. In three-pulse electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) data for natural-abundance samples, nitrogen quadrupolar frequencies due to the distant nitrogens of coordinated histidine imidazoles were observed. The intensities of the quadrupolar combination bands indicate that there are three or four coordinated imidazoles, which implies that most, if not all, of the coordinated nitrogens detected in the continuous wave spectra are from histidine imidazoles. PMID:10920038

  6. The soluble methane mono-oxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). Its ability to oxygenate n-alkanes, n-alkenes, ethers, and alicyclic, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    Colby, J; Stirling, D I; Dalton, H

    1977-08-01

    1. Methane mono-oxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) catalyses the oxidation of various substituted methane derivatives including methanol. 2. It is a very non-specific oxygenase and, in some of its catalytic properties, apparently resembles the analogous enzyme from Methylomonas methanica but differs from those found in Methylosinus trichosporium and Methylomonas albus. 3. CO is oxidized to CO2. 4. C1-C8 n-alkanes are hydroxylated, yielding mixtures of the corresponding 1- and 2-alcohols; no 3- or 4-alcohols are formed. 5. Terminal alkenes yield the corresponding 1,2-epoxides. cis- or trans-but-2-ene are each oxidized to a mixture of 2,3-epoxybutane and but-2-en-1-ol with retention of the cis or trans configuration in both products; 2-butanone is also formed from cis-but-2-ene only. 6. Dimethyl ether is oxidized. Diethyl ether undergoes sub-terminal oxidation, yielding ethanol and ethanal in equimolar amounts. 7. Methane mono-oxygenase also hydroxylates cyclic alkanes and aromatic compounds. However, styrene yields only styrene epoxide and pyridine yields only pyridine N-oxide. 8. Of those compounds tested, only NADPH can replace NADH as electron donor.

  7. The soluble methane mono-oxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). Its ability to oxygenate n-alkanes, n-alkenes, ethers, and alicyclic, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Colby, J; Stirling, D I; Dalton, H

    1977-01-01

    1. Methane mono-oxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) catalyses the oxidation of various substituted methane derivatives including methanol. 2. It is a very non-specific oxygenase and, in some of its catalytic properties, apparently resembles the analogous enzyme from Methylomonas methanica but differs from those found in Methylosinus trichosporium and Methylomonas albus. 3. CO is oxidized to CO2. 4. C1-C8 n-alkanes are hydroxylated, yielding mixtures of the corresponding 1- and 2-alcohols; no 3- or 4-alcohols are formed. 5. Terminal alkenes yield the corresponding 1,2-epoxides. cis- or trans-but-2-ene are each oxidized to a mixture of 2,3-epoxybutane and but-2-en-1-ol with retention of the cis or trans configuration in both products; 2-butanone is also formed from cis-but-2-ene only. 6. Dimethyl ether is oxidized. Diethyl ether undergoes sub-terminal oxidation, yielding ethanol and ethanal in equimolar amounts. 7. Methane mono-oxygenase also hydroxylates cyclic alkanes and aromatic compounds. However, styrene yields only styrene epoxide and pyridine yields only pyridine N-oxide. 8. Of those compounds tested, only NADPH can replace NADH as electron donor. PMID:411486

  8. Fractionation of the methane isotopologues 13CH4, 12CH3D, and 13CH3D during aerobic oxidation of methane by Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, David T.; Welander, Paula V.; Ono, Shuhei

    2016-11-01

    Aerobic oxidation of methane plays a major role in reducing the amount of methane emitted to the atmosphere from freshwater and marine settings. We cultured an aerobic methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) at 30 and 37 °C, and determined the relative abundance of 12CH4, 13CH4, 12CH3D, and 13CH3D (a doubly-substituted, or ;clumped; isotopologue of methane) to characterize the clumped isotopologue effect associated with aerobic methane oxidation. In batch culture, the residual methane became enriched in 13C and D relative to starting methane, with D/H fractionation a factor of 9.14 (Dε/13ε) larger than that of 13C/12C. As oxidation progressed, the Δ13CH3D value (a measure of the excess in abundance of 13CH3D relative to a random distribution of isotopes among isotopologues) of residual methane decreased. The isotopologue fractionation factor for 13CH3D/12CH4 was found to closely approximate the product of the measured fractionation factors for 13CH4/12CH4 and 12CH3D/12CH4 (i.e., 13C/12C and D/H). The results give insight into enzymatic reversibility in the aerobic methane oxidation pathway. Based on the experimental data, a mathematical model was developed to predict isotopologue signatures expected for methane in the environment that has been partially-oxidized by aerobic methanotrophy. Measurement of methane clumped isotopologue abundances can be used to distinguish between aerobic methane oxidation and alternative methane-cycling processes.

  9. Production of High-Quality Particulate Methane Monooxygenase in High Yields from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) with a Hollow-Fiber Membrane Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Steve S.-F.; Chen, Kelvin H.-C.; Tseng, Mandy Y.-H.; Wang, Yane-Shih; Tseng, Chiu-Feng; Chen, Yu-Ju; Huang, Ded-Shih; Chan, Sunney I.

    2003-01-01

    In order to obtain particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO)-enriched membranes from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) with high activity and in high yields, we devised a method to process cell growth in a fermentor adapted with a hollow-fiber bioreactor that allows easy control and quantitative adjustment of the copper ion concentration in NMS medium over the time course of cell culture. This technical improvement in the method for culturing bacterial cells allowed us to study the effects of copper ion concentration in the growth medium on the copper content in the membranes, as well as the specific activity of the enzyme. The optimal copper concentration in the growth medium was found to be 30 to 35 μM. Under these conditions, the pMMO is highly expressed, accounting for 80% of the total cytoplasmic membrane proteins and having a specific activity as high as 88.9 nmol of propylene oxide/min/mg of protein with NADH as the reductant. The copper stoichiometry is ∼13 atoms per pMMO molecule. Analysis of other metal contents provided no evidence of zinc, and only traces of iron were present in the pMMO-enriched membranes. Further purification by membrane solubilization in dodecyl β-d-maltoside followed by fractionation of the protein-detergent complexes according to molecular size by gel filtration chromatography resulted in a good yield of the pMMO-detergent complex and a high level of homogeneity. The pMMO-detergent complex isolated in this way had a molecular mass of 220 kDa and consisted of an αβγ protein monomer encapsulated in a micelle consisting of ca. 240 detergent molecules. The enzyme is a copper protein containing 13.6 mol of copper/mol of pMMO and essentially no iron (ratio of copper to iron, 80:1). Both the detergent-solubilized membranes and the purified pMMO-detergent complex exhibited reasonable, if not excellent, specific activity. Finally, our ability to control the level of expression of the pMMO allowed us to clarify the sensitivity of the

  10. The C-terminal aqueous-exposed domain of the 45 kDa subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) is a Cu(I) sponge.

    PubMed

    Yu, Steve S-F; Ji, Cheng-Zhi; Wu, Ya Ping; Lee, Tsu-Lin; Lai, Chien-Hung; Lin, Su-Ching; Yang, Zong-Lin; Wang, Vincent C-C; Chen, Kelvin H-C; Chan, Sunney I

    2007-12-04

    The crystal structure of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) has been reported recently [Lieberman, R. L., and Rosenzweig, A. C. (2005) Crystal structure of a membrane-bound metalloenzyme that catalyses the biological oxidation of methane, Nature 434, 177-182]. Subsequent work has shown that the preparation on which the X-ray analysis is based might be missing many of the important metal cofactors, including the putative trinuclear copper cluster at the active site as well as ca. 10 copper ions (E-clusters) that have been proposed to serve as a buffer of reducing equivalents to re-reduce the copper atoms at the active site following the catalytic chemistry [Chan, S. I., Wang, V. C.-C., Lai, J. C.-H., Yu, S. S.-F., Chen, P. P.-Y., Chen, K. H.-C., Chen, C.-L., and Chan, M. K. (2007) Redox potentiometry studies of particulate methane monooxygenase: Support for a trinuclear copper cluster active site, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 46, 1992-1994]. Since the aqueous-exposed domains of the 45 kDa subunit (PmoB) have been suggested to be the putative binding domains for the E-cluster copper ions, we have cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli the two aqueous-exposed subdomains toward the N- and C-termini of the subunit: the N-terminal subdomain (residues 54-178) and the C-terminal subdomain (residues 257-394 and 282-414). The recombinant C-terminal water-exposed subdomain is shown to behave like a Cu(I) sponge, taking up to ca. 10 Cu(I) ions cooperatively when cupric ions are added to the protein fragment in the presence of dithiothreitol or ascorbate. In addition, circular dichroism measurements reveal that the C-terminal subdomain folds into a beta-sheet structure in the presence of Cu(I). The propensity for the C-terminal subdomain to bind Cu(I) is consistent with the high redox potential(s) determined for the E-cluster copper ions in the pMMO. These properties of the E-clusters are in accordance with the function proposed

  11. Inhibition of methane oxidation by Methylococcus capsulatus with hydrochlorofluorocarbons and fluorinated methanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matheson, L.J.; Jahnke, L.L.; Oremland, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    The inhibition of methane oxidation by cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) exposed to hydrochlorofluorocarbon 21 (HCFC-21; difluorochloromethane [CHF2Cl]), HCFC-22 (fluorodichloromethane [CHFCl2]), and various fluorinated methanes was investigated. HCFC-21 inhibited methane oxidation to a greater extent than HCFC-22, for both the particulate and soluble methane monooxygenases. Among the fluorinated methanes, both methyl fluoride (CH3F) and difluoromethane (CH2F2) were inhibitory while fluoroform (CHF3) and carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) were not. The inhibition of methane oxidation by HCFC-21 and HCFC-22 was irreversible, while that by methyl fluoride was reversible. The HCFCs also proved inhibitory to methanol dehydrogenase, which suggests that they disrupt other aspects of C1 catabolism in addition to methane monooxygenase activity.

  12. Methyl sterol and cyclopropane fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus grown at low oxygen tensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Nichols, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The sterol and fatty acid concentrations for M. capsulatus grown in fed-batch cultures over a wide range of oxygen tensions (0.1-10.6 percent) and at a constant methane level are evaluated. The analyses reveal that the biomass decreases as oxygen levels are lowered; the sterol concentration increases when the oxygen range is between 0.5-1.1 percent and decreases when the oxygen range is below 0.5 percent; and the amount of monounsaturated C16 decreases and the concentration of cyclopropane fatty acids increases after oxygen is reduced. It is noted that growth and membrane synthesis occur at low oxygen concentrations and that the synthesis of membrane lipids responds to growth conditions.

  13. Methyl sterol and cyclopropane fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus grown at low oxygen tensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Nichols, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The sterol and fatty acid concentrations for M. capsulatus grown in fed-batch cultures over a wide range of oxygen tensions (0.1-10.6 percent) and at a constant methane level are evaluated. The analyses reveal that the biomass decreases as oxygen levels are lowered; the sterol concentration increases when the oxygen range is between 0.5-1.1 percent and decreases when the oxygen range is below 0.5 percent; and the amount of monounsaturated C16 decreases and the concentration of cyclopropane fatty acids increases after oxygen is reduced. It is noted that growth and membrane synthesis occur at low oxygen concentrations and that the synthesis of membrane lipids responds to growth conditions.

  14. Concerted mechanism for ethane hydroxylation by the particulate methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, B.; Priestly, N.D.; Floss, H.G.; Zhu, M.; Nguyen, H.H.T.; Chan, S.I.; Morimoto, Hiromi; Williams, P.G.

    1996-01-31

    The ethanol samples in the isolated alcohol/water mixtures were converted into their (2R)-2-acetoxy-2-phenylethanoate derivatives (2-34 mCi). Examination of the well-resolved {sup 3}H NMR spectra for these derivatives produced an exceptionally consistent set of stereochemical data. When corrected for the enantiomeric purity of the ethyl tosylate starting materials, the data clearly show that the reaction occurs with complete retention of configuration, i.e., with 100% stereoselection. Barring substantial slowing of the carbon-carbon bond rotation of the ethyl radical when bound to the enzyme, this result rules out mechanisms proceeding via alkyl radical (and/or cation) structures, even very short-lived ones, as such intermediates would have to have a lifetime of < 1 x 10{sup -14} s in order not to undergo any detectable C-C bond rotation, i.e., the capture reaction would have to be much faster than the decay of a transition state. The data instead point to a mechanism in which C-H bond cleavage is preceded by bond formation at the alkyl carbon, i.e., one proceeding through a pentacoordinated carbon species. 29 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Preparation and characterization of a (Cu,Zn)-pMMO from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Li; Chen, Kelvin H-C; Ke, Shyue-Chu; Yu, Steve S-F; Chan, Sunney I

    2004-12-01

    We report the preparation of a (Cu,Zn)-particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in which the bulk of the copper ions of the electron-transfer clusters (E-clusters) has been replaced by divalent Zn ions. The Cu and Zn contents in the (Cu,Zn)-pMMO were determined by both inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and X-ray absorption K-edge spectroscopy. Further characterization of the (Cu,Zn)-pMMO was provided by pMMO-activity assays as well as low-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy following reductive titration and incubation in air or air/propylene mixtures. The pMMO-activity assays indicated that the (Cu,Zn)-pMMO was no longer capable of supporting catalytic turnover of hydrocarbon substrates. However, the EPR studies revealed that the catalytic cluster (C-cluster) copper ions in the (Cu,Zn)-pMMO were still capable of supporting the activation of dioxygen when reduced, and that the 14N-superhyperfine features associated with one of the type 2 Cu(II) centers in the hydroxylation C-cluster remained unperturbed. The replacement of the E-cluster copper ions by Zn ions did compromise the ability of the protein to mediate the transfer of reducing equivalents from exogenous reductants to the C-clusters. These observations provide strong support for the electron transfer and catalytic roles for the E-cluster and C-cluster copper ions, respectively.

  16. Oxidation of C1 Compounds by Particulate fractions from Methylococcus capsulatus: distribution and properties of methane-dependent reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase (methane hydroxylase).

    PubMed Central

    Ribbons, D W

    1975-01-01

    Cell-free particulate fractions of extracts from the obligate methylotroph Methylococcus capsulatus catalyze the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and O2-dependent oxidation of methane (methane hydroxylase). The only oxidation product detected was formate. These preparations also catalyze the oxidation of methanol and formaldehyde to formate in the presence or absence of phenazine methosulphate with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. Methane hydroxylase activity cannot be reproducibly obtained from disintegrated cell suspensions even though the whole cells actively respired when methane was presented as a substrate. Varying the disintegration method or extraction medium had no significant effect on the activities obtained. When active particles were obtained, hydroxylase activity was stable at 0 C for days. Methane hydroxylase assays were made by measuring the methane-dependent oxidation of NADH by O2. In separate experiments, methane consumption and the accumulation of formate were also demonstrated. Formate is not oxidized by these particulate fractions. The effects of particle concentration, temperature, pH, and phosphate concentration on enzymic activity are described. Ethane is utilized in the presence of NADH and O2. The stoichiometric relationships of the reaction(s) with methane as substrate were not established since (i) the presumed initial product, methanol, is also oxidized to formate, and (ii) the contribution that NADH oxidase activity makes to the observed consumption of reactants could not be assessed in the presence of methane. Studies with known inhibitors of electron transport systems indicate that the path of electron flow from NADH to oxygen is different for the NADH oxidase, methane hydroxylase, and methanol oxidase activities. Images PMID:238946

  17. Characterization of the second prosthetic group of the flavoenzyme NADH-acceptor reductase (component C) of the methane mono-oxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed Central

    Colby, J; Dalton, H

    1979-01-01

    1. A new two-step purification is described that routinely yields 100mg quantities of component C for biochemical studies. 2. Chemical analyses show component C purified by this procedure to contain 2 g-atoms of iron, 2 mol of acid-labile sulphide (S) and 1 mol of FAD per mol of protein. 3. The Fe-S core of component C was extruded by treating the protein with p-methoxybenzenethiol in hexamethyl phosphoramide/50mM-Tris/HCl buffer, pH 8.5 (4:1, v/v), under anaerobic conditions. The spectral properties of the extruded core suggest that component C contains 1 mol of [2Fe-2S(S-Cys)4] centre per mol of protein. 4. E.p.r. spectroscopy confirms the presence of a Fe-S centre in component C. 5. Component C catalyses the reduction by NADH of ferricyanide, 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol or horse heart cytochrome c, with specific activities of 50--230 units/mg of protein. 6. The optimum pH for the NADH-acceptor reductase activity is 8.5--9.0, and the apparent Km values for NADH and NADPH are 0.05mM and 15.5mM respectively. 7. Unlike methane mono-oxygenase activity, NADH-acceptor reductase activity of component C is not inhibited by 8-hydroxyquinoline or by acetylene. PMID:220953

  18. Characterization of the second prosthetic group of the flavoenzyme NADH-acceptor reductase (component C) of the methane mono-oxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Colby, J; Dalton, H

    1979-03-01

    1. A new two-step purification is described that routinely yields 100mg quantities of component C for biochemical studies. 2. Chemical analyses show component C purified by this procedure to contain 2 g-atoms of iron, 2 mol of acid-labile sulphide (S) and 1 mol of FAD per mol of protein. 3. The Fe-S core of component C was extruded by treating the protein with p-methoxybenzenethiol in hexamethyl phosphoramide/50mM-Tris/HCl buffer, pH 8.5 (4:1, v/v), under anaerobic conditions. The spectral properties of the extruded core suggest that component C contains 1 mol of [2Fe-2S(S-Cys)4] centre per mol of protein. 4. E.p.r. spectroscopy confirms the presence of a Fe-S centre in component C. 5. Component C catalyses the reduction by NADH of ferricyanide, 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol or horse heart cytochrome c, with specific activities of 50--230 units/mg of protein. 6. The optimum pH for the NADH-acceptor reductase activity is 8.5--9.0, and the apparent Km values for NADH and NADPH are 0.05mM and 15.5mM respectively. 7. Unlike methane mono-oxygenase activity, NADH-acceptor reductase activity of component C is not inhibited by 8-hydroxyquinoline or by acetylene.

  19. Revisiting the mechanism of dioxygen activation in soluble methane monooxygenase from M. capsulatus (Bath): evidence for a multi-step, proton-dependent reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Lippard, Stephen J

    2009-12-29

    Stopped-flow kinetic investigations of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from M. capsulatus (Bath) have clarified discrepancies that exist in the literature regarding several aspects of catalysis by this enzyme. The development of thorough kinetic analytical techniques has led to the discovery of two novel oxygenated iron species that accumulate in addition to the well-established intermediates H(peroxo) and Q. The first intermediate, P*, is a precursor to H(peroxo) and was identified when the reaction of reduced MMOH and MMOB with O(2) was carried out in the presence of >or=540 microM methane to suppress the dominating absorbance signal due to Q. The optical properties of P* are similar to those of H(peroxo), with epsilon(420) = 3500 M(-1) cm(-1) and epsilon(720) = 1250 M(-1) cm(-1). These values are suggestive of a peroxo-to-iron(III) charge-transfer transition and resemble those of peroxodiiron(III) intermediates characterized in other carboxylate-bridged diiron proteins and synthetic model complexes. The second identified intermediate, Q*, forms on the pathway of Q decay when reactions are performed in the absence of hydrocarbon substrate. Q* does not react with methane, forms independently of buffer composition, and displays a unique shoulder at 455 nm in its optical spectrum. Studies conducted at different pH values reveal that rate constants corresponding to P* decay/H(peroxo) formation and H(peroxo) decay/Q formation are both significantly retarded at high pH and indicate that both events require proton transfer. The processes exhibit normal kinetic solvent isotope effects (KSIEs) of 2.0 and 1.8, respectively, when the reactions are performed in D(2)O. Mechanisms are proposed to account for the observations of these novel intermediates and the proton dependencies of P* to H(peroxo) and H(peroxo) to Q conversion.

  20. A continuous-wave electron-nuclear double resonance (X-band) study of the Cu2+ sites of particulate methane mono-oxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (strain M) in membrane and pure dopamine beta-mono-oxygenase of the adrenal medulla.

    PubMed Central

    Katterle, Bettina; Gvozdev, Rudolf I; Abudu, Ntei; Ljones, Torbjørn; Andersson, K Kristoffer

    2002-01-01

    All methanotrophic bacteria express a membrane-bound (particulate) methane mono-oxygenase (pMMO). In the present study, we have investigated pMMO in membrane fragments from Methylococcus capsulatus (strain M). pMMO contains a typical type-2 Cu(2+) centre with the following EPR parameters: g(z) 2.24, g(x,y) 2.06, A(Cu)(z) 19.0 mT and A(Cu)(x,y) 1.0 mT. Simulation of the Cu(2+) spectrum yielded a best match by using four equivalent nitrogens (A(N)=1.5 mT, 42 MHz). Incubation with ferricyanide neither changed nor increased the amount of EPR-active Cu(2+), in contrast with other reports. The EPR visible copper seems not to be part of any cluster, as judged from the microwave power saturation behaviour. Continuous-wave electron-nuclear double resonance (CW ENDOR; 9.4 GHz, 5-20 K) experiments at g( perpendicular) of the Cu(II) spectrum show a weak coupling to protons with an A(H) of 2.9 MHz that corresponds to a distance of 3.8 A (1 A identical with 0.1 nm), assuming that it is a purely dipolar coupling. Incubation in (2)H(2)O leads to a significant decrease in these (1)H-ENDOR intensities, showing that these protons are exchangeable. This result strongly suggests that the EPR visible copper site of pMMO is accessible to solvent, which was confirmed by the chelation of the Cu(2+) by diethyldithiocarbamic acid. The (1)H and (14)N hyperfine coupling constants confirm a histidine ligation of the EPR visible copper site in pMMO. The hyperfine structure in the ENDOR or EPR spectra of pMMO is not influenced by the inhibitors azide, cyanide or ammonia, indicating that they do not bind to the EPR visible copper. We compared pMMO with the type-2 Cu(2+) enzyme, dopamine beta-mono-oxygenase (DbetaM). For DbetaM, it is assumed that the copper site is solvent-accessible. CW ENDOR shows similar weakly coupled and (2)H(2)O-exchangeable protons (2.9 MHz), as observed in pMMO, as well as the strongly coupled nitrogens (40 MHz) from the co-ordinating N of the histidines in DbetaM. In

  1. Bath Salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Bath Salts KidsHealth > For Teens > Bath Salts Print A A ... Someone Quit? Avoiding Bath Salts What Are Bath Salts? The name "bath salts" sounds innocent, but don' ...

  2. Polyhydroxyalkanoate production in Rhodobacter capsulatus: genes, mutants, expression, and physiology.

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, R G; Gabbert, K K; Locke, T A; Madigan, M T

    1997-01-01

    Like many other prokaryotes, the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus produces high levels of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) when a suitable carbon source is available. The three genes that are traditionally considered to be necessary in the PHA biosynthetic pathway, phaA (beta-ketothiolase), phaB (acetoacetylcoenzyme A reductase), and phaC (PHA synthase), were cloned from Rhodobacter capsulatus. In R. capsulatus, the phaAB genes are not linked to the phaC gene. Translational beta-galactosidase fusions to phaA and phaC were constructed and recombined into the chromosome. Both phaC and phaA were constitutively expressed regardless of whether PHA production was induced, suggesting that control is posttranslational at the enzymatic level. Consistent with this conclusion, it was shown that the R. capsulatus transcriptional nitrogen-sensing circuits were not involved in PHA synthesis. The doubling times of R. capsulatus transcriptional nitrogen-sensing circuits were not involved in PHA synthesis. The doubling times of R. capsulatus grown on numerous carbon sources were determined, indicating that this bacterium grows on C2 to C12 fatty acids. Grown on acetone, caproate, or heptanoate, wild-type R. capsulatus produced high levels of PHAs. Although a phaC deletion strain was unable to synthesize PHAs on any carbon source, phaA and phaAB deletion strains were able to produce PHAs, indicating that alternative routes for the synthesis of substrates for the synthase are present. The nutritional versatility and bioenergetic versatility of R. capsulatus, coupled with its ability to produce large amounts of PHAs and its genetic tractability, make it an attractive model for the study of PHA production. PMID:9251189

  3. Cloning of the Rhodobacter capsulatus hemA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Biel, S W; Wright, M S; Biel, A J

    1988-01-01

    Portions of the Rhodobacter capsulatus hemA gene have been cloned from a hemA::Tn5 insertion strain into the lambda bacteriophage derivative EMBL3. A cosmid containing the wild-type R. capsulatus hemA gene was isolated by complementation of the hemA::Tn5 mutant. The cosmid contains a 1.4-kilobase EcoRI fragment that spans the hemA::Tn5 insertion site. The entire hemA gene is contained in this fragment and the adjacent 0.6-kilobase EcoRI fragment. Images PMID:2842318

  4. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Bacteriophages That Infect Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Bollivar, David W; Bernardoni, Brooke; Bockman, Matthew R; Miller, Brenda M; Russell, Daniel A; Delesalle, Veronique A; Krukonis, Gregory P; Hatfull, Graham F; Cross, Madeline R; Szewczyk, Marlena M; Eppurath, Atul

    2016-05-26

    Five bacteriophages that infect the Rhodobacter capsulatus strain YW1 were isolated from stream water near Bloomington, Illinois, USA. Two distinct genome types are represented in the newly isolated bacteriophages. These genomes are different from other bacteriophage genomes previously described. Copyright © 2016 Bollivar et al.

  5. Baby Bath Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel more comfortable at bath time. Start by learning baby bath basics. There's no need to give your newborn a bath every day. Three times a week might be enough until your baby becomes more mobile. Bathing your baby too much can dry out ...

  6. An mRNA degrading complex in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Stephanie; Fuhrmann, Oliver; Heck, Claudia; Hebermehl, Markus; Schiltz, Emile; Rauhut, Reinhard; Klug, Gabriele

    2001-01-01

    An RNA degrading, high molecular weight complex was purified from Rhodobacter capsulatus. N-terminal sequencing, glycerol-gradient centrifugation, and immunoaffinity purification as well as functional assays were used to determine the physical and biochemical characteristics of the complex. The complex comprises RNase E and two DEAD-box RNA helicases of 74 and 65 kDa, respectively. Most surprisingly, the transcription termination factor Rho is a major, firmly associated component of the degradosome. PMID:11713307

  7. Clustering of genes necessary for hydrogen oxidation in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H W; Wall, J D

    1991-01-01

    Three cosmids previously shown to contain information necessary for the expression of uptake of hydrogenase in Rhodobacter capsulatus were found to be present in a cluster on the chromosome. Earlier genetic experiments suggested the presence of at least six genes essential for hydrogenase activity that are now shown to be in a region of approximately 18 kb that includes the structural genes for the enzyme. A potential response regulator gene was sequenced as a part of the hup gene region. PMID:2007559

  8. METAL COATING BATHS

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, J.W.

    1958-08-26

    A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

  9. Expression of regulatory nif genes in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, P; Willison, J C; Vignais, P M; Bickle, T A

    1991-01-01

    Translational fusions of the Escherichia coli lacZ gene to Rhodobacter capsulatus nif genes were constructed in order to determine the regulatory circuit of nif gene expression in R. capsulatus, a free-living photosynthetic diazotroph. The expression of nifH, nifA (copies I and II), and nifR4 was measured in different regulatory mutant strains under different physiological conditions. The expression of nifH and nifR4 (the analog of ntrA in Klebsiella pneumoniae) depends on the NIFR1/R2 system (the analog of the ntr system in K. pneumoniae), on NIFA, and on NIFR4. The expression of both copies of nifA is regulated by the NIFR1/R2 system and is modulated by the N source of the medium under anaerobic photosynthetic growth conditions. In the presence of ammonia or oxygen, moderate expression of nifA was detectable, whereas nifH and nifR4 were not expressed under these conditions. The implications for the regulatory circuit of nif gene expression in R. capsulatus are discussed and compared with the situation in K. pneumoniae, another free-living diazotroph. PMID:1902215

  10. Sequence of the indoleglycerol phosphate synthase (trpC) gene from Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Rudzik, M; Young, D A; Marrs, B L

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated, cloned, and sequenced the indoleglycerol phosphate synthase gene (trpC) from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Normalized alignment scores comparing the trpC gene of R. capsulatus with the trpC genes of other bacterial species are reported. An unexpected degree of similarity to the trpC gene of Bacillus subtilis was found. PMID:1644778

  11. Physiological control and regulation of the Rhodobacter capsulatus cbb operons.

    PubMed

    Paoli, G C; Vichivanives, P; Tabita, F R

    1998-08-01

    The genes encoding enzymes of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) reductive pentose phosphate pathway in Rhodobacter capsulatus are organized in at least two operons, each preceded by a separate cbbR gene, encoding potential LysR-type transcriptional activators. As a prelude to studies of cbb gene regulation in R. capsulatus, the nucleotide sequence of a 4,537-bp region, which included cbbRII, was determined. This region contained the following open reading frames: a partial pgm gene (encoding phosphoglucomutase) and a complete qor gene (encoding NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase), followed by cbbRII, cbbF (encoding fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase), cbbP (encoding phosphoribulokinase), and part of cbbT (encoding transketolase). Physiological control of the CBB pathway and regulation of the R. capsulatus cbb genes were studied by using a combination of mutant strains and promoter fusion constructs. Characterization of mutant strains revealed that either form I or form II ribulose 1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), encoded by the cbbLS and cbbM genes, respectively, could support photoheterotrophic and autotrophic growth. A strain with disruptions in both cbbL and cbbM could not grow autotrophically and grew photoheterotrophically only when dimethyl sulfoxide was added to the culture medium. Disruption of cbbP resulted in a strain that did not synthesize form II RubisCO and had a phenotype similar to that observed in the RubisCO-minus strain, suggesting that there is only one cbbP gene in R. capsulatus and that this gene is cotranscribed with cbbM. Analysis of RubisCO activity and synthesis in strains with disruptions in either cbbRI or cbbRII, and beta-galactosidase determinations from wild-type and mutant strains containing cbbIp- and cbbIIp-lacZ fusion constructs, indicated that the cbbI and cbbII operons of R. capsulatus are within separate CbbR regulons.

  12. Photomixotrophic growth of Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003 on ferrous iron.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S H; Newman, D K

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates the role iron oxidation plays in the purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003. This organism is unable to grow photoautotrophically on unchelated ferrous iron [Fe(II)] despite its ability to oxidize chelated Fe(II). This apparent paradox was partly resolved by the discovery that SB1003 can grow photoheterotrophically on the photochemical breakdown products of certain ferric iron-ligand complexes, yet whether it could concomitantly benefit from the oxidation of Fe(II) to fix CO(2) was unknown. Here, we examine carbon fixation by stable isotope labeling of the inorganic carbon pool in cultures growing phototrophically on acetate with and without Fe(II). We show that R. capsulatus SB1003, an organism formally thought incapable of phototrophic growth on Fe(II), can actually harness the reducing power of this substrate and grow photomixotrophically, deriving carbon both from organic sources and from fixation of inorganic carbon. This suggests the possibility of a wider occurrence of photoferrotrophy than previously assumed. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. ADP-ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Jouanneau, Y.; Roby, C.; Meyer, C.M.; Vignais, P.M. )

    1989-07-25

    In the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, nitrogenase is regulated by a reversible covalent modification of Fe protein or dinitrogenase reductase (Rc2). The linkage of the modifying group to inactive Rc2 was found to be sensitive to alkali and to neutral hydroxylamine. Complete release of the modifying group was achieved by incubation of inactive Rc2 in 0.4 or 1 M hydroxylamine. After hydroxylamine treatment of the Rc2 preparation, the modifying group could be isolated and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The modifying group comigrated with ADP-ribose on both ion-exchange HPLC and thin-layer chromatography. Analyses by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry provided further evidence that the modifying group was ADP-ribose. The NMR spectrum of inactive Rc2 exhibited signals characteristic of ADP-ribose; integration of these signals allowed calculation of a molar ration ADP-ribose/Rc2 of 0.63. A hexapeptide carrying the ADP-ribose moiety was purified from a subtilisin digest of inactive Rc2. The structure of this peptide, determined by amino acid analysis and sequencing, is Gly-Arg(ADP-ribose)-Gly-Val-Ile-Thr. This structure allows identification of the binding site for ADP-ribose as Arg 101 of the polypeptide chain of Rc2. It is concluded that nitrogenase activity in R. capsulatus is regulated by reversible ADP-ribosylation of a specific arginyl residue of dinitrogenase reductase.

  14. A comparison of the substrate and electron-donor specificities of the methane mono-oxygenases from three strains of methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, D I; Colby, J; Dalton, H

    1979-01-01

    1. Methane mono-oxygenase from Methylosinus trichosporium has the same broad substrate specificity as the analogous enzyme from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath); the enzyme from Methylomonas methanica is more specific. 2. Contrary to previous reports, NAD(P)H and not ascorbate is the required electron donor for the enzyme from Methylosinus trichosporium. 3. It is concluded that these three bacteria contain similar methane mono-oxygenases. PMID:106847

  15. Electrocution in a bath.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, E C

    1995-01-01

    A wife was found dead by her husband, lying in a tiled bath on a cast concrete floor, with a 1 kW electric radiator immersed in the bath water. Initially the case was treated as accidental death, but the police charged the husband with murder on the grounds that his wife could not have died in the manner he described. Subsequent investigation showed that the bath had a low resistance to earth and that there were faults in both the house wiring and the radiator cable, which, together with a high blood alcohol content, produced a fatal chain of events.

  16. Cytochromes P460 and c'-beta; a new family of high-spin cytochromes c.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Bradley O; Bergmann, David J; Klotz, Martin G; Hooper, Alan B

    2007-03-06

    Cytochromes-P460 of Nitrosomonas europaea and Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), and the cytochrome c' of M. capsulatus, believed to be involved in binding or transformation of N-oxides, are shown to represent an evolutionarily related new family of monoheme, approximately 17kDa, cytochromes c found in the genomes of diverse Proteobacteria. All members of this family have a predicted secondary structure predominantly of beta-sheets in contrast to the predominantly alpha-helical cytochromes c' found in photoheterotrophic and denitrifying Proteobacteria.

  17. Artificial Quantum Thermal Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Alireza; Neven, Hartmut

    In this talk, we present a theory for engineering the temperature of a quantum system different from its ambient temperature, that is basically an analog version of the quantum metropolis algorithm. We define criteria for an engineered quantum bath that, when couples to a quantum system with Hamiltonian H, drives the system to the equilibrium state e/- H / T Tr (e - H / T) with a tunable parameter T. For a system of superconducting qubits, we propose a circuit-QED approximate realization of such an engineered thermal bath consisting of driven lossy resonators. We consider an artificial thermal bath as a simulator for many-body physics or a controllable temperature knob for a hybrid quantum-thermal annealer.

  18. Microbial photodegradation of aminoarenes. Metabolism of 2-amino-4-nitrophenol by Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Witte, C P; Blasco, R; Castillo, F

    1998-03-01

    The phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus photoreduces 2,4-dinitrophenol to 2-amino-4-nitrophenol, which is further metabolized by an aerobic pathway that is also light-dependent. The catabolism of 2-amino-4-nitrophenol requires O2 and the presence of alternative carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) sources, preferably acetate and ammonium. Rhodobacter capsulatus B10, a bacterium unable to assimilate nitrate, releases negligible amounts of nitrite when growing with 2-amino-4-nitrophenol, thus suggesting that an oxygenase, nitrite-producing activity is not involved in the metabolization of the compound. The diazotrophic growth of R. capsulatus increases in the presence of 2-amino-4-nitrophenol, but growth with ammonium is clearly inhibited by the compound. Mutant strains of R. capsulatus B10, which are affected in nifHDK, nifR1, or nifR4 genes, unable to fix dinitrogen, do not grow with 2-amino-4-nitrophenol as the sole N source. This indicates that the compound cannot be used as a N source. The nif mutants degrade 2-amino-4-nitrophenol to the same extent as the wild-type in the presence of ammonium. The compound is not used as a C source by the bacterium, either. Aromatic stable intermediates, such as 2,4-diaminophenol or 4-nitrocatechol, are not detectable in microaerobic cultures of R. capsulatus growing with 2,4-dinitrophenol or 2-amino-4-nitrophenol.

  19. 10. TYPICAL BATH IN MEN'S BATH HALL. Hot Springs ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. TYPICAL BATH IN MEN'S BATH HALL. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Buckstaff Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 Mile North of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  20. Mixed ether bath for electrodeposition of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, K.

    1969-01-01

    Anisole added to the bath mixture improves Brenner aluminum plating bath technique. Mixture has lower bath vapor-pressure and the electro-deposits obtained have greater physical strength than deposits from the Brenner bath.

  1. The Rhodobacter capsulatus glnB gene is regulated by NtrC at tandem rpoN-independent promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Foster-Hartnett, D; Kranz, R G

    1994-01-01

    The protein encoded by glnB of Rhodobacter capsulatus is part of a nitrogen-sensing cascade which regulates the expression of nitrogen fixation genes (nif). The expression of glnB was studied by using lacZ fusions, primer extension analysis, and in vitro DNase I footprinting. Our results suggest that glnB is transcribed from two promoters, one of which requires the R. capsulatus ntrC gene but is rpoN independent. Another promoter upstream of glnB is repressed by NtrC; purified R. capsulatus NtrC binds to sites that overlap this distal promoter region. Images PMID:8051036

  2. Electrochemical communication between heterotrophically grown Rhodobacter capsulatus with electrodes mediated by an osmium redox polymer.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Kamrul; Patil, Sunil A; Górecki, Kamil; Leech, Dónal; Hägerhäll, Cecilia; Gorton, Lo

    2013-10-01

    The metabolically versatile purple bacteria Rhodobacter capsulatus was investigated to check its possible applicability in biofuel cells and electrochemical microbial biosensors. The wild type strain ATCC 17015 and mutant strain 37b4 lacking the lipopolysaccharide capsule was compared for their ability to communicate with electrodes modified with an osmium redox polymer. In this work, aerobic heterotrophically grown R. capsulatus were used to screen for efficient cell-electrode communication for later implementation using photoheterotrophically grown bacteria. The bacterial cells embedded in the osmium polymer matrix demonstrated efficient electrical "wiring" with the electrodes and were able to generate a noticeable current with succinate as substrate. Interestingly, at 2mM succinate the wild type strain showed much better bioelectrocatalytic current generation (4.25 μA/cm(2)) than the strain lacking capsule (1.55 μA/cm(2)). The wild type strain also exhibited a stable current response for longer time, demonstrating that the bacterial lipopolysaccharide in fact enhances the stability of the polymer matrix layer of the modified electrode. Control experiments with R. capsulatus without any mediator did not show any current irrespective of the capsule presence. This demonstrates that development of photosensors and other light driven bioelectrochemical devices could be feasible using R. capsulatus and will be at focus for future studies.

  3. Novel Rhodobacter capsulatus genes required for the biogenesis of various c-type cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, M; Brasseur, G; Daldal, F

    2000-01-01

    Following chemical mutagenesis and screening for the inability to grow by photosynthesis and the absence of cyt cbb3 oxidase activity, two c-type cytochrome (cyt)-deficient mutants, 771 and K2, of Rhodobacter capsulatus were isolated. Both mutants were completely deficient in all known c-type cyts, and could not be complemented by the previously known cyt c biogenesis genes of R. capsulatus. Complementation of 771 and K2 with a wild-type chromosomal library led to the identification of two novel genes, cycJ and ccdA respectively. The cycJ is highly homologous to ccmE/cycJ, encountered in various Gram-negative species. Unlike in other species, where cycJ is a part of an operon essential for cyt c biogenesis, in R. capsulatus, it is located immediately downstream from argC, involved in arginine biosynthesis. Mutation of its universally conserved histidine residue, which is critical for its proposed haem chaperoning role, to an alanine led to loss of its function. All R. capsulatus cycJ mutants studied so far excrete copious amounts of coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin when grown on enriched media, suggesting that its product is also a component of the haem delivery branch of cyt c biogenesis in this species. In contrast, the R. capsulatus ccdA was homologous to the cyt c biogenesis gene ccdA, found in the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, and to the central region of dipZ, encoding a protein disulphide reductase required for cyt c biogenesis in Escherichia coli. Membrane topology of CcdA was established in R. capsulatus using ccdA:phoA and ccdA :lacZ gene fusions. The deduced topology revealed that the two conserved cysteine residues of CcdA are, as predicted, membrane embedded. Mutagenesis of these cysteines showed that both are required for the function of CcdA in cyt c biogenesis. This study demonstrated for the first time that CcdA homologues are also required for cyt c biogenesis in some gram-negative bacteria such as R. capsulatus.

  4. Phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation promotes organic carbon acquisition by Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003.

    PubMed

    Caiazza, Nicky C; Lies, Douglas P; Newman, Dianne K

    2007-10-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation is usually considered to be a lithoautotrophic metabolism that contributes to primary production in Fe-based ecosystems. In this study, we employed Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003 as a model organism to test the hypothesis that phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation can be coupled to organic carbon acquisition. R. capsulatus SB1003 oxidized Fe(II) under anoxic conditions in a light-dependent manner, but it failed to grow lithoautotrophically on soluble Fe(II). When the strain was provided with Fe(II)-citrate, however, growth was observed that was dependent upon microbially catalyzed Fe(II) oxidation, resulting in the formation of Fe(III)-citrate. Subsequent photochemical breakdown of Fe(III)-citrate yielded acetoacetic acid that supported growth in the light but not the dark. The deletion of genes (RRC00247 and RRC00248) that encode homologs of atoA and atoD, required for acetoacetic acid utilization, severely impaired the ability of R. capsulatus SB1003 to grow on Fe(II)-citrate. The growth yield achieved by R. capsulatus SB1003 in the presence of citrate cannot be explained by lithoautotrophic growth on Fe(II) enabled by indirect effects of the ligand [such as altering the thermodynamics of Fe(II) oxidation or preventing cell encrustation]. Together, these results demonstrate that R. capsulatus SB1003 grows photoheterotrophically on Fe(II)-citrate. Nitrilotriacetic acid also supported light-dependent growth on Fe(II), suggesting that Fe(II) oxidation may be a general mechanism whereby some Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria mine otherwise inaccessible organic carbon sources.

  5. 33 CFR 165.104 - Safety Zone: Vessel Launches, Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine. 165.104 Section 165.104 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.104 Safety Zone: Vessel Launches, Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine. (a... Bath Iron Works dry dock while it is being moved to and from its moored position at the Bath Iron Works...

  6. 33 CFR 165.104 - Safety Zone: Vessel Launches, Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine. 165.104 Section 165.104 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.104 Safety Zone: Vessel Launches, Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine. (a... Bath Iron Works dry dock while it is being moved to and from its moored position at the Bath Iron Works...

  7. 33 CFR 165.104 - Safety Zone: Vessel Launches, Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine. 165.104 Section 165.104 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.104 Safety Zone: Vessel Launches, Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine. (a... Bath Iron Works dry dock while it is being moved to and from its moored position at the Bath Iron Works...

  8. 33 CFR 165.104 - Safety Zone: Vessel Launches, Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine. 165.104 Section 165.104 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.104 Safety Zone: Vessel Launches, Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine. (a... Bath Iron Works dry dock while it is being moved to and from its moored position at the Bath Iron Works...

  9. 33 CFR 165.104 - Safety Zone: Vessel Launches, Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine. 165.104 Section 165.104 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.104 Safety Zone: Vessel Launches, Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine. (a... Bath Iron Works dry dock while it is being moved to and from its moored position at the Bath Iron Works...

  10. Identification and isolation of genes essential for H2 oxidation in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H W; Love, J; Borghese, R; Wall, J D

    1989-01-01

    Mutants of Rhodobacter capsulatus unable to grow photoautotrophically with H2 and CO2 were isolated. Those lacking uptake hydrogenase activity as measured by H2-dependent methylene blue reduction were analyzed genetically and used in complementation studies for the isolation of the wild-type genes. Results of further subcloning and transposon Tn5 mutagenesis suggest the involvement of a minimum of five genes. Hybridization to the 2.2-kilobase-pair SstI fragment that lies within the coding region for the large and small subunits of Bradyrhizobium japonicum uptake hydrogenase showed one region of strong homology among the R. capsulatus fragments isolated, which we interpret to mean that one or both structural genes were among the genes isolated. Images PMID:2536678

  11. Transcriptional Profiling of Hydrogen Production Metabolism of Rhodobacter capsulatus under Temperature Stress by Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gürgan, Muazzez; Afşar Erkal, Nilüfer; Özgür, Ebru; Gündüz, Ufuk; Eroglu, Inci; Yücel, Meral

    2015-01-01

    Biohydrogen is a clean and renewable form of hydrogen, which can be produced by photosynthetic bacteria in outdoor large-scale photobioreactors using sunlight. In this study, the transcriptional response of Rhodobacter capsulatus to cold (4 °C) and heat (42 °C) stress was studied using microarrays. Bacteria were grown in 30/2 acetate/glutamate medium at 30 °C for 48 h under continuous illumination. Then, cold and heat stresses were applied for two and six hours. Growth and hydrogen production were impaired under both stress conditions. Microarray chips for R. capsulatus were custom designed by Affymetrix (GeneChip®. TR_RCH2a520699F). The numbers of significantly changed genes were 328 and 293 out of 3685 genes under cold and heat stress, respectively. Our results indicate that temperature stress greatly affects the hydrogen production metabolisms of R. capsulatus. Specifically, the expression of genes that participate in nitrogen metabolism, photosynthesis and the electron transport system were induced by cold stress, while decreased by heat stress. Heat stress also resulted in down regulation of genes related to cell envelope, transporter and binding proteins. Transcriptome analysis and physiological results were consistent with each other. The results presented here may aid clarification of the genetic mechanisms for hydrogen production in purple non-sulfur (PNS) bacteria under temperature stress. PMID:26086826

  12. Extracellular production of tellurium nanoparticles by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Borghese, Roberto; Brucale, Marco; Fortunato, Gianuario; Lanzi, Massimiliano; Mezzi, Alessio; Valle, Francesco; Cavallini, Massimiliano; Zannoni, Davide

    2016-05-15

    The toxic oxyanion tellurite (TeO3(2-)) is acquired by cells of Rhodobacter capsulatus grown anaerobically in the light, via acetate permease ActP2 and then reduced to Te(0) in the cytoplasm as needle-like black precipitates. Interestingly, photosynthetic cultures of R. capsulatus can also generate Te(0) nanoprecipitates (TeNPs) outside the cells upon addition of the redox mediator lawsone (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphtoquinone). TeNPs generation kinetics were monitored to define the optimal conditions to produce TeNPs as a function of various carbon sources and lawsone concentration. We report that growing cultures over a 10 days period with daily additions of 1mM tellurite led to the accumulation in the growth medium of TeNPs with dimensions from 200 up to 600-700 nm in length as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This result suggests that nucleation of TeNPs takes place over the entire cell growth period although the addition of new tellurium Te(0) to pre-formed TeNPs is the main strategy used by R. capsulatus to generate TeNPs outside the cells. Finally, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis of TeNPs indicate they are coated with an organic material which keeps the particles in solution in aqueous solvents.

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Heat-Resistant Mutant Strains (A52 and B41) of the Photosynthetic Hydrogen-Producing Bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Abdulmecit; Cakar, Zeynep Petek; Yucel, Meral; Ozcan, Orhan; Sencan, Sevde; Sertdemir, Ibrahim; Erguner, Bekir; Yuceturk, Betul; Sarac, Aydan; Yuksel, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of two heat-resistant mutant strains, A52 and B41, derived from Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710, and with different hydrogen production levels, are reported here. These sequences may help understand the molecular basis of heat resistance and hydrogen production in R. capsulatus. PMID:27284151

  14. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Heat-Resistant Mutant Strains (A52 and B41) of the Photosynthetic Hydrogen-Producing Bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Abdulmecit; Cakar, Zeynep Petek; Yucel, Meral; Ozcan, Orhan; Sencan, Sevde; Sertdemir, Ibrahim; Erguner, Bekir; Yuceturk, Betul; Sarac, Aydan; Yuksel, Bayram; Ozturk, Yavuz

    2016-06-09

    The draft genome sequences of two heat-resistant mutant strains, A52 and B41, derived from Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710, and with different hydrogen production levels, are reported here. These sequences may help understand the molecular basis of heat resistance and hydrogen production in R. capsulatus. Copyright © 2016 Gokce et al.

  15. Environmental geology of Bath, England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellaway, G. A.

    1995-10-01

    The hot springs of Bath, England, have been of importance to man for hundreds of years. It was a famous spa in Roman times. Subsequently, the springs were used during the 17th through the 20th centuries and extensive urban and commercial properties were developed at Bath using the water for medical and tourist-oriented activities. With urban and commercial development in the area, man's impact on the environment was substantial and typical environmental problems included pollution, land subsidence, or stability that effected construction, drainage, highways, and canals. During the growth of Bath in the 18th and 19th centuries these environmental problems were described by geologist William Smith and Joseph Townsend. Bath and vicinity provides a unique example of environmental geoscience.

  16. Thioredoxin 2 is involved in oxidative stress defence and redox-dependent expression of photosynthesis genes in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuanyu; Härtig, Elisabeth; Klug, Gabriele

    2003-02-01

    Thioredoxins are small ubiquitous proteins that display different functions mainly via redox-mediated processes. The facultatively photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus harbours at least two genes for thioredoxin 1 and 2, trxA and trxC. It is demonstrated that thioredoxin 2 of R. capsulatus can partially replace the thioredoxin 1 function as a hydrogen donor for methionine sulfoxide reductase but cannot replace thioredoxin 1 as a subunit of phage T7 DNA polymerase. By inactivating the trxC gene in R. capsulatus, it is shown that thioredoxin 2 is involved in resistance against oxidative stress. As thioredoxin 1 of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, R. capsulatus thioredoxin 2 affects the oxygen-dependent expression of photosynthesis genes, albeit in an opposite way. The trxC mutant of R. capsulatus shows a stronger increase in photosynthesis gene expression after a decrease in oxygen tension than the isogenic wild-type strain. The expression of the trxC gene is downregulated by oxygen.

  17. Chlorhexidine bathing and microbial contamination in patients' bath basins.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jan; Peed, Jennifer; Burns, Lindsey; Ziemba-Davis, Mary

    2012-09-01

    Research has demonstrated the hazards associated with patients' bath basins and microbial contamination. In a previous study, soap and water bath basins in 3 acute care hospitals were found to be reservoirs for bacteria and potentially associated with the development of hospital-acquired infections. Bacteria grew in 98% of the basin samples; the most common were enterococci (54%), and 32% were gram-negative organisms. To assess the presence of bacterial contaminants in wash basins when chlorhexidine gluconate solution is used in place of standard soap and water to wash patients. Bathing with chlorhexidine gluconate is the standard of practice for all patients in intensive care units at St Vincent Hospital. Specimens from 90 bath basins used for 5 days or more were cultured for bacterial growth to assess contamination of basins when chlorhexidine gluconate is used. Of the 90 basins cultured, only 4 came back positive for microbial growth; all 4 showed growth of gram-positive organisms. Three of the 4 organisms were identified as coagulase-negative staphylococcus, which is frequently found on the skin. This translates into a 95.5% reduction in bacterial growth when chlorhexidine gluconate is used as compared with soap and water in the previous study (Fisher exact test, P < .001). The only factor that was related to positive cultures of samples from basins was the sex of the patient. Compared with the previous study examining microbial contamination of basins when soap and water was used to bathe patients, bacterial growth in patients' bath basins decreased significantly with the use of chlorhexidine gluconate, drastically reducing the risk for hospital-acquired infections. Such reduced risk is especially important for critically ill patients at high risk for bacterial infection.

  18. Microbiologists meet geologists in Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstott, T. C.

    A diverse group of microbiologists, molecular biologists, chemical engineers, and geologists met in Bath, United Kingdom, in September 1993 to reach across the barriers separating their disciplines and report new findings in the expanding field of geomicrobiology. The occasion was the second International Symposium on Subsurface Microbiology, cosponsored by the Subsurface Science Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Historically, Bath was a resort centered around the emission of thermal waters credited with the potential to cure numerous ills. The location was appropriate given that biotechnology appears to have considerable potential to cure some challenging environmental ailments.

  19. Bathing and Associated Treatments in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gittler, Julia K; Wang, Jason F; Orlow, Seth J

    2017-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis is one of the most common complaints presenting to dermatologists, and patients typically inquire as to appropriate bathing recommendations. Although many dermatologists, allergists, and primary-care practitioners provide explicit bathing instructions, recommendations regarding frequency of bathing, duration of bathing, and timing related to emollient and medication application relative to bathing vary widely. Conflicting and vague guidelines stem from knowledge related to the disparate effects of water on skin, as well as a dearth of studies, especially randomized controlled trials, evaluating the effects of water and bathing on the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis. We critically review the literature related to bathing and associated atopic dermatitis treatments, such as wet wraps, bleach baths, bath additives, and balneotherapy. We aim to provide readers with a comprehensive understanding of the impact of water and related therapies on atopic dermatitis as well as recommendations based upon the published data.

  20. Coordinated, long-range, solid substrate movement of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Shelswell, Kristopher John; Beatty, J Thomas

    2011-05-04

    The long-range movement of Rhodobacter capsulatus cells in the glass-agar interstitial region of borosilicate Petri plates was found to be due to a subset of the cells inoculated into plates. The macroscopic appearance of plates indicated that a small group of cells moved in a coordinated manner to form a visible satellite cluster of cells. Satellite clusters were initially separated from the point of inoculation by the absence of visible cell density, but after 20 to 24 hours this space was colonized by cells apparently shed from a group of cells moving away from the point of inoculation. Cell movements consisted of flagellum-independent and flagellum-dependent motility contributions. Flagellum-independent movement occurred at an early stage, such that satellite clusters formed after 12 to 24 hours. Subsequently, after 24 to 32 hours, a flagellum-dependent dispersal of cells became visible, extending laterally outward from a line of flagellum-independent motility. These modes of taxis were found in several environmental isolates and in a variety of mutants, including a strain deficient in the production of the R. capsulatus acyl-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal. Although there was great variability in the direction of movement in illuminated plates, cells were predisposed to move toward broad spectrum white light. This predisposition was increased by the use of square plates, and a statistical analysis indicated that R. capsulatus is capable of genuine phototaxis. Therefore, the variability in the direction of cell movement was attributed to optical effects on light waves passing through the plate material and agar medium.

  1. Inactivation of Mg chelatase during transition from anaerobic to aerobic growth in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Willows, Robert D; Lake, Vanessa; Roberts, Thomas Hugh; Beale, Samuel I

    2003-06-01

    The facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus can adapt from an anaerobic photosynthetic mode of growth to aerobic heterotrophic metabolism. As this adaptation occurs, the cells must rapidly halt bacteriochlorophyll synthesis to prevent phototoxic tetrapyrroles from accumulating, while still allowing heme synthesis to continue. A likely control point is Mg chelatase, the enzyme that diverts protoporphyrin IX from heme biosynthesis toward the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathway by inserting Mg(2+) to form Mg-protoporphyrin IX. Mg chelatase is composed of three subunits that are encoded by the bchI, bchD, and bchH genes in R. capsulatus. We report that BchH is the rate-limiting component of Mg chelatase activity in cell extracts. BchH binds protoporphyrin IX, and BchH that has been expressed and purified from Escherichia coli is red in color due to the bound protoporphyrin IX. Recombinant BchH is rapidly inactivated by light in the presence of O(2), and the inactivation results in the formation of a covalent adduct between the protein and the bound protoporphyrin IX. When photosynthetically growing R. capsulatus cells are transferred to aerobic conditions, Mg chelatase is rapidly inactivated, and BchH is the component that is most rapidly inactivated in vivo when cells are exposed to aerobic conditions. The light- and O(2)-stimulated inactivation of BchH could account for the rapid inactivation of Mg chelatase in vivo and provide a mechanism for inhibiting the synthesis of bacteriochlorophyll during adaptation of photosynthetically grown cells to aerobic conditions while still allowing heme synthesis to occur for aerobic respiration.

  2. The Single Superoxide Dismutase of Rhodobacter capsulatus Is a Cambialistic, Manganese-Containing Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Tabares, Leandro C.; Bittel, Cristian; Carrillo, Néstor; Bortolotti, Ana; Cortez, Néstor

    2003-01-01

    The phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus contains a single, oxygen-responsive superoxide dismutase (SODRc) homologous to iron-containing superoxide dismutase enzymes. Recombinant SODRc, however, displayed higher activity after refolding with Mn2+, especially when the pH of the assay mixture was raised. SODRc isolated from Rhodobacter cells also preferentially contains manganese, but metal discrimination depends on the culture conditions, with iron fractions increasing from 7% in aerobic cultures up to 40% in photosynthetic cultures. Therefore, SODRc behaves as a Mn-containing dismutase with cambialistic properties. PMID:12730184

  3. Isolation of a Rhodobacter capsulatus mutant that lacks c-type cytochromes and excretes porphyrins.

    PubMed Central

    Biel, S W; Biel, A J

    1990-01-01

    A Rhodobacter capsulatus mutant lacking cytochrome oxidase activity was isolated by Tn5 mutagenesis. Difference spectroscopy of crude extracts and extracted c-type cytochromes demonstrated that this mutant completely lacked all c-type cytochromes. The strain did, however, synthesize normal amounts of b-type cytochromes and nonheme iron. This mutant also excreted large amounts of coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin and synthesized reduced amounts of bacteriochlorophyll, suggesting a link between the synthesis of c-type cytochromes and the expression of the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 5 PMID:2155198

  4. Shower bath economizer test program

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.A.

    1987-10-01

    The shower bath economizer (SBE) is a simple counterflow heat exchanger which transfers heat from warm exiting shower drain water to cold incoming water. This report describes a comprehensive test program conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) to assess the technical and economic feasibility of the SBE. 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Molecular Cloning and Expression Analysis of the Rhodobacter capsulatus sodB Gene, Encoding an Iron Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Néstor; Carrillo, Néstor; Pasternak, Cécile; Balzer, Angelika; Klug, Gabriele

    1998-01-01

    Genetic complementation of a sodA sodB Escherichia coli mutant strain was used to clone Rhodobacter capsulatus genes involved in detoxification of superoxide radicals. After sequence analysis, 1 of the 16 identical clones obtained by this selection procedure was shown to contain an open reading frame with sequence similarity to that coding for Fe-containing superoxide dismutases (SodB). The R. capsulatus sodB gene was expressed in E. coli, and the nature of the metal ligand was confirmed by inhibitor sensitivity assays with lysates from both bacterial species. Activity staining of cleared Rhodobacter lysates resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that SodB was the only superoxide dismutase present in this phototrophic organism. The sodB gene was expressed at low levels in R. capsulatus cells grown under anaerobic or semiaerobic conditions, but expression was strongly induced upon exposure of the bacteria to air or to methyl viologen. Attempts to construct a sodB mutant in this organism by allelic exchange of the chromosomal copy of the gene with a suicide plasmid containing a mutated sodB gene were unsuccessful, strongly suggesting that the encoded superoxide dismutase is essential for viability of R. capsulatus in aerobic cultures. PMID:9765573

  6. Gene co-expression network analysis in Rhodobacter capsulatus and application to comparative expression analysis of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Pena-Castillo, Lourdes; Mercer, Ryan; Gurinovich, Anastasia; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.; Westbye, Alexander; Beatty, J. T.; Lang, Andrew S.

    2014-08-28

    The genus Rhodobacter contains purple nonsulfur bacteria found mostly in freshwater environments. Representative strains of two Rhodobacter species, R. capsulatus and R. sphaeroides, have had their genomes fully sequenced and both have been the subject of transcriptional profiling studies. Gene co-expression networks can be used to identify modules of genes with similar expression profiles. Functional analysis of gene modules can then associate co-expressed genes with biological pathways, and network statistics can determine the degree of module preservation in related networks. In this paper, we constructed an R. capsulatus gene co-expression network, performed functional analysis of identified gene modules, and investigated preservation of these modules in R. capsulatus proteomics data and in R. sphaeroides transcriptomics data. Results: The analysis identified 40 gene co-expression modules in R. capsulatus. Investigation of the module gene contents and expression profiles revealed patterns that were validated based on previous studies supporting the biological relevance of these modules. We identified two R. capsulatus gene modules preserved in the protein abundance data. We also identified several gene modules preserved between both Rhodobacter species, which indicate that these cellular processes are conserved between the species and are candidates for functional information transfer between species. Many gene modules were non-preserved, providing insight into processes that differentiate the two species. In addition, using Local Network Similarity (LNS), a recently proposed metric for expression divergence, we assessed the expression conservation of between-species pairs of orthologs, and within-species gene-protein expression profiles. Conclusions: Our analyses provide new sources of information for functional annotation in R. capsulatus because uncharacterized genes in modules are now connected with groups of genes that constitute a joint functional

  7. [Turpentined vapour baths with coniferous oil].

    PubMed

    Raynal, Cécile

    2007-10-01

    This article presents the history of turpentined vapour baths used to treat rheumatismes. In the same time appeared patent medicines made with coniferous oil, sold by chemist near those baths establishments.

  8. Crystallization of a flavodoxin involved in nitrogen fixation in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Bortolotti, Ana; Cortez, Néstor; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2008-05-01

    The flavodoxin NifF from R. capsulatus, a candidate for nitrogenase reduction during nitrogen fixation, has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Preliminary X-ray data processing at 2.17 Å resolution allowed determination of the crystal system and unit-cell parameters. Flavodoxins are small electron-transfer proteins that contain one molecule of noncovalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN). The flavodoxin NifF from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus is reduced by one electron from ferredoxin/flavodoxin:NADP(H) reductase and was postulated to be an electron donor to nitrogenase in vivo. NifF was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and concentrated for crystallization using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Crystals grew from a mixture of PEG 3350 and PEG 400 at pH 5.5 and belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.49, c = 121.32 Å. X-ray data sets have been collected to 2.17 Å resolution.

  9. A Rhodobacter capsulatus member of a universal permease family imports molybdate and other oxyanions.

    PubMed

    Gisin, Jonathan; Müller, Alexandra; Pfänder, Yvonne; Leimkühler, Silke; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2010-11-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is an important trace element that is toxic at high concentrations. To resolve the mechanisms underlying Mo toxicity, Rhodobacter capsulatus mutants tolerant to high Mo concentrations were isolated by random transposon Tn5 mutagenesis. The insertion sites of six independent isolates mapped within the same gene predicted to code for a permease of unknown function located in the cytoplasmic membrane. During growth under Mo-replete conditions, the wild-type strain accumulated considerably more Mo than the permease mutant. For mutants defective for the permease, the high-affinity molybdate importer ModABC, or both transporters, in vivo Mo-dependent nitrogenase (Mo-nitrogenase) activities at different Mo concentrations suggested that ModABC and the permease import molybdate in nanomolar and micromolar ranges, respectively. Like the permease mutants, a mutant defective for ATP sulfurylase tolerated high Mo concentrations, suggesting that ATP sulfurylase is the main target of Mo inhibition in R. capsulatus. Sulfate-dependent growth of a double mutant defective for the permease and the high-affinity sulfate importer CysTWA was reduced compared to those of the single mutants, implying that the permease plays an important role in sulfate uptake. In addition, permease mutants tolerated higher tungstate and vanadate concentrations than the wild type, suggesting that the permease acts as a general oxyanion importer. We propose to call this permease PerO (for oxyanion permease). It is the first reported bacterial molybdate transporter outside the ABC transporter family.

  10. Purification and properties of a nif-specific flavodoxin from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Yakunin, A F; Gennaro, G; Hallenbeck, P C

    1993-01-01

    A flavodoxin was isolated from iron-sufficient, nitrogen-limited cultures of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. Its molecular properties, molecular weight, UV-visible absorption spectrum, and amino acid composition suggest that it is similar to the nif-specific flavodoxin, NifF, of Klebsiella pneumoniae. The results of immunoblotting showed that R. capsulatus flavodoxin is nif specific, since it is absent from ammonia-replete cultures and is not synthesized by the mutant strain J61, which lacks a nif-specific regulator (NifR1). Growth of cultures under iron-deficient conditions causes a small amount of flavodoxin to be synthesized under ammonia-replete conditions and increases its synthesis under N2-fixing conditions, suggesting that its synthesis is under a dual system of control with respect to iron and fixed nitrogen availability. Here we show that flavodoxin, when supplemented with catalytic amounts of methyl viologen, is capable of efficiently reducing nitrogenase in an illuminated chloroplast system. Thus, this nif-specific flavodoxin is a potential in vivo electron carrier to nitrogenase; however, its role in the nitrogen fixation process remains to be established. Images PMID:8226618

  11. Purification of a sixth ferredoxin from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Primary structure and biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Naud, I; Vinçon, M; Garin, J; Gaillard, J; Forest, E; Jouanneau, Y

    1994-06-15

    A new ferredoxin has been purified from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. It is the sixth ferredoxin to be isolated from this bacterium and it was called FdVI. Its primary structure was established based on amino acid sequence analysis of the protein and of peptides derived from it. It is composed of 106 residues including five cysteines. The calculated mass of the polypeptide is 11,402.6 Da which matches the experimental value determined by electrospray mass spectrometry. Amino acid sequence comparison revealed that ferredoxin VI (FdVI) is strikingly similar to a ferredoxin from Caulobacter crescentus and to the putidaredoxin from Pseudomonas putida. FdVI exhibited an ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrum typical for a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin. EPR spectroscopy of the reduced protein showed a nearly axial signal similar to that of mitochondrial and P. putida ferredoxins. FdVI is biosynthesized in cells growing anaerobically under either nitrogen-sufficient or nitrogen-deficient conditions. Although the function of FdVI is unknown, its structural resemblance to [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins known to transfer electrons to oxygenases such as P-450 cytochromes, suggests that FdVI may have a similar role in R. capsulatus.

  12. Evolutionary implications of phylogenetic analyses of the gene transfer agent (GTA) of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Lang, Andrew S; Taylor, Terumi A; Beatty, J Thomas

    2002-11-01

    The gene transfer agent (GTA) of the a-proteobacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus is a cell-controlled genetic exchange vector. Genes that encode the GTA structure are clustered in a 15-kb region of the R. capsulatus chromosome, and some of these genes show sequence similarity to known bacteriophage head and tail genes. However, the production of GTA is controlled at the level of transcription by a cellular two-component signal transduction system. This paper describes homologues of both the GTA structural gene cluster and the GTA regulatory genes in the a-proteobacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Caulobacter crescentus, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Brucella melitensis. These sequences were used in a phylogenetic tree approach to examine the evolutionary relationships of selected GTA proteins to these homologues and (pro)phage proteins, which was compared to a 16S rRNA tree. The data indicate that a GTA-like element was present in a single progenitor of the extant species that contain both GTA structural cluster and regulatory gene homologues. The evolutionary relationships of GTA structural proteins to (pro)phage proteins indicated by the phylogenetic tree patterns suggest a predominantly vertical descent of GTA-like sequences in the a-proteobacteria and little past gene exchange with (pro)phages.

  13. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a) The...

  14. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a) The...

  15. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a) The...

  16. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a) The...

  17. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a) The...

  18. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey From collection of Bath Marine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey From collection of Bath Marine Museum, Washington Street, Bath SOUTHEAST VIEW OF HOUSE FROM WOOD ENGRAVING ON 1851 BATH MAP - George F. Patten House, 118 Front Street, Bath, Sagadahoc County, ME

  19. nif gene expression studies in Rhodobacter capsulatus: ntrC-independent repression by high ammonium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hübner, P; Masepohl, B; Klipp, W; Bickle, T A

    1993-10-01

    The expression of nif genes in Rhodobacter capsulatus depends on the two regulatory genes, rpoN and nifA, encoding a nif-specific alternative sigma factor of RNA polymerase and a nif-specific transcriptional activator, respectively. The expression of the rpoN gene itself is also RPON/NIFA dependent. In order to better characterize the regulation of nif gene induction, chromosomal nifH-, rpoN-, nifA1- and nifA2- lacZ fusions were constructed and the expression of these different nif-lacZ fusions was determined under photoheterotrophic conditions at different starting ammonium concentrations. The two nifA genes were found to be induced first, followed by nifH and finally by rpoN upon weak, medium and strong nitrogen starvation, respectively. This induction profile and the correlation between the expression of the different nif genes suggested that nifA1 expression is the limiting factor for nif gene induction. This hypothesis was tested by construction of different nifA1 overexpressing mutants. Contrary to the current model of nif gene expression in R. capsulatus, which predicted constitutive nif gene expression in such mutants, a strong repression of nifH and rpoN was found at high ammonium concentration. The low nifH expression under these conditions is unaffected by nifA2 and is not increased in a ntrC mutant, ruling out any role of NTRC as a mediator of this repression. This finding implies an additional, so far unidentified, regulation by fixed nitrogen in R. capsulatus. Changing the expression level of rpoN indicated that low levels of RPON are already sufficient for full nifH induction. The nifA1 and rpoN expression mutants were also tested for diazotrophic growth. Similar generation times were determined for the mutants and for the wild type, but diazotrophic growth of the nifA1 over-expressing ntrC mutant RCM14 did not start until after a prolonged lag phase of two to three days.

  20. Bath impregnation of carbon anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Perruchoud, R.C.; Meier, M.W.; Fischer, W.K.

    1996-10-01

    A rapid bath impregnation in anode butts set in contact with the cathodic metal has been observed. The sodium content of the butts is raised by 0.2% per minute of contact. Slower rates of impregnation have been measured in cases of pot current interruptions. The impact of the impregnated butts on the anode reactivity is so dramatic that sorting of these butts is absolutely needed. Critical electrolysis conditions which may lead to impregnation are reviewed and the mechanism of impregnation is examined.

  1. Crystallization of a flavodoxin involved in nitrogen fixation in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Bortolotti, Ana; Cortez, Néstor; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2008-01-01

    Flavodoxins are small electron-transfer proteins that contain one molecule of noncovalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN). The flavodoxin NifF from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus is reduced by one electron from ferredoxin/flavodoxin:NADP(H) reductase and was postulated to be an electron donor to nitrogenase in vivo. NifF was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and concentrated for crystallization using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Crystals grew from a mixture of PEG 3350 and PEG 400 at pH 5.5 and belong to the tetragonal space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.49, c = 121.32 Å. X-ray data sets have been collected to 2.17 Å resolution. PMID:18453705

  2. An overlap between operons involved in carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Young, D A; Rudzik, M B; Marrs, B L

    1992-08-15

    A new example of superoperonal gene arrangement has been documented in the Rhodobacter capsulatus photosynthetic gene cluster. The promoter for the operon initiated by the bchI gene is embedded within an upstream operon for carotenoid synthesis. The stop codon for the crtA gene, the only gene in the first operon, overlaps the start codon of the downstream bchI gene. As a consequence of this overlap, the promoter(s) for the bch operon must be located within the crtA structural gene. The bchI gene is shown here for the first time to be required for the conversion of protoporphyrin IX to subsequent intermediates in bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis.

  3. Cloning, characterization, and regulation of nifF from Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Gennaro, G; Hübner, P; Sandmeier, U; Yakunin, A F; Hallenbeck, P C

    1996-01-01

    The Rhodobacter capsulatus nifF gene and upstream sequence were cloned by using a probe based on the N-terminal sequence of NifF. nifF was found to not be contained in the previously described nif regions I, II, and III. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence showed that it is highly similar to NifF from Azotobacter vinelandii and NifF from Klebsiella pneumoniae. Analysis of translational fusions demonstrated that the regulation of transcription was the same as previously reported at the protein level. Insertional mutagen esis showed that NifF contributes significantly to nitrogenase activity under normal nitrogen-fixing conditions and that it is absolutely required for nitrogen fixation under iron limitation. PMID:8682802

  4. Replacement of sugars to hydrogen production by Rhodobacter capsulatus using dark fermentation effluent as substrate.

    PubMed

    Silva, Felipe Thales Moreira; Moreira, Luiza Rojas; de Souza Ferreira, Juliana; Batista, Fabiana Regina Xavier; Cardoso, Vicelma Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising alternative for the increased global energy demand since it has high energy density and is a clean fuel. The aim of this work was to evaluate the photo-fermentation by Rhodobacter capsulatus, using the dark fermentation effluent as substrate. Different systems were tested by changing the type of sugar in the dark fermentation, investigating the influence of supplementing DFE with sugar and adding alternate and periodically lactose and glucose throughout the process. The supplementation of the DFE with sugar resulted in higher H2 productivity and the replacement of the sugars repeatedly during the photo-fermentation process was important to maintain the cell culture active. By controlling the residual amount of sugar, bacteria inhibition was avoided; lactic acid, that was toxic to the biomass, was consumed and the metabolic route of butyric acid production was predominant. Under optimum conditions, the H2 productivity reached 208.40mmolH2/Ld in 52h.

  5. In vitro assembly of a prohead-like structure of the Rhodobacter capsulatus gene transfer agent

    SciTech Connect

    Spano, Anthony J. . E-mail: ajs6z@virginia.edu; Chen, Frank S.; Goodman, Benjamin E.; Sabat, Agnes E.; Simon, Martha N.; Wall, Joseph S.; Correia, John J.; McIvor, Wilson; Newcomb, William W.; Brown, Jay C.; Schnur, Joel M.; Lebedev, Nikolai

    2007-07-20

    The gene transfer agent (GTA) is a phage-like particle capable of exchanging double-stranded DNA fragments between cells of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. Here we show that the major capsid protein of GTA, expressed in E. coli, can be assembled into prohead-like structures in the presence of calcium ions in vitro. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of uranyl acetate staining material and thin sections of glutaraldehyde-fixed material demonstrates that these associates have spherical structures with diameters in the range of 27-35 nm. The analysis of scanning TEM images revealed particles of mass {approx} 4.3 MDa, representing 101 {+-} 11 copies of the monomeric subunit. The establishment of this simple and rapid method to form prohead-like particles permits the GTA system to be used for genome manipulation within the photosynthetic bacterium, for specific targeted drug delivery, and for the construction of biologically based distributed autonomous sensors for environmental monitoring.

  6. Controlling light-use by Rhodobacter capsulatus continuous cultures in a flat-panel photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Hoekema, Sebastiaan; Douma, Rutger D; Janssen, Marcel; Tramper, Johannes; Wijffels, René H

    2006-11-05

    The main bottleneck in scale-up of phototrophic fermentation is the low efficiency of light energy conversion to the desired product, which is caused by an excessive dissipation of light energy to heat. The photoheterotrophic formation of hydrogen from acetate and light energy by the microorganism Rhodobacter capsulatus NCIMB 11773 was chosen as a case study in this work. A light energy balance was set up, in which the total bacterial light energy absorption is split up and attributed to its destinations. These are biomass growth and maintenance, generation of hydrogen and photosynthetic heat dissipation. The constants defined in the light energy balance were determined experimentally using a flat-panel photobioreactor with a 3-cm optical path. An experimental method called D-stat was applied. Continuous cultures were kept in a so-called pseudo steady state, while the dilution rate was reduced slowly and smoothly. The biomass yield and maintenance coefficients of Rhodobacter capsulatus biomass on light energy were determined at 12.4 W/m(2) (400-950 nm) and amounted to 2.58 x 10(-8) +/- 0.04 x 10(-8) kg/J and 102 +/- 3.5 W/kg, respectively. The fraction of the absorbed light energy that was dissipated to heat at 473 W/m(2) depended on the biomass concentration in the reactor and varied between 0.80 and 0.88, as the biomass concentration was increased from 2.0 to 8.0 kg/m(3). The process conditions were estimated at which a 3.7% conversion efficiency of absorbed light energy to produced hydrogen energy should be attainable at 473 W/m(2). (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Molecular genetic and molecular evolutionary studies on the bacteriochlorophyll synthesis genes of Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Burke-Agueero, Donald H.

    1992-08-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus, purple bacterium capable of either aerobic or photosynthetic growth, has proven to be very useful in genetic studies of photosynthesis. Forty-four genes clustered together within a 46 kilobase region are required to establish photosynthetic ability in R. capsulatus. Approximately twenty of these genes are involved in bacteriochlorophyll synthesis of which eight ``bch`` genes are the subject of this thesis. Six of these genes were found to code for the two ring reductases. The first converts protochlorophyllide (PChlide) into a chlorin, the immediate precursor to chlorophyll a, and then into a bacteriochlorin. Each reductase is shown to be made up of three subunits. PChlide reductase is coded by the genes bchN, bchB, and bchL. Proteins with amino acid sequences markedly similar to those of bchN and bchL have been shown in other organisms to be required for chlorophyll synthesis; hence, their designation as chlN and chlB. A third chloroplast-encoded gene of heretofore unknown function shares amino acid identities with bchB and is probably the third subunit of the plant PChlide reductase. The bchA locus, which encodes the chlorin reductase, is found to be made up of three separate, translationally coupled genes, referred to as bchX, bchY, and bchZ. Amino acid similarities between bchX, bchL, and the nitrogenase reductase protein nifH suggest that all three classes of proteins share certain three-dimensional structural features, including elements that are central to the enzymatic mechanism of nifH. PChlide reductase and chlorin reductase are clearly derived from a common ancestor. Several lines of analysis suggests the ancestor of both enzyme systems reduced PChlide twice to produce bacteriochlorophyll supporting the concept bacteriochlorophyll as the ancestral reaction center pigment.

  8. Molecular genetic and molecular evolutionary studies on the bacteriochlorophyll synthesis genes of Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Burke-Agueero, D.H.

    1992-08-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus, purple bacterium capable of either aerobic or photosynthetic growth, has proven to be very useful in genetic studies of photosynthesis. Forty-four genes clustered together within a 46 kilobase region are required to establish photosynthetic ability in R. capsulatus. Approximately twenty of these genes are involved in bacteriochlorophyll synthesis of which eight bch'' genes are the subject of this thesis. Six of these genes were found to code for the two ring reductases. The first converts protochlorophyllide (PChlide) into a chlorin, the immediate precursor to chlorophyll a, and then into a bacteriochlorin. Each reductase is shown to be made up of three subunits. PChlide reductase is coded by the genes bchN, bchB, and bchL. Proteins with amino acid sequences markedly similar to those of bchN and bchL have been shown in other organisms to be required for chlorophyll synthesis; hence, their designation as chlN and chlB. A third chloroplast-encoded gene of heretofore unknown function shares amino acid identities with bchB and is probably the third subunit of the plant PChlide reductase. The bchA locus, which encodes the chlorin reductase, is found to be made up of three separate, translationally coupled genes, referred to as bchX, bchY, and bchZ. Amino acid similarities between bchX, bchL, and the nitrogenase reductase protein nifH suggest that all three classes of proteins share certain three-dimensional structural features, including elements that are central to the enzymatic mechanism of nifH. PChlide reductase and chlorin reductase are clearly derived from a common ancestor. Several lines of analysis suggests the ancestor of both enzyme systems reduced PChlide twice to produce bacteriochlorophyll supporting the concept bacteriochlorophyll as the ancestral reaction center pigment.

  9. Zinc biosorption by the purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Magnin, Jean-Pierre; Gondrexon, Nicolas; Willison, John C

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the first report providing information on the zinc (Zn) biosorption potentialities of the purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. The effects of various biological, physical, and chemical parameters on Zn biosorption were studied in both the wild-type strain B10 and a strain, RC220, lacking the endogenous plasmid. At an initial Zn concentration of 10 mg·L(-1), the Zn biosorption capacity at pH 7 for bacterial biomass grown in synthetic medium containing lactate as carbon source was 17 and 16 mg Zn·(g dry mass)(-1) for strains B10 and RC220, respectively. Equilibrium was achieved in a contact time of 30-120 min, depending on the initial Zn concentration. Zn sorption by live biomass was modelled, at equilibrium, according to the Redlich-Peterson and Langmuir isotherms, in the range of 1-600 mg Zn·L(-1). The wild-type strain showed a maximal Zn uptake capacity (Qm) of 164 ± 8 mg·(g dry mass)(-1) and an equilibrium constant (Kads) of 0.017 ± 0.00085 L·(mg Zn)(-1), compared with values of 73.9 mg·(g dry mass)(-1) and 0.361 L·mg(-1) for the strain lacking the endogenous plasmid. The Qm value observed for R. capsulatus B10 is one of the highest reported in the literature, suggesting that this strain may be useful for Zn bioremediation. The lower Qm value and higher equilibrium constant observed for strain RC220 suggest that the endogenous plasmid confers an enhanced biosorption capacity in this bacterium, although no genetic determinants for Zn resistance appear to be located on the plasmid, and possible explanations for this are discussed.

  10. The Reductive Half-reaction of Xanthine Dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Hall, James; Reschke, Stefan; Cao, Hongnan; Leimkühler, Silke; Hille, Russ

    2014-01-01

    The kinetic properties of an E232Q variant of the xanthine dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus have been examined to ascertain whether Glu232 in wild-type enzyme is protonated or unprotonated in the course of catalysis at neutral pH. We find that kred, the limiting rate constant for reduction at high [xanthine], is significantly compromised in the variant, a result that is inconsistent with Glu232 being neutral in the active site of the wild-type enzyme. A comparison of the pH dependence of both kred and kred/Kd from reductive half-reaction experiments between wild-type and enzyme and the E232Q variant suggests that the ionized Glu232 of wild-type enzyme plays an important role in catalysis by discriminating against the monoanionic form of substrate, effectively increasing the pKa of substrate by two pH units and ensuring that at physiological pH the neutral form of substrate predominates in the Michaelis complex. A kinetic isotope study of the wild-type R. capsulatus enzyme indicates that, as previously determined for the bovine and chicken enzymes, product release is principally rate-limiting in catalysis. The disparity in rate constants for the chemical step of the reaction and product release, however, is not as great in the bacterial enzyme as compared with the vertebrate forms. The results indicate that the bacterial and bovine enzymes catalyze the chemical step of the reaction to the same degree and that the faster turnover observed with the bacterial enzyme is due to a faster rate constant for product release than is seen with the vertebrate enzyme. PMID:25258317

  11. Enhanced Nitrogenase Activity in Strains of Rhodobacter capsulatus That Overexpress the rnf Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ho-Sang; Jouanneau, Yves

    2000-01-01

    In the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, a putative membrane-bound complex encoded by the rnfABCDGEH operon is thought to be dedicated to electron transport to nitrogenase. In this study, the whole rnf operon was cloned under the control of the nifH promoter in plasmid pNR117 and expressed in several rnf mutants. Complementation analysis demonstrated that transconjugants which integrated plasmid pNR117 directed effective biosynthesis of a functionally competent complex in R. capsulatus. Moreover, it was found that strains carrying pNR117 displayed nitrogenase activities 50 to 100% higher than the wild-type level. The results of radioactive labeling experiments indicated that the intracellular content of nitrogenase polypeptides was marginally altered in strains containing pNR117, whereas the levels of the RnfB and RnfC proteins present in the membrane were four- and twofold, respectively, higher than the wild-type level. Hence, the enhancement of in vivo nitrogenase activity was correlated with a commensurate overproduction of the Rnf polypeptides. In vitro nitrogenase assays performed in the presence of an artificial electron donor indicated that the catalytic activity of the enzyme was not increased in strains overproducing the Rnf polypeptides. It is proposed that the supply of reductants through the Rnf complex might be rate limiting for nitrogenase activity in vivo. Immunoprecipitation experiments performed on solubilized membrane proteins revealed that RnfB and RnfC are associated with each other and with additional polypeptides which may be components of the membrane-bound complex. PMID:10671439

  12. Bathing Epilepsy: Report of Three Caucasian Cases

    PubMed Central

    Dashi, Florian; Seferi, Arsen; Rroji, Arben; Enesi, Eugen; Petrela, Mentor

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bathing epilepsy is a specific type of reflex epilepsy triggered by domestic bathing in water. It is a geographically specific epilepsy syndrome that is more prevalent in India Cases in Caucasian population are very rarely reported. These cases share many similar clinical features and a similar prognosis to the Indian cases. Case report: We describe three cases of bathing epilepsy in Albanian population; two cases with well controlled seizures and one with drug-resistant seizures. PMID:26005279

  13. Rhodobacter capsulatus Catalyzes Light-Dependent Fe(II) Oxidation under Anaerobic Conditions as a Potential Detoxification Mechanism▿

    PubMed Central

    Poulain, Alexandre J.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse bacteria are known to oxidize millimolar concentrations of ferrous iron [Fe(II)] under anaerobic conditions, both phototrophically and chemotrophically. Yet whether they can do this under conditions that are relevant to natural systems is understood less well. In this study, we tested how light, Fe(II) speciation, pH, and salinity affected the rate of Fe(II) oxidation by Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003. Although R. capsulatus cannot grow photoautotrophically on Fe(II), it oxidizes Fe(II) at rates comparable to those of bacteria that do grow photoautotrophically on Fe(II) as soon as it is exposed to light, provided it has a functional photosystem. Chelation of Fe(II) by diverse organic ligands promotes Fe(II) oxidation, and as the pH increases, so does the oxidation rate, except in the presence of nitrilotriacetate; nonchelated forms of Fe(II) are also more rapidly oxidized at higher pH. Salt concentrations typical of marine environments inhibit Fe(II) oxidation. When growing photoheterotrophically on humic substances, R. capsulatus is highly sensitive to low concentrations of Fe(II); it is inhibited in the presence of concentrations as low as 5 μM. The product of Fe(II) oxidation, ferric iron, does not hamper growth under these conditions. When other parameters, such as pH or the presence of chelators, are adjusted to promote Fe(II) oxidation, the growth inhibition effect of Fe(II) is alleviated. Together, these results suggest that Fe(II) is toxic to R. capsulatus growing under strictly anaerobic conditions and that Fe(II) oxidation alleviates this toxicity. PMID:19717624

  14. Do hot baths promote anal sphincter relaxation?

    PubMed

    Pinho, M; Correa, J C; Furtado, A; Ramos, J R

    1993-03-01

    Hot perineal baths have been prescribed for the treatment of painful anorectal conditions such as anal fissures and perianal hematomas or for the postoperative care of hemorrhoidectomy. Despite this widely accepted benefit, no studies have been performed to determine whether there is a rational explanation for this procedure. Anorectal manometry was performed in 40 control subjects with no anorectal complaints before and after a hot perineal bath. No significant difference was found between anal pressures at rest or during voluntary contraction before and after the bath. We conclude from this study that no relaxation of anal sphincters can be obtained by hot perineal baths in normal subjects.

  15. Role for draTG and rnf Genes in Reduction of 2,4-Dinitrophenol by Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, Lara P.; García, Patricia; Martínez-Luque, Manuel; Klipp, Werner; Blasco, Rafael; Castillo, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    The phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus is able to reduce 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) to 2-amino-4-nitrophenol enzymatically and thus can grow in the presence of this uncoupler. DNP reduction was switched off by glutamine or ammonium, but this short-term regulation did not take place in a draTG deletion mutant. Nevertheless, the target of DraTG does not seem to be the nitrophenol reductase itself since the ammonium shock did not inactivate the enzyme. In addition to this short-term regulation, ammonium or glutamine repressed the DNP reduction system. Mutants of R. capsulatus affected in ntrC or rpoN exhibited a 10-fold decrease in nitroreductase activity in vitro but almost no DNP activity in vivo. In addition, mutants affected in rnfA or rnfC, which are also under NtrC control and encode components involved in electron transfer to nitrogenase, were unable to metabolize DNP. These results indicate that NtrC regulates dinitrophenol reduction in R. capsulatus, either directly or indirectly, by controlling expression of the Rnf proteins. Therefore, the Rnf complex seems to supply electrons for both nitrogen fixation and DNP reduction. PMID:11160111

  16. Open reading frame 176 in the photosynthesis gene cluster of Rhodobacter capsulatus encodes idi, a gene for isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, F M; Baker, J A; Poulter, C D

    1996-01-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) isomerase catalyzes an essential activation step in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway. A database search based on probes from the highly conserved regions in three eukaryotic IPP isomerases revealed substantial similarity with ORF176 in the photosynthesis gene cluster in Rhodobacter capsulatus. The open reading frame was cloned into an Escherichia coli expression vector. The encoded 20-kDa protein, which was purified in two steps by ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, catalyzed the interconversion of IPP and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Thus, the photosynthesis gene cluster encodes all of the enzymes required to incorporate IPP into the ultimate carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll metabolites in R. capsulatus. More recent searches uncovered additional putative open reading frames for IPP isomerase in seed-bearing plants (Oryza sativa, Arabadopsis thaliana, and Clarkia breweri), a worm (Caenorhabiditis elegans), and another eubacterium (Escherichia coli). The R. capsulatus enzyme is the smallest of the IPP isomerases to be identified thus far and may consist mostly of a fundamental catalytic core for the enzyme. PMID:8550491

  17. A mutation in a Rhodobacter capsulatus gene encoding an integration host factor-like protein impairs in vivo hydrogenase expression.

    PubMed Central

    Toussaint, B; Bosc, C; Richaud, P; Colbeau, A; Vignais, P M

    1991-01-01

    A gene capable of encoding a protein sharing 45% identical amino acids with the alpha subunit of the integration host factor (IHF) of Escherichia coli was isolated from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus strain B10 by complementation of a hydrogenase-deficient (Hup-) mutant, IR4. A DNA fragment of 274 base pairs containing an IHF binding consensus sequence, isolated from the promoter region of the hydrogenase structural genes (hupSL), was shown by gel retardation assays to bind the IHF protein from E. coli. The product of the R. capsulatus gene was shown to bind specifically to the 274-base-pair DNA fragment from the hupSL promoter. By analogy to the E. coli himA gene, which encodes the alpha subunit of IHF, the gene complementing the IR4 mutant was named himA of R. capsulatus. The wild-type himA gene, cloned in plasmid pBO2, was introduced into the IR4 strain and shown to restore, in trans, hydrogenase activity and autotrophic growth in the mutant. In IR4, a C----T transition mutation had replaced Arg-8 by Cys-8. Gel mobility shifts of the 274-base-pair DNA fragment, not observed with the himA gene product of IR4, were restored with extracts from IR4(pBO2) cells, containing the himA gene on the recombinant plasmid pBO2. Images PMID:1961742

  18. Pulling bubbles from a bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Justin C. T.; Blakemore, Andrea L.; Hosoi, A. E.

    2010-06-01

    Deposition of bubbles on a wall withdrawn from a liquid bath is a phenomenon observed in many everyday situations—the foam lacing left behind in an emptied glass of beer, for instance. It is also of importance to the many industrial processes where uniformity of coating is desirable. We report work on an idealized version of this situation, the drag-out of a single bubble in Landau-Levich-Derjaguin flow. We find that a well-defined critical wall speed exists, separating the two regimes of bubble persistence at the meniscus and bubble deposition on the moving wall. Experiments show that this transition occurs at Ca∗˜Bo0.73. A similar result is obtained theoretically by balancing viscous stresses and gravity.

  19. Pseudomonas folliculitis in Arabian baths.

    PubMed

    Molina-Leyva, Alejandro; Ruiz-Ruigomez, Maria

    2013-07-14

    A 35-year-old man presented with a painful cutaneous skin eruption that was localized on the upper trunk. He stated that the previous weekend he had attended an Arabian bath. The physical examination revealed multiple hair follicle-centered papulopustules surrounded by an erythematous halo. A clinical diagnosis of pseudomonas folliculitis was made and treatment was prescribed. Afterwards Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from a pustule culture. Pseudomonas folliculitis is a bacterial infection of the hair follicles. The most common reservoirs include facilities with hot water and complex piping systems that are difficult to clean, such as hot tubs and bathtubs. Despite adequate or high chlorine levels, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can grow within a biofilm.

  20. 21 CFR 890.5110 - Paraffin bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Paraffin bath. 890.5110 Section 890.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5110 Paraffin bath....

  1. 21 CFR 890.5110 - Paraffin bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Paraffin bath. 890.5110 Section 890.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5110 Paraffin bath....

  2. 21 CFR 890.5110 - Paraffin bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Paraffin bath. 890.5110 Section 890.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5110 Paraffin bath....

  3. 21 CFR 890.5110 - Paraffin bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Paraffin bath. 890.5110 Section 890.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5110 Paraffin bath....

  4. 21 CFR 890.5110 - Paraffin bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Paraffin bath. 890.5110 Section 890.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5110 Paraffin bath....

  5. Soluble variants of Rhodobacter capsulatus membrane-anchored cytochrome cy are efficient photosynthetic electron carriers.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Yavuz; Lee, Dong-Woo; Mandaci, Sevnur; Osyczka, Artur; Prince, Roger C; Daldal, Fevzi

    2008-05-16

    Photosynthetic (Ps) electron transport pathways often contain multiple electron carriers with overlapping functions. Here we focus on two c-type cytochromes (cyt) in facultative phototrophic bacteria of the Rhodobacter genus: the diffusible cyt c2 and the membrane-anchored cyt c(y). In species like R. capsulatus, cyt c(y) functions in both Ps and respiratory electron transport chains, whereas in other species like R. sphaeroides, it does so only in respiration. The molecular bases of this difference was investigated by producing a soluble variant of cyt c(y) (S-c(y)), by fusing genetically the cyt c2 signal sequence to the cyt c domain of cyt c(y). This novel electron carrier was unable to support the Ps growth of R. capsulatus. However, strains harboring cyt S-c(y) regained Ps growth ability by acquiring mutations in its cyt c domain. They produced cyt S-c(y) variants at amounts comparable with that of cyt c2, and conferred Ps growth. Chemical titration indicated that the redox midpoint potential of cyt S-c(y) was about 340 mV, similar to that of cyts c2 or c(y). Remarkably, electron transfer kinetics from the cyt bc1 complex to the photochemical reaction center (RC) mediated by cyt S-c(y) was distinct from those seen with the cyt c2 or cyt c(y). The kinetics exhibited a pronounced slow phase, suggesting that cyt S-c(y) interacted with the RC less tightly than cyt c2. Comparison of structural models of cyts c2 and S-c(y) revealed that several of the amino acid residues implicated in long-range electrostatic interactions promoting binding of cyt c2 to the RC are not conserved in cyt c(y), whereas those supporting short-range hydrophobic interactions are conserved. These findings indicated that attaching electron carrier cytochromes to the membrane allowed them to weaken their interactions with their partners so that they could accommodate more rapid multiple turnovers.

  6. Development of a Rhodobacter capsulatus self-reporting model system for optimizing light-dependent, [FeFe]-hydrogenase-driven H2 production

    DOE PAGES

    Wecker, Matt S. A.; Beaton, Stephen E.; Chado, Robert A.; ...

    2016-08-17

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus normally photoproduces H2 as a by-product of its nitrogenase-catalyzed nitrogen-fixing activity. Such H2 production, however, is expensive from a metabolic perspective, requiring nearly four times as many photons as the equivalent algal hydrogenase-based system. Here we report the insertion of a Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase and its three attendant hydrogenase assembly proteins into an R. capsulatus strain lacking its native uptake hydrogenase. Further, this strain is modified to fluoresce upon sensing H2. The resulting strain photoproduces H2 and self-reports its own H2 production through fluorescence. Furthermore, this model system represents a unique method of developing hydrogenase-basedmore » H2 production in R. capsulatus, may serve as a powerful system for in vivo directed evolution of hydrogenases and hydrogenase-associated genes, and provides a means of screening for increased metabolic production of H2.« less

  7. Bubble baths: just splashing around?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Wesley; Speirs, Nathan; Sharker, Saberul Islam; Hurd, Randy; Williams, Bj; Truscott, Tadd

    2016-11-01

    Soap Bubbles on the water surface would seem to be an intuitive means for splash suppression, but their presence appears to be a double edged sword. We present on the water entry of hydrophilic spheres where the liquid surface is augmented by the presence of a bubble layer, similar to a bubble bath. While the presence of a bubble layer can diminish splashing upon impact at low Weber numbers, it also induces cavity formation at speeds below the critical velocity. The formation of a cavity generally results in larger Worthington jets and thus, larger amounts of ejected liquid. Bubble layers induce cavity formation by wetting the sphere prior to liquid impact, causing them to form cavities similar to those created by hydrophobic spheres. Droplets present on a pre-wetted sphere disrupt the flow of the advancing liquid during entry, pushing it away from the impacting body to form an entrained air cavity. This phenomena was noted by Worthington with pre-wetted stone marbles, and suggests that the application of a bubble layer is generally ineffective as a means of splash suppression.

  8. Field evidence for the potential of Rhodobacter capsulatus as Biofertilizer for flooded rice.

    PubMed

    Gamal-Eldin, Hosny; Elbanna, Khaled

    2011-02-01

    In a previous study, we evaluated the effects of inoculating rice plants with the phototrophic purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus (Rc) on growth and yield of rice in pots and lysimeter experiments and the results obtained have been highly encouraging. In this study, we carried out two field experiments: one in the experimental farm of the Faculty of Agriculture, Fayoum University, and the second in a farmer's field in Kafr El-sheikh, to assess the effects of Rc on growth and yield of rice in comparison and in combination with chemical nitrogen fertilizer (CNF) and farmyard manure. The results indicated that both biological and grain yields in all the Rc inoculated treatments were significantly higher than those in the uninoculated corresponding treatments in both fields. With regard to grain yield, the major factor for determining the effectiveness of any agricultural treatment, inoculation with Rc in combination with 50% of the recommended CNF rate gave a grain yield that was statistically equivalent to that obtained with 100% of the recommended CNF rate. These results provide a clear evidence for the potential of Rc as biofertilizer for flooded rice under field conditions.

  9. Coenzyme binding and hydride transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus ferredoxin/flavodoxin NADP(H) oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Ana; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Goñi, Guillermina; Medina, Milagros; Hermoso, Juan A; Carrillo, Néstor; Cortez, Néstor

    2009-02-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases catalyse the reversible hydride/electron exchange between NADP(H) and ferredoxin/flavodoxin, comprising a structurally defined family of flavoenzymes with two distinct subclasses. Those present in Gram-negative bacteria (FPRs) display turnover numbers of 1-5 s(-1) while the homologues of cyanobacteria and plants (FNRs) developed a 100-fold activity increase. We investigated nucleotide interactions and hydride transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus FPR comparing them to those reported for FNRs. NADP(H) binding proceeds as in FNRs with stacking of the nicotinamide on the flavin, which resulted in formation of charge-transfer complexes prior to hydride exchange. The affinity of FPR for both NADP(H) and 2'-P-AMP was 100-fold lower than that of FNRs. The crystal structure of FPR in complex with 2'-P-AMP and NADP(+) allowed modelling of the adenosine ring system bound to the protein, whereas the nicotinamide portion was either not visible or protruding toward solvent in different obtained crystals. Stabilising contacts with the active site residues are different in the two reductase classes. We conclude that evolution to higher activities in FNRs was partially favoured by modification of NADP(H) binding in the initial complexes through changes in the active site residues involved in stabilisation of the adenosine portion of the nucleotide and in the mobile C-terminus of FPR.

  10. Mutational and nucleotide sequence analysis of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase from Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Sganga, M W; Aksamit, R R; Cantoni, G L; Bauer, C E

    1992-01-01

    The genetic locus ahcY, encoding the enzyme S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (EC 3.3.1.1) from the bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, has been mapped by mutational analysis to within a cluster of genes involved in regulating the induction and maintenance of the bacterial photosynthetic apparatus. Sequence analysis demonstrates that ahcY encodes a 51-kDa polypeptide that displays 64% sequence identity to its human homolog. Insertion mutants in ahcY lack detectable S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase activity and, as a consequence, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine accumulates in the cells, resulting in a 16-fold decrease in the intracellular ratio of S-adenosyl-L-methionine to S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine as compared to wild-type cells. The ahcY disrupted strain fails to grow in minimal medium; however, growth is restored in minimal medium supplemented with methionine or homocysteine or in a complex medium, thereby indicating that the hydrolysis of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine plays a key role in the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids. The ahcY mutant, when grown in supplemented medium, synthesizes significantly reduced levels of bacteriochlorophyll, indicating that modulation of the intracellular ratio of S-adenosyl-L-methionine to S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine may be an important factor in regulating bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis. PMID:1631127

  11. Long-term biological hydrogen production by agar immobilized Rhodobacter capsulatus in a sequential batch photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Elkahlout, Kamal; Alipour, Siamak; Eroglu, Inci; Gunduz, Ufuk; Yucel, Meral

    2017-04-01

    In this study, agar immobilization technique was employed for biological hydrogen production using Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710 (wild type) and YO3 (hup-mutant) strains in sequential batch process. Different agar and glutamate concentrations were tested with defined nutrient medium. Agar concentration 4% (w/v) and 4 mM glutamate were selected for bacterial immobilization in terms of rate and longevity of hydrogen production. Acetate concentration was increased from 40 to 60-100 and 60 mM gave best results with both bacterial strains immobilized in 4% (w/v) agar. Cell concentration was increased from 2.5 to 5 mg dcw mL(-1) agar and it was found that increasing cell concentration of wild-type strain caused decrease in yield and productivity while these parameters improved by increasing cell concentration of mutant strain. Also, the hydrogen production time has extended from 17 days up to 60 days according to the process conditions and parameters. Hydrogen production by immobilized photosynthetic bacteria is a convenient technology for hydrogen production as it enables to produce hydrogen with high organic acid concentrations comparing to suspended cultures. Besides, immobilization increases the stability of the system and allowed sequential batch operation for long-term application.

  12. RegA control of bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoid synthesis in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Willett, Jonathan; Smart, James L; Bauer, Carl E

    2007-11-01

    We provide in vivo genetic and in vitro biochemical evidence that RegA directly regulates bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis in Rhodobacter capsulatus. beta-Galactosidase expression assays with a RegA-disrupted strain containing reporter plasmids for Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase (bchE), Mg-protoporphyrin IX chelatase (bchD), and phytoene dehydrogenase (crtI) demonstrate RegA is responsible for fourfold anaerobic induction of bchE, threefold induction of bchD, and twofold induction of crtI. Promoter mapping studies, coupled with DNase I protection assays, map the region of RegA binding to three sites in the bchE promoter region. Similar studies at the crtA and crtI promoters indicate that RegA binds to a single region equidistant from these divergent promoters. These results demonstrate that RegA is directly responsible for anaerobic induction of bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis genes bchE, bchD, bchJ, bchI, bchG, and bchP and carotenoid biosynthesis genes crtI, crtB, and crtA.

  13. Hydrogen photosynthesis by Rhodobacter capsulatus and its coupling to a PEM fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Deliang; Bultel, Yann; Magnin, Jean-Pierre; Roux, Claude; Willison, John C.

    Four different mutant strains of Rhodobacter capsulatus (IR1, IR3, IR4 and JP91), a photosynthetic purple non-sulfur bacterium, were tested for their ability to produce hydrogen in a 3 L volume photobioreactor coupled to a small PEM fuel cell. The four mutants, together with the wild-type strain, B10, were grown at 30 °C under illumination with 30 mmol L -1DL-lactate and 5 mmol L -1L-glutamate as carbon and nitrogen source, respectively. Bacterial growth was measured by monitoring the increase in absorbance at 660 nm, and hydrogen yield, and substrate conversion efficiency were measured under the same conditions. The hydrogen production capability of the five strains was then compared and shown to be in the order: IR3 > JP91 > IR4 > B10 > IR1. The most preferment strain, IR3, showed a substrate conversion efficiency of 84.8% and a hydrogen yield of 3.9 L L -1 of culture. The biogas produced by these photobioreactor cultures was successfully used as feed for a small PEM fuel cell system, with the mutant IR3 showing the most sustained hydrogen and current production. The maximum current was similar to that obtained using pure hydrogen produced by a small electrolysis cell (High-Tec Inc.).

  14. Carbon Isotope Fractionations Associated with Methanotrophic Growth with the Soluble and Particulate Methane Monooxygenases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Summons, Roger E.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Growth experiments with the RuMP-type methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), have demonstrated that biomass and lipid biomarkers are significantly depleted in C-13 compared to the substrate methane and that the extent of fractionation is dependent on whether cells express the soluble (s) or particulate (p) methane monooxygenase (MMO). The presence or absence of the characteristic sMMO subunits was monitored using SDS-polyacrylamide gels. In M. capsulatus grown with no Cu supplementation, the characteristic sMMO subunits were observed in the soluble fraction throughout the entire growth period and biomass was depleted in C-13 by approximately 14,700 relative to substrate methane. In cells grown with 5uM Cu, no sMMO bands were observed and a greater fractionation of approximately 27,700 in resultant biomass was obtained. Methanol growth experiments with M. capsulatus and with a RuMP methylotroph, Methylophilus methylotrophus, in which biomass measurements yielded depletions in C-13 of 9 and 5%(sub o), respectively, suggest that oxidation of methane is the major fractionation step. Growth of M. capsulatus at a low level of oxygen, approximately 0.5%, had no significant effect on carbon isotope fractionation by either sMMO or pMMO. These observations are significant for identification of molecular biomarkers; and methanotrophic contributions to carbon isotope composition in natural environments.

  15. Protective coating for salt-bath brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francisco, A. C.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1971-01-01

    Ceramic coating, consisting of graphite, enameler's clay, and algin binder, applied to materials prior to salt bath brazing facilitates brazing process and results in superior joints. Alternate coating materials and their various proportions are given.

  16. 7 CFR 3201.62 - Bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Items § 3201.62 Bath products. (a) Definition. Personal hygiene products including bar soaps, liquids... products marketed as hand cleaners and/or hand sanitizers. (b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal...

  17. 7 CFR 3201.62 - Bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Items § 3201.62 Bath products. (a) Definition. Personal hygiene products including bar soaps, liquids... products marketed as hand cleaners and/or hand sanitizers. (b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal...

  18. 7 CFR 3201.62 - Bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Items § 3201.62 Bath products. (a) Definition. Personal hygiene products including bar soaps, liquids... products marketed as hand cleaners and/or hand sanitizers. (b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal...

  19. GBC Kitchen and Bath, LLC Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    GBC Kitchen and Bath, LLC (the Company) is located in Alexandria, Virginia. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at properties constructed prior to 1978, located in Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, D.C.

  20. Bath and Shower Diverter Notice of Intent

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    An often-overlooked source of wasted water, many bath and shower diverters continuously leak a small amount of water from the tub spout while they are engaged, and water is being diverted from the bathtub to the showerhead.

  1. A molecular genetic analysis of carotenoid biosynthesis and the effects of carotenoid mutations on other photosynthetic genes in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.

    1989-04-01

    The nine known R. capsulatus carotenoid genes are contained within the 46 kilobase (kb) photosynthesis gene cluster. An 11 kb subcluster containing eight of these genes has been cloned and its nucleotide sequence determined. A new gene, crtK, has been located in the middle of the subcluster. The carotenoid gene cluster contains sequences homologous to Escherichia coli ..omega../sup 70/ promoters, rho-independent transcription terminators, and prokaryotic transcriptional factor binding sites. The phenotypes and genotypes of ten transposon Tn5.7 insertion mutations within the carotenoid gene cluster have been analyzed, by characterization of the carotenoids accumulated and high resolution mapping of the Tn5.7 insertions. The enzymatic blockages in previously uncharacterized early carotenoid mutants have been determined using a new in vitro synthesis system, suggesting specific roles for the CrtB and CrtE gene products. The expression of six of the eight carotenoid genes in the cluster is induced upon the shift from dark chemoheterotrophic to anaerobic photosynthetic growth. The magnitude of the induction is equivalent to that of genes encoding structural photosynthesis polypeptides, although the carotenoid genes are induced earlier after the growth shift. Different means of regulating photosynthesis genes in R. capsulatus are discussed, and a rationale for the temporal pattern of expression of the carotenoid genes during photosynthetic adaptation is presented. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the two dehydrogenases of the R. capsulatus carotenoid biosynthesis pathway reveals two regions of strong similarity. The effect of carotenoid mutations on the photosynthetic phenotype has been studied by examining growth rates, pigments, pigment-protein complexes and gene expression for a complete set of carotenoid mutants. 161 refs.

  2. A [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin (FdVI) is essential for growth of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Armengaud, J; Meyer, C; Jouanneau, Y

    1997-01-01

    The physiological function of Rhodobacter capsulatus FdVI, a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, was investigated by the cloning, sequence analysis, and mutagenesis of its structural gene, called fdxE. The DNA region surrounding fdxE was mapped, and the nucleotide sequence of a 4.2-kb fragment was determined. fdxE is preceded by a sequence that is very similar to a sigma54 recognition site and is followed by a putative transcription stop signal, suggesting that fdxE forms a separate cistron. Two open reading frames were identified upstream and downstream of fdxE and were named ORFE0 and ORFE1, respectively. The former may encode a polypeptide having 34% similarity with HtrA, a serine protease found in enteric bacteria. ORFE1 is homologous to purU, a gene involved in purine biosynthesis. Interposon mutagenesis of fdxE was unsuccessful when attempted on the wild-type strain B10. Disruption of fdxE could be achieved only in strains harboring an additional copy of fdxE on a plasmid. Mutants obtained in this way and carrying a plasmid-borne copy of fdxE under the control of the nifH promoter grew only in N-free medium, thus demonstrating that fdxE expression is required for growth. Nevertheless, such mutants were found to spontaneously revert at a frequency of 5 x 10(-6) to an apparent wild-type phenotype, although they contained no detectable amount of FdVI. Taken together, the results indicate that FdVI is required for an essential metabolic function in R. capsulatus and that this FdVI dependence could be relieved by a single-mutation event. In accordance, FdVI biosynthesis was found to be constitutive in R. capsulatus. PMID:9150228

  3. Leidenfrost drops on liquid baths : experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maquet, Laurent; Darbois-Texier, Baptiste; Duchesne, Alexis; Brandenbourger, Martin; Dorbolo, Stéphane; Sobac, Benjamin; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre; Grasp, Université de Liège, Liège, Belgium Team; Tips, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Bruxelles, Belgium Team

    2015-11-01

    In the Leidenfrost effect, a liquid drop stands above a very hot substrate and levitates over a bed of its own vapor. Recently, the use of these drops has shown rather interesting possibilities, and better understanding of this effect thus appears necessary. Roughness generally leads to an increase of the Leidenfrost temperature. Therefore, the idea of our work is to use the smoothest substrate possible: a liquid bath. Indeed, we observed stable Leidenfrost drops with superheat (difference between the temperature of the bath and the boiling temperature of the drop's liquid) down to 1°C. This remarquable behavior has been seen notably for ethanol drops on silicon oil baths. However, the viscosity of the liquid of the bath seems to play an important role as no ethanol drop can be in the Leidenfrost state over high viscosity baths (kinematic viscosity ν ~ 200 cSt). This may be due to local cooling of the substrate under the drop. We also investigate the evaporation of these drops, and find scalings markably different from those applying in the case of a solid substrate. We also observe that the drop can enter in contact with the bath before its complete evaporation if the temperature is not high enough.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the Rhodobacter capsulatus magnesium chelatase BchI subunit.

    PubMed

    Willows, R D; Hansson, M; Beale, S I; Laurberg, M; Al-Karadaghi, S

    1999-03-01

    The Rhodobacter capsulatus BchI protein is one of three subunits of Mg chelatase, the enzyme which catalyzes the first committed step of chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis. The BchI protein was produced with an inducible T7 RNA polymerase expression system in Escherichia coli. The protein was purified from the soluble cell-extract fraction and crystallized from polyethylene glycol solution. The crystals diffract to a minimum Bragg spacing of 2.1 A. The space group is P63 with unit-cell dimensions a = b = 90.6, c = 84.1 A.

  5. The bluF gene of Rhodobacter capsulatus is involved in conversion of cobinamide to cobalamin (vitamin B12).

    PubMed Central

    Pollich, M; Wersig, C; Klug, G

    1996-01-01

    The bluF gene of Rhodobacter capsulatus is the first gene of the bluFEDCB operon which is involved in late steps of the cobalamin synthesis. To determine the function of the bluF gene product, a bluF::omega-Km mutant strain was constructed and characterized. This vitamin B12 auxotrophic mutant strain shows a 3.5-times higher vitamin B12 requirement under phototrophic growth conditions than under chemotrophic growth conditions. Surprisingly, the bluF promoter activity does not respond to alterations to the oxygen tension or vitamin B12 concentration. PMID:8955417

  6. Effects of room temperature on physiological and subjective responses during whole-body bathing, half-body bathing and showering.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Ni, Furong; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2002-11-01

    The effects of bathroom thermal conditions on physiological and subjective responses were evaluated before, during, and after whole-body bath (W-bath), half-body bath (H-bath) and showering. The air temperature of the dressing room and bathroom was controlled at 10 degrees C, 17.5 degrees C, and 25 degrees C. Eight healthy males bathed for 10 min under nine conditions on separate days. The water temperature of the bathtub and shower was controlled at 40 degrees C and 41 degrees C, respectively. Rectal temperature (Tre), mean skin temperature (Tsk), blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), body weight loss and blood characteristics (hematocrit: Hct, hemoglobin: Hb) were evaluated. Also, thermal sensation (TS), thermal comfort (TC) and thermal acceptability (TA) were recorded. BP decreased rapidly during W-bath and H-bath compared to showering. HR during W-bath was significantly higher than for H-bath and showering (p < 0.01). The double products due to W-bath during bathing were also greater than for H-bath and showering (p < 0.05). There were no distinct differences in Hct and Hb among the nine conditions. However, significant differences in body weight loss were observed among the bathing methods: W-bath > H-bath > showering (p < 0.001). W-bath showed the largest increase in Tre and Tsk, followed by H-bath, and showering. Significant differences in Tre after bathing among the room temperatures were found only at H-bath. The changes in Tre after bathing for H-bath at 25 degrees C were similar to those for W-bath at 17.5 degrees C and 10 degrees C. TS and TC after bathing significantly differed for the three bathing methods at 17.5 degrees C and 10 degrees C (TS: p < 0.01 TC: p < 0.001). Especially, for showering, the largest number of subjects felt "cold" and "uncomfortable". Even though all of the subjects could accept the 10 degrees C condition after W-bath, such conditions were intolerable to half of them after showering. These results suggested that the

  7. A structural role of the carotenoid in the light-harvesting II protein of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Zurdo, J; Fernandez-Cabrera, C; Ramirez, J M

    1993-01-01

    The membrane-linked light-harvesting II protein (LHII) of Rhodobacter capsulatus was partly depleted of carotenoids by selective extraction with light petroleum. Carotenoid removal was accompanied by bleaching of the Qy(S1<--S0) absorption band of bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) a near 800 nm, by a bathochromic shift and a broadening of the other Bchl Qy band at 850 nm, and by the formation of a weak Qy band of dissociated Bchl near 770 nm. The changes in the 800 and 850 nm bands seemed to reflect alterations in only those Bchl molecules that had lost their associated carotenoids, firstly, because the extent of the changes was closely correlated to the degree of carotenoid extraction, and, secondly, because the residual fraction of carotenoid-containing LHII, which could be almost quantitatively recovered from the membrane after detergent solubilization and ion-exchange chromatography, showed an unmodified LHII absorption spectrum. The Bchl responsible for the shifted 850 nm band remained bound to protein, since its visible (Qx) transition seemed to retain the induced optical activity of the native bound pigment. Besides, the shifted Bchl could act as an efficient acceptor of singlet excitation energy from the pigments of the intact LHII fraction. The close similarity between the spectroscopic Bchl changes that accompany carotenoid extraction and the differential spectral features of carotenoidless LHII of Rhodobacter mutants, previously reported, strongly suggests that the direct cause of the spectral modifications is the absence of carotenoid and not any independent effect of the experimental manipulation of the membrane. Several interpretations of the structural changes that underlie the observed spectral changes are possible. The simplest one is to assume that carotenoid removal elicits an alteration in the angle between the Qy transition moments of two strongly interacting Bchl molecules. PMID:8452543

  8. A structural role of the carotenoid in the light-harvesting II protein of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Zurdo, J; Fernandez-Cabrera, C; Ramirez, J M

    1993-03-01

    The membrane-linked light-harvesting II protein (LHII) of Rhodobacter capsulatus was partly depleted of carotenoids by selective extraction with light petroleum. Carotenoid removal was accompanied by bleaching of the Qy(S1<--S0) absorption band of bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) a near 800 nm, by a bathochromic shift and a broadening of the other Bchl Qy band at 850 nm, and by the formation of a weak Qy band of dissociated Bchl near 770 nm. The changes in the 800 and 850 nm bands seemed to reflect alterations in only those Bchl molecules that had lost their associated carotenoids, firstly, because the extent of the changes was closely correlated to the degree of carotenoid extraction, and, secondly, because the residual fraction of carotenoid-containing LHII, which could be almost quantitatively recovered from the membrane after detergent solubilization and ion-exchange chromatography, showed an unmodified LHII absorption spectrum. The Bchl responsible for the shifted 850 nm band remained bound to protein, since its visible (Qx) transition seemed to retain the induced optical activity of the native bound pigment. Besides, the shifted Bchl could act as an efficient acceptor of singlet excitation energy from the pigments of the intact LHII fraction. The close similarity between the spectroscopic Bchl changes that accompany carotenoid extraction and the differential spectral features of carotenoidless LHII of Rhodobacter mutants, previously reported, strongly suggests that the direct cause of the spectral modifications is the absence of carotenoid and not any independent effect of the experimental manipulation of the membrane. Several interpretations of the structural changes that underlie the observed spectral changes are possible. The simplest one is to assume that carotenoid removal elicits an alteration in the angle between the Qy transition moments of two strongly interacting Bchl molecules.

  9. Rhodobacter capsulatus magnesium chelatase subunit BchH contains an oxygen sensitive iron-sulfur cluster.

    PubMed

    Sirijovski, Nick; Mamedov, Fikret; Olsson, Ulf; Styring, Stenbjörn; Hansson, Mats

    2007-12-01

    Magnesium chelatase is the first unique enzyme of the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. It consists of three subunits (BchI, BchD, and BchH). Amino acid sequence analysis of the Rhodobacter capsulatus BchH revealed a novel cysteine motif (393CX2CX3CX14C) that was found in only six other proteobacteria (CX2CX3CX11-14C). The cysteine motif is likely to coordinate an unprecedented [Fe-S] cluster. Purified BchH demonstrated absorbance in the 460 nm region. This absorbance was abolished in BchH proteins with alanine substitutions at positions Cys396 and Cys414. These modified proteins were also EPR silent. In contrast, wild type BchH protein in the reduced state showed EPR signals resembling those of a [4Fe-4S] cluster with rhombic symmetry and g values at 1.90, 1.93, and 2.09, superimposed with a [3Fe-4S] cluster centered at g = 2.02. The [3Fe-4S] signal was observed independently of the [4Fe-4S] signal under oxidizing conditions. Mg-chelatase activity assays showed that the cluster is not catalytic. We suggest that the [4Fe-4S] and [3Fe-4S] signals originate from a single coordination site on the monomeric BchH protein and that the [4Fe-4S] cluster is sensitive to oxidation. It is speculated that the cluster participates in the switching between aerobic and anaerobic life of the proteobacteria.

  10. Electrostatic dominoes: long distance propagation of mutational effects in photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Sebban, P; Maróti, P; Schiffer, M; Hanson, D K

    1995-07-04

    Two point mutants from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, both modified in the M protein of the photosynthetic reaction center, have been studied by flash-induced absorbance spectroscopy. These strains carry either the M231Arg --> Leu or M43ASN --> Asp mutations, which are located 9 and 15 A, respectively, from the terminal electron acceptor QB. In the wild-type Rb. sphaeroides structure, M231Arg is involved in a conserved salt bridge with H125Glu and H232Glu and M43Asn is located among several polar residues that form or surround the QB binding site. These substitutions were originally uncovered in phenotypic revertants isolated from the photosynthetically incompetent L212Glu-L213Asp --> Ala-Ala site-specific double mutant. As second-site suppressor mutations, they have been shown to restore the proton transfer function that is interrupted in the L212Ala-L213Ala double mutant. The electrostatic effects that are induced in reaction centers by the M231Arg --> Leu and M43Asn --> Asp substitutions are roughly the same in either the double-mutant or wild-type backgrounds. In a reaction center that is otherwise wild type in sequence, they decrease the free energy gap between the QA- and QB- states by 24 +/- 5 and 45 +/- 5 meV, respectively. The pH dependences of K2, the QA-QB <--> QAQB- equilibrium constant, are altered in reaction centers that carry either of these substitutions, revealing differences in the pKas of titratable groups compared to the wild type.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Optimizing multi-step B-side charge separation in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Kressel, Lucas L.; Dylla, Nicholas P.; Wander, Marc J.; Hanson, Deborah K.; Holten, Dewey; Laible, Philip D.; Kirmaier, Christine

    2016-02-01

    Using high-throughput methods for mutagenesis, protein isolation and charge-separation functionality, we have assayed 40 Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction center (RC) mutants for their P+ QB- yield (P is a dimer of bacteriochlorophylls and Q is a ubiquinone) as produced using the normally inactive B-side cofactors BB and HB (where B is a bacteriochlorophyll and H is a bacteriopheophytin). Two sets of mutants explore all possible residues at M131 (M polypeptide, native residue Val near HB) in tandem with either a fixed His or a fixed Asn at L181 (L polypeptide, native residue Phe near BB). A third set of mutants explores all possible residues at L181 with a fixed Glu at M131 that can form a hydrogen bond to HB. For each set of mutants, the results of a rapid millisecond screening assay that probes the yield of P+ QB- are compared among that set and to the other mutants reported here or previously. For a subset of eight mutants, the rate constants and yields of the individual B-side electron transfer processes are determined via transient absorption measurements spanning 100 fs to 50 μs. The resulting ranking of mutants for their yield of P+ QB- from ultrafast experiments is in good agreement with that obtained from the millisecond screening assay, further validating the efficient, high-throughput screen for B-side transmembrane charge separation. Results from mutants that individually show progress toward optimization of P+ HB- → P+ QB- electron transfer or initial P* → P+ HB- conversion highlight unmet challenges of optimizing both processes simultaneously.

  12. The Effects of Rhodobacter capsulatus KCTC-2583 on Cholesterol Metabolism, Egg Production and Quality Parameters during the Late Laying Periods in Hens.

    PubMed

    Lokhande, Anushka; Ingale, S L; Lee, S H; Kim, J S; Lohakare, J D; Chae, B J; Kwon, I K

    2013-06-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation of Rhodobacter capsulatus KCTC-2583 on egg-yolk and serum cholesterol, egg production and quality parameters during the late laying periods in hens. A total of 160 Hy-Line Brown layers (54 wk-old) were randomly allotted to 4 treatment groups on the basis of laying performance. Each treatment had 4 replicates with 10 birds each (40 birds per treatment). Two hens were confined individually with cage size 35×35×40 cm and each 10 birds (5 cages) shared a common feed trough between them forming one experimental unit. Dietary treatments were; basal diet supplemented with 0 (control), 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15% R. capsulatus KCTC-2583. Experimental diets were fed in meal form for 56 d. Dietary supplementation of increasing levels of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583 reduced (linear, p<0.05) egg-yolk cholesterol and triglycerides (d 28, 42 and 56) concentrations. Also, serum cholesterol and triglycerides (d 21, 42 and 56) concentrations were linearly reduced (p<0.05) with increasing dietary R. capsulatus KCTC-2583. Laying hens fed a diet supplemented with increasing levels of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583 had increased (linear; p<0.05) overall egg production, egg weight, egg mass and feed efficiency. However, dietary treatments had no effect (linear or quadratic; p>0.05) on feed intake of laying hens. At d 28 and 56, breaking strength and yolk colour of eggs were linearly improved (p<0.05) in laying hens fed dietary increasing levels of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583. Dietary treatment had no effects (linear or quadratic; p>0.05) on albumin height, shell thickness and shell weight at any period of experiment. These results indicate that dietary supplementation of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583 has the potential to improve the laying hen performance and lead to the development of low cholesterol eggs during late laying period in Hy-Line Brown hens.

  13. The Effects of Rhodobacter capsulatus KCTC-2583 on Cholesterol Metabolism, Egg Production and Quality Parameters during the Late Laying Periods in Hens

    PubMed Central

    Lokhande, Anushka; Ingale, S. L.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, J. S.; Lohakare, J. D.; Chae, B. J.; Kwon, I. K.

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation of Rhodobacter capsulatus KCTC-2583 on egg-yolk and serum cholesterol, egg production and quality parameters during the late laying periods in hens. A total of 160 Hy-Line Brown layers (54 wk-old) were randomly allotted to 4 treatment groups on the basis of laying performance. Each treatment had 4 replicates with 10 birds each (40 birds per treatment). Two hens were confined individually with cage size 35×35×40 cm and each 10 birds (5 cages) shared a common feed trough between them forming one experimental unit. Dietary treatments were; basal diet supplemented with 0 (control), 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15% R. capsulatus KCTC-2583. Experimental diets were fed in meal form for 56 d. Dietary supplementation of increasing levels of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583 reduced (linear, p<0.05) egg-yolk cholesterol and triglycerides (d 28, 42 and 56) concentrations. Also, serum cholesterol and triglycerides (d 21, 42 and 56) concentrations were linearly reduced (p<0.05) with increasing dietary R. capsulatus KCTC-2583. Laying hens fed a diet supplemented with increasing levels of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583 had increased (linear; p<0.05) overall egg production, egg weight, egg mass and feed efficiency. However, dietary treatments had no effect (linear or quadratic; p>0.05) on feed intake of laying hens. At d 28 and 56, breaking strength and yolk colour of eggs were linearly improved (p<0.05) in laying hens fed dietary increasing levels of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583. Dietary treatment had no effects (linear or quadratic; p>0.05) on albumin height, shell thickness and shell weight at any period of experiment. These results indicate that dietary supplementation of R. capsulatus KCTC-2583 has the potential to improve the laying hen performance and lead to the development of low cholesterol eggs during late laying period in Hy-Line Brown hens. PMID:25049857

  14. Avian Assemblages at Bird Baths: A Comparison of Urban and Rural Bird Baths in Australia.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Gráinne P; Parsons, Holly; Davis, Adrian; Coleman, Bill R; Jones, Darryl N; Miller, Kelly K; Weston, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Private gardens provide habitat and resources for many birds living in human-dominated landscapes. While wild bird feeding is recognised as one of the most popular forms of human-wildlife interaction, almost nothing is known about the use of bird baths. This citizen science initiative explores avian assemblages at bird baths in private gardens in south-eastern Australia and how this differs with respect to levels of urbanisation and bioregion. Overall, 992 citizen scientists collected data over two, four-week survey periods during winter 2014 and summer 2015 (43% participated in both years). Avian assemblages at urban and rural bird baths differed between bioregions with aggressive nectar-eating species influenced the avian assemblages visiting urban bird baths in South Eastern Queensland, NSW North Coast and Sydney Basin while introduced birds contributed to differences in South Western Slopes, Southern Volcanic Plains and Victorian Midlands. Small honeyeaters and other small native birds occurred less often at urban bird baths compared to rural bird baths. Our results suggest that differences between urban versus rural areas, as well as bioregion, significantly influence the composition of avian assemblages visiting bird baths in private gardens. We also demonstrate that citizen science monitoring of fixed survey sites such as bird baths is a useful tool in understanding large-scale patterns in avian assemblages which requires a vast amount of data to be collected across broad areas.

  15. Avian Assemblages at Bird Baths: A Comparison of Urban and Rural Bird Baths in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Gráinne P.; Parsons, Holly; Davis, Adrian; Coleman, Bill R.; Jones, Darryl N.; Miller, Kelly K.; Weston, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Private gardens provide habitat and resources for many birds living in human-dominated landscapes. While wild bird feeding is recognised as one of the most popular forms of human-wildlife interaction, almost nothing is known about the use of bird baths. This citizen science initiative explores avian assemblages at bird baths in private gardens in south-eastern Australia and how this differs with respect to levels of urbanisation and bioregion. Overall, 992 citizen scientists collected data over two, four-week survey periods during winter 2014 and summer 2015 (43% participated in both years). Avian assemblages at urban and rural bird baths differed between bioregions with aggressive nectar-eating species influenced the avian assemblages visiting urban bird baths in South Eastern Queensland, NSW North Coast and Sydney Basin while introduced birds contributed to differences in South Western Slopes, Southern Volcanic Plains and Victorian Midlands. Small honeyeaters and other small native birds occurred less often at urban bird baths compared to rural bird baths. Our results suggest that differences between urban versus rural areas, as well as bioregion, significantly influence the composition of avian assemblages visiting bird baths in private gardens. We also demonstrate that citizen science monitoring of fixed survey sites such as bird baths is a useful tool in understanding large-scale patterns in avian assemblages which requires a vast amount of data to be collected across broad areas. PMID:26962857

  16. Proteomic analysis and identification of the structural and regulatory proteins of the Rhodobacter capsulatus gene transfer agent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Frank; Spano, Anthony; Goodman, Benjamin E; Blasier, Kiev R; Sabat, Agnes; Jeffery, Erin; Norris, Andrew; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Lebedev, Nikolai

    2009-02-01

    The gene transfer agent of Rhodobacter capsulatus (GTA) is a unique phage-like particle that exchanges genetic information between members of this same species of bacterium. Besides being an excellent tool for genetic mapping, the GTA has a number of advantages for biotechnological and nanoengineering purposes. To facilitate the GTA purification and identify the proteins involved in GTA expression, assembly and regulation, in the present work we construct and transform into R. capsulatus Y262 a gene coding for a C-terminally His-tagged capsid protein. The constructed protein was expressed in the cells, assembled into chimeric GTA particles inside the cells and excreted from the cells into surrounding medium. Transmission electron micrographs of phosphotungstate-stained, NiNTA-purified chimeric GTA confirm that its structure is similar to normal GTA particles, with many particles composed both of a head and a tail. The mass spectrometric proteomic analysis of polypeptides present in the GTA recovered outside the cells shows that GTA is composed of at least 9 proteins represented in the GTA gene cluster including proteins coded for by Orf's 3, 5, 6-9, 11, 13, and 15.

  17. Simulating Bosonic Baths with Error Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, M. P.; Cramer, M.; Plenio, M. B.

    2015-09-01

    We derive rigorous truncation-error bounds for the spin-boson model and its generalizations to arbitrary quantum systems interacting with bosonic baths. For the numerical simulation of such baths, the truncation of both the number of modes and the local Hilbert-space dimensions is necessary. We derive superexponential Lieb-Robinson-type bounds on the error when restricting the bath to finitely many modes and show how the error introduced by truncating the local Hilbert spaces may be efficiently monitored numerically. In this way we give error bounds for approximating the infinite system by a finite-dimensional one. As a consequence, numerical simulations such as the time-evolving density with orthogonal polynomials algorithm (TEDOPA) now allow for the fully certified treatment of the system-environment interaction.

  18. Nonequilibrium quantum chains under multisite Lindblad baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, Pedro H.; Landi, Gabriel T.; de Oliveira, Mario J.

    2016-09-01

    We study a quantum XX chain coupled to two heat reservoirs that act on multiple sites and are kept at different temperatures and chemical potentials. The baths are described by Lindblad dissipators, which are constructed by direct coupling to the fermionic normal modes of the chain. Using a perturbative method, we are able to find analytical formulas for all steady-state properties of the system. We compute both the particle or magnetization current and the energy current, both of which are found to have the structure of Landauer's formula. We also obtain exact formulas for the Onsager coefficients. All properties are found to differ substantially from those of a single-site bath. In particular, we find a strong dependence on the intensity of the bath couplings. In the weak-coupling regime, we show that the Onsager reciprocal relations are satisfied.

  19. Effects of Stanger bath therapy on fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Eksioglu, Emel; Yazar, Duygu; Bal, Ajda; Usan, Hicran Demir; Cakci, Aytul

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of Stanger bath on the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM). Fifty women with FM were randomly divided into two groups. The first group (n=25) was treated with amitriptyline, 10 mg/day for 8 weeks, and Stanger bath, 20 min daily for ten sessions. The second group (n=25) only had amitriptyline, 10 mg/day for 8 weeks. In the first group the assessment parameters were measured before (t1), at the end (t2), and 2 months after the hydrotherapy (t3). In the second group these parameters were examined before (T1) and 2 months after the treatment (T2). Patients were evaluated by number of tender points and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) scores. There was significant improvement in number of tender points between t1 and t2 (P<0.01) and t1 and t3 (P<0.001) in the Stanger bath group. In addition, there was significant improvement in FIQ scores between t1 and t2 (P<0.001) and t1 and t3 (P<0.01) in the Stanger bath group. In the second group we observed significant improvement in FIQ scores and tender point numbers between T1 and T2 (P=0.00). We did not find any difference between groups in tender point number percent change (p=0.074). However, we observed statistically significant improvement in percent change of FIQ scores in Stanger bath group (-30+/-16.7) when compared to group 2 (-19.3+/-13) (p=0.016). We conclude that Stanger bath therapy when combined with amitriptyline has a long lasting effect and better outcome in FM patients.

  20. The Bath Idiot and Imbecile Institution.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, P K

    2000-06-01

    The Bath Institution for Idiot Children and those of Weak Intellect was founded in 1846 by Miss Charlotte White, and opened in April 1846 in two rooms with a resident matron and three pupils. It was unique amongst the Idiot Asylums in being managed by women. In time it became similar to any small private idiot home but the Commissioners in Lunacy forced its reform, without registering it as an idiot asylum. It was taken over by the Bath Municipal Charity Trustees. It eventually became an endowed school, licensed by the Board of Control. This paper describes its history and its eventual control by the Lunacy Commission.

  1. [Pseudomonas folliculitis after spa bath exposure].

    PubMed

    Uldall Pallesen, Kristine Appel; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mørtz, Charlotte Gotthard

    2012-06-25

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of folliculitis. Pseudomonas folliculitis can develop after contact with contaminated water from swimming pools, hot tubs and spa baths. Systemic therapy may be indicated in patients with widespread lesions, systemic symptoms or in immunosuppressed patients. We describe a 23-year-old healthy woman who developed a pustular rash and general malaise after using a spa bath contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacterial culture from a pustule confirmed Pseudomonas folliculitis and the patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with rapid good effect.

  2. Mud bath dermatitis due to cinnamon oil.

    PubMed

    García-Abujeta, José Luis; de Larramendi, Carlos Hernando; Berna, José Pomares; Palomino, Elena Muñoz

    2005-04-01

    A case of long-lasting, extensive eczematous and bullous dermatitis affecting exposed areas (arms and legs), beginning within 24 hr after having a mud bath with cinnamon essential oil in a spa, in a 74-year-old woman, is reported. Patch tests with the GEIDC standard battery and the dental battery (including clove essence and eugenol), cinnamon essence and its components were carried out 5 years later. Fragrance mix, cinnamon essence, eugenol, cinnamic alcohol and cinnamic aldehyde yielded a positive result. To our knowledge, this is the first case of cinnamon dermatitis after a mud bath.

  3. Quantum bath refrigeration towards absolute zero: challenging the unattainability principle.

    PubMed

    Kolář, M; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, D; Alicki, R; Kurizki, G

    2012-08-31

    A minimal model of a quantum refrigerator, i.e., a periodically phase-flipped two-level system permanently coupled to a finite-capacity bath (cold bath) and an infinite heat dump (hot bath), is introduced and used to investigate the cooling of the cold bath towards absolute zero (T=0). Remarkably, the temperature scaling of the cold-bath cooling rate reveals that it does not vanish as T→0 for certain realistic quantized baths, e.g., phonons in strongly disordered media (fractons) or quantized spin waves in ferromagnets (magnons). This result challenges Nernst's third-law formulation known as the unattainability principle.

  4. Photo-biohydrogen production potential of Rhodobacter capsulatus-PK from wheat straw

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biotechnological exploitation of lignocellulosic biomass is promising for sustainable and environmentally sound energy provision strategy because of the abundant availability of the renewable resources. Wheat straw (WS) comprising of 75-80% cellulose and hemicellulose is one of widely available, inexpensive and renewable lignocellulosic biomass types. The cellulosic and hemicellulose substrate can be hydrolyzed into monomeric sugars by chemical and/or biological methods. Results This study examined comparative potential of dilute acid and pre-ammonia pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed wheat straw (WS) for hydrogen production by purple non sulfur bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus-PK. Gas production became noticeable after 14 h of inoculation in WS pretreated with 4% H2SO4. The detoxified liquid hydrolyzate (DLH) after overliming attained a production level of 372 mL-H2/L after 16 h under illumination of 120-150 W/m2 at 30 ± 2.0°C. Whereas the non-detoxified acid pretreated hydrolyzate (NDLH) of WS could produce only upto 254 mL-H2/L after 21 h post inoculation. Evolution of H2 became observable just after 10 ± 2.0 h of inoculation by employing 48 h age inoculum on the WS pretreated with 30% ammonia, hydrolyzed with cellulase 80 FPU/g and β-glucosidase 220 CbU/ml at 50°C. Upto 712 ml/L of culture was measured with continuous shaking for 24 h. The 47.5% and 64.2% higher hydrogen volume than the DLH and NDLH substrates, respectively appeared as a function of significantly higher monomeric sugar contents of the enzymatically hydrolyzed substrate and lesser/zero amounts of toxic derivatives including pH reducing agents. Conclusion Photofermentative hydrogen production from lignocellulosic waste is a feasible approach for eco-friendly sustainable supply of bioenergy in a cost-effective way. Results of this study provide new insight for addressing biotechnological exploitation of abundantly available and low-cost cellulosic substrates

  5. Bubble bath burns: an unusual case

    PubMed Central

    Nizamoglu, Metin; Tan, Alethea; El-Muttardi, Naguib

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We present an unusual case of flash burn injury in an adolescent following accidental combination of foaming bath bubbles and tea light candle flame. There has not been any reported similar case described before. This serves as a learning point for public prevention and clinicians managing burn injuries. PMID:27583271

  6. [Crisis and decline of bath houses].

    PubMed

    Widmann, M

    1999-01-01

    For centuries bath-houses and barber-surgeons formed such an integral part of public life that one is mystified by their vanishing from modern view with hardly any trace left. Previous authors have offered a variety of reasons for this disappearance: the bath-houses' notorious reputation, developing fuel-shortage, the "new" fashion of taking the waters and the outbreak of previously unknown contagious diseases are among those mentioned most frequently. While these factors may be valid reasons for a crisis afflicting the "hot-houses" they would hardly explain why fate overtook the barber-surgeons' entire trade. Judging from the sources available one cannot help but feel that the philosophers of the Enlightenment were largely responsible for such a dramatic change of society. Sceptical philosophy discarded the wisdom of the ancient medical authorities replacing traditional steam-bathing with "modern" cold-bathing. Society itself was subject to equally revolutionary changes: the local masters of the trade had to make room for surgeons educated at medical schools setting the stage for a new reality which has become "normal" to us.

  7. Chaucer's Wife of Bath [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This lesson introduces students to one of the most admired characterizations in Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales," the Wife of Bath. Students read Chaucer's description of the Wife in the "General Prologue" to consider how he represents her, both as the poet of "The Canterbury Tales" and as a character in his own poem,…

  8. String melting in a photon bath

    SciTech Connect

    Karouby, Johanna

    2013-10-01

    We compute the decay rate of a metastable cosmic string in contact with a thermal bath by finding the instanton solution. The new feature is that this decay rate is found in the context of non thermal scalar fields in contact with a thermal bath of photons. In general, to make topologically unstable strings stable, one can couple them to such a bath. The resulting plasma effect creates metastable configurations which can decay from the false vacuum to the true vacuum. In our specific set-up, the instanton computation is realized for the case of two out-of-equilibrium complex scalar fields: one is charged and coupled to the photon field, and the other is neutral. New effects coming from the thermal bath of photons make the radius of the nucleated bubble and most of the relevant physical quantities temperature-dependent. However, the temperature appears in a different way than in the purely thermal case, where all scalar fields are in thermal equilibrium. As a result of the tunneling, the core of the initial string melts while bubbles of true vacuum expand at the speed of light.

  9. General view, Belair Bath and Tennis Club, Belair at Bowie, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view, Belair Bath and Tennis Club, Belair at Bowie, Maryland, looking west. - Belair Bath and Tennis Club, Southwest corner of Belair Drive and Tulip Grove Drive, Bowie, Prince George's County, MD

  10. Structural and phylogenetic analysis of Rhodobacter capsulatus NifF: uncovering general features of nitrogen-fixation (nif)-flavodoxins.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Bortolotti, Ana; Cortez, Néstor; Hermoso, Juan A

    2013-01-09

    Analysis of the crystal structure of NifF from Rhodobacter capsulatus and its homologues reported so far reflects the existence of unique structural features in nif flavodoxins: a leucine at the re face of the isoalloxazine, an eight-residue insertion at the C-terminus of the 50's loop and a remarkable difference in the electrostatic potential surface with respect to non-nif flavodoxins. A phylogenetic study on 64 sequences from 52 bacterial species revealed four clusters, including different functional prototypes, correlating the previously defined as "short-chain" with the firmicutes flavodoxins and the "long-chain" with gram-negative species. The comparison of Rhodobacter NifF structure with other bacterial flavodoxin prototypes discloses the concurrence of specific features of these functional electron donors to nitrogenase.

  11. High yield single stage conversion of glucose to hydrogen by photofermentation with continuous cultures of Rhodobacter capsulatus JP91.

    PubMed

    Abo-Hashesh, Mona; Desaunay, Nicolas; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2013-01-01

    Photofermentative hydrogen (H(2)) production from glucose with the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus JP91 (hup(-)) was examined using a photobioreactor operated in continuous mode. Stable and high hydrogen yields on glucose were obtained at three different retention times (HRTs; 24, 48 and 72 h). The H(2) production rates, varying between 0.57 and 0.81 mmol/h, and optical densities (OD(600 nm)) were similar for the different HRTs examined. However, the rate of glucose consumption was influenced by HRT being greater at HRT 24h than HRTs 48 and 72 h. The highest hydrogen yield, 9.0 ± 1.2 mol H(2)/mol glucose, was obtained at 48 h HRT. These results show that single stage photofermentative hydrogen production from glucose using photobioreactors operated in continuous culture mode gives high, nearly stoichiometric yields of hydrogen from glucose, and thus is considerably more promising than either two stage photofermentation or co-culture approaches.

  12. Tellurite uptake by cells of the facultative phototroph Rhodobacter capsulatus is a Delta pH-dependent process.

    PubMed

    Borsetti, Francesca; Toninello, Antonio; Zannoni, Davide

    2003-11-20

    The uptake by light-grown cells of Rhodobacter capsulatus of the highly toxic metalloid oxyanion tellurite (TeO(3)(2-)) was examined. We show that tellurite is rapidly taken up by illuminated cells in a process which is inhibited by the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazone (FCCP) and by the K(+)/H(+) exchanger nigericin. Notably, the light-driven membrane potential (Delta psi) is enhanced by K(2)TeO(3)> or =200 microM. Further, tellurite uptake is largely insensitive to valinomycin, strongly repressed by the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylethylmaleimide (NEM) and competitively inhibited by phosphate. We conclude that tellurite is transported into cells by a Delta pH-dependent, non-electrogenic process which is likely to involve the phosphate transporter (PiT family).

  13. Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis of Rhodobacter capsulatus NifF: Uncovering General Features of Nitrogen-fixation (nif)-Flavodoxins

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Bortolotti, Ana; Cortez, Néstor; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the crystal structure of NifF from Rhodobacter capsulatus and its homologues reported so far reflects the existence of unique structural features in nif flavodoxins: a leucine at the re face of the isoalloxazine, an eight-residue insertion at the C-terminus of the 50’s loop and a remarkable difference in the electrostatic potential surface with respect to non-nif flavodoxins. A phylogenetic study on 64 sequences from 52 bacterial species revealed four clusters, including different functional prototypes, correlating the previously defined as “short-chain” with the firmicutes flavodoxins and the “long-chain” with gram-negative species. The comparison of Rhodobacter NifF structure with other bacterial flavodoxin prototypes discloses the concurrence of specific features of these functional electron donors to nitrogenase. PMID:23303276

  14. Effector-Mediated Interaction of CbbRI and CbbRII Regulators with Target Sequences in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Dubbs, Padungsri; Dubbs, James M.; Tabita, F. Robert

    2004-01-01

    In Rhodobacter capsulatus, genes encoding enzymes of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate pathway are located in the cbbI and cbbII operons. Each operon contains a divergently transcribed LysR-type transcriptional activator (CbbRI and CbbRII) that regulates the expression of its cognate cbb promoter in response to an as yet unidentified effector molecule(s). Both CbbRI and CbbRII were purified, and the ability of a variety of potential effector molecules to induce changes in their DNA binding properties at their target promoters was assessed. The responses of CbbRI and CbbRII to potential effectors were not identical. In gel mobility shift assays, the affinity of both CbbRI and CbbRII for their target promoters was enhanced in the presence of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), phosphoenolpyruvate, 3-phosphoglycerate, 2-phosphoglycolate. ATP, 2-phosphoglycerate, and KH2PO4 were found to enhance only CbbRI binding, while fructose-1,6-bisphosphate enhanced the binding of only CbbRII. The DNase I footprint of CbbRI was reduced in the presence of RuBP, while reductions in the CbbRII DNase I footprint were induced by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, 3-phosphoglycerate, and KH2PO4. The current in vitro results plus recent in vivo studies suggest that CbbR-mediated regulation of cbb transcription is controlled by multiple metabolic signals in R. capsulatus. This control reflects not only intracellular levels of Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle metabolic intermediates but also the fixed (organic) carbon status and energy charge of the cell. PMID:15547275

  15. The reductive half-reaction of xanthine dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus: the role of Glu232 in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hall, James; Reschke, Stefan; Cao, Hongnan; Leimkühler, Silke; Hille, Russ

    2014-11-14

    The kinetic properties of an E232Q variant of the xanthine dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus have been examined to ascertain whether Glu(232) in wild-type enzyme is protonated or unprotonated in the course of catalysis at neutral pH. We find that kred, the limiting rate constant for reduction at high [xanthine], is significantly compromised in the variant, a result that is inconsistent with Glu(232) being neutral in the active site of the wild-type enzyme. A comparison of the pH dependence of both kred and kred/Kd from reductive half-reaction experiments between wild-type and enzyme and the E232Q variant suggests that the ionized Glu(232) of wild-type enzyme plays an important role in catalysis by discriminating against the monoanionic form of substrate, effectively increasing the pKa of substrate by two pH units and ensuring that at physiological pH the neutral form of substrate predominates in the Michaelis complex. A kinetic isotope study of the wild-type R. capsulatus enzyme indicates that, as previously determined for the bovine and chicken enzymes, product release is principally rate-limiting in catalysis. The disparity in rate constants for the chemical step of the reaction and product release, however, is not as great in the bacterial enzyme as compared with the vertebrate forms. The results indicate that the bacterial and bovine enzymes catalyze the chemical step of the reaction to the same degree and that the faster turnover observed with the bacterial enzyme is due to a faster rate constant for product release than is seen with the vertebrate enzyme.

  16. The NprA nitroreductase required for 2,4-dinitrophenol reduction in Rhodobacter capsulatus is a dihydropteridine reductase.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Reinado, Eva; Roldán, María Dolores; Castillo, Francisco; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado

    2008-11-01

    The Rhodobacter capsulatus nprA gene codes for a putative nitroreductase. A recombinant His(6)-NprA protein was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. This protein contained FMN and showed nitroreductase activity with a wide range of nitroaromatic compounds, such as 2-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, 2,6-dinitrophenol, 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (picric acid), 2,4-dinitrobenzoate and 2,4-dinitrotoluene, and with the nitrofuran derivatives nitrofurazone and furazolidone. NADPH was the main electron donor and the ortho nitro group was preferably reduced to the corresponding amino derivative. The apparent K(m) values of NprA for NADPH, 2,4-dinitrophenol, picric acid and furazolidone were 40 microM, 78 microM, 72 microM and 83 microM, respectively, at pH and temperature optima (pH 6.5, 30 degrees C). Escherichia coli cells overproducing the NprA protein were much more sensitive to the prodrug 5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide (CB1954) used in cancer therapy than non-transformed cells. NprA showed the highest activity with the quinonoid form of 6,7-dimethyl-7,8-dihydropterine as substrate, so that NprA may be involved in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin in R. capsulatus. Expression of a transcriptional nprA-lacZ gene fusion was induced by phenylalanine or tyrosine, but not by other amino acids like glutamate or alanine. Furthermore, both nitroreductase activity and phenylalanine assimilation were inhibited in vivo by ammonium. A mutant defective in the nprA gene showed better growth rate with Phe or Tyr as nitrogen source than the wild-type strain, although both strains showed similar growth in media with Glu or without added nitrogen. These results suggest that the NprA nitroreductase may act in vivo as a dihydropteridine reductase involved in aromatic amino acids metabolism.

  17. Effector-mediated interaction of CbbRI and CbbRII regulators with target sequences in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Dubbs, Padungsri; Dubbs, James M; Tabita, F Robert

    2004-12-01

    In Rhodobacter capsulatus, genes encoding enzymes of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate pathway are located in the cbb(I) and cbb(II) operons. Each operon contains a divergently transcribed LysR-type transcriptional activator (CbbR(I) and CbbR(II)) that regulates the expression of its cognate cbb promoter in response to an as yet unidentified effector molecule(s). Both CbbR(I) and CbbR(II) were purified, and the ability of a variety of potential effector molecules to induce changes in their DNA binding properties at their target promoters was assessed. The responses of CbbR(I) and CbbR(II) to potential effectors were not identical. In gel mobility shift assays, the affinity of both CbbR(I) and CbbR(II) for their target promoters was enhanced in the presence of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), phosphoenolpyruvate, 3-phosphoglycerate, 2-phosphoglycolate. ATP, 2-phosphoglycerate, and KH(2)PO(4) were found to enhance only CbbR(I) binding, while fructose-1,6-bisphosphate enhanced the binding of only CbbR(II). The DNase I footprint of CbbR(I) was reduced in the presence of RuBP, while reductions in the CbbR(II) DNase I footprint were induced by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, 3-phosphoglycerate, and KH(2)PO(4). The current in vitro results plus recent in vivo studies suggest that CbbR-mediated regulation of cbb transcription is controlled by multiple metabolic signals in R. capsulatus. This control reflects not only intracellular levels of Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle metabolic intermediates but also the fixed (organic) carbon status and energy charge of the cell.

  18. Processing A Printed Wiring Board By Single Bath Electrodeposition

    DOEpatents

    Meltzer, Michael P.; Steffani, Christopher P.; Gonfiotti, Ray A.

    2003-04-15

    A method of processing a printed wiring board by single bath electrodeposition. Initial processing steps are implemented on the printed wiring board. Copper is plated on the printed wiring board from a bath containing nickel and copper. Nickel is plated on the printed wiring board from the bath containing nickel and copper and final processing steps are implemented on the printed wiring board.

  19. 21 CFR 740.17 - Foaming detergent bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Foaming detergent bath products. 740.17 Section...) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.17 Foaming detergent bath products. (a) For the purpose of this section, a foaming detergent bath product is any product intended to be...

  20. 21 CFR 740.17 - Foaming detergent bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Foaming detergent bath products. 740.17 Section...) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.17 Foaming detergent bath products. (a) For the purpose of this section, a foaming detergent bath product is any product intended to be...

  1. 21 CFR 740.17 - Foaming detergent bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Foaming detergent bath products. 740.17 Section...) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.17 Foaming detergent bath products. (a) For the purpose of this section, a foaming detergent bath product is any product intended to be...

  2. 21 CFR 740.17 - Foaming detergent bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Foaming detergent bath products. 740.17 Section...) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.17 Foaming detergent bath products. (a) For the purpose of this section, a foaming detergent bath product is any product intended to be...

  3. 28 CFR 551.7 - Bathing and clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bathing and clothing. 551.7 Section 551.7... Grooming § 551.7 Bathing and clothing. Each inmate must observe the standards concerning bathing and clothing that exist in the institution as required by standards of § 551.1....

  4. The H-NS-like protein HvrA modulates expression of nitrogen fixation genes in the phototrophic purple bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus by binding to selected nif promoters.

    PubMed

    Raabe, Karsten; Drepper, Thomas; Riedel, Kai Uwe; Masepohl, Bernd; Klipp, Werner

    2002-11-05

    Genetic analyses based on chromosomal lac fusions to nitrogen fixation (nif) genes demonstrated that NifA-dependent transcriptional activation of expression of Rhodobacter capsulatus nifH and nifB1 was negatively modulated by HvrA, whereas regulation of rpoN, nifA1, and nifA2 was independent of HvrA. Expression of hvrA itself was not influenced by a mutation in ntrC, which is absolutely essential for N(2) fixation. Furthermore, HvrA accumulated to comparable levels in the presence and absence of ammonium, suggesting that the amount of HvrA in the cells does not differ under nitrogenase-repressing or -derepressing conditions. In addition, competitive gel retardation studies with HvrA-His(6) purified from R. capsulatus were carried out, demonstrating preferential binding of HvrA to the nifH promoter region.

  5. Salt Bath Oxinitriding of Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, M.; Teimouri, M.; Aliofkhazraee, M.; Mousavi Khoee, S. M.

    Salt bath oxinitriding is a duplex surface treatment developed to improve tribological and corrosion properties of ferrous materials. In this research, gray cast iron samples were nitrided at the temperature range of 480°C-580°C, and then oxidized in an oxidative salt bath. The phase composition of surface layer was identified by X-ray diffraction. Using a microhardness tester, hardness of nitrided gray cast iron was measured. Corrosion behavior of treated (nitrided and oxinitrided) samples was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization technique in 3.5% NaCl solution. XRD analyses indicate that the surface layer in nitrided and oxinitrided samples is composed of ɛ-iron nitride (Fe2-3N) and magnetite (Fe3O4), respectively. Results show that the corrosion resistance of gray cast iron can be improved up to 170%.

  6. Astronaut Jack Lousma taking hot bath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A closeup view of Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, taking a hot bath in the crew quarters of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) of the Skylab space station cluster in Earth orbit. In deploying the shower facility, the shower curtain is pulled up from the floor and attached to the ceiling. The water comes through a push-button shower head attached to a flexible hose. Water is drawn off by a vacuum system.

  7. Leidenfrost drops on liquid baths: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobac, Benjamin; Rednikov, Alexei; Maquet, Laurent; Darbois-Texier, Baptiste; Duchesne, Alexis; Brandenbourger, Martin; Dorbolo, Stéphane; Colinet, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that a liquid drop released over a very hot surface generally does not contact the surface nor boils but rather levitates over a thin vapor film generated by its own evaporation (Leidenfrost effect). In particular, the case of a hot (and flat) solid substrate has been extensively studied in recent years. In contrast, we here focus on Leidenfrost drops over a superheated liquid bath, addressing the problem theoretically and comparing our predictions with experimental results, detailed in a separate talk. We predict the geometry of the drop and of the liquid bath, based on the hydrostatic Young-Laplace and lubrication equations. A good agreement is observed with the available experimental data concerning the deformation of the liquid bath. The modeling also yields a rather complete insight into the shape of the drop. As in the case of a solid substrate, the vapor layer generally appears to be composed of a vapor pocket surrounded by a circular neck. The influences of the superheat and of the drop size are parametrically investigated. A number of scaling laws are established. Unlike the case of a solid substrate, no chimney instability was found in the range of drop size studied.

  8. Polymer translocation through nanopore into active bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Mingfeng; Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2016-11-01

    Polymer translocation through nanopores into a crowded environment is of ubiquitous importance in many biological processes. Here we investigate polymer translocation through a nanopore into an active bath of self-propelled particles in two-dimensional space using Langevin dynamics simulations. Interestingly, we find that the mean translocation time <" separators=" τ > can show a bell-shape dependence on the particle activity Fa at a fixed volume fraction ϕ, indicating that the translocation process may become slower for small activity compared to the case of the passive media, and only when the particle activity becomes large enough can the translocation process be accelerated. In addition, we also find that <" separators=" τ > can show a minimum as a function of ϕ if the particle activity is large enough, implying that an intermediate volume fraction of active particles is most favorable for the polymer translocation. Detailed analysis reveals that such nontrivial behaviors result from the two-fold effect of active bath: one that active particles tend to accumulate near the pore, providing an extra pressure hindering the translocation, and the other that they also aggregate along the polymer chain, generating an effective pulling force accelerating the translocation. Such results demonstrate that active bath plays rather subtle roles on the polymer translocation process.

  9. Enteroviruses and Bacteriophages in Bathing Waters

    PubMed Central

    Mocé-Llivina, Laura; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Juan

    2005-01-01

    A new procedure for detecting and counting enteroviruses based on the VIRADEN method applied to 10 liters of seawater was examined. It improved the efficiency of detection by taking into account both the number of positive isolations and numbers found with traditional methods. It was then used to quantify viruses in bathing waters. A number of bacterial indicators and bacteriophages were also tested. Cultivable enteroviruses were detected in 55% of the samples, most of which complied with bacteriological criteria. In contrast, viral genomes were only detected in 20% of the samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Somatic coliphages outnumbered all other indicators. F-specific RNA phages were detected in only 15% of the samples, whereas phages infecting Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron were detected in 70% of samples. A numerical relationship between the numbers of enteroviruses and the numbers of enterococci and somatic coliphages was observed. In situ inactivation experiments showed that viruses persisted significantly longer than the bacterial indicators. Only somatic coliphages and bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides persisted longer than the viruses. These results explain the numbers of enteroviruses and indicators in bathing waters attending the numbers usually found in sewage in the area. Somatic coliphages show a very good potential to predict the risk of viruses being present in bathing waters. PMID:16269717

  10. Yeast Two-Hybrid Studies on Interaction of Proteins Involved in Regulation of Nitrogen Fixation in the Phototrophic Bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowski, Alice; Riedel, Kai-Uwe; Klipp, Werner; Dreiskemper, Petra; Groß, Silke; Bierhoff, Holger; Drepper, Thomas; Masepohl, Bernd

    2003-01-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus contains two PII-like proteins, GlnB and GlnK, which play central roles in controlling the synthesis and activity of nitrogenase in response to ammonium availability. Here we used the yeast two-hybrid system to probe interactions between these PII-like proteins and proteins known to be involved in regulating nitrogen fixation. Analysis of defined protein pairs demonstrated the following interactions: GlnB-NtrB, GlnB-NifA1, GlnB-NifA2, GlnB-DraT, GlnK-NifA1, GlnK-NifA2, and GlnK-DraT. These results corroborate earlier genetic data and in addition show that PII-dependent ammonium regulation of nitrogen fixation in R. capsulatus does not require additional proteins, like NifL in Klebsiella pneumoniae. In addition, we found interactions for the protein pairs GlnB-GlnB, GlnB-GlnK, NifA1-NifA1, NifA2-NifA2, and NifA1-NifA2, suggesting that fine tuning of the nitrogen fixation process in R. capsulatus may involve the formation of GlnB-GlnK heterotrimers as well as NifA1-NifA2 heterodimers. In order to identify new proteins that interact with GlnB and GlnK, we constructed an R. capsulatus genomic library for use in yeast two-hybrid studies. Screening of this library identified the ATP-dependent helicase PcrA as a new putative protein that interacts with GlnB and the Ras-like protein Era as a new protein that interacts with GlnK. PMID:12923097

  11. Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, Robert K.; LaCamera, Alfred F.; Troup, R. Lee; Ray, Siba P.; Hosler, Robert B.

    1999-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride.

  12. Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, R.K.; LaCamera, A.F.; Troup, R.L.; Ray, S.P.; Hosler, R.B.

    1999-08-17

    An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride. 4 figs.

  13. Protecting coherence by reservoir engineering: intense bath disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zixian; Lü, Zhiguo; Zheng, Hang

    2016-08-01

    We put forward a scheme based on reservoir engineering to protect quantum coherence from leaking to bath, in which we intensely disturb the Lorentzian bath by N harmonic oscillators. We show that the intense disturbance changes the spectrum of the bath and reduces the qubit-bath interaction. Furthermore, we give the exact time evolution with the Lorentzian spectrum by a master equation and calculate the concurrence and survival probability of the qubits to demonstrate the effect of the intense bath disturbance on the protection of coherence. Meanwhile, we reveal the dynamic effects of counter-rotating interaction on the qubits as compared to the results of the rotating-wave approximation.

  14. Purification of the integration host factor homolog of Rhodobacter capsulatus: cloning and sequencing of the hip gene, which encodes the beta subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Toussaint, B; Delic-Attree, I; De Sury D'Aspremont, R; David, L; Vinçon, M; Vignais, P M

    1993-01-01

    We describe a method for rapid purification of the integration host factor (IHF) homolog of Rhodobacter capsulatus that has allowed us to obtain microgram quantities of highly purified protein. R. capsulatus IHF is an alpha beta heterodimer similar to IHF of Escherichia coli. We have cloned and sequenced the hip gene, which encodes the beta subunit. The deduced amino acid sequence (10.7 kDa) has 46% identity with the beta subunit of IHF from E. coli. In gel electrophoretic mobility shift DNA binding assays, R. capsulatus IHF was able to form a stable complex in a site-specific manner with a DNA fragment isolated from the promoter of the structural hupSL operon, which contains the IHF-binding site. The mutated IHF protein isolated from the Hup- mutant IR4, which is mutated in the himA gene (coding for the alpha subunit), gave a shifted band of greater mobility, and DNase I footprinting analysis has shown that the mutated IHF interacts with the DNA fragment from the hupSL promoter region differently from the way that the wild-type IHF does. Images PMID:8407826

  15. Development of a Rhodobacter capsulatus self-reporting model system for optimizing light-dependent, [FeFe]-hydrogenase-driven H2 production.

    PubMed

    Wecker, Matt S A; Beaton, Stephen E; Chado, Robert A; Ghirardi, Maria L

    2017-02-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus normally photoproduces H2 as a by-product of its nitrogenase-catalyzed nitrogen-fixing activity. Such H2 production, however, is expensive from a metabolic perspective, requiring nearly four times as many photons as the equivalent algal hydrogenase-based system (Ghirardi et al., 2009 Photobiological hydrogen-producing systems. Chem Soc Rev 38(1):52-61). Here, we report the insertion of a Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase and its three attendant hydrogenase assembly proteins into an R. capsulatus strain lacking its native uptake hydrogenase. Further, this strain is modified to fluoresce upon sensing H2 . The resulting strain photoproduces H2 and self-reports its own H2 production through fluorescence. This model system represents a unique method of developing hydrogenase-based H2 production in R. capsulatus, may serve as a powerful system for in vivo directed evolution of hydrogenases and hydrogenase-associated genes, and provides a means of screening for increased metabolic production of H2 . Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 291-297. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Purification of the integration host factor homolog of Rhodobacter capsulatus: cloning and sequencing of the hip gene, which encodes the beta subunit.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, B; Delic-Attree, I; De Sury D'Aspremont, R; David, L; Vinçon, M; Vignais, P M

    1993-10-01

    We describe a method for rapid purification of the integration host factor (IHF) homolog of Rhodobacter capsulatus that has allowed us to obtain microgram quantities of highly purified protein. R. capsulatus IHF is an alpha beta heterodimer similar to IHF of Escherichia coli. We have cloned and sequenced the hip gene, which encodes the beta subunit. The deduced amino acid sequence (10.7 kDa) has 46% identity with the beta subunit of IHF from E. coli. In gel electrophoretic mobility shift DNA binding assays, R. capsulatus IHF was able to form a stable complex in a site-specific manner with a DNA fragment isolated from the promoter of the structural hupSL operon, which contains the IHF-binding site. The mutated IHF protein isolated from the Hup- mutant IR4, which is mutated in the himA gene (coding for the alpha subunit), gave a shifted band of greater mobility, and DNase I footprinting analysis has shown that the mutated IHF interacts with the DNA fragment from the hupSL promoter region differently from the way that the wild-type IHF does.

  17. The SOS Response Master Regulator LexA Regulates the Gene Transfer Agent of Rhodobacter capsulatus and Represses Transcription of the Signal Transduction Protein CckA

    PubMed Central

    Kuchinski, Kevin S.; Brimacombe, Cedric A.; Westbye, Alexander B.; Ding, Hao

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gene transfer agent of Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA) is a genetic exchange element that combines central aspects of bacteriophage-mediated transduction and natural transformation. RcGTA particles resemble a small double-stranded DNA bacteriophage, package random ∼4-kb fragments of the producing cell genome, and are released from a subpopulation (<1%) of cells in a stationary-phase culture. RcGTA particles deliver this DNA to surrounding R. capsulatus cells, and the DNA is integrated into the recipient genome though a process that requires homologs of natural transformation genes and RecA-mediated homologous recombination. Here, we report the identification of the LexA repressor, the master regulator of the SOS response in many bacteria, as a regulator of RcGTA activity. Deletion of the lexA gene resulted in the abolition of detectable RcGTA production and an ∼10-fold reduction in recipient capability. A search for SOS box sequences in the R. capsulatus genome sequence identified a number of putative binding sites located 5′ of typical SOS response coding sequences and also 5′ of the RcGTA regulatory gene cckA, which encodes a hybrid histidine kinase homolog. Expression of cckA was increased >5-fold in the lexA mutant, and a lexA cckA double mutant was found to have the same phenotype as a ΔcckA single mutant in terms of RcGTA production. The data indicate that LexA is required for RcGTA production and maximal recipient capability and that the RcGTA-deficient phenotype of the lexA mutant is largely due to the overexpression of cckA. IMPORTANCE This work describes an unusual phenotype of a lexA mutant of the alphaproteobacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus in respect to the phage transduction-like genetic exchange carried out by the R. capsulatus gene transfer agent (RcGTA). Instead of the expected SOS response characteristic of prophage induction, this lexA mutation not only abolishes the production of RcGTA particles but also impairs the ability

  18. Communication: quantum dynamics in classical spin baths.

    PubMed

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2013-07-21

    A formalism for studying the dynamics of quantum systems embedded in classical spin baths is introduced. The theory is based on generalized antisymmetric brackets and predicts the presence of open-path off-diagonal geometric phases in the evolution of the density matrix. The weak coupling limit of the equation can be integrated by standard algorithms and provides a non-Markovian approach to the computer simulation of quantum systems in classical spin environments. It is expected that the theory and numerical schemes presented here have a wide applicability.

  19. Communication: Quantum dynamics in classical spin baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    A formalism for studying the dynamics of quantum systems embedded in classical spin baths is introduced. The theory is based on generalized antisymmetric brackets and predicts the presence of open-path off-diagonal geometric phases in the evolution of the density matrix. The weak coupling limit of the equation can be integrated by standard algorithms and provides a non-Markovian approach to the computer simulation of quantum systems in classical spin environments. It is expected that the theory and numerical schemes presented here have a wide applicability.

  20. Orbiting droplets on a vibrated bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampara, Naresh; Burger, Loic; Gilet, Tristan; Microfluidics, university of liege Team

    2015-11-01

    A millimeter-sized oil droplet can bounce on a vertically vibrated liquid bath for unlimited time. It may couple to the surface wave it emits; leading to horizontal self-propulsion called walking. When several walkers coexist close to one another, they either repel or attract each other, in response to the superposition of the waves they generate. Attraction leads to various bound states, including droplets that orbit around each other. We have experimentally investigated the variety of quantized orbital motions exhibited by two, three and more identical walkers, as a function of forcing acceleration. Each motion is quantified in terms of droplet and wave energy.

  1. Assisting Cognitively Impaired Nursing Home Residents with Bathing: Effects of Two Bathing Interventions on Caregiving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeffer, Beverly; Talerico, Karen Amann; Rasin, Joyce; Mitchell, C. Madeline; Stewart, Babara J.; McKenzie, Darlene; Barrick, Ann Louise; Rader, Joanne; Sloane, Philip D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: When cognitively impaired nursing home residents exhibit agitated and aggressive behaviors during bathing, nursing home caregivers are in a unique position to improve residents' experience. This report addresses whether certified nursing assistants (CNAs) who received training in a person-centered approach with showering and with the…

  2. Cavitation effects in ultrasonic cleaning baths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasscock, Barbara H.

    1995-01-01

    In this project, the effect of cavitation from aqueous ultrasonic cleaning on the surfaces of metal and non-metal sample coupons was studied. After twenty cleaning cycles, the mass loss from the aluminum coupons averaged 0.22 mg/sq cm surface area and 0.014 mg/sq cm for both stainless steel and titanium. The aluminum coupons showed visual evidence of minor cavitation erosion in regions of previously existing surface irregularities. The non-metal samples showed some periods of mass gain. These effects are believed to have minor impact on hardware being cleaned, but should be evaluated in the context of specific hardware requirements. Also the ultrasonic activity in the large cleaning baths was found to be unevenly distributed as measured by damage to sheets of aluminum foil. It is therefore recommended that items being cleaned in an ultrasonic bath be moved or conveyed during the cleaning to more evenly distribute the cavitation action provide more uniform cleaning.

  3. Recovery process for electroless plating baths

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Roger W.; Neff, Wayne A.

    1992-01-01

    A process for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO.sub.3. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths.

  4. Recovery process for electroless plating baths

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.W.; Neff, W.A.

    1992-05-12

    A process is described for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO[sub 3]. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths. 18 figs.

  5. Stochastic dynamics with a mesoscopic bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyukhin, Alexander V.; Schofield, Jeremy

    2001-10-01

    We consider the effects of bath size on the nature of the dynamics and transport properties for two simple models in which the bath is composed of a collinear chain of harmonic oscillators. The first model consists of an untwisted rotating chain (elastic rotor) for which we obtain a non-Markovian equation analogous to the generalized Langevin equation for the rotational degrees of freedom. We demonstrate that the corresponding memory function oscillates with a frequency close to that of the lowest mode of the chain. The second model considered consists of a tagged oscillator in a finite harmonic chain. For this model, we find an additional harmonic force in the generalized Langevin equation for the terminal atom that does not appear in the equation of motion for the semi-infinite chain. It is demonstrated that the force constant for the additional harmonic force scales as 1/N, where N is the number of oscillators in the chain. Using an exact representation for the velocity correlation function, the transport properties of the model are discussed.

  6. Hot particles attract in a cold bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hidenori; Lee, Alpha A.; Brenner, Michael P.

    2017-04-01

    Controlling interactions out of thermodynamic equilibrium is crucial for designing addressable and functional self-organizing structures. These active interactions also underpin collective behavior in biological systems. Here we study a general setting of active particles in a bath of passive particles and demonstrate a mechanism for long-range attraction between active particles. The mechanism operates when the translational persistence length of the active particle motion is smaller than the particle diameter. In this limit, the system reduces to particles of higher diffusivity ("hot" particles) in a bath of particles with lower diffusivity ("cold" particles). This attractive interaction arises as a hot particle pushes cold particles away to create a large hole around itself, and the holes interact via a depletion-like attraction. Strikingly, the interaction range is more than an order of magnitude larger than the particle radius, well beyond the range of the conventional depletion force. Although the mechanism occurs outside the parameter regime of typical biological swimmers, the mechanism could be realized in the laboratory.

  7. [Improving the quality of bathing water by oxygen releasing substances].

    PubMed

    Jessen, H J

    1989-06-01

    The bath water of an indoor swimming bath of 25m length has been preparatory acc. to TGL 37780/02 and by procedings of flocculation-filtration-chlorination. the filter drain water (clear water) had been supplemented by 20...30 percentage hydrogen peroxide or potassium peroxide sulphate. The reaction with chlorine existing in surplus and hydrogen peroxide results in a spontaneous formation of nascinating oxygen. The occurring wet oxidation of contents substances of the bath water also with an increased frequentation of the indoor swimming bath results in reduced rates of CSVMn and chloramine. This fact can be explained by the concurring reaction between oxygen and chlorine. Because of its low expense, the forced decomposition of hydrogen peroxide could be an alternative for utilization of ozone in small bathes. Contrary to this the combination potassium peroxide sulphate/chlorine will not result in such a significant improvement of the quality of bath water.

  8. Difluoromethane, a new and improved inhibitor of methanotrophy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Sasson, C.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Difluoromethane (HFC-32; DFM) is compared to acetylene and methyl fluoride as an inhibitor of methanotrophy in cultures and soils. DFM was found to be a reversible inhibitor of CH4 oxidation by Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). Consumption of CH4 in soil was blocked by additions of low levels of DFM (0.03 kPa), and this inhibition was reversed by DFM removal. Although a small quantity of DFM was consumed during these incubations, its remaining concentration was sufficiently elevated to sustain inhibition. Methanogenesis in anaerobic soil slurries, including acetoclastic methanogenesis, was unaffected by levels of DFM which inhibit methanotrophy. Low levels of DFM (0.03 kPa) also inhibited nitrification and N2O production by soils. DFM is proposed as an improved inhibitor of CH4 oxidation over acetylene and/or methyl fluoride on the basis of its reversibility, its efficacy at low concentrations, its lack of inhibition of methanogenesis, and its low cost.

  9. Xenon and halogenated alkanes track putative substrate binding cavities in the soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Whittington, D A; Rosenzweig, A C; Frederick, C A; Lippard, S J

    2001-03-27

    To investigate the role of protein cavities in facilitating movement of the substrates, methane and dioxygen, in the soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylase (MMOH), we determined the X-ray structures of MMOH from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) cocrystallized with dibromomethane or iodoethane, or by using crystals pressurized with xenon gas. The halogenated alkanes bind in two cavities within the alpha-subunit that extend from one surface of the protein to the buried dinuclear iron active site. Two additional binding sites were located in the beta-subunit. Pressurization of two crystal forms of MMOH with xenon resulted in the identification of six binding sites located exclusively in the alpha-subunit. These results indicate that hydrophobic species bind preferentially in preexisting cavities in MMOH and support the hypothesis that such cavities may play a functional role in sequestering and enhancing the availability of the physiological substrates for reaction at the active site.

  10. Effectiveness of saltwater baths in the treatment of epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Brian Woodford; Arbuckle, Harvey A; Berman, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Current management of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) focuses on preventing secondary infections--a leading cause of mortality--by regularly cleaning and bandaging blisters and erosions and preventive bandaging of high-friction areas. Unfortunately the baths and showers used to remove bandages and clean the skin are often painful, causing lack of adherence and subsequent increases in infections, pain, and antimicrobial use. This study evaluates the hypothesis that bathing individuals with EB in saltwater is less painful than in normal bath water. The study also explores whether taking saltwater baths reduces infections as measured through skin pruritus, odor, discharge, and nonbathing pain. Participants recruited from the Children's Hospital Colorado Outpatient EB Clinic completed standardized questionnaires assessing the effects of the clinic's saltwater bathing recommendations; the data were analyzed using frequencies and Fisher tests. After starting saltwater baths, patients reported a significant reduction in pain (91%), pain medication use (66%), skin odor (31%), and skin discharge (44%). No significant differences were found with respect to the type of EB, age, length of time using baths, or amount of salt added. Saltwater baths are a noninvasive, low-cost, effective treatment that significantly reduces bathing pain, pain medication use, and some signs of skin infection. This treatment can be recommended to patients with all studied EB types without regard to age, the specific amount of salt used, bathing frequency, or pain level. Given the central role bathing and dressing changes play in the management of EB, the use of saltwater baths can lead to significant improvement in quality of life.

  11. Ultrasonic bath depth control and regulation in single cell recordings.

    PubMed

    Duong Dinh, Thien An; Jüngling, Eberhard; Strotmann, Karl-Heinz; Westhofen, Martin; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2006-09-01

    Control of the bath depth is critical in many applications of the patch-clamp technique, particularly when the capacitance of cells is determined to assess secretion or transmitter release or in studies of ion currents sensitive to small changes in the hydrostatic pressure. We describe an inexpensive technique for tight control of the bath depth with the aid of a commercially available ultrasound sensor. The sensor continuously determines changes in the distance to the bath surface with a resolution of about 10 mum. The signal from the sensor is digitized in a microcontroller card and used to send on or off signals at 100 Hz to a peristaltic pump that removes volume from the bath. The inflow into the bath can be realized in a versatile way. The capacitance of Sylgard-coated patch-clamp glass electrodes, demonstrated to be extremely sensitive to small changes in the area moistened by bath solution, is constant within the noise level of +/-3 fF when immersed into a depth-controlled bath, even during exchange of the bath medium. Thus, when small changes in the cell capacitance are measured in patch-clamp experiments, errors due to alterations in the pipette capacitance caused by bath depth fluctuations are eliminated.

  12. Bath Salts: A Newly Recognized Cause of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    McNeely, Jonathan; Parikh, Samir; Valentine, Christopher; Haddad, Nabil; Shidham, Ganesh; Rovin, Brad; Hebert, Lee; Agarwal, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Bath salts are substance of abuse that are becoming more common and are difficult to recognize due to negative toxicology screening. Acute kidney injury due to bath salt use has not previously been described. We present the case of a previously healthy male who developed acute kidney injury and dialysis dependence after bath salt ingestion and insufflation. This was self-reported with negative toxicology screening. Clinical course was marked by severe hyperthermia, hyperkalemia, rhabdomyolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, oliguria, and sepsis. We discuss signs and symptoms, differential diagnoses, potential mechanisms of injury, management, and review of the literature related to bath salt toxicity. PMID:24555135

  13. Bath salts: a newly recognized cause of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    McNeely, Jonathan; Parikh, Samir; Valentine, Christopher; Haddad, Nabil; Shidham, Ganesh; Rovin, Brad; Hebert, Lee; Agarwal, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Bath salts are substance of abuse that are becoming more common and are difficult to recognize due to negative toxicology screening. Acute kidney injury due to bath salt use has not previously been described. We present the case of a previously healthy male who developed acute kidney injury and dialysis dependence after bath salt ingestion and insufflation. This was self-reported with negative toxicology screening. Clinical course was marked by severe hyperthermia, hyperkalemia, rhabdomyolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, oliguria, and sepsis. We discuss signs and symptoms, differential diagnoses, potential mechanisms of injury, management, and review of the literature related to bath salt toxicity.

  14. An assessment of the impact of the proposed EU bathing water directive on Irish coastal bathing area compliance.

    PubMed

    Chawla, R; Real, K; Masterson, B

    2005-01-01

    An assessment of the impact of the new microbial water quality standards of the proposed EU Bathing Water Directive on the classification of designated Irish coastal bathing areas is presented. The new standards are applied retrospectively to the microbial water quality results for the bathing seasons of 1999, 2000 and 2001, and the outcome is compared with that recorded under the present Bathing Water Directive. A Microsoft EXCEL application was developed to generate the retrospective bathing area classifications according to the proposed Directive (Excellent, Good, Poor). It was found that the number of Irish coastal bathing areas not attaining 'Excellent' classification (as would be required at present for the Blue Flag award) was trebled; the number attaining 'Good' classification was increased by about 50%, and the number attracting 'Poor' classification (equivalent to 'Fail' under the present Directive) was increased nine-fold. Some of the shortcomings of the proposed Directive and suggestions for its revision are discussed.

  15. Purification and assays of Rhodobacter capsulatus RegB-RegA two-component signal transduction system.

    PubMed

    Swem, Lee R; Swem, Danielle L; Wu, Jiang; Bauer, Carl E

    2007-01-01

    Two-component signal-transduction systems, composed of a histidine-sensor kinase and a DNA-binding response regulator, allow bacteria to detect environmental changes and adjust cellular physiology to live more efficiently in a broad distribution of niches. Although many two-component signal-transduction systems are known, a limited number of signals that stimulate these systems have been discovered. This chapter describes the purification and characterization of the predominant two-component signal-transduction system utilized by Rhodobacter capsulatus, a nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacterium. Specifically, we explain the overexpression, detergent solubilization, and purification of the full-length membrane-spanning histidine-sensor kinase RegB. We also provide a method to measure autophosphorylation of RegB and discern the effect of its signal molecule, ubiquinone, on autophosphorylation levels. In addition we describe the overexpression and purification of the cognate response regulator RegA and a technique used to visualize the phosphotransfer reaction from RegB to RegA.

  16. Vitamin B12 regulates photosystem gene expression via the CrtJ antirepressor AerR in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhuo; Li, Keran; Hammad, Loubna A.; Karty, Jonathan A.; Bauer, Carl E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The tetrapyrroles heme, bacteriochlorophyll and cobalamin (B12) exhibit a complex interrelationship regarding their synthesis. In this study, we demonstrate that AerR functions as an antirepressor of the tetrapyrrole regulator CrtJ. We show that purified AerR contains B12 that is bound to a conserved histidine (His145) in AerR. The interaction of AerR to CrtJ was further demonstrated in vitro by pull down experiments using AerR as bait and quantified using microscale thermophoresis. DNase I DNA footprint assays show that AerR containing B12 inhibits CrtJ binding to the bchC promoter. We further show that bchC expression is greatly repressed in a B12 auxotroph of Rhodobacter capsulatus and that B12 regulation of gene expression is mediated by AerR’s ability to function as an antirepressor of CrtJ. This study thus provides a mechanism for how the essential tetrapyrrole, cobalamin controls the synthesis of bacteriochlorophyll, an essential component of the photosystem. PMID:24329562

  17. Identification and mapping of nitrogen fixation genes of Rhodobacter capsulatus: duplication of a nifA-nifB region.

    PubMed Central

    Klipp, W; Masepohl, B; Pühler, A

    1988-01-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus mutants unable to fix nitrogen were isolated by random transposon Tn5 mutagenesis. The Tn5 insertion sites of 30 Nif- mutants were mapped within three unlinked chromosomal regions designated A, B, and C. The majority of Tn5 insertions (21 mutants) map within nif region A, characterized by two ClaI fragments of 2.5 and 25 kilobases (kb). The 17-kb ClaI fragment of nif region B contains six nif::Tn5 insertions, and the three remaining mutations are located on a 32-kb ClaI fragment of nif region C. Hybridization experiments using all 17 Klebsiella pneumoniae nif genes individually as probes revealed homology to nifE, nifS, nifA, and nifB in nif region A. The nifHDK genes were localized in nif region B. About 2 kb away from this operon, a second copy of the DNA fragments homologous to nifA and nifB, originally found in nif region A, was identified. Images PMID:2828320

  18. Identification and sequence analysis of genes involved in late steps in cobalamin (vitamin B12) synthesis in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Pollich, M; Klug, G

    1995-01-01

    A 6.4-kb region of a 6.8-kb BamHI fragment carrying Rhodobacter capsulatus genes involved in late steps of cobalamin synthesis has been sequenced. The nucleotide sequence and genetic analysis revealed that this fragment contains eight genes arranged in at least three operons. Five of these eight genes show homology to genes involved in the cobalamin synthesis of Pseudomonas denitrificans and Salmonella typhimurium. The arrangement of these homologous genes differs considerably in the three genera. Upstream of five overlapping genes (named bluFEDCB), a promoter activity could be detected by using lacZ fusions. This promoter shows no regulation by oxygen, vitamin B12 (cobalamin), or cobinamide. Disruption of the bluE gene by a Tn5 insertion (strain AH2) results in reduced expression of the puf and puc operons, which encode pigment-binding proteins of the photosynthetic apparatus. The mutant strain AH2 can be corrected to a wild-type-like phenotype by addition of vitamin B12 or cobinamide dicyanide. Disruption of the bluB gene by an interposon (strain BB1) also disturbs the formation of the photosynthetic apparatus. The mutation of strain BB1 can be corrected by vitamin B12 but not by cobinamide. We propose that a lack of cobalamin results in deregulation and a decreased formation of the photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:7635831

  19. One for All or All for One: Heterogeneous Expression and Host Cell Lysis Are Key to Gene Transfer Agent Activity in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Paul C. M.; Westbye, Alexander B.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The gene transfer agent (RcGTA) of Rhodobacter capsulatus is the model for a family of novel bacteriophage-related genetic elements that carry out lateral transfer of essentially random host DNA. Genuine and putative gene transfer agents have been discovered in diverse genera and are becoming recognized as potentially an important source of genetic exchange and microbial evolution in the oceans. Despite being discovered over 30 years ago, little is known about many essential aspects of RcGTA biology. Here, we validate the use of direct fluorescence reporter constructs, which express the red fluorescent protein mCherry in R. capsulatus. A construct containing the RcGTA promoter fused to mCherry was used to examine the single-cell expression profiles of wild type and RcGTA overproducer R. capsulatus populations, under different growth conditions and growth phases. The majority of RcGTA production clearly arises from a small, distinct sub-set of the population in the wild type strain and a larger sub-set in the overproducer. The most likely RcGTA release mechanism concomitant with this expression pattern is host cell lysis and we present direct evidence for the release of an intracellular enzyme accompanying RcGTA release. RcGTA ORF s is annotated as a ‘cell wall peptidase’ but we rule out a role in host lysis and propose an alternative function as a key contributor to RcGTA invasion of a target cell during infection. PMID:22916305

  20. Enzymic systems proposed to be involved in the dissimilatory reduction of selenite in the purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Kessi, Janine

    2006-03-01

    Various enzymic systems, such as nitrite reductase, sulfite reductase and glutathione reductase, have been proposed for, or suspected to be involved in, the reduction of selenite in bacteria. As alphaproteobacteria have been shown to be highly tolerant to transition metal oxyanions, it seemed interesting to investigate the hypothetical involvement of these different enzymes in the reduction of selenite in the purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rhodobacter capsulatus. The hypothetical involvement of nitrite reductase and sulfite reductase in the reduction of selenite in these bacteria was investigated by analysing the effects of nitrite and sulfite amendments on the growth and kinetics of selenite reduction. The reduction of selenite was not concomitant with that of either sulfite or nitrite in Rs. rubrum, suggesting that the reduction pathways operate independently. In Rb. capsulatus, strong interactions were observed between the nitrite reduction and selenite reduction pathways. However, in both organisms, selenite reduction took place during both the growth phase and the stationary phase, indicating that selenite metabolism is constitutively expressed. In contrast, neither nitrite nor sulfite was transformed during stationary phase, suggesting that the metabolism of both ions is induced, which implies that identical reduction pathways for selenite and nitrite or selenite and sulfite are excluded. Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, S-n-butyl homocysteine sulfoximine), a specific inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, was used to depress the intracellular glutathione level. In stationary-phase cultures of both Rs. rubrum and Rb. capsulatus amended with BSO, the rate of reduction of selenite was slowed, indicating that glutathione may be involved in the dissimilatory reduction of selenite in these organisms. The analysis of the headspace gases of the cultures indicated that the synthesis of methylated selenium compounds was prevented in the presence of 3

  1. Chemical Safety: Molten Salt Baths Cited as Lab Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Rudy

    1982-01-01

    Discusses danger of explosions with molten salts baths, commonly used as heat-transfer media. One such explosion involved use of a bath containing 3-lb sodium nitrite and 1-lb potassium thiocyanate. Although most commercially available mixtures for heat transfer contain oxidizers, a reducer (thiocyanate) was included which possibly triggered the…

  2. 20 CFR 654.412 - Bathing, laundry, and handwashing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Bathing, laundry, and handwashing. (a) Bathing and handwashing facilities, supplied with hot and cold... of floor space per unit. Adequate, dry dressing space shall be provided in common use facilities.... When common use shower facilities for both sexes are in the same building they shall be separated by a...

  3. 20 CFR 654.412 - Bathing, laundry, and handwashing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Bathing, laundry, and handwashing. (a) Bathing and handwashing facilities, supplied with hot and cold... of floor space per unit. Adequate, dry dressing space shall be provided in common use facilities.... When common use shower facilities for both sexes are in the same building they shall be separated by a...

  4. 20 CFR 654.412 - Bathing, laundry, and handwashing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Bathing, laundry, and handwashing. (a) Bathing and handwashing facilities, supplied with hot and cold... of floor space per unit. Adequate, dry dressing space shall be provided in common use facilities.... When common use shower facilities for both sexes are in the same building they shall be separated by a...

  5. 20 CFR 654.412 - Bathing, laundry, and handwashing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Bathing, laundry, and handwashing. (a) Bathing and handwashing facilities, supplied with hot and cold... of floor space per unit. Adequate, dry dressing space shall be provided in common use facilities.... When common use shower facilities for both sexes are in the same building they shall be separated by a...

  6. Acute irritant reaction to an antiseptic bath emollient.

    PubMed

    Saw, N K; Hindmarsh, J R

    2005-02-01

    Antiseptic bath emollients are commonly prescribed for treatment of eczema and are generally safe for frequent application. Although acute irritant reactions are uncommon it is nevertheless recognised and could have significant morbidity. This case describes a young male patient who developed an acute irritant reaction localised to the external genitalia, mimicking Fournier's gangrene, after overnight application of Oilatum Plus antiseptic bath emollients.

  7. Acute irritant reaction to an antiseptic bath emollient

    PubMed Central

    Saw, N; Hindmarsh, J

    2005-01-01

    Antiseptic bath emollients are commonly prescribed for treatment of eczema and are generally safe for frequent application. Although acute irritant reactions are uncommon it is nevertheless recognised and could have significant morbidity. This case describes a young male patient who developed an acute irritant reaction localised to the external genitalia, mimicking Fournier's gangrene, after overnight application of Oilatum Plus antiseptic bath emollients. PMID:15701748

  8. 36 CFR 21.11 - Redemption of bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Redemption of bath tickets... INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.11 Redemption of bath tickets. Unused tickets may be redeemed by the purchaser within one year from the date of purchase, according to the...

  9. Cyanide evolution from a potassium gold cyanide plating bath

    SciTech Connect

    Antepenko, R.J.

    1980-02-12

    When a gold plating console was installed in a production area at the General Electric Neutron Devices Department (GEND), the console was placed adjacent to a 10% H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ activation bath. An experiment was made to measure the amount of hydrogen cyanide gas released as a result of the accidental addition of sulfuric acid to the gold bath. Similar hydrogen cyanide gas evolution data were obtained from the addition of either dilute sulfuric acid or concentrated sulfuric acid. Results show hydrogen cyanide gas release was a function of the plating bath pH. Air samples collected over a portion of the gold bath at pH 5.6 and at either room temperature or at a 70/sup 0/C operating temperature were found to contain 2 ..mu..g/1 hydrogen cyanide. Air samples collected over the bath sample at pH 4.1 to 4.3 contained 40 ..mu..g/1 hydrogen cyanide. A rapid increase in hydrogen cyanide was found in air samples collected over plating bath samples below pH 2.5. A quantity of reagent grade concentrated sulfuric acid was added to the test bath, which was equivalent to the addition of a 9-pound bottle of the acid to the 30-gallon production bath. Air samples were found to contain 1400 ..mu..g/1 of hydrogen cyanide.

  10. 20 CFR 654.412 - Bathing, laundry, and handwashing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Bathing, laundry, and handwashing. (a) Bathing and handwashing facilities, supplied with hot and cold.... Shower floors shall be constructed of nonabsorbent nonskid materials and sloped to properly constructed floor drains. Except in individual family units, separate shower facilities shall be provided each sex...

  11. Chemical Safety: Molten Salt Baths Cited as Lab Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Rudy

    1982-01-01

    Discusses danger of explosions with molten salts baths, commonly used as heat-transfer media. One such explosion involved use of a bath containing 3-lb sodium nitrite and 1-lb potassium thiocyanate. Although most commercially available mixtures for heat transfer contain oxidizers, a reducer (thiocyanate) was included which possibly triggered the…

  12. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket...

  13. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket...

  14. 36 CFR 21.5 - Therapeutic bathing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Therapeutic bathing requirements. 21.5 Section 21.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.5 Therapeutic bathing requirements....

  15. 36 CFR 21.11 - Redemption of bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Redemption of bath tickets. 21.11 Section 21.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.11 Redemption of bath tickets....

  16. 36 CFR 21.5 - Therapeutic bathing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Therapeutic bathing requirements. 21.5 Section 21.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.5 Therapeutic bathing requirements....

  17. 21 CFR 740.17 - Foaming detergent bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Foaming detergent bath products. 740.17 Section 740.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.17 Foaming detergent bath...

  18. 5. UNIT VENTILATOR, MEN'S BATH HALL, SHOWING POSITION AGAINST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. UNIT VENTILATOR, MEN'S BATH HALL, SHOWING POSITION AGAINST WALL ABOVE THE BATHS. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Ozark Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  19. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket...

  20. 36 CFR 21.11 - Redemption of bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Redemption of bath tickets. 21.11 Section 21.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.11 Redemption of bath tickets....

  1. 36 CFR 21.11 - Redemption of bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Redemption of bath tickets. 21.11 Section 21.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.11 Redemption of bath tickets....

  2. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket...

  3. 36 CFR 21.5 - Therapeutic bathing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Therapeutic bathing requirements. 21.5 Section 21.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.5 Therapeutic bathing requirements....

  4. 36 CFR 21.11 - Redemption of bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Redemption of bath tickets. 21.11 Section 21.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.11 Redemption of bath tickets....

  5. 36 CFR 21.5 - Therapeutic bathing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Therapeutic bathing requirements. 21.5 Section 21.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.5 Therapeutic bathing requirements....

  6. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket...

  7. 36 CFR 21.5 - Therapeutic bathing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Therapeutic bathing requirements. 21.5 Section 21.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.5 Therapeutic bathing requirements....

  8. 30 CFR 75.1712 - Bath houses and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bath houses and toilet facilities. 75.1712 Section 75.1712 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712 Bath...

  9. Remediation of chromium(VI) by a methane-oxidizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Al Hasin, Abubakr; Gurman, Stephen J; Murphy, Loretta M; Perry, Ashlee; Smith, Thomas J; Gardiner, Philip H E

    2010-01-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria are ubiquitous in the environment and are globally important in oxidizing the potent greenhouse gas methane. It is also well recognized that they have wide potential for bioremediation of organic and chlorinated organic pollutants, thanks to the wide substrate ranges of the methane monooxygenase enzymes that they produce. Here we have demonstrated that the well characterized model methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) is able to bioremediate chromium(VI) pollution over a wide range of concentrations (1.4-1000 mg L(-1) of Cr(6+)), thus extending the bioremediation potential of this major group of microorganisms to include an important heavy-metal pollutant. The chromium(VI) reduction reaction was dependent on the availability of reducing equivalents from the growth substrate methane and was partially inhibited by the metabolic poison sodium azide. X-ray spectroscopy showed that the cell-associated chromium was predominantly in the +3 oxidation state and associated with cell- or medium-derived moieties that were most likely phosphate groups. The genome sequence of Mc. capsulatus (Bath) suggests at least five candidate genes for the chromium(VI) reductase activity in this organism.

  10. Soluble methane monooxygenase component B gene probe for identification of methanotrophs that rapidly degrade trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Tsien, H C; Hanson, R S

    1992-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphisms, Western blot (immunoblot) analysis, and fluorescence-labelled signature probes were used for the characterization of methanotrophic bacteria as well as for the identification of methanotrophs which contained the soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) gene and were able to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE). The gene encoding a soluble MMO component B protein from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was cloned. It contained a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment. With this cloned component B gene as probe, methanotroph types I, II, and X and environmental and bioreactor samples were screened for the presence of the gene encoding soluble MMO. Fragments produced by digestion of DNA with rare cutting restriction endonucleases were separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and transferred to Zeta-Probe membrane (Bio-Rad) for Southern blot analysis. Samples were also analyzed for the presence of soluble MMO by Western blot analysis and the ability to degrade TCE. The physiological groups of methanotrophs in each sample were determined by hybridizing cells with fluorescence-labelled signature probes. Among twelve pure or mixed cultures, DNA fragments of seven methanotrophs hybridized with the soluble MMO B gene probe. When grown in media with limited copper, all of these bacteria degraded TCE. All of them are type II methanotrophs. The soluble MMO component B gene of the type X methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath, did not hybridize to the M. trichosporium OB3b soluble MMO component B gene probe, although M. capsulatus Bath also produces a soluble MMO. Images PMID:1349468

  11. Biochemical, Molecular, and Genetic Analyses of the Acetone Carboxylases from Xanthobacter autotrophicus Strain Py2 and Rhodobacter capsulatus Strain B10

    PubMed Central

    Sluis, Miriam K.; Larsen, Rachel A.; Krum, Jonathan G.; Anderson, Ruth; Metcalf, William W.; Ensign, Scott A.

    2002-01-01

    Acetone carboxylase is the key enzyme of bacterial acetone metabolism, catalyzing the condensation of acetone and CO2 to form acetoacetate. In this study, the acetone carboxylase of the purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus was purified to homogeneity and compared to that of Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2, the only other organism from which an acetone carboxylase has been purified. The biochemical properties of the enzymes were virtually indistinguishable, with identical subunit compositions (α2β2γ2 multimers of 85-, 78-, and 20-kDa subunits), reaction stoichiometries (CH3COCH3 + CO2 + ATP→CH3COCH2COO− + H+ + AMP + 2Pi), and kinetic properties (Km for acetone, 8 μM; kcat = 45 min−1). Both enzymes were expressed to high levels (17 to 25% of soluble protein) in cells grown with acetone as the carbon source but were not present at detectable levels in cells grown with other carbon sources. The genes encoding the acetone carboxylase subunits were identified by transposon mutagenesis of X. autotrophicus and sequence analysis of the R. capsulatus genome and were found to be clustered in similar operons consisting of the genes acxA (β subunit), acxB (α subunit), and acxC (γ subunit). Transposon mutagenesis of X. autotrophicus revealed a requirement of σ54 and a σ54-dependent transcriptional activator (AcxR) for acetone-dependent growth and acetone carboxylase gene expression. A potential σ54-dependent promoter 122 bp upstream of X. autotrophicus acxABC was identified. An AcxR gene homolog was identified 127 bp upstream of acxA in R. capsulatus, but this activator lacked key features of σ54-dependent activators, and the associated acxABC lacked an apparent σ54-dependent promoter, suggesting that σ54 is not required for expression of acxABC in R. capsulatus. These studies reveal a conserved strategy of ATP-dependent acetone carboxylation and the involvement of transcriptional enhancers in acetone carboxylase gene

  12. Q-band ENDOR spectra of the Rieske protein from Rhodobacter capsulatus ubiquinol-cyctochrome c oxidoreductase show two histidines coordinated to the (2Fe-2S) cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Gurbiel, R.J. Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow ); Ohnishi, Tomoko; Robertson, D.E.; Daldal, F. ); Hoffman, B.M. )

    1991-12-10

    Electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) experiments were performed on {sup 14}N (natural abundance) and {sup 15}N-enriched iron-sulfur Rieske protein in the ubiquinol-cytochrome c{sub 2} oxidoreductase from Rhodobactor capsulatus. The experiments proved that two distinct nitrogenous ligands, histidines, are undoubtedly ligated to the Rieske (2Fe-2S) center. The calculations of hyperfine tensors give values similar but not identical to those of the Rieske-type cluster in phthalate dioxygenase of Pseudomonas cepacia and suggest a slightly different geometry of the iron-sulfur cluster in the two proteins.

  13. Effects of bathing on skin exposed to Cobalt-60 teletherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bohannan, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of this study was to determine the effects of bathing or not bathing on the degree of skin reaction occurring in patients receiving Cobalt-60 radiation therapy to the chest, back, or head and neck. A quasi experimental study was done using a 2 x 7 repeated measures design. Sixty-seven subjects receiving Cobalt-60 radiation therapy at the Moncrief Radiation Center in Fort Worth, Texas, were randomly assigned to an experimental group who did not bathe during therapy and a control group who did bathe with water during therapy. Observations were made after each 1000 rads of therapy and two weeks after the final treatment. Erythema and pigmentation measurements were taken using the Photovolt 670 and rates were assigned using the Baker-Leith Rating Scale. Findings from the study suggest that bathing the portal of entry with water during the treatment period does not influence the degree of skin response that occurs from Cobalt-60 teletherapy.

  14. Effects of basin baths, tub baths, and showers on cardiovascular responses in 51 health men and women.

    PubMed

    Winslow, E H; Smith, J

    1991-01-01

    Heart rate and blood pressure during rest and bathing are generally lower in healthy individuals than in hospitalized patients. However, medications can exaggerate or attenuate patients' responses. Heart rate and blood pressure are highest during showering and lowest during basin baths in both patients and healthy subjects, but the differences among the three types of bathing are not clinically dramatic. In addition, the vigor of the activity can be easily controlled; hospitalized patients naturally conserve effort and move more slowly and deliberately than healthy individuals. A tachycardic response to bathing seems to be common in both healthy subjects and hospitalized patients. Careful control of water temperature and heart rate monitoring during bathing appear to be indicated when hospitalized cardiac patients bathe. Comparison of responses to sitting and standing showering would be worthwhile. The findings of this study help delineate the typical cardiovascular responses of healthy adults to three methods of bathing. The findings also emphasize gender differences and the importance of studying both men and women. Only by determining normal responses in men and women can abnormal responses be recognized. More study on cardiovascular responses to bathing and other common activities in both healthy and sick persons is clearly needed to better describe, explain, predict, and control responses to activity and to build a scientific foundation for activity prescription and restriction.

  15. Randomized, controlled study comparing sitz-bath and no-sitz-bath treatments in patients with acute anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pravinj

    2006-08-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of sitz baths in the management of acute anal fissures. Individual patients were randomized to either receive sitz baths or no sitz baths for 4 weeks in addition to oral psyllium husk. Patients were asked to soak their hips and buttocks in a tub containing plain lukewarm water for 10 min, once after defecation in the morning and again at bedtime. Each week, the patients were called to assess pain scores and healing of fissures, whereas the level of satisfaction was recorded at the end of 4 weeks. Main outcome measures were validated pain scores and levels of satisfaction. Fifty-eight subjects were recruited for this study. In all, 52 of them completed the trial (27 in the sitz bath group and 25 in the control group). Although the pain score was lesser in the sitz bath group than in the control group, it failed to reach statistical significance. There were no significant differences in fissure healing between the two groups over the 4-week study period. However, patients in the sitz bath group reported better satisfaction levels than the control group (P < 0.01). Although no serious adverse effects were observed, two patients from sitz bath group developed perianal skin rash. This study suggests that sitz baths improve patient satisfaction in acute anal fissures. However, the healing and overall pain relief was not significant enough to attract attention. It was also found to be associated with adverse effects in few patients.

  16. Electrochromic responses of carotenoid absorbance bands in purified light-harvesting complexes from Rhodobacter capsulatus reconstituted into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, M G; Jackson, J B

    1993-09-13

    Light-Harvesting Complexes I and II (LHI and LHII) were extracted from chromatophores of Rhodobacter capsulatus, purified in Triton X-100 and reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles. Application of membrane potentials (K+ diffusion potentials) to LHII proteoliposomes led to absorbance changes in the carotenoid bands which were spectrally similar to those in chromatophores. These (electrochromic) absorbance changes were linear with the applied membrane potential between -107 mV and +105 mV. The data were consistent with the existence of two forms of carotenoid in LHII. One form, comprising 2/3 of the total and with a long wavelength absorbance maximum at 510 nm, was not significantly affected by membrane potential. The other component, comprising 1/3 of the total and with a long wavelength absorbance maximum at 516.5 nm, was shifted by approx. 1.6 nm to the red by a membrane potential of 105 mV. Reduction of the B800 bacteriochlorophyll in LHII with NaBH4 before reconstitution did not affect the absorbance spectrum of the carotenoids and it did not affect their response to applied membrane potentials in proteoliposomes. Although the electrochromically-sensitive carotenoids might be associated with B800, interactions with the bacteriochlorophyll are perhaps not the cause of the polarisation of the carotenoid that is responsible for the linearity of the response. The carotenoids in reconstituted LHI complexes were not detectably electrochromic. The electrochromic absorbance changes of carotenoids in LHII could be useful for membrane potential measurement in liposomes containing ion-translocating proteins.

  17. Balamuthia mandrillaris therapeutic mud bath in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Todd, C D; Reyes-Batlle, M; Piñero, J E; Martínez-Carretero, E; Valladares, B; Lindo, J F; Lorenzo-Morales, J

    2015-07-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is an emerging cause of encephalitis in humans. The transmission dynamics are poorly understood due to the high fatality rate and the sporadic nature of cases. Seventy-two soil samples were collected from beaches and the banks of lagoons, rivers, ponds, mineral springs and streams from across Jamaica and assayed for the presence of B. mandrillaris. Seventy-nine sites were sampled and the mitochondrial 16S rDNA gene of B. mandrillaris was amplified and sequenced to confirm the presence of the amoeba. One isolate of B. mandrillaris was recovered from soil from mineral spring which hosts an informal therapeutic mud bath business. Although B. mandrillaris is less frequently isolated from soil than other free-living amoebae, rubbing mud containing the organism onto the skin increases the likelihood of exposure and infection. This first report on the isolation of B. mandrillaris in the Caribbean and its presence in soil where human contact is likely warrants further investigation using serological methods to elucidate exposure patterns.

  18. Mephedrone ("bath salt") pharmacology: insights from invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ramoz, L; Lodi, S; Bhatt, P; Reitz, A B; Tallarida, C; Tallarida, R J; Raffa, R B; Rawls, S M

    2012-04-19

    Psychoactive bath salts (also called meph, drone, meow meow, m-CAT, bounce, bubbles, mad cow, etc.) contain a substance called mephedrone (4-methylcathinone) that may share psychostimulant properties with amphetamine and cocaine. However, there are only limited studies of the neuropharmacological profile of mephedrone. The present study used an established invertebrate (planarian) assay to test the hypothesis that acute and repeated mephedrone exposure produces psychostimulant-like behavioral effects. Acute mephedrone administration (50-1000 μM) produced stereotyped movements that were attenuated by a dopamine receptor antagonist (SCH 23390) (0.3 μM). Spontaneous discontinuation of mephedrone exposure (1, 10 μM) (60 min) resulted in an abstinence-induced withdrawal response (i.e. reduced motility). In place conditioning experiments, planarians in which mephedrone (100, 500 μM) was paired with the non-preferred environment during conditioning displayed a shift in preference upon subsequent testing. These results suggest that mephedrone produces three behavioral effects associated with psychostimulant drugs, namely dopamine-sensitive stereotyped movements, abstinence-induced withdrawal, and environmental place conditioning.

  19. Bath for electrolytic reduction of alumina and method therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-11-26

    An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises a molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: (a) AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and (b) about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound may be, for example, a fluoride, oxide, or carbonate. The metal can be nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath can be employed in a combination that includes a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the bath of the present invention during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum can improve the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode. Removing sulfur from the bath can also minimize cathode deposits. Aluminum formed on the cathode can be removed directly from the cathode.

  20. Electrochemical studies of zinc nickel codeposition in sulphate bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Krisha, Mortaga M.

    2005-11-01

    The electrodeposition of Zn-Ni alloys from a sulphate bath was studied under different conditions. The bath had the composition 0.40 M sodium sulphate, 0.01 M sulphuric acid, 0.16 M boric acid, 0.20 M zinc sulphate and 0.20 M nickel sulphate. It is found that the plating bath temperature has a great effect on the cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic measurements during electrodeposition, and consequently linear polarization resistance for corrosion study and the alloy composition. Under the examined conditions, the electrodeposition of the alloys was of anomalous type. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the alloys consisted of the δ-phase (Ni 3Zn 22) or a mixture of the two phases δ and γ (Ni 5Zn 21). The comparison between Ni deposition and Zn-Ni codeposition revealed that the remarkable inhibition of Ni deposition takes place due to the presence of Zn 2+ in the plating bath. The Ni deposition starts at -0.85 V in the bath of Ni deposition only, but the deposition starts at more negative potentials in the codeposition bath although the concentration of Ni 2+ is the same in the both baths.

  1. Effect of bathing on atopic dermatitis during the summer season

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hakyoung; Ban, Jeongsuk; Park, Mi-Ran; Kim, Do-Soo; Kim, Hye-Young; Han, Youngshin; Ahn, Kangmo

    2012-01-01

    Background There are little objective data regarding the optimal practice methods of bathing, although bathing and the use of moisturizers are the most important facets to atopic dermatitis (AD) management. Objective We performed this study to evaluate the effect of bathing on AD. Methods Ninety-six children with AD were enrolled during the summer season. Parents were educated to bathe them once daily with mildly acidic cleansers, and to apply emollients for 14 days. Parents recorded the frequency of bathing and skin symptoms in a diary. Scoring AD (SCORAD) scores were measured at the initial and follow-up visits. Patients were divided into two groups, based on the compliance of bathing; poor compliance was defined as ≥ 2 bathless days. Results There was an improvement of SCORAD score, itching, and insomnia in the good compliance group (all p < 0.001). The mean change in SCORAD score from the baseline at the follow-up visit was greater in the good compliance group than the poor compliance group (p = 0.038). Conclusion Daily bathing using weakly acidic syndets can reduce skin symptoms of pediatric AD during the summer season. PMID:23130333

  2. Effect of light-dark cycles on hydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production by a photoheterotrophic culture and Rhodobacter capsulatus using a dark fermentation effluent as substrate.

    PubMed

    Montiel Corona, Virginia; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Revah, Sergio; Morales, Marcia

    2017-02-01

    A Rhodobacter capsulatus strain and a photoheterotrophic culture (IZT) were cultivated to produce hydrogen under different light-dark cycles. A dark fermentation effluent (DFE) was used as substrate. It was found that IZT culture had an average cumulative hydrogen production (Paccum H2) of 1300±43mLH2L(-1) under continuous illumination and light-dark cycles of 30 or 60min. In contrast, R. capsulatus reduced its Paccum H2 by 20% under 30:30min light-dark cycles, but tripled its poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) content (308±2mgPHB gdw(-1)) compared to continuous illumination. The highest PHB content by IZT culture was 178±10mgPHB gdw(-1) under 15:15min light-dark cycles. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that the IZT culture was mainly composed of Rhodopseudomonas palustris identified with high nucleotide similarity (99%). The evaluated cultures might be used for hydrogen and PHB production. They might provide energy savings by using light-dark cycles and DFE valorization.

  3. Cooperation between two periplasmic copper chaperones is required for full activity of the cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase and copper homeostasis in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    DOE PAGES

    Trasnea, Petru -Iulian; Utz, Marcel; Khalfaoui-Hassani, Bahia; ...

    2016-02-28

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient that functions as a cofactor in several important enzymes, like respiratory heme-copper oxygen reductases. Yet, Cu is also toxic and therefore cells engage a highly coordinated Cu uptake and delivery system to prevent the accumulation of toxic Cu concentrations. In the current work we analyzed Cu delivery to the cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase (cbb3-Cox) of Rhodobacter capsulatus. We identified the PCuAC-like periplasmic chaperone PccA and analyzed its contribution to cbb3-Cox assembly. Our data demonstrate that PccA is a Cu-binding protein with a preference for Cu(I), which is required for efficient cbb3-Cox assembly, in particularmore » at low Cu concentrations. By using in vivo and in vitro crosslinking we show that PccA forms a complex with the Sco1-homologue SenC. This complex is stabilized in the absence of the cbb3-Cox specific assembly factors CcoGHIS. In cells lacking SenC, the cytoplasmic Cu content is significantly increased, but the simultaneous absence of PccA prevents this Cu accumulation. Lastly, these data demonstrate that the interplay between PccA and SenC is not only required for Cu delivery during cbb3-Cox assembly, but that it also regulates Cu homeostasis in R. capsulatus.« less

  4. Synergistic dark and photo-fermentation continuous system for hydrogen production from molasses by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Fatthy Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated synergistic dark and photo-fermentation using continuous fermentation system (CFS). The system relies on connecting several fermenters from bottom of one to top culture level of the next in a manner that allows for delaying movement of the substrate and thus for its full consumption. While H2 was collected, CFS allowed for moving liquid byproducts toward the outlet and hence continuous productivity. CFS could be efficiently used for: (1) Continuous dark and photo-fermentation H2 production by Clostridium acetobutylicum and Rhodobacter capsulatus producing 5.65moleH2mole(-1) hexose; (2) Continuous dark-fermentation synergistic H2, acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) production by C. acetobutylicum which produced per mole hexose, 2.43mol H2 along with 73.08g ABE (3) Continuous H2 and methane production by C. acetobutylicum and bacterial sludge producing, per mole hexose, 1.64mol pure H2 and 2.56mol CH4 mixed with 0.37mol H2·The hydraulic retention time (HRT) for whole system was short where organic acids produced in dark-fermentation in first fermenter were synergistically utilized for H2 production by R. capsulatus in subsequent fermenters. CFS is suitable for fast-digestible sugars but not lignocelluloses or other hard-digestible organics, requiring prolonged HRT, unless such polymeric organics were hydrolyzed prior to fermentation.

  5. The ccoNOQP gene cluster codes for a cb-type cytochrome oxidase that functions in aerobic respiration of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Thöny-Meyer, L; Beck, C; Preisig, O; Hennecke, H

    1994-11-01

    The genes for a new type of a haem-copper cytochrome oxidase were cloned from Rhodobacter capsulatus strain 37b4, using the Bradyrhizobium japonicum fixNOQP gene region as a hybridizing probe. Four genes, probably organized in an operon (ccoNOQP), were identified; their products share extensive amino acid sequence similarity with the FixN, O, Q and P proteins that have recently been shown to be the subunits of a cb-type oxidase. CcoN is a b-type cytochrome, CcoO and CcoP are membrane-bound mono- and dihaem c-type cytochromes and CcoQ is a small membrane protein of unknown function. Genes for a similar oxidase are also present in other non-rhizobial bacterial species such as Azotobacter vinelandii, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as revealed by polymerase chain reaction analysis. A ccoN mutant was constructed whose phenotype, in combination with the structural information on the gene products, provides evidence that the CcoNOQP oxidase is a cytochrome c oxidase of the cb type, which supports aerobic respiration in R. capsulatus and which is probably identical to the cbb3-type oxidase that was recently purified from a different strain of the same species. Mutant analysis also showed that this oxidase has no influence on photosynthetic growth and nitrogen-fixation activity.

  6. Bath additives for the treatment of childhood eczema (BATHE): protocol for multicentre parallel group randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Santer, Miriam; Rumsby, Kate; Ridd, Matthew J; Francis, Nick A; Stuart, Beth; Chorozoglou, Maria; Wood, Wendy; Roberts, Amanda; Thomas, Kim S; Williams, Hywel C; Little, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bath emollients are widely prescribed for childhood eczema, yet evidence of their benefits over direct application of emollients is lacking. Objectives To determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of adding bath emollient to the standard management of eczema in children Methods and analysis Design: Pragmatic open 2-armed parallel group randomised controlled trial. Setting: General practitioner (GP) practices in England and Wales. Participants: Children aged over 12 months and less than 12 years with eczema, excluding inactive or very mild eczema (5 or less on Nottingham Eczema Severity Scale). Interventions: Children will be randomised to either bath emollients plus standard eczema care or standard eczema care only. Outcome measures: Primary outcome is long-term eczema severity, measured by the Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) repeated weekly for 16 weeks. Secondary outcomes include: number of eczema exacerbations resulting in healthcare consultations over 1 year; eczema severity over 1 year; disease-specific and generic quality of life; medication use and healthcare resource use; cost-effectiveness. Aiming to detect a mean difference between groups of 2.0 (SD 7.0) in weekly POEM scores over 16 weeks (significance 0.05, power 0.9), allowing for 20% loss to follow-up, gives a total sample size of 423 children. We will use repeated measures analysis of covariance, or a mixed model, to analyse weekly POEM scores. We will control for possible confounders, including baseline eczema severity and child's age. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be carried out from a National Health Service (NHS) perspective. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved by Newcastle and North Tyneside 1 NRES committee 14/NE/0098. Follow-up will be completed in 2017. Findings will be disseminated to participants and carers, the public, dermatology and primary care journals, guideline developers and decision-makers. Trial registration number ISRCTN

  7. Quantum Spin Baths Induced Transition of Decoherence and Entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Pochung; Lai Chengyan; Hung, J.-T.; Mou Chungyu

    2008-11-07

    We investigate the reduced dynamics of single or two qubits coupled to an interacting quantum spin bath modeled by a XXZ spin chain. By using the method of time-dependent density matrix renormalization group (t-DMRG), we evaluate nonperturbatively the induced decoherence and entanglement. We find that the behavior of both decoherence and entanglement strongly depend on the phase of the underlying spin bath. We show that spin baths can induce entanglement for an initially disentangled pair of qubits. We observe that entanglement sudden death only occurs in paramagnetic phase and discuss the effect of the coupling range.

  8. 1. NORTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHWEST SIDE (SPRING HOUSE IN FOREGROUND; BATH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHWEST SIDE (SPRING HOUSE IN FOREGROUND; BATH HOUSE AT REAR) (4 x 5 negative; 5 x 7 print) - Salt Sulphur Springs, Spring House, U.S. Route 219, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  9. Self-replaceable thermocouple for molten steel bath - A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blau, P.; Zellner, G.

    1971-01-01

    Thermocouple wires, consisting of tungsten-rhenium alloy protected by ablative ceramic coating, are wound on a reel and fed continuously into bath. Tests indicate accuracy and reliability are comparable to conventional devices.

  10. Quantum kicked harmonic oscillator in contact with a heat bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado Reynoso, M. Á.; López Vázquez, P. C.; Gorin, T.

    2017-02-01

    We consider the quantum harmonic oscillator in contact with a finite-temperature bath, modeled by the Caldeira-Leggett master equation. Applying periodic kicks to the oscillator, we study the system in different dynamical regimes between classical integrability and chaos, on the one hand, and ballistic or diffusive energy absorption, on the other. We then investigate the influence of the heat bath on the oscillator in each case. Phase-space techniques allow us to simulate the evolution of the system efficiently. In this way, we calculate high-resolution Wigner functions at long times, where the system approaches a quasistationary cyclic evolution. Thereby, we perform an accurate study of the thermodynamic properties of a nonintegrable, quantum chaotic system in contact with a heat bath at finite temperature. In particular, we find that the heat transfer between harmonic oscillator and heat bath is governed by Fourier's law.

  11. 16 CFR 1215.2 - Requirements for infant bath seats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Specification for Infant Bath Seats, approved September 1, 2011. The Director of the Federal Register approves the incorporation by reference listed in this section in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR...

  12. Noises of spin baths for qubits in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihui; Das, Anirban; Lidar, Daniel; Takahashi, Susumu

    2012-02-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a promising qubit candidate for quantum information processing and high precision magnetometry and is an excellent platform for studying quantum spin dynamics [1,2]. Overcoming spin decoherence of NV centers is critical to the applications. Coupling to spin baths of paramagnetic impurities and nuclei is a major decoherence source for NV centers. Therefore, recent theoretical and experimental efforts have aimed at suppressing the bath noises. In this presentation, we will discuss effects of the spin baths on the qubits at different regimes including high magnetic fields where the degree of the electron spin polarization is almost complete [3]. We will also discuss dynamical decoupling sequences to investigate spin bath noises. [4pt] [1] R. Hanson et al., Science. 320, 352 (2008). [0pt] [2] G. de Lange et al., Science. 330, 60 (2010) [0pt] [3] S. Takahashi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.101, 047601 (2008)

  13. WORKER REMOVING SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL BATH IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WORKER REMOVING SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL BATH IN THE ELECTRIC FURNACE AFTER ADDING A CHEMICAL COAGULANT TO FORCE IT TO THE SURFACE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Melting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  14. Interior view of hall to bath 1 showing typical doors ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of hall to bath 1 showing typical doors and attic scuttle, facing east. - Albrook Air Force Station, Field Officer's Quarters, West side of Dargue Avenue Circle, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  15. Interior view of bath 1 showing original tub and shower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of bath 1 showing original tub and shower stall, facing southwest. - Albrook Air Force Station, Field Officer's Quarters, West side of Dargue Avenue Circle, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  16. 14. STEAM CABINETS & SITZ BATH IN STEAM ROOM. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. STEAM CABINETS & SITZ BATH IN STEAM ROOM. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Fordyce Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  17. 11. GENERAL VIEW OF MEN'S BATH HALL. Hot Springs ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. GENERAL VIEW OF MEN'S BATH HALL. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Fordyce Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  18. 6. HUBBARD TUB, SHOWING WHIRLPOOL MOTOR OUTSIDE BATH STALL. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. HUBBARD TUB, SHOWING WHIRLPOOL MOTOR OUTSIDE BATH STALL. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Quapaw Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  19. 8. HUBBARD TUB IN MEN'S BATH HALL. Hot Springs ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. HUBBARD TUB IN MEN'S BATH HALL. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Buckstaff Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 Mile North of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  20. 9. VAPOR STALL IN MEN'S BATH HALL. Hot Springs ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VAPOR STALL IN MEN'S BATH HALL. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Buckstaff Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 Mile North of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  1. INTERIOR GUEST BATH, LOOKING NORTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR GUEST BATH, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  2. Interior view of groundfloor servants bath showing original casement windows, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of ground-floor servants bath showing original casement windows, shower stall, and pipes at ceiling, facing southeast. - Albrook Air Force Station, Field Officer's Quarters, West side of Dargue Avenue Circle, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  3. Interior view of bath room 05 with original toilet stall, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of bath room 0-5 with original toilet stall, marble surround, and urinal, facing west. - Marine Barracks, Panama Canal, Barracks Building, 100' North of Thatcher Highway, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  4. Implementation of the European Union's Bathing Water Directive in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yukseler, Hande; Girgin, Serkan; Yetis, Ulku; Valatka, Simonas; Semeniene, Daiva; Kerestecioglu, Merih; Jacobsen, Michael

    2009-06-01

    The European Union (EU) Bathing Water Directive (2006/7/EC) sets out standards for designated bathing waters which should be complied with by all Member States. Turkey, being a candidate country to the EU, requires heavy-cost investments in achieving approximation with the EU Environmental Acquis. This paper provides a description of the technical measures and investment and operational cost assessment related to the implementation of the Bathing Water Directive in Turkey. Bathing waters are defined as "all running or still freshwaters or parts thereof and seawater, in which bathing is explicitly authorized by the competent authorities, or bathing is not prohibited and is traditionally practiced by a large number of bathers". Since there is no complete registration of bathing waters in Turkey, this study has targeted all coastal agglomerations and designated these as in proximity to "highly-touristic" and "other" agglomerations including the agglomerations in the proximity of six lakes that are popularly used as bathing waters. For each of these agglomerations an assessment of the existing infrastructure has been made. In defining the infrastructural need, two scenarios have been developed. According to Scenario 1, only highly-touristic and touristic places are to receive investment. The suggested further treatment was "disinfection+sea outfall" and "sea-outfall", for highly-touristic and touristic agglomerations, respectively. In Scenario 2, other coastal agglomerations and all freshwater lakes were also included and disinfection has been proposed for these settlements. It appears that the total investment is at around 12.6 million Euros for Scenario 1 and increases to 21.8 million Euros for Scenario 2; whereas the annual operational and maintenance costs are about 0.5 and 0.8 million Euros for Scenarios 1 and 2, respectively.

  5. [Contrast baths in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Rychkova, M A; Aĭrapetova, N S; Davydova, O B; Krivtsova, I E; Doronina, Iu V; Derevnina, N A

    1994-01-01

    Chronic bronchitis with obstructive syndrome was treated in 91 patients with contrast baths. The latter produced good results in 80.3% of the patients. This treatment is analysed as to clinical efficacy, the effect on the external respiration, right heart hemodynamics, inflammation activity, changes in immunity system. Principal contraindications are defined. A differential approach to contrast baths in chronic bronchitis after treatment is advocated.

  6. Thermal bath of Dirac field in non-inertial frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Anwei

    2016-07-01

    The properties of inertial Dirac thermal bath viewed from the perspective of a uniformly accelerated observer is investigated. Using the single-mode approximation, we obtain the expression of the thermal reduced density matrix, which is constructed by the effective partition function in another way compared with the case of scalar field. We deduce the spectrum of particles and antiparticles seen by Rob and antiRob, respectively. It is found that the fermionic thermal bath will suppress the appearance of Unruh particles.

  7. Effect of stone Spa bathing and hot-spring bathing on pulse wave velocity in healthy, late middle-aged females.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Ikuharu; Izumi, Yurina; Inoue, Miyabi; Okada, Kanako; Sakaguchi, Kaho; Miyai, Natsuki

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of stone spa bathing (Ganban-yoku) and hot-spring bathing on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in healthy, late middle-aged females. The subjects were 13 females (mean age, 47.3 years). The skin and tympanic temperatures, blood pressure, and baPWV were measured before and after stone spa bathing and hot-spring bathing. For the stone spa bathing, the subjects lay down three times for approximately 10 min each time over warm stone beds. Although body weight showed no change after the hot-spring bathing, it significantly increased after the stone spa bathing. The increase was significantly related to the amount of water intake. The skin and tympanic temperatures increased to a smaller degree after the stone spa bathing than after the hot-spring bathing. The diastolic blood pressure decreased to a smaller degree after the stone spa bathing. BaPWV showed no significant change after bathing both in the stone spa and in the hot-spring. The results of multiple regression analysis showed that the factors significantly related to the change in baPWV after the stone spa bathing were the changes in skin and tympanic temperatures and habit of smoking, and that after the hot-spring bathing was the change in skin temperature. The results suggest that, compared with the hot-spring bathing, stone spa bathing causes less strain on the body. The stone spa bathing and hot-spring bathing showed no marked effect on baPWV. However, there is a possibility that the stone spa bathing may be used as a load for investigating arterial stiffness.

  8. Bath for electrolytic reduction of alumina and method therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2001-07-10

    An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises a molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: (a) AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and (b) about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound may be, for example, a fluoride, oxide, or carbonate. The metal can be nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath can be employed in a combination that includes a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the bath of the present invention during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum can improve the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode.

  9. Coherence of mechanical oscillators mediated by coupling to different baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanovsky, Daniel; Jasnow, David

    2017-07-01

    We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of two mechanical oscillators with general linear couplings to two uncorrelated thermal baths at temperatures T1 and T2, respectively. We obtain the complete solution of the Heisenberg-Langevin equations, which reveal a coherent mixing among the normal modes of the oscillators as a consequence of their off-diagonal couplings to the baths. Unique renormalization aspects resulting from this mixing are discussed. Diagonal and off-diagonal (coherence) correlation functions are obtained analytically in the case of strictly Ohmic baths with different couplings in the strong- and weak-coupling regimes. An asymptotic nonequilibrium stationary state emerges for which we obtain the complete expressions for the correlations and coherence. Remarkably, the coherence survives in the high-temperature, classical limit for T1≠T2 . This is a consequence of the coherence being determined by the difference of the bath correlation functions. In the case of vanishing detuning between the oscillator normal modes both coupling to one and the same bath, the coherence retains memory of the initial conditions at long times. An out-of-equilibrium setup with small detuning and large | T1-T2| produces nonvanishing steady-state coherence in the high-temperature limit of the baths.

  10. Effect of hyperthermic water bath on parameters of cellular immunity.

    PubMed

    Blazícková, S; Rovenský, J; Koska, J; Vigas, M

    2000-01-01

    Effects of hyperthermic water bath on selected immune parameters (lymphocyte subpopulations, natural killer (NK) cell counts and their activity) were studied in a group of 10 volunteers. Application of hyperthermic water bath (both topical and whole-body) was followed by a significant reduction of relative B lymphocyte counts. Whole-body hyperthermic water bath reduced relative total T lymphocyte counts, increased relative CD8+ T lymphocyte and NK cell counts and increased NK activity. Whole-body hyperthermic bath increased somatotropic hormone (STH) activity in eight out of 10 volunteers; higher relative counts of CD8+ lymphocytes and NK cells were observed compared with the group of volunteers not responding to hyperthermic water bath by STH secretion. In five volunteers STH was released in response to local hyperthermic water bath and the NK activity of lymphocytes also increased but their relative counts did not. The results suggest that these increases in CD8+ lymphocyte and NK cell counts are probably dependent on increased STH production.

  11. ELECTRODIALYSIS AS A TECHNIQUE FOR EXTENDING ELECTROLESS NICKEL BATH LIFE-IMPROVING SELECTIVITY AND REDUCING LOSSES OF VALUABLE BATH COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last decade electrodialysis has emerged as an effective technique for removing accumulated reactant counterions (sodium and sulfate) and reaction products (orthophosphite) that interfere with the electroless nickel plating process, thus extending bath life by up to 50 me...

  12. ELECTRODIALYSIS AS A TECHNIQUE FOR EXTENDING ELECTROLESS NICKEL BATH LIFE-IMPROVING SELECTIVITY AND REDUCING LOSSES OF VALUABLE BATH COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last decade electrodialysis has emerged as an effective technique for removing accumulated reactant counterions (sodium and sulfate) and reaction products (orthophosphite) that interfere with the electroless nickel plating process, thus extending bath life by up to 50 me...

  13. Bath additives for the treatment of childhood eczema (BATHE): protocol for multicentre parallel group randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Santer, Miriam; Rumsby, Kate; Ridd, Matthew J; Francis, Nick A; Stuart, Beth; Chorozoglou, Maria; Wood, Wendy; Roberts, Amanda; Thomas, Kim S; Williams, Hywel C; Little, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Bath emollients are widely prescribed for childhood eczema, yet evidence of their benefits over direct application of emollients is lacking. Objectives To determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of adding bath emollient to the standard management of eczema in children Pragmatic open 2-armed parallel group randomised controlled trial. General practitioner (GP) practices in England and Wales. Children aged over 12 months and less than 12 years with eczema, excluding inactive or very mild eczema (5 or less on Nottingham Eczema Severity Scale). Children will be randomised to either bath emollients plus standard eczema care or standard eczema care only. Primary outcome is long-term eczema severity, measured by the Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) repeated weekly for 16 weeks. Secondary outcomes include: number of eczema exacerbations resulting in healthcare consultations over 1 year; eczema severity over 1 year; disease-specific and generic quality of life; medication use and healthcare resource use; cost-effectiveness. Aiming to detect a mean difference between groups of 2.0 (SD 7.0) in weekly POEM scores over 16 weeks (significance 0.05, power 0.9), allowing for 20% loss to follow-up, gives a total sample size of 423 children. We will use repeated measures analysis of covariance, or a mixed model, to analyse weekly POEM scores. We will control for possible confounders, including baseline eczema severity and child's age. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be carried out from a National Health Service (NHS) perspective. This protocol was approved by Newcastle and North Tyneside 1 NRES committee 14/NE/0098. Follow-up will be completed in 2017. Findings will be disseminated to participants and carers, the public, dermatology and primary care journals, guideline developers and decision-makers. ISRCTN84102309. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Characterization of Rhodobacter capsulatus genes encoding a molybdenum transport system and putative molybdenum-pterin-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G; Angermüller, S; Klipp, W

    1993-01-01

    The alternative, heterometal-free nitrogenase of Rhodobacter capsulatus is repressed by traces of molybdenum in the medium. Strains carrying mutations located downstream of nifB copy II were able to express the alternative nitrogenase even in the presence of high molybdate concentrations. DNA sequence analysis of a 5.5-kb fragment of this region revealed six open reading frames, designated modABCD, mopA, and mopB. The gene products of modB and modC are homologous to ChlJ and ChlD of Escherichia coli and represent an integral membrane protein and an ATP-binding protein typical of high-affinity transport systems, respectively. ModA and ModD exhibited no homology to known proteins, but a leader peptide characteristic of proteins cleaved during export to the periplasm is present in ModA, indicating that ModA might be a periplasmic molybdate-binding protein. The MopA and MopB proteins showed a high degree of amino acid sequence homology to each other. Both proteins contained a tandem repeat of a domain encompassing 70 amino acid residues, which had significant sequence similarity to low-molecular-weight molybdenum-pterin-binding proteins from Clostridium pasteurianum. Compared with that for the parental nifHDK deletion strain, the molybdenum concentrations necessary to repress the alternative nitrogenase were increased 4-fold in a modD mutant and 500-fold in modA, modB, and modC mutants. No significant inhibition of the heterometal-free nitrogenase by molybdate was observed for mopA mopB double mutants. The uptake of molybdenum by mod and mop mutants was estimated by measuring the activity of the conventional molybdenum-containing nitrogenase. Molybdenum transport was not affected in a mopA mopB double mutant, whereas strains carrying lesions in the binding-protein-dependent transport system were impaired in molybdenum uptake. PMID:8491722

  15. Preventing bath water scalds: a cost-effectiveness analysis of introducing bath thermostatic mixer valves in social housing.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ceri J; Humphreys, Ioan; Kendrick, Denise; Stewart, Jane; Hayes, Mike; Nish, Lesley; Stone, David; Coupland, Carol; Towner, Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of installing thermostatic mixer valves (TMVs) in reducing risks of bath water scalds and estimate the costs of avoiding bath water scalds. The evaluation was undertaken from the perspective of the UK public sector, and conducted in conjunction with a randomised control trial of TMVs installed in social housing in Glasgow. Installation costs were borne by the social housing organisation, while support materials were provided by the UK NHS. Effectiveness was represented by the number of families with at-risk bath water temperatures pre- and post-installation, and the number of bath scalds avoided as a result of installation. Differences in the number of families with at-risk temperatures between groups were derived from the RCT. Cost-effectiveness was assessed and a series of one-way sensitivity analyses were conducted. Unit costs associated with installation were calculated to be £13.68, while costs associated with treating bath water scalds ranged from £25,226 to £71,902. The cost of an avoided bath water scald ranged from net savings to public purse of £1887 to £75,520 and at baseline produced a net saving of £3,229,008; that is, £1.41 saved for every £1 spent. It is very likely that installing TMVs as standard in social housing in new buildings and major refurbishments accompanied by educational information represents value for money.

  16. Hydroxylamine assimilation by Rhodobacter capsulatus E1F1. requirement of the hcp gene (hybrid cluster protein) located in the nitrate assimilation nas gene region for hydroxylamine reduction.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Purificación; Pino, Carmen; Olmo-Mira, M Francisca; Castillo, Francisco; Roldán, M Dolores; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado

    2004-10-29

    Rhodobacter capsulatus E1F1 grows phototrophically with nitrate as nitrogen source. Using primers designed for conserved motifs in bacterial assimilatory nitrate reductases, a 450-bp DNA was amplified by PCR and used for the screening of a genomic library. A cosmid carrying an insert with four SalI fragments of 2.8, 4.1, 4.5, and 5.8 kb was isolated, and DNA sequencing revealed that it contains a nitrate assimilation (nas) gene region, including the hcp gene coding for a hybrid cluster protein (HCP). Expression of hcp is probably regulated by a nitrite-sensitive repressor encoded by the adjacent nsrR gene. A His(6)-HCP was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified. HCP contained about 6 iron and 4 labile sulfide atoms per molecule, in agreement with the presence of both [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-2S-2O] clusters, and showed hydroxylamine reductase activity, forming ammonia in vitro with methyl viologen as reductant. The apparent K(m) values for NH(2)OH and methyl viologen were 1 mM and 7 microM, respectively, at the pH and temperature optima (9.3 and 40 degrees C). The activity was oxygen-sensitive and was inhibited by sulfide and iron reagents. R. capsulatus E1F1 grew phototrophically, but not heterotrophically, with 1 mM NH(2)OH as nitrogen source, and up to 10 mM NH(2)OH was taken up by anaerobic resting cells. Ammonium was transiently accumulated in the media, and its assimilation was prevented by L-methionine-D,L-sulfoximine, a glutamine synthetase inhibitor. In addition, hydroxylamine- or nitrite-grown cells showed the higher hydroxylamine reductase activities. However, R. capsulatus B10S, a strain lacking the whole hcp-nas region, did not grow with 1 mM NH(2)OH. Also, E. coli cells overproducing HCP tolerate hydroxyl-amine better during anaerobic growth. These results suggest that HCP is involved in assimilation of NH(2)OH, a toxic product that could be formed during nitrate assimilation, probably in the nitrite reduction step.

  17. Proteome Profiling of the Rhodobacter capsulatus Molybdenum Response Reveals a Role of IscN in Nitrogen Fixation by Fe-Nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Wagner, Eva; Langklotz, Sina; Pfänder, Yvonne; Hött, Sina; Bandow, Julia E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodobacter capsulatus is capable of synthesizing two nitrogenases, a molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase and an alternative Mo-free iron-only nitrogenase, enabling this diazotroph to grow with molecular dinitrogen (N2) as the sole nitrogen source. Here, the Mo responses of the wild type and of a mutant lacking ModABC, the high-affinity molybdate transporter, were examined by proteome profiling, Western analysis, epitope tagging, and lacZ reporter fusions. Many Mo-controlled proteins identified in this study have documented or presumed roles in nitrogen fixation, demonstrating the relevance of Mo control in this highly ATP-demanding process. The levels of Mo-nitrogenase, NifHDK, and the Mo storage protein, Mop, increased with increasing Mo concentrations. In contrast, Fe-nitrogenase, AnfHDGK, and ModABC, the Mo transporter, were expressed only under Mo-limiting conditions. IscN was identified as a novel Mo-repressed protein. Mo control of Mop, AnfHDGK, and ModABC corresponded to transcriptional regulation of their genes by the Mo-responsive regulators MopA and MopB. Mo control of NifHDK and IscN appeared to be more complex, involving different posttranscriptional mechanisms. In line with the simultaneous control of IscN and Fe-nitrogenase by Mo, IscN was found to be important for Fe-nitrogenase-dependent diazotrophic growth. The possible role of IscN as an A-type carrier providing Fe-nitrogenase with Fe-S clusters is discussed. IMPORTANCE Biological nitrogen fixation is a central process in the global nitrogen cycle by which the abundant but chemically inert dinitrogen (N2) is reduced to ammonia (NH3), a bioavailable form of nitrogen. Nitrogen reduction is catalyzed by nitrogenases found in diazotrophic bacteria and archaea but not in eukaryotes. All diazotrophs synthesize molybdenum-dependent nitrogenases. In addition, some diazotrophs, including Rhodobacter capsulatus, possess catalytically less efficient alternative Mo-free nitrogenases, whose expression

  18. Oxygen uptake and cardiovascular responses in control adults and acute myocardial infarction patients during bathing.

    PubMed

    Winslow, E H; Lane, L D; Gaffney, F A

    1985-01-01

    Physiological responses before, during, and after three types of baths were determined in 18 patients who were 5 to 17 days postinfarction and 22 control adults. In the patients, oxygen consumption (VO2) averaged 6, 7, and 7 ml/kg/min, peak heart rate 105, 108, and 112 beats per minute, and rate pressure product 115, 120, and 111 for basin, tub, and shower bathing, respectively. Oxygen consumption during bathing was less than 3 times resting levels. The patients had a significantly lower VO2 during bathing than the control subjects. The patients' peak heart rates were higher than anticipated for the level of exertion, and sometimes exceeded the target heart rates used in predischarge testing. Peak heart rate and occurrence of dysrhythmia did not differ significantly between the three types of baths. In the women patients, rate pressure product was significantly higher after tub bath than after basin bath or shower. The subjects had no cardiovascular symptoms during bathing, rated all three baths as light exertion, and disliked the basin bath. The data show that the physiologic costs of the three types of baths are similar, differences in responses to bathing seem more a function of subject variability than bath type, and many cardiac patients can take a tub bath or shower earlier in their hospitalization. However, more research is needed to predict patients likely to have an exaggerated response to bathing and to develop clear guidelines for bath method selection and progression.

  19. Prediction of human thermophysiological responses during shower bathing.

    PubMed

    Munir, Abdul; Takada, Satoru; Matsushita, Takayuki; Kubo, Hiroko

    2010-03-01

    This study develops a model to predict the thermophysiological response of the human body during shower bathing. Despite the needs for the quantitative evaluation of human body response during bathing for thermal comfort and safety, the complicated mechanisms of heat transfer at the skin surface, especially during shower bathing, have disturbed the development of adequate models. In this study, an initial modeling approach is proposed by developing a simple heat transfer model at the skin surface during shower bathing applied to Stolwijk's human thermal model. The main feature of the model is the division of the skin surface into three parts: a dry part, a wet part without water flow, and a wet part with water flow. The area ratio of each part is decided by a simple formula developed from a geometrical approach based on the shape of the Stolwijk's human thermal model. At the same time, the convective heat transfer coefficient between the skin and the flowing water is determined experimentally. The proposed model is validated by a comparison with the results of human subject experiments under controlled and free shower conditions. The model predicts the mean skin temperature during shower fairly well both for controlled and free shower bathing styles.

  20. Prediction of human thermophysiological responses during shower bathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, Abdul; Takada, Satoru; Matsushita, Takayuki; Kubo, Hiroko

    2010-03-01

    This study develops a model to predict the thermophysiological response of the human body during shower bathing. Despite the needs for the quantitative evaluation of human body response during bathing for thermal comfort and safety, the complicated mechanisms of heat transfer at the skin surface, especially during shower bathing, have disturbed the development of adequate models. In this study, an initial modeling approach is proposed by developing a simple heat transfer model at the skin surface during shower bathing applied to Stolwijk’s human thermal model. The main feature of the model is the division of the skin surface into three parts: a dry part, a wet part without water flow, and a wet part with water flow. The area ratio of each part is decided by a simple formula developed from a geometrical approach based on the shape of the Stolwijk’s human thermal model. At the same time, the convective heat transfer coefficient between the skin and the flowing water is determined experimentally. The proposed model is validated by a comparison with the results of human subject experiments under controlled and free shower conditions. The model predicts the mean skin temperature during shower fairly well both for controlled and free shower bathing styles.

  1. Dissipative quantum dynamics with the surrogate Hamiltonian approach. A comparison between spin and harmonic baths.

    PubMed

    Gelman, David; Koch, Christiane P; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2004-07-08

    The dissipative quantum dynamics of an anharmonic oscillator coupled to a bath is studied with the purpose of elucidating the differences between the relaxation to a spin bath and to a harmonic bath. Converged results are obtained for the spin bath by the surrogate Hamiltonian approach. This method is based on constructing a system-bath Hamiltonian, with a finite but large number of spin bath modes, that mimics exactly a bath with an infinite number of modes for a finite time interval. Convergence with respect to the number of simultaneous excitations of bath modes can be checked. The results are compared to calculations that include a finite number of harmonic modes carried out by using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method of Nest and Meyer [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 24 (2003)]. In the weak coupling regime, at zero temperature and for small excitations of the primary system, both methods converge to the Markovian limit. When initially the primary system is significantly excited, the spin bath can saturate restricting the energy acceptance. An interaction term between bath modes that spreads the excitation eliminates the saturation. The loss of phase between two cat states has been analyzed and the results for the spin and harmonic baths are almost identical. For stronger couplings, the dynamics induced by the two types of baths deviate. The accumulation and degree of entanglement between the bath modes have been characterized. Only in the spin bath the dynamics generate entanglement between the bath modes.

  2. Dissipative quantum dynamics with the surrogate Hamiltonian approach. A comparison between spin and harmonic baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, David; Koch, Christiane P.; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2004-07-01

    The dissipative quantum dynamics of an anharmonic oscillator coupled to a bath is studied with the purpose of elucidating the differences between the relaxation to a spin bath and to a harmonic bath. Converged results are obtained for the spin bath by the surrogate Hamiltonian approach. This method is based on constructing a system-bath Hamiltonian, with a finite but large number of spin bath modes, that mimics exactly a bath with an infinite number of modes for a finite time interval. Convergence with respect to the number of simultaneous excitations of bath modes can be checked. The results are compared to calculations that include a finite number of harmonic modes carried out by using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method of Nest and Meyer [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 24 (2003)]. In the weak coupling regime, at zero temperature and for small excitations of the primary system, both methods converge to the Markovian limit. When initially the primary system is significantly excited, the spin bath can saturate restricting the energy acceptance. An interaction term between bath modes that spreads the excitation eliminates the saturation. The loss of phase between two cat states has been analyzed and the results for the spin and harmonic baths are almost identical. For stronger couplings, the dynamics induced by the two types of baths deviate. The accumulation and degree of entanglement between the bath modes have been characterized. Only in the spin bath the dynamics generate entanglement between the bath modes.

  3. The puhE gene of Rhodobacter capsulatus is needed for optimal transition from aerobic to photosynthetic growth and encodes a putative negative modulator of bacteriochlorophyll production.

    PubMed

    Aklujkar, Muktak; Prince, Roger C; Beatty, J Thomas

    2005-05-15

    A conserved orf of previously unknown function (herein designated as puhE) is located 3' of the reaction centre H (puhA) gene in purple photosynthetic bacteria, in the order puhABCE in Rhodobacter capsulatus. Disruptions of R. capsulatus puhE resulted in a long lag in the growth of photosynthetic cultures inoculated with cells grown under high aeration, and increased the level of the peripheral antenna, light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2). The amount of the photosynthetic reaction centre (RC) and its core antenna, light-harvesting complex 1 (LH1), was reduced; however, there was no decrease in expression of a lacZ reporter fused to the puf (RC and LH1) promoter, in RC assembly in the absence of LH1, or in LH1 assembly in the absence of the RC. In strains that lack LH2, disruption of puhE increased the in vivo absorption at 780 nm, which we attribute to excess bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl) pigment production. This effect was seen in the presence and absence of PufQ, a protein that stimulates BChl biosynthesis. Expression of puhE from a plasmid reduced A(780) production in puhE mutants. We suggest that PuhE modulates BChl biosynthesis independently of PufQ, and that the presence of excess BChl in PuhE(-)LH2(+) strains results in excess LH2 assembly and also interferes with the adaptation of cells during the transition from aerobic respiratory to anaerobic photosynthetic growth.

  4. Hydrogen production by hup(-) mutant and wild-type strains of Rhodobacter capsulatus from dark fermentation effluent of sugar beet thick juice in batch and continuous photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Uyar, Basar; Gürgan, Muazzez; Özgür, Ebru; Gündüz, Ufuk; Yücel, Meral; Eroglu, Inci

    2015-10-01

    Photofermentative production of hydrogen is a promising and sustainable process; however, it should be coupled to dark fermentation to become cost effective. In order to integrate dark fermentation and photofermentation, the suitability of dark fermenter effluents for the photofermentative hydrogen production must be demonstrated. In this study, thermophilic dark fermenter effluent (DFE) of sugar beet thick juice was used as a substrate in photofermentation process to compare wild-type and uptake hydrogenase-deficient (hup (-)) mutant strains of Rhodobacter capsulatus by means of hydrogen production and biomass growth. The tests were conducted in small-scale (50 mL) batch and large-scale (4 L) continuous photobioreactors in indoor conditions under continuous illumination. In small scale batch conditions, maximum cell concentrations were 0.92 gdcw/L c and 1.50 gdcw/L c, hydrogen yields were 34 % and 31 %, hydrogen productivities were 0.49 mmol/(L c·h) and 0.26 mmol/(Lc·h), for hup (-) and wild-type cells, respectively. In large-scale continuous conditions, maximum cell concentrations were 1.44 gdcw/L c and 1.87 gdcw/L c, hydrogen yields were 48 and 46 %, and hydrogen productivities were 1.01 mmol/(L c·h) and 1.05 mmol/(L c·h), for hup (-) and wild-type cells, respectively. Our results showed that Rhodobacter capsulatus hup (-) cells reached to a lower maximum cell concentration but their hydrogen yield and productivity were in the same range or superior compared to the wild-type cells in both batch and continuous operating modes. The maximum biomass concentration, yield and productivity of hydrogen were higher in continuous mode compared to the batch mode with both bacterial strains.

  5. Variation in composition and relative content of accumulated photopigments in a newly isolated Rhodobacter capsulatus strain XJ-1 in response to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hua Z; Yue, Ying H; Lü, Jiang C; Zhao, Gui C; Yang, Ping S

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to isolate and characterize a new arsenic (As)-tolerant bacterial strain (XJ-1) from the Halosol soil, to evaluate its As tolerance, and to examine the variation in composition and relative content of accumulated photosynthetic pigments in response to As. The experiments were performed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and grayscale intensity image analysis using Gel-Pro analyzer software. Strain XJ-1 was identified as Rhodobacter (R.) capsulatus based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and physiological characteristics. Strain XJ-1 was able to grow when exposed to arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] under anaerobic-light conditions. The median effective concentrations (EC50) of As(III) and As(V) were 0.61 mM and 2.03 mM, respectively. Strain XJ-1 could reduce As(V) to As(III), but As(III) could not be transformed back to As(V) or other organic As compounds. Accumulation of bacteriochlorophylls and carotenoids in strain XJ-1 varied in the presence of 0.2-1.2 mM As(III) and 0-2.5 mM As(V). As exposure resulted in pronounced variation in compositions and contents of photosynthetic pigments, especially hydroxyspheroidene, bacteriophaeophytin, the ratio of tetrahydrogeranylgeranyl to phytylated BChl a, and the ratio of spheroidene to spheroidenone. This research highlights the adaptative response of R. capsulatus strain XJ-1 photosystems to environmental As, and demonstrates the potential of utilizing the sensitivity of its photosynthetic pigments to As(III) and As(V) for the biodetection of As in the environment.

  6. Refinement of the high-resolution physical and genetic map of Rhodobacter capsulatus and genome surveys using blots of the cosmid encyclopedia.

    PubMed Central

    Fonstein, M; Koshy, E G; Nikolskaya, T; Mourachov, P; Haselkorn, R

    1995-01-01

    Cosmids from a library containing Rhodobacter capsulatus DNA fragments were previously ordered in two contigs: one corresponding to the chromosome and one to a 134 kb plasmid. This map contained 40 regions connected only by colony hybridization. To confirm the linkage and correct the map, the actual sizes of the overlaps were determined by blot-hybridization with Rhodobacter chromosomal DNA and by mapping of additional cosmids. Several revisions of the earlier map include single cosmid shifts and inversions. One additional gap in a cosmid contig was also found, raising the possibility that the chromosome is not a contiguous circle. About 2500 additional EcoRI,BamHI and HindIII restriction sites were added to the 560 EcoRV sites previously mapped onto the Rhodobacter chromosome, increasing the resolution of the physical map to the size of individual genes. Twenty-five new markers were located on the genetic map. The 48 markers now mapped represent nearly 300 genes and ORFs cloned from different species of Rhodobacter. The orientation of transcription of the four rrn operons was established using 16S rRNA- and 23S rRNA-specific probes and digestion with the rare-cutting enzyme, CeuI. Gel blots of 192 cosmids of the miniset of R.capsulatus digested with EcoRV were prepared. Such a hybridization template represents the whole genome cut into 560 DNA fragments varying in size from 0.4 to 25 kb. This template was used for high-resolution mapping of single genes, analysis of total genomic DNAs from related Rhodobacter strains and differentially expressed RNAs. Images PMID:7737133

  7. High-level soluble expression of the hemA gene from Rhodobacter capsulatus and comparative study of its enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jia-wei; Zhu, Li; Wu, Mian-bin; Yang, Li-rong; Lin, Jian-ping; Cen, Pei-lin

    2014-05-01

    The Rhodobacter capsulatus hemA gene, which encodes 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS), was expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) and the enzymatic properties of the purified recombinant ALAS (RC-ALAS) were studied. Compared with ALASs encoded by hemA genes from Agrobacterium radiobacter (AR-ALAS) and Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RS-ALAS), the specific activity of RC-ALAS reached 198.2 U/mg, which was about 31.2% and 69.5% higher than those of AR-ALAS (151.1 U/mg) and RS-ALAS (116.9 U/mg), respectively. The optimum pH values and temperatures of the three above mentioned enzymes were all pH 7.5 and 37 °C, respectively. Moreover, RC-ALAS was more sensitive to pH, while the other two were sensitive to temperature. The effects of metals, ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the three ALASs were also investigated. The results indicate that they had the same effects on the activities of the three ALASs. SDS and metal ions such as Co(2+), Zn(2+), and Cu(2+) strongly inhibited the activities of the ALASs, while Mn(2+) exerted slight inhibition, and K(+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Mg(2+), or EDTA had no significant effect. The specificity constant of succinyl coenzyme A [(kcat/Km)(S-CoA)] of RC-ALAS was 1.4989, which was higher than those of AR-ALAS (0.7456) and RS-ALAS (1.1699), showing its high catalytic efficiency. The fed-batch fermentation was conducted using the recombinant strain containing the R. capsulatus hemA gene, and the yield of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) achieved was 8.8 g/L (67 mmol/L) under the appropriate conditions.

  8. Analyses of Methanobactin, a Novel Copper-Binding Compound, or Chalkophore, from Methanotrophs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semrau, J. D.; Yoon, S.; Dispirito, A.; Kraemer, S.

    2009-12-01

    Methanotrophs, cells that utilize methane as their sole carbon and energy source are known to have high requirements for copper. Many of these cells are known to synthesize a copper-chelating agent, or chalkophore, termed methanobactin that appears integral to copper uptake. Structural analyses indicate that methanobactin is a small chromopeptide that binds copper utilizing two alkylidene oxazolone rings. Using a suite of spectrophotemetric and calorimetry analyses, it was discovered that methanobactin preferentially binds copper, but also binds other metals, including gold, forming gold nanoparticles. To screen methanobactin production by methanotrophs, as well as to determine if other cells make chalkophores, a plate assay developed from the Chromo Azurol S (CAS) assay for siderophore production, was modified. In the standard CAS assay, a color change in CAS plate is observed as iron (III) ion weakly bound to CAS is taken up by siderophores. In our modified assay, iron (III) chloride of the initial CAS solution was substituted with copper(II) chloride. Assay results indicated that of the four tested methanotrophs (Methylomicrobium album BG8, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath, and Methylocystis parvus OBBP), only M. album BG8, M. trichosporium OB3b, and M. capsulatus produced methanobactin, while M. parvus OBBP did not. The assay can be easily adopted for detection of chalkophores in other microorganisms and detection as well as for screening of putative mutants of chalkophore synthesis.

  9. Discovery, taxonomic distribution, and phenotypic characterization of a gene required for 3-methylhopanoid production.

    PubMed

    Welander, Paula V; Summons, Roger E

    2012-08-07

    Hopanoids methylated at the C-3 position are a subset of bacterial triterpenoids that are readily preserved in modern and ancient sediments and in petroleum. The production of 3-methylhopanoids by extant aerobic methanotrophs and their common occurrence in modern and fossil methane seep communities, in conjunction with carbon isotope analysis, has led to their use as biomarker proxies for aerobic methanotrophy. In addition, these lipids are also produced by aerobic acetic acid bacteria and, lacking carbon isotope analysis, are more generally used as indicators for aerobiosis in ancient ecosystems. However, recent genetic studies have brought into question our current understanding of the taxonomic diversity of methylhopanoid-producing bacteria and have highlighted that a proper interpretation of methylhopanes in the rock record requires a deeper understanding of their cellular function. In this study, we identified and deleted a gene, hpnR, required for methylation of hopanoids at the C-3 position in the obligate methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus strain Bath. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the taxonomic distribution of HpnR extends beyond methanotrophic and acetic acid bacteria. Phenotypic analysis of the M. capsulatus hpnR deletion mutant demonstrated a potential physiological role for 3-methylhopanoids; they appear to be required for the maintenance of intracytoplasmic membranes and cell survival in late stationary phase. Therefore, 3-methylhopanoids may prove more useful as proxies for specific environmental conditions encountered during stationary phase rather than a particular bacterial group.

  10. Bath emollients for atopic eczema: why use them?

    PubMed

    2007-10-01

    Emollient preparations play a central role in the treatment of people with dry skin associated with conditions such as atopic eczema.1,2 As well as being advised to apply emollient creams or ointments directly to the skin, people with atopic eczema are commonly prescribed bath emollients.3 Each year, the NHS spends over pound16million on bath emollients (at an average cost of pound6.29 per item).4 This represents 38% of the total cost of treatments prescribed for preschool children with eczema, matching the proportion spent on emollients for application directly to the skin.5 What clinical contribution do bath emollients make in the treatment of people with atopic eczema?

  11. Analysis methods for meso- and macroporous silicon etching baths

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Analysis methods for electrochemical etching baths consisting of various concentrations of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and an additional organic surface wetting agent are presented. These electrolytes are used for the formation of meso- and macroporous silicon. Monitoring the etching bath composition requires at least one method each for the determination of the HF concentration and the organic content of the bath. However, it is a precondition that the analysis equipment withstands the aggressive HF. Titration and a fluoride ion-selective electrode are used for the determination of the HF and a cuvette test method for the analysis of the organic content, respectively. The most suitable analysis method is identified depending on the components in the electrolyte with the focus on capability of resistance against the aggressive HF. PMID:22805742

  12. Thermal diode utilizing asymmetric contacts to heat baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Teruhisa S.; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2010-01-01

    We propose a simple thermal diode passively acting as a rectifier of heat current. The key design of the diode is the size asymmetry of the areas in contact with two distinct heat baths. The heat-conducting medium is liquid, inside of which gaslike regions are induced depending on the applied conditions. Simulating nanoscale systems of this diode, the rectification of heat current is demonstrated. If the packing density of the medium and the working regime of temperature are properly chosen, the heat current is effectively cut off when the heat bath with narrow contact is hotter, but it flows normally under opposite temperature conditions. In the former case, the gaslike region is induced in the system and it acts as a thermal insulator because it covers the entire narrow area of contact with the bath.

  13. Reduced quantum dynamics with arbitrary bath spectral densities: Hierarchical equations of motion based on several different bath decomposition schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hao; Zhu, Lili; Bai, Shuming; Shi, Qiang

    2014-04-07

    We investigated applications of the hierarchical equation of motion (HEOM) method to perform high order perturbation calculations of reduced quantum dynamics for a harmonic bath with arbitrary spectral densities. Three different schemes are used to decompose the bath spectral density into analytical forms that are suitable to the HEOM treatment: (1) The multiple Lorentzian mode model that can be obtained by numerically fitting the model spectral density. (2) The combined Debye and oscillatory Debye modes model that can be constructed by fitting the corresponding classical bath correlation function. (3) A new method that uses undamped harmonic oscillator modes explicitly in the HEOM formalism. Methods to extract system-bath correlations were investigated for the above bath decomposition schemes. We also show that HEOM in the undamped harmonic oscillator modes can give detailed information on the partial Wigner transform of the total density operator. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations of the spin-Boson dynamics and the absorption line shape of molecular dimers show that the HEOM formalism for high order perturbations can serve as an important tool in studying the quantum dissipative dynamics in the intermediate coupling regime.

  14. Reduced quantum dynamics with arbitrary bath spectral densities: hierarchical equations of motion based on several different bath decomposition schemes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Zhu, Lili; Bai, Shuming; Shi, Qiang

    2014-04-07

    We investigated applications of the hierarchical equation of motion (HEOM) method to perform high order perturbation calculations of reduced quantum dynamics for a harmonic bath with arbitrary spectral densities. Three different schemes are used to decompose the bath spectral density into analytical forms that are suitable to the HEOM treatment: (1) The multiple Lorentzian mode model that can be obtained by numerically fitting the model spectral density. (2) The combined Debye and oscillatory Debye modes model that can be constructed by fitting the corresponding classical bath correlation function. (3) A new method that uses undamped harmonic oscillator modes explicitly in the HEOM formalism. Methods to extract system-bath correlations were investigated for the above bath decomposition schemes. We also show that HEOM in the undamped harmonic oscillator modes can give detailed information on the partial Wigner transform of the total density operator. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations of the spin-Boson dynamics and the absorption line shape of molecular dimers show that the HEOM formalism for high order perturbations can serve as an important tool in studying the quantum dissipative dynamics in the intermediate coupling regime.

  15. Sudden Death Phenomenon While Bathing in Japan - Mortality Data.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaru; Shimbo, Takuro; Ikaga, Toshiharu; Hori, Shingo

    2017-07-25

    Bath-related sudden cardiac arrest frequently occurs in Japan, but the mortality data have not been sufficiently reported.Methods and Results:This prospective cross-sectional observational study was conducted in the Tokyo Metropolis, Saga Prefecture and Yamagata Prefecture between October 2012 and March 2013 (i.e., in winter). We investigated the data for all occurrences in these areas for which the emergency medical system needed to be activated because of an accident or acute illness related to bathing. Emergency personnel enrolled the event when activation of the emergency medical system was related to bathing. Of the 4,599 registered bath-related events, 1,527 (33%) were identified as bath-related cardiac arrest events. Crude mortality (no. deaths per 100,000) during the observational period was 10.0 in Tokyo, 11.6 in Yamagata and 8.5 in Saga. According to the mortality data for age and sex, the estimated number of bath-related deaths nationwide was 13,369 in winter, for the 6 months from October (95% CI: 10,862-16,887). Most cardiac arrest events occurred in tubs filled with water with the face submerged in the water. This suggests that drowning plays a crucial role in the etiology of such phenomena. The estimated nationwide number of deaths was 13,369 (95% CI: 10,862-16,887) in winter, for the 6 months from October. Crude mortality during the winter season was 10.0 in Tokyo, 11.6 in Yamagata and 8.5 in Saga.

  16. Self-Starting Micromotors in a Bacterial Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, Luca; di Leonardo, Roberto; Ruocco, Giancarlo

    2009-01-01

    Micromotors pushed by biological entities, such as motile bacteria, constitute a fascinating way to convert chemical energy into mechanical work at the micrometer scale. Here we show, by using numerical simulations, that a properly designed asymmetric object can be spontaneously set into the desired motion when immersed in a chaotic bacterial bath. Our findings open the way to conceive new hybrid microdevices exploiting the mechanical power production of bacterial organisms. Moreover, the system provides an example of how, in contrast with equilibrium thermal baths, the irreversible chaotic motion of active particles can be rectified by asymmetric environments.

  17. Quantum nonunital dynamics of spin-bath-assisted Fisher information

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Xiang Wu, Yinzhong

    2016-04-15

    The nonunital non-Markovian dynamics of qubits immersed in a spin bath is studied without any Markovian approximation. The environmental effects on the precisions of quantum parameter estimation are taken into account. The time-dependent transfer matrix and inhomogeneity vector are obtained for the description of the open dynamical process. The dynamical behaviour of one qubit coupled to a spin bath is geometrically described by the Bloch vector. It is found out that the nonunital non-Markovian effects can engender the improvement of the precision of quantum parameter estimation. This result contributes to the environment-assisted quantum information theory.

  18. Stochastic Stirling Engine Operating in Contact with Active Baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakine, Ruben; Solon, Alexandre; Gingrich, Todd; van Wijland, Frédéric

    2017-04-01

    A Stirling engine made of a colloidal particle in contact with a nonequilibrium bath is considered and analyzed with the tools of stochastic energetics. We model the bath by non Gaussian persistent noise acting on the colloidal particle. Depending on the chosen definition of an isothermal transformation in this nonequilibrium setting, we find that either the energetics of the engine parallels that of its equilibrium counterpart or, in the simplest case, that it ends up being less efficient. Persistence, more than non Gaussian effects, are responsible for this result.

  19. Identification and sequence analysis of the hupR1 gene, which encodes a response regulator of the NtrC family required for hydrogenase expression in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Richaud, P; Colbeau, A; Toussaint, B; Vignais, P M

    1991-01-01

    The hupR1 gene from Rhodobacter capsulatus was cloned and sequenced. It can encode a protein of 53,843 Da which shares significant similarity with several transcriptional regulators and activates transcription of the structural hupSL genes of [NiFe]hydrogenase, as shown by the use of a translational fusion of lacZ with the hupSL promoter. A Hup- mutant having a point mutation in the hupR1 gene is described. PMID:1885559

  20. Activity of the Molybdopterin-Containing Xanthine Dehydrogenase of Rhodobacter capsulatus Can Be Restored by High Molybdenum Concentrations in a moeA Mutant Defective in Molybdenum Cofactor Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Leimkühler, Silke; Angermüller, Sieglinde; Schwarz, Günter; Mendel, Ralf R.; Klipp, Werner

    1999-01-01

    During the screening for Rhodobacter capsulatus mutants defective in xanthine degradation, one Tn5 mutant which was able to grow with xanthine as a sole nitrogen source only in the presence of high molybdate concentrations (1 mM), a phenotype resembling Escherichia coli mogA mutants, was identified. Unexpectedly, the corresponding Tn5 insertion was located within the moeA gene. Partial DNA sequence analysis and interposon mutagenesis of regions flanking R. capsulatus moeA revealed that no further genes essential for molybdopterin biosynthesis are located in the vicinity of moeA and revealed that moeA forms a monocistronic transcriptional unit in R. capsulatus. Amino acid sequence alignments of R. capsulatus MoeA (414 amino acids [aa]) with E. coli MogA (195 aa) showed that MoeA contains an internal domain homologous to MogA, suggesting similar functions of these proteins in the biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor. Interposon mutants defective in moeA did not exhibit dimethyl sulfoxide reductase or nitrate reductase activity, which both require the molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (MGD) cofactor, even after addition of 1 mM molybdate to the medium. In contrast, the activity of xanthine dehydrogenase, which binds the molybdopterin (MPT) cofactor, was restored to wild-type levels after the addition of 1 mM molybdate to the growth medium. Analysis of fluorescent derivatives of the molybdenum cofactor of purified xanthine dehydrogenase isolated from moeA and modA mutant strains, respectively, revealed that MPT is inserted into the enzyme only after molybdenum chelation, and both metal chelation and Mo-MPT insertion can occur only under high molybdate concentrations in the absence of MoeA. These data support a model for the biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor in which the biosynthesis of MPT and MGD are split at a stage when the molybdenum atom is added to MPT. PMID:10498704

  1. Characterization of a Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction center mutant that enhances the distinction between spectral forms of the initial electron donor.

    PubMed

    Eastman, J E; Taguchi, A K; Lin, S; Jackson, J A; Woodbury, N W

    2000-12-05

    A large scale mutation of the Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction center M-subunit gene, sym2-1, has been constructed in which amino acid residues M205-M210 have been changed to the corresponding L subunit amino acids. Two interconvertable spectral forms of the initial electron donor are observed in isolated reaction centers from this mutant. Which conformation dominates depends on ionic strength, the nature of the detergent used, and the temperature. Reaction centers from this mutant have a ground-state absorbance spectrum that is very similar to wild-type when measured immediately after purification in the presence of high salt. However, upon subsequent dialysis against a low ionic strength buffer or the addition of positively charged detergents, the near-infrared spectral band of P (the initial electron donor) in sym2-1 reaction centers is shifted by over 30 nm to the blue, from 852 to 820 nm. Systematically varying either the ionic strength or the amount of charged detergent reveals an isobestic point in the absorbance spectrum at 845 nm. The wild-type spectrum also shifts with ionic strength or detergent with an isobestic point at 860 nm. The large spectral separation between the two dominant conformational forms of the sym2-1 reaction center makes detailed measurements of each state possible. Both of the spectral forms of P bleach in the presence of light. Electrochemical measurements of the P/P+ midpoint potential of sym2-1 reaction centers show an increase of about 30 mV upon conversion from the long-wavelength form to the short-wavelength form of the mutant. The rate constant of initial electron transfer in both forms of the mutant reaction centers is essentially the same, suggesting that the spectral characteristics of P are not critical for charge separation. The short-wavelength form of P in this mutant also converts to the long-wavelength form as a function of temperature between room temperature and 130 K, again giving rise to an isobestic point, in this

  2. Development of a Rhodobacter capsulatus self-reporting model system for optimizing light-dependent, [FeFe]-hydrogenase-driven H2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Wecker, Matt S. A.; Beaton, Stephen E.; Chado, Robert A.; Ghirardi, Maria L.

    2016-08-17

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus normally photoproduces H2 as a by-product of its nitrogenase-catalyzed nitrogen-fixing activity. Such H2 production, however, is expensive from a metabolic perspective, requiring nearly four times as many photons as the equivalent algal hydrogenase-based system. Here we report the insertion of a Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase and its three attendant hydrogenase assembly proteins into an R. capsulatus strain lacking its native uptake hydrogenase. Further, this strain is modified to fluoresce upon sensing H2. The resulting strain photoproduces H2 and self-reports its own H2 production through fluorescence. Furthermore, this model system represents a unique method of developing hydrogenase-based H2 production in R. capsulatus, may serve as a powerful system for in vivo directed evolution of hydrogenases and hydrogenase-associated genes, and provides a means of screening for increased metabolic production of H2.

  3. Development of a Rhodobacter capsulatus self-reporting model system for optimizing light-dependent, [FeFe]-hydrogenase-driven H2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Wecker, Matt S. A.; Beaton, Stephen E.; Chado, Robert A.; Ghirardi, Maria L.

    2016-08-17

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus normally photoproduces H2 as a by-product of its nitrogenase-catalyzed nitrogen-fixing activity. Such H2 production, however, is expensive from a metabolic perspective, requiring nearly four times as many photons as the equivalent algal hydrogenase-based system. Here we report the insertion of a Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase and its three attendant hydrogenase assembly proteins into an R. capsulatus strain lacking its native uptake hydrogenase. Further, this strain is modified to fluoresce upon sensing H2. The resulting strain photoproduces H2 and self-reports its own H2 production through fluorescence. Furthermore, this model system represents a unique method of developing hydrogenase-based H2 production in R. capsulatus, may serve as a powerful system for in vivo directed evolution of hydrogenases and hydrogenase-associated genes, and provides a means of screening for increased metabolic production of H2.

  4. Development of a Rhodobacter capsulatus self-reporting model system for optimizing light-dependent, [FeFe]-hydrogenase-driven H 2 production: A Model System for Optimizing H 2 Production

    DOE PAGES

    Wecker, Matt S. A.; Beaton, Stephen E.; Chado, Robert A.; ...

    2016-08-23

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus normally photoproduces H2 as a by-product of its nitrogenase-catalyzed nitrogen-fixing activity. Such H2 production, however, is expensive from a metabolic perspective, requiring nearly four times as many photons as the equivalent algal hydrogenase-based system (Ghirardi et al. 2009). Here we report the insertion of a Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase and its three attendant hydrogenase assembly proteins into an R. capsulatus strain lacking its native uptake hydrogenase. Further, this strain is modified to fluoresce upon sensing H2. The resulting strain photoproduces H2 and self-reports its own H2 production through fluorescence. This model system represents a unique methodmore » of developing hydrogenase-based H2 production in R. capsulatus, may serve as a powerful system for in vivo directed evolution of hydrogenases and hydrogenase-associated genes, and provides a means of screening for increased metabolic production of H2.« less

  5. Open reading frame 5 (ORF5), encoding a ferredoxinlike protein, and nifQ are cotranscribed with nifE, nifN, nifX, and ORF4 in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Vivian, C; Hennecke, S; Pühler, A; Klipp, W

    1989-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis of a 1,600-base-pair fragment located downstream of nifENX in nif region A of Rhodobacter capsulatus revealed two additional open reading frames (ORFs): ORF5, encoding a ferredoxinlike protein, and nifQ. The ferredoxinlike gene product contained two cysteine motifs, typical of ferredoxins coordinating two 4Fe-4S clusters, but the distance between these two motifs was unusual for low-molecular-weight ferredoxins. The R. capsulatus nifQ gene product shared a high degree of homology with Klebsiella pneumoniae and Azotobacter vinelandii NifQ, including a typical cysteine motif located in the C-terminal part. nifQ insertion mutants and also an ORF5-nifQ double deletion mutant showed normal diazotrophic growth only in the presence of high concentrations of molybdate. This demonstrated that the gene encoding the ferredoxinlike protein is not essential for nitrogen fixation. No NifA-activated consensus promoter could be found in the intergenic region between nifENX-ORF4 and ORF5-nifQ. Analyses of a nifQ-lacZYA fusion revealed that transcription of nifQ was initiated at a promoter in front of nifE. In contrast to other nitrogen-fixing organisms, R. capsulatus nifE, nifN, nifX, ORF4, ORF5, and nifQ were organized in one transcriptional unit. PMID:2708314

  6. Effect of precursor concentration and bath temperature on the growth of chemical bath deposited tin sulphide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasree, Y.; Chalapathi, U.; Uday Bhaskar, P.; Sundara Raja, V.

    2012-01-01

    SnS is a promising candidate for a low-cost, non-toxic solar cell absorber layer. Tin sulphide thin films have been deposited by chemical bath deposition technique from a solution containing stannous chloride, thioacetamide, ammonia and triethanolamine (TEA). The effects of concentration of tin salt, triethanolamine and bath temperature on the growth of tin sulphide films have been investigated in order to optimize the growth conditions to obtain tin monosulphide (SnS) films. SnS films obtained under optimized conditions were found to be polycrystalline in nature with orthorhombic structure. The optical band gap of these films was found to be 1.5 eV.

  7. Completeness of assisted bathing in nursing homes related to dementia and bathing method: results from a secondary analysis of cluster-randomised trial data.

    PubMed

    van Achterberg, Theo; van Gaal, Betsie G I; Geense, Wytske W; Verbeke, Geert; van der Vleuten, Carine; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2016-06-01

    Bathing assistance is a core element of essential care in nursing homes, yet little is known for quality of assisted bathing or its determinants. To explore differences in completeness of assisted bathing in relation to bathing method and resident characteristics. Secondary analysis of a cluster randomised trial including 500 nursing home residents designed to compare traditional bathing methods for skin effects and cost-consequences; GlinicalTrials.gov ID [NCT01187732]. Logistic mixed modelling was used to relate resident characteristics and bathing method to bathing completeness. Bathing completeness was highly variable over wards. Apart from a large effect for ward, logistic mixed modelling indicated bathing was more often complete in case of washing without water (using disposable skin cleaning and caring materials; estimate 2.55, SE 0.17, P < 0.0001) and less often complete in residents with dementia (estimate -0.22, SE 0.08, P = 0.0040). Introduction of washing without water is likely to lead to more bathing completeness in nursing homes. However, inequity in care was also identified with a view to highly variable bathing completeness over wards and more incomplete bathing by care staff in residents with dementia. Monitoring the performance of assisted bathing in nursing homes is indicated for the identification of undesirable variation in essential care and poorly performing teams. The introduction of washing without water could serve the promotion of bathing completeness in nursing homes overall, but will not solve inequity issues for residents. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Bath-induced coherence and the secular approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastham, P. R.; Kirton, P.; Cammack, H. M.; Lovett, B. W.; Keeling, J.

    2016-07-01

    Finding efficient descriptions of how an environment affects a collection of discrete quantum systems would lead to new insights into many areas of modern physics. Markovian, or time-local, methods work well for individual systems, but for groups a question arises: Does system-bath or intersystem coupling dominate the dissipative dynamics? The answer has profound consequences for the long-time quantum correlations within the system. We consider two bosonic modes coupled to a bath. By comparing an exact solution against different Markovian master equations, we find that a smooth crossover of the equations of motion between dominant intersystem and system-bath coupling exists—but it requires a nonsecular master equation. We predict singular behavior of the dynamics and show that the ultimate failure of nonsecular equations of motion is essentially a failure of the Markov approximation. Our findings support the use of time-local theories throughout the crossover between system-bath-dominated and intersystem-coupling-dominated dynamics.

  9. Bath County Computer Attitude Scale: A Reliability and Validity Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moroz, Pauline A.; Nash, John B.

    The Bath County Computer Attitude Scale (BCCAS) has received limited attention concerning its reliability and validity with a U.S. adult population. As developed by G. G. Bear, H. C. Richards, and P. Lancaster in 1987, the instrument assessed attitudes toward computers in areas of computer use, computer-aided instruction, programming and technical…

  10. 16 CFR 1215.2 - Requirements for infant bath seats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... products that are designed or intended to retain water for bathing. (ii) (2) Instead of section 6.1 of ASTM... test solution (see table 1) to distilled water, immediately before each test run, thoroughly saturate all test platform surfaces above the water line where the product makes contact and where...

  11. 9. VIEW OF MOLTEN SALT BATH EQUIPMENT AND ROLLER PRESSES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF MOLTEN SALT BATH EQUIPMENT AND ROLLER PRESSES BEING INSTALLED ON THE WEST SIDE (SIDE B) OF BUILDING 883. SIDE B OF BUILDING 883 WAS USED TO PROCESS ENRICHED URANIUM FROM 1957-66. (1/23/57) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  12. MASTER BATH SHOWING THE LINEN CLOSET WITH BUILTIN SHELVES. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MASTER BATH SHOWING THE LINEN CLOSET WITH BUILT-IN SHELVES. NOTE THE WINDOWS IN THE UPPER PORTION OF THE EXTERIOR WALL. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. Finite Systems in a Heat Bath: Spectrum Perturbations and Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Rodrigo; Rubi, J Miguel

    2016-09-01

    When a finite system is at equilibrium with a heat bath, the equilibrium temperature is dictated by the heat bath and not by the intrinsic thermostatistics of the finite system. If not sufficiently large, it may be necessary for the finite system to change its thermostatistics in order to be at equilibrium with the heat bath. We account for this process by invoking Landsberg's notion of temperature-dependent energy levels. We establish that the mismatch between the intrinsic temperature of the excited finite system and that of the heat bath drives a spectrum perturbation which enables thermal equilibrium. We show that the temperature-induced spectrum perturbation is equivalent to Hill's purely thermodynamic subdivision potential. The difference between intrinsic and equilibrium temperature provides us with a measure for how large a system can be before it no longer needs to be regarded as small. The theoretical framework proposed in this paper identifies the role of temperature in a bottom-up thermostatistical description of finite systems.

  14. 21 CFR 890.5125 - Nonpowered sitz bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonpowered sitz bath. 890.5125 Section 890.5125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5125 Nonpowered...

  15. 21 CFR 890.5125 - Nonpowered sitz bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonpowered sitz bath. 890.5125 Section 890.5125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5125 Nonpowered...

  16. Clinical skills: bed bathing and personal hygiene needs of patients.

    PubMed

    Pegram, Anne; Bloomfield, Jacqueline; Jones, Anne

    The maintenance of personal hygiene is essential for a patient's health and well-being. Nurses play a key role in ensuring that the individual hygiene needs of patients are met. In this article the process of bed-bathing a patient is described.

  17. Optomechanical oscillator controlled by variation in its heat bath temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolář, Michal; Ryabov, Artem; Filip, Radim

    2017-04-01

    We propose a generation of a low-noise state of optomechanical oscillator by a temperature-dependent force. We analyze the situation in which a quantum optomechanical oscillator (denoted as the membrane) is driven by an external force (produced by the piston). Both systems are embedded in a common heat bath at certain temperature T . The driving force the piston exerts on the membrane is bath temperature dependent. Initially, for T =T0 , the piston is linearly coupled to the membrane. The bath temperature is then reversibly changed to T ≠T0 . The change of temperature shifts the membrane, but simultaneously also increases its fluctuations. The resulting equilibrium state of the membrane is analyzed from the point of view of mechanical, as well as of thermodynamic, characteristics. We compare these characteristics of membrane and derive their intimate connection. Next, we cool down the thermal noise of the membrane, bringing it out of equilibrium, still being in the contact with heat bath. This cooling retains the effective canonical Gibbs state with the effective temperature T. In such case we study the analogs of the equilibrium quantities for low-noise mechanical states of the membrane.

  18. VIEW OF INTEGRITY TESTING EQUIPMENT UTILIZING CRYOGENIC BATHS IN BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTEGRITY TESTING EQUIPMENT UTILIZING CRYOGENIC BATHS IN BUILDING 991. (6/7/68) - Rocky Flats Plant, Final Assembly & Shipping, Eastern portion of plant site, south of Spruce Avenue, east of Tenth Street & north of Central Avenue, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Regenerate metal-plating baths to cut waste and save

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    During electrode-based metal plating of equipment components, the formation of an electrical field causes metal deposits to be thicker at edges and seams, and thinner on flat surfaces. And, electrode-based methods consume large amounts of energy. Electroless-nickel (EN) -- or autocatalytic -- plating systems were pioneered in the 1940s to solve these problems. EN plating produces a more uniform coating, irrespective of the complexity of the part, and it consumes less electricity, since to electric current is required during plating. Plating in an EN system results from a chemical reaction between nickel in the bath and the substrate of the equipment component. The downside of electroless plating, however, is the limited life of the nickel bath, and the large volume of metal waste produced by bath disposal. Ionsep Corp. (Wilmington, Del.) has developed an electrodialytic system that continuously reforms the EN plating baths, to give them longer life. Its patented system has been successfully laboratory tested in a 1-ft{sup 2} cell, and the firm recently won a $250,000 grant from the US Dept. of Energy (Washington, D.C.) and Environmental Protection Agency (Washington, D.C.), to design and engineer a commercial-scale version of the system.

  20. BATH 1 SHOWING THE SHOWER ENCLOSURE AND FLUSH DOOR OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BATH 1 SHOWING THE SHOWER ENCLOSURE AND FLUSH DOOR OF LINEN CLOSET. VIEW FACING SOUTH - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Three-Bedroom Duplex Type 4, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, Cedar Drive and Elm Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. BATH 1 SHOWING THE LINEN CLOSET DOOR. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BATH 1 SHOWING THE LINEN CLOSET DOOR. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, M-Shaped Four-Bedroom Duplex Type 5, Birch Circle, Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. MASTER BATH. NOTE THE LINEN CLOSET DOOR TO THE RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MASTER BATH. NOTE THE LINEN CLOSET DOOR TO THE RIGHT OF THE SHOWER ENCLOSURE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Three-Bedroom Single-Family Type 7, Birch Circle, Elm Drive, Elm Circle, and Date Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. MASTER BATH SHOWING THE LINEN CLOSET WITH BUILT IN SHELVES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MASTER BATH SHOWING THE LINEN CLOSET WITH BUILT IN SHELVES NEXT TO THE SHOWER ENCLOSURE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Three-Bedroom Single-Family Types 8 and 11, Birch Circle, Elm Drive, Elm Circle, and Date Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Interior detail of unit "A" bath showing original medicine cabinet, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior detail of unit "A" bath showing original medicine cabinet, ceramic soap dishes, ceramic towel rod, and triangular motif on ceramic features, facing south. - Albrook Air Force Station, Non-Commissioned Officers' Duplex, East side of Hall Street, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  5. MASTER BATH SHOWING SINK WITH VANITY AND THE MEDICINE CABINET. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MASTER BATH SHOWING SINK WITH VANITY AND THE MEDICINE CABINET. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Single-Family Type 6, Birch Circle, Elm Drive, Elm Circle, and Date Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. 21 CFR 890.5125 - Nonpowered sitz bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonpowered sitz bath. 890.5125 Section 890.5125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5125 Nonpowered...

  7. 21 CFR 890.5125 - Nonpowered sitz bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonpowered sitz bath. 890.5125 Section 890.5125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5125 Nonpowered...

  8. 21 CFR 890.5125 - Nonpowered sitz bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonpowered sitz bath. 890.5125 Section 890.5125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5125 Nonpowered...

  9. Elderly people urged not to bath when home alone.

    PubMed

    1994-03-30

    Elderly people should only have a batch when someone else is in the house and should never lock the door, researchers have urged. The calls follow a survey which found one in seven older people have been trapped in the bath at least once.

  10. 13. VIEW OF THE MOLTEN SALT BATHS USED TO UNIFORMLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF THE MOLTEN SALT BATHS USED TO UNIFORMLY AND QUICKLY HEAT METALS PRIOR TO WORKING (ROLLING). (9/16/85) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  11. 19. VIEW OF THE PLATING BATHS AND CONTROL PANELS. GOLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF THE PLATING BATHS AND CONTROL PANELS. GOLD AND SILVER WERE AMONG THE MATERIALS PLATED ONTO PARTS MADE OF COPPER, STAINLESS STEEL AND STEEL. (11/15/89) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  12. 75 FR 51177 - Safety Standard for Infant Bath Seats; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... reference ASTM F 1967-08a with certain changes. The Commission is correcting an error that left in an... infant bath seats by incorporating by reference ASTM F 1967-08. An introductory phrase in the stability performance requirements in the ASTM standard should have been removed to make the provision consistent with...

  13. Bath Stone - a Possible Global Heritage Stone from England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marker, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The Middle Jurassic strata of England have several horizons of oolitic and bioclastic limestones that provide high quality dimension stone. One of the most important is found in and near the City of Bath. The Great Oolite Group (Upper Bathonian) contains the Combe Down and Bath Oolites, consisting of current bedded oolites and shelly oolites, that have been used extensively as freestones for construction nearby, for prestigious buildings through much of southern England and more widely. The stone has been used to some extent since Roman times when the city, then known as Aquae Sulis, was an important hot spa. The stone was used to a limited extent through medieval times but from the early 18th century onwards was exploited on a large scale through surface quarrying and underground mining. The City was extensively redeveloped in the 18th to early 19th century, mostly using Bath Stone, when the spas made it a fashionable resort. Buildings from that period include architectural "gems" such as the Royal Crescent and Pulteney Bridge, as well as the renovated Roman Baths. Many buildings were designed by some of the foremost British architects of the time. The consistent use of this stone gives the City an architectural integrity throughout. These features led to the designation of the City as a World Heritage Site. It is a requirement in current City planning policy documents that Bath Stone should be used for new building to preserve the appearance of the City. More widely the stone was used in major houses (e.g. Buckingham Palace and Apsley House in London; King's Pavilion in Brighton); civic buildings (e.g. Bristol Guildhall; Dartmouth Naval College in Devon); churches and cathedrals (e.g. Truro Cathedral in Cornwall); and engineered structures (e.g. the large Dundas Aqueduct on the Kennet and Avon Canal). More widely, Bath Stone has been used in Union Station in Washington DC; Toronto Bible College and the Town Hall at Cape Town, South Africa. Extraction declined in

  14. A stochastic reorganizational bath model for electronic energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Takatoshi E-mail: aspuru@chemistry.harvard.edu; Huh, Joonsuk; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán E-mail: aspuru@chemistry.harvard.edu

    2014-06-28

    Environmentally induced fluctuations of the optical gap play a crucial role in electronic energy transfer dynamics. One of the simplest approaches to incorporate such fluctuations in energy transfer dynamics is the well known Haken-Strobl-Reineker (HSR) model, in which the energy-gap fluctuation is approximated as white noise. Recently, several groups have employed molecular dynamics simulations and excited-state calculations in conjunction to account for excitation energies’ thermal fluctuations. On the other hand, since the original work of HSR, many groups have employed stochastic models to simulate the same transfer dynamics. Here, we discuss a rigorous connection between the stochastic and the atomistic bath models. If the phonon bath is treated classically, time evolution of the exciton-phonon system can be described by Ehrenfest dynamics. To establish the relationship between the stochastic and atomistic bath models, we employ a projection operator technique to derive the generalized Langevin equations for the energy-gap fluctuations. The stochastic bath model can be obtained as an approximation of the atomistic Ehrenfest equations via the generalized Langevin approach. Based on this connection, we propose a novel scheme to take account of reorganization effects within the framework of stochastic models. The proposed scheme provides a better description of the population dynamics especially in the regime of strong exciton-phonon coupling. Finally, we discuss the effect of the bath reorganization in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of ideal J-aggregates in terms of the Stokes shifts. We find a simple expression that relates the reorganization contribution to the Stokes shifts – the reorganization shift – to the ideal or non-ideal exciton delocalization in a J-aggregate. The reorganization shift can be described by three parameters: the monomer reorganization energy, the relaxation time of the optical gap, and the exciton delocalization length

  15. [The use of sodium chloride baths in patients with chronic bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Anisimkina, A N; Aĭrapetova, N S; Davydova, O B; Doronina, Iu V; Derevnina, N A; Gontar', E V

    1996-01-01

    80 patients with chronic bronchitis took baths with sodium chloride concentration 20, 40, 60 g/l and temperature 37-38 degrees C. The baths produced a positive effect on central and regional hemodynamics, reduced inflammation and sensitization.

  16. Cardiac infection and sepsis in 3 intravenous bath salts drug users.

    PubMed

    Belton, Patrick; Sharngoe, Tenzing; Maguire, F Michael; Polhemus, Mark

    2013-06-01

    The street drug "bath salts" are psychoactive mixtures of cathinone derivatives. We report 3 cases of disseminated Staphylococcus aureus infection with cardiac involvement (2 endocarditis and 1 pericarditis), secondary to intravenous bath salts use.

  17. [The use of sodium chloride baths in the treatment of diabetic patients with micro- and macroangiopathies].

    PubMed

    Davydova, O B; Turova, E A; Grishina, E V

    1998-01-01

    Patients suffering from insulin-dependent or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with micro- and macroangiopathy took sodium chloride baths of diverse concentration (30 and 50 g/l). A control group consisted of patients who had taken "neutral" baths. The response to sodium chloride baths was registered in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, microcirculation, hemorheology, lower limbs circulation, exercise tolerance. Baths with sodium chloride concentrations 50 g/l have advantages, especially in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  18. Nucleotide sequence of the Rhodobacter capsulatus fruK gene, which encodes fructose-1-phosphate kinase: evidence for a kinase superfamily including both phosphofructokinases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L F; Reizer, A; Reizer, J; Cai, B; Tomich, J M; Saier, M H

    1991-01-01

    The fruK gene encoding fructose-1-phosphate kinase (FruK), located within the fructose (fru)-catabolic operon of Rhodobacter capsulatus, was sequenced. FruK of R. capsulatus (316 amino acids; molecular weight = 31,232) is the same size as and is homologous to FruK of Escherichia coli, phosphofructokinase B (PfkB) of E. coli, phosphotagatokinase of Staphylococcus aureus, and ribokinase of E. coli. These proteins therefore make up a family of homologous proteins, termed the PfkB family. A phylogenetic tree for this new family was constructed. Sequence comparisons plus chemical inactivation studies suggested the lack of involvement of specific residues in catalysis. Although the Rhodobacter FruK differed markedly from the other enzymes within the PfkB family with respect to amino acid composition, these enzymes exhibited similar predicted secondary structural features. A large internal segment of the Rhodobacter FruK was found to be similar in sequence to the domain bearing the sugar bisphosphate-binding region of the large subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of plants and bacteria. Proteins of the PfkB family did not exhibit statistically significant sequence identity with PfkA of E. coli. PfkA, however, is homologous to other prokaryotic and eukaryotic ATP- and PPi-dependent Pfks (the PfkA family). These eukaryotic, ATP-dependent enzymes each consist of a homotetramer (mammalian) or a heterooctamer (yeasts), with each subunit containing an internal duplication of the size of the entire PfkA protein of E. coli. In some of these enzymes, additional domains are present. A phylogenetic tree was constructed for the PfkA family and revealed that the bacterial enzymes closely resemble the N-terminal domains of the eukaryotic enzyme subunits whereas the C-terminal domains have diverged more extensively. The PPi-dependent Pfk of potato is only distantly related to the ATP-dependent enzymes. On the basis of their similar functions, sizes, predicted

  19. Characterization of a nif-regulated flavoprotein (FprA) from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Redox properties and molecular interaction with a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Jouanneau, Y; Meyer, C; Asso, M; Guigliarelli, B; Willison, J C

    2000-02-01

    A flavoprotein from Rhodobacter capsulatus was purified as a recombinant (His)6-tag fusion from an Escherichia coli clone over-expressing the fprA structural gene. The FprA protein is a homodimer containing one molecule of FMN per 48-kDa monomer. Reduction of the flavoprotein by dithionite showed biphasic kinetics, starting with a fast step of semiquinone (SQ) formation, and followed by a slow reduction of the SQ. This SQ was in the anionic form as shown by EPR and optical spectroscopies. Spectrophotometric titration gave a midpoint redox potential for the oxidized/SQ couple of Em1 = +20 mV (pH 8.0), whereas the SQ/hydroquinone couple could not be titrated due to the thermodynamic instability of SQ associated with its slow reduction process. The inability to detect the intermediate form, SQ, upon oxidative titration confirmed this instability and led to an estimate of Em2 - Em1 of > 80 mV. The reduction of SQ by dithionite was significantly accelerated when the [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin FdIV was used as redox mediator. The midpoint redox potential of this ferredoxin was determined to be -275 +/- 2 mV at pH 7.5, consistent with FdIV serving as electron donor to FprA in vivo. FdIV and FprA were found to cross-react when incubated together with the 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide, giving a covalent complex with an Mr of approximately 60 000. Formation of this complex was unaffected by the redox states of the two proteins. Other [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins, including FdV and FdVI from R. capsulatus, were ineffective as electron carriers to FprA, and cross-reacted poorly with the flavoprotein. The possible function of FprA with regard to nitrogen fixation was investigated using an fprA-deleted mutant. Although nitrogenase activity was significantly reduced in the mutant compared with the wild-type strain, nitrogen fixation was apparently unaffected by the fprA deletion even under iron limitation or microaerobic conditions.

  20. 40 CFR 420.80 - Applicability; description of the salt bath descaling subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Salt Bath Descaling Subcategory § 420.80 Applicability; description of the salt bath descaling... into publicly owned treatment works resulting from oxidizing and reducing salt bath descaling... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the...

  1. 40 CFR 420.80 - Applicability; description of the salt bath descaling subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Salt Bath Descaling Subcategory § 420.80 Applicability; description of the salt bath descaling... into publicly owned treatment works resulting from oxidizing and reducing salt bath descaling... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the...

  2. 40 CFR 420.80 - Applicability; description of the salt bath descaling subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Salt Bath Descaling Subcategory § 420.80 Applicability; description of the salt bath descaling... into publicly owned treatment works resulting from oxidizing and reducing salt bath descaling... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability; description of the...

  3. 40 CFR 420.80 - Applicability; description of the salt bath descaling subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Salt Bath Descaling Subcategory § 420.80 Applicability; description of the salt bath descaling... into publicly owned treatment works resulting from oxidizing and reducing salt bath descaling... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Applicability; description of the...

  4. Quantitative assessment of combination bathing and/or moisturizing regimens on skin hydration in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Charles; Eichenfield, Lawrence F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Standard recommendations for skin care for patients with atopic dermatitis stress the importance of skin hydration and the application of moisturizers. However, there is little objective data to guide recommendations regarding the optimal practice methods of bathing and emollient application. Objective This study quantified cutaneous hydration status after various combination bathing and/or moisturizing regimens. Methods Four bathing/moisturizer regimens were evaluated in ten subjects, five pediatric subjects with atopic dermatitis and five subjects with healthy skin. The regimens consisted of bathing alone without emollient application, bathing and immediate emollient application, bathing and delayed application, and emollient application alone. Each regimen was evaluated in all subjects, utilizing a cross-over design. Skin hydration was assessed with standard capacitance measurements. Results In atopic dermatitis subjects, emollient alone yielded a significantly (p<0.05) greater mean hydration over 90 min (206.2% baseline hydration) than bathing with immediate emollient (141.6%), bathing and delayed emollient (141%), and bathing alone (91.4%). The combination bathing and emollient application regimens demonstrated hydration values at 90 minutes not significantly greater than baseline. Atopic dermatitis subjects had a decreased mean hydration benefit compared to normal skin subjects. Conclusions Bathing without moisturizer may compromise skin hydration. Bathing followed by moisturizer application provides modest hydration benefits, though less than that of simply applying moisturizer alone. PMID:19706087

  5. Bath Salts Abuse Leading to New-Onset Psychosis and Potential for Violence.

    PubMed

    John, Michelle E; Thomas-Rozea, Crystal; Hahn, David

    Bath salts have recently emerged as a popular designer drug of abuse causing significant hazardous effects on mental health and physical health, resulting in public health legislation making its usage illegal in the United States. To educate mental health providers on the effects of the new designer drug bath salts, including its potential to cause psychosis and violence in patients. This is a case report on a 40-year-old male with no past psychiatric history who presented with new-onset psychosis and increased risk for violence after ingesting bath salts. In addition, a literature review was performed to summarize the documented effects of bath salts abuse and the current U.S. public health legislation on bath salts. The presented case illustrates a new-onset, substance-induced psychotic disorder related to bath salts usage. The literature review explains the sympathomimetic reaction and the potential for psychotic symptoms. To discuss the physical and psychological effects of bath salts, treatment options for bath salts abuse and U.S. legislation by Ohio state law to current U.S. federal law that bans production, sale, and possession of main substances found in bath salts. It is important for mental health providers to be aware of bath salts, understand the physical and psychiatric effects of bath salts and be familiar with current legislative policy banning its usage. Lastly, bath salts abuse should be in the differential diagnosis where psychosis is new onset or clinically incongruent with known primary presentation of a psychotic disorder.

  6. The Medical Risks and Benefits of Sauna, Steam Bath, and Whirlpool Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Marty

    1987-01-01

    Saunas, steam baths, and whirlpools--popular fixtures at health clubs--are safe means of relaxation if used properly. Ignoring the recommendations for moderate, commonsense enjoyment of these baths may expose users to health risks, including sudden death, arrhythmias, and skin infections. A guide to safe use of such baths is presented. (Author/CB)

  7. INVESTIGATION INTO THE REJUVENATION OF SPENT ELECTROLESS NICKEL BATHS BY ELECTRODIALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electroless nickel plating generates substantially more waste than other metal-finishing processes due to the inherent limited bath life and the need for regular bath disposal. Electrodialysis can be used to generate electroless nickel baths, but poor membrane permselectivity, l...

  8. INVESTIGATION INTO THE REJUVENATION OF SPENT ELECTROLESS NICKEL BATHS BY ELECTRODIALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electroless nickel plating generates substantially more waste than other metal-finishing processes due to the inherent limited bath life and the need for regular bath disposal. Electrodialysis can be used to generate electroless nickel baths, but poor membrane permselectivity, l...

  9. Using a Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety to Evaluate a Hospital-Wide Daily Chlorhexidine Bathing Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Caya, Teresa; Musuuza, Jackson; Yanke, Eric; Schmitz, Michelle; Anderson, Brooke; Carayon, Pascale; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-01-01

    We undertook a systems engineering approach to evaluate housewide implementation of daily chlorhexidine bathing. We performed direct observations of the bathing process and conducted provider and patient surveys. The main outcome was compliance with bathing using a checklist. Fifty-seven percent of baths had full compliance with the chlorhexidine bathing protocol. Additional time was the main barrier. Institutions undertaking daily chlorhexidine bathing should perform a rigorous assessment of implementation to optimize the benefits of this intervention. PMID:26035708

  10. Using a Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety to Evaluate a Hospital-wide Daily Chlorhexidine Bathing Intervention.

    PubMed

    Caya, Teresa; Musuuza, Jackson; Yanke, Eric; Schmitz, Michelle; Anderson, Brooke; Carayon, Pascale; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-01-01

    We undertook a systems engineering approach to evaluate housewide implementation of daily chlorhexidine bathing. We performed direct observations of the bathing process and conducted provider and patient surveys. The main outcome was compliance with bathing using a checklist. Fifty-seven percent of baths had full compliance with the chlorhexidine bathing protocol. Additional time was the main barrier. Institutions undertaking daily chlorhexidine bathing should perform a rigorous assessment of implementation to optimize the benefits of this intervention.

  11. Effect of the bathing without a battle training intervention on bathing-associated physical and verbal outcomes in nursing home residents with dementia: a randomized crossover diffusion study.

    PubMed

    Gozalo, Pedro; Prakash, Shivaani; Qato, Danya M; Sloane, Philip D; Mor, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the Bathing Without a Battle intervention in reducing physical and verbal aggressive behaviors for nursing home residents with dementia. A randomized crossover diffusion study, with one group receiving the intervention after one round of baseline observations and a delayed intervention group receiving the intervention after two rounds of baseline observations. Six nursing home facilities in the state of New York. Nursing home residents with dementia (N = 240). The Bathing Without a Battle educational program, designed for direct-care staff members responsible for bathing residents diagnosed with dementia and implemented through a train-the-trainer model. Rates of verbal and physical aggressive and agitated behaviors were measured using the Care Recipient Behavior Assessment; secondary measures of effect included bath duration, bath modality, and antipsychotic medication use. In spite of implementation obstacles (consent delays and change in leadership at one facility), a significant change was observed in how residents were bathed that translated into a significant reduction in the rate of aggressive and agitated behaviors, particularly verbal, during residents' baths. The use of in-bed baths increased 17%, and average bath duration decreased significantly (average 1.5 minutes less) in the postintervention period, particularly for in-bed baths. Verbal behaviors declined 17.8% (P = .008), combined verbal and physical behaviors declined 18.6% (P = .004), and antipsychotic use declined 30% (P = .002) after the intervention. The Bathing Without a Battle educational program, delivered through a train-the-trainer format, is an effective means of improving the bathing experience of residents with dementia in nursing homes. This research supports broadly adopting this intervention, especially for nursing homes serving many residents with dementia. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  12. Effective run-and-tumble dynamics of bacteria baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoluzzi, M.; Di Leonardo, R.; Angelani, L.

    2013-10-01

    E. coli bacteria swim in straight runs interrupted by sudden reorientation events called tumbles. The resulting random walks give rise to density fluctuations that can be derived analytically in the limit of non-interacting particles or equivalently of very low concentrations. However, in situations of practical interest, the concentration of bacteria is always large enough to make interactions an important factor. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the dynamic structure factor of a model bacterial bath for increasing values of densities. We show that it is possible to reproduce the dynamics of density fluctuations in the system using a free run-and-tumble model with effective fitting parameters. We discuss the dependence of these parameters, e.g., the tumbling rate, tumbling time and self-propulsion velocity, on the density of the bath.

  13. Appendix B: Inventory of coniferous forests near Bath, New York

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanturf, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    A zoom stereoscope was used to interpret aerial color photographs of the Finger Lakes region near Bath, New York, and areas of conifers were delineated on acetate sheets. Scale was determined for each photograph and units were converted to acres. Photographically enlarged positive transparencies of imagery from LANDSAT bands 5,6, and 7 for the southern portion of the study area were placed in a cold additive viewer and registered with each other to provide a composite image. A green filter was used on band 5, blue on band 6, and red on band 7. Conifers appeared at dark, reddish purple. Average was determined using a grid. Results show that the total confer stands within 50 miles of Bath is approximately 176,000 acres of which 60,000 acres are in Pennsylvania. The study was conducted to determine the feasibility of locating a particleboard manufacturing firm in the Southern Tier.

  14. Optimization of chemical bath deposited cadmium sulfide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Oladeji, I.O.; Chow, L.

    1997-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) is known to be an excellent heterojunction partner of p-type cadmium telluride (CdTe) or p-type copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) due essentially to its high electron affinity. It is widely used as a window material in high efficiency thin-film solar cells based on CdTe or CuInSe{sub 2} owing to its transparency and photoconductivity among other properties. The authors report the optimization of CdS thin film grown by chemical bath deposition where homogeneous reactions are minimized. The optimum parameters have enabled them to maximize the thickness of the deposited film in a single dip and to grow thicker films by periodically replenishing the concentration of reactants while the substrate remains continuously dipped in the reaction bath. Characterization results reveal the deposited CdS films exhibit improved optical and electrical properties.

  15. A stirred bath technique for diffusivity measurements in cell matrices.

    PubMed

    Chresand, T J; Dale, B E; Hanson, S L; Gillies, R J

    1988-10-05

    A stirred bath technique was developed for determining effective diffusivities in cell matrices. The technique involves cell immobilization in a dilute gel which has negligible effect on solute diffusion. Agar and collagen were tested as immobilizing gels. Agar gel was shown to have minor interactions with the diffusion of various biological molecules, and was used for immobilization of Ehrlich Ascites Tumor (EAT) cells. Diffusivities of glucose and lactic acid were measured in EAT matrices for cell loadings between 20 and 45 vol %. Treatment with glutaraldehyde was effective in quenching the metabolic activity of the cells while preserving their physical properties and diffusive resistance. The measured data agree favorably with predictions based on Maxwell's equation for effective diffusion in a periodic composite material. The stirred bath technique is useful for diffusivity determinations in immobilized matrices or free slurries, and is applicable to both microbial and mammalian cell systems.

  16. Numerical renormalization group for quantum impurities in a bosonic bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulla, Ralf; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Tong, Ning-Hua; Vojta, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    We present a detailed description of the recently proposed numerical renormalization group method for models of quantum impurities coupled to a bosonic bath. Specifically, the method is applied to the spin-boson model, both in the Ohmic and sub-Ohmic cases. We present various results for static as well as dynamic quantities and discuss details of the numerical implementation, e.g., the discretization of a bosonic bath with arbitrary continuous spectral density, the suitable choice of a finite basis in the bosonic Hilbert space, and questions of convergence with respect to truncation parameters. The method is shown to provide high-accuracy data over the whole range of model parameters and temperatures, which are in agreement with exact results and other numerical data from the literature.

  17. Observations on the effect of immersion in Bath spa water.

    PubMed Central

    O'Hare, J P; Heywood, A; Summerhayes, C; Lunn, G; Evans, J M; Walters, G; Corrall, R J; Dieppe, P A

    1985-01-01

    Immersion in water in spas has been practised for centuries and has many proponents. Despite fierce debate about its efficacy there has been little scientific evaluation of the effect of immersion in mineral waters. Eight normal subjects were immersed in Bath spa water for two hours and the renal, haematological, and cardiovascular responses were compared with those in the control periods before and after immersion. Significant, twofold diuresis and natriuresis, 5% haemodilution, and a 50% increase in cardiac index were observed in subjects immersed, sitting, in Bath spa water at 35 degrees C. These changes may constitute part of the scientific rationale for spa treatment in many states of disease. Images FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 FIG 5 PMID:3936569

  18. Purification of spent chromium bath by membrane electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Korzenowski, C; Rodrigues, M A S; Bresciani, L; Bernardes, A M; Ferreira, J Z

    2008-04-15

    The present study deals with the purification of spent chromium bath contaminated by trivalent chromium, iron and aluminum. The ionic transfer of Fe(III) depends on the presence of chloride ions on the pH while aluminum transfer is not affected by chromium(III) chloride. Five different commercial cation-exchange membranes were used. Nafion and PC-SK membranes showed the best results for trivalent iron and aluminum transfer.

  19. Bath salt intoxication causing acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Regunath, Hariharan; Ariyamuthu, Venkatesh Kumar; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Misra, Madhukar

    2012-10-01

    Traditional bath salts contain a combination of inorganic salts like Epsom salts, table salt, baking soda, sodium metaphosphate, and borax that have cleansing properties. Since 2010, there have been rising concerns about a new type of substance abuse in the name of "bath salts." They are beta-ketone amphetamine analogs and are derivates of cathinone, a naturally occurring amphetamine analog found in the "khat" plant (Catha edulis). Effects reported with intake included increased energy, empathy, openness, and increased libido. Serious adverse effects reported with intoxication included cardiac, psychiatric, and neurological signs and symptoms. Not much is known about the toxicology and metabolism of these compounds. They inhibit monoamine reuptake (dopamine, nor epinephrine, etc.) and act as central nervous system stimulants with high additive and abuse potential because of their clinical and biochemical similarities to effects from use of cocaine, amphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine. Deaths associated with use of these compounds have also been reported. We report a case of acute kidney injury associated with the use of "bath salt" pills that improved with hemodialysis.

  20. Affecting non-Markovian behaviour by changing bath structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, V.; Plato, A. D. K.; Tufarelli, Tommaso; Kim, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    For many open quantum systems, a master equation approach employing the Markov approximation cannot reliably describe the dynamical behaviour. This is the case, for example, in a number of solid state or biological systems, and it has motivated a line of research aimed at quantifying the amount of non-Markovian behaviour (NMB) in a given model. Within this framework, we investigate the dynamics of a quantum harmonic oscillator linearly coupled to a bosonic bath. We focus on Gaussian states, which are suitably treated using a covariance matrix approach. Concentrating on an entanglement based NMB quantifier (NMBQ) proposed by Rivas et al (2010 Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 050403), we consider the role that near resonant and off-resonant modes play in affecting the NMBQ. By using a large but finite bath of oscillators for both Ohmic and super Ohmic spectral densities we find, by systematically increasing the coupling strength, initially the near resonant modes provide the most significant non-Markovian effects, while after a certain threshold of coupling strength the off-resonant modes play the dominant role. We also consider the NMBQ for two other models where we add a single strongly coupled oscillator to the model in extra bath mode and ‘buffer’ configurations, which affects the modes that determine NMB.

  1. Rayleigh wave inversion using heat-bath simulated annealing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongxu; Peng, Suping; Du, Wenfeng; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Ma, Zhenyuan; Lin, Peng

    2016-11-01

    The dispersion of Rayleigh waves can be used to obtain near-surface shear (S)-wave velocity profiles. This is performed mainly by inversion of the phase velocity dispersion curves, which has been proven to be a highly nonlinear and multimodal problem, and it is unsuitable to use local search methods (LSMs) as the inversion algorithm. In this study, a new strategy is proposed based on a variant of simulated annealing (SA) algorithm. SA, which simulates the annealing procedure of crystalline solids in nature, is one of the global search methods (GSMs). There are many variants of SA, most of which contain two steps: the perturbation of model and the Metropolis-criterion-based acceptance of the new model. In this paper we propose a one-step SA variant known as heat-bath SA. To test the performance of the heat-bath SA, two models are created. Both noise-free and noisy synthetic data are generated. Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm and a variant of SA, known as the fast simulated annealing (FSA) algorithm, are also adopted for comparison. The inverted results of the synthetic data show that the heat-bath SA algorithm is a reasonable choice for Rayleigh wave dispersion curve inversion. Finally, a real-world inversion example from a coal mine in northwestern China is shown, which proves that the scheme we propose is applicable.

  2. Density matrix embedding in an antisymmetrized geminal power bath

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Welborn, Matthew; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-07-14

    Density matrix embedding theory (DMET) has emerged as a powerful tool for performing wave function-in-wave function embedding for strongly correlated systems. In traditional DMET, an accurate calculation is performed on a small impurity embedded in a mean field bath. Here, we extend the original DMET equations to account for correlation in the bath via an antisymmetrized geminal power (AGP) wave function. The resulting formalism has a number of advantages. First, it allows one to properly treat the weak correlation limit of independent pairs, which DMET is unable to do with a mean-field bath. Second, it associates a size extensive correlation energy with a given density matrix (for the models tested), which AGP by itself is incapable of providing. Third, it provides a reasonable description of charge redistribution in strongly correlated but non-periodic systems. Thus, AGP-DMET appears to be a good starting point for describing electron correlation in molecules, which are aperiodic and possess both strong and weak electron correlation.

  3. Blackbody radiation: rosetta stone of heat bath models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, R. F.

    2007-06-01

    The radiation field can be regarded as a collection of independent harmonic oscillators and, as such, constitutes a heat bath. Moreover, the known form of its interaction with charged particles provides a "rosetta stone" for deciding on and interpreting the correct interaction for the more general case of a quantum particle in an external potential and coupled to an arbitrary heat bath. In particular, combining QED with the machinery of stochastic physics, enables the usual scope of applications to be widened. We discuss blackbody radiation effects on: the equation of motion of a radiating electron (obtaining an equation of motion which is free from runaway solutions), anomalous diffusion, the spreading of a Gaussian wave packet, and decoherence effects due to zero-point oscillations. In addition, utilizing a formula we obtained for the free energy of an oscillator in a heat bath, enables us to determine all the quantum thermodynamic functions of interest (particularly in the areas of quantum information and nanophysics where small systems are involved) and from which we obtain temperature dependent Lamb shifts, quantum effects on the entropy at low temperature and implications for Nernst's law.

  4. Integrated hydro-bacterial modelling for predicting bathing water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guoxian; Falconer, Roger A.; Lin, Binliang

    2017-03-01

    In recent years health risks associated with the non-compliance of bathing water quality have received increasing worldwide attention. However, it is particularly challenging to establish the source of any non-compliance, due to the complex nature of the source of faecal indicator organisms, and the fate and delivery processes and scarcity of field measured data in many catchments and estuaries. In the current study an integrated hydro-bacterial model, linking a catchment, 1-D model and 2-D model were integrated to simulate the adsorption-desorption processes of faecal bacteria to and from sediment particles in river, estuarine and coastal waters, respectively. The model was then validated using hydrodynamic, sediment and faecal bacteria concentration data, measured in 2012, in the Ribble river and estuary, and along the Fylde coast, UK. Particular emphasis has been placed on the mechanism of faecal bacteria transport and decay through the deposition and resuspension of suspended sediments. The results showed that by coupling the E.coli concentration with the sediment transport processes, the accuracy of the predicted E.coli levels was improved. A series of scenario runs were then carried out to investigate the impacts of different management scenarios on the E.coli concentration levels in the coastal bathing water sites around Liverpool Bay, UK. The model results show that the level of compliance with the new EU bathing water standards can be improved significantly by extending outfalls and/or reducing urban sources by typically 50%.

  5. [Turpentine white emulsion baths in the rehabilation in patients with sexual dysfunctions].

    PubMed

    Karpukhin, I V; Li, A A; Gusev, M E

    2000-01-01

    100 patients with sexual dysfunction (SD) and 20 SD patients took turpentine white emulsion baths and sodium chloride baths, respectively. The turpentine baths were given with step-by-step rise in turpentine concentration from 20 to 50 ml per 200 l of water, temperature 36-37 degrees C, duration of the procedure 10-15 min. The course consisted of 10-12 procedures which were conducted daily or each other day. The turpentine baths were more effective than sodium chloride baths (85 vs 50%, respectively).

  6. Phosphate Concentration and the Putative Sensor Kinase Protein CckA Modulate Cell Lysis and Release of the Rhodobacter capsulatus Gene Transfer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Westbye, A. B.; Leung, M. M.; Florizone, S. M.; Taylor, T. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Fogg, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    The gene transfer agent of Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA) is a bacteriophage-like genetic element with the sole known function of horizontal gene transfer. Homologues of RcGTA genes are present in many members of the alphaproteobacteria and may serve an important role in microbial evolution. Transcription of RcGTA genes is induced as cultures enter the stationary phase; however, little is known about cis-active sequences. In this work, we identify the promoter of the first gene in the RcGTA structural gene cluster. Additionally, gene transduction frequency depends on the growth medium, and the reason for this is not known. We report that millimolar concentrations of phosphate posttranslationally inhibit the lysis-dependent release of RcGTA from cells in both a complex medium and a defined medium. Furthermore, we found that cell lysis requires the genes rcc00555 and rcc00556, which were expressed and studied in Escherichia coli to determine their predicted functions as an endolysin and holin, respectively. Production of RcGTA is regulated by host systems, including a putative histidine kinase, CckA, and we found that CckA is required for maximal expression of rcc00555 and for maturation of RcGTA to yield gene transduction-functional particles. PMID:23995641

  7. Carotenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: In vitro studies of a crt/bch transcription factor from Rhodobacter capsulatus and carotenoid enzymes from Erwinia herbicola

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, David Allen

    1992-11-01

    A putative transcription factor in Rhodobactor capsulatus which binds upstream of the crt and bch pigment biosynthesis operons and appears to play a role in the adaptation of the organism from the aerobic to the anaerobic-photosynthetic growth mode was characterized. Chapter 2 describes the identification of this factor through an in vitro mobility shift assay, as well as the determination of its binding properties and sequence specificity. Chapter 3 focuses on the isolation of this factor. Biochemistry of later carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes derived from the non-photosynthetic bacterium, Erwinia herbicola. Chapter 4 describes the separate overexpression and in vitro analysis of two enzymes involved in the main sequence of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, lycopene cyclase and 5-carotene hydroxylase. Chapter 5 examines the overexpression and enzymology of functionally active zeaxanthin glucosyltransferase, an enzyme which carries out a more unusual transformation, converting a carotenoid into its more hydrophilic mono- and diglucoside derivatives. In addition, amino acid homology with other glucosyltransferases suggests a putative binding site for the UDP-activated glucose substrate.

  8. Use of hupS::lacZ gene fusion to study regulation of hydrogenase expression in Rhodobacter capsulatus: stimulation by H2.

    PubMed Central

    Colbeau, A; Vignais, P M

    1992-01-01

    The Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase enzyme was used as a reporter molecule for genetic fusions in Rhodobacter capsulatus. DNA fragments that were from the upstream region of the hydrogenase structural operon hupSLM and contained 5' hupS sequences were fused in frame to a promoterless lacZ gene, yielding fusion proteins comprising the putative signal sequence and the first 22 amino acids of the HupS protein joined to the eight amino acid of beta-galactosidase. We demonstrate the usefulness of the hupS::lacZ fusion in monitoring regulation of hydrogenase gene expression. The activities of plasmid-determined beta-galactosidase and chromosome-encoded hydrogenase changed in parallel in response to various growth conditions (light or dark, aerobiosis or anaerobiosis, and presence or absence of ammonia or of H2), showing that changes in hydrogenase activity were due to changes in enzyme synthesis. Molecular hydrogen stimulated hydrogenase synthesis in dark, aerobic cultures and in illuminated, anaerobic cultures. Analysis of hupS::lacZ expression in various mutants indicated that neither the hydrogenase structural genes nor NifR4 (sigma 54) was essential for hydrogen regulation of hydrogenase synthesis. PMID:1624420

  9. Sequence analysis and interposon mutagenesis of the hupT gene, which encodes a sensor protein involved in repression of hydrogenase synthesis in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Elsen, S; Richaud, P; Colbeau, A; Vignais, P M

    1993-01-01

    The hupT gene, which represses hydrogenase gene expression in the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, has been identified and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of hupT and of the contiguous downstream open reading frame, hupU, is reported. The HupT protein of 456 amino acids (48,414 Da) has sequence similarity with the FixL, DctB, NtrB, and ArcB proteins and is predicted to be a soluble sensor kinase. Insertional inactivation of the hupT gene led to deregulation of transcriptional control, so that the hydrogenase structural operon hupSLC became overexpressed in cells grown anaerobically or aerobically. The HupT- mutants were complemented in trans by a plasmid containing an intact copy of the hupT gene. The hupU open reading frame, capable of encoding a protein of 84,879 Da, shared identity with [NiFe]hydrogenase subunits; the strongest similarity was observed with the periplasmic hydrogenase of Desulfovibrio baculatus. Images PMID:8226687

  10. The structural role of the carotenoid in the bacterial light-harvesting protein 2 (LH2) of Rhodonbacter capsulatus. A Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy and circular dichroism study.

    PubMed

    Zurdo, J; Centeno, M A; Odriozola, J A; Fernández-Cabrera, C; Ramírez, J M

    1995-11-01

    In previous work (Zurdo J, Fernández-Cabrera C and Ramírez JM (1993) Biochem J 290: 531-537), it had been shown that selective extraction of the carotenoid from the light-harvesting protein 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter capsulatus induced the dissociation of 800-nm absorbing bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl), a 10-nm red shift of 854-nm Bchl, and a decrease of the stability of the protein in detergent solution. In the present study, the Fourier transform Raman and near-infrared circular dichroism spectra of native and carotenoid-depleted LH2 membrane preparations were compared. It was found that while the coupled carbonyls of 854-nm Bchl remained specifically H-bonded to the peptides after carotenoid extraction, the optical activity of the near-infrared electronic transition was significantly altered. Given the excitonic origin of such optical activity, our data suggest that carotenoid extraction elicits a rearrengement of the chromophore cluster and of the associated polypeptide subunits. This implies a significant role of the carotenoid in maintaining the native quaternary structure of the protein, which would be consistent with the observed dissociation of 800-nm Bchl and the loss of solubilized LH2 stability that result from carotenoid removal. There is no evidence for a similar role of the carotenoid in the LH1 protein.

  11. NifA- and CooA-Coordinated cowN Expression Sustains Nitrogen Fixation by Rhodobacter capsulatus in the Presence of Carbon Monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Pfänder, Yvonne; Fehringer, Maria; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus fixes atmospheric dinitrogen via two nitrogenases, Mo- and Fe-nitrogenase, which operate under different conditions. Here, we describe the functions in nitrogen fixation and regulation of the rcc00574 (cooA) and rcc00575 (cowN) genes, which are located upstream of the structural genes of Mo-nitrogenase, nifHDK. Disruption of cooA or cowN specifically impaired Mo-nitrogenase-dependent growth at carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations still tolerated by the wild type. The cooA gene was shown to belong to the Mo-nitrogenase regulon, which is exclusively expressed when ammonium is limiting. Its expression was activated by NifA1 and NifA2, the transcriptional activators of nifHDK. AnfA, the transcriptional activator of Fe-nitrogenase genes, repressed cooA, thereby counteracting NifA activation. CooA activated cowN expression in response to increasing CO concentrations. Base substitutions in the presumed CooA binding site located upstream of the cowN transcription start site abolished cowN expression, indicating that cowN regulation by CooA is direct. In conclusion, a transcription factor-based network controls cowN expression to protect Mo-nitrogenase (but not Fe-nitrogenase) under appropriate conditions. PMID:25070737

  12. Carotenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: In vitro studies of a crt/bch transcription factor from Rhodobacter capsulatus and carotenoid enzymes from Erwinia herbicola

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, D.A.

    1992-11-01

    A putative transcription factor in Rhodobactor capsulatus which binds upstream of the crt and bch pigment biosynthesis operons and appears to play a role in the adaptation of the organism from the aerobic to the anaerobic-photosynthetic growth mode was characterized. Chapter 2 describes the identification of this factor through an in vitro mobility shift assay, as well as the determination of its binding properties and sequence specificity. Chapter 3 focuses on the isolation of this factor. Biochemistry of later carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes derived from the non-photosynthetic bacterium, Erwinia herbicola. Chapter 4 describes the separate overexpression and in vitro analysis of two enzymes involved in the main sequence of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, lycopene cyclase and 5-carotene hydroxylase. Chapter 5 examines the overexpression and enzymology of functionally active zeaxanthin glucosyltransferase, an enzyme which carries out a more unusual transformation, converting a carotenoid into its more hydrophilic mono- and diglucoside derivatives. In addition, amino acid homology with other glucosyltransferases suggests a putative binding site for the UDP-activated glucose substrate.

  13. Optimization of the hydrogen yield from single-stage photofermentation of glucose by Rhodobacter capsulatus JP91 using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Dipankar; Sobro, Irma Flore; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen production from glucose via single-stage photofermentation was examined with the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus JP91 (hup-). Response surface methodology with Box-Behnken design was used to optimize the independent experimental variables of glucose concentration, glutamate concentration and light intensity, as well as examining their interactive effects for maximization of molar hydrogen yield. Under optimal condition with a light intensity of 175W/m(2), 35mM glucose, and 4.5mM glutamate, a maximum hydrogen yield of 5.5 (±0.15)molH(2)/molglucose, and a maximum nitrogenase activity of 246 (±3.5)nmolC(2)H(4)/ml/min were obtained. Densitometric analysis of nitrogenase Fe-protein expression under different conditions showed significant variation in Fe-protein expression with a maximum at the optimized central point. Even under optimum conditions for hydrogen production, a significant fraction of the Fe-protein was found in the ADP-ribosylated state, suggesting that further improvement in yields might be possible.

  14. Bacteriochlorophyll-dependent expression of genes for pigment-binding proteins in Rhodobacter capsulatus involves the RegB/RegA two-component system.

    PubMed

    Abada, E M; Balzer, A; Jäger, A; Klug, G

    2002-04-01

    Expression of the puf and puc operons, which encode proteins of the photosynthetic apparatus of Rhodobacter capsulatus, is regulated by oxygen. A drop in the oxygen tension in the environment leads to an increase in the levels of puf and puc mRNAs. In strains lacking bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) due to mutations in bch genes, the rise in puf and puc mRNA levels observed on reduction of oxygen tension is much less pronounced than in wild-type cells, indicating co-regulation of the syntheses of pigments and pigment-binding proteins. Here we show that Bchl synthesis also affects the expression of the bchC gene, which codes for a subunit of bacteriochlorophyll synthase, suggesting an autoregulatory mechanism for the Bchl biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that the RegB/RegA two-component system, which is known to play a central role in oxygen-controlled expression of photosynthesis genes, is also involved in the Bchl-dependent regulation. Mutant strains which do not synthesize RegB or RegA show similar oxygen-dependent puf and puc expression in the presence and absence of Bchl. Our results support the view that the RegB/RegA system can directly or indirectly sense whether Bchl synthesis takes place or not.

  15. Habitual hot-spring bathing by a group of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in their natural habitat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Watanabe, Kunio; Eishi, Tokida

    2007-12-01

    Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in a free-ranging group in Jigokudani valley, Nagano prefecture, are known to bathe in a hot spring. We used scan sampling in a study aimed at elucidating the causal factors and possible social transmission of this behavior. From 1980-2003, 31% of a total 114 females in the group habitually bathed in the hot spring. The habit was more widespread in dominant matrilines than in subordinate matrilines. Infants whose mothers bathed were more likely to bathe than infants of mothers who did not bathe. The number of monkeys bathing was clearly influenced by ambient air temperature. More monkeys bathed in the hot spring in winter than in summer. The results support the thermoregulation hypothesis of hot-spring bathing. Bathing behavior varies among age and sex categories of monkeys, with adult females and juveniles bathing more often than adult males and subadults. We compared hot-spring bathing with other thermoregulatory behaviors in various primate populations.

  16. Bathing hospitalized dependent patients with prepackaged disposable washcloths instead of traditional bath basins: A case-crossover study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emily Toth; Haider, Samran; Palleschi, Maria; Eagle, Sommer; Crisostomo, Delfin V; Haddox, Pamela; Harmon, Laura; Mazur, Robin; Moshos, Judy; Marchaim, Dror; Kaye, Keith S

    2017-09-01

    Basins used for patient bathing have been shown to be contaminated with multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) and have prompted the evaluation of alternatives to soap and water bathing methods. We conducted a prospective, randomized, open-label interventional crossover study to assess the impact of replacing traditional bath basins with prepackaged washcloths on the incidence of hospital-associated infections (HAIs), MDROs, and secondarily, rates of skin deterioration. Unit-wide use of disposable washcloths over an 8-month period was compared with an 8-month period of standard care using basins. A total of 2,637 patients were included from 2 medical-surgical units at a single tertiary medical center, contributing 16,034 patient days. During the study period, there were a total of 33 unit-acquired infections, the rates of which were not statistically different between study phases (incidence rate ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.50-2.23; P = .88). However, occurrence of skin integrity deterioration was significantly less in the intervention group (odds ratio, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.22-0.88; P = .02). Although we were unable to demonstrate a significant reduction in HAI or MDRO acquisition, we found a decrease in skin deterioration with the use of disposable washcloths and confirmed earlier findings of MDRO contamination of wash basins. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Structure of the puf operon of the obligately aerobic, bacteriochlorophyll alpha-containing bacterium Roseobacter denitrificans OCh114 and its expression in a Rhodobacter capsulatus puf puc deletion mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Kortlüke, C; Breese, K; Gad'on, N; Labahn, A; Drews, G

    1997-01-01

    Roseobacter denitrificans (Erythrobacter species strain OCh114) synthesizes bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl) and the photosynthetic apparatus only in the presence of oxygen and is unable to carry out primary photosynthetic reactions and to grow photosynthetically under anoxic conditions. The puf operon of R. denitrificans has the same five genes in the same order as in many photosynthetic bacteria, i.e., pufBALMC. PufC, the tetraheme subunit of the reaction center (RC), consists of 352 amino acids (Mr, 39,043); 20 and 34% of the total amino acids are identical to those of PufC of Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Rubrivivax gelatinosus, respectively. The N-terminal hydrophobic domain is probably responsible for anchoring the subunit in the membrane. Four heme-binding domains are homologous to those of PufC in several purple bacteria. Sequences similar to pufQ and pufX of Rhodobacter capsulatus were not detected on the chromosome of R. denitrificans. The puf operon of R. denitrificans was expressed in trans in Escherichia coli, and all gene products were synthesized. The Roseobacter puf operon was also expressed in R. capsulatus CK11, a puf puc double-deletion mutant. For the first time, an RC/light-harvesting complex I core complex was heterologously synthesized. The strongest expression of the R. denitrificans puf operon was observed under the control of the R. capsulatus puf promoter, in the presence of pufQ and pufX and in the absence of pufC. Charge recombination between the primary donor P+ and the primary ubiquinone Q(A)- was observed in the transconjugant, showing that the M and L subunits of the RC were correctly assembled. The transconjugants did not grow photosynthetically under anoxic conditions. PMID:9286973

  18. [Shower-bath and its influence on the behaviour of the aerobic resident flora of the human skin. Half-side comparisons between a single shower bath with and without bath supplements (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A A

    1980-01-01

    A method for the in vivo investigation of shower-bath supplements and their influences on the human skin flora is presented. The shower-bath supplement is added in a constant dosis directly to the shower-jet to obtain constant conditions of shower-bathing on the human skin. Different concentrations of the shower-bath supplement in neighboured areas of the skin can be avoided and this allows to make comparative investigations of the effect of shower-bath supplements to the normal human skin flora. The reproducibility of the results and the accuracy of the method were investigated in half-side comparisons of the aerobic resident flora of the flexor sides of the forearms in three groups of volunteers, 60 persons in total. A marketable product in two slightly differing modificatons was used as shower-bath supplement. Half-side comparisons between each of the two supplements against water alone and between the shower-bath supplements directly were performed. The detergent washing method was used for sampling the skin flora. Statistically significant changes of the aerobic resident flora in the half-side comparison between the two supplements were obvious only 24 h after a single bath. It could be proved that the results can be reproduced at different times and with different groups of vlunteers. Further more, that a half-side comparison between th two shower-bath supplements detects more sensible differences in the effect on the human skin flora of the two marketable products than the comparison of each supplement with water alone.

  19. Resummed memory kernels in generalized system-bath master equations.

    PubMed

    Mavros, Michael G; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2014-08-07

    Generalized master equations provide a concise formalism for studying reduced population dynamics. Usually, these master equations require a perturbative expansion of the memory kernels governing the dynamics; in order to prevent divergences, these expansions must be resummed. Resummation techniques of perturbation series are ubiquitous in physics, but they have not been readily studied for the time-dependent memory kernels used in generalized master equations. In this paper, we present a comparison of different resummation techniques for such memory kernels up to fourth order. We study specifically the spin-boson Hamiltonian as a model system bath Hamiltonian, treating the diabatic coupling between the two states as a perturbation. A novel derivation of the fourth-order memory kernel for the spin-boson problem is presented; then, the second- and fourth-order kernels are evaluated numerically for a variety of spin-boson parameter regimes. We find that resumming the kernels through fourth order using a Padé approximant results in divergent populations in the strong electronic coupling regime due to a singularity introduced by the nature of the resummation, and thus recommend a non-divergent exponential resummation (the "Landau-Zener resummation" of previous work). The inclusion of fourth-order effects in a Landau-Zener-resummed kernel is shown to improve both the dephasing rate and the obedience of detailed balance over simpler prescriptions like the non-interacting blip approximation, showing a relatively quick convergence on the exact answer. The results suggest that including higher-order contributions to the memory kernel of a generalized master equation and performing an appropriate resummation can provide a numerically-exact solution to system-bath dynamics for a general spectral density, opening the way to a new class of methods for treating system-bath dynamics.

  20. Copper selenide thin films by chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, V. M.; Nair, P. K.; Nair, M. T. S.

    1999-05-01

    We report the structural, optical, and electrical properties of thin films (0.05 to 0.25 μm) of copper selenide obtained from chemical baths using sodium selenosulfate or N,N-dimethylselenourea as a source of selenide ions. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies on the films obtained from baths using sodium selenosulfate suggest a cubic structure as in berzelianite, Cu 2- xSe with x=0.15. Annealing the films at 400°C in nitrogen leads to a partial conversion of the film to Cu 2Se. In the case of films obtained from the baths containing dimethylselenourea, the XRD patterns match that of klockmannite, CuSe. Annealing these films in nitrogen at 400°C results in loss of selenium, and consequently a composition rich in copper, similar to Cu 2- xSe, is reached. Optical absorption in the films result from free carrier absorption in the near infrared region with absorption coefficient of ˜10 5 cm -1. Band-to-band transitions which gives rise to the optical absorption in the visible-ultraviolet region may be interpreted in terms of direct allowed transitions with band gap in the 2.1-2.3 eV range and indirect allowed transitions with band gap 1.2-1.4 eV. All the films, as prepared and annealed, show p-type conductivity, in the range of (1-5)×10 3 Ω -1 cm -1. This results in high near infrared reflectance, of 30-80%.

  1. Resummed memory kernels in generalized system-bath master equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavros, Michael G.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2014-08-01

    Generalized master equations provide a concise formalism for studying reduced population dynamics. Usually, these master equations require a perturbative expansion of the memory kernels governing the dynamics; in order to prevent divergences, these expansions must be resummed. Resummation techniques of perturbation series are ubiquitous in physics, but they have not been readily studied for the time-dependent memory kernels used in generalized master equations. In this paper, we present a comparison of different resummation techniques for such memory kernels up to fourth order. We study specifically the spin-boson Hamiltonian as a model system bath Hamiltonian, treating the diabatic coupling between the two states as a perturbation. A novel derivation of the fourth-order memory kernel for the spin-boson problem is presented; then, the second- and fourth-order kernels are evaluated numerically for a variety of spin-boson parameter regimes. We find that resumming the kernels through fourth order using a Padé approximant results in divergent populations in the strong electronic coupling regime due to a singularity introduced by the nature of the resummation, and thus recommend a non-divergent exponential resummation (the "Landau-Zener resummation" of previous work). The inclusion of fourth-order effects in a Landau-Zener-resummed kernel is shown to improve both the dephasing rate and the obedience of detailed balance over simpler prescriptions like the non-interacting blip approximation, showing a relatively quick convergence on the exact answer. The results suggest that including higher-order contributions to the memory kernel of a generalized master equation and performing an appropriate resummation can provide a numerically-exact solution to system-bath dynamics for a general spectral density, opening the way to a new class of methods for treating system-bath dynamics.

  2. Quantum kinetics and thermalization in a particle bath model.

    PubMed

    Alamoudi, S M; Boyanovsky, D; de Vega, H J

    1999-07-01

    We study the dynamics of relaxation and thermalization in an exactly solvable model of a particle interacting with a harmonic oscillator bath. Our goal is to understand the effects of non-Markovian processes on the relaxational dynamics and to compare the exact evolution of the distribution function with approximate Markovian and non-Markovian quantum kinetics. There are two different cases that are studied in detail: (i) a quasiparticle (resonance) when the renormalized frequency of the particle is above the frequency threshold of the bath and (ii) a stable renormalized "particle" state below this threshold. The time evolution of the occupation number for the particle is evaluated exactly using different approaches that yield to complementary insights. The exact solution allows us to investigate the concept of the formation time of a quasiparticle and to study the difference between the relaxation of the distribution of bare particles and that of quasiparticles. For the case of quasiparticles, the exact occupation number asymptotically tends to a statistical equilibrium distribution that differs from a simple Bose-Einstein form as a result of off-shell processes whereas in the stable particle case, the distribution of particles does not thermalize with the bath. We derive a non-Markovian quantum kinetic equation which resums the perturbative series and includes off-shell effects. A Markovian approximation that includes off-shell contributions and the usual Boltzmann equation (energy conserving) are obtained from the quantum kinetic equation in the limit of wide separation of time scales upon different coarse-graining assumptions. The relaxational dynamics predicted by the non-Markovian, Markovian, and Boltzmann approximations are compared to the exact result. The Boltzmann approach is seen to fail in the case of wide resonances and when threshold and renormalization effects are important.

  3. [History of hot spring bath treatment in China].

    PubMed

    Hao, Wanpeng; Wang, Xiaojun; Xiang, Yinghong; Gu Li, A Man; Li, Ming; Zhang, Xin

    2011-07-01

    As early as the 7th century B.C. (Western Zhou Dynasty), there is a recording as 'spring which contains sulfur could treat disease' on the Wentang Stele written by WANG Bao. Wenquan Fu written by ZHANG Heng in the Easten Han Dynasty also mentioned hot spring bath treatment. The distribution of hot springs in China has been summarized by LI Daoyuan in the Northern Wei Dynasty in his Shuijingzhu which recorded hot springs in 41 places and interpreted the definition of hot spring. Bencao Shiyi (by CHEN Cangqi, Tang Dynasty) discussed the formation of and indications for hot springs. HU Zai in the Song Dynasty pointed out distinguishing hot springs according to water quality in his book Yuyin Conghua. TANG Shenwei in the Song Dynasty noted in Jingshi Zhenglei Beiji Bencao that hot spring bath treatment should be combined with diet. Shiwu Bencao (Ming Dynasty) classified hot springs into sulfur springs, arsenicum springs, cinnabar springs, aluminite springs, etc. and pointed out their individual indications. Geologists did not start the work on distribution and water quality analysis of hot springs until the first half of the 20th century. There are 972 hot springs in Wenquan Jiyao (written by geologist ZHANG Hongzhao and published in 1956). In July 1982, the First National Geothermal Conference was held and it reported that there were more than 2600 hot springs in China. Since the second half of the 20th century, hot spring sanatoriums and rehabilitation centers have been established, which promoted the development of hot spring bath treatment.

  4. Resummed memory kernels in generalized system-bath master equations

    SciTech Connect

    Mavros, Michael G.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2014-08-07

    Generalized master equations provide a concise formalism for studying reduced population dynamics. Usually, these master equations require a perturbative expansion of the memory kernels governing the dynamics; in order to prevent divergences, these expansions must be resummed. Resummation techniques of perturbation series are ubiquitous in physics, but they have not been readily studied for the time-dependent memory kernels used in generalized master equations. In this paper, we present a comparison of different resummation techniques for such memory kernels up to fourth order. We study specifically the spin-boson Hamiltonian as a model system bath Hamiltonian, treating the diabatic coupling between the two states as a perturbation. A novel derivation of the fourth-order memory kernel for the spin-boson problem is presented; then, the second- and fourth-order kernels are evaluated numerically for a variety of spin-boson parameter regimes. We find that resumming the kernels through fourth order using a Padé approximant results in divergent populations in the strong electronic coupling regime due to a singularity introduced by the nature of the resummation, and thus recommend a non-divergent exponential resummation (the “Landau-Zener resummation” of previous work). The inclusion of fourth-order effects in a Landau-Zener-resummed kernel is shown to improve both the dephasing rate and the obedience of detailed balance over simpler prescriptions like the non-interacting blip approximation, showing a relatively quick convergence on the exact answer. The results suggest that including higher-order contributions to the memory kernel of a generalized master equation and performing an appropriate resummation can provide a numerically-exact solution to system-bath dynamics for a general spectral density, opening the way to a new class of methods for treating system-bath dynamics.

  5. Decoherence of a single spin coupled to an interacting spin bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ning; Fröhling, Nina; Xing, Xi; Hackmann, Johannes; Nanduri, Arun; Anders, Frithjof B.; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-01-01

    Decoherence of a central spin coupled to an interacting spin bath via inhomogeneous Heisenberg coupling is studied by two different approaches, namely an exact equations of motion (EOMs) method and a Chebyshev expansion technique (CET). By assuming a wheel topology of the bath spins with uniform nearest-neighbor X X -type intrabath coupling, we examine the central spin dynamics with the bath prepared in two different types of bath initial conditions. For fully polarized baths in strong magnetic fields, the polarization dynamics of the central spin exhibits a collapse-revival behavior in the intermediate-time regime. Under an antiferromagnetic bath initial condition, the two methods give excellently consistent central spin decoherence dynamics for finite-size baths of N ≤14 bath spins. The decoherence factor is found to drop off abruptly on a short time scale and approach a finite plateau value which depends on the intrabath coupling strength nonmonotonically. In the ultrastrong intrabath coupling regime, the plateau values show an oscillatory behavior depending on whether N /2 is even or odd. The observed results are interpreted qualitatively within the framework of the EOM and perturbation analysis. The effects of anisotropic spin-bath coupling and inhomogeneous intrabath bath couplings are briefly discussed. Possible experimental realization of the model in a modified quantum corral setup is suggested.

  6. [The use of white and yellow turpentine baths with diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Davydova, O B; Turova, E A; Golovach, A V

    1998-01-01

    In patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus while and yellow turpentine baths produced a positive effect on carbohydrate metabolism. White baths were more effective in respect to lipid metabolism, blood viscosity, produced a good effect on plasmic hemocoagulation factors. Both while and yellow turpentine baths were beneficial for capillary blood flow: initially high distal blood flow in patients with prevailing distal polyneuropathy decreased while in patients with macroangiopathy initially subnormal blood flow increased. Both white and yellow turpentine baths promoted better pulse blood filling of the lower limbs and weaker peripheral resistance of large vessels. In patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus white and yellow turpentine baths contributed to normalization of carbohydrate metabolism. Yellow baths were more effective in lowering lipids. White baths induced inhibition of platelet aggregation but had no effect on coagulation, yellow baths promoted a reduction of fibrinogen but had no effect on platelet aggregation. Yellow baths produced more pronounced effect than white ones on blood viscosity and microcirculation. Both yellow and white baths stimulated pulse blood filling, corrected peripheral resistance of large and small vessels of the lower limbs.

  7. Generalized Energy Equipartition in Harmonic Oscillators Driven by Active Baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Claudio; Paoluzzi, Matteo; Pellicciotta, Nicola; Lepore, Alessia; Angelani, Luca; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    We study experimentally and numerically the dynamics of colloidal beads confined by a harmonic potential in a bath of swimming E. coli bacteria. The resulting dynamics is well approximated by a Langevin equation for an overdamped oscillator driven by the combination of a white thermal noise and an exponentially correlated active noise. This scenario leads to a simple generalization of the equipartition theorem resulting in the coexistence of two different effective temperatures that govern dynamics along the flat and the curved directions in the potential landscape.

  8. Transport of thermal water from well to thermal baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montegrossi, Giordano; Vaselli, Orlando; Tassi, Franco; Nocentini, Matteo; Liccioli, Caterina; Nisi, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    The main problem in building a thermal bath is having a hot spring or a thermal well located in an appropriate position for customer access; since Roman age, thermal baths were distributed in the whole empire and often road and cities were built all around afterwards. Nowadays, the perspectives are changed and occasionally the thermal resource is required to be transported with a pipeline system from the main source to the spa. Nevertheless, the geothermal fluid may show problems of corrosion and scaling during transport. In the Ambra valley, central Italy, a geothermal well has recently been drilled and it discharges a Ca(Mg)-SO4, CO2-rich water at the temperature of 41 °C, that could be used for supplying a new spa in the surrounding areas of the well itself. The main problem is that the producing well is located in a forest tree ca. 4 km far away from the nearest structure suitable to host the thermal bath. In this study, we illustrate the pipeline design from the producing well to the spa, constraining the physical and geochemical parameters to reduce scaling and corrosion phenomena. The starting point is the thermal well that has a flow rate ranging from 22 up to 25 L/sec. The thermal fluid is heavily precipitating calcite (50-100 ton/month) due to the calcite-CO2 equilibrium in the reservoir, where a partial pressure of 11 bar of CO2 is present. One of the most vexing problems in investigating scaling processed during the fluid transport in the pipeline is that there is not a proper software package for multiphase fluid flow in pipes characterized by such a complex chemistry. As a consequence, we used a modified TOUGHREACT with Pitzer database, arranged to use Darcy-Weisbach equation, and applying "fictitious" material properties in order to give the proper y- z- velocity profile in comparison to the analytical solution for laminar fluid flow in pipes. This investigation gave as a result the lowest CO2 partial pressure to be kept in the pipeline (nearly 2

  9. The geology of Burnsville Cove, Bath and Highland Counties, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swezey, Christopher; Haynes, John T.; Lambert, Richard A.; White, William B.; Lucas, Philip C.; Garrity, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Burnsville Cove is a karst region in Bath and Highland Counties of Virginia. A new geologic map of the area reveals various units of limestone, sandstone, and siliciclastic mudstone (shale) of Silurian through Devonian age, as well as structural features such as northeast-trending anticlines and synclines, minor thrust faults, and prominent joints. Quaternary features include erosional (strath) terraces and accumulations of mud, sand, and gravel. The caves of Burnsville Cove are located within predominantly carbonate strata above the Silurian Williamsport Sandstone and below the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone. Most of the caves are located within the Silurian Tonoloway Limestone, rather than the Silurian-Devonian Keyser Limestone as reported previously.

  10. Dissociation rate of bromine diatomics in an argon heat bath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razner, R.; Hopkins, D.

    1973-01-01

    The evolution of a collection of 300 K bromine diatomics embedded in a heat bath of argon atoms at 1800 K was studied by computer, and a dissociation-rate constant for the reaction Br2 + BR + Ar yields Br + Ar was determined. Previously published probability distributions for energy and angular momentum transfers in classical three-dimensional Br2-Ar collisions were used in conjunction with a newly developed Monte Carlo scheme for this purpose. Results are compared with experimental shock-tube data and the predictions of several other theoretical models. A departure from equilibrium is obtained which is significantly greater than that predicted by any of these other theories.

  11. Dynamical quantum phase transitions in presence of a spin bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-León, Á.; Stamp, P. C. E.

    2017-02-01

    We derive an effective time independent Hamiltonian for the transverse Ising model coupled to a spin bath, in the presence of a high frequency AC magnetic field. The spin blocking mechanism that removes the quantum phase transition can be suppressed by the AC field, allowing tunability of the quantum critical point. We calculate the phase diagram, including the nuclear spins, and apply the results to quantum Ising systems with long-range dipolar interactions; the example of LiHoF4 is discussed in detail.

  12. Molecular analysis of the pmo (particulate methane monooxygenase) operons from two type II methanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, B; McDonald, I R; Finch, R; Stafford, G P; Nielsen, A K; Murrell, J C

    2000-03-01

    The particulate methane monooxygenase gene clusters, pmoCAB, from two representative type II methanotrophs of the alpha-Proteobacteria, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and Methylocystis sp. strain M, have been cloned and sequenced. Primer extension experiments revealed that the pmo cluster is probably transcribed from a single transcriptional start site located 300 bp upstream of the start of the first gene, pmoC, for Methylocystis sp. strain M. Immediately upstream of the putative start site, consensus sequences for sigma(70) promoters were identified, suggesting that these pmo genes are recognized by sigma(70) and negatively regulated under low-copper conditions. The pmo genes were cloned in several overlapping fragments, since parts of these genes appeared to be toxic to the Escherichia coli host. Methanotrophs contain two virtually identical copies of pmo genes, and it was necessary to use Southern blotting and probing with pmo gene fragments in order to differentiate between the two pmoCAB clusters in both methanotrophs. The complete DNA sequence of one copy of pmo genes from each organism is reported here. The gene sequences are 84% similar to each other and 75% similar to that of a type I methanotroph of the gamma-Proteobacteria, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. The derived proteins PmoC and PmoA are predicted to be highly hydrophobic and consist mainly of transmembrane-spanning regions, whereas PmoB has only two putative transmembrane-spanning helices. Hybridization experiments showed that there are two copies of pmoC in both M. trichosporium OB3b and Methylocystis sp. strain M, and not three copies as found in M. capsulatus Bath.

  13. Verification of impact of morning showering and mist sauna bathing on human physiological functions and work efficiency during the day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soomin; Fujimura, Hiroko; Shimomura, Yoshihiro; Katsuura, Tetsuo

    2015-09-01

    Recently, a growing number in Japan are switching to taking baths in the morning (morning bathing). However, the effects of the morning bathing on human physiological functions and work efficiency have not yet been revealed. Then, we hypothesized that the effect of morning bathing on physiological functions would be different from those of night bathing. In this study, we measured the physiological functions and work efficiency during the day following the morning bathing (7:10-7:20) including showering, mist sauna bathing, and no bathing as a control. Ten male healthy young adults participated in this study as the subjects. We evaluated the rectal temperature (Tre), skin temperature (Tsk), heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), blood pressure (BP), the relative power density of the alpha wave (α-wave ratio) of electroencephalogram, alpha attenuation coefficient (AAC), and the error rate of the task performance. As a result, we found that the HR after the mist sauna bathing was significantly lower than those after no bathing rest 3 (11:00). Furthermore, we verified that the α-wave ratio of the Pz after the mist sauna bathing was significantly lower than those after no bathing during the task 6 (15:00). On the other hand, the α-wave ratio of the Pz after the mist sauna bathing was significantly higher than those after showering during the rest 3 (11:00). Tsk after the mist sauna bathing was higher than those after the showering at 9:00 and 15:00. In addition, the error rate of the task performance after the mist sauna bathing was lower than those after no bathing and showering at 14:00. This study concludes that a morning mist sauna is safe and maintains both skin temperature compared to other bathing methods. Moreover, it is presumed that the morning mist sauna bathing improves work efficiency comparing other bathing methods during the task period of the day following the morning bathing.

  14. On the electrospraying of conducting liquids in dielectric liquid baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Marín, Álvaro; Loscertales, Ignacio G.; Márquez, Manuel; Barrero, Antonio

    2004-11-01

    Steady cone-jets of conducting liquids inside dielectris liquid baths are easily obtained. In particular water and glycerol have been electrosprayed in either heptane or vaseline oil. Experimental results show that the current emitted from the cone-jet depends on the flow rate and the liquid properties in the same way that it does in air. On the contrary, the effects of the bath inertia plays an important role to determine the size of droplets. Also the addition of small amounts of both water-soluble and lipid-soluble surfactants changes appreciably the spray characteristics. The influence of either lipid-soluble or water soluble surfactants at different concentrations on the droplet size of a water electrospray in oil or heptane has been experimentally obtained. In the case of glycerol, the high viscosity of the fluid gives rise to very long jets presenting kink instabilitiy far from the vertex cone. Much more stable jets are obtained by adding small amounts of lipid or water-soluble surfactants. In those cases, the electric field on the very long jet of glycerol is very small and a big droplet is formed at the end of the jet.

  15. Efficient heat-bath sampling in Fock space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Adam; Changlani, Hitesh; Umrigar, Cyrus

    We introduce an algorithm for sampling many-body quantum states in Fock space. The algorithm efficiently samples states with probability approximately proportional to an arbitrary function of the second-quantized Hamiltonian matrix elements connected to the current state. We apply the new sampling algorithm to the recently-developed Semistochastic Full Configuration Interaction Quantum Monte Carlo method (S-FCIQMC), a semistochastic implementation of the power method for projecting out the ground state energy in a basis of Slater determinants. The heat-bath sampling requires modest additional computational time and memory compared to uniform sampling but results in newly-spawned weights that are approximately of the same magnitude, thereby greatly improving the efficiency of projection. A comparison in efficiency between uniform and approximate heat-bath sampling is performed on the all-electron nitrogen dimer at equilibrium in Dunning's cc-pVXZ basis sets with X ∈ D , T , Q , 5 , demonstrating a large gain in efficiency that increases with basis set size. This work was supported in part by grants NSF CHE-1112097, DOE DE-SC0006650, and NSF ACI-1534965.

  16. Lunar Surface Systems Wet-Bath Design Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Shelby; Szabo, Rich; Howard, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the current evaluation was to examine five different wet-bath architectural design concepts. The primary means of testing the concepts required participants to physically act-out a number of functional tasks (e.g., shaving, showering, changing clothes, maintenance) in order to give judgments on the affordance of the volume as based on the design concepts. Each of the concepts was designed in such a way that certain features were exploited - for example, a concept may have a large amount of internal stowage, but minimum amount of usable space to perform tasks. The results showed that the most preferred concept was one in which stowage and usable space were balanced. This concept allowed for a moderate amount of stowage with some suggested redesign, but would not preclude additional personal items such as clothing. This concept also allowed for a greater distance to be achieved between the toilet and the sink with minimum redesign, which was desirable. Therefore, the all-in-one (i.e., toilet, sink, and shower all occupying a single volume) wet-bath concept seemed to be a viable solution in which there is a minimal amount of overall volume available with certain lunar habitat configurations.

  17. Music-assisted bathing: making shower time easier for people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Ray, Kendra D; Fitzsimmons, Suzanne

    2014-02-01

    It is estimated that 90% of nursing home residents need assistance with bathing. The purpose of this article is to describe a music-assisted care technique that can be used by caregivers when bathing nursing home residents with dementia. Research suggests that music has many therapeutic benefits for people with dementia. Using music to soothe anxiety can be an effective intervention to assist with lessening of agitation during activities of daily living, especially bathing. This article will provide nursing and direct care staff tools to successfully conduct the music-assisted bathing protocol. Consideration for choosing appropriate music for bathing, the creation of individualized personalized playlists, and acknowledgement of desired outcomes are presented. Incorporating music-assisted bathing may address neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia by lessening agitation and improving mood, which in turn can increase job satisfaction.

  18. Equilibrium states of a test particle coupled to finite-size heat baths.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qun; Smith, S Taylor; Onofrio, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    We report on numerical simulations of the dynamics of a test particle coupled to competing Boltzmann heat baths of finite size. After discussing some features of the single bath case, we show that the presence of two heat baths further constrains the conditions necessary for the test particle to thermalize with the heat baths. We find that thermalization is a spectral property in which the oscillators of the bath with frequencies in the range of the test particle characteristic frequency determine its degree of thermalization. We also find an unexpected frequency shift of the test particle response with respect to the spectra of the two heat baths. Finally, we discuss implications of our results for the study of high-frequency nanomechanical resonators through cold damping cooling techniques and for engineering reservoirs capable of mitigating the back action on a mechanical system.

  19. Experimental study of pharmacokinetics of external, whole-body bathing application of ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Atsushi; Komoda, Masayo; Akagi, Keita; Yuzawa, Kaoru; Yoshimasu, Takashi; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Hirota, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    As a novel method improving the safety of conventional oral ivermectin (IVM) for scabies treatment, we conceived an idea called the "whole-body bathing method". In this method, the patients would bathe themselves in a bathing fluid containing IVM at an effective concentration. To evaluate the feasibility of the method, we investigated the IVM concentration in the skin and plasma after bathing rats in a fluid containing 100 ng/mL of IVM. After the bathing, the concentration of IVM in the skin was more than 400 ng/g wet weight and was maintained until 8 h after the bathing. The concentration was clearly higher than that in patients taking IVM p.o. as previously reported; IVM was not detected in plasma in the present study. Thus, the method would be a preferable drug delivery system for the skin application of IVM compared with p.o. administration. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  20. Daily Bathing with Chlorhexidine and Its Effects on Nosocomial Infection Rates in Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Raulji, Chittalsinh M; Clay, Kristin; Velasco, Cruz; Yu, Lolie C

    2015-01-01

    Infections remain a serious complication in pediatric oncology patients. To determine if daily bathing with Chlorhexidine gluconate can decrease the rate of nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients, we reviewed rates of infections in pediatric oncology patients over a 14-month span. Intervention group received daily bath with Chlorhexidine, while the control group did not receive daily bath. The results showed that daily bath with antiseptic chlorhexidine as daily prophylactic antiseptic topical wash leads to decreased infection density amongst the pediatric oncology patients, especially in patients older than 12 years of age. Furthermore, daily chlorhexidine bathing significantly reduced the rate of hospital acquired infection in patients older than 12 years of age. The findings of this study suggest that daily bathing with chlorhexidine may be an effective measure of reducing nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients.

  1. Dissipative Landau-Zener transitions of a qubit: Bath-specific and universal behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Keiji; Wubs, Martijn; Kohler, Sigmund; Haenggi, Peter; Kayanuma, Yosuke

    2007-06-01

    We study Landau-Zener transitions in a qubit coupled to a bath at zero temperature. A general formula that is applicable to models with a nondegenerate ground state is derived. We calculate exact transition probabilities for a qubit coupled to either a bosonic or a spin bath. The nature of the baths and the qubit-bath coupling is reflected in the transition probabilities. For diagonal coupling, when the bath causes energy fluctuations of the diabatic qubit states but no transitions between them, the transition probability coincides with the standard Landau-Zener probability of an isolated qubit. This result is universal as it does not depend on the specific type of bath. For pure off-diagonal coupling, by contrast, the tunneling probability is sensitive to the coupling strength. We discuss the relevance of our results for experiments on molecular nanomagnets, in circuit QED, and for the fast-pulse readout of superconducting phase qubits.

  2. Bath water contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria in 24-hour home baths, hot springs, and public bathhouses of Nagano Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michiko; Oana, Kozue; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Bath water samples were collected from 116 hot springs, 197 public bathhouses, and 38 24-hour home baths in Nagano Prefecture, Japan, during the period of April 2009 to November 2011, for determining the presence and extent of contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Cultures positive for Legionella were observed in 123 of the 3,314 bath water samples examined. The distribution and abundance of Legionella and/or combined contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria were investigated to clarify the contamination levels. The abundance of Legionella was demonstrated to correlate considerably with the levels of combined contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Legionella spp. were obtained from 61% of the water samples from 24-hour home baths, but only from 3% of the samples from public bathhouses and hot springs. This is despite the fact that a few outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease in Nagano Prefecture as well as other regions of Japan have been traced to bath water contamination. The comparatively higher rate of contamination of the 24-hour home baths is a matter of concern. It is therefore advisable to routinely implement good maintenance of the water basins, particularly of the 24-hour home baths.

  3. Does the bathing water classification depend on sampling strategy? A bootstrap approach for bathing water quality assessment, according to Directive 2006/7/EC requirements.

    PubMed

    López, Iago; Alvarez, César; Gil, José L; Revilla, José A

    2012-11-30

    Data on the 95th and 90th percentiles of bacteriological quality indicators are used to classify bathing waters in Europe, according to the requirements of Directive 2006/7/EC. However, percentile values and consequently, classification of bathing waters depend both on sampling effort and sample-size, which may undermine an appropriate assessment of bathing water classification. To analyse the influence of sampling effort and sample size on water classification, a bootstrap approach was applied to 55 bacteriological quality datasets of several beaches in the Balearic Islands (Spain). Our results show that the probability of failing the regulatory standards of the Directive is high when sample size is low, due to a higher variability in percentile values. In this way, 49% of the bathing waters reaching an "Excellent" classification (95th percentile of Escherichia coli under 250 cfu/100 ml) can fail the "Excellent" regulatory standard due to sampling strategy, when 23 samples per season are considered. This percentage increases to 81% when 4 samples per season are considered. "Good" regulatory standards can also be failed in bathing waters with an "Excellent" classification as a result of these sampling strategies. The variability in percentile values may affect bathing water classification and is critical for the appropriate design and implementation of bathing water Quality Monitoring and Assessment Programs. Hence, variability of percentile values should be taken into account by authorities if an adequate management of these areas is to be achieved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sulfite stimulates the ATP hydrolysis activity of but not proton translocation by the ATP synthase of Rhodobacter capsulatus and interferes with its activation by delta muH+.

    PubMed

    Cappellini, P; Turina, P; Fregni, V; Melandri, B A

    1997-09-01

    Sulfite stimulates the rate of ATP hydrolysis by the ATP synthase in chromatophores of Rhodobacter capsulatus. The stimulated activity is inhibited by oligomycin. The activation takes place also in uncoupled chromatophores. The activation consists in an increase of about 12-15-fold of the Vmax for the ATP hydrolysis reaction, while the Km for MgATP is unaffected at 0.16+/-0.03 mM. The dependence of Vmax on the sulfite concentration follows a hyperbolic pattern with half maximum effect at 12 mM. Sulfite affects the ability of the enzyme in translocating protons. Concomitant measurements of the rate of ATP hydrolysis and of ATP-induced protonic flows demonstrate that at sulfite concentrations of greater than 10 mM the hydrolytic reaction becomes progressively uncoupled from the process of proton translocation. This is accompanied by an inhibition of ATP synthesis, either driven by light or by artificially induced ionic gradients. ATP synthesis is totally inhibited at concentrations of at least 80 mM. Sulfite interferes with the mechanism of activation by delta muH+. Low concentrations of this anion (< or = 2 mM) prevent the activation by delta muH+. At higher concentrations a marked stimulation of the activity prevails, regardless of the occurrence of a delta muH+ across the membrane. Phosphate at millimolar concentrations can reverse the inhibition by sulfite. These experimental results can be simulated by a model assuming multiple and competitive equilibria for phosphate or sulfite binding with two binding sites for the two ligands (for sulfite K1S = 0.26 and K2S = 37 mM, and for phosphate K1P = 0.06 and K2P = 4.22 mM), and in which the state bound only to one sulfite molecule is totally inactive in hydrolysis. The competition between phosphate and sulfite is consistent with the molecular structures of the two ligands and of the enzyme.

  5. Coordinated Expression of fdxD and Molybdenum Nitrogenase Genes Promotes Nitrogen Fixation by Rhodobacter capsulatus in the Presence of Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Müller, Alexandra; Fehringer, Maria; Pfänder, Yvonne; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus is able to grow with N2 as the sole nitrogen source using either a molybdenum-dependent or a molybdenum-free iron-only nitrogenase whose expression is strictly inhibited by ammonium. Disruption of the fdxD gene, which is located directly upstream of the Mo-nitrogenase genes, nifHDK, abolished diazotrophic growth via Mo-nitrogenase at oxygen concentrations still tolerated by the wild type, thus demonstrating the importance of FdxD under semiaerobic conditions. In contrast, FdxD was not beneficial for diazotrophic growth depending on Fe-nitrogenase. These findings suggest that the 2Fe2S ferredoxin FdxD specifically supports the Mo-nitrogenase system, probably by protecting Mo-nitrogenase against oxygen, as previously shown for its Azotobacter vinelandii counterpart, FeSII. Expression of fdxD occurred under nitrogen-fixing conditions, but not in the presence of ammonium. Expression of fdxD strictly required NifA1 and NifA2, the transcriptional activators of the Mo-nitrogenase genes, but not AnfA, the transcriptional activator of the Fe-nitrogenase genes. Expression of the fdxD and nifH genes, as well as the FdxD and NifH protein levels, increased with increasing molybdate concentrations. Molybdate induction of fdxD was independent of the molybdate-sensing regulators MopA and MopB, which repress anfA transcription at micromolar molybdate concentrations. In this report, we demonstrate the physiological relevance of an fesII-like gene, fdxD, and show that the cellular nitrogen and molybdenum statuses are integrated to control its expression. PMID:24272776

  6. 1-Deoxy-d-Xylulose 5-Phosphate Synthase, the Gene Product of Open Reading Frame (ORF) 2816 and ORF 2895 in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Frederick M.; Eubanks, Lisa M.; Testa, Charles A.; Blagg, Brian S. J.; Baker, Jonathan A.; Poulter, C. Dale

    2001-01-01

    In eubacteria, green algae, and plant chloroplasts, isopentenyl diphosphate, a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of isoprenoids, is synthesized by the methylerythritol phosphate pathway. The five carbons of the basic isoprenoid unit are assembled by joining pyruvate and d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The reaction is catalyzed by the thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase. In Rhodobacter capsulatus, two open reading frames (ORFs) carry the genes that encode 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase. ORF 2816 is located in the photosynthesis-related gene cluster, along with most of the genes required for synthesis of the photosynthetic machinery of the bacterium, whereas ORF 2895 is located elsewhere in the genome. The proteins encoded by ORF 2816 and ORF 2895, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase A and B, containing a His6 tag, were synthesized in Escherichia coli and purified to greater than 95% homogeneity in two steps. 1-Deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase A appears to be a homodimer with 68 kDa subunits. A new assay was developed, and the following steady-state kinetic constants were determined for 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase A and B: Kmpyruvate = 0.61 and 3.0 mM, Kmd-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate = 150 and 120 μM, and Vmax = 1.9 and 1.4 μmol/min/mg in 200 mM sodium citrate (pH 7.4). The ORF encoding 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase B complemented the disrupted essential dxs gene in E. coli strain FH11. PMID:11114895

  7. BchJ and BchM interact in a 1 : 1 ratio with the magnesium chelatase BchH subunit of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Artur; Willows, Robert D

    2010-11-01

    Substrate channeling between the enzymatic steps in the (bacterio)chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway catalyzed by magnesium chelatase (BchI/ChlI, BchD/ChlD and BchH/ChlH subunits) and S-adenosyl-L-methionine:magnesium-protoporphyrin IX O-methyltransferase (BchM/ChlM) has been suggested. This involves delivery of magnesium-protoporphyrin IX from the BchH/ChlH subunit of magnesium chelatase to BchM/ChlM. Stimulation of BchM/ChlM activity by BchH/ChlH has previously been shown, and physical interaction of the two proteins has been demonstrated. In plants and cyanobacteria, there is an added layer of complexity, as Gun4 serves as a porphyrin (protoporphyrin IX and magnesium-protoporphyrin IX) carrier, but this protein does not exist in anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. BchJ may play a similar role to Gun4 in Rhodobacter, as it has no currently assigned function in the established pathway. Purified recombinant Rhodobacter capsulatus BchJ and BchM were found to cause a shift in the equilibrium amount of Mg-protoporphyrin IX formed in a magnesium chelatase assay. Analysis of this shift revealed that it was always in a 1 : 1 ratio with either of these proteins and the BchH subunit of the magnesium chelatase. The establishment of the new equilibrium was faster with BchM than with BchJ in a coupled magnesium chelatase assay. BchJ bound magnesium-protoporphyrin IX or formed a ternary complex with BchH and magnesium-protoporphyrin IX. These results suggest that BchJ may play a role as a general magnesium porphyrin carrier, similar to one of the roles of GUN4 in oxygenic organisms.

  8. Heterologous expression of the Rhodobacter capsulatus BchI, -D, and -H genes that encode magnesium chelatase subunits and characterization of the reconstituted enzyme.

    PubMed

    Willows, R D; Beale, S I

    1998-12-18

    Magnesium chelatase inserts Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX in the chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathways. In photosynthetic bacteria, the products of three genes, bchI, bchD, and bchH, are required for magnesium chelatase activity. These genes from Rhodobacter capsulatus were cloned separately into expression plasmids pET3a and pET15b. The pET15b constructs produced NH2-terminally His6-tagged proteins. All proteins were highly expressed and were purified to near homogeneity. The BchI and BchH proteins were soluble. BchD proteins were insoluble, inactive inclusion bodies that were renatured by rapid dilution from 6 M urea. The presence of BchI in the solution into which the urea solution of BchD was diluted increased the yield of active BchD. A molar ratio of 1 BchI:1 BchD was sufficient for maximum renaturation of BchD. All of the proteins were active in the magnesium chelatase assay except His-tagged BchI, which was inactive and inhibited in incubations containing non-His-tagged BchI. Expressed BchH proteins contained tightly bound protoporphyrin IX, and they were susceptible to inactivation by light. Maximum magnesium chelatase activity per mol of BchD occurred at a stoichiometry of 4 BchI:1 BchD. The optimum reaction pH was 8.0. The reaction exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics with respect to protoporphyrin IX and BchH.

  9. Expression of Uptake Hydrogenase and Molybdenum Nitrogenase in Rhodobacter capsulatus Is Coregulated by the RegB-RegA Two-Component Regulatory System

    PubMed Central

    Elsen, Sylvie; Dischert, Wanda; Colbeau, Annette; Bauer, Carl E.

    2000-01-01

    Purple photosynthetic bacteria are capable of generating cellular energy from several sources, including photosynthesis, respiration, and H2 oxidation. Under nutrient-limiting conditions, cellular energy can be used to assimilate carbon and nitrogen. This study provides the first evidence of a molecular link for the coregulation of nitrogenase and hydrogenase biosynthesis in an anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium. We demonstrated that molybdenum nitrogenase biosynthesis is under the control of the RegB-RegA two-component regulatory system in Rhodobacter capsulatus. Footprint analyses and in vivo transcription studies showed that RegA indirectly activates nitrogenase synthesis by binding to and activating the expression of nifA2, which encodes one of the two functional copies of the nif-specific transcriptional activator, NifA. Expression of nifA2 but not nifA1 is reduced in the reg mutants up to eightfold under derepressing conditions and is also reduced under repressing conditions. Thus, although NtrC is absolutely required for nifA2 expression, RegA acts as a coactivator of nifA2. We also demonstrated that in reg mutants, [NiFe]hydrogenase synthesis and activity are increased up to sixfold. RegA binds to the promoter of the hydrogenase gene operon and therefore directly represses its expression. Thus, the RegB-RegA system controls such diverse processes as energy-generating photosynthesis and H2 oxidation, as well as the energy-demanding processes of N2 fixation and CO2 assimilation. PMID:10781552

  10. Interaction between the H2 Sensor HupUV and the Histidine Kinase HupT Controls HupSL Hydrogenase Synthesis in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Elsen, Sylvie; Duché, Ophélie; Colbeau, Annette

    2003-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus contains two [NiFe]hydrogenases: an energy-generating hydrogenase, HupSL, and a regulatory hydrogenase, HupUV. The synthesis of HupSL is specifically activated by H2 through a signal transduction cascade comprising three proteins: the H2-sensing HupUV protein, the histidine kinase HupT, and the transcriptional regulator HupR. Whereas a phosphotransfer between HupT and HupR was previously demonstrated, interaction between HupUV and HupT was only hypothesized based on in vivo analyses of mutant phenotypes. To visualize the in vitro interaction between HupUV and HupT proteins, a six-His (His6)-HupU fusion protein and the HupV protein were coproduced by using a homologous expression system. The two proteins copurified as a His6-HupUHupV complex present in dimeric and tetrameric forms, both of which had H2 uptake activity. We demonstrated that HupT and HupUV interact and form stable complexes that could be separated on a native gel. Interaction was also monitored with surface plasmon resonance technology and was shown to be insensitive to salt concentration and pH changes, suggesting that the interactions involve hydrophobic residues. As expected, H2 affects the interaction between HupUV and HupT, leading to a weakening of the interaction, which is independent of the phosphate status of HupT. Several forms of HupT were tested for their ability to interact with HupUV and to complement hupT mutants. Strong interaction with HupUV was obtained with the isolated PAS domain of HupT and with inactive HupT mutated in the phosphorylable histidine residue, but only the wild-type HupT protein was able to restore normal H2 regulation. PMID:14645270

  11. bchFNBH bacteriochlorophyll synthesis genes of Rhodobacter capsulatus and identification of the third subunit of light-independent protochlorophyllide reductase in bacteria and plants.

    PubMed

    Burke, D H; Alberti, M; Hearst, J E

    1993-04-01

    We present the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of four contiguous bacteriochlorophyll synthesis genes from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Three of these genes code for enzymes which catalyze reactions common to the chlorophyll synthesis pathway and therefore are likely to be found in plants and cyanobacteria as well. The pigments accumulated in strains with physically mapped transposon insertion mutations are analyzed by absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy, allowing us to assign the genes as bchF, bchN, bchB, and bchH, in that order. bchF encodes a bacteriochlorophyll alpha-specific enzyme that adds water across the 2-vinyl group. The other three genes are required for portions of the pathway that are shared with chlorophyll synthesis, and they were expected to be common to both pathways. bchN and bchB are required for protochlorophyllide reduction in the dark (along with bchL), a reaction that has been observed in all major groups of photosynthetic organisms except angiosperms, where only the light-dependent reaction has been clearly established. The purple bacterial and plant enzymes show 35% identity between the amino acids coded by bchN and chlN (gidA) and 49% identity between the amino acids coded by bchL and chlL (frxC). Furthermore, bchB is 33% identical to ORF513 from the Marchantia polymorpha chloroplast. We present arguments in favor of the probable role of ORF513 (chlB) in protochlorophyllide reduction in the dark. The further similarities of all three subunits of protochlorophyllide reductase and the three subunits of chlorin reductase in bacteriochlorophyll synthesis suggest that the two reductase systems are derived from a common ancestor.

  12. Coupling of proton flow to ATP synthesis in Rhodobacter capsulatus: F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase is absent from about half of chromatophores.

    PubMed

    Feniouk, B A; Cherepanov, D A; Junge, W; Mulkidjanian, A Y

    2001-11-01

    F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase (H(+)-ATP synthase, F(0)F(1)) utilizes the transmembrane protonmotive force to catalyze the formation of ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate (P(i)). Structurally the enzyme consists of a membrane-embedded proton-translocating F(0) portion and a protruding hydrophilic F(1) part that catalyzes the synthesis of ATP. In photosynthetic purple bacteria a single turnover of the photosynthetic reaction centers (driven by a short saturating flash of light) generates protonmotive force that is sufficiently large to drive ATP synthesis. Using isolated chromatophore vesicles of Rhodobacter capsulatus, we monitored the flash induced ATP synthesis (by chemoluminescence of luciferin/luciferase) in parallel to the transmembrane charge transfer through F(0)F(1) (by following the decay of electrochromic bandshifts of intrinsic carotenoids). With the help of specific inhibitors of F(1) (efrapeptin) and of F(0) (venturicidin), we decomposed the kinetics of the total proton flow through F(0)F(1) into (i) those coupled to the ATP synthesis and (ii) the de-coupled proton escape through F(0). Taking the coupled proton flow, we calculated the H(+)/ATP ratio; it was found to be 3.3+/-0.6 at a large driving force (after one saturating flash of light) but to increase up to 5.1+/-0.9 at a smaller driving force (after a half-saturating flash). From the results obtained, we conclude that our routine chromatophore preparations contained three subsets of chromatophore vesicles. Chromatophores with coupled F(0)F(1) dominated in fresh material. Freezing/thawing or pre-illumination in the absence of ADP and P(i) led to an increase in the fraction of chromatophores with at least one de-coupled F(0)(F(1)). The disclosed fraction of chromatophores that lacked proton-conducting F(0)(F(1)) (approx. 40% of the total amount) remained constant upon these treatments.

  13. A microscopic model for noise induced transport: Heat-bath nonlinearly driven by external white noise

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Pradipta; Shit, Anindita; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray

    2011-03-15

    This work explores the observation that, even in the absence of a net externally applied bias, a symmetric homogeneous system coupled linearly to two heat baths is capable of producing unidirectional motion simply by nonlinearly driving one of the heat baths by an external Gaussian white noise. This is quite contrary to the traditional observation that, in order to obtain a net drift current, a state-dependent dissipation, which is a consequence of nonlinear system-bath coupling, is ubiquitous.

  14. Effects of an artificially carbonated bath on athletic warm-up.

    PubMed

    Akamine, T; Taguchi, N

    1998-12-01

    The effects of an artificially carbonated bath (36 degrees C, CO2 300 ppm, 20 minutes) on the warm-up of swimmers was compared with those of a freshwater bath (36 degrees C, 20 minutes). Carbon dioxide is reported to have a vasodilatory effect on peripheral blood vessels of cutaneous and muscular tissue and to promote blood flow. We observed that the warm-up effects of a carbonated bath before swimming on the hematocrit, white blood cell, total plasma protein, and total cholesterol levels in venous blood were significantly increased more than those of a freshwater bath before swimming in recovery period (p < 0.05). Thus the carbonated bath tended to be more effective for increasing the concentrations of blood components. In the recovery period, the carbonated bath before swimming also resulted in significantly smaller changes in blood lactic acid and heart rate than those of a freshwater bath before swimming (p < 0.05). The decrease in electromyography of the M. rectus femoris during swimming suggested more efficient muscle activity after a carbonated bath. Therefore after a carbonated bath, swimmers should have a higher reserve left in the cardiovascular system, resulting in better performance during swimming and less accumulation of fatigue-related metabolites after swimming.

  15. Culture and long-term care: the bath as social service in Japan.

    PubMed

    Traphagan, John W

    2004-01-01

    A central feature of Japan's approach to community-based care of the elderly, including long-term home health care, is the emphasis on providing bath facilities. For mobile elders, senior centers typically provide a public bathing facility in which people can enjoy a relaxing soak along with friends who also visit the centers. In terms of in-home long-term care, visiting bath services are provided to assist family care providers with the difflcult task of bathing a frail or disabled elder--a task made more problematic as a result of the Japanese style of bathing. I argue that the bath, as social service, is a culturally shaped solution to a specific problem of elder care that arises in the Japanese context as a result of the importance of the bath in everyday life for Japanese. While the services may be considered specific to Japan, some aspects of bathing services, particularly the mobile bath service, may also have applicability in the United States.

  16. Occurrence of thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. and adenoviruses in Finnish bathing waters and purified sewage effluents.

    PubMed

    Hokajärvi, Anna-Maria; Pitkänen, Tarja; Siljanen, Henri M P; Nakari, Ulla-Maija; Torvinen, Eila; Siitonen, Anja; Miettinen, Ilkka T

    2013-03-01

    A total of 50 Finnish bathing water samples and 34 sewage effluent samples originating from 17 locations were studied in the summers of 2006 and 2007. Campylobacter were present in 58% and adenoviruses in 12% of all bathing water samples; 53% of all sewage effluent samples were positive for Campylobacter spp. and 59% for adenoviruses. C. jejuni was the most common Campylobacter species found and human adenovirus serotype 41 was the most common identified adenovirus type. Bathing water temperature displayed a significant negative relationship with the occurrence of Campylobacter. One location had identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of C. coli isolates in the bathing water and in sewage effluent, suggesting that sewage effluent was the source of C. coli at this bathing site. The counts of faecal indicator bacteria were not able to predict the presence of Campylobacter spp. or adenoviruses in the bathing waters. Thus the observed common presence of these pathogens in Finnish sewage effluents and bathing waters may represent a public health risk. The low water temperature in Finland may enhance the prevalence of Campylobacter in bathing waters. More attention needs to be paid to minimizing the concentrations of intestinal pathogens in bathing waters.

  17. Quantum Otto engine using a single ion and a single thermal bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Asoka; Chand, Suman

    2016-05-01

    Quantum heat engines employ a quantum system as the working fluid, that gives rise to large work efficiency, beyond the limit for classical heat engines. Existing proposals for implementing quantum heat engines require that the system interacts with the hot bath and the cold bath (both modelled as a classical system) in an alternative fashion and therefore assumes ability to switch off the interaction with the bath during a certain stage of the heat-cycle. However, it is not possible to decouple a quantum system from its always-on interaction with the bath without use of complex pulse sequences. It is also hard to identify two different baths at two different temperatures in quantum domain, that sequentially interact with the system. Here, we show how to implement a quantum Otto engine without requiring to decouple the bath in a sequential manner. This is done by considering a single thermal bath, coupled to a single trapped ion. The electronic degree of freedom of the ion is chosen as a two-level working fluid while the vibrational degree of freedom plays the role of the cold bath. Measuring the electronic state mimics the release of heat into the cold bath. Thus, our model is fully quantum and exhibits very large work efficiency, asymptotically close to unity.

  18. Quantum Entanglement and Discord Dynamics of two Noninteracting Spin Qubits in Two Independent Spin Baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lan; Wu, Guiping; Yan, Lin

    2017-03-01

    We study the dynamics of quantum entanglement and quantum discord between two non-interacting qubits, which couple with two independent spin baths, obeying the XXZ Hamiltonian. After the Holstein-Primakoff transformation, one could reduce the spin bath to a single-mode bosonic bath field. Then we use this model to study the entanglement and discord dynamics of two qubits in their corresponding spin bath. For the initial Werner state, it is indicated that both entanglement and quantum discord exhibit death and revival behavior, while the quantum correlations change more smaller.

  19. Effective Interactions between Colloidal Particles Suspended in a Bath of Swimming Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, L.; Maggi, C.; Bernardini, M. L.; Rizzo, A.; di Leonardo, R.

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics of passive colloidal tracers in a bath of self-propelled particles is receiving a lot of attention in the context of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. Here we demonstrate that active baths are also capable of mediating effective interactions between suspended bodies. In particular we observe that a bath of swimming bacteria gives rise to a short range attraction similar to depletion forces in equilibrium colloidal suspensions. Using numerical simulations and experiments we show how the features of this interaction arise from the combination of nonequilibrium dynamics (peculiar of bacterial baths) and excluded volume effects.

  20. Gauging a quantum heat bath with dissipative Landau-Zener transitions.

    PubMed

    Wubs, Martijn; Saito, Keiji; Kohler, Sigmund; Hänggi, Peter; Kayanuma, Yosuke

    2006-11-17

    We calculate the exact Landau-Zener transition probabilities for a qubit with an arbitrary linear coupling to a bath at zero temperature. The final quantum state exhibits a peculiar entanglement between the qubit and the bath. In the special case of diagonal coupling, the bath does not influence the transition probability, whatever the speed of the Landau-Zener sweep. It is proposed to use Landau-Zener transitions to determine both the reorganization energy and the integrated spectral density of the bath. Possible applications include circuit QED and molecular nanomagnets.

  1. Gauging a Quantum Heat Bath with Dissipative Landau-Zener Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Wubs, Martijn; Kohler, Sigmund; Haenggi, Peter; Saito, Keiji; Kayanuma, Yosuke

    2006-11-17

    We calculate the exact Landau-Zener transition probabilities for a qubit with an arbitrary linear coupling to a bath at zero temperature. The final quantum state exhibits a peculiar entanglement between the qubit and the bath. In the special case of diagonal coupling, the bath does not influence the transition probability, whatever the speed of the Landau-Zener sweep. It is proposed to use Landau-Zener transitions to determine both the reorganization energy and the integrated spectral density of the bath. Possible applications include circuit QED and molecular nanomagnets.

  2. Elderly patients' and nurses' assessment of traditional bed bath compared to prepacked single units--randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nøddeskou, Lis Horstmann; Hemmingsen, Lars E; Hørdam, Britta

    2015-06-01

    There are two types of bed baths: the traditional basin used with soap and water, and the disposable bath, which is prepacked in single-use units and heated before use. To compare the traditional basin bed bath to a disposable bed bath, there are four factors that need to be considered: (1) duration and quality of the bath, (2) cost, (3) nurse satisfaction and (4) patient satisfaction. Fifty-eight patients received bed baths on two consecutive days - a traditional bed bath on 1 day and a disposable bed bath on the other. The patients were bathed by the same nurse on both days. The baths were observed in relation to duration, use of supplies and quality. Nurses and patients were interviewed about their preferences. Both types of baths scored very highly in the area of quality. There was no difference in the cost of supplies. Significantly less time was used with the disposable baths (p < 0.001). In terms of total expenditure, the disposable bath cost 11.84 DKK and the basin method cost 11.87 DKK, resulting in an insignificant difference (p > 0.05). Taking the nurses salaries into account, it was much cheaper to bathe patients using the disposable bath. Most patients preferred the disposable bath, while others preferred the basin method or were equally satisfied with both types of baths. There was no significant difference in these results (p > 0.22). There were 46 cases during the trial where nurses preferred the disposable bath method. The washbasin method was preferred in six cases. And there was one case where the nurse was equally satisfied with both types of baths. The nurses rated the disposable bath significantly higher than the basin method. In most cases, patients and nurses preferred the same type of bath (70%). This study presents a comparison of the new method of bed bathing to the traditional basin method, in relation to cost, duration, quality and nurse and patient preference. In the case of disposable baths, the costs are lower as significantly less

  3. Increased coherence time in narrowed bath states in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravert, Lars B.; Lorenz, Peter; Nase, Carsten; Stolze, Joachim; Uhrig, Götz S.

    2016-09-01

    We study the influence of narrowed distributions of the nuclear Overhauser field on the decoherence of a central electron spin in quantum dots. We describe the spin dynamics in quantum dots by the central spin model. We use analytic solutions for uniform couplings and the time dependent density-matrix renormalization group (tDMRG) for nonuniform couplings. With these tools we calculate the dynamics of the central spin for large baths of nuclear spins with or without external magnetic field applied to the central spin. The focus of our study is the influence of initial mixtures with narrowed distributions of the Overhauser field and of applied magnetic fields on the decoherence of the central spin.

  4. Resonator-assisted quantum bath engineering of a flux qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xian-Peng; Shen, Li-Tuo; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Wu, Huai-Zhi; Yang, Zhen-Biao

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate quantum bath engineering for preparation of any orbital state with the controllable phase factor of a superconducting flux qubit assisted by a microwave coplanar waveguide resonator. We investigate the polarization efficiency of the arbitrary direction rotating on the Bloch sphere, and obtain an effective Rabi frequency by using the convergence condition of the Markovian master equation. The processes of polarization can be implemented effectively in a dissipative environment created by resonator photon loss when the spectrum of the microwave resonator matches with the specially tailored Rabi and resonant frequencies of the drive. Our calculations indicate that state-preparation fidelities in excess of 99% and the required time on the order of magnitude of a microsecond are in principle possible for experimentally reasonable sample parameters. Furthermore, our proposal could be applied to other systems with spin-based qubits.

  5. Influence of Additives on Bath Analysis in Aluminum Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jianfeng; Shi, Dong; Wang, Zhaowen; Gao, Bingliang; Shi, Zhongning; Hu, Xianwei

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the phase compositions of a solid cryolitic electrolyte based on the Na3AlF6-AlF3-KF-LiF-CaF2-Al2O3 system have been investigated. Using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluoride ion selective electrode analysis (FISEA) techniques, the molar ratio of NaF-AlF3 of the cryolitic electrolyte has been determined. The influence of the acidity of the additive electrolytes on the phase compositions of the cryolitic electrolyte has been discussed to gain fundamental insights into understanding the role of additives in such systems. Moreover, an improved XRD-based industrial bath analysis method has been introduced to analyze the composition of the complex cryolitic electrolytes. Finally, based on these results, a new equation has been derived that can be used for FISEA to complement such composition analyses.

  6. Instability arisen on liquid jet penetrated in flowing liquid bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Naoto; Ueno, Ichiro

    2009-11-01

    We carry out an experimental study with a special interest on a penetration process and an instability on a liquid jet impinged to a flowing liquid pool. The impinged jet penetrates into the flowing bath accompanying with an entrainment of the ambient immiscible gas without coalescing with the liquid in the pool until the air wrap around the jet collapses. The wrapping air controls instabilities arisen on the jet. We observe the dynamic behaviors of the penetrated jet and the departure of the bubble of the wrapping gas at the tip of the collapsing jet by use of a high-speed camera in order to categorize the behaviors as functions of the velocities of the jet and flow in the pool. We also evaluate an averaged thickness of the wrapping gas through the observation.

  7. Bath salts and synthetic cathinones: an emerging designer drug phenomenon.

    PubMed

    German, Christopher L; Fleckenstein, Annette E; Hanson, Glen R

    2014-02-27

    Synthetic cathinones are an emerging class of designer drugs abused for psychostimulant and hallucinogenic effects similar to cocaine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), or other amphetamines. Abuse of synthetic cathinones, frequently included in products sold as 'bath salts', became prevalent in early 2009, leading to legislative classification throughout Europe in 2010 and schedule I classification within the United States in 2011. Recent pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate that dysregulation of central monoamine systems is a principal mechanism of synthetic cathinone action and presumably underlie the behavioral effects and abuse liability associated with these drugs. This review provides insight into the development of synthetic cathinones as substances of abuse, current patterns of their abuse, known mechanisms of their action and toxicology, and the benefits and drawbacks of their classification.

  8. Influence of Additives on Bath Analysis in Aluminum Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jianfeng; Shi, Dong; Wang, Zhaowen; Gao, Bingliang; Shi, Zhongning; Hu, Xianwei

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the phase compositions of a solid cryolitic electrolyte based on the Na3AlF6-AlF3-KF-LiF-CaF2-Al2O3 system have been investigated. Using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluoride ion selective electrode analysis (FISEA) techniques, the molar ratio of NaF-AlF3 of the cryolitic electrolyte has been determined. The influence of the acidity of the additive electrolytes on the phase compositions of the cryolitic electrolyte has been discussed to gain fundamental insights into understanding the role of additives in such systems. Moreover, an improved XRD-based industrial bath analysis method has been introduced to analyze the composition of the complex cryolitic electrolytes. Finally, based on these results, a new equation has been derived that can be used for FISEA to complement such composition analyses.

  9. Bath salts and synthetic cathinones: An emerging designer drug phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    German, Christopher L.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.; Hanson, Glen R.

    2014-01-01

    The synthetic cathinones are an emerging class of designer drugs abused for psychostimulant and hallucinogenic effects similar to cocaine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), or other amphetamines. Abuse of synthetic cathinones, frequently included in products sold as ‘bath salts’, became prevalent in early 2009, leading to legislative classification throughout Europe in 2010 and schedule I classification within the United States in 2011. Recent pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate dysregulation of central monoamine systems are a principal mechanism of synthetic cathinone action and presumably underlie the behavioral effects and abuse liability associated with these drugs. This review provides insight into the development of synthetic cathinones as substances of abuse, current patterns of their abuse, known mechanisms of their action and toxicology, and the benefits and drawbacks of their classification. PMID:23911668

  10. Sex and the baths: a not-so-secret report.

    PubMed

    Helquist, Michael; Osmon, Rick

    2003-01-01

    During the 1984 debate about closing the baths in San Francisco the mayor directed the police to investigate sexual behavior in the bathhouses and write a report for her. The directive had been a secret, but when the community learned of the report, its response was quick and furious. The mayor squelched the report and no one but the report's authors, the mayor, and probably a handful of intermediaries ever saw the written report. In response to this investigation, two local journalists conducted a more open investigation that resulted in a newspaper article for Coming Up!, a lesbian and gay community newspaper published monthly in San Francisco (California). This article is reprinted here in large part because of its scientific rather than journalistic or historical value. These investigators approached their work systematically (certainly much more so than many other scientists, journalists or police professionals at the time), and as a result, their article provides a much more thorough description of what was happening in the baths at that point in the AIDS epidemic. Interestingly, many public policy options considered today were already part of the discussion then and, at times, already in place in the San Francisco bathhouses. Of note, at the time, orgy rooms were considered likely to be contributing to transmission, thus the authors gave particular attention to its presence/absence and use. The original paper was published in the July 1984 edition (pp. 17-22). As with all the reprinted papers in this volume, no editorial changes were made to the paper and only minor typographical errors were corrected. The editor of Coming Up! included a preface to the article in the original publication, and that preface is also reprinted here.

  11. [Hemodynamic effects of bathing in severe burnt patients].

    PubMed

    Moutet, J; Pinaud, M; Zaouter, M; Le Floch, R; Fourret, P; Meignier, M; Pannier, M

    1992-01-01

    Repeated water immersion is currently used in France in the treatment of severe burn injury. A prospective study was carried out to assess the haemodynamic effects of immersing such patients in a half sitting position in water, the temperature of which was kept at 35 degrees C. The burn exceeded 50% of body surface area (BSA), with at least 30% being third degree burns. The study was carried out during the first bath, three days after the injury. The patients were immersed up to the clavicles. They were sedated with 2 mg.h-1 of both flunitrazepam and phenoperidine, and were mechanically ventilated. The following haemodynamic parameters were monitored: heart rate, arterial blood pressure (the transducer being level with the arterial catheter), right atrial and pulmonary arterial pressures (the transducer being level with the right atrium, level which had been marked on the chest before immersion and placed two intercostal spaces higher after immersion because of the change in position of the heart). The cardiac output was measured using the thermodilution method. The patient's temperature was monitored with the thermistance of the Swan-Ganz catheter. Values were obtained before immersion, after 15 and 30 minutes of immersion, and 5 minutes after the end of the bath. Nine patients were included, 2 women and 7 men, aged between 24 and 45 years, weighing 73.7 kg on average. Burn size was 78% of BSA (range 64 to 95%). Water immersion was maintained for 34 +/- 3 min. The right atrial, mean pulmonary arterial, and wedge pressures, and the cardiac and systolic indices increased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Bathing adaptations in the homes of older adults (BATH-OUT): protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial (RCT).

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Phillip J; James, Marilyn; Belshaw, Stuart; Dawson, Tony; Day, Miriam R; Walker, Marion F

    2016-10-06

    The Care Act 2014 has placed a responsibility on local authorities in England to provide services that prevent deterioration and minimise the use of other health and social care services. Housing adaptations have been identified as 1 of the 10 most promising prevention services for older adults, with bathing adaptations being the most requested. However, many local authorities have lengthy waiting times which may increase costs, reduce effectiveness and reduce the preventive effect. There is no robust evidence of the effect of these adaptations on: health, well-being and functional ability. This is a feasibility randomised controlled trial (RCT) with nested qualitative interview study. The RCT will recruit between 40 and 60 people who have been referred for an accessible showering facility, and their carers, from 1 local authority in England. They will be randomised to either usual adaptations (∼3-month wait) or immediate adaptations (no wait). The primary outcome is the feasibility of conducting a powered study. The outcomes assessed will be: health and social care-related quality of life, independence in activities of daily living and bathing, falls and use of health and social care services. Outcomes will be assessed at 3 and 6 months. Preliminary health economic feasibility will be established. Favourable ethical opinion was provided by the Social Care Research Ethics Committee (reference number 16/IEC08/0017). The results of this study will lay the foundations for a further powered study. This would investigate the effect of bathing adaptations on quality of life and whether increased waiting times are associated with poorer outcomes and increased costs. The results have further potential to inform trials of other housing or social care interventions using the novel waiting list control method. Dissemination will include peer-reviewed publications and presentations at national and international conferences. ISRCTN14876332; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ

  13. 78 FR 53734 - Proposed Extension of Approval of Information Collection; Comment Request-Infant Bath Seats

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Extension of Approval of Information Collection; Comment Request--Infant Bath Seats... safety standard for infant bath seats. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) previously approved the... promulgate consumer product safety standards for durable infant or toddler products. These standards are to...

  14. 75 FR 31691 - Safety Standard for Infant Bath Seats: Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ... risk of injury associated with the product. We are issuing a safety standard for infant bath seats in... that the older user of a bath seat would apply his/her total weight in the head location when in a... out of the water. Infants may be physically capable of lifting their heads, but they may not do so...

  15. CURRENT AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR EXTENDING THE LIFETIME OF ELECTROLESS NICKEL PLATING BATHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The waste treatment and rejuvenation of spent electroless nickel baths has attracted a considerable amount of interest from electroplating shops, electroless nickel suppliers, universities and regulatory agencies due to the finite life of the baths and the associated waste that t...

  16. Investigation into the rejuvenation of spent electroless nickel baths by electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Paul T; Szlag, David C

    2002-05-15

    Electroless nickel plating generates substantially more waste than other metal-finishing processes due to the inherent limited bath life and the need for regular bath disposal. Electrodialysis can be used to regenerate electroless nickel baths, but poor membrane permselectivity, leading to high losses of valuable bath components, continues to be a weakness of the technology. This research has investigated improving electrodialysis permselectivity for removing contaminants (sodium, orthophosphite, and sulfate) in a spent electroless nickel bath while minimizing the losses of valuable bath ions (nickel, hypophosphite, and organic acids). Ion permselectivity was explored with respect to electrodialysis operating conditions, membrane type, and cell configuration. Excellent permselectivity for sodium over nickel was attained irrespective of operating condition, membrane, or cell configuration. Studies on the effects of four different operating conditions (current density, pH, flow rate, and temperature) on anion permselectivity revealed bath pH and current density to be critical operating parameters. The type of anion exchange membrane used had a crucial effect on selectivity; one membrane (Ionac MA-3475) was identified as having superior selectivity for bath contaminants particularly for sulfate. The improvements in electrodialysis permselectivity established by this research will decrease waste generation within the electroless nickel process and increase resource productivity by minimizing the loss of valuable plating chemicals.

  17. CURRENT AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR EXTENDING THE LIFETIME OF ELECTROLESS NICKEL PLATING BATHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The waste treatment and rejuvenation of spent electroless nickel baths has attracted a considerable amount of interest from electroplating shops, electroless nickel suppliers, universities and regulatory agencies due to the finite life of the baths and the associated waste that t...

  18. Bath-Ambience—A Mechatronic System for Assisting the Caregivers of Bedridden People

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Karolina; Machado, José; Carvalho, Vítor; Castro, Marcelo; Costa, Pedro; Matos, Demétrio; Soares, Filomena

    2017-01-01

    The health of older people is receiving special attention and dedication nowadays, with the aim of increasing their general wellbeing and quality of life. Studies into different aspects of the care of the elderly have found that emphasis should be given to solving problems related to bathing in different situations and environments. In particular, it is important to develop new assistive technologies to streamline and ease the burden of a caregiver’s daily tasks. Generally-speaking, in the case of bedridden patients, bathing is typically carried out manually by a caregiver, using towels, sponges, and a water basin. Nevertheless, this apparently simple task needs some precautions in order to avoid the risk of microbial infections, falls and other injuries. With that in mind, this paper presents the design of a portable washing system, called Bath-Ambience, which enables bedridden patients to be bathed efficiently without having to be moved from their position. This portable system can be installed in different situations, both in a domestic setting, and in specialized institutions, and allows the caregiver to perform the bathing tasks without compromising health and safety, thereby making it possible to offer a comfortable and hygienic procedure to patients, improving their quality of life. This paper presents the design of the portable Bath-Ambience washing system, which provides efficient assistance for bathing bedridden patients without moving them to another place. This system is mainly dedicated for integration a smart home application in to allow bathing everywhere. PMID:28524114

  19. Appraising the Literature On Bathing Practices And Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Prevention.

    PubMed

    Strouse, Abigail C

    2015-01-01

    As pressure for reduced catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CA UTI) rates continues, health care organizations are challenged to find new methods for infection prevention. The purpose of this review is to synthesize the evidence regarding the impact of bathing practices, particularly non-basin bathing, on CAUTI prevention.

  20. 40 CFR 420.80 - Applicability; description of the salt bath descaling subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the salt bath descaling subcategory. 420.80 Section 420.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Salt Bath Descaling Subcategory §...

  1. Comparison of Foot Bathing and Foot Massage in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Park, Ranhee; Park, Chaisoon

    2015-01-01

    In a clinical setting, patients have been observed to complain of discomfort and to discontinue treatment because of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), but few data exist regarding the quality of life in these patients in Korea. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to analyze the effects of foot bathing and massage in patients with CIPN. Subjects included 48 patients with CIPN, who were hospitalized in C University Hospital. The subjects were alternately assigned to 1 of 2 groups according to their registration order. The interventions consisted of 8 treatments of foot bathing or massage over a period of 2 weeks, at 30 minutes per session, every other day. The foot skin temperature increased significantly in the foot bathing group, whereas it decreased significantly in the massage group. Quality of life was significantly increased in the foot bathing group, whereas it was significantly decreased in the massage group. Although foot bathing and foot massage are both supportive care techniques for CIPN patients, foot bathing was more effective than foot massage on skin temperature, grade of neurotoxicity, and quality of life. Additional well-designed studies are recommended, so that the effectiveness of foot bathing and foot massage is confirmed. Foot bathing is more useful as supportive care with respect to nonpharmacologic interventions for alleviating CIPN and promoting the quality of life in cancer patients.

  2. Bath-Ambience-A Mechatronic System for Assisting the Caregivers of Bedridden People.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Karolina; Machado, José; Carvalho, Vítor; Castro, Marcelo; Costa, Pedro; Matos, Demétrio; Soares, Filomena

    2017-05-18

    The health of older people is receiving special attention and dedication nowadays, with the aim of increasing their general wellbeing and quality of life. Studies into different aspects of the care of the elderly have found that emphasis should be given to solving problems related to bathing in different situations and environments. In particular, it is important to develop new assistive technologies to streamline and ease the burden of a caregiver's daily tasks. Generally-speaking, in the case of bedridden patients, bathing is typically carried out manually by a caregiver, using towels, sponges, and a water basin. Nevertheless, this apparently simple task needs some precautions in order to avoid the risk of microbial infections, falls and other injuries. With that in mind, this paper presents the design of a portable washing system, called Bath-Ambience, which enables bedridden patients to be bathed efficiently without having to be moved from their position. This portable system can be installed in different situations, both in a domestic setting, and in specialized institutions, and allows the caregiver to perform the bathing tasks without compromising health and safety, thereby making it possible to offer a comfortable and hygienic procedure to patients, improving their quality of life. This paper presents the design of the portable Bath-Ambience washing system, which provides efficient assistance for bathing bedridden patients without moving them to another place. This system is mainly dedicated for integration a smart home application in to allow bathing everywhere.

  3. The efficacy of tepid sponge bathing to reduce fever in young children.

    PubMed

    Sharber, J

    1997-03-01

    Tepid sponge baths distress febrile children, and their efficacy at reducing fever has not been established. This study compared fever reduction and with (1) acetaminophen alone and (2) acetaminophen plus a 15-minute tepid sponge bath. Twenty children, ages 5 to 68 months, who presented to the emergency department or urgent care center with fever of > or = 38.9 degrees C were randomized to receive (1) acetaminophen alone or (2) acetaminophen plus a 15-minute tepid sponge bath. All subjects received a 15-mg/kg dose of acetaminophen. Tympanic temperature was monitored every 30 minutes for 2 hours. Subjects were monitored for signs of discomfort (crying, shivering, goosebumps). Sponge-bathed subjects cooled faster during the first hour but there was no significant temperature difference between the groups over the 2-hour study period (P = .871). Subjects in the sponge bath group had significantly higher discomfort scores (P = .009).

  4. Clinical and pharmacological aspects of bath salt use: a review of the literature and case reports.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Karen; Striebel, Joan; Cho, Arthur K; Wang, Christine

    2013-09-01

    Bath salts are designer drugs with stimulant properties that are a growing medical and psychiatric concern due to their widespread availability and use. Although the chemical compounds in the mixtures referred to as "bath salts" vary, many are derivatives of cathinone, a monoamine alkaloid. Cathinones have an affinity for dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine synapses in the brain. Because of the strong selection for these neurotransmitters, these drugs induce stimulating effects similar to those of methamphetamines, cocaine, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA). Much of the emerging information about bath salts is from emergency department evaluation and treatment of severe medical and neuropsychiatric adverse outcomes. This review consists of a compilation of case reports and describes the emergent literature that illustrates the chemical composition of bath salts, patterns of use, administration methods, medical and neuropsychiatric effects, and treatments of patients with bath salt toxicity.

  5. Sources of bathing water pollution in northern Tuscany (Italy): Effects of meteorological variables.

    PubMed

    Federigi, Ileana; Verani, Marco; Carducci, Annalaura

    2017-01-30

    This study was carried out in a popular tourist destination located in Italy, where short-term pollution posed the problem of low quality status of bathing waters (according to European Directive) owing to the fecal contamination caused by drainage ditches. Our goal was to understand the role of meteorological conditions on freshwater and seawater bacterial indicator levels, and the impact of polluted streams on seawater contamination. To this aim, results from surface waters were analyzed during five bathing seasons, from 2011 to 2015. Our results demonstrated a relationship between bacterial densities and rainfall amount and a time-dependent dilution effect of the sea between the two halves of each bathing season. This analytical survey confirmed the strategic role of meteorological variables in bathing waters quality, and it could be a support for generation and development of predicting models of indicator levels for bathing area.

  6. Prevalence of Legionella species isolated from shower water in public bath facilities in Toyama Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kanatani, Jun-Ichi; Isobe, Junko; Norimoto, Shiho; Kimata, Keiko; Mitsui, Chieko; Amemura-Maekawa, Junko; Kura, Fumiaki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Watahiki, Masanori

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the prevalence of Legionella spp. isolated from shower water in public bath facilities in Toyama Prefecture, Japan. In addition, we analyzed the genetic diversity among Legionella pneumophila isolates from shower water as well as the genetic relationship between isolates from shower water and from stock strains previously analyzed from sputum specimens. The isolates were characterized using serogrouping, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and sequence-based typing. Legionella spp. were isolated from 31/91 (34.1%) samples derived from 17/37 (45.9%) bath facilities. Isolates from shower water and bath water in each public bath facility were serologically or genetically different, indicating that we need to isolate several L. pneumophila colonies from both bath and shower water to identify public bath facilities as sources of legionellosis. The 61 L. pneumophila isolates from shower water were classified into 39 sequence types (STs) (index of discrimination = 0.974), including 19 new STs. Among the 39 STs, 12 STs match clinical isolates in the European Working Group for Legionella Infections database. Notably, ST505 L. pneumophila SG 1, a strain frequently isolated from patients with legionellosis and from bath water in this area, was isolated from shower water. Pathogenic L. pneumophila strains including ST505 strain were widely distributed in shower water in public bath facilities, with genetic diversity showing several different origins. This study highlights the need to isolate several L. pneumophila colonies from both bath water and shower water to identify public bath facilities as infection sources in legionellosis cases. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. X-ray crystallographic and mass spectrometric structure determination and functional characterization of succinylated porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus: implications for ion selectivity and single-channel conductance.

    PubMed Central

    Przybylski, M.; Glocker, M. O.; Nestel, U.; Schnaible, V.; Blüggel, M.; Diederichs, K.; Weckesser, J.; Schad, M.; Schmid, A.; Welte, W.; Benz, R.

    1996-01-01

    The role of charges near the pore mouth has been discussed in theoretical work about ion channels. To introduce new negative charges in a channel protein, amino groups of porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus 37b4 were succinylated with succinic anhydride, and the precise extent and sites of succinylations and structures of the succinylporins determined by mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. Molecular weight and peptide mapping analyses using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry identified selective succinylation of three lysine-epsilon-amino groups (Lys-46, Lys-298, Lys-300) and the N-terminal alpha-amino group. The structure of a tetra-succinylated porin (TS-porin) was determined to 2.4 A and was generally found unchanged in comparison to native porin to form a trimeric complex. All succinylated amino groups found in a mono/di-succinylated porin (MS-porin) and a TS-porin are localized at the inner channel surface and are solvent-accessible: Lys-46 is located at the channel constriction site, whereas Lys-298, Lys-300, and the N-terminus are all near the periplasmic entrance of the channel. The Lys-46 residue at the central constriction loop was modeled as succinyl-lysine from the electron density data and shown to bend toward the periplasmic pore mouth. The electrical properties of the MS-and TS-porins were determined by reconstitution into black lipid membranes, and showed a negative charge effect on ion transport and an increased cation selectivity through the porin channel. The properties of a typical general diffusion porin changed to those of a channel that contains point charges near the pore mouth. The single-channel conductance was no longer a linear function of the bulk aqueous salt concentration. The substantially higher cation selectivity of the succinylated porins compared with the native protein is consistent with the increase of negatively charged groups introduced. These results show tertiary structure

  8. Functional assignment of gene AAC16202.1 from Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003: new insights into the bacterial SDR sorbitol dehydrogenases family.

    PubMed

    Sola-Carvajal, Agustín; García-García, María Inmaculada; Sánchez-Carrón, Guiomar; García-Carmona, Francisco; Sánchez-Ferrer, Alvaro

    2012-11-01

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) constitute one of the largest enzyme superfamilies with over 60,000 non-redundant sequences in the database, many of which need a correct functional assignment. Among them, the gene AAC16202.1 (NCBI) from Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003 has been assigned in Uniprot both as a sorbitol dehydrogenase (#D5AUY1) and, as an N-acetyl-d-mannosamine dehydrogenase (#O66112), both enzymes being of biotechnological interest. When the gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3)pLys, the purified enzyme was not active toward N-acetyl-d-mannosamine, whereas it was active toward d-sorbitol and d-fructose. However, the relative activities toward xylitol and l-iditol (0.45 and 6.9%, respectively) were low compared with that toward d-sorbitol. Thus, the enzyme could be considered sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) with very low activity toward xylitol, which could increase its biotechnological interest for determining sorbitol without the unspecific cross-determination of added xylitol in food and pharma compositions. The tetrameric enzyme (120 kDa) showed similar catalytic efficiency (2.2 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)) to other sorbitol dehydrogenases for d-sorbitol, with an optimum pH of 9.0 and an optimum temperature of 37 °C. The enzyme was also more thermostable than other reported SDH, ammonium sulfate being the best stabilizer in this respect, increasing the melting temperature (T(m)) up to 52.9 °C. The enzyme can also be considered as a new member of the Zn(2+) independent SDH family since no effect on activity was detected in the presence of divalent cations or chelating agents. Finally, its in silico analysis enabled the specific conserved sequence blocks that are the fingerprints of bacterial sorbitol dehydrogenases and mainly located at C-terminal of the protein, to be determined for the first time. This knowledge will facilitate future data curation of present databases and a better functional assignment of newly described

  9. Single amino acid substitutions in the B870 alpha and beta light-harvesting polypeptides of Rhodobacter capsulatus. Structural and spectral effects.

    PubMed

    Babst, M; Albrecht, H; Wegmann, I; Brunisholz, R; Zuber, H

    1991-12-05

    To obtain information on the structural and functional role of highly conserved amino acid residues in the B870 alpha and beta light-harvesting polypeptides of Rhodobacter capsulatus, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. 18 mutants with single amino acid substitutions at nine different positions in the B870 antenna polypeptides were prepared in a B800-850-lacking strain. The characterization of the resulting phenotypes was based on a quantification of the core-complex elements (reaction center, light-harvesting polypeptides, bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoid) and the core-complex spectral characteristics (absorption maximum, absorption coefficient and fluorescence intensity). These data generally showed that strong structural effects were caused by the amino acid substitutions. Thus, the three tryptophan exchanges at the position alpha 8 resulted in either the absence of a core complex (alpha Trp8----Leu), the absence of the core antenna (alpha Trp8----Ala) or a reduction in the carotenoid content (alpha Trp8----Tyr). Likewise, the mutants alpha Pro13Gly (i.e. alpha Pro13----Gly), beta Gly10Val and alpha Phe23Ala demonstrated an abnormal protein/pigment ratio in the core antenna, while a drastically reduced antenna size resulted from the amino acid exchange beta Arg45Asp. In contrast to the structural effects, the absorption maxima and the fluorescence intensities of the mutant antennae differed only slightly from the wild type. The strongest blue shift of the bacteriochlorophyll a (8-11 nm) was induced by substitutions of the Trp at position alpha 43 (alpha Trp43----Ala, Leu or Tyr). Contrary to the other spectral effects, the absorption coefficient of bacteriochlorophyll a was strongly influenced by the amino acid substitutions and varied by 1.6-times less (beta Arg45Asp) and 1.3-times greater (alpha Phe25Ala) than normal. The antenna-free mutant, alpha Trp8Ala, yielded a high rate of B800-850 revertants during phototrophic growth, indicating a direct

  10. Exposure assessment for swimmers in bathing waters and swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Schets, Franciska M; Schijven, Jack F; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2011-03-01

    Bathing water compliant with bathing water legislation may nevertheless contain pathogens to such a level that they pose unacceptable health risks for swimmers. Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA) can provide a proper basis for protective measures, but the required data on swimmer exposure are currently limited or lacking. The objective of this study was to collect exposure data for swimmers in fresh water, seawater and swimming pools, i.e. volume of water swallowed and frequency and duration of swimming events. The study related to swimming in 2007, but since the summer of 2007 was wet and this might have biased the results regarding surface water exposure, the study was repeated relating to swimming in 2009, which had a dry and sunny summer. Exposure data were collected through questionnaires administered to approximately 19 000 persons representing the general Dutch population. Questionnaires were completed by 8000 adults of whom 1924 additionally answered the questions for their eldest child (< 15 years). The collected data did not differ significantly between 2007 and 2009. The frequency of swimming and the duration of swimming were different for men, women and children and between water types. Differences between men and women were small, but children behaved differently: they swam more often, stayed in the water longer, submerged their heads more often and swallowed more water. Swimming pools were visited most frequently (on average 13-24 times/year) with longest duration of swimming (on average 67-81 min). On average, fresh and seawater sites were visited 6-8 times/year and visits lasted 41-79 min. Dependent on the water type, men swallowed on average 27-34 ml per swimming event, women 18-23 ml, and children 31-51 ml. Data on exposure of swimmers to recreational waters could be obtained by using a questionnaire approach in combination with a test to measure mouthfuls of water for transformation of categorical data to numerical data of

  11. Microbial and nutrient pollution of coastal bathing waters in Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Daby, D; Turner, J; Jago, C

    2002-02-01

    The coastal pollution problem in Mauritius is exacerbated by the hydrogeology of the volcanic substratum. Bacterial contamination of bathing waters and nutrients, water temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen (DO) were monitored at three different spatial and temporal scales along the coastline of Mauritius during 1997-1998. Standard techniques for water sample collection and analysis set by the American Public Health Association [APHA. Standard methods for the examination of water and wastewater. 19th ed. Washington, DC: APHA, 1995.] were used at: (a) 16 sites around the island over a period of 7 months; (b) 12 stations along a recreational beach over an 18-month period; and (c) at an underground freshwater seepage point over 1 day. Total coliform (TC), faecal coliform (FC), and faecal streptococci (FS) contamination reported during all surveys varied randomly (e.g., with maximum densities in the ranges of 346-2020 TC, 130-2000 FC, and 180-1040 FS at one site) and at times exceeded the established EEC and Environment Protection Agency (EPA) standards for bathing water (e.g., in >90% of samples) to qualify for beach closure. Computed FC:FS ratios were used to pinpoint human faecal matter as the main source of contamination. Nitrate, phosphate, and silicate concentrations in seepage water were high (3600-9485, 38-105, and 9950-24,775 microg l(-1), respectively) and a cause for concern when compared with levels (5-845, 5-72, and 35-6570 microg l(-1), respectively) in cleaner lagoon water samples. Statistical analysis showed significant correlations (for TC and NO3: r=.75, P<.02; for TC and PO4: r=.779, P<.02; for TC and SiO4: r=.731, P<.05; for FC and NO3: r=.773, P<.02; for FC and SiO4: r=.727, P<.05; for FS and SiO4: r=.801 P<.01) between microbial densities and nutrients recorded, confirming the pathogen-contaminated water to be highly eutrophic. There is an urgency for Mauritius to properly address the issue of sewage treatment and wastewater discharge to

  12. Bath's Law as a Consequence of Magnitude Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Console, R.; Maura, M.; Lombardi, A.

    2002-12-01

    We revisit the issue of the so-called Bath's law concerning the difference D1 between the magnitude of the mainshock, M0, and the second largest shock, M1, in the same sequence. Various authors, in the past, observed that this difference is approximately equal to 1.2. Feller demonstrated in 1966 that the D1 expected value was about 0.5 given that the difference between the two largest random variables of a sample, N, exponentially distributed is also a random variable with the same distribution. Feller's proof leads to the consequence that the mainshock comes from a sample, which is different from the one of its aftershocks. A mathematical formulation of the problem is developed here, the only assumption being that all the events belong to the same self-similar set of earthquakes following the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution with a constant b-value. Assuming that the number of aftershocks in each aftershock series is known, and not extremely large, this model shows a substantial dependence of D1 on the magnitude thresholds chosen for the mainshock and its largest aftershock. In this way it explains the large D1 values reported in the past. Analysis of the PDE catalog of shallow earthquakes demonstrates a good agreement between the average D1 values predicted by the theoretical model and those observed. Limiting our attention to the average D1 values, Bath's law doesn't seem to strongly contradict the Gutenberg-Richter law. Nevertheless, a detailed analysis of the observed D1 distribution shows that the Gutenberg-Richter hypothesis doesn't fully explain the experimental observations. The theoretical distribution has a larger proportion of low D1 values and a smaller proportion of high D1 values than the experimental observations. A reasonable explanation for this mismatch, which appears a minor effect with respect to what was supposed in the past, seems to consist in the byes (not assumed in the model) that the selection of clustered events produces on the

  13. [An outbreak of legionellosis in a new facility of hot spring bath in Hiuga City].

    PubMed

    Yabuuchi, Eiko; Agata, Kunio

    2004-02-01

    Following cerebrating ceremony in 20 June 2002, for the completion of Hiuga Sun-Park Hot Spring Bath "Ofunade-no-Yu" facilities, Miyazaki Prefecture, Kyushu Island, 200 neighbors were invited each day to experience bathing on 20 and 21 June. The Bath "Ofunade-no-Yu" officially opened on 1 July 2002. On 18 July, Hiuga Health Center was informed that 3 suspected Legionella pneumonia patients in a hospital and all of them have bathing history of "Ofunade-no-Yu". Health Center officers notified Hiuga City, the main proprietor of the Bath business, that on-site inspection on sanitary managements will be done next day and requested the City to keep the bath facilities as they are. On 19 July, Health Center officers collected bath water from seven places and recommended voluntary-closing of "Ofunade-no-Yu" business. Because of various reasons, Hiuga City did not accept the recommendation and continued business up to 23 July. Because Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains from 4 patients' sputa and several bath water specimens were determined genetically similar by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis of Sfi I-cut DNA. "Ofunede-no-Yu" was regarded as the source of infection of this outbreak. On 24 July, "Ofunade-no-Yu" accepted the Command to prohibit the business. Among 19,773 persons who took the bath during the period from 20 June to 23 July, 295 became ill, and 7 died. Among them, 34 were definitely diagnosed as Legionella pneumonia due to L. pneumophila SG 1, by either one or two tests of positive sputum culture, Legionella-specific urinary antigen, and significant rise of serum antibody titer against L. pneumophila SG 1. In addition to the 8 items shown by Miyazaki-Prefecture Investigation Committee as the cause of infection. Hiuga City Investigation Committee pointed out following 3 items: 1) Insufficient knowledge and understanding of stuffs on Legionella and legionellosis; 2) Residual water in tubing system after trial runs might lead multiplication of legionellae

  14. Chlorhexidine Bathing and Healthcare-Associated Infections: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Michael J.; Domenico, Henry J.; Byrne, Daniel W.; Talbot, Tom; Rice, Todd W.; Bernard, Gordon R.; Wheeler, Arthur P.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Daily bathing of critically ill patients with the broad spectrum, topical antimicrobial agent chlorhexidine is widely performed and may reduce healthcare-associated infections. Objective To determine if daily bathing of critically ill patients with chlorhexidine decreases the incidence of healthcare-associated infections. Design, setting, and participants A pragmatic cluster-randomized, cross-over study of 9,340 patients admitted to five adult intensive care units of a tertiary medical center in Nashville, Tennessee Intervention Units performed once-daily bathing of all patients with disposable cloths impregnated with 2% chlorhexidine or non-antimicrobial cloths as a control. Bathing treatments were performed for a 10-week period followed by a two-week washout period during which patients were bathed with non-antimicrobial disposable cloths, before crossover to the alternate bathing treatment for 10 weeks. Each unit crossed over between bathing assignments three times during the study Main Outcome and Measures The primary prespecified outcome was a composite of central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSI), catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and Clostridium difficile infections. Secondary outcomes included rates of clinical cultures positive for multi-drug resistant organisms, blood culture contamination, healthcare-associated bloodstream infections, and rates of the primary outcome by ICU. Results A total of 55 and 60 infections occurred during chlorhexidine and control bathing periods, respectively (4 and 4 CLABSI, 21 and 32 CAUTI, 17 and 8 VAP, 13 and 16 C. difficile infections, respectively, between chlorhexidine and control bathing periods). The primary outcome rate was 2.86 per 1000 patient-days and 2.90 per 1000 patient-days during chlorhexidine and control bathing periods, respectively (rate difference, −0.04; 95% CI, −1.09 to 1.01; P=0.95). After adjusting for baseline

  15. Locomotor stimulant and discriminative stimulus effects of 'bath salt' cathinones.

    PubMed

    Gatch, Michael B; Taylor, Cynthia M; Forster, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    A number of psychostimulant-like cathinone compounds are being sold as 'legal' alternatives to methamphetamine or cocaine. The purpose of these experiments was to determine whether cathinone compounds stimulate motor activity and have discriminative stimulus effects similar to those of cocaine and/or methamphetamine. 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), methylone, mephedrone, naphyrone, flephedrone, and butylone were tested for locomotor stimulant effects in mice and subsequently for substitution in rats trained to discriminate cocaine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) or methamphetamine (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) from saline. All compounds fully substituted for the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine and methamphetamine. Several commonly marketed cathinones produce discriminative stimulus effects comparable with those of cocaine and methamphetamine, which suggests that these compounds are likely to have similar abuse liabilities. MDPV and naphyrone produced locomotor stimulant effects that lasted much longer than those of cocaine or methamphetamine and therefore may be of particular concern, particularly because MDPV is one of the most commonly found substances associated with emergency room visits because of adverse effects of taking 'bath salts'.

  16. Cooling a Harmonic Oscillator by Optomechanical Modification of Its Bath.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xunnong; Purdy, Thomas; Taylor, Jacob M

    2017-06-02

    Optomechanical systems show tremendous promise for the high-sensitivity sensing of forces and modification of mechanical properties via light. For example, similar to neutral atoms and trapped ions, laser cooling of mechanical motion by radiation pressure can take single mechanical modes to their ground state. Conventional optomechanical cooling is able to introduce an additional damping channel to mechanical motion while keeping its thermal noise at the same level, and, as a consequence, the effective temperature of the mechanical mode is lowered. However, the ratio of the temperature to the quality factor remains roughly constant, preventing dramatic advances in quantum sensing using this approach. Here we propose an approach for simultaneously reducing the thermal load on a mechanical resonator while improving its quality factor. In essence, we use the optical interaction to dynamically modify the dominant damping mechanism, providing an optomechanically induced effect analogous to a phononic band gap. The mechanical mode of interest is assumed to be weakly coupled to its heat bath but strongly coupled to a second mechanical mode, which is cooled by radiation pressure coupling to a red-detuned cavity field. We also identify a realistic optomechanical design that has the potential to realize this novel cooling scheme.

  17. Mechanisms of carrier transport induced by a microswimmer bath.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andreas; Sokolov, Andrey; Aranson, Igor S; Löwen, Hartmut

    2015-04-01

    It was shown that a wedgelike microparticle (referred to as "carrier") exhibits a directed translational motion along the wedge cusp if it is exposed to a bath of microswimmers. Here we model this effect in detail by resolving the microswimmers explicitly using interaction models with different degrees of mutual alignment. Using computer simulations we study the impact of these interactions on the transport efficiency of a V-shaped carrier. We show that the transport mechanism itself strongly depends on the degree of alignment embodied in the modeling of the individual swimmer dynamics. For weak alignment, optimal carrier transport occurs in the turbulent microswimmer state and is induced by swirl depletion inside the carrier. For strong aligning interactions, optimal transport occurs already in the dilute regime and is mediated by a polar cloud of swimmers in the carrier wake pushing the wedge-particle forward. We also demonstrate that the optimal shape of the carrier leading to maximal transport speed depends on the kind of interaction model used.

  18. CdSe nanowires grown by using chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubur, H. Metin; Septekin, F.; Alpdogan, S.

    2015-10-01

    The Cadmium-selenide (CdSe) nanowire thin films were prepared on glass substrates by using chemical bath deposition (CBD) at 70 °C. Cadmium sulfate and sodium selenosulphate were used as Cd2+ and Se2- ion sources, respectively. The CdSe nanowire film was annealed in an air atmosphere at 573 K for 1 hour. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the nanowire films as-deposited and annealed had mixed cubic and hexagonal phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the CdSe nanowires had lengths ranging from 642 nm to 2.5 μm and diameters ranging from 46 nm to 211 nm. The optical properties of the as-deposited and the annealed nanowire films, an investigated by recording the transmission spectra by using an UV-visible spectrophotometer revealed that the energy band gap decreased (from 1.78 eV to 1.50 eV) upon annealing. The conductivity measurements made by using four-probe methods for both the annealed and the as-deposited films showed that the resistivity, conductivity and activation energy changed upon annealing.

  19. Mechanisms of Carrier Transport Induced by a Microswimmer Bath

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Andreas; Sokolov, Andrey; Aranson, Igor S.; Lowen, Hartmut

    2015-04-01

    Recently, it was found that a wedgelike microparticle (referred to as ”carrier”) which is only allowed to translate but not to rotate exhibits a directed translational motion along the wedge cusp if it is exposed to a bath of microswimmers. Here we model this effect in detail by resolving the microswimmers explicitly using interaction models with different degrees of mutual alignment. Using computer simulations we study the impact of these interactions on the transport efficiency of V-shaped carrier. We show that the transport mechanisms itself strongly depends on the degree of alignment embodied in the modelling of the individual swimmer dynamics. For weak alignment, optimal carrier transport occurs in the turbulent microswimmer state and is induced by swirl depletion inside the carrier. For strong aligning interactions, optimal transport occurs already in the dilute regime and is mediated by a polar cloud of swimmers in the carrier wake pushing the wedge-particle forward. We also demonstrate that the optimal shape of the carrier leading to maximal transport speed depends on the kind of interaction model used.

  20. Mechanisms of Carrier Transport Induced by a Microswimmer Bath

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Andreas; Sokolov, Andrey; Aranson, Igor S.; Lowen, Hartmut

    2014-10-20

    Recently, it was found that a wedgelike microparticle (referred to as ”carrier”) which is only allowed to translate but not to rotate exhibits a directed translational motion along the wedge cusp if it is exposed to a bath of microswimmers. Here we model this effect in detail by resolving the microswimmers explicitly using interaction models with different degrees of mutual alignment. Using computer simulations we study the impact of these interactions on the transport efficiency of V-shaped carrier. We show that the transport mechanisms itself strongly depends on the degree of alignment embodied in the modelling of the individual swimmer dynamics. For weak alignment, optimal carrier transport occurs in the turbulent microswimmer state and is induced by swirl depletion inside the carrier. For strong aligning interactions, optimal transport occurs already in the dilute regime and is mediated by a polar cloud of swimmers in the carrier wake pushing the wedge-particle forward. Finally, we also demonstrate that the optimal shape of the carrier leading to maximal transport speed depends on the kind of interaction model used.

  1. Mechanisms of Carrier Transport Induced by a Microswimmer Bath

    DOE PAGES

    Kaiser, Andreas; Sokolov, Andrey; Aranson, Igor S.; ...

    2014-10-20

    Recently, it was found that a wedgelike microparticle (referred to as ”carrier”) which is only allowed to translate but not to rotate exhibits a directed translational motion along the wedge cusp if it is exposed to a bath of microswimmers. Here we model this effect in detail by resolving the microswimmers explicitly using interaction models with different degrees of mutual alignment. Using computer simulations we study the impact of these interactions on the transport efficiency of V-shaped carrier. We show that the transport mechanisms itself strongly depends on the degree of alignment embodied in the modelling of the individual swimmermore » dynamics. For weak alignment, optimal carrier transport occurs in the turbulent microswimmer state and is induced by swirl depletion inside the carrier. For strong aligning interactions, optimal transport occurs already in the dilute regime and is mediated by a polar cloud of swimmers in the carrier wake pushing the wedge-particle forward. Finally, we also demonstrate that the optimal shape of the carrier leading to maximal transport speed depends on the kind of interaction model used.« less

  2. Analysis of tellurium thin films electrodeposition from acidic citric bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalik, Remigiusz; Kutyła, Dawid; Mech, Krzysztof; Żabiński, Piotr

    2016-12-01

    This work presents the description of the electrochemical process of formation thin tellurium layers from citrate acidic solution. The suggested methodology consists in the preparation of stable acidic baths with high content of tellurium, and with the addition of citrate acid. In order to analyse the mechanism of the process of tellurium deposition, the electroanalytical tests were conducted. The tests of cyclic voltammetry and hydrodynamic ones were performed with the use of polycrystalline gold disk electrode. The range of potentials in which deposition of tellurium in direct four-electron process is possible was determined as well as the reduction of deposited Te° to Te2- and its re-deposition as a result of the comproportionation reaction. On the basis of the obtained results, the deposition of tellurium was conducted by the potentiostatic method. The influence of a deposition potential and a concentration of TeO2 in the solution on the rate of tellurium coatings deposition was examined. The presence of tellurium was confirmed by X-ray spectrofluorometry and electron probe microanalysis. In order to determine the phase composition and the morphology, the obtained coatings were analysed with the use of x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  3. Cooling a Harmonic Oscillator by Optomechanical Modification of Its Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xunnong; Purdy, Thomas; Taylor, Jacob M.

    2017-06-01

    Optomechanical systems show tremendous promise for the high-sensitivity sensing of forces and modification of mechanical properties via light. For example, similar to neutral atoms and trapped ions, laser cooling of mechanical motion by radiation pressure can take single mechanical modes to their ground state. Conventional optomechanical cooling is able to introduce an additional damping channel to mechanical motion while keeping its thermal noise at the same level, and, as a consequence, the effective temperature of the mechanical mode is lowered. However, the ratio of the temperature to the quality factor remains roughly constant, preventing dramatic advances in quantum sensing using this approach. Here we propose an approach for simultaneously reducing the thermal load on a mechanical resonator while improving its quality factor. In essence, we use the optical interaction to dynamically modify the dominant damping mechanism, providing an optomechanically induced effect analogous to a phononic band gap. The mechanical mode of interest is assumed to be weakly coupled to its heat bath but strongly coupled to a second mechanical mode, which is cooled by radiation pressure coupling to a red-detuned cavity field. We also identify a realistic optomechanical design that has the potential to realize this novel cooling scheme.

  4. Laser cooling of a harmonic oscillator's bath with optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xunnong; Taylor, Jacob

    Thermal noise reduction in mechanical systems is a topic both of fundamental interest for studying quantum physics at the macroscopic level and for application of interest, such as building high sensitivity mechanics based sensors. Similar to laser cooling of neutral atoms and trapped ions, the cooling of mechanical motion by radiation pressure can take single mechanical modes to their ground state. Conventional optomechanical cooling is able to introduce additional damping channel to mechanical motion, while keeping its thermal noise at the same level, and as a consequence, the effective temperature of the mechanical mode is lowered. However, the ratio of temperature to quality factor remains roughly constant, preventing dramatic advances in quantum sensing using this approach. Here we propose an efficient scheme for reducing the thermal load on a mechanical resonator while improving its quality factor. The mechanical mode of interest is assumed to be weakly coupled to its heat bath but strongly coupled to a second mechanical mode, which is cooled by radiation pressure coupling to a red detuned cavity field. We also identify a realistic optomechanical design that has the potential to realize this novel cooling scheme. Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of ivermectin applied topically by whole-body bathing method in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Atsushi; Hirota, Takashi; Tashiro, Mari; Noguchi, Wataru; Kawano, Yayoi; Hanawa, Takehisa; Kigure, Akira; Anata, Taichi; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Yuasa, Nae; Koshino, Machi; Shiraishi, Yumi; Yuzawa, Kaoru; Akagi, Keita; Yoshimasu, Takashi; Makigami, Kuniko; Komoda, Masayo

    2016-10-15

    As a novel administration method of ivermectin (IVM) for scabies treatment, we proposed a "whole-body bathing method (WBBM)". In this method, the patients would bathe themselves in a bathing fluid containing IVM at an effective concentration. Previously, we demonstrated that WBBM could deliver IVM to the skin but not to the plasma in rats. In the present study, to assess the clinical validity of the method an arm bathing examination (first trial) and a whole-body bathing examination (second trial) were conducted in healthy volunteers. In both the first and second trials, after bathing in fluid containing IVM, the exposure in the stratum corneum was higher compared with that after taking IVM p.o. as reported previously. IVM was not detected in plasma at any sampling point after the whole-body bathing in the second trial. Furthermore no serious adverse events were found. These results in both trials suggest that WBBM can deliver IVM to the human stratum corneum without systemic exposure or serious adverse effects in healthy volunteers, and at concentrations that would be adequate for scabies treatment.

  6. Initial system-bath state via the maximum-entropy principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jibo; Len, Yink Loong; Ng, Hui Khoon

    2016-11-01

    The initial state of a system-bath composite is needed as the input for prediction from any quantum evolution equation to describe subsequent system-only reduced dynamics or the noise on the system from joint evolution of the system and the bath. The conventional wisdom is to write down an uncorrelated state as if the system and the bath were prepared in the absence of each other; yet, such a factorized state cannot be the exact description in the presence of system-bath interactions. Here, we show how to go beyond the simplistic factorized-state prescription using ideas from quantum tomography: We employ the maximum-entropy principle to deduce an initial system-bath state consistent with the available information. For the generic case of weak interactions, we obtain an explicit formula for the correction to the factorized state. Such a state turns out to have little correlation between the system and the bath, which we can quantify using our formula. This has implications, in particular, on the subject of subsequent non-completely positive dynamics of the system. Deviation from predictions based on such an almost uncorrelated state is indicative of accidental control of hidden degrees of freedom in the bath.

  7. Investigation of "bath salts" use patterns within an online sample of users in the United States.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Patrick S; Johnson, Matthew W

    2014-01-01

    "Bath salts" are synthetic stimulant "legal highs" that have recently been banned in the US. Epidemiological data regarding bath salts use are limited. In the present study, 113 individuals in the US reporting use of bath salts completed an anonymous, online survey characterizing demographic, experiential, and psychological variables. Respondents were more often male, 18-24 years old, and Caucasian/White with some college education. Past-year use was typically low (≤ 10 days), but marked by repeated dosing. Intranasal was the most frequently reported administration route and subjective effects were similar to other stimulants (e.g., cocaine, amphetamines). Bath salts use was associated with increased sexual desire and sexual HIV risk behavior, and met DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for disordered use in more than half of respondents. Bath salts use persists in the US despite federal bans of cathinone-like constituents. Self-reported stimulant-like effects of bath salts suggest their use as substitutes for traditional illicit stimulants. Data revealed more normative outcomes vis-à-vis extreme accounts by media and medical case reports. However, indications of product abuse potential and sexual risk remain, suggesting bath salts pose potential public health harm.

  8. Mapping of an ultrasonic bath for ultrasound assisted extraction of mangiferin from Mangifera indica leaves.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Vrushali M; Rathod, Virendra K

    2014-03-01

    The present work deals with the mapping of an ultrasonic bath for the maximum extraction of mangiferin from Mangifera indica leaves. I3(-) liberation experiments (chemical transformations) and extraction (physical transformations) were carried out at different locations in an ultrasonic bath and compared. The experimental findings indicated a similar trend in variation in an ultrasonic bath by both these methods. Various parameters such as position and depth of vessel in an ultrasonic bath, diameter and shape of a vessel, frequency and input power which affect the extraction yield have been studied in detail. Maximum yield of mangiferin obtained was approximately 31 mg/g at optimized parameters: distance of 2.54 cm above the bottom of the bath, 7 cm diameter of vessel, flat bottom vessel, 6.35 cm liquid height, 122 W input power and 25 kHz frequency. The present work indicates that the position and depth of vessel in an ultrasonic bath, diameter and shape of a vessel, frequency and input power have significant effect on the extraction yield. This work can be used as a base for all ultrasonic baths to obtain maximum efficiency for ultrasound assisted extraction.

  9. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental study on the oxidation of the Zn-Al-Mg coating baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xuping; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Jianhua; Wu, Changjun; Liu, Ya; Tu, Hao; Peng, Haoping

    2017-02-01

    Surface oxidation of molten Zn-6Al baths containing 0.0, 3.0 and 6.0 wt. % Mg were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. γ-Al2O3 is formed on the surface of the Zn-6Al bath, while MgAl2O4 and MgO occur at 460 °C in the Zn-6Al-3Mg and Zn-6Al-6Mg baths, respectively. Thermodynamic analysis on the oxidation of the Zn-Al-Mg baths was performed. Calculated phase diagrams at 460 °C and 560 °C show good agreements with the experimental results. MgO or MgAl2O4 exists in almost the entire composition range of the calculated oxidation diagrams. According to the calculation, oxidation products depend on the composition and temperature of the baths. The primary and secondary oxidation products of the Zn-Al-Mg baths can be reasonably explained by oxidation phase diagrams. Utilizing these results, the favorable practical bath melts and operating conditions can be designed.

  10. Accidents associated with bathing in home care services for the aged in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, S; Okayama, M; Ishikawa, S; Nakamura, Y; Kajii, E

    2001-05-01

    To reveal what kinds of accidents happen associated with bathing in home care services for the aged in Japan. The study was cross-sectional in design. In November 1999, a postal questionnaire survey was conducted of 828 councils selected from the list of the National Council of Social Welfare of Japan by a systematic sampling method (extraction rate was 25%). The main outcome measures were characteristics of cases of accidents associated with bathing service for the aged, including patient age, sex, time of occurrence, symptoms, and results of accidents. Replies were received from 683 (82%) councils. Of the councils that replied, 430 (63%) reported providing bathing service for the aged. Of these 430 councils, 108 (25%) have experienced accidents, and 130 cases were analyzed. Affected patients had a mean age of 80.7 years (SD: 9.0 years), and 71 were females (55%). Sixty-two (48%) had symptoms of a disease or had accidents after bathing, and 42 (32%) presented with loss of consciousness. In results of accidents, 14 (11%) were reported to have died. This study revealed that there were not a few accidents associated with bathing in home care services for the aged in Japan, the most frequent symptom was loss of consciousness, most accidents occurred after bathing, and that some patients died as a result of bathing provided by home care services.

  11. Effects of single moor baths on physiological stress response and psychological state: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier-Jarmer, M.; Frisch, D.; Oberhauser, C.; Immich, G.; Kirschneck, M.; Schuh, A.

    2017-06-01

    Moor mud applications in the form of packs and baths are widely used therapeutically as part of balneotherapy. They are commonly given as therapy for musculoskeletal disorders, with their thermo-physical effects being furthest studied. Moor baths are one of the key therapeutic elements in our recently developed and evaluated 3-week prevention program for subjects with high stress level and increased risk of developing a burnout syndrome. An embedded pilot study add-on to this core project was carried out to assess the relaxing effect of a single moor bath. During the prevention program, 78 participants received a total of seven moor applications, each consisting of a moor bath (42 °C, 20 min, given between 02:30 and 05:20 p.m.) followed by resting period (20 min). Before and after the first moor application in week 1, and the penultimate moor application in week 3, salivary cortisol was collected, blood pressure and heart rate were measured, and mood state (Multidimensional Mood State Questionnaire) was assessed. A Friedman test of differences among repeated measures was conducted. Post hoc analyses were performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. A significant decrease in salivary cortisol concentration was seen between pre- and post-moor bath in week 1 (Z = -3.355, p = 0.0008). A non-significant decrease was seen between pre- and post-moor bath in week 3. Mood state improved significantly after both moor baths. This pilot study has provided initial evidence on the stress-relieving effects of single moor baths, which can be a sensible and recommendable therapeutic element of multimodal stress-reducing prevention programs. The full potential of moor baths still needs to be validated. A randomized controlled trial should be conducted comparing this balneo-therapeutic approach against other types of stress reduction interventions.

  12. The effects of daily bathing on symptoms of patients with bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Arimoto, Yoshihito; Homma, Chie; Takeoka, Shinjiro; Fukusumi, Munehisa; Mouri, Atsuto; Hamamoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence of bathing in asthma patients is not yet fully known. Objective We conducted an observational study to investigate changes in symptoms and their degree by bathing in asthmatic patients. Methods A questionnaire focusing on ever experienced bathing-induced symptom changes and their degree, as well as contributing factors, was designed and administered to asthmatic patients in the outpatient department of our institute between January 2012 and November 2013. Results Two hundred fifteen cases were recruited. In 60 cases (27.9%), asthmatic symptoms appeared, including 20 cases of chest discomfort (33.3%), 19 cases of cough (31.7%), and 21 cases of wheezing (35.0%). The triggering factors included vapor inhalation (32 cases, 53.3%), hydrostatic pressure on the thorax due to body immersion in the bathtub (26 cases, 43.3%), and sudden change of air temperature (16 cases, 26.7%). Thirty-eight cases (17.7%) experienced improvement in active asthmatic symptoms by bathing. Vapor inhalation was the most common contributing factor (34 cases, 89.5%), followed by warming of the whole body (13 cases, 34.2%). There was no relationship between asthma severity and the appearance of bathing-induced symptoms or improvement of active asthmatic symptoms by bathing. Conclusion The effects of bathing in asthmatic patients widely differed from patient to patient and their etiology includes several factors. For those who suffer from bathing-induced asthma symptoms, preventive methods, such as premedication with bronchodilators before bathing, should be established. This study is registered in the University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) clinical trials registry in Japan with the registration number UMIN000015641. PMID:27141485

  13. On the operation of machines powered by quantum non-thermal baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedenzu, Wolfgang; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Kofman, Abraham G.; Kurizki, Gershon

    2016-08-01

    Diverse models of engines energised by quantum-coherent, hence non-thermal, baths allow the engine efficiency to transgress the standard thermodynamic Carnot bound. These transgressions call for an elucidation of the underlying mechanisms. Here we show that non-thermal baths may impart not only heat, but also mechanical work to a machine. The Carnot bound is inapplicable to such a hybrid machine. Intriguingly, it may exhibit dual action, concurrently as engine and refrigerator, with up to 100% efficiency. We conclude that even though a machine powered by a quantum bath may exhibit an unconventional performance, it still abides by the traditional principles of thermodynamics.

  14. The magnetic stripe card: An innovative tool for magnetic particle bath control

    SciTech Connect

    Chedister, W.C.

    1996-10-01

    An innovative application of an often overlooked magnetic phenomenon can be used to simplify and to readily document the control over a magnetic particle inspection bath. The specialized magnetic encoding of the magnetic stripe on a unique card has been used by Circle Systems. Two companion magnetic stripe cards, Type A and Type B, can each instantly provide a snapshot of a magnetic particle bath. This snapshot allows inspection personnel to determine whether the bath meets operating requirements or it needs replacement or other corrective action.

  15. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of the heat bath for two Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    De Bacco, Caterina; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Sekimoto, Ken

    2014-05-09

    We propose a new look at the heat bath for two Brownian particles, in which the heat bath as a "system" is both perturbed and sensed by the Brownian particles. Nonlocal thermal fluctuations give rise to bath-mediated static forces between the particles. Based on the general sum rule of the linear response theory, we derive an explicit relation linking these forces to the friction kernel describing the particles' dynamics. The relation is analytically confirmed in the case of two solvable models and could be experimentally challenged. Our results point out that the inclusion of the environment as a part of the whole system is important for micron- or nanoscale physics.

  16. [The effect of contrast baths on the hemostatic function of patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Sorokina, E I; Ali, O

    1998-01-01

    Contrast baths effects on hemostasis were studied in 72 patients with postinfarction cardiosclerosis and stable angina pectoris. Hemostasis was assessed by recalcification time, blood plasma tolerance to heparin, fibrinolytic activity, functional activity of antithrombin, soluble fibrin-monomeric complex, platelet count and aggregation. The results were compared to those in patients exposed to laser irradiation. Hydrotherapy with contrast baths was hemostatically effective in 70.9% of patients. Blood coagulation and platelet aggregation improved, the risk of intravascular microthrombogenesis diminished. Contrast baths had more pronounced beneficial effects on coagulation in ischemic heart disease of NYHA functional class II.

  17. Cooperation between two periplasmic copper chaperones is required for full activity of the cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase and copper homeostasis in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Trasnea, Petru -Iulian; Utz, Marcel; Khalfaoui-Hassani, Bahia; Lagies, Simon; Daldal, Fevzi; Koch, Hans -Georg

    2016-02-28

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient that functions as a cofactor in several important enzymes, like respiratory heme-copper oxygen reductases. Yet, Cu is also toxic and therefore cells engage a highly coordinated Cu uptake and delivery system to prevent the accumulation of toxic Cu concentrations. In the current work we analyzed Cu delivery to the cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase (cbb3-Cox) of Rhodobacter capsulatus. We identified the PCuAC-like periplasmic chaperone PccA and analyzed its contribution to cbb3-Cox assembly. Our data demonstrate that PccA is a Cu-binding protein with a preference for Cu(I), which is required for efficient cbb3-Cox assembly, in particular at low Cu concentrations. By using in vivo and in vitro crosslinking we show that PccA forms a complex with the Sco1-homologue SenC. This complex is stabilized in the absence of the cbb3-Cox specific assembly factors CcoGHIS. In cells lacking SenC, the cytoplasmic Cu content is significantly increased, but the simultaneous absence of PccA prevents this Cu accumulation. Lastly, these data demonstrate that the interplay between PccA and SenC is not only required for Cu delivery during cbb3-Cox assembly, but that it also regulates Cu homeostasis in R. capsulatus.

  18. Catalytically-relevant electron transfer between two hemes bL in the hybrid cytochrome bc1-like complex containing a fusion of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and capsulatus cytochromes b.

    PubMed

    Czapla, Monika; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2013-06-01

    To address mechanistic questions about the functioning of dimeric cytochrome bc1 new genetic approaches have recently been developed. They were specifically designed to enable construction of asymmetrically-mutated variants suitable for functional studies. One approach exploited a fusion of two cytochromes b that replaced the separate subunits in the dimer. The fusion protein, built from two copies of the same cytochrome b of purple bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, served as a template to create a series of asymmetrically-mutated cytochrome bc1-like complexes (B-B) which, through kinetic studies, disclosed several important principles of dimer engineering. Here, we report on construction of another fusion protein complex that adds a new tool to investigate dimeric function of the enzyme through the asymmetrically mutated forms of the protein. This complex (BS-B) contains a hybrid protein that combines two different cytochromes b: one coming from R. capsulatus and the other - from a closely related species, R. sphaeroides. With this new fusion we addressed a still controversial issue of electron transfer between the two hemes bL in the core of dimer. Kinetic data obtained with a series of BS-B variants provided new evidence confirming the previously reported observations that electron transfer between those two hemes occurs on a millisecond timescale, thus is a catalytically-relevant event. Both types of the fusion complexes (B-B and BS-B) consistently implicate that the heme-bL-bL bridge forms an electronic connection available for inter-monomer electron transfer in cytochrome bc1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Large-time evolution of an electron in photon bath

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Kirill A.; Nikitin, Vladimir V.

    2012-12-15

    The problem of infrared divergence of the effective electromagnetic field produced by elementary charges is revisited using the model of an electron freely evolving in a photon bath. It is shown that for any finite travel time, the effective field of the electron is infrared-finite, and that at each order of perturbation theory the radiative contributions grow unboundedly with time. Using the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism, factorization of divergent contributions in multi-loop diagrams is proved, and summation of the resulting infinite series is performed. It is found that despite the unbounded growth of individual contributions to the effective field, their sum is bounded, tending to zero in the limit of infinite travel time. It is concluded that the physical meaning of infrared singularity in the effective field is the existence of a peculiar irreversible spreading of electric charges, caused by their interaction with the electromagnetic field. This spreading originates from the quantum electromagnetic fluctuations, rather than the electron-photon scattering, and exists in vacuum as well as at finite temperatures. It shows itself in a damping of the off-diagonal elements of the momentum-space density matrix of electron, but does not affect its momentum probability distribution. This effect is discussed in terms of thermalization of the electron state, and the asymptotic growth of its quantum entropy is determined. Relationship of the obtained results to the Bloch-Nordsieck theorem is established and considered from the standpoint of measurability of the electromagnetic field. The effect of irreversible spreading on the electron diffraction in the classic two-slit experiment is determined, and is shown to be detectable in principle by modern devices already at room temperature. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Infrared finiteness of the effective electromagnetic field of a free electron is proved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum radiative effects

  20. Effects of Sodium Citrate Concentration on Electroless Ni-Fe Bath Stability and Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Myung-Won; Kang, Sung K.; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    In this research, electroless Ni-Fe bath stability and deposition characteristics were investigated for various sodium citrate concentrations. Complexing agents such as sodium citrate are one of the main components of such electroless plating baths. Since they could play various roles such as maintaining pH stability, preventing precipitation of metal salts, and reducing the concentrations of free metal ions, the concentration of complexing agents in the plating bath is an important parameter for electroless deposition processes. In this research, unstable baths were obtained for insufficient sodium citrate concentrations, and these phenomena were analyzed with ChemEQL. Moreover, the deposition characteristics of electroless Ni-Fe for under bump metallurgy diffusion barriers were also investigated using energy-dispersive spectroscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy.