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Sample records for metrizamide myelography ctmm

  1. Conventional metrizamide myelography (MM) and computed tomographic metrizamide myelography (CTMM) in scoliosis: a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersson, H.; Harwood-Nash, D.C.; Fitz, C.R.; Chuang, H.S.; Armstrong, E.

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective examination was performed to assess the accuracy of metrizamide myelography (MM) and computed tomographic metrizamide myelography (CTMM) in scoliosis. Of 81 consecutive scoliotic children studied by myelography, 30 had only MM while the remaining 51 had CTMM immediately afterward. CTMM added esential diagnostic information in 13 cases of dysraphism and 4 cases, both methods gave the same imformation. The outhors conclude that in patients with severe scoliosis, dysraphism, and scoliosis with localized neurological disturbances, CTMM should always be added to MM or be the only examination; while in idiopathic scoliosis with vague neurological disturbances a survey of the entire spine is essential, preferably with MM.

  2. Capgras syndrome associated with metrizamide myelography.

    PubMed

    Fishbain, D A; Rosomoff, H

    A case of Capgras' Syndrome secondary to an Organic Mental Disorder associated with metrizamide myelography is presented. The relationship of Capgras' symptom to reduplicative paramnesia and prosopagnosia is discussed.

  3. [Lumbar myelography with metrizamid (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kehler, M

    1977-03-01

    A series of lumbar myelographies -- 105 in 98 patients - was carried out with water-soluble Metrizamid (Amipaque R) in a concentration of 170 mg I/ml and showed side-effects in 32% and a quality of contrast similar to that of other water-soluble contrast media used before. The side effects were mild, of short duration and needed no treatment. There were no epileptic fits, tonic or clonic carried out 1 - 12 months later showed no signs of arachnoiditis. Dangers of more serious complications appeared to increase, the higher the level of injection into the spinal canal. A short survey of contrast media used in myelography and earlier experience of experimental or clinical side effects caused by Medtrizamid in myelography follows.

  4. Aphasia, apraxia and neurogenic stuttering as complications of metrizamide myelography (speech deficits following myelography).

    PubMed

    Pimental, P A; Gorelick, P B

    1985-11-01

    Aphasia following metrizamide myelography has been reported infrequently. During a seven-month period, we examined two patients who developed Broca's aphasia, apraxia of speech, oral-buccal-facial apraxia and neurogenic stuttering after intrathecal metrizamide administration. In each case, focal neurologic deficits were accompanied by clinical, electroencephalographic and radiologic signs of generalized neurologic disease. Serial speech and language evaluations initially revealed severe deficits that were largely resolved by the third day post-myelography. Out-patient follow-up examinations demonstrated persistence of mild speech and language abnormalities in each case. Our findings suggest that metrizamide may cause longlasting neurologic dysfunction. PMID:4082914

  5. Comparative advantages of small- and large-dose metrizamide myelography

    SciTech Connect

    Solti-Bohman, L.; Bentson, J.R.

    1983-10-01

    A series of myelographies performed with a smaller than customary dose (3.75 g) of metrizamide was compared with a series using the larger customary dose. While little decrease in the incidence of headache and vomiting resulted from the decreased dose, there was a heartening drop in the incidence of psychoneurologic side effects. Little difference in diagnostic quality between the two series resulted when the contrast agent was injected close to the side of main interest, but total spinal canal myelography performed with the low dose is often inadequate.

  6. Lumbar myelography with iohexol and metrizamide: a comparative multicenter prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Kieffer, S.A.; Binet, E.F.; Davis, D.O.; Gabrielsen, T.O.; Kido, D.K.; Latchaw, R.E.; Turski, P.A.; Shaw, D.D.

    1984-06-01

    Diagnostic quality of radiographs and adverse reactions associated with the use of metrizamide and iohexol as contrast agents in lumbar myelography were compared in a prospective randomized double blind study in 350 patients at seven centers. Overall quality of radiographic visualization was graded good or excellent in 95% of 175 metrizamide studies and in 98% of 175 iohexol studies. Ninety-three patients examined using metrizamide (53%) and 130 patients examined using iohexol (74%) experienced no discomfort during or after myelography. Postmyelographic headache was associated with 38% of metrizamide examinations and 21% of iohexol examinations. Nausea and vomiting were also more common with metrizamide. Five patients examined using metrizamide (3%) experienced transient confusion and disorientation following lumbar myelography. No such reactions were observed following iohexol myelography.

  7. Comparison of arachnoiditis produced by meglumine iocarmate and metrizamide myelography in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Haughton, V M; Ho, K C; Larson, S J; Unger, G F; Correa-Paz, F

    1978-07-01

    Myelography in monkeys was performed with either meglumine iocarmate or metrizamide. The severity of resultant arachnoiditis in each animal 12 weeks later was evaluated by repeat myelography and by histologic study of the arachnoid. Three of the four animals examined with meglumine iocarmate had severe arachnoiditis; none of the four animals examined with metrizamide had as severe changes. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P less than .05).

  8. Spinal computed tomography and computed tomographic metrizamide myelography in the early diagnosis of metastatic disease

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, T.; George, C.B.; Redmond, J. 3d.; Davidson, H.; Cornett, P.; Fill, W.L.; Spring, D.B.; Sobel, D.; Dabe, I.B.; Karl, R.D. Jr.

    1986-04-01

    New lesions were shown by Tc99m bone scans to have developed in sixty patients with known metastatic cancer or high-risk primary cancer and normal neurologic examinations; they were further evaluated with plain radiographs, spinal computed tomography (CT), and CT myelography (CT-M) according to an algorithm. Three groups were identified based on plain radiographs: group 1 (normal radiograph), group 2 (compression fracture as indicated by radiograph), group 3 (evidence of metastasis as indicated by radiograph). In group 1 (n = 18), spinal CT revealed that 33% of the patients had benign disease and 67%, metastases; epidural compression was seen in 25% of the patients with metastasis as indicated by CT-M. In group 2 (n = 26), CT-M disclosed that 38% had a benign compression fracture and 62% had metastases and that 63% of the patients with metastases had an epidural compression. In group 3 (n = 16), spinal CT revealed that 15 patients had metastases (one patient had benign disease). Epidural cord compression was seen in 47% of the patients with metastatic disease. In all groups, the presence of cortical bone discontinuity around the neural canal (seen in 31 patients) was highly associated with epidural compression (seen in 20 patients). Our approach allowed the early and accurate diagnosis of spinal metastasis and epidural tumor as well as the diagnosis of benign disease and was useful in planning optimal local therapy.

  9. Arachnoiditis from myelography and laminectomy in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Johansen, J G; Barthelemy, C R; Haughton, V M; Lipman, B T; Ho, K C

    1984-01-01

    Clinical reports have suggested that myelography and laminectomy may produce more arachnoiditis than myelography alone. The effect of experimental lumbar myelography and laminectomy on arachnoiditis in monkeys was studied. Arachnoiditis was as severe after myelography alone as after myelography and laminectomy. Minimal arachnoiditis was found myelographically and histologically after myelography with metrizamide 300 mg l/ml, and severe arachnoiditis was found after myelography with iophendylate whether or not laminectomy was performed. Laminectomy alone produced insignificant arachnoid changes. Experimental myelography preceding laminectomy did not increase the risk of arachnoiditis.

  10. Digital myelography of spinal dysraphism in infancy: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.D.; Reynolds, A.F.; Galloway, D.C.; Pollay, M.; Leonard, J.C.; Prince, J.R.

    1984-06-01

    For the past 2 years, the authors have used metrizamide myelography with simple, thick-section polytomography (myelotomography) to evaluate patients with spinal dysraphism. This technique has provided separation of simultaneously imaged bone and neural landmarks in standard surgical planes, while directing CT for specific transaxial plane imaging. It also allows reduction in metrizamide dosage and total radiation exposure as compared with previously used myelographic procedures employing multiple plain filming plus complex thin-section tomography. For further reductions in risk and cost, digital fluorographic techniques are currently being explored. They describe preliminary results with digital myelography in the evaluation of spinal dysraphism in infancy.

  11. Urography with metrizamide in children

    SciTech Connect

    Siegle, R.L.; Davies, P.; Fullerton, G.D.

    1982-11-01

    Noionic contrast material could have particular value in pediatric urography because of the absence of osmotic diuresis and associated fluid loss. Excretory urograms were obtained in 23 children using metrizamide at 300 mg l/ml and administered at a dose of 2.2 ml/kg. The radiographs gave excellent urinary tract opacification without changes in serum osmolality. The calyces appeared sharp but undistended, there was increased occurrence of ureteral ridging, and the urinary bladders often remained undistended at the completion of the studied. The dense opacification attainable with isoosmolar metrizamide also gave the opportunity for performing urography with higher than normal kilovoltage and thus reducing radiation exposure to the child. Also in vitro studies demonstrated the significant radiation dose reduction possible with the higher kilovoltage technique.

  12. Iopamidol in lumbar myelography.

    PubMed

    Kleefield, J; Chirico-Post, J; Levine, H L; Srinivasan, M K; Harris, J M; Rommel, A J; Robbins, A H

    1983-08-01

    Iopamidol is a new, nonionic, water-soluble contrast material currently undergoing clinical trials for intravascular and intrathecal use in Europe and the United States. In this study, 12 patients underwent lumbar myelography with this agent. For each subject, up to 12 mL of iopamidol (at 200 mg I/mL) was employed. The myelograms obtained were highly satisfactory. No serious adverse reactions were observed. The most common side effect--headache--occurred in seven patients. However, six of the seven headaches were mild and transient, and did not require treatment. Nausea occurred in two patients, back pain in two patients, hypotension and hypertension each in one patient. All of these reactions were mild and self-limited. Iopamidol appears to be a safe and conveniently used agent for lumbar myelography.

  13. Metrizamide evaluation of the esophagus in infants

    SciTech Connect

    Belt, T.; Cohen, M.D.

    1984-08-01

    Barium and conventional hypertonic water-soluble contrast media (e.g., gastrografin) are not ideal contrast agents in the evaluation of the esophagus when leakage into the mediastinum or aspiration into the lung is possible. Metrizamide (Amipaque) is water-soluble and can be well visualized in isotonic solution. Three cases are presented where metrizamide was used successfully in the evaluation of suspected esophageal perforation or tracheoesophageal fistula.

  14. Myelography: modern technique and indications.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, Stuart R

    2016-01-01

    Myelography describes the instillation of intrathecal contrast media for the imaging evaluation of spinal canal pathology. The technique has evolved with the use of progressively less toxic contrast agents over its 90-year history and the inclusion of advanced image acquisition technology, including both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in addition to plain radiographic projections. The use of myelography for routine evaluation of spinal disease has diminished greatly due to the advent of MRI which has superior soft-tissue contrast and is relatively non-invasive. However, it is still a critical technique for conventional indications, such as spinal stenosis, when MRI is contraindicated or nondiagnostic. It is also recognized as the study of choice for brachial plexus injury, radiation therapy treatment planning, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Modern myelographic procedural technique and a discussion of how it contributes to these current indications will be reviewed in this chapter. PMID:27432666

  15. The effect of intrathecal iohexol on visual evoked response latency: a comparison including incidence of headache with iopamidol and metrizamide in myeloradiculography.

    PubMed

    Broadbridge, A T; Bayliss, S G; Brayshaw, C I

    1987-01-01

    Fifty consecutive unselected patients referred for myeloradiculography and examined by the same radiologist, when facilities for measuring the visual evoked response were available, are considered. The effect on the visual evoked response of the examination and the incidence of headache following the use of iohexol as the contrast medium are compared with those after the use of iopamidol and metrizamide reported in a previous study. A total of 400 cases examined with iopamidol and 200 cases examined with iohexol are reviewed with regard to the incidence of headache. Whereas iopamidol and, to a greater extent metrizamide, were found to cause significant lengthening of the visual evoked response latency 20 hours after the radiological examination, iohexol did not. Furthermore there was no significant difference in the 20 hour reading following the use of iohexol compared with the original control group of patients who underwent lumbar puncture alone. There was a lower incidence and severity of headache following the use of iohexol than with iopamidol and a markedly reduced incidence compared with metrizamide. Iohexol is considered less neurotoxic than iopamidol which had previously superceded metrizamide as the contrast medium used for myeloradiculography in the Royal Surrey County Hospital. Volumes of up to 14 ml of iohexol 300 mg I/ml have been used for lumbar radiculography and for total myelography and up to 10 ml for direct lateral cervical puncture. In 350 cases examined to date with iohexol the only serious sequel was a case of chemical meningitis following the lumbar injection of 10 ml of the 300 mg I/ml solution for a cervical examination. The patient made an uneventful recovery.

  16. Myelography

    MedlinePlus

    ... a physician specifically trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a ... the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique ...

  17. Outpatient Myelography: A Prospective Trial Comparing Complications after Myelography between Outpatients and Inpatients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Inoue, Hidenori; Aoki, Takaaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Osawa, Yoshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective comparative study. Purpose To compare the incidence and severity of adverse reactions associated with myelography performed in outpatients vs. in inpatients and report the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Overview of Literature Myelography is normally performed as an inpatient procedure in most hospitals in Japan. No studies have reported the usefulness and adverse effects of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Methods We performed 221 myelography procedures. Eighty-five of the 221 patients underwent outpatient myelography using our new protocol. The incidence and severity of adverse reactions were compared with the other 136 patients, who underwent conventional inpatient myelography. We further compared the cost of outpatient and inpatient myelography. Results The overall rate of adverse effects was 9.4% in outpatients, as compared with 7.4% in inpatients. Overall, 1.2% of outpatients and 0.74% inpatients experienced "severe" adverse effects (requiring hospitalization). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in either the overall rate of adverse effects or the rate of "severe" adverse effects. Moreover, the average outpatient procedure cost was only one-third to one-half that of the inpatient procedure. Conclusions This was the first study to address the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. If selected according to proper inclusion criteria for outpatient procedure, no significant differences were observed in the adverse effects between inpatients and outpatients. The outpatient procedure is more economical and has the added benefit of being more convenient and time-efficient for the patient. PMID:26713127

  18. Bowel perforation in the newborn: diagnosis with metrizamide

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.D.; Weber, T.R.; Grosfeld, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of bowel perforation is frequently straightforward, it may be difficult in the neonate. Clinical signs may be limited to abdominal distension. If the patient is on assisted ventilation, pneumoperitoneum may be due to air tracking down from the chest rather than perforation. Perforation in infants in whom the diagnosis could not readily be made from the clinical findings and plain radiographs was apparent when oral metrizamide was employed. This suggests that metrizamide can be a valuable adjunct in some cases of neonatal bowel perforation.

  19. Multi-Dimensional Impact of the Public-Private Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM) in the Netherlands: Understanding New 21(st) Century Institutional Designs to Support Innovation-in-Society.

    PubMed

    Steuten, Lotte M

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge translation is at the epicenter of 21st century life sciences and integrative biology. Several innovative institutional designs have been formulated to cultivate knowledge translation. One of these organizational innovations has been the Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM), a multi-million public-private partnership in the Netherlands. The CTMM aims to accelerate molecular diagnostics and imaging technologies to forecast disease susceptibilities in healthy populations and early diagnosis and personalized treatment of patients. This research evaluated CTMM's impact on scientific, translational, clinical, and economic dimensions. A pragmatic, operationally-defined process indicators approach was used. Data were gathered from CTMM administrations, through a CTMM-wide survey (n = 167) and group interviews. We found that the CTMM focused on disease areas with high human, clinical, and economic burden to society (i.e., oncology, cardiovascular, neurologic, infection, and immunity diseases). CTMM displayed a robust scientific impact that rests 15%-80% above international reference values regarding publication volume and impact. Technology translation to the clinic was accelerated, with >50% of projects progressing from pre-clinical development to clinical testing within 5 years. Furthermore, CTMM has generated nearly 1500 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of translational R&D capacity. Its positive impact on translational, (future) clinical, and economic aspects is recognized across all surveyed stakeholders. As organizational innovation is increasingly considered critical to forge linkages between life sciences discoveries and innovation-in-society, lessons learned from this study may inform other institutions with similar objectives such as the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) Program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States.

  20. Comparative hemodynamic effect of metrizamide and Renografin 76 in infants with congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Baltaxe, H.A.; Mooring, P.; Kugler, J.; Pinsky, W.; Chu, W.K.

    1983-06-01

    Twenty patients under the age of 2 years with suspected congenital heart disease received alternately Renografin 76 and metrizamide for angiocardiography. The dose was 2.0 ml/kg per injection for both contrast media into the left ventricle. Metrizamide induced slightly lesser change in heart rate, peak systolic pressure, and peak end-diastolic pressures. Serum osmolality, hematocrit, and serum electrolytes were affected equally by the contrast media. Metrizamide was well tolerated by the neonates with congenital heart disease and its radiopacity was adequate for diagnostic purposes. At the doses administered, metrizamide does not seem to have any great advantage over Renografin 76 for angiocardiography in infants with severe congenital heart disease.

  1. Experimental production of arachnoiditis with glove powder contamination during myelography.

    PubMed

    Williams, A G; Seigel, R S; Kornfeld, M; Whorton, J A

    1982-01-01

    Adhesive spinal arachnoiditis is a rare condition of several causes, including complications of myelography. An experiment was conducted to study the effects of surgical glove powder contamination in the cerebrospinal fluid. The subarachnoid space of 45 rabbits was injected with either a suspension of powder from sterile surgical gloves, Pantopaque (iophendylate), or a combination of the two agents. Mild to severe arachnoiditis was produced in 10 of 17 animals injected with the combination of powder and Pantopaque. Only two of 16 rabbits injected with glove powder and one of nine with Pantopaque had more than minimal changes of arachnoiditis. Three rabbits (two injected with glove powder alone and one with both agents) died of meningitis within 1 week of injection. The combination of glove powder and Pantopaque is synergistic in producing arachnoiditis. These results emphasize the importance of meticulous technique in myelography.

  2. Computed tomography of the brain stem with intrathecal metrizamide. Part 1: the normal brain stem

    SciTech Connect

    Mawad, M.E.; Silver, A.J.; Hilal, S.K.; Ganti, S.R.

    1983-03-01

    Detailed anatomy of the brain stem and cervicomedullary junction can be accurately demonstrated with metrizamide computed tomographic cisternography. Specifically surface anatomy is unusually well outlined. Nine distinct and easily recognizable levels of section are described: four levels in the medulla, three in the pons, and two in the mesencephalon. Surface features of the brain stem, fine details in the floor of the fourth ventricle, cranial nerves, and vascular structures are shown and discussed.

  3. CT-determined canine kidney and urine iodine concentration following intravenous administration of sodium diatrizoate, metrizamide, iopamidol, and sodium ioxaglate.

    PubMed

    Brennan, R E; Rapoport, S; Weinberg, I; Pollack, H M; Curtis, J A

    1982-01-01

    Following 24-hour fasting and fluid deprivation, sequential changes in CT numbers of the canine kidney were determined in 4 dogs, each of whom received, at intervals, IV sodium diatrizoate, metrizamide, iopamidol, and sodium ioxaglate at a dose of 500 mgI/kg body weight. The urinary bladder was catheterized for baseline determination of urine osmolality and, subsequently, urine volume and CT number, CT number of the bladder urine from 0 to 10 minutes and from 10 to 20 minutes post-injection was obtained by scanning known dilutions of urine in vitro. Peak renal cortical enhancement occurred within 2 minutes of bolus injection and was not dependent on the chemical make-up of the contrast agent. Peak medullary enhancement occurred within 3 minutes of bolus injection. Peak medulla CT number following sodium diatrizoate was significantly less than that following metrizamide (P less than 0.025) or iopamidol (P less than 0.01). Peak medulla CT number was significantly less following sodium diatrizoate (P less than 0.01), metrizamide (P less than 0.01) and iopamidol (P less than 0.05) than following sodium ioxaglate. Urine iodine concentrations followed a similar pattern, with significant differences as follows: sodium diatrizoate less than metrizamide = iopamidol less than sodium ioxaglate. It was concluded that the investigational agents metrizamide, iopamidol, and sodium ioxaglate have theoretical advantage for excretory urography. Differences in renal handling of these agents are detectable, with CT scanning as differences in renal medullary enhancement and urine iodine concentration.

  4. Myelography and cytology in the treatment of medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, M.; Reigel, D.H.

    1981-06-01

    Eight of 22 children with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma had asymptomatic spinal cord involvement detected by myelography. Two additional patients had demonstrable spinal cord lesions at the time of relapse in the posterior fossa. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) cytology results were inaccurate in predicting cord involvement. Seven patients have relapsed 9 to 69 months from completion of radiotherapy. Three had initial cord involvement and also had subsequent cord involvement at the time of intracranial relapse or afterwards. Frontal lobe involvement as the initial site of relapse occurred in 3 patients. Computerized tomography has been valuable in the early detection of intracranial relapse. Three children are alive and well 10, 18 and 19 months, respectively, from time of relapse. All were retreated with radiotherapy in conjunction with misonidazole and subsequent chemotherapy.

  5. [Comparison of the acute cardiovascular side effects of iopamidol, metrizamide and amidotrizoate after intracoronary and left ventricular injections].

    PubMed

    Schräder, R; Wolpers, H G; Hoeft, A; Korb, H; Hellige, G

    1984-05-01

    The acute cardiovascular side effects of iopamidol (osmolality: 0.8 osmol/kg), metrizamide (0.6 osmol/kg), and amidotrizoate (2.1 osmol/kg) during coronary arteriography (n = 30) and left ventriculography (n = 9) have been compared in anesthetized closed-chest dogs (n = 5). The influences of these contrast media on hemodynamics, coronary circulation, ECG and physicochemical properties of coronary sinus blood were evaluated. Following intracoronary injection, iopamidol and metrizamide cause positive inotropism while amidotrizoate initially induces cardiodepression. All contrast solutions lead to marked increase of myocardial blood flow. Electrocardiographic changes are greater after amidotrizoate (P less than 0.05). A fall of cationic content in coronary sinus blood is seen after each contrast medium. Amidotrizoate leads to more decrease of potassium (P less than 0.01) and both ionized and total calcium (P less than 0.001). Increase of osmolality and hydrogen ionic content is greater after amidotrizoate than after iopamidol and metrizamide (P less than 0.01). Following left ventricular injection, marked peripheral vasodilation, as seen after amidotrizoate, does not occur after low osmolality compounds. There are no significant differences between iopamidol and metrizamide in spite of the slightly higher osmolality of the former. Thus, both contrast materials should be equivalent with respect to their acute cardiovascular side effects under clinical conditions. Advantages of low osmolality radiological contrast media are discussed.

  6. Cervical neural foraminal canal stenosis: computerized tomographic myelography diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Houser, O W; Onofrio, B M; Miller, G M; Folger, W N; Smith, P L; Kallman, D A

    1993-07-01

    The surgical and computerized tomographic myelography (CTM) features of 134 stenotic foraminal canals were correlated retrospectively in 95 patients. The myelographic site of stenosis was the entrance to the foraminal canal in 70 cases (52%) and the canal itself in 37 (28%); the site was not identified definitively in 27 (20%). At the entrance to the foraminal canal, encroachment on the adjacent nerve root was by a cartilaginous cap in 10 cases (8%), a bony osteophyte in 17 (13%), a synovial cyst in one (1%), and a combination of a bony and cartilaginous osteophyte in 42 (31%). The diagnostic features of stenosis within the foraminal canal were more variable. Small bone spurs arising from the uncovertebral process encroached on the anterior aspect of the foramen in 29 instances (22%), accompanied in all cases by either a congenitally narrow canal (in 16) or a diffuse osteophytically narrowed canal (in 13); osteophytes arising from the superior facet in eight instances (6%) were larger and encroached on the posterior aspect of the foramen. Diagnosis on the basis of CTM is difficult because stenosis was readily evident as a bone spur in only 13% of cases, could not be distinguished from prolapsed disc in 39%, had to be differentiated from a congenitally narrow foraminal canal in 27%, and was frankly missed in 20% of the instances of stenosis.

  7. Posttraumatic spinal cord cysts: clinical features and characterization with metrizamide computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Quencer, R.M.; Green, B.A.; Eismont, F.J.

    1983-02-01

    Sixteen patients with posttraumatic spinal cord cysts (PTSCC) were evaluated clinically and studied with metrizamide computed tomography (MCT). These patients presented months to years following a severe spinal cord injury, usually with new or progressively worsening neurological symptoms. The development of the PTSCC was unrelated to the location, type, and severity of injury, or to the time interval from the original injury. MCT showed that these cysts occur most frequently in normal or atrophic cords, they may be multiple, they most frequently are found in the dorsal portion of the cord, and they may vary along their length in width and position within the cord. Knowledge of this radiographic morphology is crucial to the surgical planning. The location of the cysts and the mode of their enlargement are correlated with anatomic features of the spinal cord and changes in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. Cyst-to-subarachnoid space shunting relieves the majority of symptoms.

  8. Comparing the cost of spinal MR with conventional myelography and radiculography.

    PubMed

    du Boulay, G H; Hawkes, S; Lee, C C; Teather, B A; Teather, D

    1990-01-01

    All spinal magnetic resonance imaging examinations carried out during a three month period were analysed retrospectively in order to determine the clinical reasons for the scan requests. Technical details of the examinations they received and the clinical profiles formed a data set which revealed 10 separate "Clinical groups" for management purposes. Hardware, salary and expendables were costed as though the imaging unit had been sited within a National Health Service radiology department. A spread sheet was designed capable of calculating costs per patient for a variety of types of working week and of different staffing structures, sensitive to the mixture of clinical groups referred for examination. The spreadsheet also accomodated straight line depreciation for hardware value and interest rates for borrowed capital. A second, prospectively observed, sample of spinal MR examinations was used to improve the accuracy of the timing of the length of patient examinations. Costs were compared with those for patients submitted for myelography and radiculography at the adjacent hospital during the same period. The comparison indicated that spinal MR was less costly than myelography and radiculography. The most important element of the extra cost of myelography related to the need to admit patients to hospital for at least one night for this examination because of the likelihood of headache and other common (though usually minor) complications following lumbar puncture and/or the injection of contrast medium. From the limited information that it was possible to obtain in the period of follow up, it appeared that MR had either been superior or equivalent to myelography or radiculography in all the clinical groups of patients where both could be tested. There were a number of groups in which no myelograms had been requested, presumably because clinical suspicions had pointed toward conditions like tumours, developmental abnormalities and demyelinating diseases in which

  9. Digital subtraction myelography for the identification of spontaneous spinal CSF-venous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Moser, Franklin G; Maya, M Marcel; Prasad, Ravi S

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE In most patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension, a spinal CSF leak can be found, but occasionally, no leak can be demonstrated despite extensive spinal imaging. Failure to localize a CSF leak limits treatment options. The authors recently reported the discovery of CSF-venous fistulas in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension and now report on the use of digital subtraction myelography in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension but no CSF leak identifiable on conventional spinal imaging (i.e., non-digital subtraction myelography). METHODS The patient population consisted of 53 consecutive patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension who underwent digital subtraction myelography but in whom no spinal CSF leak (i.e., presence of extradural CSF) was identifiable on conventional spinal imaging. RESULTS The mean age of the 33 women and 20 men was 53.4 years (range 29-71 years). A CSF-venous fistula was demonstrated in 10 (19%) of the 53 patients. A CSF-venous fistula was found in 9 (27%) of the 33 women and in 1 (5%) of the 20 men (p = 0.0697). One patient was treated successfully with percutaneous injection of fibrin sealant. Nine patients underwent surgery for the fistula. Surgery resulted in complete resolution of symptoms in 8 patients (follow-up 7-25 months), and in 1 patient, symptoms recurred after 4 months. CONCLUSIONS In this study, the authors found a CSF-venous fistula in approximately one-fifth of the patients with recalcitrant spontaneous intracranial hypotension but no CSF leak identifiable on conventional spinal imaging. The authors suggest that digital subtraction myelography be considered in this patient population. PMID:26849709

  10. Comparing the cost of spinal MR with conventional myelography and radiculography.

    PubMed

    du Boulay, G H; Hawkes, S; Lee, C C; Teather, B A; Teather, D

    1990-01-01

    All spinal magnetic resonance imaging examinations carried out during a three month period were analysed retrospectively in order to determine the clinical reasons for the scan requests. Technical details of the examinations they received and the clinical profiles formed a data set which revealed 10 separate "Clinical groups" for management purposes. Hardware, salary and expendables were costed as though the imaging unit had been sited within a National Health Service radiology department. A spread sheet was designed capable of calculating costs per patient for a variety of types of working week and of different staffing structures, sensitive to the mixture of clinical groups referred for examination. The spreadsheet also accomodated straight line depreciation for hardware value and interest rates for borrowed capital. A second, prospectively observed, sample of spinal MR examinations was used to improve the accuracy of the timing of the length of patient examinations. Costs were compared with those for patients submitted for myelography and radiculography at the adjacent hospital during the same period. The comparison indicated that spinal MR was less costly than myelography and radiculography. The most important element of the extra cost of myelography related to the need to admit patients to hospital for at least one night for this examination because of the likelihood of headache and other common (though usually minor) complications following lumbar puncture and/or the injection of contrast medium. From the limited information that it was possible to obtain in the period of follow up, it appeared that MR had either been superior or equivalent to myelography or radiculography in all the clinical groups of patients where both could be tested. There were a number of groups in which no myelograms had been requested, presumably because clinical suspicions had pointed toward conditions like tumours, developmental abnormalities and demyelinating diseases in which

  11. Lumbar myelography with iopamidol: a methodological approach to the investigation of side effects.

    PubMed

    Provinciali, L; Signorino, M; Giovagnoli, A R; Baroni, M; Angeleri, F; Salvolini, U; Pasquini, U; Porta, M; Judice, A; Cerutti, R

    1988-01-01

    Pathophysiology of adverse reactions occurring during myelography with non-ionic contrast agents, such as iopamidol, seem related to their direct action on the nervous system. The authors try a multivariate approach, involving neurophysiological, neuropsychological and neurochemical parameters on a pilot group of twelve subjects. Any possible change in the above examinations is thoroughly analyzed and correlated to the postulated neurotoxic properties of contrast media.

  12. Cervical myelography of nerve root avulsion injuries using water-soluble contrast media.

    PubMed

    Cobby, M J; Leslie, I J; Watt, I

    1988-08-01

    Eight cases of cervical nerve root avulsion injury are presented which were investigated by cervical myelography using a water-soluble contrast medium. The previous literature describes the appearances of this lesion using an oil-based agent and has resulted in emphasis being placed on looking for a traumatic meningocele rather than an abnormality of the roots themselves. The excellent definition of the nerve rootlets and axillary pouch that are obtained with a water-soluble contrast medium resulted in more root lesions per patient being detected than with an oil-based medium. There was complete correlation with the surgical findings at all but one root level explored. The appearances of root avulsion injuries and the advantages of using a water-soluble contrast medium are discussed. PMID:3416107

  13. MR and CT image fusion of the cervical spine: a noninvasive alternative to CT-myelography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Mirza, Sohail K.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Haynor, David R.

    2005-04-01

    CT-Myelography (CTM) is routinely used for planning surgery for degenerative disease of the spine, but its invasive nature, significant potential morbidity, and high costs make a noninvasive substitute desirable. We report our work on evaluating CT and MR image fusion as an alternative to CTM. Because the spine is only piecewise rigid, a multi-rigid approach to the registration of spinal CT and MR images was developed (SPIE 2004), in which the spine on CT images is first segmented into separate vertebrae, each of which is then rigidly registered with the corresponding vertebra on MR images. The results are then blended to obtain fusion images. Since they contain information from both modalities, we hypothesized that fusion images would be equivalent to CTM. To test this we selected 34 patients who had undergone MRI and CTM for degenerative disease of the cervical spine, and used the multi-rigid approach to produce fused images. A clinical vignette for each patient was created and presented along with either CT/MR fusion images or CTM images. A group of spine surgeons are asked to formulate detailed surgical plans based on each set of images, and the surgical plans are compared. A similar study assessing diagnostic agreement is being performed with neuroradiologists, who also assess the accuracy of registration. Our work to date has demonstrated the feasibility of segmentation and multi-rigid fusion in clinical cases and the acceptability of the questionnaire to physicians. Preliminary analysis of one surgeon's and one neuroradiologist"s evaluation has been performed.

  14. Visual evoked response changes following intrathecal injection of water-soluble contrast media: a possible method of assessing neurotoxicity and a comparison of metrizamide and iopamidol.

    PubMed

    Broadbridge, A T; Bayliss, S G; Firth, R; Farrell, G

    1984-09-01

    An investigation was carried out to ascertain if there was a change in visual evoked responses following the intrathecal injection of water-soluble contrast media for myeloradiculography and if this change provided an indication of neurotoxicity as assessed by the onset of headache during a period of 20 h following the radiological examination. The patients were unselected and examined, when facilities for measuring the visual evoked response were available, immediately before and at 1 and 20 h after the examination. Control readings were carried out before, 1 h and 20 h after lumbar puncture in patients who did not have an injection of contrast medium. The first 25 patients in the series received metrizamide; when iopamidol became available a change to the newer medium was made and iopamidol was used on all subsequent patients. All the injections were carried out by the same radiologist and the patients were kept in hospital overnight and interviewed the next morning, avoiding a specific reference to headache unless the patient denied all symptoms. It was found that the latency of the visual evoked response was affected in some cases by the presence of contrast medium in the cerebrospinal fluid and that there was a correlation between the severity of headaches and the delay in the visual evoked response at the 20 h post-myelogram measurement, but not at 1 h after the examination. It would appear, therefore, that the visual evoked response measurement is a valid method of assessing, in the short term, the neurotoxicity of intrathecal water-soluble contrast media and that, on this evidence, iopamidol is less neurotoxic than metrizamide. We are not aware of any long-term complications resulting from the use of either contrast medium.

  15. Supine Digital Subtraction Myelography for the Demonstration of a Dorsal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak in a Patient with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Carstensen, Michael; Chaudhary, Navjot; Leung, Andrew; Ng, Wai

    2012-01-01

    A patient with spontaneous intracranial hypotension due to a spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak required localization of the leakage site prior to surgical management. Conventional, computed tomography and prone digital subtraction myelography failed to localize the dural tear, which was postulated to be dorsally located. We present here a digital subtraction myelographic approach to accurately localize a dorsal site of CSF leakage by injecting iodinated contrast via a lumbar drain with the patient in the supine position. PMID:23378882

  16. Comparative studies on the lysosomal association of monomeric /sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Am in rat and Chinese hamster liver: analysis with sucrose, metrizamide, and Percoll density gradients of subcellular binding as dependent on time

    SciTech Connect

    Suetterlin, U.; Thies, W.G.; Haffner, H.; Seidel, A.

    1984-05-01

    The binding of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Am in the livers of Chinese hamsters and rats was analyzed by centrifugation of a mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction in sucrose, metrizamide, and Percoll density gradients at intervals between 4 and 70 days after nuclide injection. The behavior of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Am during the centrifugation experiments was very similar. In contrast to the results for rats, the median densities of the nuclide fraction liberated by addition of Triton X-100, and the nuclide profiles do not respond typically to Triton WR 1339 treatment of the animals. It was concluded from the results that the major fraction of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Am remained bound to typical lysosomes in rat liver, whereas those in hamster liver may be transformed into telolysosomes. Possibly, a vesicular biliary transport system for certain heavy metals, for which evidence exists in rat liver, does not occur in Chinese hamster liver.

  17. Vertebral canal and spinal cord mensuration: a comparative study of its effect on lumbosacral myelography in the dachshund and German shepherd dog.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J P; Atilola, M; Bailey, C S

    1987-10-15

    One hundred noncontrast spinal radiographic studies followed by myelography were evaluated to compare vertebral canal size and spinal cord location and size in a chondrodystrophic breed (50 Dachshunds) with those variables in a nonchondrodystrophic breed (50 German Shepherd Dogs). Measurements were made of the sagittal diameter (height) of the vertebral canal, sagittal diameter (height) of the spinal cord, and transverse diameter (width) of the spinal cord in the lumbar and sacral regions. Differences were detected in the craniocaudal location of maximal vertebral canal height and maximal spinal cord height. The spinal cords in the Dachshunds terminated further caudally than those in the German Shepherd Dogs. Location of maximal spinal cord width was different between the breeds, consistent with the apparent, more caudal termination of the cord in the Dachshunds. The ratio of spinal cord to vetebral canal heights was notably greater in the Dachshunds than in the German Shepherd Dogs. These differences in vertebral canal and spinal cord mensuration may influence the choice of radiographic technique and its interpretation. Injection sites may be selected further cranially in German Shepherd Dogs (L4-5) than in Dachshunds (L5-6).

  18. The risk of arachnoiditis from experimental nonionic contrast media.

    PubMed

    Haughton, V M; Ho, K C

    1980-08-01

    Aqueous myelographic contrast media are needed that are less expensive and better tolerated than metrizamide. This study compares two new, nonionic aqueous contrast media, ioglunide and iopamidol, with two previously developed contrast media, metrizamide and iocarmate. Myelography was performed with one of the contrast media in monkeys; four weeks later the degree of arachnoid fibrosis was determined in each animal by myelographic and histologic studies of the dural sac. Iopamidol, ioglunide, and metrizamide produced no more arachnoid changes than were found in the control animals. Iocarmate produced moderate to severe arachnoiditis.

  19. Experimental study of arachnoiditis from iohexol, an investigational nonionic aqueous contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Haughton, V M; Ho, K C; Lipman, B T

    1982-01-01

    Myelography was performed in 16 monkeys using either metrizamide or iohexol, a new nonionic aqueous contrast medium. Eight of the animals received almost five times the recommended clinical dose of contrast medium per unit of body weight; the other eight received the equivalent of a high clinical dose. The severity of resultant arachnoiditis 12 weeks later was evaluated by repeat myelography and by histologic study of the arachnoid. No animals had severe arachnoiditis. Two of the four animals examined with the higher dose of metrizamide had moderate arachnoiditis and one had mild arachnoiditis; with the lower dose of metrizamide, two of four animals had mild arachnoiditis. No significant evidence of arachnoiditis was seen in any of the eight animals examined with iohexol.

  20. Computed tomography in cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy: visualisation of structures, myelographic comparison, cord measurements and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y L; du Boulay, G H; Stevens, J M; Kendall, B E

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-nine patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), radiculopathy (CSR), or both (CSMR) were studied with computed tomography (CT). Computer-assisted myelography (CAM) accurately determines the site and nature of spondylotic protrusions and provides good visualisation of the subarachnoid space and cord deformities even in areas with dilute metrizamide. However, excessive vertebral movement and bulging ligamenta flava with their effects on cord deformity, so easily visualised in myelograms, are completely or partially missed. In the assessment of CSM, metrizamide myelography (MM) followed by CAM should be performed, particularly when the myelographic images are unsatisfactory due to contrast dilution or blockage, when cord compression cannot be ascertained with MM and when cord atrophy is suspected. In CSR, the diagnostic information from MM and CAM is comparable. The diagnostic criteria in CAM are, however, less direct and since MM is adequate in uncomplicated cases, CAM is generally not necessary. The APD, APD/TD ratio, area and circularity are sensitive indices of cord deformity and the first two should be used more often to assist visual assessment of cord deformity. The relation between cord parameters and treatment response is better reflected in CSM cases managed conservatively and the results suggest that the degree of cord deformity is helpful in determining the outcome and hence the choice between surgical and conservative treatment. In plain CT, the osteophytes and calcified discs are adequately visualised and canal dimensions measured with accuracy, but the cervical cord and roots cannot be properly assessed and the diagnosis of CSM or CSR cannot be ascertained. At present, its role in cervical spondylosis is therefore limited.

  1. The effect of clinical bias on the interpretation of myelography and spinal computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Eldevik, O.P.; Dugstad, G.; Orrison, W.W.; Haughton, V.M.

    1982-10-01

    Spinal computed tomograms and myelograms of 107 patients with sciatica or low back pain were interpreted with and without knowledge of clinical history. A significant number of interpretations was changed by knowledge of the clinical history. More studies were interpreted correctly without the clinical history than with it. Knowledge of the clinical history increased the number of false-positive and decreased the number of false-negative diagnoses. This study suggest a tendency of observers to interpret questionable myelographic or computed tomograhic findings as positive when they correlate with clinical findings.

  2. Crackle template based metallic mesh with highly homogeneous light transmission for high-performance transparent EMI shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yu; Lin, Jie; Liu, Yuxuan; Fu, Hao; Ma, Yuan; Jin, Peng; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-05-01

    Our daily electromagnetic environment is becoming increasingly complex with the rapid development of consumer electronics and wireless communication technologies, which in turn necessitates the development of electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding, especially for transparent components. We engineered a transparent EMI shielding film with crack-template based metallic mesh (CT-MM) that shows highly homogeneous light transmission and strong microwave shielding efficacy. The CT-MM film is fabricated using a cost-effective lift-off method based on a crackle template. It achieves a shielding effectiveness of ~26 dB, optical transmittance of ~91% and negligible impact on optical imaging performance. Moreover, high–quality CT-MM film is demonstrated on a large–calibre spherical surface. These excellent properties of CT-MM film, together with its advantages of facile large-area fabrication and scalability in processing on multi-shaped substrates, make CT-MM a powerful technology for transparent EMI shielding in practical applications.

  3. Brain parenchyma penetration by intrathecal nonionic iopamidol.

    PubMed

    Sage, M R; Wilcox, J

    1983-01-01

    Iopamidol, a nonionic, water-soluble contrast medium, has been recently recommended for myelography. As with other such media, the extent of parenchymal penetration is of interest in relation to the genesis of clinical complications. In this study the degree and depth of brain penetration of intrathecal iopamidol, using an iodine concentration of 280 mg l/ml, were compared at 15 and 60 min in adult greyhound dogs using coronal computed tomographic scanning of the brain after removal. A significant but patchy penetration corresponding to the cortical sulci was demonstrated at 15 min, while by 60 min there had been a further increase in the distribution and concentration of the contrast medium. Comparing the present study with a previous series using metrizamide and methylglucamine iothalamate at a similar iodine concentration (280 mg l/ml), no significant difference in the depth or degree of penetration at 60 min was found between the three contrast media, indicating a similar rate of diffusion across the cerebrospinal fluid/brain interface. Therefore, any difference in neurotoxicity is not explained by a reduced concentration of contrast medium due to variation in the rate of diffusion across this interface.

  4. Crackle template based metallic mesh with highly homogeneous light transmission for high-performance transparent EMI shielding

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu; Lin, Jie; Liu, Yuxuan; Fu, Hao; Ma, Yuan; Jin, Peng; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-01-01

    Our daily electromagnetic environment is becoming increasingly complex with the rapid development of consumer electronics and wireless communication technologies, which in turn necessitates the development of electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding, especially for transparent components. We engineered a transparent EMI shielding film with crack-template based metallic mesh (CT-MM) that shows highly homogeneous light transmission and strong microwave shielding efficacy. The CT-MM film is fabricated using a cost-effective lift-off method based on a crackle template. It achieves a shielding effectiveness of ~26 dB, optical transmittance of ~91% and negligible impact on optical imaging performance. Moreover, high–quality CT-MM film is demonstrated on a large–calibre spherical surface. These excellent properties of CT-MM film, together with its advantages of facile large-area fabrication and scalability in processing on multi-shaped substrates, make CT-MM a powerful technology for transparent EMI shielding in practical applications. PMID:27151578

  5. Myelography in achondroplasia: value of a lateral C1-2 puncture and non-ionic, water-soluble contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Suss, R.A.; Udvarhelyi, G.B.; Wang, H.; Kumar, A.J.; Zinreich, S.J.; Rosenbaum, A.E.

    1983-10-01

    Because of technical difficulties and diagnostic limitations encountered with other myelographic techniques in patients with achondroplasia, the authors employed a lateral C1-2 puncture and non-ionic, water-soluble contrast medium in 18 achondroplastic patients with spinal compression (21 procedures). This technique proved most appropriate for identifying the upper limit of degenerative osteophytes causing exacerbation of congenital spinal stenosis, which is crucial in planning decompressive surgery. A potentially important additional finding was the presence of degenerative lower cervical spine disease in the majority of patients. There were no serious complications. The authors recommend this technique as safe and effective in achondroplastic patients with severe congenital spinal stenosis.

  6. Spinal epidural empyema in a cat.

    PubMed

    Maeta, Noritaka; Kanda, Teppei; Sasaki, Takanori; Morita, Takehito; Furukawa, Toshinori

    2010-06-01

    The diagnosis and surgical treatment of spinal epidural empyema (SEE) in a 2-year-old neutered male domestic shorthaired cat is described. SEE was diagnosed by computed tomographic myelography (CT myelography) and surgical exploration. The lesion was missed on both non-enhanced CT and conventional myelography. SEE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of progressive myelopathy in cats, and CT myelography should be undertaken when magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cannot be performed. PMID:20226705

  7. [Lumbar arachnoid cysts: 2 unusual cases].

    PubMed

    Mailleux, P; Dooms, G; Coulier, B; Malbecq, S

    1992-04-01

    Two cases of arachnoid cyst in the lumbar region are described. One is intradural, acquired, and associated to severe arachnoiditis while the other is extradural in location and probably congenital. The interest of myelography, CT myelography, and MRI for the diagnosis is discussed.

  8. [CT kinetics of intratumor liposome deposits].

    PubMed

    Wowra, B; Mentrup, E; Zeller, W J; Stricker, H; Sturm, V

    1988-04-01

    CT follow-up studies of liposome-entrapped metrizamide after intraneoplastic injection into neurogenic s.c. rat tumors were performed. By closely resembling clinical examination conditions, the experimental design has proven suitable in determining the in vivo kinetics of these interstitial liposome deposits. When compared to free metrizamide which may be considered an analogue of water-soluble chemotherapeutics, the encapsulation of metrizamide in liposomes resulted in a retarded decline of the contrast enhancement. Diffusion of liposomes could not be detected and the X-ray attenuation values measured within the liposome deposits continuously decreased with time for both types of liposomes. In the case of multilamellar vesicles, this significantly corresponded to a zero order kinetics with a mean halflife of 300 h. An initial increment in the X-ray attenuation of the liposome deposits might be due to the interstitial absorption of the water component of the liposome-dispersion. Because of the pronounced retardation effect of multilamellar liposomes resulting in a 140-fold prolongation of the interstitial retention time of metrizamide and due to their release kinetics these vesicles may be an appropriate carrier system for a local interstitial chemotherapy modality. Small unilamellar vesicles having an interstitial half-life of 14 h may be used as a faster component of a composed therapy system.

  9. Ventriculography and cisternography with water-soluble contrast media in infants with myelomeningocele

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Nakamura, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tajima, M.; Kageyama, N.

    1982-04-01

    Fifty-four newborn infants with myelomeningocele and hydrocephalus were studied by ventriculography using water-soluble contrast media; 20 were also studied by metrizamide myeloencephalography and computerized tomographic (CT) cisternography. Ventriculography suggested that the aqueduct was patent in all cases. Outflow of contrast medium from the fourth ventricle was slow in most cases, complete obstruction was seen in 15%, communication was delayed at the outlet in 54%, and rather free communication was observedin 31%. Metrizamide myeloencephalography and CT cisternography suggested a partial block at the level of the ambient cisterns in approximately one-third of infants. These findings support the concept that flow of cerebrospinal fluid is reduced in several areas. Aqueductal stenosis was not considered an important factor in hydrocephalus, while the most important site of obstruction was felt to be the lowest portion of the fourth ventricle.

  10. Anomaly of the facial canal in a Mondini malformation with recurrent meningitis

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Vignaud, J.; Bar, D.

    1982-07-01

    A patient with recurrent meningitis and congenital hearing loss was evaluated with tomography and metrizamide cisternography. Tomography showed an aberrant first portion of the facial nerve canal, while on cisternography, communication between the internal auditory canal and the dilated labyrinthine remnant was evident. The authors describe the radiographic findings and their significance and propose a mechanism for the formation of the anomalous facial nerve canal.

  11. Iopamidol: new preclinical and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Bonati, F; Felder, E; Tirone, P

    1980-01-01

    Iopamidol was rapidly eliminated from the central nervous system of dogs (greater than 90% in 24 hours). In rabbits, renal excretion involved tubular mechanisms at low blood levels, and predominant glomerular filtration at higher levels. Injection of iopamidol into the right atriums of rabbits produced hemodynamic effects similar to those of other contrast media, but less severe. The effect of iopamidol on peripheral vascular resistance was significantly lower than that of metrizamide. Iopamidol was found useful in clinical neuroradiology and angiography.

  12. Dermoid sinus and spinal malformations in a Yorkshire terrier: diagnosis and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fatone, G; Brunetti, A; Lamagna, F; Potena, A

    1995-04-01

    An unusual case of a Yorkshire terrier with a dermoid sinus associated with multiple spinal/costal malformations is described. The dog presented with ataxia and pain in the dorsal thoracic region. Diagnostic characterisation of the lesions was obtained with radiography, myelography and computed tomography. After surgical removal of the sinus, the dog showed marked clinical improvement over a two-year period.

  13. [Computed tomography in space-occupying intraspinal processes].

    PubMed

    Prömper, C; Friedmann, G

    1983-02-01

    Spinal computed tomography has considerably enhanced differential diagnostic safety in the course of the past two years. It has disclosed new possibilities of indication in the diagnosis of the vertebral column. With the expected improvement in apparatus technology, computed tomography will increasingly replace invasive examination methods. Detailed knowledge of clinical data, classification of the neurological findings, and localisation of the height--as far as possible--are the necessary prerequisites of successful diagnosis. If they are absent, it is recommended to perform myelography followed by secondary CT-myelography. If these preliminary conditions are observed, spinal CT can make outstanding contributions to the diagnosis of slipped disk, of the constricted vertebral canal, as well as tumours, malformations and posttraumatic conditions, postoperative changes and inflammatory processes. PMID:6338578

  14. [Incidence of extra-arachnoid discharge following lumbar puncture].

    PubMed

    Wiggli, U; Oberson, R

    1975-02-22

    Dimer-X is considered a good contrast medium for lumbar myelography. Its physical properties guarantee a homogeneous mixture with cerebrospinal fluid, with the result that postpunctural fluid leakage is easy to detect. One hundred Dimer-X lumbar myelographies were performed with two different spinal needles, a short beveled needle of 1.2 mm outer diameter and a special beveled "Quincke" needle of 0.7 mm outer diameter. Postpunctural fluid leakage is observed in 32% of the cases with the former and in only 12% with the latter. False-route injections occurred in 5% of the cases. Epidural leakage is the most frequent and can be detected by its "Christmas tree" appearance on antero-posterior X-ray. Subdural leakage is represented by a "railroad track" appearance on a lateral view. The leakage is observed more frequently in patients with normal myelogram (28%) than in patients with a herniated lumbar disc (18%).

  15. Computed tomography of the medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1982-10-01

    The medulla was studied in cadavers and in 100 patients both with and without the intrathecal administration of contrast material. The computed tomographic (CT) anatomy was correlated with the appearance on anatomic dissections. The pyramids, olives, and inferior cerebellar peduncles produced characteristic contours on cross sections of the medulla. The hypoglossal nerve by its location and course in the medullary cistern could be distinguished from the glossopharyngeal, vagal, and spinal accessory nerves. For optimal evaluation of the medulla, intrathecal administration of metrizamide and 5- and/or 1.5-mm-thick axial and coronal sections are recommended.

  16. A bandpass filter for the enhancement of an X-ray reconstruction of the tissue in the spinal canal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, I. S.; Glenn, W. V.; Kwoh, Y. S.; Truong, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    In this communication, a new bandpass reconstruction filter is developed to partially remove the low spatial frequencies of the bone and the soft tissue in an X-ray reconstruction of a lumbar spine. This partial removal of the low frequencies suppresses the bony vertebral body and the soft tissue components within the projections of actual clinical data. It also has the effect of enhancing the sharp edges of the fatty tissue surrounding the spinal cord region. The intent of this effort is to directly visualize the spinal cord without the need for water-soluble contrast (e.g., metrizamide) to be installed through lumbar punctures.

  17. Septum posticum cysts: an uncommon cause of chronic back pain.

    PubMed

    Wyler, A R; Loeser, J D; Killien, F C

    1975-09-01

    The authors describe two patients with posterior thoracic pain associated with cysts of the septum posticum. One patient's pain was relieved by surgical removal of the cysts; the second patient's symptoms temporarily resolved after myelography. Posterior thoracic pain can be ascribed to myelographically proven arachnoid cysts when the pain is persistent, positionally exacerbated and associated with radicular sensory changes. Excision of the cysts may provide pain relief for some patients.

  18. The spinal cord in rheumatoid arthritis with clinical myelopathy: a computed myelographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, J M; Kendall, B E; Crockard, H A

    1986-01-01

    Thirty one patients with suspected myelopathy due to rheumatoid arthritis were examined by plain radiography and 27 had computed myelography. Clinical features and radiological findings were compared. Deformity of the spinal cord could occur in the absence of combined anterior and posterior compression and correlated closely with clinical features only when considered in combination with skeletal and adjacent soft tissue abnormalities. The best surgical results were achieved by transoral odontoidectomy. Images PMID:3950633

  19. Peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a subadult golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos).

    PubMed

    Wernick, Morena Bernadette; Dennler, Matthias; Beckmann, Kathrin; Schybli, Martina; Albini, Sarah; Hoop, Richard K; Steffen, Frank; Kircher, Patrick; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2014-03-01

    A 5-year-old, female golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) was admitted with tetraplegia that progressed to a nonambulatory, spastic tetraparesis after a few days of treatment. Clinical and radiologic examinations, including radiography, computed tomography scan, and myelography, were indicative of neoplasia involving a spinal nerve root. Postmortem magnetic resonance imaging and necropsy findings confirmed the diagnosis of a peripheral nerve sheath neoplasia, not, to our knowledge, previously reported in a raptor. PMID:24881155

  20. Myelomeningocoele and a dermoid sinus-like lesion in a French bulldog

    PubMed Central

    Ployart, Stéphane; Doran, Ivan; Bomassi, Eric; Bille, Christophe; Libermann, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    A 2-year-old male French bulldog was presented for investigation of lumbosacral pain and hindlimb ataxia associated with urinary and fecal incontinence. Survey radiography, myelography, and computed tomography images were suggestive of a dermoid sinus with associated spina bifida. Surgical intervention led to a resolution of pain and neurological deficits. Histopathological analysis of the excised tissue was compatible with a myelomeningocoele of the 7th lumbar vertebra. PMID:24293672

  1. Wet and dry bacterial spore densities determined by buoyant sedimentation.

    PubMed Central

    Tisa, L S; Koshikawa, T; Gerhardt, P

    1982-01-01

    The wet densities of various types of dormant bacterial spores and reference particles were determined by centrifugal buoyant sedimentation in density gradient solutions of three commercial media of high chemical density. With Metrizamide or Renografin, the wet density values for the spores and permeable Sephadex beads were higher than those obtained by a reference direct mass method, and some spore populations were separated into several density bands. With Percoll, all of the wet density values were about the same as those obtained by the direct mass method, and only single density bands resulted. The differences were due to the partial permeation of Metrizamide and Renografin, but not Percoll, into the spores and the permeable Sephadex beads. Consequently, the wet density of the entire spore was accurately represented only by the values obtained with the Percoll gradient and the direct mass method. The dry densities of the spores and particles were determined by gravity buoyant sedimentation in a gradient of two organic solvents, one of high and the other of low chemical density. All of the dry density values obtained by this method were about the same as those obtained by the direct mass method. PMID:6285824

  2. Survival of newly postmitotic motoneurons is transiently independent of exogenous trophic support.

    PubMed

    Mettling, C; Gouin, A; Robinson, M; el M'Hamdi, H; Camu, W; Bloch-Gallego, E; Buisson, B; Tanaka, H; Davies, A M; Henderson, C E

    1995-04-01

    We compared the survival requirements of early- and late-born motoneurons from E5 chicken spinal cord. Density gradient centrifugation followed by immunopanning using SC1 antibody allowed us to purify two size classes of motoneuron. Large motoneurons retained by 6.8% metrizamide were shown by BrdU labeling in ovo to be born on average 1.5 d earlier than the small motoneurons recovered from the metrizamide pellet. Large motoneurons were both biochemically and functionally more mature: they expressed higher levels of choline acetyltransferase and low-affinity neurotrophin receptor, and had an acute requirement for trophic support from muscle-derived factors. After 24 hr in culture in basal medium, all early-born motoneurons died, whereas 60% of late-born motoneurons survived. Small motoneurons can develop into large motoneurons in ovo, suggesting that they represent a general transitional stage in motoneuron development. Our results suggest that a defined period elapses between birth of a motoneuron and its acquisition of trophic dependence, possibly corresponding to the time required for target innervation. This property may have important consequences for the timing and regulation of developmental motoneuron death.

  3. Ultracentrifugal isolation of vesicular carriers of biliary cholesterol in native human and rat bile.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, N; Garrido, J; Nervi, F

    1987-01-01

    We have utilized ultracentrifugation of native bile-Metrizamide density gradients to isolate a vesicular transport system of biliary lipids in both man and rat. We identified vesicular structures by electron microscopy. Fresh bile specimens were obtained from bile fistula rats (unsaturated bile) and from patients 1 week after bile duct surgery (supersaturated bile). Metrizamide was dissolved in bile (33% w/v), and continuous density gradients were performed with undiluted bile (density limits = 1.020 to 1.300 gm per ml). The relative distribution of biliary cholesterol, phospholipid and bile salt was studied as a function of the density of the fractions. Approximately 50% of total rat biliary cholesterol and between 61 and 90% of human biliary cholesterol was concentrated in the lightest fractions of the gradients (density less than 1.060 gm per ml). In contrast, less than 20% of bile salts was present in fractions with densities lower than 1.060 gm per ml. The highest amounts of bile salts and phospholipids of the bile-Metrizamide density gradients were found in the density range of 1.075 to 1.100 gm per ml in both human and rat bile. More than 80% of biliary proteins was found in fractions with densities greater than 1.075 gm per ml, and only 2% was found in the cholesterol-rich fraction with density less than 1.060 gm per ml in both species. When bile salt concentration was raised in rat bile from 38 to 97 mM by adding taurocholate, the low density cholesterol-rich fraction almost disappeared. Electron microscopy of negatively stained preparations of the fractions with density less than 1.060 gm per ml showed 40 to 120 nm vesicles, which were not apparent in the other fractions. Similar vesicles were demonstrated also in fresh rat bile and within the canaliculi after acute depletion of the bile salt pool (biliary bile salt concentration of 3.45 mM; total biliary lipid concentration of 0.25 gm%). The structure of these vesicles was shown in thin sections of liver

  4. Caudal cervical disc protrusion in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, N E; Berry, W L

    2000-09-01

    A young adult male white Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) presented with hindlimb ataxia. Cervical and lumbar myelography revealed a compressive lesion of the cord at C(6-7). Corticosteroid therapy and confinement failed to provide lasting remission of signs. A modified, inverted cone ventral slot decompression was used to remove the fibrous material causing cord compression at C(6-7). Temporary Horner's syndrome and laryngeal paresis developed postsurgically because of excessive tissue retraction. The animal recovered normal ambulatory function 6 wk after surgery.

  5. Segmental spinal cord hypoplasia in a Holstein Friesian calf.

    PubMed

    Binanti, D; Fantinato, E; De Zani, D; Riccaboni, P; Pravettoni, D; Zani, D D

    2013-08-01

    An 8-day-old female Holstein Friesian calf was examined because of congenital spastic paresis of the hind limbs. Myelography revealed deviation and thinning of subarachnoid contrast medium columns in the lumbar segment. Upon magnetic resonance imaging, the 'hour-glass' subdural compression appeared as a T1-hypointense, T2-hyperintense ovoidal area suggestive of cerebral spinal fluid collection, compatible with hydrosyringomyelia. The calf was euthanized and the necropsy confirmed the diagnosis of segmental spinal cord hypoplasia of the lumbar tract associated to hydromyelic and syringomyelic cavities.

  6. Retroperitoneal approach for lumbar lateral meningocele--case report.

    PubMed

    Miyata, M; Yamasaki, S; Yoshida, T; Matsubara, M; Okamura, M; Hirayama, A; Tamaki, N

    1995-12-01

    A 29-year-old female with neurofibromatosis presented with a right lumbar lateral meningocele. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed a huge right retroperitoneal cyst expanding anterolaterally and displacing the right kidney. CT following myelography disclosed the cyst expanding through a wide defect of the right pedicles of the T-12 and L-1 vertebrae. The cyst was resected through a retroperitoneal approach with right flank oblique incision. Postoperatively, cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred, which improved after lumboperitoneal shunt. Careful screening for lateral meningocele, including the lumbar region, should be undertaken in a patient with neurofibromatosis who presents with vertebral anomalies.

  7. Upper lumbar disk herniations.

    PubMed

    Cedoz, M E; Larbre, J P; Lequin, C; Fischer, G; Llorca, G

    1996-06-01

    Specific features of upper lumbar disk herniations are reviewed based on data from the literature and from a retrospective study of 24 cases treated surgically between 1982 and 1994 (seven at L1-L2 and 17 at L2-L3). Clinical manifestations are polymorphic, misleading (abdominogenital pain suggestive of a visceral or psychogenic condition, meralgia paresthetica, isolated sciatica; femoral neuralgia is uncommon) and sometimes severe (five cases of cauda equina syndrome in our study group). The diagnostic usefulness of imaging studies (radiography, myelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and results of surgery are discussed. The risk of misdiagnosis and the encouraging results of surgery are emphasized. PMID:8817752

  8. Caudal cervical disc protrusion in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, N E; Berry, W L

    2000-09-01

    A young adult male white Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) presented with hindlimb ataxia. Cervical and lumbar myelography revealed a compressive lesion of the cord at C(6-7). Corticosteroid therapy and confinement failed to provide lasting remission of signs. A modified, inverted cone ventral slot decompression was used to remove the fibrous material causing cord compression at C(6-7). Temporary Horner's syndrome and laryngeal paresis developed postsurgically because of excessive tissue retraction. The animal recovered normal ambulatory function 6 wk after surgery. PMID:11237151

  9. An experimental evaluation of response to contrast media: Pantopaque, iopamidol, and iohexol in the subarachnoid space.

    PubMed

    Paşaoğlu, A; Gök, A; Patiroğlu, T E

    1988-10-01

    Myelography in dogs was performed with Pantopaque, iopamidol and iohexol. The effects of these agents were evaluated by histologic study of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges four months after the procedure. Retained Pantopaque was always accompanied by some degree of arachnoidal reaction, mild in the cervical cord segment and severe in the most caudal part of the cul-de-sac. No apparent protection against Pantopaque arachnoiditis was provided by either intrathecal or intramuscular methylprednisolone. We found no histologic evidence of arachnoiditis in animals examined with iopamidol and iohexol.

  10. Neuroimaging of Spinal Canal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Spinal stenosis is common and presents in a variety of forms. Symptomatic lumbar stenosis occurs in approximately 10% of the population and cervical stenosis in 9% over age 70. Imaging is central to the management decision process and first-choice MR imaging may be substituted with CT and CT myelography. A review of the literature is presented with particular emphasis on the clinical-radiologic correlation in both neurogenic intermittent claudication and cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Advanced techniques promise improvements, particularly with radicular compressive lesions, but remain underutilized in routine clinical practice.

  11. Dynamic CT scanning of spinal column trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.M.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Cann, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Dynamic sequential computed tomographic scanning with automatic table incrementation uses low milliampere-second technique to eliminate tube cooling delays between scanning slices and, thus, markedly shortens examination times. A total of 25 patients with spinal column trauma involving 28 levels were studied with dynamic scans and retrospectively reviewed. Dynamic studies were considerably faster than conventional spine examinations and yielded reliable diagnosis. Bone disruption and subluxation was accurately evaluated, and the use of intrathecal metrizamide in low doses allowed direct visualization of spinal cord or radicular compromise. Multiplanar image reformation was aided by the dynamic incrementation technique, since motion between slices (and the resulting misregistration artifact on image reformation) was minimized. A phantom was devised to test spatial resolution of computed tomography for objects 1-3 mm in size and disclosed minimal differences for dynamic and conventional computed tomographic techniques in resolving medium-to-high-contrast objects.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of Arnold-Chiari type I malformation with hydromyelia

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaPaz, R.L.; Brady, T.J.; Buonanno, F.S.; New, P.F.; Kistler, J.P.; McGinnis, B.D.; Pykett, I.L.; Taveras, J.M.

    1983-02-01

    Saturation recovery nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images and metrizamide computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained in an adult patient with a clinical history suggestive of syringomyelia. Both NMR and CT studies showed low lying cerebellar tonsils. The CT study demonstrated central cavitation of the spinal cord from the midthoracic to midcervical levels but could not exclude an intramedullary soft tissue mass at the cervico-medullary junction. The NMR images in transverse, coronal, and sagittal planes demonstrated extension of an enlarged central spinal cord cerebrospinal fluid space to the cervico-medullary junction. This was felt to be strong evidence for exclusion of an intramedullary soft tissue mass and in favor of a diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari Type I malformation with hydromyelia. The noninvasive nature of spinal cord and cervico-medullary junction evaluation with NMR is emphasized.

  13. Treatment of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypotension With Tea: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Petramfar, Peyman; Mohammadi, S. Saeed; Hosseinzadeh, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The syndrome of spontaneous intracranial hypotension has been increasingly diagnosed since its discovery through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is a rare syndrome that is due to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a tear in the dura and can occur at any age, even among adolescents, but is most frequently seen among females in late middle age. Case Presentation Here, we describe a 32-year-old woman with a two-month history of headaches and occasional nausea and vomiting (N/V). MRI without gadolinium was normal, but meningeal enhancement was seen in MRI with gadolinium. The lumbar puncture revealed a low opening pressure. Computed tomography myelography (CT myelography) showed no leakage; Therefore, idiopathic intracranial hypotension was diagnosed. Treatment was started using tea, and the patient’s headache got significantly better in about a day. Conclusions Conservative therapy, such as bed rest and caffeine treatment with eight cups of tea daily, yielded a significant improvement in our patient. Effectively, the patient constitutes a case of idiopathic intracranial hypotension due to undetectable CSF leakage or hyper-absorption, with good response to conservative management through tea-drinking. Further investigations with an appropriate sample size are needed in order to confirm this intervention in the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypotension. PMID:27621920

  14. Treatment of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypotension With Tea: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Petramfar, Peyman; Mohammadi, S. Saeed; Hosseinzadeh, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The syndrome of spontaneous intracranial hypotension has been increasingly diagnosed since its discovery through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is a rare syndrome that is due to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a tear in the dura and can occur at any age, even among adolescents, but is most frequently seen among females in late middle age. Case Presentation Here, we describe a 32-year-old woman with a two-month history of headaches and occasional nausea and vomiting (N/V). MRI without gadolinium was normal, but meningeal enhancement was seen in MRI with gadolinium. The lumbar puncture revealed a low opening pressure. Computed tomography myelography (CT myelography) showed no leakage; Therefore, idiopathic intracranial hypotension was diagnosed. Treatment was started using tea, and the patient’s headache got significantly better in about a day. Conclusions Conservative therapy, such as bed rest and caffeine treatment with eight cups of tea daily, yielded a significant improvement in our patient. Effectively, the patient constitutes a case of idiopathic intracranial hypotension due to undetectable CSF leakage or hyper-absorption, with good response to conservative management through tea-drinking. Further investigations with an appropriate sample size are needed in order to confirm this intervention in the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypotension.

  15. Original surgical treatment of thoracolumbar subarachnoid cysts in six chondrodystrophic dogs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Subarachnoid cysts are rare conditions in veterinary medicine, associated with spinal cord dysfunction. Most of the 100 cases of subarachnoid cysts described since the first report in 1968 were apparently not true cysts. Reported cysts are usually situated in the cervical area and occur in predisposed breeds such as the Rottweiler. The purpose of this retrospective study, from May 2003 to April 2012, was to describe the distinctive features of thoracolumbar spinal subarachnoid cysts, together with their surgical treatment and outcome in 6 chondrodystrophic dogs. Results Five Pugs and 1 French Bulldog were examined. Images suggestive of a subarachnoid cyst were obtained by myelography (2/6) and computed tomography myelography (4/6), and associated disc herniation was observed in 3/6 dogs. A hemilaminectomy was performed. The protruding disc eventually found in 5/6 dogs was treated by lateral corpectomy. The ventral leptomeningeal adhesions observed in all dogs after durotomy were dissected. No or only mild post-operative neurological degradation was observed. Follow-up studies (7 months to 4 years) indicated good outcome and no recurrence. Conclusions All the thoracolumbar subarachnoid cysts described in these 6 chondrodystrophic dogs were associated with leptomeningeal adhesions. Good results seemed to be obtained by dissecting and removing these adhesions. A protruding disc, found here in 5/6 dogs, needs to be ruled out and can be treated by lateral corpectomy. PMID:24884635

  16. Iopamidol for intrathecal use in pediatric neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, R; Piscitelli, G; Ambrosio, A

    1986-01-01

    A clinical trial using iopamidol, a non-ionic contrast medium, in various iodine concentrations (300, 200 and 150 mg I/ml), was carried out in 947 children, aged between 1 day and 14 years, who underwent various neuroradiologic procedures: computed tomography (CT) cisternography (n = 307), CT ventriculography (n = 203), CT myelography (n = 153), and conventional myelography (n = 284). No significant variation in vital signs and neurologic status was recorded during and up to 72 hours after the examination. Psychic agitation was the major effect registered, being clearly related to the type of procedure used. A significant reduction of untoward side effects (about 50%) was observed using the lower concentrations of the medium. Iopamidol 150 mg and 200 mg represented the optimal concentration for CT enhancement, these concentrations reducing artifacts; the 300 mg I/ml concentration gave best results in conventional radiology. It seems that the lower concentrations of iopamidol (200 and 150 mg I/ml) can be usefully employed in pediatric neuroradiology, with preserved contrast and dramatically reduced untoward reactions.

  17. The acute lumbar disc herniation: imaging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yussen, P S; Swartz, J D

    1993-12-01

    The acute lumbar herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) can often be diagnosed on good quality MRI or CT examination. Myelography, discography, and postmyelography/postdiscography CT ordinarily are reserved for equivocal and protracted cases. MRI is recommended as the initial study of choice except for older patients for whom CT may be more valuable because of the high incidence of osteophytosis. Patients with acute herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) may have varied clinical symptoms depending on the level of the HNP, extent of the annulus tear/depth of penetration of nuclear material, and the direction of the disc herniation. HNP does not necessarily produce radiculopathy and may cause vague low back pain. This article reviews and analyzes the clinical symptoms and problems associated with HNP, as well as the pitfalls and differential diagnostic possibilities in interpretation. PMID:8297631

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine: technical and clinical observations

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Boumphrey, F.; Starnes, D.; Duchesneau, P.M.

    1983-12-01

    Seventy-two patients were examined to determine the clinical potential for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine. MRI using different pulse sequences was compared with plain radiography, high-resolution computed tomography, and myelography. There were 35 normal patients; pathologic conditions studied included canal stenosis, herniated disk, metastatic tumor, neurofibroma, trauma, Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, arteriovenous malformation, and rheumatoid arthritis. MRI provided sharply defined anatomic delineation and tissue characterization. It was diagnostic in syringomyelia and Chiari malformation and was useful in the evaluation of trauma and spinal canal block from any cause. MRI was sensitive to degenerative disk disease and infection. The spin-echo technique, with three pulse sequence variations, seems very promising. A short echo time (TE) produces the best signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Lengthening the TE enhances differentiation of various tissues by their signal intensity, whil the combined increase of TE and recovery time (TR) produces selective enhancement of the cerebrospinal fluid signal intensity.

  19. Electro-acupuncture and Chinese herbs for treatment of cervical intervertebral disk disease in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Matera, Júlia Maria; da Silva, Tatiana Soares; de Campos Fonseca Pinto, Ana Carolina Brandão; Cortopassi, Sílvia Renata Gaido

    2007-01-01

    A non-ambulatory dog with tetraparesis following a pain episode that had evolved over 2 months was submitted for medical treatment and diagnosed with intervertebral disk disease at C3-C4 and dorsal extradural compression at C1-C2 and C3-C4 using myelography and computed tomography. The dog experienced ambulation recovery after 15 days of treatment with only electroacupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine, with marked improvement occurring after only 10 treatments. Six months of follow-up demonstrated that the dog was stable and had no recurrence of symptoms. Therefore, it was concluded that the combination of electroacupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine was responsible for motor rehabilitation. PMID:17322780

  20. An atlas of radiological anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, J.; Abrahams, P.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains a wealth of radiologic images of normal human anatomy; plain radiographs, contrast-enhanced radiographs, and computed tomography (CT) scans. There are 18 pages of magnetic resonance (MR) images, most on the brain and spinal cord, so that there are only two pages on MR imaging of the heart and two pages on abdominal and pelvic MR imaging. Twelve pages of ultrasound (US) images are included. This book has the radiologic image paired with an explanatory drawing; the image is on the left with a paragraph or two of text, and the drawing is on the right with legends. This book includes images of the brain and spinal cord obtained with arteriography, venography, myelography, encephalography, CT, and MR imaging.

  1. [Feasibilities and bounds of diagnostic radiology in case of back pain].

    PubMed

    Pennekamp, W; Rduch, G; Nicolas, V

    2005-04-01

    Chronic monotone back pain is no pressing indication for radiographic procedures, but chronic progressive or symptomatic back pain should be investigated by radiographic means. Beneath conventional radiology and computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a more method of standard in these cases. The radiographic investigation of back pain is shown in cases of discal and vertebral degeneration and spondylitis. Typical signs and differential diagnosis are demonstrated. After demonstration of radiological means. After introduction and valuation of radiological means, as conventional radiography, CT, MRI, myelography and scintigraphy, it is entered into degenerative changes and degenerative diseases of vertebra endplates and vertebra bodies as a reason of pain. Reasons of spinal stenosis are discussed. In case of inflammatory changes, bacterial inflammation of vertebrae and intervertebral joints are represented. Changes of spondylodiscitis/spondylitis are opposed to inflammatory changes of Morbus Bechterew and Morbus Scheuermann.

  2. MR imaging of lumbar arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Ross, J S; Masaryk, T J; Modic, M T; Delamater, R; Bohlman, H; Wilbur, G; Kaufman, B

    1987-11-01

    To assess the usefulness of MR in defining the changes of lumbar arachnoiditis, we reviewed retrospectively the MR, plain-film myelographic, and CT myelographic findings in 100 patients referred for evaluation of failed-back-surgery syndrome. In 11 of 12 cases of arachnoiditis demonstrated by plain-film and CT myelography, an abnormal configuration of nerve roots was seen by MR. The correlated MR and CT and plain-film myelographic changes were divided into three anatomic groups: group 1 showed conglomerations of adherent roots residing centrally within the thecal sac, group 2 demonstrated roots adherent peripherally to the meninges giving rise to an "empty-sac" appearance, and group 3 demonstrated a soft-tissue mass replacing the subarachnoid space. There was one false-negative MR study. For the diagnosis of moderate to severe arachnoiditis, we found MR to correlate excellently with CT myelographic and plain-film myelographic findings.

  3. Cauda equina syndrome with multiple lumbar diverticula complicating long-standing ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Schröder, R; Urbach, H; Zierz, S

    1994-12-01

    A patient with cauda equina syndrome complicating long-standing inactive ankylosing spondylitis is described. The first neurological symptoms started 15 years after the onset of ankylosing spondylitis. Over a follow-up period of 12 years the cauda equina syndrome showed a slowly progressive but disabling course leading to sensory disturbances in the lumbar and sacral dermatomes, weakness and wasting of the muscles innervated by these nerve roots, sphincter disturbances, and impotence. Magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and lumbar myelography showed enlargement of the dural sac with multiple lubar diverticula eroding the lumbosacral vertebrae. The pathophysiology of the cauda equina syndrome in ankylosing spondylitis is unclear. Surgical treatment seems justified only in patients with a short history of neurological symptoms.

  4. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  5. Targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) through a single catheter access site for treatment of a cerebral spinal fluid leak causing spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Woolen, Sean; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S; Chaudhary, Neeraj

    2015-06-02

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) usually occurs in the setting of a spontaneous cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leak. We report the first description of a case of SIH caused by a CSF leak which improved after a targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) at the right T1-T2 level. An 81-year-old woman presented with an orthostatic headache for 6 days. MRI of the brain with contrast demonstrated low lying cerebellar tonsils, an engorged transverse sinus flow void, bifrontal small subdural fluid collections, and diffuse dural enhancement. CT myelography showed extravasation of intrathecal contrast at the right T1-T2 level. A targeted epidural patch was performed by injection of n-BCA through a catheter at the right T1-T2 level. After treatment, the patient's symptoms immediately improved and she was without a headache at 1-year follow-up.

  6. Pelvic meningocele can be missed during laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Vincent Y T; Rosenthal, David M

    2006-01-01

    Pelvic meningocele is an uncommon condition and is frequently asymptomatic. The diagnosis easily can be mistaken as ovarian cyst on pelvic sonography. In many reported cases, the diagnosis was made during laparotomy for presumed ovarian cysts. Myelography, computerized tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful for definitive diagnosis. A 49-year-old woman, who had a normal diagnostic laparoscopy 3 years prior, was referred for a persistent ovarian cyst. Repeat laparoscopy revealed a retroperitoneal cyst in the left pelvic sidewall. Both ovaries and fallopian tubes were normal. Subsequent CT and MRI were used to diagnose pelvic meningocele. We speculate that pelvic meningoceles can be missed during laparoscopy due to the increased intraperitoneal pressure and the potential reduction in the cerebrospinal fluid pressure at the lumbosacral level.

  7. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Son, Byung-chul; Ha, Sang-woo; Lee, Si-hoon; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge. PMID:27445613

  8. Intraspinal synovial cyst in a dog.

    PubMed

    Perez, B; Rollan, E; Ramiro; Pumarola, M

    2000-01-01

    An eight-year-old, male Siberian husky cross was referred with a history of an acute onset of pelvic-limb ataxia and paraparesis. Radiography and subsequent myelography of the spine revealed an extradural compression of the spinal cord at the level of the 13th thoracic (T13) to first lumbar (L1) vertebrae. Hemilaminectomy resulted in the successful removal of an extradural cystic lesion. The morphological diagnosis based on histopathology was a synovial cyst with chondromatosis. There were no postoperative complications, and the dog's condition improved markedly. At two years postoperatively, the animal remains normal on both physical and neurological examination. To the authors' knowledge, this article is the first report of an intraspinal synovial cyst in a dog.

  9. Computed tomographic epidurography: an aid to understanding deformation of the lumbar dural sac by epidural injections.

    PubMed

    Fukushige, T; Kano, T; Sano, T; Irie, M

    1999-09-01

    Local anaesthetics injected into the epidural space may deform the dural sac to a variable degree, thereby contributing to variability in the extent of the block. We investigated deformation of the lumbar dural sac after injection into the lumbar epidural space. The subjects were 26 patients with low-back pain who underwent lumbar epidurography and computed tomographic (CT) epidurography, of whom seven also underwent myelography and computed tomographic myelography. The epidural space was entered via the sacral hiatus in 24 patients and through the L5/S1 interspace in two patients. Ten millilitres of local anaesthetic was then injected into the epidural space followed by 20 mL of contrast medium. Computed tomographic epidurography was undertaken approximately 30-min after the epidural injection at the mid-vertebral and mid-discal levels from the first lumbar through to the first sacral vertebrae. The dural sac usually showed an oval or hexagonal shape on the transverse views at the first and second lumbar vertebral levels, and the shape of an inverted triangle below the level of the third lumbar vertebra. A median line of translucency was also observed on the posteroanterior epidurographic view in 25 of the 26 patients. This line was though to be a manifestation of the dural deformation to the inverted triangle. Dural sac deformation usually shows a specific pattern, although there are individual variations. Dural deformability is an important consideration in any analysis of the spread of epidural block or of the changes of epidural pressure after epidural injection of local anaesthetics. PMID:10549463

  10. Preparation and evaluation of a /sup 99m/Tc-SnF2 colloid kit for leukocyte labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, J.I.; Tatum, J.L.; Fratkin, M.J.; Apostolides, D.L.; Quint, R.I.

    1989-07-01

    Stannous fluoride colloid (SFC) kits for instant radiolabeling with 99mTc were prepared and evaluated for suitability as a leukocyte radiolabeling agent. Technetium-99m labeling for kits stored at -15/degree/C for up to 3 mo was greater than 95% as determined by instant thin layer chromatography while colloid particles of 1-3 microns were measured by electron microscope for these preparations. Canine leukocyte preparations labeled with (/sup 99m/Tc)SFC and characterized by triple density gradients of metrizamide in plasma demonstrated an 83% leukocyte association. Analysis of labeled cell preparation for up to 3 hr demonstrated label stability. Labeled leukocytes, when readministered in normal dogs, demonstrated bi-exponential blood clearance with uptake and subsequent clearance from lung. There was increasing uptake of labeled leukocytes by the liver until steady state was achieved. Furthermore, when whole blood samples were analyzed by the triple density gradient method, an increasing monocyte-to-granulocyte ratio was observed to occur with time. By 3 hr 95% of the whole blood activity was associated with the leukocyte fraction. Dogs in which a 24-hr sterile abscess was created demonstrated elevated blood-pool activity as compared to control with localization of the labeled cells at inflammatory sites within 3 hr following cell readministration.

  11. Leukocyte labeling with technetium-99m tin colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, B.H.; English, D.

    1987-09-01

    Triple density gradients of metrizamide in plasma (MP) were used to characterize label distribution in human leukocyte preparations incubated with /sup 99m/Tc tin colloids. Less than 50% of the cell-associated radioactivity was specifically bound to leukocytes when heparinized blood was rotated with stannous fluoride colloid ((Tc)SFC). Labeling efficiency in leukocyte rich plasma (LRP) averaged 44%, of which greater than 90% was specifically bound to leukocytes. MP-gradient analysis also revealed that leukocyte labeling did not occur with stannous chloride colloid, nor when citrate was present during rotation with (Tc)SFC. When citrate was added after labeling to solubilize unbound (Tc)SFC, radiocolloid was removed from the leukocytes, indicating that the mechanism of (Tc)SFC labeling is adherence rather than phagocytosis. Technetium-labeled neutrophils exhibited normal in vitro chemotaxis and no lung uptake in vivo. Technetium-labeled mononuclear leukocytes, on the other hand, exhibited prolonged lung transit in vivo. Neither (Tc)SFC cell preparation showed signs of in vivo reoxidation to pertechnetate.

  12. Autophagic sequestration of (/sup 14/C)sucrose, introduced into rat hepatocytes by reversible electro-permeabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, P.B.; Seglen, P.O.

    1982-11-01

    Isolated rat hepatocytes could be made permeable to small molecules such as (/sup 14/C)sucrose (but not to proteins) but subjecting the cells to repeated discharges in a high-voltage field. During subsequent incubation at 37/sup 0/C, the permeability changes were reversed within 15 min, the electron-injected (/sup 14/C)sucros remaining trapped inside the re-sealed plasma membrane. Autophagic sequestration of (/sup 14/C)sucrose, i.e., the transfer of radioactivity from cytosol to sedimentable vesicles (autophagosomes and lysosomes), could be followed by incubating the (/sup 14/C)sucrose-loaded hepatocytes for up to 2 h at 37/sup 0/C. After incubation, the cells were disrupted by a single high-voltage discharge in electrolyte-free medium (sucrose), and sedimentable cell components were separated from the cytosol by centrifugation through metrizamide. By the use of these methods, which are particularly suitable for the analysis of many small cell samples, it could be shown that (/sup 14/C)sucros was autophagically sequestered in the hepatocytes at a rate of 4-5%/h. The sequestration was nearly completely inhibited by the specific autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine.

  13. Preparation and evaluation of a 99mTc-SnF2 colloid kit for leukocyte labeling.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, J I; Tatum, J L; Fratkin, M J; Apostolides, D L; Quint, R I

    1989-07-01

    Stannous fluoride colloid (SFC) kits for instant radiolabeling with 99mTc were prepared and evaluated for suitability as a leukocyte radiolabeling agent. Technetium-99m labeling for kits stored at -15 degrees C for up to 3 mo was greater than 95% as determined by instant thin layer chromatography while colloid particles of 1-3 microns were measured by electron microscope for these preparations. Canine leukocyte preparations labeled with [99mTc]SFC and characterized by triple density gradients of metrizamide in plasma demonstrated an 83% leukocyte association. Analysis of labeled cell preparation for up to 3 hr demonstrated label stability. Labeled leukocytes, when readministered in normal dogs, demonstrated bi-exponential blood clearance with uptake and subsequent clearance from lung. There was increasing uptake of labeled leukocytes by the liver until steady state was achieved. Furthermore, when whole blood samples were analyzed by the triple density gradient method, an increasing monocyte-to-granulocyte ratio was observed to occur with time. By 3 hr 95% of the whole blood activity was associated with the leukocyte fraction. Dogs in which a 24-hr sterile abscess was created demonstrated elevated blood-pool activity as compared to control with localization of the labeled cells at inflammatory sites within 3 hr following cell readministration.

  14. Heavy and Light Particles of Adeno-Associated Virus

    PubMed Central

    de la Maza, Luis M.; Carter, Barrie J.

    1980-01-01

    KB cells coinfected with adenovirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV) yielded two kinds of infectious AAV particles that banded in CsCl at densities of 1.45 and 1.41 g/cm2, respectively. The 1.45 band was found to be composed of a heterogeneous group of viral particles that could be subfractionated by velocity sedimentation. The main component from this band had a smaller S value (109) than the main component from the 1.41 band (111S), although both had the same DNA/protein ratio and the same density in metrizamide gradients. Continuous-label experiments showed that early after infection, both components (1.45 and 1.41) were generated in the same amounts, but this was followed by a relative increase in the proportion of the 1.41 component over the 1.45 particles. Pulse-chase analysis failed to demonstrate a precursor-product relationship between these two bands. The slower-sedimenting components from the 1.45 band were unstable in CsCl and were present in a greater proportion early after infection. These particles contained DNA that was enriched for the terminal sequences of the AAV genomes and was accessible to digestion with micrococcal nuclease. Images PMID:6245263

  15. Flow generated around particle clusters in a rotating ultrasonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, G

    1998-09-01

    A chamber cavity, which has a square cross section and pressure-release walls, is used to produce a well-defined, 160-kHz standing ultrasonic field. A suspension of latex microspheres in aqueous metrizamide fills the chamber. The chamber rotates about a horizontal axis producing the centripetal force necessary to contain the buoyant spheres in the axial region. At low particle concentrations, clusters of microspheres form at half-wavelength intervals near the axial positions of acoustic pressure amplitude (p0) minima, as expected because of rotational and acoustic radiation forces. At higher concentrations, additional particle distributions are often seen that suggest the presence of flow. When high concentrations of larger particles are used, small clusters also form at axial positions of p0 maxima. Theory for acoustic streaming in a rotating fluid predicts flow speeds that are too small to account for the observed flow. Reasonable agreement with observations is obtained using a theory for flow generated by the buoyant gravitational force acting on the clusters. PMID:9745732

  16. An overview of the clinical pharmacokinetics of x-ray contrast media.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Jolliet, P; Ballereau, F

    1997-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies of contrast media are usually performed as preclinical trials in anaesthetised animals; however, results in humans have also been reported for this type of compounds. This paper reviews the existing data about x-ray contrast media in humans. In some cases, animal data are used in areas where no human data are available. The administration of contrast media is generally made via the intravenous, intra-arterial or intrathecal route. Diagnostic procedures are based on differential distribution to organs and between normal and abnormal tissue. Data are available for iodixanol, iohexol, iopamidol, iopromide, iothalamate and ioxaglate, but the kinetic distribution of all contrast media is similar. With the exception of biliary contrast agents, all compounds display limited plasma protein binding and do not undergo biotransformation. From the pharmacokinetic viewpoint, the main area of interest for these compounds is elimination. The majority of the data were obtained with iopamidol (of which 66 to 72% of the dose is excreted in the urine), iohexol, ioxaglate and iopromide. Some studies were performed in patients with renal impairment: in this case, metabolic clearance was abnormally elevated, suggesting the existence of significant compensatory factors such as hepatic metabolism, enterohepatic circulation and biliary elimination. New compounds, such as iodinated polymers for x-ray perfusion imaging and iopromide- or metrizamide-containing liposomes allowing liver enhancement are discussed.

  17. Effect of arachnoiditis on pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Beyer, G A; Lipman, B T; Haughton, V M; Ho, K C

    1987-10-01

    A model for studying the relationship between chronic arachnoiditis and pain sensitivity was developed. Thirty male ICR mice were randomly divided into three groups and the tail-flick test was done using an EMDIE-TF6 apparatus (Emdie Instrument Co., Montpelier, VA). Ten mice were injected intrathecally with 5.0 microL of a kaolin-metrizamide mixture and ten control mice were injected intrathecally with 5.0 microL of an electrolyte solution resembling CSF. A third group, (naive controls) were given no treatment. Six weeks later tail-flick tests were repeated. The kaolin-treated mice had significantly decreased tail-flick latencies (P less than .05) compared with the baseline; the controls had no significant change in tail-flick latency. Histologic examination revealed moderate to severe arachnoiditis in the kaolin-treated animals and no evidence of arachnoid abnormalities in the controls. This study suggests that arachnoiditis may be associated with decreased pain thresholds.

  18. Accessory function of Kupffer cells in the antigen-specific blastogenic response of an L3T4+ T-lymphocyte clone to Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, S H; Wing, E J

    1990-01-01

    The function of Kupffer cells in the development of protective immunity to infection by Listeria monocytogenes is controversial. To determine their role in antilisterial host defenses, Kupffer cells were separated from other nonparenchymal cells of the liver by centrifugation on a metrizamide gradient followed by adherence to glass or plastic. The resultant highly enriched Kupffer cell population supported the antigen-specific blastogenic response [( 3H]thymidine incorporation) of cloned L3T4+ T lymphocytes to L. monocytogenes in vitro. Blastogenesis was dependent upon the duration of the incubation period, the concentration of the antigen, and the number of Kupffer cells in culture. Maximum reactivity was greater than that observed when the same T-cell population was incubated with adherent peritoneal exudate cells and antigen under optimal conditions. The addition of antibodies specific for murine interleukin-1 beta to cocultures of Kupffer cells and T lymphocytes eliminated the antigen-stimulated incorporation of [3H]thymidine, indicating a requirement for interleukin-1. Analysis of the culture supernatants demonstrated that, in addition to interleukin-1, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-6, and gamma interferon were elaborated in cocultures containing cloned T lymphocytes, Kupffer cells, and antigen. These results suggest that Kupffer cells may serve a critical role in the development of immunity to infection by L. monocytogenes in vivo. Images PMID:2114361

  19. Vesicles and mixed micelles in hypothyroid rat bile before and after thyroid hormone treatment: evidence for a vesicle transport system for biliary cholesterol secretion.

    PubMed

    Andreini, J P; Prigge, W F; Ma, C; Gebbard, R L

    1994-08-01

    Hypothyroid rats show reduced secretion of biliary lipids, especially cholesterol. Secretion of biliary cholesterol is markedly augmented to levels above euthryroid beginning 12-24 h after administration of thyroid hormone. In the current studies, bile from hypothyroid and triiodothyronine-treated chronic bile-fistula rats was analyzed for vesicles and mixed micelles by metrizamide gradient ultracentrifugation. For euthryoid and hypothyroid animals, less than 12% of biliary cholesterol was in a vesicle gradient fraction. After treatment with triiodothyronine, biliary cholesterol increased markedly, and 50% of total cholesterol, 60% of excess cholesterol secreted, appeared in the vesicle fraction. Triiodothyronine stimulation of vesicle secretion resulted in cholesterol-rich vesicles (cholesterol:phospholipid ratio rose from less than 0.1 to 0.56), but no change in the distinct fatty acid composition of vesicle phospholipids. The microtubule inhibitor colchicine, given 12 h after triiodothyronine, prevented subsequent increase in cholesterol secretion in the form of vesicles. These studies, in a model that allows rapid changes in biliary lipid secretion, support the hypothesis that an important component of cholesterol and phospholipid secretion into bile involves microtubules and may involve a vesicle pathway.

  20. Effects of a phospholipase A/sub 2/ inhibitor on uptake and toxicity of liposomes containing plant phosphatidylinositol

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, M.; Alving, C.R.

    1986-05-01

    Plant phosphatidylinositol (PI) has been shown by us to have a direct cytotoxic effect on cultured tumor cells but not on normal cells. Synthetic PI containing /sup 14/C-linoleic acid in the sn-2 position, also showed the same pattern of selective cytotoxicity. When the metabolic fate of synthetic PI was examined with tumor cells, the radioactivity which no longer occurred as PI, was found as either products of phospholipase A/sub 2/ (93%, free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholine) or phospholipase C (7%, diglycerides). Uptake of liposomal PI was directly correlated with cytotoxicity. They tested a variety of inhibitors to see the effect on uptake and/or cytotoxicity of plant PI. General metabolic inhibitors such as metrizamide or sodium azide did not alter cellular uptake of the plant PI liposomes. Inhibitors of lipoxygenase formation, such as indomethacin, also did not alter the uptake or cytotoxicity induced by plant PI. Quinacrine, an inhibitor of phospholipase A/sub 2/, decreased the uptake of the PI containing liposomes to 50% of that seen in the presence or absence of any other inhibitor. Although quinacrine is itself toxic to cells, at low concentrations of quinacrine, plant PI did not show the same degree of cytotoxicity as in the absence of quinacrine. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that plant PI exerts cytotoxicity by serving as a substrate for phospholipase A/sub 2/.

  1. Clinical cardiovascular experiences with iopamidol: a new non-ionic contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Partridge, J B; Robinson, P J; Turnbull, C M; Stoker, J B; Boyle, R M; Morrison, G W

    1981-07-01

    Iopamidol, a new non-ionic water-soluble contrast medium, has been compared with standard ionic media in a number of cardiovascular applications. It is stable in aqueous solution, is much less viscous and only slightly more osmolar than metrizamide. Compared to sodium meglumine diatrizoate in a series of 40 coronary arteriograms, it produced a consistent and highly significant decrease in the incidence and severity of hypotension and bradycardia following intracoronary injection. In the same group and in 62 children undergoing ventricular or great vessel angiocardiography, a subjective assessment of patient reaction showed that iopamidol was better tolerated than the ionic medium. There was a very strong patient preference for iopamidol in a group of 20 of the adult patients who had also consented to femoral artery injections of both media. Throughout these series there was no detectable difference in arterial image quality between the media. Venous phase opacification during arterioportography was assessed in 11 cases comparing iopamidol with sodium meglumine iothalamate. No significant difference was found. We conclude that iopamidol is clearly preferable to ionic media for routine cardiovascular applications.

  2. Torsten Almén (1931-2016): the father of non-ionic iodine contrast media.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Ulf; Ekberg, Olle; Aspelin, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The Swedish radiologist Torsten Almén is the first clinical radiologist ever to have made a fundamental contribution to intravascular contrast medium design, the development of non-ionic contrast media. He became emotionally triggered by the patients' severe pain each time he injected the ionic "high-osmolar" contrast media when performing peripheral arteriographies in the early 1960s. One day he got a flash of genius that combined the observation of pain, a pathophysiological theory and how to eliminate it with suitable contrast media chemistry. After self-studies in chemistry he developed the concept of iodine contrast media not dissociating into ions in solution to reduce their osmolality and even reach plasma isotonicity. He offered several pharmaceutical companies his concept of mono- and polymeric non-ionic agents but without response, since it was considered against the chemical laws of that time. Contrast media constructed as salts and dissociating into ions in solution was regarded an absolute necessity to achieve high enough water solubility and concentration for diagnostic purposes. Finally a small Norwegian company, Nyegaard & Co., took up his idea 1968 and together they developed the essentially painless "low-osmolar" monomeric non-ionic metrizamide (Amipaque) released in 1974 and iohexol (Omipaque) in 1982 followed by the "iso-osmolar" dimeric non-ionic iodixanol (Visipaque) released in 1993. This has implied a profound paradigm shift with regard to reduction of both hypertonic and chemotoxic side effects, which have been a prerequisite for the today's widespread use of contrast medium-enhanced CT and advanced endovascular interventional techniques even in fragile patients.

  3. Retrograde labeling, enrichment, and characterization of retinal ganglion cells from the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Sarthy, P V; Curtis, B M; Catterall, W A

    1983-12-01

    We have developed a method for labeling retinal ganglion cells in neonatal rats by retrograde transport of the fluorescent dye, True Blue (TB), injected into the optic chiasm. Following proteolytic dissociation of labeled retinas into single cells, the labeled cells could be enriched 50- to 100-fold by centrifugation in a 5%/10% metrizamide gradient. When plated in Ham's F-10 medium in the presence of fetal calf serum and chick optic tectum-conditioned medium, the labeled cells could be maintained in vitro up to 48 hr. In these cultures, the ganglion cells (GCS) constituted 50 to 70% of the total cell population. When GC-rich fractions or GC cultures were stained with a monoclonal antibody to Thy-1 antigen, greater than 90% of the TB-labeled cells were reactive. In order to localize voltage-sensitive sodium channels, GC-rich cultures were reacted with 125I-scorpion toxin. Analysis of the autoradiograms showed that the density of silver grains was about 10-fold higher on TB-labeled cells than on nonfluorescent cells, or in controls which contained excess of unlabeled toxin. When GC cultures were incubated with micromolar concentrations of putative GC transmitters, aspartate and glutamate, the amino acids were accumulated by 15 to 20% of labeled cells. Several lectin receptors were also localized on TB-labeled cells in situ. Whereas the lectins wheat germ agglutinin, concanavalin A, peanut agglutinin, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin bound to TB-labeled cells, others such as Ricinus communis agglutinin I, Ulex, and Lotus lectins showed no binding. The lectin binding was specific since preincubation with the appropriate hapten sugar blocked lectin binding.

  4. Effects of garlic extract and of three pure components isolated from it on human platelet aggregation, arachidonate metabolism, release reaction and platelet ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Apitz-Castro, R; Cabrera, S; Cruz, M R; Ledezma, E; Jain, M K

    1983-10-15

    We studied the effect of the methanol extract of garlic bulbs (EOG) and of three pure components isolated from it (F1, F2, F3), on human platelet aggregation induced by ADP, epinephrine, collagen, thrombin, arachidonate, PAF, and the ionophore A-23187. Incubation of PRP with EOG, either in methanol or in homologous PPP, inhibits platelet aggregation induced by all of the above mentioned agonists. F1, F2, and F3 also inhibit platelet aggregation, however, F3 was about four times more potent. Addition of EOG or F3 to platelets that have already been irreversibly aggregated by 10 microM ADP, induces rapid deaggregation. Inhibition of aggregation was still present after three hours. The inhibitory effect persisted even after the treated platelets were Gel-Filtered (GFP) or separated from plasma through a metrizamide gradient and resuspended in new homologous PPP. Thrombin-induced release of ATP from GFP was inhibited by 75-80% after EOG or F3 treatment. Incorporation of [3-H]-arachidonate by intact platelets was decreased by 50-60% in treated platelets. However, platelets incubated with the inhibitors after incorporation of radiolabeled arachidonate, although did not aggregate, produced, after thrombin activation similar amounts of radiolabeled TXB2 and lipoxygenase products as the controls. Electron microscopy of inhibited platelets, in the presence of thrombin, showed no degranulation but an increase of spherical forms. Our results suggest that the effects described might be mediate by a perturbation of the physicochemical properties of the plasma membrane rather than by affecting arachidonate or calcium metabolism in the cells. Chemical structures of F1, F2 and F3 have been provisionally assigned: F1 is diallytrisulfide, F2 is 2-vinyl-1,3-dithiene, and F3 is most probably allyl 1,5-hexadienyltrisulfide. PMID:6419374

  5. Paraparesis as initial manifestation of a Prototheca zopfii infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Font, C; Mascort, J; Márquez, M; Esteban, C; Sánchez, D; Durall, N; Pumarola, M; Luján, A

    2014-05-01

    A case of protothecosis causing non-ambulatory paraparesis in a dog without clinical evidence of disseminated infection is described. A five-year-old female Labrador retriever was referred with a 10-day history of progressive non-ambulatory paraparesis and lumbar pain as the only physical and neurological abnormalities. Lumbar myelography revealed severe extradural spinal cord compression extending from L4 to L7 vertebrae, and a right hemilaminectomy was performed. Surgical findings included an adherent whitish hard ill-defined mass. Cytology and biopsy results disclosed the presence of algae enclosed in a matrix of chronic inflammatory infiltrate. Culture confirmed the presence of Prototheca species. Neurological improvement occurred within a month, and the dog received antifungal treatment without evidence of clinical disseminated disease for 6 months, but died after a generalised tonic-clonic seizure. Post-mortem examination revealed multiple foci of inflammatory granulomatous infiltrate and algae-like structures in the brain, lumbar intumescence and cauda equina. Prototheca zopfii was identified using molecular biology methods. PMID:24502403

  6. [Intramedullary bronchogenic cyst. Apropos of 1 case. Discussion of the endo-ectodermal adhesion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Duthel, R; Brunon, J; Michel, D; Boucheron, S

    1983-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 40-year-old man who has presented for many years an intermittent progressive spastic paraplegia. Plain films of the spine show very important dysraphic abnormalities of the inferior dorsal column and the myelography shows a complete block suggesting an intramedullary space-occupying lesion at four levels above the vertebral abnormalities. The operation permits a total removal of an intramedullary "bronchogenic cyst". In the post-operative course, the neurologic deficit improves, six months later a spastic paraparesia remains. The review of the literature shows that this is an exceptional observation. Intramedullary bronchogenic cysts must be regarded as similar to intramedullary enterogenic cysts. They are not teratomas but dysembryoplasiae due to failure of the ento-ectoblastic separation between the second and the third weeks of life. These cysts form a part of the "ento-ectodermal adhesion syndrome" of Prob et al. The preoperative diagnosis is possible on the association of intermittent progressive syndrome of medullary compression and dysraphic spondylotic changes. The total surgical removal of the cyst, by micro-surgical techniques, is able to preserve the neurologic evolution with an excellent result if the operation is performed before definitive neurologic deficits occur.

  7. Imaging of terminal myelocystoceles.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, S. E.; Harvey, C.; McLone, D. G.; Darling, C. F.

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a retrospective analysis of the presentation, imaging studies, and associated findings in 20 children with surgically and histologically proven terminal myelocystoceles. All 20 children presented at birth with a black mass; 13 had cloacal extrophy. The patient population was comprised of 15 girls and 5 with ambiguous genitalia: Of the imaging studies, 8 had plain radiographs, 6 myelography-computed tomography, 11 ultrasound, and 14 magnetic resonance. The associated findings included Chiari I (eight patients), Chiari II (one patient), hydromyelia (three patients), hydrocephalus (three patients), and vertebral segmentation anomalies (six patients). Magnetic resonance imaging was the best imaging modality to diagnose and evaluate children with a myelocystocele. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the classic findings: a terminal cyst of the central canal of the spinal cord that is tethered and herniated with arachnoid and cerebrospinal fluid through an area of spinal dysphria onto the back as a mass. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8803433

  8. COMPARISON BETWEEN MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING ESTIMATES OF EXTRACRANIAL CEREBROSPINAL FLUID VOLUME AND PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS IN HEALTHY DOGS.

    PubMed

    Reinitz, László Z; Bajzik, Gábor; Garamvölgyi, Rita; Petneházy, Örs; Lassó, András; Abonyi-Tóth, Zsolt; Lőrincz, Borbála; Sótonyi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Dosages for myelography procedures in dogs are based on a hypothetical proportional relationship between bodyweight and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume. Anecdotal radiographic evidence and recent studies have challenged the existence of such a defined relationship in dogs. The objectives of this prospective cross-sectional study were to describe CSF volumes using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a group of clinically healthy dogs, measure the accuracy of MRI CSF volumes, and compare MRI CSF volumes with dog physical measurements. A sampling perfection with application optimized contrast using different flip-angle evolution MRI examination of the central nervous system was carried out on 12 healthy, male mongrel dogs, aged between 3 and 5 years with a bodyweight range of 7.5-35.0 kg. The images were processed with image analysis freeware (3D Slicer) in order to calculate the volume of extracranial CSF. Cylindrical phantoms of known volume were included in scans and used to calculate accuracy of MRI volume estimates. The accuracy of MRI volume estimates was 99.8%. Extracranial compartment CSF volumes ranged from 20.21 to 44.06 ml. Overall volume of the extracranial CSF increased linearly with bodyweight, but the proportional volume (ml/bodyweight kilograms) of the extracranial CSF was inversely proportional to bodyweight. Relative ratios of volumes in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral regions were constant. Findings indicated that the current standard method of using body weight to calculate dosages of myelographic contrast agents in dogs may need to be revised. PMID:26311617

  9. Presumptive exercise-associated peracute thoracolumbar disc extrusion in 48 dogs.

    PubMed

    McKee, W M; Downes, C J; Pink, J J; Gemmill, T J

    2010-04-24

    Forty-eight dogs were diagnosed with presumptive exercise-associated peracute thoracolumbar disc extrusion. The median age was seven years (range two to 11 years), and median bodyweight was 23 kg (range 10 to 41 kg). The duration of signs before presentation ranged from 0.5 to four days. Twenty-nine dogs were non-ambulatory, of which 17 were incontinent and two had lost pain perception. Pelvic limbs were hyporeflexic or areflexic in 11 dogs. Intervertebral disc narrowing was evident on radiographs in 44 dogs. Myelography demonstrated a small, extradural space-occupying lesion dorsal to an intervertebral disc between T11-12 and L3-4 with adjacent spinal cord swelling. Forty-six dogs were treated non-surgically, one was euthanased and one was managed by hemilaminectomy (and subsequently euthanased). Follow-up information was available for 46 dogs 1.5 to 55 months after injury (median 22 months) showing that pelvic limb function had improved in all cases and all non-ambulatory dogs had regained the ability to walk. Six dogs remained faecally incontinent, and one dog remained urinarily and faecally incontinent. PMID:20418513

  10. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: Targeted or blind blood patch.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this review is to determine the efficacy and optimal strategy for epidural blood patch placement in the treatment of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. We present a 37-year-old man who developed a 4 week duration postural headache without sustaining significant trauma. The diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension with associated subdural hygromas was confirmed with lumbar puncture and radiologic imaging. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is generally due to cerebrospinal fluid leak from the thecal sac or nerve root sleeves, although the cause of leakage is unknown. In our patient, the site of leakage was identified at cervical C1-C2 level in the spine on myelography. Conservative management with repeated epidural blood patches was successful in symptom relief and complete resolution of cerebrospinal fluid leak and subdural hygromas. We reviewed the literature for efficacy of blood patches delivered directly to the site of leakage (targeted) or to the lumbar or thoracic spine away from the site of leakage or where the site cannot be determined (blind). No clear evidence exists on comparative efficacy due to paucity of randomized trials. However, epidural blood patches in general result in positive outcomes with overall efficacy near 90%. Some trials have suggested greater efficacy for targeted rather than blind epidural blood patches, but randomized studies and long-term prognosis remain to be evaluated. PMID:26461907

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging of bone pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Atlan, H.; Sigal, R.; Hadar, H.; Chisin, R.; Cohen, I.; Lanir, A.; Soudry, M.; Machtey, Y.; Schreiber, R.; Benmair, J.

    1986-02-01

    Thirty-two patients with diversified pathology were examined with a supraconductive NMR imager using spin echo with different TR and TE to obtain T1 and T2 weighted images. They included 20 tumors (12 primary, eight metastasis), six osteomyelitis, three fractures, two osteonecrosis, and one diffuse metabolic (Gaucher) disease. In all cases except for the stress fractures, the bone pathology was clearly visualized in spite of the normal lack of signal from the compact cortical bone. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging proved to be at least as sensitive as radionuclide scintigraphy but much more accurate than all other imaging procedures including computed tomography (CT) and angiography to assess the extension of the lesions, especially in tumors extended to soft tissue. This is due both to easy acquisition of sagittal and coronal sections and to different patterns of pathologic modifications of T1 and T2 which are beginning to be defined. It is hoped that more experience in clinical use of these patterns will help to discriminate between tumor extension and soft-tissue edema. We conclude that while radionuclide scintigraphy will probably remain the most sensitive and easy to perform screening test for bone pathology, NMR imaging, among noninvasive diagnostic procedures, appears to be at least as specific as CT. In addition, where the extension of the lesions is concerned, NMR imaging is much more informative than CT. In pathology of the spine, the easy visualization of the spinal cord should decrease the need for myelography.

  12. Serum glial fibrillary acidic protein as a diagnostic biomarker in dogs with progressive myelomalacia.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasunori; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Mashita, Tadahisa; Kobayashi, Saori; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Masaaki; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Sato, Reeko; Uzuka, Yuji; Yasuda, Jun

    2013-07-31

    In humans, increased levels of GFAP in the CSF and blood have been reported with various neural diseases. However, there has been no study describing the usefulness of GFAP in the blood for disease of the spinal cord in dogs. The aim of this study was to describe the utility of GFAP in serum for a diagnosis of progressive myelomalacia. Fifty-six dogs with acute thoracolumbar IVDD diagnosed by computed tomography with myelography or MRI were included. Serum specimens were collected at initial presentation from all cases and at follow-up examinations from some cases. Serum samples were assayed for GFAP concentrations using a commercially available GFAP ELISA Kit. Progressive myelomalacia was the final diagnosis in 8/51 cases (15.6%). Eight dogs had clinical signs suggestive of progressive myelomalacia, of which 6 were positive and 2 were negative by GFAP. Seven dogs had a detectable level of serum GFAP, of which 6 had the onset of progressive myelomalacia. The sensitivity and specificity of the GFAP to progressive myelomalacia were 75% and 97.7%, respectively. The results suggest the utility of GFAP in serum in the diagnosis of progressive myelomalacia.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid outflow along lumbar nerves and possible relevance for pain research: case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Bechter, Karl; Schmitz, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    CSF outflow through the cribriform plate near the olfactory nerves and the outflow along brain and spinal nerves are together known as peripheral CSF outflow pathway (PCOP). It is still not clear whether the PCOP has pathogenetic relevance. Our previous clinical observations have indicated that CSF may interact with nerves along the PCOP and in this article we present our finding of CSF outflow demonstrated by myelography in a single patient. We also discuss unexplained experimental pain pathomechanisms against the background of the PCOP hypothesis. We observed that CSF flowed along lumbar nerves in distal direction at a speed of about 10 cm per hour on its way through the tissues, mainly muscles. Total CSF outflow volume at the lumbar site was remarkable. CSF outflow at lumbar nerves was also documented by neuroradiology. It is plausible that CSF signaling serves for interaction with nerves along the PCOP, which could explain previously unknown pathomechanisms in pain generation. Experimental findings of tactile pain hypersensitivity within lumbosacral pain pathways could be explained by releasing of molecules, microparticles, or exosomes into the CSF by mast cells, which then move with CSF outflow along the PCOP and interact with nerves, initiating even retrograde synaptic stripping. PMID:25165054

  14. Cryptococcus neoformans granuloma in the lung and spinal cord of a free-ranging cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus). A clinical report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Millward, I R; Williams, M C

    2005-12-01

    A 6-year-old, male, wild-born, free-ranging cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) was evaluated for acute onset of progressive lameness in the right hind limb. Survey radiographs were unrewarding and myelography indicated an intramedullary compressive mass at the L3-L4 region. A fine needle aspirate of the lesion indicated the presence of Cryptococcus organisms. Necropsy confirmed the presence of granulomas (cryptococcoma) in the lung and the spinal cord (meningomyelitis) caused by Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii. Cryptococcus neoformans is a yeast-like organism that is a potential pathogen to many species. Initial infection is thought to be of respiratory origin and then it commonly disseminates systemically from the nasal cavity or lungs to the skin, eyes and central nervous system in particular. The cheetah tested negative for both feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), as have all the previously reported cheetah cases. C. neoformans is a non-contagious, opportunistic organism and is the most common systemic mycoses in domestic cats and the cheetah.

  15. Spinal cord compression by multistrand cables after solid posterior atlantoaxial fusion. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Hideki; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Ito, Manabu; Kotani, Yoshihisa; Minami, Akio

    2002-10-01

    The sublaminar wiring procedure has been commonly used for stabilizing the atlantoaxial complex. Multistrand braided cables were introduced in the early 1990s. In previous biomechanical studies these cables were demonstrated to be superior to monofilament wires in terms of their flexibility, mechanical strength, and fatigue-related characteristics. To the authors' knowledge, they are the first to describe clinically the occurrence of delayed spinal cord compression resulting from multistrand cables after the completion of rigid spinal arthrodesis in the upper cervical spine. Three patients underwent posterior atlantoaxial fusion in which two sublaminar multistrand cables were placed. Between 15 and 48 months postoperatively, they suffered from upper- and lower-extremity numbness as well as gait disturbance. Plain radiography and computerized tomography myelography revealed spinal cord compression caused by the sublaminar cables, although fusion was complete and physiological alignment was maintained at the fused segment. The radiographs obtained immediately after surgery demonstrated that the initial cable placement had been properly performed. The shape of the cable at the initial surgery was oval and then gradually became circular. The anterior arc of the circular shape of the cable in fact led to the spinal cord compression. Considering the mechanism of this late complication, a cable tends to spring open because of its high flexibility and becomes circular shaped even after the complete arthrodesis. When applying multistrand cables for intersegmental fixation at the atlantoaxial complex, delayed complications related to bowing of the cables is possible. PMID:12408393

  16. Intradural lumbar disc herniation after percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: case report.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Yasuaki; Sakai, Toshinori; Miyagi, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takefumi; Shimakawa, Tateaki; Sairyo, Koichi; Chikawa, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    A 64-year-old man was referred to the authors with low-back pain (LBP) and right leg pain with a history of previously diagnosed lumbar disc herniation (LDH) at L4-5. He had undergone 2 percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomies (PELDs) for the herniation at another institution, and according to the surgical record of the second surgery, a dural tear occurred intraoperatively but was not repaired. Postoperative conservative treatments such as an epidural block and blood patch had not relieved his persistent LBP or right leg pain. Upon referral to the authors, MRI and myelography revealed an intradural LDH. The herniated mass was removed by durotomy, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion was performed. His symptoms were partially improved after surgery. Primary suture is technically difficult when a dural tear occurs during PELD. Therefore, close attention should be paid to avoiding such tears, and surgeons should increase their awareness of intradural LDH as a possible postoperative complication of PELD. PMID:26068274

  17. Using PCR-based detection and genotyping to trace Streptococcus salivarius meningitis outbreak strain to oral flora of radiology physician assistant.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Gertz, Robert E; Shewmaker, Patricia L; Patrick, Sarah; Chitnis, Amit S; O'Connell, Heather; Benowitz, Isaac; Patel, Priti; Guh, Alice Y; Noble-Wang, Judith; Turabelidze, George; Beall, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    We recently investigated three cases of bacterial meningitis that were reported from a midwestern radiology clinic where facemasks were not worn during spinal injection of contrast agent during myelography procedures. Using pulsed field gel electrophoresis we linked a case strain of S. salivarius to an oral specimen of a radiology physician assistant (RPA). We also used a real-time PCR assay to detect S. salivarius DNA within a culture-negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen. Here we extend this investigation through using a nested PCR/sequencing strategy to link the culture-negative CSF specimen to the case strain. We also provide validation of the real-time PCR assay used, demonstrating that it is not solely specific for Streptococcus salivarius, but is also highly sensitive for detection of the closely related oral species Streptococcus vestibularis. Through using multilocus sequence typing and 16S rDNA sequencing we further strengthen the link between the CSF case isolate and the RPA carriage isolate. We also demonstrate that the newly characterized strains from this study are distinct from previously characterized S. salivarius strains associated with carriage and meningitis. PMID:22384169

  18. Using PCR-Based Detection and Genotyping to Trace Streptococcus salivarius Meningitis Outbreak Strain to Oral Flora of Radiology Physician Assistant

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Gertz Jr., Robert E.; Shewmaker, Patricia L.; Patrick, Sarah; Chitnis, Amit S.; O'Connell, Heather; Benowitz, Isaac; Patel, Priti; Guh, Alice Y.; Noble-Wang, Judith; Turabelidze, George; Beall, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    We recently investigated three cases of bacterial meningitis that were reported from a midwestern radiology clinic where facemasks were not worn during spinal injection of contrast agent during myelography procedures. Using pulsed field gel electrophoresis we linked a case strain of S. salivarius to an oral specimen of a radiology physician assistant (RPA). We also used a real-time PCR assay to detect S. salivarius DNA within a culture-negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen. Here we extend this investigation through using a nested PCR/sequencing strategy to link the culture-negative CSF specimen to the case strain. We also provide validation of the real-time PCR assay used, demonstrating that it is not solely specific for Streptococcus salivarius, but is also highly sensitive for detection of the closely related oral species Streptococcus vestibularis. Through using multilocus sequence typing and 16S rDNA sequencing we further strengthen the link between the CSF case isolate and the RPA carriage isolate. We also demonstrate that the newly characterized strains from this study are distinct from previously characterized S. salivarius strains associated with carriage and meningitis. PMID:22384169

  19. Radiologic investigation of low back pain.

    PubMed Central

    Pelz, D M; Haddad, R G

    1989-01-01

    Low back pain is one of the commonest disorders, yet is the most confusing. The cost in work-time lost and in the search for and treatment of its many causes amounts to billions of dollars annually. The traditional techniques for anatomic visualization have been plain-film radiography and myelography, but they have limitations. The development of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have substantially improved anatomic imaging. However, invasive procedures, such as discography, percutaneous nerve-root blocking and percutaneous facet injection, may be helpful in patients with disabling pain in whom noninvasive methods give negative findings, show abnormalities that do not correlate with the symptoms or identify multiple sites of disease. The invasive procedures are believed by some to be associated with too many complications. We have attempted to clarify the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available methods of investigating low back pain and the indications for their use. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2521569

  20. Lumbar spinal stenosis CAD from clinical MRM and MRI based on inter- and intra-context features with a two-level classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Jaehan; Alomari, Raja S.; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2011-03-01

    An imaging test has an important role in the diagnosis of lumbar abnormalities since it allows to examine the internal structure of soft tissues and bony elements without the need of an unnecessary surgery and recovery time. For the past decade, among various imaging modalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has taken the significant part of the clinical evaluation of the lumbar spine. This is mainly due to technological advancements that lead to the improvement of imaging devices in spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and multi-planar capabilities. In addition, noninvasive nature of MRI makes it easy to diagnose many common causes of low back pain such as disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and degenerative disc diseases. In this paper, we propose a method to diagnose lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), a narrowing of the spinal canal, from magnetic resonance myelography (MRM) images. Our method segments the thecal sac in the preprocessing stage, generates the features based on inter- and intra-context information, and diagnoses lumbar disc stenosis. Experiments with 55 subjects show that our method achieves 91.3% diagnostic accuracy. In the future, we plan to test our method on more subjects.

  1. Computed tomographic evaluation of cervical vertebral canal and spinal cord morphometry in normal dogs

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Eunjeong; Choi, Jihye; Choi, Mincheol

    2014-01-01

    The height, width, and cross-sectional area of the vertebral canal and spinal cord along with the area ratio of spinal cord to vertebral canal in the cervical vertebra were evaluated in images obtained using computed tomography (CT). Measurements were taken at the cranial, middle, and caudal point of each cervical vertebra in eight clinically normal small breed dogs (two shih tzu, two miniature schnauzers, and four mixed breed), 10 beagles, and four German shepherds. CT myelography facilitated the delineation of the epidural space, subarachnoid space, and spinal cord except at the caudal portion of the 7th cervical vertebra. The spinal cord had a tendency to have a clear ventral border in the middle portion of the vertebral canal and lateral borders near both end plates. The height, width, and area of the vertebral canal and spinal cord in the cervical vertebra were increased as the size of dog increased. However, the ratio of the spinal cord area to vertebral canal area in the small dogs was higher than that of the larger dogs. Results of the present study could provide basic and quantitative information for CT evaluation of pathologic lesions in the cervical vertebra and spinal cord. PMID:24136210

  2. Evaluation of Diagnosis Techniques Used for Spinal Injury Related Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Meaghan; Nabih, Aliaa; Moussa, Walied; Kawchuk, Gregory N.; Carey, Jason P.

    2011-01-01

    Back pain is a prevalent condition affecting much of the population at one time or the other. Complications, including neurological ones, can result from missed or mismanaged spinal abnormalities. These complications often result in serious patient injury and require more medical treatment. Correct diagnosis enables more effective, often less costly treatment methods. Current diagnosis technologies focus on spinal alterations. Only approximately 10% of back pain is diagnosable, with current diagnostic technologies. The objective of this paper is to investigate and evaluate based on specific criteria current diagnosis technique. Nine diagnostic techniques were found in the literature, namely, discography, myelography, single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT), computer tomography (CT), combined CT & SPECT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), upright and kinematic MRI, plain radiography and cineradiography. Upon review of the techniques, it is suggested that improvements can be made to all the existing techniques for diagnosing back pain. This review will aid health service developers to focus on insufficient areas, which will help to improve existing technologies or even develop alternative ones. PMID:22110925

  3. A three-dimensional digital visualization model of cervical nerves in a healthy person.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiaming; Fu, Dong; Li, Sen

    2013-07-15

    Three-dimensional reconstruction nerve models are classically obtained from two-dimensional ages of "visible human" frozen sections. However, because of the flexibility of nerve tissues and small color differences compared with surrounding tissues, the integrity and validity of nerve tissues can be impaired during milling. Thus, in the present study, we obtained two-dimensional data from a healthy volunteer based on continuous CT angiography and magnetic resonance myelography. Semi-automatic segmentation and reconstruction were then conducted at different thresholds in different tissues using Mimics software. Small anatomical structures such as muscles and cervical nerves were reconstructed using the medical computer aided design module. Three-dimensional digital models of the cervical nerves and their surrounding structures were successfully developed, which allowed visualization of the spatial relation of anatomical structures with a strong three-dimensional effect, distinct appearance, clear distribution, and good continuity, precision, and integrality. These results indicate the validity of a three-dimensional digital visualization model of healthy human cervical nerves, which overcomes the disadvantages of milling, avoids data loss, and exhibits a realistic appearance and three-dimensional image. PMID:25206491

  4. Imaging symptomatic bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced heterotopic bone formation within the spinal canal: case report.

    PubMed

    Chryssikos, Timothy; Crandall, Kenneth M; Sansur, Charles A

    2016-05-01

    Heterotopic bone formation within the spinal canal is a known complication of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and presents a clinical and surgical challenge. Imaging modalities are routinely used for operative planning in this setting. Here, the authors present the case of a 59-year-old woman with cauda equina syndrome following intraoperative BMP-2 administration. Plain film myelographic studies showed a region of severe stenosis that was underappreciated on CT myelography due to a heterotopic bony lesion mimicking the dorsal aspect of a circumferentially patent thecal sac. When evaluating spinal stenosis under these circumstances, it is important to carefully consider plain myelographic images in addition to postmyelography CT images as the latter may underestimate the true degree of stenosis due to the potentially similar radiographic appearances of evolving BMP-2-induced heterotopic bone and intrathecal contrast. Alternatively, comparison of sequentially acquired noncontrast CT scans with CT myelographic images may also assist in distinguishing BMP-2-induced heterotopic bony lesions from the thecal sac. Further studies are needed to elucidate the roles of the available imaging techniques in this setting and to characterize the connection between the radiographic and histological appearances of BMP-2-induced heterotopic bone. PMID:26824586

  5. Inherited prothrombotic risk factors and cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hillier, C E; Collins, P W; Bowen, D J; Bowley, S; Wiles, C M

    1998-10-01

    Fifteen patients with cerebral venous thrombosis were ascertained retrospectively. Their case notes were reviewed, and stored or new blood was assayed for factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation, prothrombin gene mutation 20201A, and 5,10 methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation. A clinical risk factor was identified in 13 patients--the oral contraceptive pill (5), puerperium (1), HRT (1), mastoiditis (1), dehydration (1), lumbar puncture and myelography (1), carcinoma (1), lupus anticoagulant (2). In addition, two patients had the FVL mutation and five (one of whom also had the FVL mutation) were homozygous for the MTHFR mutation. The latter showed a higher than expected frequency compared to 300 healthy controls from South Wales (OR 3.15.95% Cl 1.01-9.83). No patient had the prothrombin 20201A mutation. Two patients died and three had a monocular visual deficit following anticoagulation (13) or thrombolytic (2) treatment, but there was no association between the presence of a primary prothrombotic risk factor and outcome. These results confirm the importance of investigating patients for both clinical predisposing factors and primary prothrombotic states. PMID:10024925

  6. Rate of clearance of intrathecal iopamidol in the dog.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, J; Evill, C A; Sage, M R

    1986-01-01

    The incidence of post-myelographic side-effects has been significantly reduced since the advent of the new generation of water-soluble, non-ionic, contrast media (CM). One of these CM, iopamidol, has recently been released for clinical intrathecal use in Australia. Clinical evaluations have shown iopamidol to give excellent diagnostic results. However, many adverse side-effects have been cited in the literature. Reactions to iopamidol following myelography are thought to be due to the lack of a physiologic barrier between the extracellular fluid of the brain parenchyma and the CSF, thereby allowing CM to penetrate the brain parenchyma tissue, following subarachnoid injection. This study investigates the rate of clearance of intrathecal iopamidol from the brain in dogs by performing coronal CT scans at intervals over a 48 h, post-injection period. Analysis of similar regions of interest (ROI) for each time period indicate that iopamidol can be detected in canine brains for at least 48 h following intrathecal injection (P less than 0.05). Furthermore, the disappearance of iopamidol from the brain parenchyma is approximately logarithmic in form, with a half-life of approximately 22 h.

  7. Pathophysiology of primary spinal syringomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, John D.; Snyder, Kendall; Peterson, Matthew M.; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Butman, John A.; Smith, René K.; DeVroom, Hetty L.; Sansur, Charles A.; Eskioglu, Eric; Kammerer, William A.; Oldfield, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    Object The pathogenesis of syringomyelia in patients with an associated spinal lesion is incompletely understood. The authors hypothesized that in primary spinal syringomyelia, a subarachnoid block effectively shortens the length of the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS), reducing compliance and the ability of the spinal theca to dampen the subarachnoid CSF pressure waves produced by brain expansion during cardiac systole. This creates exaggerated spinal subarachnoid pressure waves during every heartbeat that act on the spinal cord above the block to drive CSF into the spinal cord and create a syrinx. After a syrinx is formed, enlarged subarachnoid pressure waves compress the external surface of the spinal cord, propel the syrinx fluid, and promote syrinx progression. Methods To elucidate the pathophysiology, the authors prospectively studied 36 adult patients with spinal lesions obstructing the spinal SAS. Testing before surgery included clinical examination; evaluation of anatomy on T1-weighted MRI; measurement of lumbar and cervical subarachnoid mean and pulse pressures at rest, during Valsalva maneuver, during jugular compression, and after removal of CSF (CSF compliance measurement); and evaluation with CT myelography. During surgery, pressure measurements from the SAS above the level of the lesion and the lumbar intrathecal space below the lesion were obtained, and cardiac-gated ultrasonography was performed. One week after surgery, CT myelography was repeated. Three months after surgery, clinical examination, T1-weighted MRI, and CSF pressure recordings (cervical and lumbar) were repeated. Clinical examination and MRI studies were repeated annually thereafter. Findings in patients were compared with those obtained in a group of 18 healthy individuals who had already undergone T1-weighted MRI, cine MRI, and cervical and lumbar subarachnoid pressure testing. Results In syringomyelia patients compared with healthy volunteers, cervical subarachnoid pulse pressure

  8. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension following epidural anesthesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    An, X; Wu, S; He, F; Li, C; Fang, X

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of refractory spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) following epidural anesthesia. In this case, typical clinical symptoms and concomitant use of regional anesthesia led to the misdiagnosis of SIH as post-dural puncture headache (PDPH). A 56-year-old man received a successful appendectomy under epidural anesthesia performed at a T11-T12 intravertebral space. About 20 h later, the patient started complaining about orthostatic headache when getting up from his lying position, then a PDPH was diagnosed. However, the patient did not respond well to conservative treatment. Three months later, the first epidural blood patch was performed at the L3-L4 level, however, the patient still had an orthostatic headache. Five days later, spine magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple meningeal diverticulum in the cervicothoracic junction, and computerized tomography myelography demonstrated a C5-C6 spinal dural tear suggesting cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Finally, the patient was diagnosed as SIH and received a second epidural blood patch at the T2-T3 level and responded with improvements in symptomatology. The patient was then discharged, and at a 2-year follow-up, he had fully recovered except for some remaining neck stiffness. This case illustrates that SIH was misdiagnosed as PDPH because of the common clinical symptoms and potentially confounding events (epidural/spinal anesthesia and assumption that it was a case of PDPH). It is important to carefully observe patients in such conditions and promptly conduct suitable diagnostic tests. For a successful treatment of SIH, a timely epidural blood patch should be considered as soon as the diagnosis is established. PMID:26939569

  9. Experiences and Conceptualisation of Spinal Intramedullary Tuberculoma Management

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Ashok; Sharma, Achal; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Objective Spinal intramedullary tuberculoma (SIMT) is rare, accounting for 2/100,000 cases of tuberculosis and only 0.2% of all cases of central nervous system(CNS) tuberculosis. We share our experiences of 11 cases of this entity for improving diagnosis and conceptualize the management of this rare disease. Methods The clinical profile, radiological data and management of 11 cases of SIMT which were managed either conservatively or by surgical intervention during last 27 years (1987-2014) were analysed. Results Male:female ratio was 1.75:1. Five cases had associated pulmonary Koch's. Most common site was thoracic cord. Two cases had concurrent multiple intracranial tuberculoma. Most common presentation was paraparesis. X-ray myelography was performed in two patients in the initial period of study suggesting intramedullary pathology. In the subsequent nine cases who had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), seven showed typical "target sign" and conglomerate ring lesion. Out of 8 surgically managed patients, 6 cases improved rapidly and in 2 patients gradual improvement was seen in follow-up. Most common indication of surgical excision was rapid neurological deterioration followed by diagnosis in doubt. Histopathology confirmed tuberculous etiology of the intramedullary lesion in all. Clinical and radiological improvement was seen in all 3 conservatively managed patients in follow-up. Conclusion MRI findings of SIMT were specific and proven histologically correct. Surgical intervention may be indicated if there is no response to chemotherapy, the diagnosis is in doubt, or there is a rapid deterioration in neurological function because surgical outcome is good in these circumstances. PMID:25883661

  10. Clinical Presentation of Cervical Myelopathy at C1–2 Level

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Tsuneo; Terashima, Yoshinori; Tsuda, Hajime; Yoshimoto, Mitsunori; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Single-center retrospective study. Purpose To clarify the clinical features of cervical myelopathy at the C1–2 level. Overview of Literature Methods for distinguishing the affected level based on myelomere symptoms or dysfunction of the conducting pathway were established. However, no symptoms have been identified as being specific to the C1–2 level segment. Methods We evaluated 24 patients with cervical myelopathy due to spinal cord compression at the C1–2 level. Preoperative neurological assessment were investigated and compared with the rate and site of compression of the spinal cord using computed tomography-myelography. Results Impaired temperature and pain sensation were confirmed in 18 of the 24 patients with that localized to the upper arms (n=3), forearm (n=9), both (n=2), and whole body (n=4). Muscle weakness was observed in 18 patients, muscle weakness extended from the biceps brachii to the abductor digiti minimi in 10 patients, and in the whole body in 8 patients. Deep tendon reflexes were normal in 10 patients, whereas hyperactive deep tendon reflexes were noted in 14 patients. The rate of spinal cord compression was significantly higher in patients with perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness compared with those with no dysfunction. However, no significant difference in the rate and site of compression was identified in those with dysfunction. Conclusions Perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness localized to the upper limbs was observed in 58% and 42% of patients, respectively. Neurological abnormalities, such as perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness, were visualized in patients with marked compression. PMID:27559458

  11. [Familial spastic paraplegia with syndrome of continuous muscle fiber activity (Isaacs)].

    PubMed

    Yokota, T; Matsunaga, T; Furukawa, T; Tsukagoshi, H

    1989-06-01

    A woman aged fifty-three developed paraparesis at the age of 4, which progressed slowly and required crutches by the age of 30. At the age of 51, muscle stiffness involved bilateral hands and arms gradually. At the age of 53, she suffered from painful spasms in right deltoid muscle. Her two brothers had spastic paraplegia without other neurological deficits. Her paternal grandfather and maternal grandmother were cousins. Slight dementia was noted (WAIS: IQ, 79). Her posture was stiff and muscles of upper limbs were in a persistent contraction; Subcutaneous tissue was thin, and muscles were well-defined and firm. There was moderate muscle weakness of legs and hands. Continuous fasciculations and myokymias were recognized in muscles of the arms and the limb girdles. Muscle tone was considerably increased especially in the bilateral arms. The deep tendon reflexes were exaggerated with extensor plantar responses. Profuse sweating affected palms, soles and backs. No sensory disturbance was appreciated. There was no myotonic responses to percussion of muscles. Following laboratory data were normal; thyroid functions, CSF studies, anti HTLV-I antibody and long chain fatty acid in red blood cells, myelography and brain CT except for increased basal metabolic rate (53%). Electromyographic study in the arms and hands revealed spontaneous motor unit activities including doublets at rest and increased proportion of polyphasic potentials and high amplitude potentials in voluntary contraction. Biopsy of right quadriceps femoris muscle showed hypertrophy of type I fibers and angulated atrophy of type II fibers. Continuous muscle activities in upper limbs did not change at sleep or with intravenous administration of 7 mg diazepam.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2803825

  12. Minimally invasive convection-enhanced delivery of biologics into dorsal root ganglia: validation in the pig model and prospective modeling in humans. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Pleticha, Josef; Maus, Timothy P; Christner, Jodie A; Marsh, Michael P; Lee, Kendall H; Hooten, W Michael; Beutler, Andreas S

    2014-10-01

    Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are critical anatomical structures involved in nociception. Intraganglionic (IG) drug delivery is therefore an important route of administration for novel analgesic therapies. Although IG injection in large animal models is highly desirable for preclinical biodistribution and toxicology studies of new drugs, no method to deliver pharmaceutical agents into the DRG has been reported in any large species. The present study describes a minimally invasive technique of IG agent delivery in domestic swine, one of the most common large animal models. The technique utilizes CT guidance for DRG targeting and a custom-made injection assembly for convection enhanced delivery (CED) of therapeutic agents directly into DRG parenchyma. The DRG were initially visualized by CT myelography to determine the optimal access route to the DRG. The subsequent IG injection consisted of 3 steps. First, a commercially available guide needle was advanced to a position dorsolateral to the DRG, and the dural root sleeve was punctured, leaving the guide needle contiguous with, but not penetrating, the DRG. Second, the custom-made stepped stylet was inserted through the guide needle into the DRG parenchyma. Third, the stepped stylet was replaced by the custom-made stepped needle, which was used for the IG CED. Initial dye injections performed in pig cadavers confirmed the accuracy of DRG targeting under CT guidance. Intraganglionic administration of adeno-associated virus in vivo resulted in a unilateral transduction of the injected DRG, with 33.5% DRG neurons transduced. Transgene expression was also found in the dorsal root entry zones at the corresponding spinal levels. The results thereby confirm the efficacy of CED by the stepped needle and a selectivity of DRG targeting. Imaging-based modeling of the procedure in humans suggests that IG CED may be translatable to the clinical setting.

  13. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pulse wave rising from pulsations of both the spinal cord and the brain in humans.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Urayama, K; Hoshino, Y

    1997-11-01

    There are two theories regarding the origin of the lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pulse wave (L-CSFPW): that it arises from the arteries supplying the spinal cord, and that it is due to the pulsations of the brain transmitted through the subarachnoid space of the spine. We investigated L-CSFPW of 11 myelopathic patients with a complete (five patients, CB-group) or an incomplete spinal block (six, ICB-group) on myelography to determine the origin of L-CSFPW. Since arterial pressure amplitude (APA), the energy source of L-CSFPW, is not the same between individuals or between before and after operation, not only L-CSFPW itself but also the transfer function between the arterial pressure wave and the L-CSFPW calculated by the system analysis method was analyzed to eliminate the influence of hemodynamic fluctuations. In the system analysis, the arterial pressure wave, L-CSFPW and transfer function were decomposed into five harmonic waves (HW). In the CB group, L-CSFPW was observed to be 0.72 mmHg on average (range, 0.25-1.00) in spite of blocking pulsations of the brain, showing that there was a contribution to L-CSFPW unrelated to the brain, that is, the spinal cord. In the CB group, however, the preoperative transfer function value of HW1 (mean, 0.056; range, 0.012-0.170) was lower than that in the ICB group (mean, 0.137; range, 0.061-0.236) (P < 0.05), indicating that the brain pulsation also contributed to L-CSFPW. In the ICB group, there was significant reduction of HW1 (P < 0.01) and HW2 (P < 0.05) transfer function after posterior decompression surgery in spite of improvement in the subarachnoid space narrowing: preoperative HW1, mean, 0.137, range, 0.061-0.236; postoperative HW1, mean, 0.065, range, 0.021-0.153; preoperative HW2, mean, 0.092, range, 0.011-0.148; postoperative HW2, mean, 0.044, range, 0.030-0.066. It has been reported that the spinal cord blood flow is decreased 20% or more by laminectomy, therefore, L-CSFPW measurement may be sensitive enough to

  14. [Iatrogenic spinal epidermoid tumors. A late complication of spinal puncture].

    PubMed

    Reina, M A; López-García, A; Dittmann, M; de Andrés, J A; Blázquez, M G

    1996-04-01

    INTRODUCTION. Epidermoid tumors in the spinal canal are rare. Whether congenitally or iatrogenically caused, they form as the result of epidermal cells implanted within the spinal channel. Such implantation can occur during a variety of procedures and events such as bullet wounds, surgery, myelography or punctures for diagnosis, anesthesia or treatment. Although this complication is not discussed in books or journals on anesthesiology, we have found it mentioned in over 100 published cases reporting iatrogenically caused spinal epidermoid tumors. ETIOPATHOGENESIS. Iatrogenic epidermoid tumors of the spine derive from the implantation of epidermal tissue transported inside the spinal canal during lumbar punctures without guidance or with inadequate guidance. There is ample evidence that such tumors are iatrogenic. All cases occur in patients with a history of lumbar puncture. They are rarely associated with congenital anomalies. They are extramedullary. They tend to develop near sites of earlier lumbar puncture, usually near the conus medullaris and the cauda equina. Iatrogenic epidermoid tumors of the spine have been reproduced experimentally in two studies in which autologous skin fragments were implanted in the spinal canal. CLINICAL SIGNS. These tumors are well tolerated by patients for extended periods of time, ranging from 2 to 10 years. At the cauda equinus, tumors can grow slowly for long periods without signs of nerve compression. Symptoms are directly related to tumor size and site. All patients with tumors at the cauda equinus report severe pain radiating toward the roots of compressed nerves. Nuclear magnetic resonance makes it possible to detect the tumor without administration of intrathecal contrast. At present gadolinium-DTPA improves the image so that these tumors can be distinguished from other types. The prognosis for epidermoid tumors of the spine is good, as they are histologically benign. Treatment is always surgical. CONCLUSION. Although the

  15. A history of lumbar disc herniation from Hippocrates to the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Truumees, Eeric

    2015-06-01

    In ancient times, a supernatural understanding of the syndrome of lumbar radiculopathy often involved demonic forces vexing the individual with often crippling pain. The ancient Greeks and Egyptians began to take a more naturalistic view and, critically, suspected a relationship between lumbar spinal pathology and leg symptoms. Relatively little then changed for those with sciatica until the classic works by Cotugno and Kocher arrived in the late 18th century. Early lumbar canal explorations were performed in the late 1800s and early 1900s by MacEwen, Horsley, Krause, Taylor, Dandy, and Cushing, among others. In these cases, when compressive pathologies were found and removed, the lesions typically were (mis-)identified as enchondromas or osteochondritis dissecans. To better understand the history, learn more about the first treatments of lumbar disc herniation, and evaluate the impact of the early influences on modern spine practice, searches of PubMed and Embase were performed using the search terms discectomy, medical history, lumbar spine surgery, herniated disc, herniated nucleus pulposus, sciatica, and lumbar radiculopathy. Additional sources were identified from the reference lists of the reviewed papers. Many older and ancient sources including De Ischiade Nervosa are available in English translations and were used. When full texts were not available, English abstracts were used. The first true, intentional discectomy surgery was performed by Mixter and Barr in 1932. Early on, a transdural approach was favored. In 1938, Love described the intralaminar, extradural approach. His technique, although modified with improved lighting, magnification, and retractors, remains a staple approach to disc herniations today. Other modalities such as chymopapain have been investigated. Some remain a part of the therapeutic armamentarium, whereas others have disappeared. By the 1970s, CT scanning after myelography markedly improved the clinical evaluation of patients with

  16. Assessing the Effect of Spaceflight on the Propensity for Astronauts to Develop Disk Herniation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, A. H.; Mendez, C. M.; Somers, J. T.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A previous study [1] reported that the instantaneous risk of developing a Herniated Nucleus Pulposus (HNP) was higher in astronauts who had flown at least one mission, as compared with those in the corps who had not yet flown. However, the study only analyzed time to HNP after the first mission (if any) and did not account for the possible effects of multiple missions. While many HNP's occurred well into astronauts' careers or in some cases years after retirement, the higher incidence of HNPs relatively soon after completion of space missions appears to indicate that spaceflight may lead to an increased risk of HNP. The purpose of this study was to support the Human System Risk Board assessment of back pain, evaluate the risk of injury due to dynamic loads, and update the previous dataset which contained events up to December 31, 2006. METHODS: Data was queried from the electronic medical record and provided by the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health. The data included all 330 United States astronauts from 1959 through February 2014. Cases were confirmed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Computerized Tomography, Myelography, operative findings, or through clinical confirmation with a neurologist or neurosurgeon. In this analysis, astronauts who had an HNP at selection into the corps or had an HNP diagnosis prior to their first flight were excluded. The statistical challenges in using the available data to separate effects of spaceflight from those associated with general astronaut training and lifestyle on propensity to develop HNPs are many. The primary outcome is reported date of first HNP (if any), which at best is only an approximation to the actual time of occurrence. To properly analyze this data with a survival analysis model, one must also know the "exposure" time - i.e. how long each astronaut has been at risk for developing an HNP. If an HNP is reported soon after a mission, is it mission caused or general? If the former, exposure time