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Sample records for metsala omar parve

  1. Parvovirus PARV4 visualization and detection.

    PubMed

    Tuke, Philip W; Parry, Ruth P; Appleton, Hazel

    2010-02-01

    The parvovirus PARV4 is the most recently described member of the family Parvoviridae that has a human host. To investigate the prevalence of PARV4 in blood, a quantitative TaqMan PCR was developed and plasma, sera or whole blood from a variety of population groups were examined. Eight samples were positive for PARV4, one at high copy number. The high-titre-positive plasma had an approximate viral load of 5 x 10(8) genome equivalents ml(-1). Two human sera, identified as PARV4 antibody-positive by indirect immunofluorescence, were used in immune electron microscopy to try to visualize native PARV4 within the high-titre human plasma. PARV4 particles were observed using one of these two sera. To our knowledge, this is the first time that native PARV4 has been visualized.

  2. Human parvovirus PARV4 in plasma pools of Chinese origin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y-Y; Guo, Y; Zhao, X; Wang, Z; Lv, M-M; Yan, Q-P; Zhang, J-G

    2012-10-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is present in blood and blood products. As the presence and levels of PARV4 in Chinese source plasma pools have never been determined, we implemented real-time quantitative PCR to investigate the presence of PARV4 in source plasma pools in China. Results showed that 26·15% (51/195) of lots tested positive for PARV4. The amounts of DNA ranged from 2·83 × 10(3) copies/ml to 2·35×10(7) copies/ml plasma. The high level of PARV4 in plasma pools may pose a potential risk to recipients. Further studies on the pathogenesis of PARV4 are urgently required.

  3. Summer Series 2012 - Conversation with Omar Yaghi

    ScienceCinema

    Omar Yaghi

    2016-07-12

    Jeff Miller, head of Public Affairs, sat down in conversation with Omar Yaghi, director of the Molecular Foundry, in the first of a series of "powerpoint-free" talks on July 11th 2012, at Berkeley Lab.

  4. In Their Own Words: Omar Baez

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Omar Baez, the launch director for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory, discusses the challenges and rewards that come with dispatching a 1-ton rover to the surface of another world. Baez, part of NASA'...

  5. Summer Series 2012 - Conversation with Omar Yaghi

    SciTech Connect

    Omar Yaghi

    2012-07-23

    Jeff Miller, head of Public Affairs, sat down in conversation with Omar Yaghi, director of the Molecular Foundry, in the first of a series of "powerpoint-free" talks on July 11th 2012, at Berkeley Lab.

  6. High frequencies of exposure to the novel human parvovirus, PARV4 in haemophiliacs and injecting drug users detected by a serological assay for PARV4 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Colin P.; Lail, Alice; Donfield, Sharyne; Simmons, Ruth; Leen, Clifford; Klenerman, Paul; Delwart, Eric; Gomperts, Edward D.; Simmonds, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background PARV4 is a human parvovirus first detected and cloned from an individual with a HIV seroconversion-like illness and which subsequently persists in lymphoid tissue and bone marrow. In contrast to B19V, PARV4 infections are most frequently detected in injecting drug users (IDUs), particularly those co-infected with HIV-1. To investigate its transmission routes and whether infections are acquired through plasma-derived blood products, we developed a novel anti-PARV4 ELISA to determine seroprevalence in parenterally exposed and non-exposed subjects. Methods PARV4 VP2 was expressed and used as antigen in an indirect ELISA to detect anti-PARV4 IgG. Results All 50 non-parenterally exposed adult controls were anti-PARV4 negative, in contrast to 67% and 33% antibody frequencies in HIV-positive and –negative IDUs respectively. Predominantly parenteral transmission was confirmed by the finding of similar infection frequencies (11/20 and 4/15) among HIV-coinfected and –uninfected haemophiliacs treated with non-virally inactivated FVIII/IX, whereas all but one of their 35 non-haemophiliac siblings were seronegative (despite close household contact). Conclusions This study provides convincing evidence that PARV4 is primarily transmitted parenterally. Evidence for widespread infection of haemophiliacs treated with non-virally inactivated clotting factor creates fresh safety concerns for plasma-derived blood products, particularly as parvoviruses are relatively resistant to virus inactivation. PMID:19691429

  7. Absence of novel human parvovirus (PARV4) in Danish mothers and children.

    PubMed

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Rosenfeldt, Vibeke; Lindberg, Ellinor; Jensen, Lise; Hedman, Lea; Li, Xuemeng; Väisänen, Elina; Hedman, Klaus; Norja, Päivi

    2015-04-01

    The recently discovered human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is found most frequently in injection drug users, HIV-positive patients, and in haemophiliacs. Studies from Ghana report the finding of PARV4 in plasma from 2 to 12% of children without acute infection, and in nasal secretions and faecal samples. Studies of PARV4 in children from industrialized countries are few. We aimed to describe the occurrence of PARV4 in a population-based birth cohort of 228 Danish mothers and their healthy children who previously participated in a study of respiratory tract infections in infancy. Children were included over a whole calendar year and were monitored through monthly home visits through the first year of life. Plasma samples for the present study were available from 228 mothers, 176 newborns, and 202 12-months-old children. All samples were analysed for the presence of PARV4 antibodies by enzyme immunoassay, and samples with detectable antibodies were in addition studied by real-time PCR. One (0.4%) of 228 mothers had PARV4 IgG exceeding the cut-off absorbance level and another had borderline IgG reactivity. No mother among these two had an acute infection, as they were IgM and PARV4 DNA negative. All blood samples from newborns and one-year-old children had IgG and IgM reactivity below cut-off. PARV4 is rare in Danish mothers and infants. Further studies are needed, in both rural and urban settings, to investigate the epidemiology and clinical significance of this novel human parvovirus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Omar Yaghi on Chemistry and Metal Organic Frameworks

    ScienceCinema

    Omar Yaghi

    2016-07-12

    In this edited version of the hour long talk, Omar Yaghi, director of the Molecular Foundry, sat down in conversation with Jeff Miller, head of Public Affairs, on July 11th, 2012 to discuss his fascination with the hidden world of chemistry and his work on Metal Organic Frameworks.

  9. Omar Yaghi on Chemistry and Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Omar Yaghi

    2012-07-23

    In this edited version of the hour long talk, Omar Yaghi, director of the Molecular Foundry, sat down in conversation with Jeff Miller, head of Public Affairs, on July 11th, 2012 to discuss his fascination with the hidden world of chemistry and his work on Metal Organic Frameworks.

  10. Human parvovirus 4 ‘PARV4’ remains elusive despite a decade of study

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Philippa C.; Sharp, Colin; Simmonds, Peter; Klenerman, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (‘PARV4’) is a small DNA tetraparvovirus, first reported in 2005. In some populations, PARV4 infection is uncommon, and evidence of exposure is found only in individuals with risk factors for parenteral infection who are infected with other blood-borne viruses. In other settings, seroprevalence studies suggest an endemic, age-associated transmission pattern, independent of any specific risk factors. The clinical impact of PARV4 infection remains uncertain, but reported disease associations include an influenza-like syndrome, encephalitis, acceleration of HIV disease, and foetal hydrops. In this review, we set out to report progress updates from the recent literature, focusing on the investigation of cohorts in different geographical settings, now including insights from Asia, the Middle East, and South America, and discussing whether attributes of viral or host populations underpin the striking differences in epidemiology. We review progress in understanding viral phylogeny and biology, approaches to diagnostics, and insights that might be gained from studies of closely related animal pathogens. Crucial questions about pathogenicity remain unanswered, but we highlight new evidence supporting a possible link between PARV4 and an encephalitis syndrome. The unequivocal evidence that PARV4 is endemic in certain populations should drive ongoing research efforts to understand risk factors and routes of transmission and to gain new insights into the impact of this virus on human health. PMID:28184291

  11. Human parvovirus 4 'PARV4' remains elusive despite a decade of study.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philippa C; Sharp, Colin; Simmonds, Peter; Klenerman, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 ('PARV4') is a small DNA tetraparvovirus, first reported in 2005. In some populations, PARV4 infection is uncommon, and evidence of exposure is found only in individuals with risk factors for parenteral infection who are infected with other blood-borne viruses. In other settings, seroprevalence studies suggest an endemic, age-associated transmission pattern, independent of any specific risk factors. The clinical impact of PARV4 infection remains uncertain, but reported disease associations include an influenza-like syndrome, encephalitis, acceleration of HIV disease, and foetal hydrops. In this review, we set out to report progress updates from the recent literature, focusing on the investigation of cohorts in different geographical settings, now including insights from Asia, the Middle East, and South America, and discussing whether attributes of viral or host populations underpin the striking differences in epidemiology. We review progress in understanding viral phylogeny and biology, approaches to diagnostics, and insights that might be gained from studies of closely related animal pathogens. Crucial questions about pathogenicity remain unanswered, but we highlight new evidence supporting a possible link between PARV4 and an encephalitis syndrome. The unequivocal evidence that PARV4 is endemic in certain populations should drive ongoing research efforts to understand risk factors and routes of transmission and to gain new insights into the impact of this virus on human health.

  12. Omar field discovery confirms Syria as exploration hot spot

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-20

    Syria is proving to be one of the Mediterranean's exploration hot spots. The discovery of Omar field by a Shell-led exploration group earlier this year confirmed Syria as a prime exploration prospect. For years Syria produced small volumes of heavy, high-sulfur crude mainly for refining and use in the domestic market and found it difficult to attract foreign explorers. Industry sources say there is now no shortage of outside industry interest in taking new exploration concessions. Over the last 6 months much of the available prospective acreage has been taken up as industry interest in Syria reached nee heights.

  13. Dosimetric impact of orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) on Spine SBRT patients.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Xia, Ping; Klahr, Paul; Djemil, Toufik

    2015-09-08

    The dosimetric impact of orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) on spine SBRT patients has not been comprehensively studied, particularly with spinal prostheses in high-dose gradient regions. Using both phantom and patient datasets, we investigated dosimetric effects of O-MAR in combination of various metal locations and dose calculation algorithms. A physical phantom, with and without a titanium insert, was scanned. A clinical patient plan was applied to the artifact-free reference, non-O-MAR, and O-MAR phantom images with the titanium located either inside or outside of the tumor. Subsequently, five clinical patient plans were calculated with pencil beam and Monte Carlo (iPlan) on non-O-MAR and O-MAR patient images using an extended CT-density table. The dose differences for phantom plans and patient plans were analyzed using dose distributions, dose-volume histograms (DVHs), gamma index, and selected dosimetric endpoints. From both phantom plans and patient plans, O-MAR did not affect dose distributions and DVHs while minimizing metal artifacts. Among patient plans, we found that, when the same dose calculation method was used, the difference in the dosimetric endpoints between non-O-MAR and O-MAR datasets were small. In conclusion, for spine SBRT patients with spinal prostheses, O-MAR image reconstruction does not affect dose calculation accuracy while minimizing metal artifacts. Therefore, O-MAR images can be safely used for clinical spine SBRT treatment planning.

  14. Summer Series 2012 - Conversation with Omar Yaghi (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Yaghi, Omar

    2012-07-11

    Jeff Miller, head of Public Affairs, sat down in conversation with Omar Yaghi, director of the Molecular Foundry, in the first of a series of "powerpoint-free" talks on July 11th 2012, at Berkeley Lab.

  15. Dosimetric impact of orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) on spine SBRT patients.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Xia, Ping; Klahr, Paul; Djemil, Toufik

    2015-09-01

    The dosimetric impact of orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) on spine SBRT patients has not been comprehensively studied, particularly with spinal prostheses in high-dose gradient regions. Using both phantom and patient datasets, we investigated dosimetric effects of O-MAR in combination of various metal locations and dose calculation algorithms. A physical phantom, with and without a titanium insert, was scanned. A clinical patient plan was applied to the artifact-free reference, non-O-MAR, and O-MAR phantom images with the titanium located either inside or outside of the tumor. Subsequently, five clinical patient plans were calculated with pencil beam and Monte Carlo (iPlan) on non-O-MAR and O-MAR patient images using an extended CT-density table. The dose differences for phantom plans and patient plans were analyzed using dose distributions, dose-volume histograms (DVHs), gamma index, and selected dosimetric endpoints. From both phantom plans and patient plans, O-MAR did not affect dose distributions and DVHs while minimizing metal artifacts. Among patient plans, we found that, when the same dose calculation method was used, the difference in the dosimetric endpoints between non-O-MAR and O-MAR datasets were small. In conclusion, for spine SBRT patients with spinal prostheses, O-MAR image reconstruction does not affect dose calculation accuracy while minimizing metal artifacts. Therefore, O-MAR images can be safely used for clinical spine SBRT treatment planning. PACS numbers: 87.53.Bn, 87.55.K-, 87.57.Q-, 87.57.cp.

  16. An Investigation into Undergraduates' Errors in the Use of the Indefinite Article at Omar Al-Mukhtar University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaibani, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of English articles as well the errors made by the students at Omar Al-Mukhtar University. The research objectives consists of: To identify the types and sources of errors made by Libyan EFL Undergraduates at Omar Al-Mukhtar University in the use of the indefinite article during their written…

  17. Reduction of dental metallic artefacts in CT: value of a newly developed algorithm for metal artefact reduction (O-MAR).

    PubMed

    Kidoh, M; Nakaura, T; Nakamura, S; Tokuyasu, S; Osakabe, H; Harada, K; Yamashita, Y

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the image quality of O-MAR (Metal Artifact Reduction for Orthopedic Implants) for dental metal artefact reduction. This prospective study received institutional review board approval and written informed consent was obtained. Thirty patients who had dental implants or dental fillings were included in this study. Computed tomography (CT) images were obtained through the oral cavity and neck during the portal venous phase. The system reconstructed the O-MAR-processed images in addition to the uncorrected images. CT attenuation and image noise of the soft tissue of the oral cavity were compared between the O-MAR and the uncorrected images. Qualitative analysis was undertaken between the two image groups. The image noise of the O-MAR images was significantly lower than that of the uncorrected images (p < 0.01). O-MAR offered plausible attenuations of soft tissue compared with non-O-MAR. Better qualitative scores were obtained in the streaking artefacts and the degree of depiction of the oral cavity with O-MAR compared with non-O-MAR. O-MAR enables the depiction of structures in areas in which this was not previously possible due to dental metallic artefacts in qualitative image analysis. O-MAR images may have a supplementary role in addition to uncorrected images in oral diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Metal Artifact Reduction for Orthopedic Implants (O-MAR): Usefulness in CT Evaluation of Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shim, Euddeum; Kang, Yusuhn; Ahn, Joong Mo; Lee, Eugene; Lee, Joon Woo; Oh, Joo Han; Kang, Heung Sik

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of the metal artifact reduction algorithm for orthopedic implants (O-MAR) on CT image quality for patients with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), with emphasis placed on the evaluation of bone in the vicinity of prostheses. Sixty-five patients who underwent CT scanning after RTSA were enrolled in the study. Two radiologists analyzed the images reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) with or without O-MAR processing. Images were evaluated to determine the degree of streaking artifacts, the confidence in depicting various structures around the prosthesis, and the presence of pseudolesions. The mean CT number and SD of the selected ROIs placed in the greater tuberosity, glenoid bone, and deltoid muscle were recorded. For measurements from the greater tuberosity and glenoid bone, the frequency with which the measurement met the typical CT number of bone was calculated. O-MAR images showed less metal streak artifact and noise and provided better visualization of the axillary neurovascular bundle compared with FBP images, with a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001 for all). FBP images were found to be statistically significantly better than O-MAR images, offering better visualization of bone cortex, bone trabeculae, and the bone-prosthesis interface (p < 0.001 for all). Scapular pseudonotching was observed on 4.6% of FBP images and 36.9% of O-MAR images. The pseudocemented appearance was noted on 47.7% of O-MAR images but was not seen on FBP images. The use of O-MAR improved CT image quality for patients with RTSA in the aspect of metal artifact reduction and soft-tissue profile. However, O-MAR tends to degrade depiction of the bone trabeculae and bone cortex and generate new artifacts, including a pseudocemented appearance and scapular pseudonotching.

  19. Storm surge induced by hurricane Omar on the Caribbean coasts, example of the port of Deshaies in Guadeloupe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorville, J.-F.; Zahibo, N.

    2009-04-01

    In October, the hurricane Omar, that was in category four (SSHS) moved in the Caribbean to the south west of the Atlantic. During the night between the15th and the 16th, it runs near Guadeloupe coasts, at less than 300km. In the same time an increasing surge occurred on all the Caribbean coasts. In Guadeloupe the waves increased by 3 m of height, that is 6 or 8 times higher than normal conditions. The surge of Omar caused damaged of millions of euros in Guadeloupe. We made an observation on the exposes spots, and have pictures before and after the disaster. We determined the size and consequences of the surge of the hurricane Omar on this coasts. The measure of the sea elevation on the coast and neighboring coasts helped us to characterize the levels of the sea elevation during this surge. Measures on different points gave the characterization of the swell product by this hurricane. With a numerical model of wave propagation (SWAN), we improve our observation in the Port of Deshaies. We propose in our presentation to give a synoptic and the description of the surge of the hurricane Omar on the Guadeloupean coasts, and particularly in the town of Deshaies, that was ravaged by the flood of Omar.

  20. Age as an Affective Factor in Influencing Public Speaking Anxiety of English Language Learners at Omar Al-Mukhtar University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaibani, Ahmed; Elmenfi, Fadil

    2016-01-01

    The study is to show how age factor can influence public speaking anxiety among English Language Learners at Omar Al-Mukhtar University. To indicate the influence of age factor a questionnaire was distributed to the participants of the study. As well as correlation was also undertaken to the data collected to investigate the influence of age…

  1. SU-E-I-75: Evaluation of An Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (O-MAR) Algorithm On Patients with Spinal Prostheses Near Spinal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z; Xia, P; Djemil, T; Klahr, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) algorithm on CT image quality and dose calculation for patients with spinal prostheses near spinal tumors. Methods: A CT electron density phantom was scanned twice: with tissue-simulating inserts only, and with a titanium insert replacing solid water. A patient plan was mapped to the phantom images in two ways: with the titanium inside or outside of the spinal tumor. Pinnacle and Eclipse were used to evaluate the dosimetric effects of O-MAR on 12-bit and 16-bit CT data, respectively. CT images from five patients with spinal prostheses were reconstructed with and without O-MAR. Two observers assessed the image quality improvement from O-MAR. Both pencil beam and Monte Carlo dose calculation in iPlan were used for the patient study. The percentage differences between non-OMAR and O-MAR datasets were calculated for PTV-min, PTV-max, PTV-mean, PTV-V100, PTV-D90, OAR-V10Gy, OAR-max, and OAR-D0.1cc. Results: O-MAR improved image quality but did not significantly affect the dose distributions and DVHs for both 12-bit and 16- bit CT phantom data. All five patient cases demonstrated some degree of image quality improvement from O-MAR, ranging from small to large metal artifact reduction. For pencil beam, the largest discrepancy was observed for OARV-10Gy at 5.4%, while the other seven parameters were ≤0.6%. For Monte Carlo, the differences between non-O-MAR and O-MAR datasets were ≤3.0%. Conclusion: Both phantom and patient studies indicated that O-MAR can substantially reduce metal artifacts on CT images, allowing better visualization of the anatomical structures and metal objects. The dosimetric impact of O-MAR was insignificant regardless of the metal location, image bit-depth, and dose calculation algorithm. O-MAR corrected images are recommended for radiation treatment planning on patients with spinal prostheses because of the improved image quality and no need to modify

  2. SU-E-I-63: Quantitative Evaluation of the Effects of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR) Software On CT Images for Radiotherapy Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jani, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: CT simulation for patients with metal implants can often be challenging due to artifacts that obscure tumor/target delineation and normal organ definition. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR), a commercially available software, in reducing metal-induced artifacts and its effect on computed dose during treatment planning. Methods: CT images of water surrounding metallic cylindrical rods made of aluminum, copper and iron were studied in terms of Hounsfield Units (HU) spread. Metal-induced artifacts were characterized in terms of HU/Volume Histogram (HVH) using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Effects of OMAR on enhancing our ability to delineate organs on CT and subsequent dose computation were examined in nine (9) patients with hip implants and two (2) patients with breast tissue expanders. Results: Our study characterized water at 1000 HU with a standard deviation (SD) of about 20 HU. The HVHs allowed us to evaluate how the presence of metal changed the HU spread. For example, introducing a 2.54 cm diameter copper rod in water increased the SD in HU of the surrounding water from 20 to 209, representing an increase in artifacts. Subsequent use of OMAR brought the SD down to 78. Aluminum produced least artifacts whereas Iron showed largest amount of artifacts. In general, an increase in kVp and mA during CT scanning showed better effectiveness of OMAR in reducing artifacts. Our dose analysis showed that some isodose contours shifted by several mm with OMAR but infrequently and were nonsignificant in planning process. Computed volumes of various dose levels showed <2% change. Conclusions: In our experience, OMAR software greatly reduced the metal-induced CT artifacts for the majority of patients with implants, thereby improving our ability to delineate tumor and surrounding organs. OMAR had a clinically negligible effect on computed dose within tissues. Partially funded by unrestricted

  3. The Role of Social Evaluation in Influencing Public Speaking Anxiety of English Foreign Language Learners at Omar Al-Mukhtar University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmenfi, Fadil; Gaibani, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of social evaluation on Public Speaking Anxiety of English foreign language learners at Omar Al-Mukhtar University in Libya. A random sample of 111 students was used in the study. To analyse the collected data, means, standard deviations, a three-way ANOVA analysis, and the correlation coefficients were used with…

  4. Imaging the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in humans with [11C]OMAR: assessment of kinetic analysis methods, test-retest reproducibility, and gender differences.

    PubMed

    Normandin, Marc D; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Mason, N Scott; Lin, Shu-Fei; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Henry, Shannan; Williams, Wendol A; Carson, Richard E; Neumeister, Alexander; Huang, Yiyun

    2015-08-01

    The Radiotracer [(11)C]OMAR was developed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1R). The objectives of the present study were to evaluate kinetic analysis methods, determine test-retest reliability, and assess gender differences in receptor availability. Dynamic PET data were acquired in 10 human subjects, and analyzed with one-tissue (1T) and two-tissue (2T) compartment models and by the Logan and multilinear analysis (MA1) methods to estimate regional volume of distribution (VT). The 2T model inclusive of a vascular component (2TV) and MA1 were the preferred techniques. Test-retest reliability of VT was good (mean absolute deviation ~9%; intraclass correlation coefficient ~0.7). Tracer parent fraction in plasma was lower in women (P<0.0001). Cerebral uptake normalized by body weight and injected dose was higher in men by 17% (P<0.0001), but VT was significantly greater in women by 23% (P<0.0001). These findings show that [(11)C]OMAR binding can be reliably quantified by the 2T model or MA1 method and demonstrate the utility of this tracer for in vivo imaging of CB1R. In addition, results from the present study indicate that gender difference in receptor binding should be taken into consideration when [(11)C]OMAR is used to quantify CB1R availability in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  5. Effects of Human Alterations on Global River Basins and their Associated Coastal Zones: focus on River-dominated Ocean Margins (RiOMars)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, H. H.; Van Cappellen, P.; Meybeck, M.; Laruelle, G. G.; Mayorga, E.; Hartmann, J.; Maavara, T.; Bouwman, L.; Seitzinger, S.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal systems connected to large rivers, mostly major delta systems or river-dominated ocean margins (RiOMars), make up <1% of the worldwide shoreline. Yet, they comprise 28% of the exorheic terrestrial river basins area, and host 26.4% of the population connected via rivers to coastal systems (Dürr et al. 2011). These systems receive 41.6% of the discharge delivered to oceans. 25.7% of the suspended sediment load is processed, with comparable amounts for the total nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loads. The filter function for incoming riverine nutrients (N, P, C, Si) in these coastal environments is very different from other near-shore environments such as macro-tidal estuaries, lagoons or fjords. In this type, the major biogeochemical transformation of incoming river fluxes takes place in a plume on the continental margins (RiOMars). This effect is even more pronounced at high flow stages when the highest volumes of water and material are delivered. The filtering efficiency of delta systems is highest during low flows, and some of the systems may be influenced by tides when ebb and flood might flow through different channels, creating a braided network of streams and many islands (Dürr et al. 2011). Here, we discuss controls on the different nutrient forms delivered to different coastal environments, and how they are assessed (Global-NEWS and other approaches), with a special focus on large deltas and RiOMars. Drivers and impacts of global change will be explored through the Millenium Assessment Scenarios and how the fluxes to these different coastal systems might change. An increasing role is also played by aquaculture in different coastal types as a non-insignificant source of nutrients. World-wide distribution of coastal types and their related river basins (Dürr et al. 2011). Characteristics of types of near-shore coastal areas and their associated river basins Greenland and Antarctica excepted. Data from Dürr et al. (2011) and the Global-NEWS program

  6. Interview with Dr. Omar Khan, noted global health specialist.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Rob; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2012-07-01

    Dr. Khan has had a distinguished career in global health. He has served as a faculty member at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. He is currently a family medicine physician at Christiana Care Health System in Newark, Delaware, and is President of the Delaware Academy of Family Physicians. Dr. Khan has authored more than 55 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters and has conducted research and lead primary care and public health initiatives in numerous countries. Last year, Dr. Khan also coedited a book titled Megacities and Global Health sponsored by the American Public Health Association with Dr. Gregory Pappas, Deputy Health Commissioner for Washington, DC.

  7. Khayyam [al-Khayyam], Omar [Abu ol-Fath ebn-Ebrahim `Omar ol-Khayyami of Nishapur] (c. 1044-c. 1123)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Poet, mathematician, astronomer, born in Nishapur, Persia (now Iran), to a family of Arabic tent makers (a translation of his name), an outstanding mathematician and astronomer. The Saljuq Sultan, Malikshah Jalal al-Din, appointed him to the observatory at Ray around 1074 to determine the solar calendar, as an aid to tax collection. Khayyam developed a calendar called Al-Tarikh-al-Jalali, which h...

  8. 77 FR 20633 - OC International Freight, Inc., OMJ International Freight, Inc. and Omar Collado; Order for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... Sections 10(A)(1) and 19 of the Shipping Act of 1984 I. Appeal of FMC Staff Determination to Deny OTI...). However, negotiations with BOE terminated unsuccessfully. Section 19 of the Shipping Act of 1984, 46 U.S.C... the Shipping Act of 1984, 46 U.S.C. 40901, 40902, 41302 and 41304, an adjudicatory proceeding...

  9. Natural Resources Research Program. Use of Implan with Public Area Recreation Visitor Survey (PARVS) Pretest Data: Findings and Recommendations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    point of final consumption by many visitors is retail or wholesale establishments. In this case, only the markups, or trade mar- gins, are allocated to...Corps of Engineers ___ 8c. ADDRESS (City, State, and 2IP Code) 10. SOURCE OF FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK IWORK UNIT Washington, DC 20314-1000...and will soon be available from the Forest Service’s Sys- tems Application Unit of the Land Management Planning Division in Fort Collins. Briefly, the

  10. Study of Occupational Safety and Health Audit on Facilities at Ungku Omar College, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM): A Preliminary Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariffin, Kadir; Ahmad, Shaharuddin; Aiyub, Kadaruddin; Awang, Azhan; Aziz, Azmi; Mohamad, Lukman Z.; Mamat, Samsu Adabi

    2010-01-01

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) is being considered as an important program to measure employee and student welfare and well-being. During academic session, apart from attending lectures, laboratory works, tutorial and library search, majority of students spend most of their time in residential…

  11. General of the Army Omar Nelson Bradley in the Korean War and the Meaning of the Chairmanship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-19

    estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden to Department of Defense, Washington...Robert F. Baumann, Ph.D. Degree Programs Disclaimer: Opinions, conclusions, and recommendations expressed or implied within are solely those of the...States Army, the Department of Defense, or any other US government agency. Cleared for public release: distribution unlimited. i Abstract SAMS

  12. Study of Occupational Safety and Health Audit on Facilities at Ungku Omar College, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM): A Preliminary Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariffin, Kadir; Ahmad, Shaharuddin; Aiyub, Kadaruddin; Awang, Azhan; Aziz, Azmi; Mohamad, Lukman Z.; Mamat, Samsu Adabi

    2010-01-01

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) is being considered as an important program to measure employee and student welfare and well-being. During academic session, apart from attending lectures, laboratory works, tutorial and library search, majority of students spend most of their time in residential…

  13. Placental transmission of human parvovirus 4 in newborns with hydrops, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mao-Yuan; Yang, Shiu-Ju; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2011-10-01

    In studying the epidemiology of parvovirus 4 (PARV4) in Taiwan, we detected DNA in plasma of 3 mothers and their newborns with hydrops. In 1 additional case, only the mother had PARV4 DNA. Our findings demonstrate that PARV4 can be transmitted through the placenta.

  14. Parvalbumin expression in visual cortical interneurons depends on neuronal activity and TrkB ligands during an Early period of postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Patz, Silke; Grabert, Jochen; Gorba, Thorsten; Wirth, Marcus J; Wahle, Petra

    2004-03-01

    The differentiation of cortical interneurons is controlled by environmental factors. Here, we describe the role of activity and neurotrophins in regulating parvalbumin (PARV) expression using organotypic cultures (OTC) of rat visual cortex as model system. In OTC, PARV expression was dramatically delayed. The organotypic proportion of approximately 6% PARV neurons was not established before 50-70 DIV, whereas in vivo all neurons are present until P20. Thalamic afferents increased cortical PARV mRNA in OTC, but not to the age-matched in vivo level. During the first 10 DIV, BDNF and NT-4 accelerated PARV mRNA expression in a Trk receptor and MEK2 dependent manner. The BDNF action required PI3 kinase signalling. PARV expression required activity. The proportion of neurons which managed to up-regulate PARV was inversely related to the duration of early transient periods of activity deprivation. Long-term activity-deprived OTC completely failed to up-regulate PARV mRNA. Both TrkB ligands failed to promote PARV expression in activity-deprived OTC. However, a few basket and chandelier neurons were observed, suggesting that the development of class-specific morphological features is activity-independent. Once established, PARV expression became resistant to late-onset activity deprivation. In conclusion, PARV expression depended on activity and TrkB ligands which appear to prime the PARV expression already before its developmental onset.

  15. Detection of human parvovirus 4 viremia in the follow-up blood samples from seropositive individuals suggests the existence of persistent viral replication or reactivation of latent viral infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mao-Yuan; Hung, Chien-Ching; Lee, Kuang-Lun

    2015-06-19

    The transmission routes for human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) infections in areas with high seroprevalence are not known. In the work described here, persistent PARV4 viral replication was investigated by conducting a longitudinal study. Ten healthcare workers each provided a blood sample at the beginning of the study (first sample) and 12 months later (second sample). The paired samples were tested for PARV4-positivity by immunoblotting analysis and nested polymerase chain reactions. IgG antibodies against PARV4 were detected in six participants, three of whom also had IgM antibodies against PARV4. The immunoblotting results did not vary over time. PARV4 DNA was detected in the first blood sample from one participant who had IgG antibodies against PARV4 and in the second blood samples from 2 participants who had IgG and IgM antibodies against PARV4. Detection of PARV4 DNA in the second blood samples from two seropositive participants suggests the existence of persistent PARV4 replication or reactivation of inactive virus in the tissues. The finding of persistent or intermittent PARV4 replication in individuals with past infections provides an important clue toward unraveling the non-parenteral transmission routes of PARV4 infection in areas where the virus is endemic.

  16. Parvovirus 4–like Virus in Blood Products

    PubMed Central

    Szelei, Jozsef; Liu, Kaiyu; Li, Yi; Fernandes, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Porcine plasma and factor VIII preparations were screened for parvovirus 4 (PARV)–like viruses. Although the prevalence of PARV4-like viruses in plasma samples was relatively low, viruses appeared to be concentrated during manufacture of factor VIII. PARV4-like viruses from human and porcine origins coevolved likewise with their hosts. PMID:20202447

  17. Placental Transmission of Human Parvovirus 4 in Newborns with Hydrops, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shiu-Ju; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2011-01-01

    In studying the epidemiology of parvovirus 4 (PARV4) in Taiwan, we detected DNA in plasma of 3 mothers and their newborns with hydrops. In 1 additional case, only the mother had PARV4 DNA. Our findings demonstrate that PARV4 can be transmitted through the placenta. PMID:22000381

  18. CTC Sentinel. Volume 3, Issue 1, January 2010. The Facade of Allegiance: Bin Ladin’s Dubious Pledge to Mullah Omar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    generated by the Cold War.4 Groups such as the Palestinian Abu Nidal Organization (ANO) and Lebanese Hizb Allah, in addition to Carlos “The Jackal ...in Vienna in 1975, Venezuelan terrorist Carlos “The Jackal ” first joined the Palestinian cause as a member of the leftist Popular Front for the...John Follain, Jackal : The Complete Story of the Legendary Terrorist, Carlos the Jackal (New York: Arcade Publish- jANUARy 2010 . VoL 3 . IssUE 1 23

  19. Lexical Restructuring in the Absence of Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventura, Paulo; Kolinsky, Regine; Fernandes, Sandra; Querido, Luis; Morais, Jose

    2007-01-01

    Vocabulary growth was suggested to prompt the implementation of increasingly finer-grained lexical representations of spoken words in children (e.g., [Metsala, J. L., & Walley, A. C. (1998). "Spoken vocabulary growth and the segmental restructuring of lexical representations: precursors to phonemic awareness and early reading…

  20. Low Prevalence of Parvovirus 4 in HIV-infected Children in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeldt, Vibeke; Norja, Päivi; Lindberg, Ellinor; Jensen, Lise; Hedman, Lea; Väisänen, Elina; Li, Xuemeng; Hedman, Klaus; von Linstow, Marie-Louise

    2015-07-01

    Parvovirus 4 (PARV4) has been associated with HIV infection in adults. We examined plasma samples from 46 HIV-infected 0-year-old to 16-year-old children for the presence of PARV4. Four children (8.7%) had detectable PARV4 IgG and 1 had IgM. The result of PARV4 polymerase chain reaction was found to be negative in all patients. PARV4 seropositivity was associated with low CD4 count but not with HIV viral load.

  1. Beta-parvin inhibits integrin-linked kinase signaling and is downregulated in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mongroo, Perry S; Johnstone, Cameron N; Naruszewicz, Izabela; Leung-Hagesteijn, Chungyee; Sung, Raphael K; Carnio, Leanne; Rustgi, Anil K; Hannigan, Gregory E

    2004-11-25

    We analysed breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines for the expression of beta-parvin (ParvB), an adaptor protein that binds to the integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Quantitative RT-PCR indicated that ParvB mRNA was downregulated, by at least 60%, in four of nine breast tumors, relative to patient-matched normal mammary gland tissue. We also found that ParvB protein levels were reduced by > or =90% in five of seven advanced tumors, relative to matched normal breast tissue. Conversely, ILK protein and kinase activity levels were elevated in these tumors, suggesting that downregulation of ParvB stimulates ILK signaling. Western blot analyses indicated very low levels of ParvB protein in MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 breast cancer cells, facilitating functional studies of the effects of ParvB on ILK signaling. Expression of ParvB in MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 cells increased cell adhesion to collagen. ParvB inhibited ILK kinase activity, anchorage-independent cell growth and in vitro matrigel invasion by MDA-MB-231 cells. EGF-induced phosphorylation of two ILK targets, PKB (Ser473) and glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (Ser9), was also inhibited by ParvB. These results indicated that ParvB inhibits ILK signaling downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases. Our results suggest that loss of ParvB expression is a novel mechanism for upregulating ILK activity in tumors.

  2. Testing UK blood donors for exposure to human parvovirus 4 using a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay to screen sera and Western blot to confirm reactive samples.

    PubMed

    Maple, Peter A C; Beard, Stuart; Parry, Ruth P; Brown, Kevin E

    2013-10-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (ParV4), a newly described member of the family Parvoviridae, like B19V, has been found in pooled plasma preparations. The extent, and significance, of ParV4 exposure in UK blood donors remain to be determined and reliable detection of ParV4 immunoglobulin (Ig)G, using validated methods, is needed. With ParV4 virus-like particles a ParV4 IgG time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (TRFIA) was developed. There is no gold standard or reference assay for measuring ParV4 IgG and the utility of the TRFIA was first examined using a panel of sera from people who inject drugs (PWIDS)--a high-prevalence population for ParV4 infection. Western blotting was used to confirm the specificity of TRFIA-reactive sera. Two cohorts of UK blood donor sera comprising 452 sera collected in 1999 and 156 sera collected in 2009 were tested for ParV4 IgG. Additional testing for B19V IgG, hepatitis C virus antibodies (anti-HCV), and ParV4 DNA was also undertaken. The rate of ParV4 IgG seroprevalence in PWIDS was 20.7% and ParV4 IgG was positively associated with the presence of anti-HCV with 68.4% ParV4 IgG-positive sera testing anti-HCV-positive versus 17.1% ParV4 IgG-negative sera. Overall seropositivity for ParV4 IgG, in 608 UK blood donors was 4.76%. The ParV4 IgG seropositivity for sera collected in 1999 was 5.08%, compared to 3.84% for sera collected in 2009. No ParV4 IgG-positive blood donor sera had detectable ParV4 DNA. ParV4 IgG has been found in UK blood donors and this finding needs further investigation. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  3. Separating positive and negative magnetoresistance for polyaniline-silicon nanocomposites in variable range hopping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hongbo; Guo, Jiang; Sadu, Rakesh; Huang, Yudong; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Chen, Daniel; Young, David P.; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2013-05-01

    This letter reports on unique room temperature organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in the disordered polyaniline/silicon polymer nanocomposites in the variable range hopping regime. A transition from positive to negative OMAR was observed around 5.5 T. The theoretical analysis revealed that both wave-function shrinkage model and forward interference model contributed to the positive OMAR and only forward interference model was responsible for the observed negative OMAR. The obtained positive OMAR is well explained by the introduced localization length a0, density of states at the Fermi level (N(EF)), and average hopping length Rhop; and the negative OMAR is interpreted by the quantum interference effect.

  4. Human parvovirus 4 prevalence among HTLV-1/2 infected individuals in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Svetoslav Nanev; Otaguiri, Katia Kaori; Smid, Jerusa; de Oliveira, Augusto Cesar Penalva; Casseb, Jorge; Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Eis-Hübinger, Anna Maria; Kashima, Simone

    2017-04-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), a Tetraparvovirus, has been largely found in HIV, HBV, or HCV infected individuals. However, there is no data for the PARV4 occurrence in Human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1/2) infected individuals, despite similar transmission routes. Here, PARV4 viremia was evaluated in 130 HTLV infected patients under care of a Brazilian HTLV outpatient clinic. PARV4 viremia was detected in 6.2% of the HTLV-1 infected patients. Most PARV4 positives showed no evidence for parenterally transmitted infections. It is suggested that in Brazil, transmission routes of PARV4 are more complex than in Europe and North America and resemble those in Africa. J. Med. Virol. 89:748-752, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Human parvovirus 4 in nasal and fecal specimens from children, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Reber, Ulrike; Muth, Doreen; Herzog, Petra; Annan, Augustina; Ebach, Fabian; Sarpong, Nimarko; Acquah, Samuel; Adlkofer, Julia; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Panning, Marcus; Tannich, Egbert; May, Jürgen; Drosten, Christian; Eis-Hübinger, Anna Maria

    2012-10-01

    Nonparenteral transmission might contribute to human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PARV4 DNA was detected in 8 (0.83%) of 961 nasal samples and 5 (0.53%) of 943 fecal samples from 1,904 children in Ghana. Virus concentrations ≤ 6-7 log(10) copies/mL suggest respiratory or fecal-oral modes of PARV4 transmission.

  6. Human Parvovirus 4 in Nasal and Fecal Specimens from Children, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Reber, Ulrike; Muth, Doreen; Herzog, Petra; Annan, Augustina; Ebach, Fabian; Sarpong, Nimarko; Acquah, Samuel; Adlkofer, Julia; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Panning, Marcus; Tannich, Egbert; May, Jürgen; Drosten, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Nonparenteral transmission might contribute to human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PARV4 DNA was detected in 8 (0.83%) of 961 nasal samples and 5 (0.53%) of 943 fecal samples from 1,904 children in Ghana. Virus concentrations ≤6–7 log10 copies/mL suggest respiratory or fecal–oral modes of PARV4 transmission. PMID:23018024

  7. Developmental expression of parvalbumin mRNA in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the rat.

    PubMed

    de Lecea, L; del Río, J A; Soriano, E

    1995-08-01

    Parvalbumin (PARV) belongs to the family of calcium-binding proteins bearing the EF hand domain. Immunocytochemical studies in the cerebral cortex have demonstrated that neurons containing PARV include two types of GABAergic interneurons, namely, basket and axo-axonic chandelier cells. The present study examines the onset and pattern of PARV mRNA expression during the development of rat neocortex and hippocampus by means of 'in situ' hybridization with an oligonucleotide probe corresponding to rat PARV cDNA. In animals aged P0-P6 no signal was detected above background in neocortex or hippocampus. At P8, a few cortical cells displayed a number of silver grains just above background levels. By P10 PARV mRNA-expressing cells in the neocortex were detected almost exclusively in layer V of somatosensory, frontal and cingulate cortices. At P12 PARV mRNA was mainly detected in layers IV, V and VIa. By P14 there was a marked overall increase in the entire neocortex, including layer II-III, both in the number of cells and in their intensity of labelling. Further maturation in the pattern of PARV mRNA concentration was observed between P16 and P21. In the hippocampus low hybridization was observed at P10-P12. In subsequent stages both the number of positive cells and the intensity of labelling increased steadily. No clear-cut radial gradients for the expression of PARV mRNA were observed in the hippocampal region. Our results show that the developmental radial gradient followed by PARV mRNA expression in the neocortex does not follow an 'inside-out' gradient, consistent with previous immunocytochemical findings. Taken together, these data indicate that the developmental sequence followed by the PARV protein directly reflects mRNA abundance and suggest that PARV mRNA expression correlates with the functional maturation of cortical interneurons.

  8. 76 FR 20450 - Designation of Nine Individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13566

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Intelligence; Colonel (individual) 2. DORDA, Abu Zaid (a.k.a. DORDA, Abouzid Omar; a.k.a. DORDA, Abu Zayd Umar; a.k.a. DORDA, Bu Zaid; a.k.a. DOURDA, Abu Zaid Omar; a.k.a. DURDA, Abu Zeid Omar); DOB 4 Apr...

  9. Les corps étrangers laryngo-trachéo-bronchiques: expérience de l'hôpital d'instruction des armées Omar Bongo Ondimba (HIAOBO) de Libreville

    PubMed Central

    Nyeki, Adèle-Rose Ngo; Miloundja, Jérôme; Dalil, Asmaou Bouba; Lawson, Jean Marcel Mandji; Nzenze, Sylvie; Sougou, Emery; Nziengui, Annie; N'zouba, Léon

    2015-01-01

    L'inhalation accidentelle de corps étranger est fréquente chez l'enfant et exceptionnelle chez l'adulte. Elle représente une urgence respiratoire pouvant mettre en jeu le pronostic vital. L'objectif était de présenter les difficultés de prise en charge des corps étrangers laryngo-trachéo-bronchiques (CELTB). Il s'agissait d'une étude rétrospective réalisée sur une période de 6 ans (Avril 2006-Mars 2012), dans les services d'Oto-Rhino-Laryngologie et de chirurgie cervico-faciale (ORL-CCF) de l'HIA OBO de Libreville. Nous avons répertorié 21 dossiers de patients admis pour corps étrangers laryngo-trachéo-bronchiques. Leur âge moyen était de 8,95 ans avec des extrêmes de 3 et 37 ans. Les enfants représentaient 90% de cas. Le sex-ratio était de 2,30. Les corps étrangers étaient à 55% d'origine alimentaire et à 45% d'origine métallique. Leur localisation était laryngée dans 60% des cas, bronchique dans 35% et trachéale dans 5% des cas. Sur le plan clinique, la toux était retrouvée chez tous les patients. Il existait un syndrome de pénétration dans 60% de cas. La découverte était fortuite lors d'un syndrome de séjour broncho-pulmonaire dans 30% des cas. L'extraction des corps étrangers était réalisée par voie endoscopique et sous anesthésie générale. Chez 47,6% de cas, nous avons effectué une trachéotomie première. Les suites opératoires étaient favorables dans 95,24% et un décès a été noté. La prise en charge des CELTB doit être précoce et nécessite une parfaite collaboration entre anesthésistes et chirurgiens. Leur extraction se fait par voie endoscopique d'où l'intérêt de disposer, dans un service d'ORL-CCF, de matériel endoscopique adapté à l’âge. PMID:26161221

  10. A Comparative Study of Three Interneuron Types in the Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yaxi; Liu, Zongwei; Wang, Weiping; Wei, Jiayou; Li, Keyi; Wu, Jiajia; Chen, Zhi; Li, Youlan; Mu, Shuhua; OuYang, Lisi; Lei, Wanlong

    2016-01-01

    Interneurons are involved in the physiological function and the pathomechanism of the spinal cord. Present study aimed to examine and compare the characteristics of Cr+, Calb+ and Parv+ interneurons in morphology and distribution by using immunhistochemical and Western blot techniques. Results showed that 1) Cr-Calb presented a higher co-existence rate than that of Cr-Parv, and both of them were higher in the ventral horn than in the dosal horn; 2) Cr+, Calb+ and Parv+ neurons distributing zonally in the superficial dosal horn were small-sized. Parv+ neuronswere the largest, and Cr+ and Calb+ neurons were higher density among them. In the deep dorsal horn, Parv+ neurons were mainly located in nucleus thoracicus and the remaining scatteredly distributed. Cr+ neuronal size was the largest, and Calb+ neurons were the least among three interneuron types; 3) Cr+, Calb+ and Parv+ neurons of ventral horns displayed polygonal, round and fusiform, and Cr+ and Parv+ neurons were mainly distributed in the deep layer, but Calb+ neurons mainly in the superficial layer. Cr+ neurons were the largest, and distributed more in ventral horns than in dorsal horns; 4) in the dorsal horn of lumbar cords, Calb protein levels was the highest, but Parv protein level in ventral horns was the highest among the three protein types. Present results suggested that the morphological characteristics of three interneuron types imply their physiological function and pathomechanism relevance. PMID:27658248

  11. High prevalence of human parvovirus 4 infection in HBV and HCV infected individuals in shanghai.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelian; Zhang, Jing; Hong, Liang; Wang, Jiayu; Yuan, Zhengan; Zhang, Xi; Ghildyal, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) has been detected in blood and diverse tissues samples from HIV/AIDS patients who are injecting drug users. Although B19 virus, the best characterized human parvovirus, has been shown to co-infect patients with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus (HBV, HCV) infection, the association of PARV4 with HBV or HCV infections is still unknown.The aim of this study was to characterise the association of viruses belonging to PARV4 genotype 1 and 2 with chronic HBV and HCV infection in Shanghai.Serum samples of healthy controls, HCV infected subjects and HBV infected subjects were retrieved from Shanghai Center for Disease Control and Prevention (SCDC) Sample Bank. Parvovirus-specific nested-PCR was performed and results confirmed by sequencing. Sequences were compared with reference sequences obtained from Genbank to derive phylogeny trees.The frequency of parvovirus molecular detection was 16-22%, 33% and 41% in healthy controls, HCV infected and HBV infected subjects respectively, with PARV4 being the only parvovirus detected. HCV infected and HBV infected subjects had a significantly higher PARV4 prevalence than the healthy population. No statistical difference was found in PARV4 prevalence between HBV or HCV infected subjects. PARV4 sequence divergence within study groups was similar in healthy subjects, HBV or HCV infected subjects.Our data clearly demonstrate that PARV4 infection is strongly associated with HCV and HBV infection in Shanghai but may not cause increased disease severity.

  12. First report of human parvovirus 4 detection in Iran.

    PubMed

    Asiyabi, Sanaz; Nejati, Ahmad; Shoja, Zabihollah; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Jalilvand, Somayeh; Farahmand, Mohammad; Gorzin, Ali-Akbar; Najafi, Alireza; Haji Mollahoseini, Mostafa; Marashi, Sayed Mahdi

    2016-08-01

    Parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is an emerging and intriguing virus that currently received many attentions. High prevalence of PARV4 infection in high-risk groups such as HIV infected patients highlights the potential clinical outcomes that this virus might have. Molecular techniques were used to determine both the presence and the genotype of circulating PARV4 on previously collected serum samples from 133 HIV infected patients and 120 healthy blood donors. Nested PCR was applied to assess the presence of PARV4 DNA genome in both groups. PARV4 DNA was detected in 35.3% of HIV infected patients compared to 16.6% healthy donors. To genetically characterize the PARV4 genotype in these groups, positive samples were randomly selected and subjected for sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. All PARV4 sequences were found to be genotype 1 and clustered with the reference sequences of PARV4 genotype 1. J. Med. Virol. 88:1314-1318, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Isolates of Human Parvovirus 4 from Patients with Acute Encephalitis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Shantanu; Seth, Akanksha; Singh, Arvind K.; Jain, Bhawana

    2015-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (Parv4) is a relatively new virus. Association of this virus with any human disease is yet to be established. We detected human parvovirus 4 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of two patients presenting with acute encephalitis syndrome in northern India. This is the first report of the Parv4 genome sequence from northern India. PMID:25635010

  14. A Comparative Study of Three Interneuron Types in the Rat Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Yang, Guangqi; Zhu, Yaxi; Liu, Zongwei; Wang, Weiping; Wei, Jiayou; Li, Keyi; Wu, Jiajia; Chen, Zhi; Li, Youlan; Mu, Shuhua; OuYang, Lisi; Lei, Wanlong

    Interneurons are involved in the physiological function and the pathomechanism of the spinal cord. Present study aimed to examine and compare the characteristics of Cr+, Calb+ and Parv+ interneurons in morphology and distribution by using immunhistochemical and Western blot techniques. Results showed that 1) Cr-Calb presented a higher co-existence rate than that of Cr-Parv, and both of them were higher in the ventral horn than in the dosal horn; 2) Cr+, Calb+ and Parv+ neurons distributing zonally in the superficial dosal horn were small-sized. Parv+ neuronswere the largest, and Cr+ and Calb+ neurons were higher density among them. In the deep dorsal horn, Parv+ neurons were mainly located in nucleus thoracicus and the remaining scatteredly distributed. Cr+ neuronal size was the largest, and Calb+ neurons were the least among three interneuron types; 3) Cr+, Calb+ and Parv+ neurons of ventral horns displayed polygonal, round and fusiform, and Cr+ and Parv+ neurons were mainly distributed in the deep layer, but Calb+ neurons mainly in the superficial layer. Cr+ neurons were the largest, and distributed more in ventral horns than in dorsal horns; 4) in the dorsal horn of lumbar cords, Calb protein levels was the highest, but Parv protein level in ventral horns was the highest among the three protein types. Present results suggested that the morphological characteristics of three interneuron types imply their physiological function and pathomechanism relevance.

  15. Magnetic effect on hopping rate of electrons in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junqing; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Meisheng; Zhang, Ningyu; Pang, Yantao; Li, Luyan; Ji, Yanju; Zhuang, Shidong; Mao, Jinhua; Wang, Huilin

    2013-10-01

    Considering effects of molecular vibration (ω0), hyperfine interaction (J), spin energy split, spin flip, and spin entanglement (η) of electron with nucleus on the hopping rate of electrons in organic semiconductors, we establish a model to calculate organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) within magnetic field B of 1 T. The results show that the effect of spin energy split is minimal, ω0 influences the gradient of OMAR to B in high field, J influences the OMAR in low field, the spin flip shows impact mainly in low field, η affects OMAR throughout the considered magnetic field and turns the high-field OMAR from positive to negative value.

  16. Occurrence of human bocaviruses and parvovirus 4 in solid tissues.

    PubMed

    Norja, Päivi; Hedman, Lea; Kantola, Kalle; Kemppainen, Kaisa; Suvilehto, Jari; Pitkäranta, Anne; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Seppänen, Mikko; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria

    2012-08-01

    Human bocaviruses 1-4 (HBoV1-4) and parvovirus 4 (PARV4) are recently discovered human parvoviruses. HBoV1 is associated with respiratory infections of young children, while HBoV2-4 are enteric viruses. The clinical manifestations of PARV4 remain unknown. The objective of this study was to determine whether the DNAs of HBoV1-4 and PARV4 persist in human tissues long after primary infection. Biopsies of tonsillar tissue, skin, and synovia were examined for HBoV1-4 DNA and PARV4 DNA by PCR. Serum samples from the tissue donors were assayed for HBoV1 and PARV4 IgG and IgM antibodies. To obtain species-specific seroprevalences for HBoV1 and for HBoV2/3 combined, the sera were analyzed after virus-like particle (VLP) competition. While HBoV1 DNA was detected exclusively in the tonsillar tissues of 16/438 individuals (3.7%), all of them ≤8 years of age. HBoV2-4 and PARV4 DNAs were absent from all tissue types. HBoV1 IgG seroprevalence was 94.9%. No subject had HBoV1 or PARV4 IgM, nor did they have PARV4 IgG. The results indicate that HBoV1 DNA occurred in a small proportion of tonsils of young children after recent primary HBoV1 infection, but did not persist long in the other tissue types studied, unlike parvovirus B19 DNA. The results obtained by the PARV4 assays are in line with previous results on PARV4 epidemiology.

  17. Stress differentially alters mu opioid receptor density and trafficking in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the female and male rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Milner, Teresa A; Burstein, Suzanne R; Marrone, Gina F; Khalid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D; Williams, Tanya J; Schierberl, Kathryn C; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Gonzales, Keith L; McEwen, Bruce S; Waters, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Stress differentially affects hippocampal-dependent learning relevant to addiction and morphology in male and female rats. Mu opioid receptors (MORs), which are located in parvalbumin (PARV)-containing GABAergic interneurons and are trafficked in response to changes in the hormonal environment, play a critical role in promoting principal cell excitability and long-term potentiation. Here, we compared the effects of acute and chronic immobilization stress (AIS and CIS) on MOR trafficking in PARV-containing neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus in female and male rats using dual label immunoelectron microscopy. Following AIS, the density of MOR silver-intensified gold particles (SIGs) in the cytoplasm of PARV-labeled dendrites was significantly reduced in females (estrus stage). Conversely, AIS significantly increased the proportion of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs in PARV-labeled dendrites in male rats. CIS significantly reduced the number of PARV-labeled neurons in the dentate hilus of males but not females. However, MOR/PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals were significantly smaller in CIS females, but not males, compared with controls. Following CIS, the density of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs increased in PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals in females. Moreover, the proportion of near-plasmalemmal MOR SIGs relative to total decreased in large PARV-labeled dendrites in females. After CIS, no changes in the density or trafficking of MOR SIGs were seen in PARV-labeled dendrites or terminals in males. These data show that AIS and CIS differentially affect available MOR pools in PARV-containing interneurons in female and male rats. Furthermore, they suggest that CIS could affect principal cell excitability in a manner that maintains learning processes in females but not males.

  18. Cholinergic septal afferent terminals preferentially contact neuropeptide Y-containing interneurons compared to parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the rat dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, K D; Milner, T A

    1999-11-15

    Septal cholinergic neurons may affect hippocampal memory encoding and retrieval by differentially targeting parvalbumin (PARV)-containing basket cells and neuropeptide Y (NPY) interneurons. Thus, the cellular associations of cholinergic efferents, identified by the low-affinity, p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)), with interneurons containing either PARV or NPY in the hilus of the rat dentate gyrus were examined in single sections using dual labeling immunoelectron microscopy. Most profiles immunoreactive (IR) for PARV and NPY were perikaryal and dendritic and found within the infragranular and central hilar regions, respectively, whereas most profiles with p75(NTR)-labeling were unmyelinated axons and axon terminals. Although PARV-labeled profiles were more numerous, p75(NTR)-labeled axons and terminals contacted few PARV-IR profiles compared to NPY-labeled profiles (2% of 561 for PARV vs 12% of 433 for NPY). Moreover, structures targeted by p75(NTR)-IR axon terminals varied depending on the presence of PARV or NPY immunoreactivity. p75(NTR)-IR terminals primarily contacted PARV-IR dendrites (87%) compared to somata (13%); however, they contacted more NPY-IR somata (57%) than dendrites (43%). p75(NTR)-labeled terminals formed exclusively symmetric (inhibitory-type) synapses with PARV-IR somata and dendrites; however, they formed mostly symmetric but also asymmetric (excitatory-type) synapses with NPY-IR somata and dendrites. These results suggest that septal cholinergic efferents in the dentate gyrus: (1) preferentially innervate NPY-containing interneurons compared to PARV-containing basket cells; and (2) may provide a more powerful (i.e., somatic contacts), yet functionally diverse (i.e., asymmetric and symmetric synapses), modulation of NPY-containing interneurons. Moreover, they provide evidence that neurochemical subsets of hippocampal interneurons can be distinguished by afferent input.

  19. Studies on the inactivation of human parvovirus 4.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Sally A; Tuke, Philip W; Miyagawa, Eiji; Blümel, Johannes

    2013-10-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is a novel parvovirus, which like parvovirus B19 (B19V) can be a contaminant of plasma pools used to prepare plasma-derived medicinal products. Inactivation studies of B19V have shown that it is more sensitive to virus inactivation strategies than animal parvoviruses. However, inactivation of PARV4 has not yet been specifically addressed. Treatment of parvoviruses by heat or low-pH conditions causes externalization of the virus genome. Using nuclease treatment combined with real-time polymerase chain reaction, the extent of virus DNA externalization was used as an indirect measure of the inactivation of PARV4, B19V, and minute virus of mice (MVM) by pasteurization of albumin and by low-pH treatment. Infectivity studies were performed in parallel for B19V and MVM. PARV4 showed greater resistance to pasteurization and low-pH treatment than B19V, although PARV4 was not as resistant as MVM. There was a 2- to 3-log reduction of encapsidated PARV4 DNA after pasteurization and low-pH treatment. In contrast, B19V was effectively inactivated while MVM was stable under these conditions. Divalent cations were found to have a stabilizing effect on PARV4 capsids. In the absence of divalent cations, even at neutral pH, there was a reduction of PARV4 titer, an effect not observed for B19V or MVM. In the case of heat treatment and incubation at low pH, PARV4 shows intermediate resistance when compared to B19V and MVM. Divalent cations seem important for stabilizing PARV4 virus particles. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  20. Noncanonical EF-hand motif strategically delays Ca2+ buffering to enhance cardiac performance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wang; Barnabei, Matthew S; Asp, Michelle L; Heinis, Frazer I; Arden, Erik; Davis, Jennifer; Braunlin, Elizabeth; Li, Qi; Davis, Jonathan P; Potter, James D; Metzger, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    EF-hand proteins are ubiquitous in cell signaling. Parvalbumin (Parv), the archetypal EF-hand protein, is a high-affinity Ca2+ buffer in many biological systems. Given the centrality of Ca2+ signaling in health and disease, EF-hand motifs designed to have new biological activities may have widespread utility. Here, an EF-hand motif substitution that had been presumed to destroy EF-hand function, that of glutamine for glutamate at position 12 of the second cation binding loop domain of Parv (ParvE101Q), markedly inverted relative cation affinities: Mg2+ affinity increased, whereas Ca2+ affinity decreased, forming a new ultra-delayed Ca2+ buffer with favorable properties for promoting cardiac relaxation. In therapeutic testing, expression of ParvE101Q fully reversed the severe myocyte intrinsic contractile defect inherent to expression of native Parv and corrected abnormal myocardial relaxation in diastolic dysfunction disease models in vitro and in vivo. Strategic design of new EF-hand motif domains to modulate intracellular Ca2+ signaling could benefit many biological systems with abnormal Ca2+ handling, including the diseased heart. PMID:23396207

  1. Impedance spectroscopy of organic magnetoresistance devices—Effect of interface disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Fayolle, M.; Yamaguchi, M.; Ohto, T.; Tada, H.

    2015-02-21

    Organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) can be caused by either single carrier (bipolaron) or double carriers (electron-hole)-based mechanisms. In order to consider applications for OMAR, it is important to control the mechanism present in the device. In this paper, we report the effect of traps on OMAR resulting of disorder at the interface between the organic active layer with the hole injection layer [poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate): PEDOT:PSS]. It has been found that while the single carriers OMAR is enhanced by the presence of traps, the double carriers OMAR is totally removed in a sample with a high interface trap density. The reasons for these results are discussed based on the impedance spectroscopy measurements. First, the mechanism (single or double carriers) responsible of the OMAR was determined with the support of the capacitance measurement. Then, the influence of traps was discussed with the Nyquist diagrams and phase angle-frequency plots of the samples. The results suggested that with a rough interface and thus high disorder, the presence of traps enhanced the bipolaron formation. Traps also acted as recombination centers for electron-hole pairs, which prevented the double carriers OMAR in devices with a rough interface. On the other hand, with a low trap density, i.e., with a smooth surface, the single carrier OMAR decreased, and double carriers OMAR appeared. The sign of the OMAR could then be controlled by simply sweeping the bias voltage. This work demonstrated that the roughness at the interface is important for controlling OMAR and its reproducibility, and that the combination of OMAR measurement and impedance spectroscopy is helpful for clarifying the processes at the interface.

  2. Impedance spectroscopy of organic magnetoresistance devices—Effect of interface disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayolle, M.; Yamaguchi, M.; Ohto, T.; Tada, H.

    2015-02-01

    Organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) can be caused by either single carrier (bipolaron) or double carriers (electron-hole)-based mechanisms. In order to consider applications for OMAR, it is important to control the mechanism present in the device. In this paper, we report the effect of traps on OMAR resulting of disorder at the interface between the organic active layer with the hole injection layer [poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate): PEDOT:PSS]. It has been found that while the single carriers OMAR is enhanced by the presence of traps, the double carriers OMAR is totally removed in a sample with a high interface trap density. The reasons for these results are discussed based on the impedance spectroscopy measurements. First, the mechanism (single or double carriers) responsible of the OMAR was determined with the support of the capacitance measurement. Then, the influence of traps was discussed with the Nyquist diagrams and phase angle-frequency plots of the samples. The results suggested that with a rough interface and thus high disorder, the presence of traps enhanced the bipolaron formation. Traps also acted as recombination centers for electron-hole pairs, which prevented the double carriers OMAR in devices with a rough interface. On the other hand, with a low trap density, i.e., with a smooth surface, the single carrier OMAR decreased, and double carriers OMAR appeared. The sign of the OMAR could then be controlled by simply sweeping the bias voltage. This work demonstrated that the roughness at the interface is important for controlling OMAR and its reproducibility, and that the combination of OMAR measurement and impedance spectroscopy is helpful for clarifying the processes at the interface.

  3. Frequency and time domain studies of magneto-transport and charge trapping in amorphous organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybicki, James Edward

    The focus of this thesis is a recently discovered organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) whose underlying mechanism remains much debated. As an introduction, the field of organic electronic is briefly discussed focusing mainly on organic light emitting diodes, the devices in which OMAR was first discovered. Important findings related to OMAR from prior work are highlighted and several proposed models for the underlying mechanism are discussed. The frequency dependence of OMAR along with capacitance spectroscopy are studied to help distinguish between proposed models. The limit frequency for OMAR devices is obtained. Magnetic field dependent time-of-flight spectroscopy is used to determine whether applied magnetic fields modify the photocarrier generation efficiency in OMAR devices, their mobility, or both. These results are used to compare the bipolaron model and the triplet-polaron scattering mechanism. As it is generally agreed that OMAR is a spintronic effect, the role of spin-orbit coupling in polymers was studied to help understand its importance in the spin-transport of organic semiconductors. The possibility of spin-orbit induced spin precession is examined and a phonon assisted spin-flip process is proposed. We show OMAR may be enhanced by exposure to x-ray radiation. This is shown to be related to the production of traps. The effect on other device characteristics including turn-voltage and quantum efficiency is also examined. The role of trap production in enhancing OMAR is explained using the biopolaron model.

  4. Ovarian steroids alter mu opioid receptor trafficking in hippocampal parvalbumin GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Williams, Tanya J; Chapleau, Jeanette D; Waters, Elizabeth M; McEwen, Bruce S; Drake, Carrie T; Milner, Teresa A

    2009-09-01

    The endogenous hippocampal opioid systems are implicated in learning associated with drug use. Recently, we showed that ovarian hormones regulate enkephalin levels in the mossy fiber pathway. This pathway overlaps with parvalbumin (PARV)-basket interneurons that contain the enkephalin-activated mu opioid receptors (MORs) and are important for controlling the "temporal timing" of granule cells. Here, we evaluated the influence of ovarian steroids on the trafficking of MORs in PARV interneurons. Two groups of female rats were analyzed: cycling rats in proestrus (relatively high estrogens) or diestrus; and ovariectomized rats euthanized 6, 24 or 72 h after estradiol benzoate (10 microg, s.c.) administration. Dorsal hippocampal sections were dually immunolabeled for MOR and PARV and examined by light and electron microscopy. As in males, in females MOR-immunoreactivity (-ir) was in numerous PARV-labeled perikarya, dendrites and terminals in the dentate hilar region. Variation in ovarian steroid levels altered the subcellular distribution of MORs in PARV-labeled dendrites but not terminals. In normal cycling rats, MOR-gold particles on the plasma membrane of small PARV-labeled dendrites (area <1 microm2) had higher density in proestrus rats than in diestrus rats. Likewise, in ovariectomized rats MORs showed higher density on the plasma membrane of small PARV-labeled dendrites 72 h after estradiol exposure. The number of PARV-labeled cells was not affected by estrous cycle phase or estrogen levels. These results demonstrate that estrogen levels positively regulate the availability of MORs on GABAergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus, suggesting cooperative interaction between opioids and estrogens in modulating principal cell excitability.

  5. Virologic and clinical features of primary infection with human parvovirus 4 in subjects with hemophilia: frequent transmission by virally inactivated clotting factor concentrates.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Colin P; Lail, Alice; Donfield, Sharyne; Gomperts, Edward D; Simmonds, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is a newly discovered parvovirus prevalent in injecting drug users and other groups with histories of parenteral exposure including persons with hemophilia exposed to non-virally inactivated clotting factor concentrates. To investigate its potential ongoing transmission to persons with hemophilia treated with plasma-derived, virally inactivated clotting factors, we screened a large cohort of persons with hemophilia for antibody seroconversion to PARV4 over a 5-year observation period. Samples from 195 persons with hemophilia enrolled in the Hemophilia Growth and Development Study cohort were screened for PARV4 antibodies at the start and end of a 5-year period of treatment with exclusively virally inactivated clotting factor concentrates. Samples collected at intermediate time points from subjects seroconverting over the study period were screened to narrow down the seroconversion time and investigate immunoglobulin (Ig)M responses, duration of acute viremia, and clinical presentations. PARV4 seroprevalence at the outset of the study was 44%. Over the observation period, nine subjects (seven human immunodeficiency virus positive) seroconverted for anti-PARV4 (incidence, 1.7%/year). Infected subjects showed relatively prolonged durations of viremia (mean, 7 months) and weak, transient IgM responses during acute infections. Clotting factors inactivated by solvent/detergent or by wet or dry heat were infectious. The most common clinical presentations were rashes and exacerbation of hepatitis. This study identifies PARV4 as a transfusion-transmissible agent that is resistant to viral inactivation. Of concern, infections may still regularly occur in those exposed to plasma-derived blood products. Urgent evaluation of the incidence of PARV4 in treated individuals and disease associations of PARV4 infections is required. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  6. Whose Rule? Whose Law? Filtering America Out of the Rule of Law Mission in Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    Brown Books, 2003), 81. 21 Suha Omar, “Women: Honour, Shame and Dictatorship,” in Iraq since the Gulf War Prospects for Democracy, ed. Franz...3 rd ed., 2002. Omar, Suha . “Women: Honour, Shame and Dictatorship.” Iraq Since the Gulf War Prospects for Democracy. Edited by Fran Hazelton

  7. Precious Knowledge: Teaching Solidarity with Tucson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carberry, Devin

    2013-01-01

    The author's class has been invited to speak on NPR's "Call-In-Radio" and two of her students, Omar and Diana, were elected to be their spokespeople regarding HB 2281, Arizona's controversial ethnic studies ban. Omar stressed that he and his classmates are engaged by this topic because they see what's happening in Arizona is wrong--that…

  8. Precious Knowledge: Teaching Solidarity with Tucson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carberry, Devin

    2013-01-01

    The author's class has been invited to speak on NPR's "Call-In-Radio" and two of her students, Omar and Diana, were elected to be their spokespeople regarding HB 2281, Arizona's controversial ethnic studies ban. Omar stressed that he and his classmates are engaged by this topic because they see what's happening in Arizona is wrong--that…

  9. Culture Warfare: A War Against Culture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-16

    Afghan people. Whether it is saying one’s prayers five times a day, fasting in Ramadan or giving zakat-an Islamic contribution to the poor – few...demand that the Taliban government in Afghanistan hand over Osama bin Laden. Mullah Omar instinctively refused.‖12 Mullah Omar was known for his

  10. On the Probability Density Function of the Crest to Trough Heights of Waves and on the Physics of Extreme Waves Including Results from Hurricane Camille.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    evidence" and that no conclusions are possible. Quatrain XXVII of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam (Fitzgerald (undated)) might be one way for the reader to...t -f -. . . ’ ,.. *i.’- ,k -X.:, . .j _.-: ’ - 1 - . . . . Fitzgerald, E. J. (undated) "Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam ", translated by E. J

  11. Hyperfine interaction and magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y.; Nguyen, T. D.; Veeraraghavan, G.; Mermer, Ö.; Wohlgenannt, M.; Qiu, S.; Scherf, U.

    2006-07-01

    We explore the possibility that hyperfine interaction causes the recently discovered organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) effect. We deduce a simple fitting formula from the hyperfine Hamiltonian that relates the saturation field of the OMAR traces to the hyperfine coupling constant. We compare the fitting results to literature values for this parameter. Furthermore, we apply an excitonic pair mechanism model based on hyperfine interaction, previously suggested by others to explain various magnetic-field effects in organics, to the OMAR data. Whereas this model can explain a few key aspects of the experimental data, we uncover several fundamental contradictions as well. By varying the injection efficiency for minority carriers in the devices, we show experimentally that OMAR is only weakly dependent on the ratio between excitons formed and carriers injected, likely excluding any excitonic effect as the origin of OMAR.

  12. Partial loss of parvalbumin-containing hippocampal interneurons in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Johnson, Mary; Perry, Robert H; LeBeau, Fiona E N; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Bogerts, Bernhard; Perry, Elaine K

    2011-02-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative dementia. Among many other neuropathological changes in DLB, brain region-specific cellular deficits have been reported. They include decreases in motor neuron and pyramidal cell densities, while neocortical parvalbumin (parv)-containing neurons are thought to be free of Lewy bodies and spared in DLB. However, elevated parv levels are found in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients suffering from dementia with Lewy bodies. We performed an immunohistochemical analysis of hippocampal parv-immunoreactive neurons in well-characterised DLB cases and from controls using a specific antibody against the calcium binding protein. In addition, an analysis of the regional and cellular distribution of alpha-synuclein was carried out. Subfield and laminar distribution of parv-immunoreactive (ir) neurons on the hippocampus in subjects with DLB and controls were present exclusively as non-granule cells of the dentate gyrus (DG)/hilus and non-pyramidal cells of CA1, CA2, CA3 and CA4 areas of the hippocampus. The distribution patterns did not differ qualitatively between DLB and controls. Quantitative estimation of parv-ir neuron density revealed significant decreases in the dentate (DG)/hilus region as well as in the CA1 subfield. Double immunolabelling experiments showed that only 2% of parv expressing interneurons were laden with alpha-synuclein immunoreactive material. No significant changes were found for the total neuron densities in DLB cases. Our results show a partial loss of parv-expressing hippocampal interneurons in DLB, which might be the result of long-lasting calcium overload in combination with a proposed impaired mitochondrial function. It remains to be elucidated if the numerical decrease of this particular subset of hippocampal interneurons has consequences for the gamma (20-80 Hz) frequency activity in DLB patients.

  13. Evaluation of a commercial orthopaedic metal artefact reduction tool in radiation therapy of patients with head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, H; Kim, K S; Chun, Y M; Wu, H-G; Carlson, J N K; Park, J M

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the image quality and dosimetric effects of the Philips orthopaedic metal artefact reduction (OMAR) (Philips Healthcare System, Cleveland, OH) function for reducing metal artefacts on CT images of head and neck (H&N) patients. Methods: 11 patients and a custom-built phantom with metal bead inserts (alumina, titanium, zirconia and chrome) were scanned. The image was reconstructed in two ways: with and without OMAR (OMAR and non-OMAR image). The mean and standard deviation values of CT Hounsfield unit (HU) for selected regions of interest of each case were investigated for both images. Volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were generated for all cases. Gamma analysis of each dose distribution pair in the patient (1%/1 mm criteria) and phantom (2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm criteria) images was performed. The film measurements in phantom for two metal beads were conducted for evaluating the calculated dose on both OMAR and non-OMAR images. Results: In the OMAR images, noise values were generally reduced, and the mean HU became closer to the reference value (measured from patients without metal implants) in both patient and phantom cases. Although dosimetric difference was insignificant for the eight closed-mouth patients (γ = 99.4 ± 0.5%), there was a large discrepancy in dosimetric calculation between OMAR and non-OMAR images for the three opened-mouth patients (γ = 91.1%, 94.8% and 96.6%). Moreover, the calculated dose on the OMAR image is closer to the real delivered dose on a radiochromic film than was the dose from the non-OMAR image. Conclusion: The OMAR algorithm increases the accuracy of CT HU and reduces the noise such that the entire radiation treatment planning process can be improved, especially for contouring and segmentation. Advances in knowledge: OMAR reconstruction is appropriate for the radiotherapy planning process of H&N patients, particularly of patients who use a bite block. PMID:25993487

  14. A two-step real-time PCR assay for quantitation and genotyping of human parvovirus 4.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, E; Lahtinen, A; Eis-Hübinger, A M; Lappalainen, M; Hedman, K; Söderlund-Venermo, M

    2014-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) of the family Parvoviridae was discovered in a plasma sample of a patient with an undiagnosed acute infection in 2005. Currently, three PARV4 genotypes have been identified, however, with an unknown clinical significance. Interestingly, these genotypes seem to differ in epidemiology. In Northern Europe, USA and Asia, genotypes 1 and 2 have been found to occur mainly in persons with a history of injecting drug use or other parenteral exposure. In contrast, genotype 3 appears to be endemic in sub-Saharan Africa, where it infects children and adults without such risk behaviour. In this study, a novel straightforward and cost-efficient molecular assay for both quantitation and genotyping of PARV4 DNA was developed. The two-step method first applies a single-probe pan-PARV4 qPCR for screening and quantitation of this relatively rare virus, and subsequently, only the positive samples undergo a real-time PCR-based multi-probe genotyping. The new qPCR-GT method is highly sensitive and specific regardless of the genotype, and thus being suitable for studying the clinical impact and occurrence of the different PARV4 genotypes.

  15. Percolation Blocking as the Origin of Organic Magneto-resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun-Qing; Sun, Ling-Ling; Wang, Ting

    2016-05-01

    In order to identify the elementary mechanisms governing the organic magneto-resistance (OMAR) phenomenon, we demonstrated how the applied magnetic field acts on the variable hopping mobility. Based on a percolation model of hopping between localized states, we introduced an analytic expression for magneto-mobility and thus the OMAR, and discussed the influence of inter-site electronic interaction, operating bias, film thickness, temperature, and material parameters on the OMAR. The double occupied states and the spin selection rules play a major role in the mechanism.

  16. [Detection of human parvovirus B19, human bocavirus and human parvovirus 4 infections in blood samples among 95 patients with liver disease in Nanjing by nested PCR].

    PubMed

    Tong, Rui; Zhou, Wei-Min; Liu, Xi-Jun; Wang, Yue; Lou, Yong-Liang; Tan, Wen-Jie

    2013-04-01

    To analyze the infection of human parvovirus B19, human bocavirus (HBoV) and human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) in blood samples among patients with liver disease in Nanjing by molecular detection. Nested PCR assays were designed and validated to detect B19, HBoV and PARV4, respectively. The assays were used to screen three parvoviruses in blood samples from 95 patients with different liver disease in Nanjing. The parvovirus infection was analyzed statistically. The detection limits were 10 copies of genomic DNA equivalents per reaction for each assays and the good specificity were observed. The frequency of B19 and HBoV were 2/95 (2.1%) and 9/95 (9.5%) in blood samples respectively. No PARV4 was detected. HBoV was detected in 3/5 patients with drug-induced hepatitis. Both B19 and HBoV infection were detected in blood from patients with liver disease.

  17. 75 FR 36474 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... (Colombia); (INDIVIDUAL) . 2. OSTAIZA AMAY, Jefferson Omar, c/o MULTINACIONAL INTEGRAL PRODUCTIVA JOOAMY EMA... MULTINACIONAL INTEGRAL PRODUCTIVA JOOAMY EMA, Quito, Pichincha, Ecuador; DOB 19 Jul 1975; Citizen Ecuador..., Colombia; Citizen Colombia; (INDIVIDUAL) . Entities: 1. MULTINACIONAL INTEGRAL PRODUCTIVA JOOAMY EMA...

  18. The Annual Meeting (16th) and the 20th Day of Scientific Lectures of the National Society of Black Physicists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-24

    unprepared to do very well in high level competition. Needless to say, I did not advance beyond this first phase of competition, which was a combination...joined by my friends and classmates, Omar Antar, Mike Antonelli, and Charlie Saulino. Omar, Mike and I all advanced to the second stage of competition...CSCE preempted us from our original hotel. As a result the team leaders, who saw the questions in advance , were staying two floors above the team

  19. Studies to Improve the Science in the GAIM - Full Physics Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    adjusting the drivers (neutral winds and electric fields). Therefore, a graduate student, Omar Nava , studied the effect that equatorial plasma bubbles...RESULTS Plasma Bubbles A graduate student, Omar Nava , studied the effect that equatorial plasma bubbles have on GPS-TEC measurements. The study...Institute of Technology, M. S. Thesis; March, 2011. Nava , O. A., Analysis of plasma bubble signatures in the ionosphere, Utah State University/Air

  20. Exploring Novel Spintronic Responses from Advanced Functional Organic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-10

    application of spin -radical containing molecule. This report has three parts. First, we will report the results of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in...respectively. We conclude that dominant OMAR mechanism can be changed by injecting minority charge carriers. Second, we will report on the spin ...and diminished electron spin resonance (ESR) signal upon AA addition. Finally, we will briefly report the result of collaboration work with Prof. Bin

  1. A two-site bipolaron model for organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemans, W.; Bloom, F. L.; Bobbert, P. A.; Wohlgenannt, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2008-04-01

    The recently proposed bipolaron model for large "organic magnetoresistance" (OMAR) at room temperature is extended to an analytically solvable two-site scheme. It is shown that even this extremely simplified approach reproduces some of the key features of OMAR, viz., the possibility to have both positive and negative magnetoresistance, as well as its universal line shapes. Specific behavior and limiting cases are discussed. Extensions of the model, to guide future experiments and numerical Monte Carlo studies, are suggested.

  2. Optimal Finite-Thrust Trans-earth Injection (TEI) Maneuvers for a Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) Earth Return Mission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    THRUST TRANS- EARTH INJECTION (TEI) MANEUVERS FOR A LOW LUNAR ORBIT (LLO) EARTH RETURN MISSION by Omar J. Wheatley December 2010 Thesis Co...2010 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Optimal Finite-Thrust Trans- earth Injection (TEI) Maneuvers for a Low...Lunar Orbit (LLO) Earth Return Mission 6. AUTHOR(S) Wheatley, Omar J. 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval

  3. Computational Study of Chalcopyrite Semiconductors and Their Non-Linear Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-12

    Daniel J. Friedman, Omar Manasreh, Irina A. Buyanova, Anneli Munkholm, F. Danie Auret, Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 799, Z5.3.1 (2004). d...optical proper- ties on the composition of the materials; (3) understand the trends in the family of chalcopyrite semicondutors and related materials with...Friedman, Omar Manasreh, Irina A. Buyanova, Anneli Munkholm, F. Danie Auret, Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 799, Z5.3.1 (2004). [2] "Theoretical study of

  4. The Rise of Islam in Turkey: Opportunity or Obstruction for the West?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-17

    5 This, and other less overt actions such as formally hosting an iftar dinner party during Ramadan , led to the familiar allegation of improper...in order to promote cooperation between the two countries. Sudanese president Omar Hassan al-Bashir, who has been charged by the International...country.9 In 1994, Mullah Mohammad Omar , a little-known cleric who ran a religious school in Kandahar, claimed to have a vision in which God told him

  5. Econonmic effects of river recreation on local economies

    Treesearch

    H. Ken Cordell; John C. Bergstrom; Gregory A. Ashley; John Karish

    1990-01-01

    Outdoor recreation is a major, growing use of water resources in the United States. The economic effects of expenditures by visitors to three recreational river sites on local economies surrounding the sites were estimated using an input-output model (IMPLAN). Expenditure data were from the Public Area Recreation Visitors Study (PARVS). Results indicate that visitor...

  6. No evidence of presence of parvovirus 4 in a Swedish cohort of severely immunocompromised children and adults.

    PubMed

    Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Norbeck, Oscar; Ohrmalm, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The recently discovered human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) has been associated with seropositivity for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. High prevalence is seen especially in intravenous drug users. The virus has been detected in blood products and persons who have been repeatedly transfused have shown to be a risk-group. Furthermore, reports from different parts of the world suggesting a prevalence ranging from zero to one third of the healthy population and the virus is thought to cause a latent or persistent infection. We investigated the presence of PARV4 DNA and parvovirus B19 (B19) DNA in serum from 231 severely immunocompromised cancer patients that have been exposed for blood products. Compared to B19, which was found in 3.9% of the patients, we found no evidence of PARV4. Our results may indicate a very low prevalence of the virus in Sweden, and it would be useful to measure the real PARV4 exposure of the healthy population as well as individuals with known risk factors by serology.

  7. No Evidence of Presence of Parvovirus 4 in a Swedish Cohort of Severely Immunocompromised Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Norbeck, Oscar; Öhrmalm, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The recently discovered human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) has been associated with seropositivity for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. High prevalence is seen especially in intravenous drug users. The virus has been detected in blood products and persons who have been repeatedly transfused have shown to be a risk-group. Furthermore, reports from different parts of the world suggesting a prevalence ranging from zero to one third of the healthy population and the virus is thought to cause a latent or persistent infection. We investigated the presence of PARV4 DNA and parvovirus B19 (B19) DNA in serum from 231 severely immunocompromised cancer patients that have been exposed for blood products. Compared to B19, which was found in 3.9% of the patients, we found no evidence of PARV4. Our results may indicate a very low prevalence of the virus in Sweden, and it would be useful to measure the real PARV4 exposure of the healthy population as well as individuals with known risk factors by serology. PMID:23050026

  8. Experimental studies and Monte-Carlo simulations of possible mechanisms for the organic magnetoresistive effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tho Duc

    We recently discovered a large and intriguing magnetoresistive effect in devices made from pi-conjugated polymers and small molecules, which we dubbed organic magnetoresistance (OMAR). In some materials, the effect reaches up to ≈ 15% magnetoresistance at 10mT fields at room temperature. The effect is independent of the field direction, and is often weakly temperature dependent. The effect can be positive or negative in sign depending on the material and the device operating point. To the best of our knowledge, the mechanism causing OMAR has not yet been established with certainty. In this thesis, I first briefly summarize OMAR in typical pi-conjugated polymer and small molecule organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Next, I study magnetoresistance in materials with varying hyperfine and spin-orbit coupling strengths and show that OMAR is caused by the hyperfine coupling between the magnetic moments of the hydrogen proton and the pi-electrons. Then, I survey all existing models of OMAR, namely the electron-hole pair model, the triplet-exciton polaron quenching model, and introduce our own theory of OMAR: the bipolaron model. Monte-Carlo simulations of our model show excellent agreement with the experimental results. Finally, I perform experiments to distinguish between these models of OMAR. For this, I study magnetic field effects in bipolar, almost hole-only and almost electron-only sandwich devices made from films of pi-conjugated semiconductors. I find OMAR also exists in effectively hole-only devices which excludes an exitonic origin of OMAR. Furthermore, I report the charge-induced absorption spectra of a polyfluorene OLED. Our experiments allow us to measure the singlet exciton, triplet exciton and polaron densities in a live device under an applied magnetic field. I discuss the experimental findings within the frame work of all three models. Our data again appears to be inconsistent with the exciton formation and triplet-exciton polaron quenching models

  9. A study of magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors with varying strengths of hyperfine and spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yugang

    This thesis concerns itself with the scientific study of the recently discovered organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) whose underlying mechanism is currently not known with certainty. As an introduction, we briefly review the major findings from prior work done by my colleagues. They found that OMAR can be as large as ≈10% magnetoresistance at 10 mT magnetic fields at room temperature. Both OMAR and other kinds of magnetic field effect data in organics can be fitted using the empirical laws B2/B2+B20 or B2/(|B| + B0)2, dependent on material. The fitting parameter B0 is a measure of the characteristic magnetic field strength of OMAR. We explore the dependence of B0 on material parameters to clarify the origin of OMAR. Various pi-conjugated semiconductor OMAR devices were studied to explore the possibility that hyperfine interaction causes OMAR. For a quantitative analysis of the experiments, we developed a theoretical fitting formula to relate B0 to the hyperfine coupling strength. In addition, organic materials with different spin-orbit coupling strengths were also measured. Fluorescence and phosphorescence spectroscopies were used to estimate the spin-orbit coupling strength from the measured spectra. For analyzing our measurements, we developed a fitting formula from the time-dependent Schrodinger equation that takes into account the combined effect of hyperfine and spin-orbit coupling on spin-dynamics. We found that in the case of strong spin-orbit coupling, it dominates the behavior, resulting in magnetic field effect traces that are much wider than those in ordinary organics. However, a small cone remains at zero field with a width equal to the hyperfine coupling strength. We find qualitative agreement between the experimental results and the model. We also investigated the question whether OMAR is related to an excitonic effect, or is primarily a transport effect. We measured the magnetic field effects on current, photocurrent and electroluminescence to address

  10. Poster — Thur Eve — 11: Validation of the orthopedic metallic artifact reduction tool for CT simulations at the Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J; Foottit, C

    2014-08-15

    Metallic implants in patients can produce image artifacts in kilovoltage CT simulation images which can introduce noise and inaccuracies in CT number, affecting anatomical segmentation and dose distributions. The commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm (O-MAR) (Philips Healthcare System) was recently made available on CT simulation scanners at our institution. This study validated the clinical use of O-MAR by investigating its effects on CT number and dose distributions. O-MAR corrected and uncorrected images were acquired with a Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT simulator of a cylindrical solid water phantom that contained various plugs (including metal) of known density. CT number accuracy was investigated by determining the mean and standard deviation in regions of interest (ROI) within each plug for uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images and comparing with no-metal image values. Dose distributions were calculated using the Monaco treatment planning system. Seven open fields were equally spaced about the phantom around a ROI near the center of the phantom. These were compared to a “correct” dose distribution calculated by overriding electron densities a no-metal phantom image to produce an image containing metal but no artifacts. An overall improvement in CT number and dose distribution accuracy was achieved by applying the O-MAR correction. Mean CT numbers and standard deviations were found to be generally improved. Exceptions included lung equivalent media, which is consistent with vendor specified contraindications. Dose profiles were found to vary by ±4% between uncorrected or O-MAR corrected images with O-MAR producing doses closer to ground truth.

  11. Clinical evaluation of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Noel, Camille; Chen, Haijian; Harold Li, H.; Low, Daniel; Moore, Kevin; Klahr, Paul; Michalski, Jeff; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Severe artifacts in kilovoltage-CT simulation images caused by large metallic implants can significantly degrade the conspicuity and apparent CT Hounsfield number of targets and anatomic structures, jeopardize the confidence of anatomical segmentation, and introduce inaccuracies into the radiation therapy treatment planning process. This study evaluated the performance of the first commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) for radiation therapy, and investigated its clinical applications in treatment planning. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for the evaluation. The CIRS electron density phantom with known physical (and electron) density plugs and removable titanium implants was scanned on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore 16-slice CT simulator. The CT Hounsfield numbers of density plugs on both uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images were compared. Treatment planning accuracy was evaluated by comparing simulated dose distributions computed using the true density images, uncorrected images, and O-MAR corrected images. Ten CT image sets of patients with large hip implants were processed with the O-MAR function and evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point score for overall image quality, anatomical conspicuity, and CT Hounsfield number accuracy. By utilizing the same structure contours delineated from the O-MAR corrected images, clinical IMRT treatment plans for five patients were computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images, respectively, and compared. Results: Results of the phantom study indicated that CT Hounsfield number accuracy and noise were improved on the O-MAR corrected images, especially for images with bilateral metal implants. The γ pass rates of the simulated dose distributions computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images referenced to those of the true densities were higher than 99.9% (even when using 1% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criterion), suggesting that dose

  12. Clinical evaluation of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hua; Noel, Camille; Chen, Haijian; Harold Li, H.; Low, Daniel; Moore, Kevin; Klahr, Paul; Michalski, Jeff; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Severe artifacts in kilovoltage-CT simulation images caused by large metallic implants can significantly degrade the conspicuity and apparent CT Hounsfield number of targets and anatomic structures, jeopardize the confidence of anatomical segmentation, and introduce inaccuracies into the radiation therapy treatment planning process. This study evaluated the performance of the first commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) for radiation therapy, and investigated its clinical applications in treatment planning. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for the evaluation. The CIRS electron density phantom with known physical (and electron) density plugs and removable titanium implants was scanned on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore 16-slice CT simulator. The CT Hounsfield numbers of density plugs on both uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images were compared. Treatment planning accuracy was evaluated by comparing simulated dose distributions computed using the true density images, uncorrected images, and O-MAR corrected images. Ten CT image sets of patients with large hip implants were processed with the O-MAR function and evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point score for overall image quality, anatomical conspicuity, and CT Hounsfield number accuracy. By utilizing the same structure contours delineated from the O-MAR corrected images, clinical IMRT treatment plans for five patients were computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images, respectively, and compared. Results: Results of the phantom study indicated that CT Hounsfield number accuracy and noise were improved on the O-MAR corrected images, especially for images with bilateral metal implants. The {gamma} pass rates of the simulated dose distributions computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images referenced to those of the true densities were higher than 99.9% (even when using 1% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criterion), suggesting that dose

  13. SU-E-T-579: On the Relative Sensitivity of Monte Carlo and Pencil Beam Dose Calculation Algorithms to CT Metal Artifacts in Volumetric-Modulated Arc Spine Radiosurgery (RS)

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, M; Lee, V; Leung, R; Lee, K; Law, G; Tung, S; Chan, M; Blanck, O

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Investigating the relative sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) and Pencil Beam (PB) dose calculation algorithms to low-Z (titanium) metallic artifacts is important for accurate and consistent dose reporting in post¬operative spinal RS. Methods: Sensitivity analysis of MC and PB dose calculation algorithms on the Monaco v.3.3 treatment planning system (Elekta CMS, Maryland Heights, MO, USA) was performed using CT images reconstructed without (plain) and with Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR; Philips Healthcare system, Cleveland, OH, USA). 6MV and 10MV volumetric-modulated arc (VMAT) RS plans were obtained for MC and PB on the plain and OMAR images (MC-plain/OMAR and PB-plain/OMAR). Results: Maximum differences in dose to 0.2cc (D0.2cc) of spinal cord and cord +2mm for 6MV and 10MV VMAT plans were 0.1Gy between MC-OMAR and MC-plain, and between PB-OMAR and PB-plain. Planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage changed by 0.1±0.7% and 0.2±0.3% for 6MV and 10MV from MC-OMAR to MC-plain, and by 0.1±0.1% for both 6MV and 10 MV from PB-OMAR to PB-plain, respectively. In no case for both MC and PB the D0.2cc to spinal cord was found to exceed the planned tolerance changing from OMAR to plain CT in dose calculations. Conclusion: Dosimetric impacts of metallic artifacts caused by low-Z metallic spinal hardware (mainly titanium alloy) are not clinically important in VMAT-based spine RS, without significant dependence on dose calculation methods (MC and PB) and photon energy ≥ 6MV. There is no need to use one algorithm instead of the other to reduce uncertainty for dose reporting. The dose calculation method that should be used in spine RS shall be consistent with the usual clinical practice.

  14. Reduction of artifacts caused by orthopedic hardware in the spine in spectral detector CT examinations using virtual monoenergetic image reconstructions and metal-artifact-reduction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Große Hokamp, Nils; Neuhaus, V; Abdullayev, N; Laukamp, K; Lennartz, S; Mpotsaris, A; Borggrefe, J

    2017-09-21

    Aim of this study was to assess the artifact reduction in patients with orthopedic hardware in the spine as provided by (1) metal-artifact-reduction algorithms (O-MAR) and (2) virtual monoenergetic images (MonoE) as provided by spectral detector CT (SDCT) compared to conventional iterative reconstruction (CI). In all, 28 consecutive patients with orthopedic hardware in the spine who underwent SDCT-examinations were included. CI, O-MAR and MonoE (40-200 keV) images were reconstructed. Attenuation (HU) and noise (SD) were measured in order to calculate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of paravertebral muscle and spinal canal. Subjective image quality was assessed by two radiologists in terms of image quality and extent of artifact reduction. O-MAR and high-keV MonoE showed significant decrease of hypodense artifacts in terms of higher attenuation as compared to CI (CI vs O-MAR, 200 keV MonoE: -396.5HU vs. -115.2HU, -48.1HU; both p ≤ 0.001). Further, artifacts as depicted by noise were reduced in O-MAR and high-keV MonoE as compared to CI in (1) paravertebral muscle and (2) spinal canal-CI vs. O-MAR/200 keV: (1) 34.7 ± 19.0 HU vs. 26.4 ± 14.4 HU, p ≤ 0.05/27.4 ± 16.1, n.s.; (2) 103.4 ± 61.3 HU vs. 72.6 ± 62.6 HU/60.9 ± 40.1 HU, both p ≤ 0.001. Subjectively both O-MAR and high-keV images yielded an artifact reduction in up to 24/28 patients. Both, O-MAR and high-keV MonoE reconstructions as provided by SDCT lead to objective and subjective artifact reduction, thus the combination of O-MAR and MonoE seems promising for further reduction.

  15. Magnetic field effect in non-magnetic organic semiconductor thin film devices and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermer, Omer

    Organic pi-conjugated materials have been used to manufacture devices such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells and field-effect transistors. Recently there has been growing interest in spin and magnetic field effects in these materials. In this thesis, I report on the discovery and experimental characterization of a large and intriguing magnetoresistance effect, which we dubbed organic magnetoresistance (OMAR), in various pi-conjugated polymer and small molecular OLEDs. OMAR may find application in magnetic field sensors in OLED interactive displays (patent pending). We discovered OMAR originally in devices made from the pi-conjugated polymer polyfluorene. We found ≈ 10% magnetoresistance at 10 mT fields at room temperature. The effect is independent of the field direction, and is only weakly temperature dependent. We show that OMAR is a bulk effect related to the majority carrier transport. Studying polymer films with different amount of disorder we found that low disorder/large mobility is not a necessary prerequisite for large OMAR response. We also studied a possible interrelation between spin-orbit coupling and the OMAR effect in platinum-containing polymers. We found that spin-orbit coupling has apparently little effect on OMAR. A large OMAR effect was also observed in devices made from the prototypical small molecule, Alq3 that is similar in size to that in the polyfluorene devices. Our study shows that the basic properties are equivalent to polymer devices. To the best of our knowledge, OMAR is not adequately described by any of the magnetoresistance mechanisms known to date. A future explanation for this effect may lead to a breakthrough in the scientific understanding of organic semiconductors. In a largely unrelated effort, we also modelled spin-dependent exciton formation in OLEDs. Our work leads to the following picture of exciton formation: Since the triplet exciton states lie lower in energy than singlets, more phonons must

  16. Investigation of organic magnetoresistance dependence on spin-orbit coupling using 8-hydroxyquinolinate rare-earth based complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, R. S.; Ávila, H. C.; Cremona, M.; Costa, D. G.; Paolini, T. B.; Brito, H. F.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.

    2016-05-16

    The recently discovered organic magnetoresistance effect (OMAR) reveals the spin-dependent behavior of the charge transport in organic semiconductors. So far, it is known that hyperfine interactions play an important role in this phenomenon and also that spin-orbit coupling is negligible for light-atom based compounds. However, in the presence of heavy atoms, spin-orbit interactions should play an important role in OMAR. It is known that these interactions are responsible for singlet and triplet states mixing via intersystem crossing and the change of spin-charge relaxation time in the charge mobility process. In this work, we report a dramatic change in the OMAR effect caused by the presence of strong intramolecular spin-orbit coupling in a series of rare-earth quinolate organic complex-based devices. Our data show a different OMAR lineshape compared with the OMAR lineshape of tris(8-hydroxyquinolinate) aluminum-based devices, which are well described in the literature. In addition, electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory help to establish the connection between this results and the presence of heavy central ions in the different complexes.

  17. Controlling organic magnetoresistance via interface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, C. A.; Jang, H.-J.; Pookpanratana, S. J.; Basham, J. I.; Hacker, C. A.; Kirillov, O. A.; Kline, R. J.; Jurchescu, O. D.; Gundlach, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of experiments in which we manipulate organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in devices based on Alq3 (tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum) and TPD (N,N '-Bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N '-diphenylbenzidine) by adding a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The results of OMAR measurements on this OLED-like architecture are correlated with impedance spectroscopy results to elucidate charge carrier transport and accumulation. We observe competing OMAR mechanisms in these devices, the relative strength of which can be tuned by adding SAMs at electrode interfaces. To determine how the interfacial and structural properties of these organic devices effect the OMAR, we obtained a complete picture of the interfacial, topological, and crystalline properties of these devices by performing UPS (Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy), XPS (X-ray PS), XRD (X-ray diffraction), and AFM (atomic force microscopy). To verify our understanding of how interfacial changes affect OMAR, we characterized simple Alq3-only devices: one with a SAM and one without it. Despite having the same current density at room temperature, the latter shows a negative MR while the former displays a positive MR.

  18. Magnetoresistance detected spin collectivity in organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malissa, Hans; Waters, David P.; Joshi, Gajadhar; Kavand, Marzieh; Limes, Mark E.; Burn, Paul L.; Lupton, John M.; Boehme, Christoph

    Organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) typically refers to the significant change in the conductivity of thin layers of organic semiconductors at low static magnetic fields (< 10 mT). When radio frequency (rf) radiation is applied to an organic semiconductor under bipolar injection, and in the presence of small magnetic fields B, magnetic resonance can occur, which is observed as a change of the OMAR effect [Baker et al., Nat. Commun. 3, 898 (2012)]. When B and the resonant driving field are stronger than local hyperfine fields, an ultrastrong coupling regime emerges, which is marked by collective spin effects analogous to the optical Dicke effect [Roundy and Raikh, Phys. Rev. B 88, 125206 (2013)]. Experimentally, this collective behavior of spins can be probed in the steady state OMAR of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) at room temperature by observation of a sign reversal of the OMAR change under rf irradiation. Furthermore, in the presence of strong driving fields, an ac Zeeman effect can be observed through OMAR [Waters et al., Nat. Phys. 11, 910 (2015)], a unique window to observe room temperature macroscopic spin quantum coherence.

  19. Investigation of organic magnetoresistance dependence on spin-orbit coupling using 8-hydroxyquinolinate rare-earth based complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, R. S.; Costa, D. G.; Ávila, H. C.; Paolini, T. B.; Brito, H. F.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Cremona, M.

    2016-05-01

    The recently discovered organic magnetoresistance effect (OMAR) reveals the spin-dependent behavior of the charge transport in organic semiconductors. So far, it is known that hyperfine interactions play an important role in this phenomenon and also that spin-orbit coupling is negligible for light-atom based compounds. However, in the presence of heavy atoms, spin-orbit interactions should play an important role in OMAR. It is known that these interactions are responsible for singlet and triplet states mixing via intersystem crossing and the change of spin-charge relaxation time in the charge mobility process. In this work, we report a dramatic change in the OMAR effect caused by the presence of strong intramolecular spin-orbit coupling in a series of rare-earth quinolate organic complex-based devices. Our data show a different OMAR lineshape compared with the OMAR lineshape of tris(8-hydroxyquinolinate) aluminum-based devices, which are well described in the literature. In addition, electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory help to establish the connection between this results and the presence of heavy central ions in the different complexes.

  20. Expression of nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 mRNAs in hippocampal interneurons: morphological characterization, levels of expression, and colocalization of nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3.

    PubMed

    Pascual, M; Rocamora, N; Acsády, L; Freund, T F; Soriano, E

    1998-05-25

    We have investigated the distribution and morphology of hippocampal interneurons that express the neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in the rat. For this study, we combined in situ hybridization for the detection of NGF and NT-3 mRNAs and immunocytochemistry against the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin (PARV), calretinin (CALR), and calbindin (CALB). Whereas the majority of PARV+ interneurons expressed NGF mRNA, only subsets of CALR- and CALB-immunoreactive interneurons (23% and 24%, respectively) displayed NGF hybridization. Most CALB/NGF+ cells were located in the stratum oriens/alveus of the CA3-CA1 regions, suggesting that they may include the population of CALB+, hippocamposeptal, nonpyramidal neurons. Most of the nonspiny CALR/NGF+ neurons were located within or in the vicinity of the pyramidal layer and had faint CALR immunostaining and stellate, thin dendrites. Regarding the spiny CALR-immunoreactive cells, we found that most of these neurons in the hilus were NGF+, whereas only 59% of displayed NGF hybridization in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 region. A small subset of PARV- and CALR-immunoreactive cells expressed NT-3 mRNA (16% and 13%, respectively). NT-3 message was not found in the large basket cells of the dentate gyrus, whereas the distribution and morphology of CALR/NT-3+ cells were similar to those of nonspiny CALR/NGF+ cells. In fact, double in situ hybridization analysis confirmed that most NT-3+ neurons also expressed NGF mRNA, indicating coexpression of both neurotrophins in subpopulations of PARV+ and CALR+ neurons. Moreover, the level of NGF mRNA expression was higher in PARV+ neurons than in CALR- and CALB-immunoreactive interneurons, whereas NT-3 message was expressed similarly in PARV+ and CALR+ neurons. The present findings show a differential expression of NGF and NT-3 mRNAs in subsets of hippocampal interneurons and suggest that the expression of these transcripts depends on factors intrinsic to

  1. The GABAergic septohippocampal connection is impaired in a mouse model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Soler, Helena; Dorca-Arévalo, Jonatan; González, Marta; Rubio, Sara Esmeralda; Ávila, Jesús; Soriano, Eduardo; Pascual, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia nowadays, has been linked to alterations in the septohippocampal pathway (SHP), among other circuits in the brain. In fact, the GABAergic component of the SHP, which controls hippocampal rhythmic activity crucial for learning and memory, is altered in the J20 mouse model of AD-a model that mimics the amyloid pathology of this disease. However, AD is characterized by another pathophysiological hallmark: the hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau. To evaluate whether tauopathies alter the GABAergic SHP, we analyzed transgenic mice expressing human mutated Tau (mutations G272V, P301L, and R406W, VLW transgenic strain). We show that pyramidal neurons, mossy cells, and some parvalbumin (PARV)-positive hippocampal interneurons in 2- and 8-month-old (mo) VLW mice accumulate phosphorylated forms of Tau (P-Tau). By tract-tracing studies of the GABAergic SHP, we describe early-onset deterioration of GABAergic septohippocampal (SH) innervation on PARV-positive interneurons in 2-mo VLW mice. In 8-mo animals, this alteration was more severe and affected mainly P-Tau-accumulating PARV-positive interneurons. No major loss of GABAergic SHP neurons or PARV-positive hippocampal interneurons was observed, thereby indicating that this decline is not caused by neuronal loss but by the reduced number and complexity of GABAergic SHP axon terminals. The decrease in GABAergic SHP described in this study, targeted onto the PARV-positive/P-Tau-accumulating inhibitory neurons in the hippocampus, establishes a cellular correlation with the dysfunctions in rhythmic neuronal activity and excitation levels in the hippocampus. These dysfunctions are associated with the VLW transgenic strain in particular and with AD human pathology in general. These data, together with our previous results in the J20 mouse model, indicate that the GABAergic SHP is impaired in response to both amyloid-β and P

  2. Effect of spin-orbit coupling on magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y.; Nguyen, T. D.; Veeraraghavan, G.; Mermer, Ö.; Wohlgenannt, M.

    2007-01-01

    We study the recently discovered organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) effect in a pair of materials that have similar chemical structures except that one contains a heavy atom to enhance spin-orbit coupling. We use photoluminescence spectroscopy to estimate the spin-orbit coupling strength. In the material with weak spin-orbit coupling the characteristic magnetic field scale is comparable to the hyperfine coupling strength. In the material with strong spin-orbit coupling we find that the OMAR is strongly reduced in size and the OMAR traces clearly exhibit a second, higher field scale which we identify with the spin-orbit coupling strength. We model our results using the standard spin-dynamics Hamiltonian.

  3. Molecular hyperfine fields in organic magnetoresistance devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giro, Ronaldo; Rosselli, Flávia P.; dos Santos Carvalho, Rafael; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Cremona, Marco; Achete, Carlos A.

    2013-03-01

    We calculate molecular hyperfine fields in organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) devices using ab initio calculations. To do so, we establish a protocol for the accurate determination of the average hyperfine field Bhf and apply it to selected molecular ions: NPB, TPD, and Alq3. Then, we make devices with precisely the same molecules and perform measurements of the OMAR effect, in order to address the role of hole-transport layer in the characteristic magnetic field B0 of OMAR. Contrary to common belief, we find that molecular hyperfine fields are not only caused by hydrogen nuclei. We also find that dipolar contributions to the hyperfine fields can be comparable to the Fermi contact contributions. However, such contributions are restricted to nuclei located in the same molecular ion as the charge carrier (intramolecular), as extramolecular contributions are negligible.

  4. Reduced Brain Cannabinoid Receptor Availability In Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Mohini; Cortes, Jose; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Thurnauer, Halle; Planeta, Beata; Skosnik, Patrick; Gao, Hong; Labaree, David; Neumeister, Alexander; Pittman, Brian; Surti, Toral; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E.; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several lines of evidence suggest the presence of abnormalities in the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in schizophrenia (SCZ). However, there are limited in vivo measures of the eCB system in SCZ. METHODS Twenty five male SCZ subjects (SCZs), 18 antipsychotic treated [SCZ-MED] and 7 antipsychotic free [SCZ-UNMED]) were compared to 18 age- matched male healthy control subjects (HCs). Subjects underwent one Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan each with the cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1R) selective radiotracer [11C]OMAR on the High Resolution Research Tomography (HRRT) scanner. Regional volume of distribution (VT) values were determined using kinetic modeling of PET data as a measure of CB1R availability. Group differences in mean composite [11C]OMAR VT values were compared between SCZs and HCs. Exploratory comparisons of CB1R availability within 15 brain regions were also conducted. All analyses were covaried for age and body mass index. RESULTS SCZs showed significantly (p =0.02) lower composite [11C]OMAR VT relative to HCs (~12% difference, effect size d= 0.73). [11C]OMAR VT was significantly (all ps <0.05) lower in SCZs in the amygdala, caudate, posterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and insula. Composite [11C]OMAR VT was greater in HCs> SCZ-MED>SCZ-UNMED. Furthermore, composite [11C]OMAR VT was greater in HCs> SCZ smokers (n=11) > SCZ non-smokers (n=14). CONCLUSIONS CB1R availability is lower in males SCZs compared to HCs. Furthermore, antipsychotics and tobacco use may increase CB1R availability in this population. The findings of the study provide further evidence supporting the hypothesis that alterations in the eCB system might contribute to the pathophysiology of SCZ. PMID:26432420

  5. Spin-Spin Interactions in Organic Magnetoresistance Probed by Angle-Dependent Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemans, W.; Schellekens, A. J.; Kemper, M.; Bloom, F. L.; Bobbert, P. A.; Koopmans, B.

    2011-05-01

    The dependence of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) on the orientation of the magnetic field has been investigated. In contrast with previous claims, a finite and systematic change in magnitude is observed when the orientation of the field is changed with respect to the sample. It is demonstrated that, to explain these effects, spin-spin interactions have to be included in the models previously suggested for OMAR. Dipole coupling and exchange coupling are introduced in combination with either an anisotropy of the orientation of the spin pairs or an anisotropy in the hyperfine fields.

  6. Spin-spin interactions in organic magnetoresistance probed by angle-dependent measurements.

    PubMed

    Wagemans, W; Schellekens, A J; Kemper, M; Bloom, F L; Bobbert, P A; Koopmans, B

    2011-05-13

    The dependence of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) on the orientation of the magnetic field has been investigated. In contrast with previous claims, a finite and systematic change in magnitude is observed when the orientation of the field is changed with respect to the sample. It is demonstrated that, to explain these effects, spin-spin interactions have to be included in the models previously suggested for OMAR. Dipole coupling and exchange coupling are introduced in combination with either an anisotropy of the orientation of the spin pairs or an anisotropy in the hyperfine fields.

  7. Frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemans, W.; Janssen, P.; van der Heijden, E. H. M.; Kemerink, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2010-09-01

    To identify the microscopic mechanisms of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR), the dependency on the frequency of the applied magnetic field is explored, which consists of a dc and ac component. The measured magnetoconductance decreases when the frequency is increased. The decrease is stronger for lower voltages, which is shown to be linked to the presence of a negative capacitance, as measured with admittance spectroscopy. The negative capacitance disappears when the frequency becomes comparable to the inverse transit time of the minority carriers. These results are in agreement with recent interpretations that magnetic field effects on minority carrier mobility dominate OMAR.

  8. Tuning the Performance of Organic Spintronic Devices Using X-Ray Generated Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybicki, J.; Lin, R.; Wang, F.; Wohlgenannt, M.; He, C.; Sanders, T.; Suzuki, Y.

    2012-08-01

    X rays produced during electron-beam deposition of metallic electrodes drastically change the performance of organic spintronic devices. The x rays generate traps with an activation energy of ≈0.5eV in a commonly used organic. These traps lead to a dramatic decrease in spin-diffusion length in organic spin valves. In organic magnetoresistive (OMAR) devices, however, the traps strongly enhance magnetoresistance. OMAR is an intrinsic magnetotransport phenomenon and does not rely on spin injection. We discuss our observations in the framework of currently existing theories.

  9. Differential effects of NT-4, NGF and BDNF on development of neurochemical architecture and cell size regulation in rat visual cortex during the critical period.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Maren; Di Cristo, Graziella; Berardi, Nicoletta; Maffei, Lamberto; Wahle, Petra

    2007-01-01

    Development of inhibition is a crucial determinant of the time course of visual cortical plasticity. BDNF strongly affects interneuron development and the onset and closure of the critical period for ocular dominance plasticity. Less is known on the effects of NT-4 despite a clear involvement in ocular dominance plasticity. We have investigated the effects of NT-4 on interneuron development by supplying NT-4 with osmotic minipumps during two time windows overlapping the onset (P12-20) and the peak (P20-28) of the critical period. We assessed the expression of interneuronal markers and soma size maturation either after the end of the infusion periods or at the end of the critical period (P45). We found that NT-4 was very effective in regulating interneuron development. NPY, SOM and PARV neuron somata grew faster during both infusion periods whereas CR neurons only responded during the early infusion period. The effects of soma size elicited during the earlier infusion period were still present at P45. In PARV neurons, NT-4 caused a long-lasting stabilization of CB and NPY expression. Furthermore, NT-4 accelerated the expression of GAD-65 mRNA in a subset of non-PARV neurons of layer V, which normally up-regulate GAD-65 towards the end of the critical period. Most of these effects were shared by NT-4 and BDNF. Some were unexpectedly also shared by NGF, which promoted growth of layer V PARV neurons, stabilized the CB expression and accelerated the GAD-65 expression. The results suggest that neurotrophins act on critical period plasticity by strengthening inhibition.

  10. Differential activity-dependent, homeostatic plasticity of two neocortical inhibitory circuits.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Aundrea F; Huang, Z Josh; Huber, Kimberly M; Gibson, Jay R

    2008-10-01

    Chronic changes in neuronal activity homeostatically regulate excitatory circuitry. However, little is known about how activity regulates inhibitory circuits or specific inhibitory neuron types. Here, we examined the activity-dependent regulation of two neocortical inhibitory circuits--parvalbumin-positive (Parv+) and somatostatin-positive (Som+)--using paired recordings of synaptically coupled neurons. Action potentials were blocked for 5 days in slice culture, and unitary synaptic connections among inhibitory/excitatory neuron pairs were examined. Chronic activity blockade caused similar and distinct changes between the two inhibitory circuits. First, increases in intrinsic membrane excitability and excitatory synaptic drive in both inhibitory subtypes were consistent with the homeostatic regulation of firing rate of these neurons. On the other hand, inhibitory synapses originating from these two subtypes were differentially regulated by activity blockade. Parv+ unitary inhibitory postsynaptic current (uIPSC) strength was decreased while Som+ uIPSC strength was unchanged. Using short-duration stimulus trains, short-term plasticity for both unitary excitatory postsynaptic current (uEPSCs) and uIPSCs was unchanged in Parv+ circuitry while distinctively altered in Som+ circuitry--uEPSCs became less facilitating and uIPSCs became more depressing. In the context of recurrent inhibition, these changes would result in a frequency-dependent shift in the relative influence of each circuit. The functional changes at both types of inhibitory connections appear to be mediated by increases in presynaptic release probability and decreases in synapse number. Interestingly, these opposing changes result in decreased Parv+-mediated uIPSCs but balance out to maintain normal Som+-mediated uIPSCs. In summary, these results reveal that inhibitory circuitry is not uniformly regulated by activity levels and may provide insight into the mechanisms of both normal and pathological

  11. Early infant diagnosis of HIV infection in southeastern Nigeria: prevalence of HIV infection among HIV-exposed babies.

    PubMed

    Ugochukwu, E F; Kanu, S O

    2010-01-01

    Vertical transmission of HIV-1 is responsible for a high level of infant mortality necessitating early infant diagnosis. Serologic tests are not useful because of persistence of maternal antibodies in infants. Amplification of the integrated viral genome by PCR is the preferred method of diagnosis of HIV infection in these children. To determine the prevalence of HIV among a cohort of HIV-exposed babies. HIV-exposed infants were recruited for DNA PCR (early infant diagnosis). Babies were enrolled from six weeks of age. Relevant data were collected with the aid of a proforma. Mothers were given pre-test counselling. Heel or finger prick samples of blood on Whatman filter paper were used for DNA PCR testing. Data on the initial 304 babies enrolled for DNA PCR were analyzed. Seven (3.6%) of 192 mother-baby pairs who had received requisite prophylactic anti-retrovirals (PARV) were PCR-positive. In 23 (8.7%) PCR positive babies, their mothers received PARV but the babies had no post exposure prophylaxis (PEP), while two (12.5%) of 16 babies who had received PARV without their mothers turned out PCR-positive. Thirty nine (53.4%) of 73 mother-baby pairs who had no PARV were infected. Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) rate was 35.5%. In these babies five (18.5%) were infected, while 288 (75%) of babies were exclusive formula fed (EFF), out of which 11 (4.8%) were infected. Forty-seven (15.5%) of the babies were mixed-fed, and 32 (68.0%) of them were infected. Prophylactic ARV in mothers and babies gave a marked reduction in Mother-to-Child-Transmission (MTCT) rate. Feeding BMS conferred a superior protection against (MTCT) than EBF.

  12. Expression of NMDA glutamate receptor subunit mRNAs in neurochemically identified projection and interneurons in the striatum of the rat.

    PubMed

    Standaert, D G; Friberg, I K; Landwehrmeyer, G B; Young, A B; Penney, J B

    1999-01-22

    NMDA receptors are composed of proteins from two families: NMDAR1 and NMDAR2. We used quantitative double-label in situ hybridization to examine in rat brain the expression of NMDAR1, NMDAR2A, NMDAR2B, and NMDAR2C mRNA in six neurochemically defined populations of striatal neurons: preproenkephalin (ENK) and preprotachykinin (SP) expressing projection neurons, and somatostatin (SOM), glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), parvalbumin (PARV), and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) expressing interneurons. NMDAR1 was expressed by all striatal neurons: strongly in ENK, SP, PARV and ChAT neurons, and less intensely in SOM and GAD67 positive cells. NMDAR2A mRNA was present at moderate levels in all striatal neurons except those containing ChAT. Labeling for NMDAR2B was strong in projection neurons and ChAT interneurons, and only moderate in SOM, GAD67 and PARV interneurons. NMDAR2C was scarce in striatal neurons, but a low level signal was detected in GAD67 positive cells. NMDAR2C expression was also observed in small cells not labeled by any of the markers, most likely glia. These data suggest that all striatal neurons have NMDA receptors, but different populations have different subunit compositions which may affect function as well as selective vulnerability.

  13. A novel insect-specific flavivirus replicates only in Aedes-derived cells and persists at high prevalence in wild Aedes vigilax populations in Sydney, Australia.

    PubMed

    McLean, Breeanna J; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Webb, Cameron E; Watterson, Daniel; Prow, Natalie A; Nguyen, Hong Duyen; Hall-Mendelin, Sonja; Warrilow, David; Johansen, Cheryl A; Jansen, Cassie C; van den Hurk, Andrew F; Beebe, Nigel W; Schnettler, Esther; Barnard, Ross T; Hall, Roy A

    2015-12-01

    To date, insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) have only been isolated from mosquitoes and increasing evidence suggests that ISFs may affect the transmission of pathogenic flaviviruses. To investigate the diversity and prevalence of ISFs in Australian mosquitoes, samples from various regions were screened for flaviviruses by ELISA and RT-PCR. Thirty-eight pools of Aedes vigilax from Sydney in 2007 yielded isolates of a novel flavivirus, named Parramatta River virus (PaRV). Sequencing of the viral RNA genome revealed it was closely related to Hanko virus with 62.3% nucleotide identity over the open reading frame. PaRV failed to grow in vertebrate cells, with only Aedes-derived mosquito cell lines permissive to replication, suggesting a narrow host range. 2014 collections revealed that PaRV had persisted in A. vigilax populations in Sydney, with 88% of pools positive. Further investigations into its mode of transmission and potential to influence vector competence of A. vigilax for pathogenic viruses are warranted. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Loss of hippocampal interneurons and epileptogenesis: a comparison of two animal models of acquired epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Huusko, Noora; Römer, Christine; Ndode-Ekane, Xavier Ekolle; Lukasiuk, Katarzyna; Pitkänen, Asla

    2015-01-01

    Reduced hippocampal GABAergic inhibition is acknowledged to be associated with epilepsy. However, there are no studies that had quantitatively compared the loss of various interneuron populations in different models of epilepsy. We tested a hypothesis that the more severe the loss of hippocampal interneurons, the more severe was the epilepsy. Epileptogenesis was triggered in adult rats by status epilepticus (SE) (56 SE, 24 controls) or by traumatic brain injury (TBI) (45 TBI, 23 controls). The total number of hippocampal parvalbumin (PARV), cholecystokinin (CCK), calretinin (CR), somatostatin (SOM), or neuropeptide Y (NPY) positive neurons was estimated using unbiased stereology at 1 or 6 months post-insult. The rats with TBI had no spontaneous seizures but showed increased seizure susceptibility. Eleven of the 28 rats (39 %) in the SE group had spontaneous seizures. The most affected hippocampal area after TBI was the ipsilateral dentate gyrus, where 62 % of PARV-immunoreactive (ir) (p < 0.001 compared to controls), 77 % of CR-ir (p < 0.05), 46 % of SOM-ir (p < 0.001), and 59 % of NPY-ir (p < 0.001) cells remained at 1 month after TBI. At 6 months post-TBI, only 35 % of PARV-ir (p < 0.001 compared to controls), 63 % of CCK-ir (p < 0.01), 74 % of CR-ir (p < 0.001), 55 % of SOM-ir (p < 0.001), and 51 % of NPY-ir (p < 0.001) cells were remaining. Moreover, the reduction in PARV-ir, CCK-ir, and CR-ir neurons was bilateral (all p < 0.05). Substantial reductions in different neuronal populations were also found in subfields of the CA3 and CA1. In rats with epilepsy after SE, the number of PARV-ir neurons was reduced in the ipsilateral CA1 (80 % remaining, p < 0.05) and the number of NPY-ir neurons bilaterally in the dentate gyrus (33-37 %, p < 0.01) and the CA3 (54-57 %, p < 0.05). Taken together, interneuron loss was substantially more severe, widespread, progressive, and included more interneuron subclasses after TBI than after SE. Interneurons responsible for

  15. The Carolinas Speech Communication Annual, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Bruce C., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This 1996 issue of the "Carolinas Speech Communication Annual" contains the following articles: "Rhetoric in the Second Sophistic, Medieval, and Renaissance Periods: Implications for Pedagogy" (Omar J. Swartz and Chris Bachelder); "Thou Art Damned: Cursing as a Rhetorical Strategy of the Accusers in the Salem Witch…

  16. Patient Privacy, Consent, and Identity Management in Health Information Exchange: Issues for the Military Health System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    United States: Implications for Meaningful Use,” Annals Internal Medicine, Vol. 154, 2011, pp. 666–671. Bouhaddou, Omar, Jamie Bennett, Tim Cromwell...Veterans, Final Report, 2003. Pritts, Joy, and Kathleen Connor, The Implementation of E-Consent Mechanisms in Three Countries: Canada, England, and the

  17. Environmental Assessment to Repair/Modify Drainage and Remove Headwalls on Runway 17/35 and Taxiway D

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    buirdil No . soc Mountain Plover Charadrlus monram/S No . soc Western BwrowinJ!. Owl Arhene cunicrdarla No . soc Black-tailed Prairie Do2 Cvnom\\’S...include the Read- eared Slider (Traclremys scriplll e/egcms), the occasional Ornate Box Turtle (Terrapende omaw omare) and Common Snapping Tunle (Chelydra

  18. GOES-R Prelaunch News Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-17

    From left, Sandra Smalley, director, Joint Agency Satellite Division, NASA Headquarters; Omar Baez, launch director, NASA Kennedy; and Scott Messer, program manager, NASA Missions, United Launch Alliance, speak to members of the news media during a Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) prelaunch news conference in the Kennedy Space Center's Press Site auditorium in Florida.

  19. Analysis of the Hessian for Inverse Scattering Problems. Part 1: Inverse Shape Scattering of Acoustic Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    approximations. SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, 33(1):407– 432, 2011. [5] Tan Bui-Thanh, Carsten Burstedde, Omar Ghattas, James Martin, Georg Stadler, and...James A. Cochran and Mark A. Lukas . Differentiable positive definite kernels and Lipschitz continuity. Math. Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc., 104:361–369

  20. Potential of Iraqi Local Councils to facilitate Iraqi National Unity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-12

    34 11 said James Miller of the Center for New American Security in Washington. Although achieving national unity is admittedly a daunting task...gain power and build confidence in the people that [reform] would finally come.” 104 Dr. Omar, an anesthesiologist and local council member

  1. Spin in organics: a new route to spintronics.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Bert; Wagemans, Wiebe; Bloom, Francisco L; Bobbert, Peter A; Kemerink, Martijn; Wohlgenannt, Markus

    2011-09-28

    New developments in the nascent field of organic spintronics are discussed. Two classes of phenomena can be discerned. In hybrid organic spin valves (OSVs), an organic semiconducting film is sandwiched between two ferromagnetic (FM) thin films, aiming at magnetoresistive effects as a function of the relative alignment of the respective magnetization directions. Alternatively, organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) is achieved without any FM components, and is an intrinsic property of the organic semiconductor material. Some of the exciting characteristics of OMAR, in both electrical conductance and photoconductance, are presented. A systematic, combined experimental-theoretical study of sign changes between positive and negative magnetoresistance is shown to provide important insight about the underlying mechanisms of OMAR. A simple explanation of experimental observations is obtained by combining a 'spin-blocking' mechanism, an essential ingredient in the recently proposed bipolaron model, with specific features of the device physics of space charge limited current devices in the bipolar regime. Finally, we discuss possible links between the physics relevant for OMAR and that for OSVs. More specifically, weak hyperfine fields from the hydrogen atoms in organic materials are thought to be crucial for a proper understanding of both types of phenomena.

  2. Cuba: Issues for the 111th Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-04

    Cuban government. In May 2008, Sánchez was awarded Spain’s Ortega y Gasset award for digital journalism, but the Cuban government did not provide her...released four political prisoners—union activist Pedro Pablo Alvarez Ramos, human rights activist Omar Pernet Hernández, and journalists Jose

  3. Intersectionality as Education Policy Reform: Creating Schools That Empower Telling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Brittney

    2017-01-01

    Brittney Beck wrote this commentary two days after the act of terror and hate that occurred at Pulse in Orlando, Florida in which Omar Mateen murdered 50 people at a queer night club during a celebration of LatinX cultures and identities. Historians have long observed that social movements are preceded by tragedy. Anyon (2014) argued that schools…

  4. A Quadrotor Sensor Platform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    Alain Martin , and Nicolas Petit. “Using Magnetic Disturbances to Improve IMU-Based Position Estimation”. In Proceedings of the European Control...Conference, pp. 2853–2858, Kos, Greece, Jul. 2–5, 2007. [45] Daniel Cruz, James McClintock, Brent Perteet, Omar A.A. Orqueda, Uyan Cao, and Rafael Fierro

  5. Stockpile Stewardship's 20th Anniversary

    SciTech Connect

    Hecker, Siegfried; Gottemoeller, Rose; Reis, Victor H.; McMillan, Charles; Rohlfing, Joan; Hurricane, Omar; Hagengruber, Roger; Taylor, John

    2015-10-22

    A short oral history of the NNSA's Stockpile Stewardship Program, produced in association with the 20th anniversary of the program. It features Siegfried Hecker, Rose Gottemoeller, Victor Reis, Charles McMillan, Joan Rohlfing, Omar Hurricane, Roger Hagengruber, and John Taylor.

  6. Pragmatics and Language Learning, Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouton, Lawrence F., Ed.; Kachru, Yamuna, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Monographs on pragmatics and language learning include: "Do We All Apologize the Same?--An Empirical Study on the Act of Apologizing by Spanish Speakers Learning English" (Montserrat Mir); "Conversational Openings in Kiswahili: The Pragmatic Performance of Native and Non-Native Speakers" (Alwiya S. Omar); "Experimental and…

  7. Warlords of the Somali Civil War (1988-1995)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    13 Ahmed Omar Jess and the Somali Patriotic Movement ........................................................14 Conclusions...Patriotic Movement and the United Somali Congress are the three factions the aforementioned leaders led. Most of these groups were bred out of Somali...National Movement .1 As groups with various interests/agenda emerged, I intend to explain how the faction leaders functioned as political entities

  8. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-31

    Minister Sergio Roberto Pinto Teixeira and Omar Gattas are Erman Gonzalez has announced that "all the installa- superintending director and commercial...purposes. Approached by ESTADO DE SAO PAULO, Jacques "It is important to retain the useful components, espe- Mercier, Arianespace representative in...according to Elebras superintending director Sergio Pinto Teixeira, the Foreign Affairs Ministry opposed The international consortium which Elebra

  9. 77 FR 60106 - Membership of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... Dent Smith, Deputy Director, Office of Human Resources ] Management. U.S. Department of Commerce. Mark..., 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Omar Williams, Executive Resources Program Manager, Workforce Management Office, NOAA, 1305 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910, (301) 713-6301. SUPPLEMENTARY...

  10. [Effect of Reconstruction Technique for Metal Artifact Reduction in Computed Tomography by Changing Display Field of View].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinobu; Kawata, Hidemichi; Kuroki, Hidefumi; Mizoguchi, Asumi

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of orthopedic-metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) for metal artifact in computed tomography with 73 simulated seeds for brachytherapy in different sizes of display field of view (DFOV) obtained by helical scan under the same clinical scan condition. The metal artifacts were analyzed with the Gumbel's method by changing DFOV sizes 80 mm, 160 mm, and 320 mm. Gumbel distribution, scale parameter (γ), and location parameter (β) of the metal artifacts with O-MAR were compared with that of the metal artifacts with filtered back projection (FBP). In conclusion, it was considered that the effect of metal artifact reduction with O-MAR was influenced by DFOV size in this study. The reduction rates of scale parameter (γ) were 22.3%, 21.3%, and 10.0% in DFOV 80 mm, 160 mm, and 320 mm, respectively. The reduction rates of location parameter (β) were 27.4%, 23.4 %, and 9.8%. Therefore, the effect of metal artifact reduction with O-MAR showed the tendency of increasing with decreasing DFOV size.

  11. Analysis of the Hessian for Inverse Scattering Problems. Part 3. Inverse Medium Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves in Three Dimensions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    mathematics. [3] Philippe Blanchard and Erwin Brüning, Mathematical Methods in Physics, Birhäuser Ver- lag, 2003. [4] Tan Bui-Thanh, Carsten Burstedde, Omar...Order, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, second (Classics in Mathematics) ed., 2001. [16] Ken Kreutz-Delgado, The complex gradient operator and the CR-calculus

  12. Stockpile Stewardship's 20th Anniversary

    ScienceCinema

    Hecker, Siegfried; Gottemoeller, Rose; Reis, Victor H.; McMillan, Charles; Rohlfing, Joan; Hurricane, Omar; Hagengruber, Roger; Taylor, John

    2016-07-12

    A short oral history of the NNSA's Stockpile Stewardship Program, produced in association with the 20th anniversary of the program. It features Siegfried Hecker, Rose Gottemoeller, Victor Reis, Charles McMillan, Joan Rohlfing, Omar Hurricane, Roger Hagengruber, and John Taylor.

  13. Using Second Life with Learning-Disabled Students in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Stephanie; Horspool, Agi; Willers, Renee; Safie, Omar; Richlin, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    The educational potential of Second Life is still in the process of being developed and harnessed. According to Stephanie McKinney, Agi Horspool, Renee Willers, Omar Safie, and Laurie Richlin, an essential step in this development will be to figure out how to use Second Life to support learning-disabled (LD) students who face numerous challenges…

  14. Civil Rights Activists in the Information Age: The Development of Math Literacy Workers. CIRCLE Working Paper 50

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Roderick J.; Guessous, Omar

    2006-01-01

    Roderick Watts and Omar Guessous of Georgia State University conducted exploratory research to investigate the link between math and civic engagement. Their research is based on an evaluation of the Young People's Project (YPP), a national program that recruits, trains, and deploys high school and college Math Literacy Workers for mentoring middle…

  15. MOFs move to market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Omar Farha (Chief Science Officer & technical founder) and Ben Hernandez (Chief Executive Officer) of NuMat Technologies, talk to Nature Chemistry about the release of one of the first MOF-based commercial products and the challenges the journey posed.

  16. Man of Two Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walgate, Robert

    Abdus Salam, in a lecture delivered last December to the students of the University of Stockholm, spoke with controlled anger of the exploitation of the Third World by the advanced nations. Piling fact upon fact, finally he burst out passionately with these lines of Omar Khayyam…

  17. Lessons from Costa Rica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borthwick, Arlene; Lobo, Irina

    2005-01-01

    Costa Rica has one of the highest concentrations of computers in the Americas and is regarded as a Central American pioneer in technology development. The authors of this article describe their trip to Costa Rica, which included visits to several schools as well as to the Foundation Omar Dengo (FOD) and the Ministry of Public Education (MEP),…

  18. Frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fujian; Rybicki, James; Lin, Ran; Hutchinson, Kent; Hou, Jia; Wohlgenannt, Markus

    2011-03-01

    Organic magnetoresistive (OMAR) devices show a large enough magnetoresistive response (typically 10%) for potential applications as magnetic field sensors. However, applications often require sensing high frequency magnetic fields, and the examination of the frequency-dependent magnetoresistive response is therefore required. Analysis of time constants that limit the frequency response may also shed light on the mechanism behind the OMAR effect, because different OMAR mechanisms occur at different time scales In our experiments, the AC magnetic field is supplied by a coil with a ferrite core which is driven by a function generator The AC magnet shows a frequency response that is almost flat up to 1MHz. We found that the OMAR frequency limit is about 10 kHz for a typical organic semiconductor device and at least 100 kHz for devices made from a doped polymer film. We also performed capacitance and conductance vs. frequency measurements to understand the origin of the observed limit frequencies. This work was supported by Army MURI under GrantNo. W911NF-08-1-0317 and NSF under Grant No. ECS 0725280.

  19. Room Temperature Ferromagnetic Polymer and the Correlated Anomalous Magnetoresistance Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinsong; Yang, Bin; Shield, Jeffrey

    2011-03-01

    Organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) has been observed in organic semiconductor devices where resistance can change in a relatively small external magnetic field at room temperature. Since a weak magnetic field is involved, the hyperfine interaction (HFI) is employed to explain OMAR in the reported literatures. None of these issues consider the magnetic properties of the organic semiconductors themselves. However, the we recently discovered that polymer semiconductors, such as poly(3-hexylthiophene) P3HT, can have room temperature (RT) ferromagnetic properties in their crystalline phase and when mixed with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Here, we will report the possible correlation between the ferromagnetic property of the P3HT:PCBM and anomalous OMAR phenomenon including the anisotropic and hysteretic OMAR behavior. The magnetic property of the polymer including the anisotropic and photo induced change of magnetism will be also discussed to explore the possible mechanism of the room temperature ferromagnetism.~ This work is partially supported by the NSF MRSEC program at University.

  20. The Taliban: An Organizational Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    than to the insurgents.71 today’s guerrilla strategy reflects a change in taliban operations. afghans knew mullah omar for his robin hood -like actions... robin hood tactics and its current disregard for civilians. these human weapons have produced more casualties among the civilian population than among

  1. Improving the Numerical Efficiency of Generalized Multipole Technique by Non-Redundant Multipole Choices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-23

    M. Mongiardoà and A.S. Omar    Chair of Microwave and Communication Engineering, FET-IESK, Otto -von- Guericke University, Magdeburg, PF 4120...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Chair of Microwave and Communication Engineering, FET-IESK, Otto -von- Guericke University, Magdeburg, PF 4120

  2. The Determination of Hexahydro-1, 3, 5,-Trinitro-S-Triazine (RDX) and Octahydro-1, 3, 5, 7-Tetranitro-S-Tetrazocine (HMX) by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    Spectrophometry ", Anal. Chem., 44, pp. 1676-1678, August 1972. 5J A compounds. Previous experience in the analysis of er’.rgetic materials using high performance...in Octahydro-l, 3, 5, 7-Tetranitro-s-Tetrazocine (HMX) by Infrared Spectrophometry ", Anal. Chem., 44, pp. 1676-1678, August 1972. 7. J. Omar Doali

  3. Conjunctions in Argumentative Writing of Libyan Tertiary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Muftah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was an attempt to investigate the use of conjunctions in argumentative essays written by English as a Foreign Language fourth-year undergraduate Libyan students majoring in English at Omar Al-Mukhtar University in Libya. A corpus of 32 argumentative essays was collected from a sample of 16 students in order to be investigated…

  4. Quantitative analysis of orthopedic metal artefact reduction in 64-slice computed tomography scans in large head metal-on-metal total hip replacement, a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, Martijn F; Warringa, Niek; Edens, Mireille A; Mueller, Dirk; Ettema, Harmen B; Verheyen, Cees C P M; Maas, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of the effect of O-MAR on decreasing metal artefacts caused by large head metal on metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA) in a dedicated phantom setup of the hip. Pathological reactions of the hip capsule on Computed tomography (CT) can be difficult to diagnose due to different metal artefacts. The O-MAR algorithm deploys an iterative loop where the metal sinogram is identified, extracted, and subsequently serves as a mask to correct the measured sinogram. Main goal of this study is to quantify the ability of the O-MAR technique to correct deviation in medullary bone attenuation caused by streak artefacts from the large-head MoM THA embedded in a phantom. Secondary goal is to evaluate the influence of O-MAR on CNR. The phantom was designed as a Perspex box (PMMA) containing water and a supplementary MOM THA surrounded by Perspex columns comprising calibrated calcium pellets. Each column contains 200 mg of hydroxyapatite/calcium carbonate to simulate healthy bone tissue. Scans were obtained with and without a MoM THA at different dose levels. Different reconstructions were made with filter A, iDose(4) level 5 and with and without O-MAR. The scans without the prosthesis were used as the baseline. Information about the attenuation in Hounsfield units, image noise in standard deviation within the ROI's were extracted and the CNR was calculated. Pellet L0 and R0 (proximal of the MoM THA) were defined as reference, lacking any disturbance by metal artefacts; L5, L6 and L8 were respectively visually categorized as 'light' 'medium' and 'heavy disturbance'. Significant improvements in attenuation deviation caused by metal artefact were 43, 68 and 32 %, for respectively pellet L5, L6 and L8 (p < 0.001). Significant CNR improvements were present for L5 and L6 and were respectively 72 and 52 % (p < 0.001). O-MAR showed no improvement on CNR for L8. This phantom study significantly increases image quality by the use of O-MAR in the presence of metal

  5. Metal artifact reduction in MRI-based cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Yuan James; Zoberi, Jacqueline E.; Kadbi, Mo; Grigsby, Perry W.; Cammin, Jochen; Mackey, Stacie L.; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Goddu, S. Murty; Schwarz, Julie K.; Gach, H. Michael

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an increasingly important role in brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Yet, metal tandem, ovoid intracavitary applicators, and fiducial markers used in brachytherapy cause magnetic susceptibility artifacts in standard MRI. These artifacts may impact the accuracy of brachytherapy treatment and the evaluation of tumor response by misrepresenting the size and location of the metal implant, and distorting the surrounding anatomy and tissue. Metal artifact reduction sequences (MARS) with high bandwidth RF selective excitations and turbo spin-echo readouts were developed for MRI of orthopedic implants. In this study, metal artifact reduction was applied to brachytherapy of cervical cancer using the orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) sequence. O-MAR combined MARS features with view angle tilting and slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) to minimize in-plane and through-plane susceptibility artifacts. O-MAR improved visualization of the tandem tip on T2 and proton density weighted (PDW) imaging in phantoms and accurately represented the diameter of the tandem. In a pilot group of cervical cancer patients (N  =  7), O-MAR significantly minimized the blooming artifact at the tip of the tandem in PDW MRI. There was no significant difference observed in artifact reduction between the weak (5 kHz, 7 z-phase encodes) and medium (10 kHz, 13 z-phase encodes) SEMAC settings. However, the weak setting allowed a significantly shorter acquisition time than the medium setting. O-MAR also reduced susceptibility artifacts associated with metal fiducial markers so that they appeared on MRI at their true dimensions.

  6. Metal artifact reduction in MRI-based cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yuan James; Zoberi, Jacqueline E; Kadbi, Mo; Grigsby, Perry W; Cammin, Jochen; Mackey, Stacie L; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Goddu, S Murty; Schwarz, Julie K; Gach, H Michael

    2017-04-21

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an increasingly important role in brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Yet, metal tandem, ovoid intracavitary applicators, and fiducial markers used in brachytherapy cause magnetic susceptibility artifacts in standard MRI. These artifacts may impact the accuracy of brachytherapy treatment and the evaluation of tumor response by misrepresenting the size and location of the metal implant, and distorting the surrounding anatomy and tissue. Metal artifact reduction sequences (MARS) with high bandwidth RF selective excitations and turbo spin-echo readouts were developed for MRI of orthopedic implants. In this study, metal artifact reduction was applied to brachytherapy of cervical cancer using the orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) sequence. O-MAR combined MARS features with view angle tilting and slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) to minimize in-plane and through-plane susceptibility artifacts. O-MAR improved visualization of the tandem tip on T2 and proton density weighted (PDW) imaging in phantoms and accurately represented the diameter of the tandem. In a pilot group of cervical cancer patients (N  =  7), O-MAR significantly minimized the blooming artifact at the tip of the tandem in PDW MRI. There was no significant difference observed in artifact reduction between the weak (5 kHz, 7 z-phase encodes) and medium (10 kHz, 13 z-phase encodes) SEMAC settings. However, the weak setting allowed a significantly shorter acquisition time than the medium setting. O-MAR also reduced susceptibility artifacts associated with metal fiducial markers so that they appeared on MRI at their true dimensions.

  7. Magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors and their applications in displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeraraghavan, Govindarajan

    Organic semiconductors have been widely expected to replace inorganic semiconductors in the field of display electronics since the advent of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Organic pi-conjugated materials have also been used to manufacture photovoltaic cells and field-effect transistors. Recent years have seen a surge in interest in the magnetotransport properties of these materials because they show great potential for such applications as magnetic field sensors and spintronics devices. In this thesis, I experimentally characterize a large magnetoresistance effect, which was recently discovered at the University of Iowa and was dubbed organic magnetoresistance (OMAR). We focus on two materials that show particularly great promise; one a macromolecular polymer called polyfluorene, the other a prototypical small molecule called Alq3. Building on the work of a prior student; in this thesis I report on the magnetic field dependence of current, photocurrent and electroluminescence in OLEDs made from Alq3 and polyfluorene. We provide a comprehensive overview of all these three types of magnetic field effects. In particular, we show that they are all caused by the same mechanism, in contrast to some claims by others. To the best of our knowledge, the mechanism causing OMAR and the other magnetic field effects is currently not known with certainty. Moreover, we show that experiments in bipolar, electroluminescent devices do not allow determination whether the mechanism acts on the carrier density or carrier mobility. This is a crucial gap in knowledge since it makes any attempt of explaining it ambiguous. As a remedy, we performed magnetoresistance measurements in hole-only polyfluorene devices and show that the mechanism acts on the carrier mobility rather than carrier recombination. We present an outline of a possible explanation which will be studied in more detail in another thesis. In my thesis I focus on possible applications of OMAR. I present the design

  8. Expression of NMDAR2D glutamate receptor subunit mRNA in neurochemically identified interneurons in the rat neostriatum, neocortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Standaert, D G; Landwehrmeyer, G B; Kerner, J A; Penney, J B; Young, A B

    1996-11-01

    NMDA receptors are composed of proteins from two families: NMDAR1, which are required for channel activity, and NMDAR2, which modulate properties of the channels. The mRNA encoding the NMDAR2D subunit has a highly restricted pattern of expression: in the forebrain, it is found in only a small subset of cortical, neostriatal and hippocampal neurons. We have used a quantitative double-label in situ hybridization method to examine the expression of NMDAR2D mRNA in neurochemically defined populations of neurons. In the neostriatum, NMDAR2D was expressed by the interneuron populations marked by preprosomatostatin (SOM), the 67-kDa form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67), parvalbumin (PARV), and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) mRNAs but not by the projection neurons expressing beta-preprotachykinin (SP) or preproenkephalin (ENK) mRNAs. In the neocortex, NMDAR2D expression was observed in only a small number of neurons, but these included almost all of the SOM-, GAD67-, and PARV-expressing interneurons. In the hippocampus, NMDAR2D was not present in pyramidal or granule cells, but was abundant in SOM-, GAD67-, and PARV-positive interneurons. NMDAR2D expression appears to be a property shared by interneurons in several regions of the brain. The unique electrophysiological characteristics conveyed by this subunit, which include resistance to blockade by magnesium ion and long channel offset latencies, may be important for the integrative functions of these neurons. NMDAR2D-containing receptor complexes may prove to be important therapeutic targets in human disorders of movement. In addition, the presence of NMDAR2D subunits may contribute to the differential vulnerability of interneurons to excitotoxic injury.

  9. The influences of reproductive status and acute stress on the levels of phosphorylated mu opioid receptor immunoreactivity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Keith L; Chapleau, Jeanette D; Pierce, Joseph P; Kelter, David T; Williams, Tanya J; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; McEwen, Bruce S; Waters, Elizabeth M; Milner, Teresa A

    2011-08-19

    Opioids play a critical role in hippocampally dependent behavior and plasticity. In the hippocampal formation, mu opioid receptors (MOR) are prominent in parvalbumin (PARV) containing interneurons. Previously we found that gonadal hormones modulate the trafficking of MORs in PARV interneurons. Although sex differences in response to stress are well documented, the point at which opioids, sex and stress interact to influence hippocampal function remains elusive. Thus, we used quantitative immunocytochemistry in combination with light and electron microscopy for the phosphorylated MOR at the SER375 carboxy-terminal residue (pMOR) in male and female rats to assess these interactions. In both sexes, pMOR-immunoreactivity (ir) was prominent in axons and terminals and in a few neuronal somata and dendrites, some of which contained PARV in the mossy fiber pathway region of the dentate gyrus (DG) hilus and CA3 stratum lucidum. In unstressed rats, the levels of pMOR-ir in the DG or CA3 were not affected by sex or estrous cycle stage. However, immediately following 30 minutes of acute immobilization stress (AIS), males had higher levels of pMOR-ir whereas females at proestrus and estrus (high estrogen stages) had lower levels of pMOR-ir within the DG. In contrast, the number and types of neuronal profiles with pMOR-ir were not altered by AIS in either males or proestrus females. These data demonstrate that although gonadal steroids do not affect pMOR levels at resting conditions, they are differentially activated both pre- and post-synaptic MORs following stress. These interactions may contribute to the reported sex differences in hippocampally dependent behaviors in stressed animals.

  10. Generation of hybrid human immunodeficiency virus utilizing the cotransfection method and analysis of cellular tropism.

    PubMed Central

    Velpandi, A; Nagashunmugam, T; Murthy, S; Cartas, M; Monken, C; Srinivasan, A

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) isolated from infected individuals show tremendous genetic and biologic diversity. To delineate the genetic determinants underlying specific biologic characteristics, such as rate of replication, cytopathic effects, and ability to infect macrophages and T4 lymphoid cells, generation of hybrid HIV using viruses which exhibit distinct biologic features is essential. To develop methods for generating hybrid HIV, we constructed truncated HIV proviral DNA plasmids. Upon digestion with restriction enzymes, these plasmid DNAs were cotransfected into human rhabdomyosarcoma cells to generate hybrid HIV. The hybrid HIVs derived by this method were infectious upon transmission to both phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes and established human leukemic T-cell lines. The virus derived from molecular clone pHXB2 (HIVHTLV-III) productively infected CEMx174 cells. On the other hand, molecular clone pARV (HIVSF2)-derived virus did not show productive infection of CEMx174 cells when used as a cell-free virus. The hybrid HIV containing the 3' end of the genome from pARV and the 5' end of the genome from pHXB2 was effective in infecting CEMx174 cells, but the converse hybrid containing 5' pARV and 3' pHXB2 was not effective in infecting CEMx174 cells. These results suggest that differences in the genes outside of env and nef play a role in the ability of the virus to infect a certain cell type. The intracellular ligation method should be useful in the analysis of related and unrelated HIV-1 isolates with common restriction enzyme cleavage sites. Images PMID:1678438

  11. Specific reactions of different striatal neuron types in morphology induced by quinolinic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qiqi; Ma, Yuxin; Mu, Shuhua; Wu, Jiajia; Chen, Si; Ouyang, Lisi; Lei, Wanlong

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurological degenerative disease and quinolinic acid (QA) has been used to establish HD model in animals through the mechanism of excitotoxicity. Yet the specific pathological changes and the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. We aimed to reveal the specific morphological changes of different striatal neurons in the HD model. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to unilaterally intrastriatal injections of QA to mimic the HD model. Behavioral tests, histochemical and immunhistochemical stainings as well as Western blots were applied in the present study. The results showed that QA-treated rats had obvious motor and cognitive impairments when compared with the control group. Immunohistochemical detection showed a great loss of NeuN+ neurons and Darpp32+ projection neurons in the transition zone in the QA group when compared with the control group. The numbers of parvalbumin (Parv)+ and neuropeptide Y (NPY)+ interneurons were both significantly reduced while those of calretinin (Cr)+ and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)+ were not changed notably in the transition zone in the QA group when compared to the controls. Parv+, NPY+ and ChAT+ interneurons were not significantly increased in fiber density while Cr+ neurons displayed an obvious increase in fiber density in the transition zone in QA-treated rats. The varicosity densities of Parv+, Cr+ and NPY+ interneurons were all raised in the transition zone after QA treatment. In conclusion, the present study revealed that QA induced obvious behavioral changes as well as a general loss of striatal projection neurons and specific morphological changes in different striatal interneurons, which may help further explain the underlying mechanisms and the specific functions of various striatal neurons in the pathological process of HD.

  12. Infant word recognition: Insights from TRACE simulations☆

    PubMed Central

    Mayor, Julien; Plunkett, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The TRACE model of speech perception (McClelland & Elman, 1986) is used to simulate results from the infant word recognition literature, to provide a unified, theoretical framework for interpreting these findings. In a first set of simulations, we demonstrate how TRACE can reconcile apparently conflicting findings suggesting, on the one hand, that consonants play a pre-eminent role in lexical acquisition (Nespor, Peña & Mehler, 2003; Nazzi, 2005), and on the other, that there is a symmetry in infant sensitivity to vowel and consonant mispronunciations of familiar words (Mani & Plunkett, 2007). In a second series of simulations, we use TRACE to simulate infants’ graded sensitivity to mispronunciations of familiar words as reported by White and Morgan (2008). An unexpected outcome is that TRACE fails to demonstrate graded sensitivity for White and Morgan’s stimuli unless the inhibitory parameters in TRACE are substantially reduced. We explore the ramifications of this finding for theories of lexical development. Finally, TRACE mimics the impact of phonological neighbourhoods on early word learning reported by Swingley and Aslin (2007). TRACE offers an alternative explanation of these findings in terms of mispronunciations of lexical items rather than imputing word learning to infants. Together these simulations provide an evaluation of Developmental (Jusczyk, 1993) and Familiarity (Metsala, 1999) accounts of word recognition by infants and young children. The findings point to a role for both theoretical approaches whereby vocabulary structure and content constrain infant word recognition in an experience-dependent fashion, and highlight the continuity in the processes and representations involved in lexical development during the second year of life. PMID:24493907

  13. Rapid export of organic matter to the Mississippi Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Thomas S.; Allison, Mead A.; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Reide Corbett, D.; McKee, Brent A.; Sampere, Troy P.; Wakeham, Stuart G.; Waterson, Elizabeth

    2006-12-01

    Coastal margins, where rivers serve as the dominant control on productivity and delivery of dissolved and particulate materials, have been understudied.The potential importance of certain river-dominated margins (RiOMars), such as those of the Mississippi River plume, to the global carbon budget is garnering increased attention because of their disproportionate role in transporting terrigenous materials to the ocean [Dagg et al., 2004; McKee et al., 2004].This study concludes that labile (readily open to chemical, physical, or biological change) sedimentary organic matter, produced by in situ diatom production in the Mississippi River plume, is rapidly transported to the Mississippi Canyon. Despite the notion that canyon sediments are typically unstable and lack adequate food resources to support significant macrobenthic communities, this study suggests that productive RiOMars are important conduits for transporting fixed carbon from highly productive plume waters on the shelf to deeper benthic communities.

  14. Magnetic field effect on photocurrent in N,N'-di(naphthalene-l-yl)-N,N'-diphenyl-benzidine (NPB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B. K.; Chen, W. J.; Lam, M. K.; Cheah, K. W.; Wang, J. N.

    2009-11-01

    We studied organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) and magneto-photocurrent (MPC) in ITO/N,N'-di(naphthalene-l-yl)-N,N'-diplienyl-benzidine (NPB)/A1 sandwich devices with NPB thicknesses of 50 nm. Without illumination, no OMAR is observable. While the MPC curves are found to have different line shapes containing a low field and a high field component, depending on excitation photon energy and applied bias. The analysis of experimental results indicate that: (i) the magnetic field effects in NPB is associated with excitonic states, and (ii) the dissociation of singlet excitons is associated to the high field component and triplet-exciton-charge interaction is to the low field component in MPC curves.

  15. Separating Positive and Negative Magnetoresistance in Organic Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, F. L.; Wagemans, W.; Kemerink, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2007-12-01

    We study the transition between positive and negative organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in tris-(8 hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3), in order to identify the elementary mechanisms governing this phenomenon. We show how the sign of OMAR changes as function of the applied voltage and temperature. The transition from negative to positive magnetoresistance (MR) is found to be accompanied by an increase in slope of log⁡(I) versus log⁡(V). ac admittance measurements show this transition coincides with the onset of minority charge (hole) injection in the device. All these observations are consistent with two simultaneous contributions with opposite sign of MR, which may be assigned to holes and electrons having different magnetic field responses.

  16. Unraveling the temperature and voltage dependence of magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Paul; Wouters, Steinar H. W.; Cox, Matthijs; Koopmans, Bert

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, it was discovered that the current through an organic semiconductor, sandwiched between two non-magnetic electrodes, can be changed significantly by applying a small magnetic field. This surprisingly large magnetoresistance effect, often dubbed as organic magnetoresistance (OMAR), has puzzled the young field of organic spintronics during the last decade. Here, we present a detailed study on the voltage and temperature dependence of OMAR, aiming to unravel the lineshapes of the magnetic field effects and thereby gain a deeper fundamental understanding of the underlying microscopic mechanism. Using a full quantitative analysis of the lineshapes, we are able to extract all linewidth parameters and the voltage and temperature dependencies are explained with a recently proposed trion mechanism. Moreover, explicit microscopic simulations show a qualitative agreement to the experimental results.

  17. Sliding wear resistance of epoxy polymers against stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Spinks, G.M.; Dimovski, L.; Samandi, M.

    1993-12-31

    The wear mechanisms occurring during sliding contact between epoxy resins and a smooth steel counterface have been investigated. The samples were prepared from a commercial diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy and cured with various hardeners. The cured resins displayed a wide range of mechanical properties (particularly fracture toughness), and crosslink densities. The wear rates of the samples were found to vary by up to four orders of magnitude. It was found that the wear rates correlated to the inverse of the fracture toughness, which was in accord with previous studies on the wear of plastics by Omar et al. The mechanism was found to involve an ``adhesive/fatigue`` process, as proposed by Omar. Additionally, it was found that the addition of a rubber toughening agent had no effect on the wear rate, whilst sliding contact between polymer and polymer resulted in a much higher rate of wear. Possible explanations for this behavior are given.

  18. Multiscale Simulations of Barrier and Aging Properties of Polymer Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-29

    Complexation Between Weakly Basic Dendrimers and Linear Polyelectrolytes: Effects of Chain Stiffness, Grafts, and pOH,” Thomas Lewis, Gunja Pandav, Ahmad Omar...November 2012. (c) Presentations 20.0010/29/2013 Venkat Ganesan, Thomas Lewis. Interactions between Grafted Cationic Dendrimers and Anionic Bilayer... dendrimers have shown great promise in drug and gene therapy applications. Despite the advantages realized through positively charged dendrimers , a

  19. Cooperative Navigation for Low-bandwidth Mobile Acoustic Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    pages 1–7, Durham, NH. Williams, S. and Mahon, I. (2004). Simultaneous localisation and mapping on the great barrier reef . In Proceedings of the IEEE... Barrier Reef (Williams and Mahon, 2004). AUVs require robust navigation algorithms to safely operate in such hostile environments and geo-reference the...few folks I met, Ryan, Ellen, Omar, and Sills, thank you for loads of laughs and heaps of great memories. All friends, past and present, get a job! And

  20. Differential Expression of Zinc Transporters in Prostate Epithelia of Racial Groups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Omar Bagasra. The Effects of Zinc Accumulation pertaining to Diabetes in the African American community vs. other racial populations Claflin...The role of zinc and zinc transporters in the pathogenesis of Diabetes Mellitus: Health disparity addressed on the bases of race and the environment...carcinogenesis” PI: Larisa Noon Co-I: Andre Kajdacsy-Balla and O. Bagasra Period: 2012- 2017 $2.2M/5 yrs CONCLUSION This was a Synergy grant

  1. Organic magnetoresistance based on hopping theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fu-Jiang; Xie, Shi-Jie

    2014-09-01

    For the organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) effect, we suggest a spin-related hopping of carriers (polarons) based on Marcus theory. The mobility of polarons is calculated with the master equation (ME) and then the magnetoresistance (MR) is obtained. The theoretical results are consistent with the experimental observation. Especially, the sign inversion of the MR under different driving bias voltages found in the experiment is predicted. Besides, the effects of molecule disorder, hyperfine interaction (HFI), polaron localization, and temperature on the MR are investigated.

  2. MIZEX. A Program for Mesoscale Air-Ice-Ocean Interaction Experiments in Arctic Marginal Ice Zones. I. Research Strategy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    ol scatterometer and radiometer op- back to the ship, of the wind, wave , and current erating at the same frequency following Living- forces acting on...Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, Washington Robert Paquette Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California Omar Shemdin Jet Propulsion Laboratory...BERING-79 (Bauer and Martin, foundly influence hemispheric climate and have a 1980) and BERING-81, east Greenland wave -ice significant effect on petroleum

  3. The Unintended Consequences of Killing Civilians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-17

    intelligence on the growing insurgencies), who then made recommendations to military prison cadre on deprivations which supposedly coaxed the prisoners...Fakhriyah, asked a neighbor if Abeer could start sleeping in their home because she believed her daughter was in danger. The neighbor, Omar Janabi...Hermann Knell, a teenager at the time of the Wurzburg attack (a city of 107,000 inhabitants which was 89% destroyed), survived the bombings and

  4. Sexual Functioning During Menopause: Schemas, Hormones, and Race

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-08

    John Wu and Mr. Omar Larco lent their expertise in performing the ELISA hormone assays. I also would like to thank all the individuals who allowed me...theorists have postulated that schema formation may be linked to early attachment experiences ( Bowlby , 1969). Schemas are thought to form at a young...population study. Maturitas, 34(1), 17-23. Bowlby , J. (1969). Attachment and loss (vol 1) Attachment. New York: Basic Books. Bowles, C. (1986

  5. Elevated brain cannabinoid CB1 receptor availability in post-traumatic stress disorder: a positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Neumeister, A; Normandin, M D; Pietrzak, R H; Piomelli, D; Zheng, M Q; Gujarro-Anton, A; Potenza, M N; Bailey, C R; Lin, S F; Najafzadeh, S; Ropchan, J; Henry, S; Corsi-Travali, S; Carson, R E; Huang, Y

    2013-09-01

    Endocannabinoids and their attending cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor have been implicated in animal models of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, their specific role has not been studied in people with PTSD. Herein, we present an in vivo imaging study using positron emission tomography (PET) and the CB1-selective radioligand [(11)C]OMAR in individuals with PTSD, and healthy controls with lifetime histories of trauma (trauma-exposed controls (TC)) and those without such histories (healthy controls (HC)). Untreated individuals with PTSD (N=25) with non-combat trauma histories, and TC (N=12) and HC (N=23) participated in a magnetic resonance imaging scan and a resting PET scan with the CB1 receptor antagonist radiotracer [(11)C]OMAR, which measures the volume of distribution (VT) linearly related to CB1 receptor availability. Peripheral levels of anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, oleoylethanolamide, palmitoylethanolamide and cortisol were also assessed. In the PTSD group, relative to the HC and TC groups, we found elevated brain-wide [(11)C]OMAR VT values (F(2,53)=7.96, P=0.001; 19.5% and 14.5% higher, respectively), which were most pronounced in women (F(1,53)=5.52, P=0.023). Anandamide concentrations were reduced in the PTSD relative to the TC (53.1% lower) and HC (58.2% lower) groups. Cortisol levels were lower in the PTSD and TC groups relative to the HC group. Three biomarkers examined collectively--OMAR VT, anandamide and cortisol--correctly classified nearly 85% of PTSD cases. These results suggest that abnormal CB1 receptor-mediated anandamide signaling is implicated in the etiology of PTSD, and provide a promising neurobiological model to develop novel, evidence-based pharmacotherapies for this disorder.

  6. Developing Malaysian Ocean Wave Database Using Satellite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    Malaysia , Johor Bahru. Shinkai A. and Wan S., (1996). Statistical Characteristics of the Global Wave Statistics Data and Long-term Predictions, ASME, Japan. ...5535700 Fax: +607-5574710 Email: omar@fkm.utm.my KEY WORDS: altimetry, statistics , wave periods, wave heights ABSTRACT. Correct wave data ...develop a more reliable and comprehensive wave database for Malaysia sea areas using satellite altimetry. Significant wave height data is extracted

  7. Libya: Unrest and U.S. Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-25

    reflected in the celebration of the legacy of the anti- colonial figure Omar al Mukhtar during the current uprising. Prior to the recent unrest...Administration, Global Security, The Making of Modern Libya ( Ali Abdullatif Ahmida, State University of New York Press, 1994). Edited by CRS. Libya...with his counterpart Ali al Issawi working to secure international recognition of and support for the ITNC and the broader opposition movement they

  8. Vortex Simulation of Turbulent Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-19

    TURBULENT COMBUSTION (AFOSR Grant No. 89-0491) Principal Investigator: Ahmed F. Ghoniem Department of Mechanical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of...Heavy Industries, Nagoya, Japan.(talk and discussion). 17. 1990, Mazda Motor Co., Yokohama, Japan, (talk and discussion). 18. 1990, American Math Society...VORTICITY LAYERS UNDER NON-SYMMETRIC CONDITIONS Omar M. Kniot and Ahmed F. Ghoniem Department of Mechanical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of

  9. U.S. Army Public Affairs Knowledges and Skills Required to Perform Domestic Support Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    USACE), Lt. Col. Dick Devlin (USAPAC), Lt. Col. Bruce Roy ( CANG ), Lt. Col. T. Youngbluth (USADOMS), Maj. Robert Dunlap (NGB), Maj. Kevin Murphy (USMC...soldiers were doing similar work in Hawaii following Hurricane Iniki; 161 Guam Army National Guard soldiers were at work in Guam following Typhoon Omar...the needs and interests of America and local communities" (8-1). Included in community assistance are national efforts such as public works maintenance

  10. U.S. and Chinese Scientists Discuss the Ocean's Response to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiMarco, Steven F.; Wu, Dexing

    2009-04-01

    Climate Change and Coastal Oceans Workshop; Qingdao, China, 26-28 October 2008; A 3-day workshop was held in China to discuss coastal ocean processes, the biogeochemistry of large river-dominated ocean margins (RiOMars), and climate change and variability studies; to formulate a strategy for a joint venture to assess how climate change has affected coastal oceans; and to predict the ocean's response to future change scenarios. The workshop, which brought together experts from Texas A&M University (TAMU) and five Chinese universities and institutes—Ocean University of China (OUC), Institute of Oceanology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IOCAS), Xiamen University (XU), Tianjin University of Science and Technology (TUST), and East China Normal University (ECNU), highlighted the similarities in topics important to North America and Asia. As indicated by the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report, climate change imposes far-reaching challenges on society. This workshop focused on two large, river-dominated coastal environments: the Mississippi-Atchafalaya system and the Changjiang estuary. Numerous parallels exist between the impacts of the Changjiang on the East China Sea and the Mississippi on the Gulf of Mexico. These RiOMars are ideal for examining the impacts of climate change because they are characterized by large, heavily populated watersheds in two countries that are important in determining the human carbon footprint. The hydrology, biodiversity, and geochemical characteristics of these systems have been greatly influenced by land use and regional-scale climate change. Workshop participants reviewed current progress in understanding physical and biogeochemical processes controlling the two RiOMars, brainstormed challenges in developing a multidisciplinary system capable of assessing and predicting impacts of global climate change on these RiOMars, and identified a multifaceted approach to address these challenges.

  11. Time-stratigraphic aspects of a formation: Interpretation of surficial Pleistocene deposits by analogy with Holocene paralic deposits, southeastern Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarest, J. M.; Biggs, R. B.; Kraft, J. C.

    1981-08-01

    Pleistocene shoreline deposits in close spatial and temporal proximity to Holocene deposits permit detailed interpretation of the development of Pleistocene coastal deposits when a modern-ancient analog approach is used. Peak sea levels during the past 1 m.y. or more have allowed the preservation of transgressive shoreline systems, here referred to as paralic units, along the inner continental margin. These Pleistocene paralic units are similar to Holocene coastal deposits now forming on Delmarva Peninsula. The Omar Formation (early to late Pleistocene age) incorporates at least four juxtaposed, transgressive, paralic units of different ages, each containing deposits of lagoonal sands and muds, tidal marsh, barrier sands and gravels, tidal delta sands and silty sands, and tidal channel sands and gravels. The successive paralic units become younger in the seaward direction. Thus, although the Omar Formation in the study area is almost entirely made up of transgressive deposits produced during rising sea levels, in a longer time frame it forms a progradational sequence. Only about 2% to 5% of the elapsed time during the deposition of the studied part of the Omar Formation is represented by sedimentary units. The internal time-stratigraphy of the Omar Formation is extremely complex. This makes the time-stratigraphic interpretation of any one outcrop or drill hole difficult. Any lithologic change may represent a wide variety of time gaps, from minutes to tens of thousands of years. The analog approach, in which sedimentary lithosome mapping is used, allows one to infer a time-stratigraphic framework of the deposits. These concepts can aid in the interpretation of depositional history of older paralic deposits and the nature of the development of certain types of clastic formations.

  12. De-Radicalization of Muslim Communities in the UK

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    extremism, the Muslim community has to develop a stronger message. What is needed is an idea that not only can change the general mindset, but which...Husain, in his childhood, was a soft-spoken kid . During his days at Sir William Burrough School, he experienced two incidents that left indelible... developed friendships with gangs of Muslim youth who hung out on street corners in the evenings. Hizb clerics like Omar Bakri also tried to drive a wedge

  13. Arboviral Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illnesses in Western South America, 2000-2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Manuel Cespedes2, Jorge Vargas3, Alberto Gianella3, Efrain Vallejo4, César Madrid5, Nicolas Aguayo6, Eduardo Gotuzzo7, Victor Suarez2, Ana Maria...Jorochito), Omar Camargo (SEDES Trinidad), Simar Del Villar (Hospital Municipal César Banzer), Simon Delgado (Centro de Salud, Eterazama), Roxana Loayza...Guayaquil), Franklin Delgado (Hospital Naval, Guayaquil) Peru. Javier Acha (Clı́nica Naval, Iquitos), Jorge Aldazabal (Dirección Regional de Salud de Madre

  14. Protocol Programmability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Michael Maass, Ligia Nistor, Larry Maccherone, Cyrus Omar, Ivan Ruchkin, Jason Tsay, and YoungSeok Yoon. Thank you to former students and post-docs... Baumgartner , and Michal Young. Compiler and tool support for debugging object protocols. In Proceedings of the 8th ACM SIGSOFT International Symposium...ACM. 2.1 Michael Hoppe and Stefan Hanenberg. Do developers benefit from generic types?: An empirical comparison of generic and raw types in java. In

  15. Strategic Leadership: It Doesn’t Take a Bully.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    every level of leadership. After unsuccessful attempts to modify performance, by training and mentoring subordinates, changes in methodology are...is responsible for establishing a climate or environment conducive of maximum effort. So the leaders’ job is to inspire, motivate, and set the...course for mission success. To be the example and provide the climate for all within the organization to reach their full potential. General Omar

  16. Organic magnetoresistance under resonant ac drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, R. C.; Raikh, M. E.

    2013-09-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment, we develop a theory of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in the presence of a resonant ac drive. To this end, we perform a thorough analysis of the dynamics of ac-driven electron-hole polaron pair in magnetic field, which is a sum of external and random hyperfine fields. Resonant ac drive affects the OMAR by modifying the singlet content of the eigenmodes. This, in turn, leads to the change of recombination rate, and ultimately, to the change of the spin-blocking that controls the current. Our analysis demonstrates that, upon increasing the drive amplitude, the blocking eigenmodes of the triplet type acquire a singlet admixture and become unblocking. Most surprisingly, the opposite process goes in parallel: new blocking modes emerge from nonblocking precursors as the drive increases. These emergent blocking modes are similar to subradiant modes in the Dicke effect. A nontrivial evolution of eigenmodes translates into a nontrivial behavior of OMAR with the amplitude of the ac drive: it is initially linear, then passes through a maximum, drops, and finally saturates.

  17. The Effects of Fringe Fields on Organic Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Nicholas; Macià, Ferran; Wang, Fujian; Wohlgenannt, Markus; Kent, Andrew; Flatté, Michael

    2013-03-01

    The importance of random hyperfine fields is now widely acknowledged as a vital ingredient for the phenomena of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR). Recent experiments (Phys. Rev. X 2 021013 (2012)) have shown that another type of random field - fringe fields due to a nearby ferromagnet - can also dramatically affect magnetoconductivity. A theoretical analysis of the fringe field OMAR is challenging due to the different properties of the fringe fields when compared to the hyperfine fields. For instance, the range of fringe field strengths is 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than that of the hyperfine couplings. The correlation length between fringe fields is also larger by the same degree. We use a recent theory of OMAR that is well-suited to numerically calculate the magnetoresistance with both hyperfine and fringe fields present. We find agreement with key features of experimental fringe-field magnetoresistance dependences on applied magnetic field, including the field values of extrema of the magnetoresistance, the region of large magnetoresistance effects from the fringe fields, and the sign of the effect. This work was supported by an ARO MURI.

  18. Frequency dependence of magnetoresistance in MEH-PPV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdem Djidjou, Thaddee; Nguyen, Tho; Valy Vardeny, Z.; Rogachev, Andrey

    2012-02-01

    The organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) made of MEH-PPV was investigated by means of DC transport and the admittance spectroscopy in the range of 1 Hz to 10 MHz at room temperature. The measurements were carried out on unipolar and bipolar OLEDs made of pristine MEH-PPV as well as MEH-PPV with traps introduced by the UV light irradiation. We found that in bipolar, UV-exposed OLEDs, the magnitude of magnetoresistance effect in real part of admittance increases with DC bias, reaches very high value of 35 % (in the field 30mT) at bias 4.8 V and decreases at higher bias voltages. Also, we observed that the cutoff frequency of OMAR effect monotonically increases with DC bias voltage. The cutoff has extrinsic origin and is likely caused by a dissipative process related to the reorientation of permanent dipoles. At the highest tested bias voltage 6.7 V, we were able to detect the OMAR at the highest frequency of our system, 10 MHz. We have found that imaginary part of the admittance is also affected by magnetic field. The effect of magnetic field on dynamical capacitance of the device at low frequencies is very strong and opens up a possibility of using these devices as magnetic field sensors.

  19. Striatal GDNF Production Is Independent to Circulating Estradiol Level Despite Pan-Neuronal Activation in the Female Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Enterría-Morales, Daniel; López-López, Ivette; López-Barneo, José; d’Anglemont de Tassigny, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Gender difference in Parkinson’s disease (PD) suggests that female sex steroids may promote dopaminergic neuron survival and protect them from degeneration. The glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is believed to be dopaminotrophic; thus it is considered as a potential therapeutic target in PD. Additionally, GDNF is endogenously synthetized in the caudate/putamen of humans and striatum in rodents. A neuroprotective role of estrogens on the nigrostriatal pathway via the stimulation of GDNF has been proposed. Since the GDNF-producing parvalbumin (Parv) interneurons express the estrogen receptor alpha in the mouse striatum, we sought to determine whether ectopic estrogenic compound modulates the GDNF synthesis in mice. Using an ovariectomized-estradiol (E2) replacement regimen, which reliably generates a rise of plasma estradiol, we assessed the effects of different levels of E2 on the activation of striatal neuronal populations, and GDNF production. A strong correlation was found between plasma E2 and the expression of the immediate early gene cFos in the striatum, as well as in other cortical regions. However, moderate and high E2 treatments failed to induce any striatal GDNF mRNA and protein synthesis. High E2 only stimulates cFos induction in a low percentage of striatal Parv neurons whereas the majority of cFos-positive cells are medium spiny neurons. Activation of these projecting neurons by E2 suggests a role of circulating sex steroids in the modulation of striatal neural pathways. PMID:27741271

  20. Striatal GDNF Production Is Independent to Circulating Estradiol Level Despite Pan-Neuronal Activation in the Female Mouse.

    PubMed

    Enterría-Morales, Daniel; López-López, Ivette; López-Barneo, José; d'Anglemont de Tassigny, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Gender difference in Parkinson's disease (PD) suggests that female sex steroids may promote dopaminergic neuron survival and protect them from degeneration. The glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is believed to be dopaminotrophic; thus it is considered as a potential therapeutic target in PD. Additionally, GDNF is endogenously synthetized in the caudate/putamen of humans and striatum in rodents. A neuroprotective role of estrogens on the nigrostriatal pathway via the stimulation of GDNF has been proposed. Since the GDNF-producing parvalbumin (Parv) interneurons express the estrogen receptor alpha in the mouse striatum, we sought to determine whether ectopic estrogenic compound modulates the GDNF synthesis in mice. Using an ovariectomized-estradiol (E2) replacement regimen, which reliably generates a rise of plasma estradiol, we assessed the effects of different levels of E2 on the activation of striatal neuronal populations, and GDNF production. A strong correlation was found between plasma E2 and the expression of the immediate early gene cFos in the striatum, as well as in other cortical regions. However, moderate and high E2 treatments failed to induce any striatal GDNF mRNA and protein synthesis. High E2 only stimulates cFos induction in a low percentage of striatal Parv neurons whereas the majority of cFos-positive cells are medium spiny neurons. Activation of these projecting neurons by E2 suggests a role of circulating sex steroids in the modulation of striatal neural pathways.

  1. SU-E-I-26: The CT Compatibility of a Novel Direction Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT) Tandem Applicator for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Elzibak, A; Safigholi, H; Soliman, A; Ravi, A; Song, WY; Kager, P; Han, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To examine CT metal image artifact from a novel direction-modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator (95% tungsten) for cervical cancer using a commercially available orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) algorithm. Comparison to a conventional stainless steel applicator is also performed. Methods: Each applicator was placed in a water-filled phantom resembling the female pelvis and scanned in a Philips Brilliance 16-slice CT scanner using two pelvis protocols: a typical clinical protocol (120kVp, 16×0.75mm collimation, 0.692 pitch, 1.0s rotation, 350mm field of view (FOV), 600mAs, 1.5mm slices) and a protocol with a higher kVp and mAs setting useful for larger patients (140kVp, 16×0.75mm collimation, 0.688 pitch, 1.5s rotation, 350mm FOV, 870mAs, 1.5mm slices). Images of each tandem were acquired with and without the application of the O-MAR algorithm. Baseline scans of the phantom (no applicator) were also collected. CT numbers were quantified at distances from 5 to 30 mm away from the applicator’s edge (in increments of 5mm) using measurements at eight angles around the applicator, on three consecutive slices. Results: While the presence of both applicators degraded image quality, the DMBT applicator resulted in larger streaking artifacts and dark areas in the image compared to the stainless steel applicator. Application of the O-MAR algorithm improved all acquired images, both visually and quantitatively. The use of low and high kVp and mAs settings (120 kVp/600mAs and 140 kVp/870mAs) in conjunction with the O-MAR algorithm lead to similar CT numbers in the vicinity of the applicator and a similar reduction of the induced metal artifact. Conclusion: This work indicated that metal artifacts induced by the DMBT and the stainless steel applicator are greatly reduced when using the O-MAR algorithm, leading to better quality phantom images. The use of a high dose protocol provided similar improvements in metal artifacts compared to the

  2. Comparison of the myoplasmic calcium transient elicited by an action potential in intact fibres of mdx and normal mice.

    PubMed

    Hollingworth, Stephen; Zeiger, Ulrike; Baylor, Stephen M

    2008-11-01

    The myoplasmic free [Ca2+] transient elicited by an action potential (Delta[Ca2+]) was compared in fast-twitch fibres of mdx (dystrophin null) and normal mice. Methods were used that maximized the likelihood that any detected differences apply in vivo. Small bundles of fibres were manually dissected from extensor digitorum longus muscles of 7- to 14-week-old mice. One fibre within a bundle was microinjected with furaptra, a low-affinity rapidly responding fluorescent calcium indicator. A fibre was accepted for study if it gave a stable, all-or-nothing fluorescence response to an external shock. In 18 normal fibres, the peak amplitude and the full-duration at half-maximum (FDHM) of Delta[Ca2+] were 18.4 +/- 0.5 microm and 4.9 +/- 0.2 ms, respectively (mean +/- s.e.m.; 16 degrees C). In 13 mdx fibres, the corresponding values were 14.5 +/- 0.6 microm and 4.7 +/- 0.2 ms. The difference in amplitude is statistically highly significant (P = 0.0001; two-tailed t test), whereas the difference in FDHM is not (P = 0.3). A multi-compartment computer model was used to estimate the amplitude and time course of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release flux underlying Delta[Ca2+]. Estimates were made based on several differing assumptions: (i) that the resting myoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]R) and the total concentration of parvalbumin ([Parv(T)]) are the same in mdx and normal fibres, (ii) that [Ca2+](R) is larger in mdx fibres, (iii) that [Parv(T)] is smaller in mdx fibres, and (iv) that [Ca2+]R is larger and [Parv(T)] is smaller in mdx fibres. According to the simulations, the 21% smaller amplitude of Delta[Ca2+] in mdx fibres in combination with the unchanged FDHM of Delta[Ca2+] is consistent with mdx fibres having a approximately 25% smaller flux amplitude, a 6-23% larger FDHM of the flux, and a 9-20% smaller total amount of released Ca2+ than normal fibres. The changes in flux are probably due to a change in the gating of the SR Ca2+-release channels and

  3. Geochemistry and geochronology of carbonate-hosted base metal deposits in the southern Brooks Range, Alaska: temporal association with VMS deposits and metallogenic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Karen; Slack, John; Selby, David

    2009-01-01

    The Brooks Range contains enormous accumulations of zinc and copper, either as VMS or sediment-hosted deposits. The Ruby Creek and Omar deposits are Cu-Co stratabound deposits associated with dolomitic breccias. Numerous volcanogenic Cu-Zn (+/-Ag, Au) deposits are situated ~20 km north of the Ruby Creek deposit. The carbonate-hosted deposits consist of chalcopyrite and bornite that fill open spaces, replace the matrix of the breccias, and occur in later cross-cutting veins. Cobaltiferous pyrite, chalcocite, minor tennantite-tetrahedrite, galena, and sphalerite are also present. At Ruby Creek, phases such as carrollite, renierite, and germanite occur rarely. The deposits have undergone post-depositional metamorphism (Ruby Creek, low greenschist facies; Omar, blueschist facies). The unusual geochemical signature includes Cu-Co +/- Ag, As, Au, Bi, Ge, Hg, Sb, and U with sporadic high Re concentrations (up to 2.7 ppm). New Re-Os data were obtained for chalcopyrite, bornite, and pyrite from the Ruby Creek deposit (analyses of sulfides from Omar are in progress). The data show extremely high Re abundances (hundreds of ppb, low ppm) and contain essentially no common Os. The Re-Os data provide the first absolute ages of ore formation for the Ruby Creek deposit and demonstrate that the Re-Os systematics of pyrite, chalcopyrite, and bornite are unaffected by greenschist metamorphism. The Re-Os data show that the main phase of Cu mineralization occurred at 384 +/-4.2 Ma, which coincides with zircon U-Pb ages from igneous rocks that are spatially and genetically associated with VMS deposits. This suggests a temporal link between regional magmatism and hydrothermal mineralization.

  4. Rapid Changes in CB1 Receptor Availability in Cannabis Dependent Males after Abstinence from Cannabis

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Deepak Cyril; Cortes-Briones, Jose A.; Ranganathan, Mohini; Thurnauer, Halle; Creatura, Gina; Surti, Toral; Planeta, Beata; Neumeister, Alexander; Pittman, Brian; Normandin, Marc; Kapinos, Michael; Ropchan, Jim; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E.; Skosnik, Patrick D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The widespread use of cannabis, the increasing legalization of “medical” cannabis, the increasing potency of cannabis and the growing recreational use of synthetic cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) full agonists underscores the importance of elucidating the effects of cannabinoids on the CB1R system. Exposure to cannabinoids is known to result in CB1R downregulation. However, the precise time course of changes in CB1R availability in cannabis dependent subjects (CDs) following short and intermediate term abstinence has not been determined. Methods Using High Resolution Research Tomography (HRRT) and [11C]OMAR, CB1R availability as indexed by the volume of distribution (VT) [11C]OMAR was measured in male CDs (n=11) and matched healthy controls (HCs) (n=19). CDs were scanned at baseline (while they were neither intoxicated nor in withdrawal), and after 2 days and 28 days of monitored abstinence. HCs were scanned at baseline and a subset (n=4) was rescanned 28 days later. Results Compared to HCs, [11C]OMAR VT was 15% lower in CDs (effect size Cohen’s d=−1.11) at baseline in almost all brain regions. However, these group differences in CB1R availability were no longer evident after just 2 days of monitored abstinence from cannabis. There was a robust negative correlation between CB1R availability and withdrawal symptoms after 2 days of abstinence. Finally, there were no significant group differences in CB1R availability in CDs after 28 days of abstinence. Conclusions Cannabis dependence is associated with CB1R downregulation, which begins to reverse surprisingly rapidly upon termination of cannabis use and may continue to increase over time. PMID:26858993

  5. WE-D-18A-01: Evaluation of Three Commercial Metal Artifact Reduction Methods for CT Simulations in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J; Kerns, J; Nute, J; Liu, X; Stingo, F; Followill, D; Mirkovic, D; Howell, R; Kry, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate three commercial metal artifact reduction methods (MAR) in the context of radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods: Three MAR strategies were evaluated: Philips O-MAR, monochromatic imaging using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) dual energy CT, and monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software (GSIMARs). The Gammex RMI 467 tissue characterization phantom with several metal rods and two anthropomorphic phantoms (pelvic phantom with hip prosthesis and head phantom with dental fillings), were scanned with and without (baseline) metals. Each MAR method was evaluated based on CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and reduction in the severity of streak artifacts. CT number difference maps between the baseline and metal scan images were calculated, and the severity of streak artifacts was quantified using the percentage of pixels with >40 HU error (“bad pixels”). Results: Philips O-MAR generally reduced HU errors in the RMI phantom. However, increased errors and induced artifacts were observed for lung materials. GSI monochromatic 70keV images generally showed similar HU errors as 120kVp imaging, while 140keV images reduced errors. GSI-MARs systematically reduced errors compared to GSI monochromatic imaging. All imaging techniques preserved the diameter of a stainless steel rod to within ±1.6mm (2 pixels). For the hip prosthesis, O-MAR reduced the average % bad pixels from 47% to 32%. For GSI 140keV imaging, the percent of bad pixels was reduced from 37% to 29% compared to 120kVp imaging, while GSI-MARs further reduced it to 12%. For the head phantom, none of the MAR methods were particularly successful. Conclusion: The three MAR methods all improve CT images for treatment planning to some degree, but none of them are globally effective for all conditions. The MAR methods were successful for large metal implants in a homogeneous environment (hip prosthesis) but were not successful for the more complicated case of dental

  6. Rapid Changes in CB1 Receptor Availability in Cannabis Dependent Males after Abstinence from Cannabis.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Deepak Cyril; Cortes-Briones, Jose A; Ranganathan, Mohini; Thurnauer, Halle; Creatura, Gina; Surti, Toral; Planeta, Beata; Neumeister, Alexander; Pittman, Brian; Normandin, Marc; Kapinos, Michael; Ropchan, Jim; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E; Skosnik, Patrick D

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of cannabis, the increasing legalization of "medical" cannabis, the increasing potency of cannabis and the growing recreational use of synthetic cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) full agonists underscores the importance of elucidating the effects of cannabinoids on the CB1R system. Exposure to cannabinoids is known to result in CB1R downregulation. However, the precise time course of changes in CB1R availability in cannabis dependent subjects (CDs) following short and intermediate term abstinence has not been determined. Using High Resolution Research Tomography (HRRT) and [(11)C]OMAR, CB1R availability as indexed by the volume of distribution (VT) [(11)C]OMAR was measured in male CDs (n=11) and matched healthy controls (HCs) (n=19). CDs were scanned at baseline (while they were neither intoxicated nor in withdrawal), and after 2 days and 28 days of monitored abstinence. HCs were scanned at baseline and a subset (n=4) was rescanned 28 days later. Compared to HCs, [(11)C]OMAR VT was 15% lower in CDs (effect size Cohen's d=-1.11) at baseline in almost all brain regions. However, these group differences in CB1R availability were no longer evident after just 2 days of monitored abstinence from cannabis. There was a robust negative correlation between CB1R availability and withdrawal symptoms after 2 days of abstinence. Finally, there were no significant group differences in CB1R availability in CDs after 28 days of abstinence. Cannabis dependence is associated with CB1R downregulation, which begins to reverse surprisingly rapidly upon termination of cannabis use and may continue to increase over time.

  7. Competing Mechanisms in Organic Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, Bert

    2013-03-01

    A surprisingly large ``organic magnetoresistance'' (OMAR) has been found in both polymers and small molecule organic semiconductors at relatively small applied magnetic fields (~ 5 mT) and at room temperature. Unlike spin-injection devices, where the occurrence of a finite spin polarization of the current is essential for measuring a finite magnetoresistance, OMAR is generally considered to be due to spin correlations between spin carrying particles in the organic material. Although the microscopic mechanisms of hyperfine field induced spin mixing are relatively well understood, it is still intensively debated which particles are involved and how they can affect the current in such a drastic manner. In this presentation recent developments and new insights as to the underlying physics are discussed. Quantitative models will be introduced, based on different pairs of particles and mechanisms, and giving rise to effects at a variety of field scales. It will be discussed how specific device physics causes a non-trivial relation between microscopic spin-dependent reactions and macroscopic device behaviour. Finally, it will be shown how comprehensive studies on especially engineered organic systems, including polymer-fullerene blends and molecular doping, can be used to pinpoint the relevance of different mechanisms in the complementary regimes. The experimentally observed linewidth, sign and amplitude of both ``high-field'' (>100 mT) and ``low-field'' (~ 5 mT) effects, as well as their bias voltage dependence display very pronounced features as a function of fullerene doping. They provide unique fingerprints for which mechanism is of relevance. After careful analysis, this allows for identification of three earlier proposed mechanisms, involving exciton-charge, electron-hole and bipolaron (polarons of like charge) reactions. Present activities are aiming at using this insight for tailoring OMAR response by design.

  8. CTC Sentinel. Volume 6, Issue 10

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    2013. 17 Ibid. Omar al-Nabhan was the nephew of the late Saleh al-Nabhan, an al-Qa`ida operative in East Africa who served as a military trainer for...September 30, 2013; “Number of Somali Refugees in Horn of Africa Passes 1 Million Mark,” Unit- ed Nations Refugee Agency, July 17, 2012. the African Union...information to paint a rough sketch of these foreign fighters. The majority of the 20 identified Dutch foreign fighters came from Moroccan , Somali

  9. Field trips tour southern California and Colorado. Front page, 1986. Formal report

    SciTech Connect

    Baughman, G.; Cunningham, M.; Sarles, J.

    1987-02-01

    Groups visited Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve and a nearby light oil stream flood operation. Groups toured the Omar Hill cogeneration plant and the wind farms of Tehachapi. Groups toured Platform Edith and held discussions on issues surrounding offshore oil drilling/production. Groups visited the Cool Water Coal Gasification Plant (Solar One and SEGS-1) and listened to discussions on desert land use issues. In Denver, groups toured the Cross Gold Mine. Wrap-up sessions were held, followed by tours of Solar Energy Research Institute labs in Golden, CO.

  10. GOES-R Prelaunch News Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-17

    Members of the news media attend a Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) prelaunch news conference in the Kennedy Space Center's Press Site auditorium in Florida. NASA and industry leaders include: Michael Curie, of NASA Communications; Stephen Volz, assistant administrator for satellite and information services, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA's); Greg Mandt, GOES-R system program director, NOAA; Sandra Smalley, director, Joint Agency Satellite Division, NASA Headquarters; Omar Baez, launch director, NASA Kennedy; Scott Messer, program manager, NASA Missions, United Launch Alliance; and Clay Flinn, launch weather officer, 4th Weather Squadron, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

  11. The Operational Use of Intelligence: What to Avoid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-13

    sme c -=st returned from France where they had completed test pilot scnool inl the Mirage F-I ED. While it ma- be a lac: of a -ata base. there is am... testing _.ecit:c ar :a c e-emv . Satfo rms versus a c omaratIve ana , sis o - U aniail it es Finally. EEls need a definite Driorit, _evelcomert and M -7,e...the necessary experience since they worked closely with or were Previous pilots who hat usec these munitions in test and during training exercises. A

  12. KSC-2009-5238

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-25

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At a post-launch news conference for the media about launch of the Space Tracking and Satellite System – Demonstrator spacecraft, NASA Launch Manager Omar Baez, at center, responds to a question. At right is Rear Adm. Joseph Horn, deputy director, with the U.S. Missile Defense Agency. At left, Public Affairs Officer Tracy Young moderates. The STSS-Demo is a space-based sensor component of a layered Ballistic Missile Defense System designed for the overall mission of detecting, tracking and discriminating ballistic missiles. The spacecraft was launched by NASA for the U.S. Missile Defense Agency. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  13. KSC-2009-5239

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-25

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At a post-launch news conference for the media about launch of the Space Tracking and Satellite System – Demonstrator spacecraft, Rear Adm. Joseph Horn, deputy director with the U.S. Missile Defense Agency, answers a question. NASA Launch Manager Omar Baez is at center. At left, Public Affairs Officer Tracy Young moderates. The STSS-Demo is a space-based sensor component of a layered Ballistic Missile Defense System designed for the overall mission of detecting, tracking and discriminating ballistic missiles. The spacecraft was launched by NASA for the U.S. Missile Defense Agency. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  14. KSC-2009-5237

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-25

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Public Affairs Officer Tracy Young moderates a post-launch news conference for the media about the Space Tracking and Satellite System – Demonstrator spacecraft. Seated at center is Omar Baez, NASA launch manager, and Rear Adm. Joseph Horn, deputy director, with the U.S. Missile Defense Agency. The STSS-Demo is a space-based sensor component of a layered Ballistic Missile Defense System designed for the overall mission of detecting, tracking and discriminating ballistic missiles. The spacecraft was launched by NASA for the U.S. Missile Defense Agency. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  15. Jedburgh Operations: Support to the French Resistance in Eastern Brittany From June-September 1944

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-04

    1944, pp. xiii-xiv. 15. Ibid., pp. xv-xvi. 12 CHAPTER TWO JEDBURGH DOCTRINE Jedburgh Recruitment In the fall of 1943 no Jedburgh force existed. Planning...Jedburgh operations in the Ille et Villaine department were successful. While on a reconnaissance patrol in the village of La Bastille , Captain Dreux...pp. 570-71. 10. Ibid., p. 575 and Blumenson, Breakout and Pursuit, p. 36. General Omar N. Bradley assumed command of the U.S. First Army in the fall

  16. Scheduling of an aircraft fleet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paltrinieri, Massimo; Momigliano, Alberto; Torquati, Franco

    1992-01-01

    Scheduling is the task of assigning resources to operations. When the resources are mobile vehicles, they describe routes through the served stations. To emphasize such aspect, this problem is usually referred to as the routing problem. In particular, if vehicles are aircraft and stations are airports, the problem is known as aircraft routing. This paper describes the solution to such a problem developed in OMAR (Operative Management of Aircraft Routing), a system implemented by Bull HN for Alitalia. In our approach, aircraft routing is viewed as a Constraint Satisfaction Problem. The solving strategy combines network consistency and tree search techniques.

  17. On the Li Coefficients for the Hecke L-functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Sami; Ouni, Raouf; Mazhouda, Kamel

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we compute and verify the positivity of the Li coefficients for the Hecke L-functions using an arithmetic formula established in Omar and Mazhouda, J. Number Theory 125(1), 50-58 (2007) and J. Number Theory 130(4), 1098-1108 (2010) and the Serre trace formula. Additional results are presented, including new formulas for the Li coefficients and a formulation of a criterion for the partial Riemann hypothesis. Basing on the numerical computations made below, we conjecture that these coefficients are increasing in n.

  18. Optimal policies for a finite-horizon batching inventory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khamis, Talal M.; Benkherouf, Lakdere; Omar, Mohamed

    2014-10-01

    This paper is concerned with finding an optimal inventory policy for the integrated replenishment-production batching model of Omar and Smith (2002). Here, a company produces a single finished product which requires a single raw material and the objective is to minimise the total inventory costs over a finite planning horizon. Earlier work in the literature considered models with linear demand rate function of the finished product. This work proposes a general methodology for finding an optimal inventory policy for general demand rate functions. The proposed methodology is adapted from the recent work of Benkherouf and Gilding (2009).

  19. Field trial for sealing abandoned mine shafts and adits with lightweight concrete. Report of investigations/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, E.H.; Beckett, L.A.

    1993-10-01

    An abandoned mine shaft near Omar, in Logan County, WV, was permanently sealed through a cooperative agreement between the West Virginia Department of Commerce, Labor, and Environmental Research, Division of Environmental Protection, and the U.S. Bureau of Mines, Abandoned Mine Lands (AML). An engineered shaft seal design was developed and demonstrated that featured lightweight concrete as a key material component at a wet density of about 45 lb/cu ft. A reinforced concrete cap designed for 5 psi live load was placed over the shaft seal.

  20. CTC Sentinel (Volume 5, Issue 6, June 2012)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    a force multiplier not only against already beleaguered Latin American law enforcement, but also against U.S. law enforcement personnel. The Zetas...It came in response to the unjust war launched by the Sana`a regime’s forces in cooperation with the American and Saudi forces.”2 1 “Hadi: I...and MS-13: Nontraditional Alliances By John p. Sullivan and Adam Elkus 10 The Evolution of an American Jihadi: The Case of Omar Hammami By

  1. Pegasus XL CYGNSS Second Launch Attempt

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-15

    In the Mission Director's Center at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana, right, congratulates, Omar Baez, a senior launch director in NASA's Launch Services Program, after the successful launch of eight Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System, or CYGNSS, spacecraft. The satellites will make frequent and accurate measurements of ocean surface winds throughout the life cycle of tropical storms and hurricanes. The data that CYGNSS provides will enable scientists to probe key air-sea interaction processes that take place near the core of storms, which are rapidly changing and play a crucial role in the beginning and intensification of hurricanes.

  2. Terrorist Attacks on Commercial Airlines: Federal Criminal Prohibitions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-22

    bomber;18 Zacarias Moussaoui , the co-conspirator of the 9/11 terrorists;19 and Ahmed Omar Abu Ali, convicted in connection with the activities of an al...10-cr- 2005 (E.D. Mich. (S.D) Jan. 6, 2010). 19 Moussaoui pleaded guilty to being a co-conspirator in the 9/11 terrorist attacks and was sentenced...n)), United States v. Moussaoui , ___ F.3d ____, ____ (4th Cir. Jan. 4, 2010). 20 United States v. Abu Ali, 528 F.3d 210, 225 (4th Cir. 2008). Abu

  3. Optical Properties of III-V Semiconductor Nanostructures and Quantum Wells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-31

    Form Approved REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMB No. 0704-0188 Publici,, ting u P for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per...control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1 . REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 31-12...wells. 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-04- 1 -0002 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Omar Manasreh 59. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER

  4. Antibody reactivity to the major fish allergen parvalbumin is determined by isoforms and impact of thermal processing.

    PubMed

    Saptarshi, Shruti R; Sharp, Michael F; Kamath, Sandip D; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-04-01

    The EF-hand calcium binding protein, parvalbumin, is a major fish allergen. Detection of this allergen is often difficult due to its structural diversity among various fish species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cross-reactivity of parvalbumin in a comprehensive range of bony and cartilaginous fish, from the Asia-Pacific region, and conduct a molecular analysis of this highly allergenic protein. Using the monoclonal anti-parvalbumin antibody PARV-19, we demonstrated the presence of monomeric and oligomeric parvalbumin in all fish analysed, except for gummy shark a cartilaginous fish. Heat processing of this allergen greatly affected its antibody reactivity. While heating caused a reduction in antibody reactivity to multimeric forms of parvalbumins for most bony fish, a complete loss of reactivity was observed for cartilaginous fish. Molecular analysis demonstrated that parvalbumin cross-reactivity, among fish species, is due to the molecular phylogenetic association of this major fish allergen.

  5. Human Parvoviruses.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jianming; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Young, Neal S

    2017-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) and human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), members of the large Parvoviridae family, are human pathogens responsible for a variety of diseases. For B19V in particular, host features determine disease manifestations. These viruses are prevalent worldwide and are culturable in vitro, and serological and molecular assays are available but require careful interpretation of results. Additional human parvoviruses, including HBoV2 to -4, human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), and human bufavirus (BuV) are also reviewed. The full spectrum of parvovirus disease in humans has yet to be established. Candidate recombinant B19V vaccines have been developed but may not be commercially feasible. We review relevant features of the molecular and cellular biology of these viruses, and the human immune response that they elicit, which have allowed a deep understanding of pathophysiology. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Kerns, James R.; Nute, Jessica L.; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Followill, David S.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2015-02-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios.

  7. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jessie Y; Kerns, James R; Nute, Jessica L; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A; Stingo, Francesco C; Followill, David S; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE's monochromatic Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings, and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios. PMID:25585685

  8. Simulation of aromatic SOA formation using the lumping model integrated with explicit gas-phase kinetic mechanisms and aerosol-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Y.; Jang, M.; Beardsley, R. L.

    2013-03-01

    The Unified Partitioning-Aerosol phase Reaction (UNIPAR) model has been developed to predict the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation through multiphase reactions. An explicit gas-kinetic model was employed to express gas-phase oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Gas-phase products are grouped based on volatility (6 levels) and reactivity (5 levels) and used to construct the stoichiometric coefficients (αi,j) matrix, the set of parameters used to describe the concentrations of organic compounds in multiphase. Weighting of the αi,j matrix as a function of NOx improved the evaluation of NOx effects on SOA. The total amount of organic matter (OMT) is predicted by two modules in the UNIPAR model: OMP by a partitioning process and OMAR by aerosol-phase reactions. OMP is estimated using the SOA partitioning model that has been used in a regional air quality model (CMAQ 5.0.1). OMAR predicts multiphase reactions of organic compounds, such as oligomerization, acid-catalyzed reactions, and organosulfate (OS) formation. The model was evaluated with the SOA data produced from the photooxidation of toluene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene using an outdoor reactor (UF-APHOR chamber). The model reasonably simulates SOA formation under various aerosol acidities, NOx concentrations, humidities and temperatures. Furthermore, the OS fraction in the SOA predicted by the model was in good agreement with the experimentally measured OS fraction.

  9. Syria: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports on discoveries by foreign license holders in 1991, another production record and progress on a major water injection project that could further substantially boost national output that are highlights of recent activity in Syria. Syrian production at the end of last year topped 470,000 bpd, about 300,000 of which was 37{degrees} gravity oil from 20 fields in eastern Syria operated by the Al Furat Petroleum Co. (AFPC). Some 20,000 bpd of 36{degrees} crude being produced by Elf from its Attala North field and 150,000 bpd of heavy oil produced by Syrian Petroleum Co. (SPC) from its declining fields in the northeastern part of the country accounted for the remainder. Discoveries of significant light oil production near the town of Deir Ez Zor in recent years were made by the Shell Group (Royal Dutch, Pecten International and Deminex). AFPC, owned by SPC and Shell Group participants, which is developing the discoveries, has become the largest producer in the country. AFPC recently began injecting water on its $100-million flood in Omar field which is designed to overcome a sharp reservoir pressure decline that occurred in 1989 when the field was brought onstream at 100,000 bpd. Water injection is ultimately expected to boost Omar production from about 16,400 bpd last January to between 40,000 and 50,000 bpd.

  10. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Produces Neuron Loss That Can Be Rescued by Modulating Microglial Activation Using a CB2 Receptor Inverse Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Wei; Ren, Huiling; Deng, Yunping; Del Mar, Nobel; Guley, Natalie M.; Moore, Bob M.; Honig, Marcia G.; Reiner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that mild TBI created by focal left-side cranial blast in mice produces widespread axonal injury, microglial activation, and a variety of functional deficits. We have also shown that these functional deficits are reduced by targeting microglia through their cannabinoid type-2 (CB2) receptors using 2-week daily administration of the CB2 inverse agonist SMM-189. CB2 inverse agonists stabilize the G-protein coupled CB2 receptor in an inactive conformation, leading to increased phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), and thus bias activated microglia from a pro-inflammatory M1 to a pro-healing M2 state. In the present study, we showed that SMM-189 boosts nuclear pCREB levels in microglia in several brain regions by 3 days after TBI, by using pCREB/CD68 double immunofluorescent labeling. Next, to better understand the basis of motor deficits and increased fearfulness after TBI, we used unbiased stereological methods to characterize neuronal loss in cortex, striatum, and basolateral amygdala (BLA) and assessed how neuronal loss was affected by SMM-189 treatment. Our stereological neuron counts revealed a 20% reduction in cortical and 30% reduction in striatal neurons bilaterally at 2–3 months post blast, with SMM-189 yielding about 50% rescue. Loss of BLA neurons was restricted to the blast side, with 33% of Thy1+ fear-suppressing pyramidal neurons and 47% of fear-suppressing parvalbuminergic (PARV) interneurons lost, and Thy1-negative fear-promoting pyramidal neurons not significantly affected. SMM-189 yielded 50–60% rescue of Thy1+ and PARV neuron loss in BLA. Thus, fearfulness after mild TBI may result from the loss of fear-suppressing neuron types in BLA, and SMM-189 may reduce fearfulness by their rescue. Overall, our findings indicate that SMM-189 rescues damaged neurons and thereby alleviates functional deficits resulting from TBI, apparently by selectively modulating microglia

  11. A Model to Measure Bombardier/Navigator Performance during Radar Navigation in Device 2F114, A-6E Weapon System Trainer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    ADA098 776 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA F/6 5/9 MODEL TO MEASURE BOMBARDIER/NAVIGATOR PERFORMANCE DURING RADA--ETC(U)MAR 81 R M IXON N...476; WAPON §YSTEM ZRAINER. I-or Ted . M ~ OMar1 4081 Thesis Advisor: W. F. Moroney &Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 81 512 03 3...4 : 4 .0 w W g -t Hu Z 0 ,U c 0 U 4 - 4, U - -4 0 H a -4 00> M U •0 H2 0 ts M - lU> l 41 4 (n a)w (nE i .U. C4)( 0 ,.Q 4J-40- H 1- 0 Hu4-- 4-) 0 1Q

  12. Auditory Cortical Processing in Real-World Listening: The Auditory System Going Real

    PubMed Central

    Bizley, Jennifer; Shamma, Shihab A.; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2014-01-01

    The auditory sense of humans transforms intrinsically senseless pressure waveforms into spectacularly rich perceptual phenomena: the music of Bach or the Beatles, the poetry of Li Bai or Omar Khayyam, or more prosaically the sense of the world filled with objects emitting sounds that is so important for those of us lucky enough to have hearing. Whereas the early representations of sounds in the auditory system are based on their physical structure, higher auditory centers are thought to represent sounds in terms of their perceptual attributes. In this symposium, we will illustrate the current research into this process, using four case studies. We will illustrate how the spectral and temporal properties of sounds are used to bind together, segregate, categorize, and interpret sound patterns on their way to acquire meaning, with important lessons to other sensory systems as well. PMID:25392481

  13. Auditory cortical processing in real-world listening: the auditory system going real.

    PubMed

    Nelken, Israel; Bizley, Jennifer; Shamma, Shihab A; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2014-11-12

    The auditory sense of humans transforms intrinsically senseless pressure waveforms into spectacularly rich perceptual phenomena: the music of Bach or the Beatles, the poetry of Li Bai or Omar Khayyam, or more prosaically the sense of the world filled with objects emitting sounds that is so important for those of us lucky enough to have hearing. Whereas the early representations of sounds in the auditory system are based on their physical structure, higher auditory centers are thought to represent sounds in terms of their perceptual attributes. In this symposium, we will illustrate the current research into this process, using four case studies. We will illustrate how the spectral and temporal properties of sounds are used to bind together, segregate, categorize, and interpret sound patterns on their way to acquire meaning, with important lessons to other sensory systems as well.

  14. Upper Cenozoic deposits of the central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owens, James Patrick; Denny, Charles Storrow

    1979-01-01

    The surface and shallow subsurface sediments of the lower Delmarva Peninsula include beds ranging in age from Miocene to Holocene. The oldest beds appear to be typical shelf deposits of the Chesapeake Group (Calvert-Choptank age). These marine units are overlain by deltaic deposits, which range from fluviatile facies in the north (Pensauken Formation) to marginal marine and marine beds in the south ('Yorktown(?) and Cohansey(?)' Formations as used by Rasmussen and Slaughter in 1955). This large deltaic mass underlies most of the Delmarva Peninsula. Fossil age determinations supplemented by some radiometric dates indicate the delta to be largely late Miocene in age. The nonmarine facies of the delta, the Pensauken Formation, previously was considered to be Pleistocene in age. The late Miocene delta and possibly the Yorktown Formation (lower to middle Pliocene) are overlain by a feldspathic sand, the Beaverdam, which is at least in part marginal marine. Microflora recovered from this formation include species no longer indigenous to the Delmarva region ('exotics'). On the basis of existing information, microfloral assemblages containing 'exotics' are pre-Pleistocene in age. The Beaverdam therefore is pre-Pleistocene in age, probably late Pliocene. A highly dissected and weathered unit, the Walston Silt, caps the uplands of the central Delmarva Peninsula, where it overlies the Beaverdam. The Walston has a microflora containing 'exotics' and therefore is considered to be the youngest Tertiary unit (uppermost Pliocene) in this area. Sediments forming a barrier-back-barrier sequence fringe most of the southern Maryland-Delaware part of the Delmarva Peninsula and are found at altitudes of as much as 15 m (50 ft) above sea level. This sequence, the Omar Formation, is Sangamon in age and has been dated radiometrically as 60,000 to about 100,000 years old. The microflora in these beds contains no 'exotics,' and the assemblage suggests a warm-temperate environment. The Omar

  15. Sunni and Shi’a Terrorism: Differences that Matter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-29

    2006), 81‐145. See also  Ali  M. Ansiri, Confronting Iran: The Failure of  American Foreign Policy and the Roots of Mistrust (London: C. Hurst... Omar  Mujahedin – India   Al‐Qa’ida/al‐Qa’ida  Al‐Qa’ida on the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) – Saudi Arabia  Al‐Qa’ida in the Land of the Two Rivers – Saudi...Brigades – Iraq only since 2004    Umar al‐ Mukhtar  unit of the National Revolutionary Command*     72 4 ‐ Counting Events: Coding Terrorist Strikes

  16. Caribbean hurricanes: case study of interacting easterly and westerly waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, Mark R.

    2011-11-01

    This observational study considers Caribbean cyclogenesis in the period 2003-2009. Numerous events are identified from maximum of low-level relative vorticity and rain rate, and a case study is analyzed. Although fast moving tropical cyclones (TC) pose dangers to Caribbean Islands, it is the slower moving TC that inflict flood damage. The Atlantic warm pool enlarges through October as steering winds slacken. African easterly waves move over the warm pool and draw moist unstable air, while near-equatorial Kelvin waves from the Pacific surge into the Caribbean. The westerly flow accelerates around the northern Andes and is drawn into TC Omar 13-15 October 2008. A combination of warm pool air and cyclonic vorticity provided by transient zonal waves sets off the process of cyclogenesis.

  17. Photo-Auger-ionization and charge-state distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Gaber; Hahn, Yukap

    1991-07-01

    The radiative and Auger emissions in cascade (RAC) model constructed earlier [G. Omar and Y. Hahn, Phys. Rev. A (to be published)] is applied to the calculation of the final-charge-state distribution in the decay of Ar+(1s¯) with an initial 1s hole created by synchrotron irradiation. Experimental data of Church et al. [Phys. Rev. A 36, 2487 (1987)] are reasonably well reproduced, including the observed asymmetry in the final-state charge distribution. In addition to Ar+(1s¯), we have also considered the decay of the initial states Ar+(2s¯), Ar+(2p¯), and Ar(1s¯,4p). The higher charge states are underestimated by the RAC model, presumably due to the neglect of correlated multielectron processes in the present calculation.

  18. Theory of organic magnetoresistance in disordered organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Nicholas J.; Flatté, Michael E.

    2012-10-01

    The understanding of spin transport in organics has been challenged by the discovery of large magnetic field effects on properties such as conductivity and electroluminescence in a wide array of organic systems. To explain the large organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) phenomenon, we present and solve a model for magnetoresistance in positionally disordered organic materials using percolation theory. The model describes the effects of singlettriplet spin transitions on hopping transport by considering the role of spin dynamics on an effective density of hopping sites. Faster spin transitions open up `spin-blocked' pathways to become viable conduction channels and hence produce magnetoresistance. We concentrate on spin transitions under the effects of the hyperfine (isotropic and anisotropic), exchange, and dipolar interactions. The magnetoresistance can be found analytically in several regimes and explains several experimental observations

  19. KSC-2011-6819

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-08

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- On Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, members of NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) launch team monitor GRAIL's launch countdown from the Mission Directors Center in Hangar AE. From left are Dana Grieco, launch operations manager, Analex, NASA's Launch Services Program (LSP); Bruce Reid, GRAIL mission manager, LSP; Al Sierra, manager of the Flight Project Office, LSP; Omar Baez, GRAIL assistant launch director, LSP; and Tim Dunn, GRAIL launch director, LSP. Launch is scheduled for 8:37:06 a.m. EDT Sept. 8 from Space Launch Complex 17B on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem around the moon to precisely measure and map variations in the moon's gravitational field. The mission will provide the most accurate global gravity field to date for any planet, including Earth. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/grail. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  20. KSC-2013-4535

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-28

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Atlas V Spaceflight Operations Center, NASA managers monitor progress of the countdown for the launch the agency's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, spacecraft. From the left are Tim Dunn, NASA's assistant MAVEN launch director, Omar Baez, MAVEN launch director, Albert Sierra, director of the Flight Projects Office, and Chuck Tatro, MAVEN mission manager for the Launch Services Program. MAVEN was launched on Nov. 18, 2013 from Cape Canaveral's Space Launch Complex 41 atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Positioned in an orbit above the Red Planet, MAVEN will study the upper atmosphere of Mars in unprecedented detail. For more information, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/maven/main/index.html Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  1. KSC-2013-3398

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-26

    PORT CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Port Canaveral, Fla., NASA and United Launch Alliance managers brief members of the news media on the arrival of the ULA Atlas V rocket that will boost the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, spacecraft to the Red Planet. From the left, are Chuck Tatro, NASA's MAVEN mission manager, Vernon Thorp, ULA's NASA and Commercial Program manager and Omar Baez, NASA's launch director. MAVEN is being prepared for its scheduled launch in November from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Positioned in an orbit above the Red Planet, MAVEN will study the upper atmosphere of Mars in unprecedented detail. For more information, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/maven/main/index.html Photo credit: NASA/ Dimitri Gerondidakis

  2. WE-G-18A-07: Clinical Evaluation of Normalized Metal Artifact Reduction in KVCT Using MVCT Prior Images (MVCT-NMAR) Technique in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, M; MacKenzie, M; Fallone, B; Rathee, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the metal artifacts in diagnostic kVCT images of patients that are corrected using a normalized metal artifact reduction method with MVCT prior images, MVCT-NMAR. Methods: An MVCTNMAR algorithm was developed and applied to five patients: three with bilateral hip prostheses, one with unilateral hip prosthesis and one with dental fillings. The corrected images were evaluated for visualization of tissue structures and their interfaces, and for radiotherapy dose calculations. They were also compared against the corresponding images corrected by a commercial metal artifact reduction technique, O-MAR, on a Phillips™ CT scanner. Results: The use of MVCT images for correcting kVCT images in the MVCT-NMAR technique greatly reduces metal artifacts, avoids secondary artifacts, and makes patient images more useful for correct dose calculation in radiotherapy. These improvements are significant over the commercial correction method, provided the MVCT and kVCT images are correctly registered. The remaining and the secondary artifacts (soft tissue blurring, eroded bones, false bones or air pockets, CT number cupping within the metal) present in O-MAR corrected images are removed in the MVCT-NMAR corrected images. Large dose reduction is possible outside the planning target volume (e.g., 59.2 Gy in comparison to 52.5 Gy in pubic bone) when these MVCT-NMAR corrected images are used in TomoTherapy™ treatment plans, as the corrected images no longer require directional blocks for prostate plans in order to avoid the image artifact regions. Conclusion: The use of MVCT-NMAR corrected images in radiotherapy treatment planning could improve the treatment plan quality for cancer patients with metallic implants. Moti Raj Paudel is supported by the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship, the Endowed Graduate Scholarship in Oncology and the Dissertation Fellowship at the University of Alberta. The authors acknowledge the CIHR operating grant number MOP 53254.

  3. Simulation of aromatic SOA formation using the lumping model integrated with explicit gas-phase kinetic mechanisms and aerosol-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Y.; Jang, M.; Beardsley, R. L.

    2014-04-01

    The Unified Partitioning-Aerosol phase Reaction (UNIPAR) model has been developed to predict the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation through multiphase reactions. The model was evaluated with aromatic SOA data produced from the photooxidation of toluene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (135-TMB) under various concentrations of NOx and SO2 using an outdoor reactor (University of Florida Atmospheric PHotochemical Outdoor Reactor (UF-APHOR) chamber). When inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium and water) are present in aerosol, the prediction of both toluene SOA and 135-TMB SOA, in which the oxygen-to-carbon (O : C) ratio is lower than 0.62, are approached under the assumption of a complete organic/electrolyte-phase separation below a certain relative humidity. An explicit gas-kinetic model was employed to express gas-phase oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Gas-phase products are grouped based on their volatility (6 levels) and reactivity (5 levels) and exploited to construct the stoichiometric coefficient (αi,j) matrix, the set of parameters used to describe the concentrations of organic compounds in multiphase. Weighting of the αi,j matrix as a function of NOx improved the evaluation of NOx effects on aromatic SOA. The total amount of organic matter (OMT) is predicted by two modules in the UNIPAR model: OMP by a partitioning process and OMAR by aerosol-phase reactions. The OMAR module predicts multiphase reactions of organic compounds, such as oligomerization, acid-catalyzed reactions, and organosulfate (OS) formation. The model reasonably simulates SOA formation under various aerosol acidities, NOx concentrations, humidities and temperatures. Furthermore, the OS fractions in the SOA predicted by the model were in good agreement with the experimentally measured OS fractions.

  4. Reduced Brain Cannabinoid Receptor Availability in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Mohini; Cortes-Briones, Jose; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Thurnauer, Halle; Planeta, Beata; Skosnik, Patrick; Gao, Hong; Labaree, David; Neumeister, Alexander; Pittman, Brian; Surti, Toral; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2016-06-15

    Several lines of evidence suggest the presence of abnormalities in the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in schizophrenia (SCZ). However, there are limited in vivo measures of the eCB system in SCZ. Twenty five male SCZ subjects (SCZs) (18 antipsychotic treated and 7 antipsychotic free) were compared with 18 age-matched male healthy control subjects (HCs). Subjects underwent one positron emission tomography scan each with the cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1R) selective radiotracer [(11)C]OMAR on the high resolution research tomography scanner. Regional volume of distribution (VT) values were determined using kinetic modeling of positron emission tomography data as a measure of CB1R availability. Group differences in mean composite [(11)C]OMAR VT values were compared between SCZs and HCs. Exploratory comparisons of CB1R availability within 15 brain regions were also conducted. All analyses were covaried for age and body mass index. SCZs showed significantly (p = .02) lower composite [(11)C]OMAR VT relative to HCs (~12% difference, effect size d = .73). [(11)C]OMAR VT was significantly (all ps < .05) lower in SCZs in the amygdala, caudate, posterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and insula. Composite [11]OMAR VT was HCs > antipsychotic treated SZCs > antipsychotic free SZCs. Furthermore, composite [(11)C]OMAR VT was greater in HCs than SCZ smokers (n = 11) and SCZ nonsmokers (n = 14). CB1R availability is lower in male SCZ subjects compared with HCs. Furthermore, antipsychotics and tobacco use may increase CB1R availability in this population. The findings of the study provide further evidence supporting the hypothesis that alterations in the eCB system might contribute to the pathophysiology of SCZ. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Platelet counts, MPV and PDW in culture proven and probable neonatal sepsis and association of platelet counts with mortality rate.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mirza Sultan; Waheed, Abdul

    2014-05-01

    To determine frequency of thrombocytopenia and thrombocytosis, the MPV (mean platelet volume) and PDW (platelet distribution width) in patients with probable and culture proven neonatal sepsis and determine any association between platelet counts and mortality rate. Descriptive analytical study. NICU, Fazle Omar Hospital, from January 2011 to December 2012. Cases of culture proven and probable neonatal sepsis, admitted in Fazle Omar Hospital, Rabwah, were included in the study. Platelet counts, MPV and PDW of the cases were recorded. Mortality was documented. Frequencies of thrombocytopenia (< 150000/mm3) and thrombocytosis (> 450000/mm3) were ascertained. Mortality rates in different groups according to platelet counts were calculated and compared by chi-square test to check association. Four hundred and sixty nine patients were included; 68 (14.5%) of them died. One hundred and thirty six (29%) had culture proven sepsis, and 333 (71%) were categorized as probable sepsis. Thrombocytopenia was present in 116 (24.7%), and thrombocytosis was present in 36 (7.7%) cases. Median platelet count was 213.0/mm3. Twenty eight (27.7%) patients with thrombocytopenia, and 40 (12.1%) cases with normal or raised platelet counts died (p < 0.001). Median MPV was 9.30, and median PDW was 12.30. MPV and PDW of the patients who died and who were discharged were not significantly different from each other. Thrombocytopenia is a common complication of neonatal sepsis. Those with thrombocytopenia have higher mortality rate. No significant difference was present between PDW and MPV of the cases who survived and died.

  6. Spin dynamics of polarons and polaron pairs in a random hyperfine field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, Robert C.

    Spin-dependent recombination of polaron pairs and spin relaxation of a single polaron are the most fundamental processes are responsible for the performance of organic spintronics-based devices such as light-emitting diodes and organic spin valves. In organic materials, with no spin-orbit coupling, both processes are due to random hyperfine fields created by protons neighboring the polaron sites. The essence of spin-dependent recombination is that in order to recombine the pair must be in the singlet state. Hyperfine fields acting on the electron and hole govern the spin-dynamics of localized pairs during the waiting time for recombination. We demonstrate that for certain domain of trapping configurations of hyperfine fields, crossover to the singlet state is quenched. This leads to the blocking of current. The phenomenon of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) is described by counting the weights of trapping configurations as a function of magnetic field. This explains the universality of the lineshapes of the OMAR curves. In finite samples incomplete averaging over the hyperfine fields gives rise to mesoscopic fluctuations of the current response. We also demonstrate that under the condition of magnetic resonance, new trapping configurations emerge. This leads to nontrivial evolution of current through the sample with microwave power. When discussing spin-relaxation two questions can be asked: (a) How does the local spin polarization decay as a function of distance from the spin-polarized injector? (b) How does the injected spin decay as a function of time after spatial averaging? With regard to (a), we demonstrate that, while decaying exponentially on average, local spin-polarization exhibits giant fluctuations from point to point. Concerning (b), we find that for a spin-carrier which moves diffusively in low dimensions the decay is faster than a simple exponent. The underlying physics for both findings is that in describing spin evolution it is necessary to add up

  7. The science of hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: a review.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, T S; DiMarco, S F; Cowan, J H; Hetland, R D; Chapman, P; Day, J W; Allison, M A

    2010-03-01

    The Mississippi River is one of the world's 10 largest rivers, with average freshwater discharge into the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) of 380km(3) year(-1). In the northern GOM, anthropogenic nitrogen is primarily derived from agricultural fertilizer and delivered via the Mississippi River. The general consensus is that hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico is caused primarily by algal production stimulated by excess nitrogen delivered from the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin and seasonal vertical stratification of incoming stream flow and Gulf waters, which restricts replenishment of oxygen from the atmosphere. In this paper, we review the controversial aspects of the largely nutrient-centric view of the hypoxic region, and introduce the role of non-riverine organic matter inputs as other oxygen-consuming mechanisms. Similarly, we discuss non-nutrient physically-controlled impacts of freshwater stratification as an alternative mechanism for controlling in part, the seasonality of hypoxia. We then explore why hypoxia in this dynamic river-dominated margin (RiOMar) is not comparable to many of the other traditional estuarine systems (e.g., Chesapeake Bay, Baltic Sea, and Long Island Sound). The presence of mobile muds and the proximity of the Mississippi Canyon are discussed as possible reasons for the amelioration of hypoxia (e.g., healthy fisheries) in this region. The most recent prediction of hypoxia area for 2009, using the current nutrient-centric models, failed due to the limited scope of these simple models and the complexity of this system. Predictive models should not be the main driver for management decisions. We postulate that a better management plan for this region can only be reached through a more comprehensive understanding of this RiOMar system-not just more information on river fluxes (e.g., nutrients) and coastal hypoxia monitoring programs.

  8. Lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks of Baird Mountains Quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Dumoulin, J.A.; Harris, A.G.

    1985-04-01

    Lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks in the Baird Mountains quadrangle form a relatively thin (about 550 m), chiefly shallow-water succession that has been imbricately thrust and metamorphosed to lower greenschist facies. Middle and Upper Cambrian rocks - the first reported from the western Brooks Range - occur in the northeastern quarter of the quadrangle, south of Angayukaqsraq (formerly Hub) Mountain. They consist of marble grading upward into thin-bedded marble/dolostone couplets and contain pelagiellid mollusks, acetretid brachiopods, and agnostid trilobites. Sedimentologic features and the Pelagiellas indicate a shallow-water depositional environment. Overlying these rocks are Lower and Middle Ordovician marble and phyllite containing graptolites and conodonts of midshelf to basinal aspect. Upper Ordovician rocks in this area are bioturbated to laminated dolostone containing warm, shallow-water conodonts. In the Omar and Squirrel Rivers areas to the west, the Lower Ordovician carbonate rocks show striking differences in lithofacies, biofacies, and thickness. Here they are mainly dolostone with locally well-developed fenestral fabric and evaporite molds, and bioturbated to laminated orange- and gray-weathering dolomitic marble. Upper Silurian dolostone, found near Angayukaqsraq Mountain and on the central Squirrel River, contains locally abundant corals and stronmatoporoids. Devonian carbonate rocks are widely distributed in the Baird Mountains quadrangle; at least two distinct sequences have been identified. In the Omar area, Lower and Middle Devonian dolostone and marble are locally cherty and rich in megafossils. In the north-central (Nakolik River) area, Middle and Upper Devonian marble is interlayered with planar to cross-laminated quartz-carbonate metasandstone and phyllite.

  9. Kudoa saudiensis sp. n. (Myxosporea: Multivalvulida) infecting oocytes of the Indian mackerel Rastrelliger kanagurta (Perciformes: Scombridae).

    PubMed

    Mansour, Lamjed; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Al, Suliman Y Omar

    2015-01-01

    During a survey the occurrence of Kudoa quraishii Mansour, Harrath, Abd-Elkader, Alwasel, Abdel-Baki et Al Omar, 2014, recently identified in the muscles of the Indian mackerel, Rastrelliger kanagurta (Cuvier), a species of Kudoa Meglitsch, 1947 infecting oocytes of mature females of the same host fish was found. The new species, for which the name Kudoa saudiensis sp. n. is proposed, infects oocytes that are enlarged with a whitish colour. The parasite develops in vesicular polysporous plasmodia within the oocyte. Infection occurs with a mean prevalence of 20% (7/35) of examined females. Mature spores are quadratic in shape in apical view, having four equal valves and four symmetrical polar capsules. Fresh spores are 2.4-3.6 µm long (mean ± SD 3.1 ± 0.3 µm), 4.3-5.4 µm (4.7 ± 0.3 µm) wide and 3.4-4.3 µm (3.8 ± 0.3 µm) in thickness and long. The smaller size of the new Kudoa species was the distinctive feature that separates it from all previously described species. Molecular analysis based on the SSU rDNA sequences shows that the highest percentage of similarity of 98.5% was observed with K. ovivora Swearer et Robertson, 1999, reported from oocytes of labroid fish from the Caribbean coasts of Panama. The percentage of similarity was 98% with K. azevedoi Mansour, Thabet, Chourabi, Harrath, Gtari, Al Omar et Ben Hassine, 2013 and 89% with K. quraishii. Phylogenetic analysis of the SSU and LSU rDNA data revealed a consistent of the new species with K. azevedoi and K. ovivora. Our findings support the creation of Kudoa saudiensis sp. n. that infects oocytes of the Indian mackerel Rastrelliger kanagurta.

  10. High prevalence of porcine Hokovirus in German wild boar populations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Porcine Hokovirus (PHoV) was recently discovered in Hong Kong. This new Parvovirus of pigs is closely related to the human Parvoviruses 4 and 5 (PARV4/5) and bovine Hokovirus (BHoV). So far, nothing is known about the presence and prevalence of PHoV in regions of the world other than Hong Kong. A study was initiated to investigate PHoV in German wild boars from five different geographical regions, using a newly established quantitative real-time PCR assay. Analysis of collected liver and serum samples revealed high overall prevalence (32.7%; 51/156) of PHoV in wild boars. The prevalence differed between the regions and increased with age. Two near full-length genomes and a large fragment for three additional isolates from different regions were sequenced and used for phylogenetic analysis. The German PHoV sequences from wild boars showed a close relationship with sequences of isolates from Hong Kong. PMID:20653980

  11. Parvovirus transmission by blood products - a cause for concern?

    PubMed

    Norja, Päivi; Lassila, Riitta; Makris, Mike

    2012-11-01

    The introduction of dual viral inactivation of clotting factor concentrates has practically eliminated infections by viruses associated with significant pathogenicity over the last 20 years. Despite this, theoretical concerns about transmission of infection have remained, as it is known that currently available viral inactivation methods are unable to eliminate parvovirus B19 or prions from these products. Recently, concern has been raised following the identification of the new parvoviruses, human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) and new genotypes of parvovirus B19, in blood products. Parvoviruses do not cause chronic pathogenicity similar to human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis C virus, but nevertheless may cause clinical manifestations, especially in immunosuppressed patients. Manufacturers should institute measures, such as minipool polymerase chain reaction testing, to ensure that their products contain no known viruses. So far, human bocavirus, another new genus of parvovirus, has not been detected in fractionated blood products, and unless their presence can be demonstrated, routine testing during manufacture is not essential. Continued surveillance of the patients and of the safety of blood products remains an important ongoing issue.

  12. Treponema denticola chymotrypsin-like proteinase (CTLP) integrates spirochaetes within oral microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Cogoni, Valentina; Morgan-Smith, Alex; Fenno, J Christopher; Jenkinson, Howard F; Dymock, David

    2012-03-01

    Treponema denticola is found ubiquitously in the human oral cavity and is mainly associated with bacterial communities implicated in the establishment and development of periodontal disease. The ability to become integrated within biofilm communities is crucial to the growth and survival of oral bacteria, and involves inter-bacterial coaggregation, metabolic cooperation, and synergy against host defences. In this article we show that the chymotrypsin-like proteinase (CTLP), found within a high-molecular-mass complex on the cell surface, mediates adherence of T. denticola to other potential periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia and Parvimonas micra. Proteolytic activity per se did not appear to be required for the interactions, and expression of the major outer-sheath protein (Msp) was not necessary, except for binding Parv. micra. Biofilms of densely packed cells and matrix, up to 40 µm in depth, were formed between T. denticola and P. gingivalis on salivary pellicle, with T. denticola cells enriched in the upper layers. Expression of CTLP, but not Msp, was critical for dual-species biofilm formation with P. gingivalis. T. denticola did not form dual-species biofilms with any of the other three periodontal bacterial species under various conditions. Synergy between T. denticola and P. gingivalis was also shown by increased inhibition of blood clotting, which was CTLP-dependent. The results demonstrate the critical role of CTLP in interactions of T. denticola with other oral micro-organisms, leading to synergy in microbial community development and host tissue pathogenesis.

  13. Transcriptional profiling at whole population and single cell levels reveals somatosensory neuron molecular diversity

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Isaac M; Barrett, Lee B; Williams, Erika K; Strochlic, David E; Lee, Seungkyu; Weyer, Andy D; Lou, Shan; Bryman, Gregory S; Roberson, David P; Ghasemlou, Nader; Piccoli, Cara; Ahat, Ezgi; Wang, Victor; Cobos, Enrique J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ma, Qiufu; Liberles, Stephen D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    The somatosensory nervous system is critical for the organism's ability to respond to mechanical, thermal, and nociceptive stimuli. Somatosensory neurons are functionally and anatomically diverse but their molecular profiles are not well-defined. Here, we used transcriptional profiling to analyze the detailed molecular signatures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. We used two mouse reporter lines and surface IB4 labeling to purify three major non-overlapping classes of neurons: 1) IB4+SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, 2) IB4−SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, and 3) Parv-Cre/TdTomato+ cells, encompassing the majority of nociceptive, pruriceptive, and proprioceptive neurons. These neurons displayed distinct expression patterns of ion channels, transcription factors, and GPCRs. Highly parallel qRT-PCR analysis of 334 single neurons selected by membership of the three populations demonstrated further diversity, with unbiased clustering analysis identifying six distinct subgroups. These data significantly increase our knowledge of the molecular identities of known DRG populations and uncover potentially novel subsets, revealing the complexity and diversity of those neurons underlying somatosensation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04660.001 PMID:25525749

  14. Approaches to reducing photon dose calculation errors near metal implants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jessie Y; Followill, David S; Howell, Rebecca M; Liu, Xinming; Mirkovic, Dragan; Stingo, Francesco C; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-09-01

    Dose calculation errors near metal implants are caused by limitations of the dose calculation algorithm in modeling tissue/metal interface effects as well as density assignment errors caused by imaging artifacts. The purpose of this study was to investigate two strategies for reducing dose calculation errors near metal implants: implementation of metal-based energy deposition kernels in the convolution/superposition (C/S) dose calculation method and use of metal artifact reduction methods for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Both error reduction strategies were investigated using a simple geometric slab phantom with a rectangular metal insert (composed of titanium or Cerrobend), as well as two anthropomorphic phantoms (one with spinal hardware and one with dental fillings), designed to mimic relevant clinical scenarios. To assess the dosimetric impact of metal kernels, the authors implemented titanium and silver kernels in a commercial collapsed cone C/S algorithm. To assess the impact of CT metal artifact reduction methods, the authors performed dose calculations using baseline imaging techniques (uncorrected 120 kVp imaging) and three commercial metal artifact reduction methods: Philips Healthcare's o-mar, GE Healthcare's monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (gsi) using dual-energy CT, and gsi with metal artifact reduction software (mars) applied. For the simple geometric phantom, radiochromic film was used to measure dose upstream and downstream of metal inserts. For the anthropomorphic phantoms, ion chambers and radiochromic film were used to quantify the benefit of the error reduction strategies. Metal kernels did not universally improve accuracy but rather resulted in better accuracy upstream of metal implants and decreased accuracy directly downstream. For the clinical cases (spinal hardware and dental fillings), metal kernels had very little impact on the dose calculation accuracy (<1.0%). Of the commercial CT artifact reduction methods investigated

  15. Approaches to reducing photon dose calculation errors near metal implants

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Followill, David S.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Liu, Xinming; Mirkovic, Dragan; Stingo, Francesco C.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Dose calculation errors near metal implants are caused by limitations of the dose calculation algorithm in modeling tissue/metal interface effects as well as density assignment errors caused by imaging artifacts. The purpose of this study was to investigate two strategies for reducing dose calculation errors near metal implants: implementation of metal-based energy deposition kernels in the convolution/superposition (C/S) dose calculation method and use of metal artifact reduction methods for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: Both error reduction strategies were investigated using a simple geometric slab phantom with a rectangular metal insert (composed of titanium or Cerrobend), as well as two anthropomorphic phantoms (one with spinal hardware and one with dental fillings), designed to mimic relevant clinical scenarios. To assess the dosimetric impact of metal kernels, the authors implemented titanium and silver kernels in a commercial collapsed cone C/S algorithm. To assess the impact of CT metal artifact reduction methods, the authors performed dose calculations using baseline imaging techniques (uncorrected 120 kVp imaging) and three commercial metal artifact reduction methods: Philips Healthcare’s o-mar, GE Healthcare’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (gsi) using dual-energy CT, and gsi with metal artifact reduction software (mars) applied. For the simple geometric phantom, radiochromic film was used to measure dose upstream and downstream of metal inserts. For the anthropomorphic phantoms, ion chambers and radiochromic film were used to quantify the benefit of the error reduction strategies. Results: Metal kernels did not universally improve accuracy but rather resulted in better accuracy upstream of metal implants and decreased accuracy directly downstream. For the clinical cases (spinal hardware and dental fillings), metal kernels had very little impact on the dose calculation accuracy (<1.0%). Of the commercial CT artifact

  16. Optimization of tomotherapy treatment planning for patients with bilateral hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Chapman, David; Smith, Shaun; Barnett, Rob; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav

    2014-02-04

    To determine the effect of different imaging options and the most efficient imaging strategy for treatment planning of patients with hip prostheses. The planning kilovoltage CT (kVCT) and daily megavoltage CT (MVCT) studies for three prostate cancer patients with bilateral hip prostheses were used for creating hybrid kVCT/MVCT image sets. Treatment plans were created for kVCT images alone, hybrid kVCT/MVCT images, and MVCT images alone using the same dose prescription and planning parameters. The resulting dose volume histograms were compared. The orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) reconstruction tool for kVCT images and different MVCT options were investigated with a water tank fit with double hip prostheses. Treatment plans were created for all imaging options and calculated dose was compared with the one measured by a pin-point ion chamber. On average for three patients, the D35% for the bladder was 8% higher in plans based on MVCT images and 7% higher in plans based on hybrid images, compared to the plans based on kVCT images alone. Likewise, the D35% for the rectum was 3% higher than the kVCT based plan for both hybrid and MVCT plans. The average difference in planned D99% in the PTV compared to kVCT plans was 0.9% and 0.1% for MVCT and hybrid plans, respectively. For the water tank with hip prostheses phantom, the kVCT plan with O-MAR correction applied showed better agreement between the measured and calculated dose than the original image set, with a difference of -1.9% compared to 3.3%. The measured doses for the MVCT plans were lower than the calculated dose due to image size limitations. The best agreement was for the kVCT/MVCT hybrid plans with the difference between calculated and measured dose around 1%. MVCT image provides better visualization of patient anatomy and hybrid kVCT/MVCT study enables more accurate calculations using updated MVCT relative electron density calibration.

  17. Lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks of the Baird Mountains quadrangle, western Brooks Range, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumoulin, Julie A.; Harris, Anita G.; Tailleur, Irvin L.; Weimer, Paul

    1987-01-01

    Lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks in the Baird Mountains quadrangle form a relatively thin, chiefly shallow-water succession that has been thrust-faulted and metamorphosed to blueschist and greenschist facies. Although this succession was thought to be mostly Devonian until recently, a large part of it is in fact pre-Silurian in age.Middle and Upper Cambrian rocks - the first confirmed in the western Brooks Range - occur in the northeastern quarter of the quadrangle, south of Mt. Angayukaqsraq. These rocks consist of massive marble that grades upward into thin-bedded metalimestone/dolostone couplets and contain pelagiellid mollusks, acrotretid brachiopods, and agnostids. Sedimentologic features and the Pefagiellas indicate a shallow-water depositional environment. Overlying these Cambrian rocks is a thin sequence of Lower arid Middle Ordovician metalimestone and phyllite containing graptolites and cool-water, mid-shelf to basinal conodonts. Upper Ordovician rocks in the Mt. Angayukaqsraq area are bioturbated to laminated dolostone containing conodonts of warm-, shallow-water biofacies.In the Omar and Squirrel Rivers area to the west, the Lower Ordovician carbonate rocks are thicker and quite different in lithofacies and biofacies. These rocks are mainly dolostone with locally well-developed fenestral fabric and evaporite molds, and bioturbated to laminated orange- and gray-weathering dolomitic marble and metalimestone. Conodonts and sedimentary structures indicate deposition in restricted to normal marine, shallow to very shallow water platform environments.Exposures of Upper Silurian rocks occur near Mi. Angayukaqsraq and on the middle fork of the Squirrel River, and consist mostly of thinly laminated dolomitic mudstones. Conodonts in these rocks indicate deposition in a somewhat restricted, shallow-water environment.Devonian carbonate rocks are widely distributed in the western Baird Mountains quadrangle; at least two distinct sequences have been identified. In the

  18. Long-lasting c-fos and NGF mRNA expressions and loss of perikaryal parvalbumin immunoreactivity in the development of epileptogenesis after ethacrynic acid-induced seizure.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, J; Omori, K; Okugawa, G; Fujiseki, Y; Heizmann, C W; Inagaki, C

    1999-07-10

    A single cerebroventricular injection of ethacrynic acid (EA), a Cl(-)-ATPase inhibitor, induces generalized tonic-clonic convulsions in mice. To clarify whether such convulsive stimulus triggers a long-lasting rearrangement of the neural circuitry culminating in seizure susceptibility, we examined molecular, cellular and behavioral changes following the EA-induced seizure. The expression of immediate early gene c-fos mRNA as an index for cellular activation increased biphasically, with an early transient increase at 60 min and a late prolonged increase on the 10th to 14th day post-EA administration, most remarkably in the hippocampus and pyriform cortex. On the 14th day post-EA seizure, subconvulsive dose of kainic acid (5-17.5 mg/kg) caused severe (stage 5) seizure in 77% of the mice, with 70% mortality. In addition, the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) also showed biphasic increases with close spatiotemporal correlation with c-fos expression. Moreover, the number of cell somata and the density of axon fibers of parvalbumin (PARV)-positive cells, a subpopulation of GABAergic interneurons, decreased in area dentata, CA1 and CA3 on the 7th and 14th day post-EA seizure. In area dentata and CA1, the density of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-positive cells also decreased on the 14th day. Thus, the transient EA-induced seizures appear to develop seizure susceptibility by causing damage of a subpopulation of inhibitory interneurons along with increases in the expression of c-fos and NGF in limbic structures.

  19. Bioavailability, Biodistribution, and CNS Toxicity of Clinical-Grade Parvovirus H1 after Intravenous and Intracerebral Injection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Geletneky, Karsten; Leoni, Anne-Laure; Pohlmeyer-Esch, Gabriele; Loebhard, Stephanie; Leuchs, Barbara; Hoefer, Constance; Jochims, Karin; Dahm, Michael; Huber, Bernard; Rommelaere, Jean; Krebs, Ottheinz; Hajda, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The autonomous parvovirus H1 (H1PV) is transmitted in rodent populations. The natural host is the rat, in which H1PV infection is pathogenic only in fetuses and newborns. H1PV infection of human cancer cells leads to strong oncolytic effects in preclinical models. In preparation for a clinical trial of H1PV injection in patients with malignant brain tumors, H1PV had to be prepared to Good Manufacturing Practice standards, including extensive toxicology testing in rats. Because the trial involves direct intracerebral injection of H1PV into the tumor and around the resection cavity, possible toxicity to CNS tissue had to be investigated. In addition, quantitative blood levels and the tissue distribution of H1PV after single intracerebral or intravenous injection were measured. Direct injection of H1PV into rat brain at 3 dose levels (maximum, 7.96 × 107 pfu) did not cause any macroscopic or histologic pathology. Furthermore, H1PV infection of the brain did not alter central or autonomous nervous system function. H1PV DNA was detected in almost all organs at 6 h, 48 h, and 14 d after intravenous and intracerebral injection, with the highest levels in liver and spleen. H1PV concentrations in most organs were similar after intravenous and intracerebral injection, indicating high permeability of the blood–brain barrier for this small virus. The current results demonstrate wide organ distribution of H1PV after intravenous or intracerebral injection, confirm that H1PV is nonpathogenic in adult rats even after direct injection into the brain, and form the basis for the ongoing ParvOryx01 clinical trial. PMID:25730755

  20. Collagen XIX is expressed by interneurons and contributes to the formation of hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianmin; Gorse, Karen; Ramirez, Francesco; Fox, Michael A

    2010-01-10

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules contribute to the formation and maintenance of synapses in the mammalian nervous system. We previously discovered a family of nonfibrillar collagens that organize synaptic differentiation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Although many NMJ-organizing cues contribute to central nervous system (CNS) synaptogenesis, whether similar roles for collagens exist at central synapses remained unclear. In the present study we discovered that col19a1, the gene encoding nonfibrillar collagen XIX, is expressed by subsets of hippocampal neurons. Colocalization with the interneuron-specific enzyme glutamate decarboxylase 67 (Gad67), but not other cell-type-specific markers, suggests that hippocampal expression of col19a1 is restricted to interneurons. However, not all hippocampal interneurons express col19a1 mRNA; subsets of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-, somatostatin (Som)-, and calbindin (Calb)-immunoreactive interneurons express col19a1, but those containing parvalbumin (Parv) or calretinin (Calr) do not. To assess whether collagen XIX is required for the normal formation of hippocampal synapses, we examined synaptic morphology and composition in targeted mouse mutants lacking collagen XIX. We show here that subsets of synaptotagmin 2 (Syt2)-containing hippocampal nerve terminals appear malformed in the absence of collagen XIX. The presence of Syt2 in inhibitory hippocampal synapses, the altered distribution of Gad67 in collagen XIX-deficient subiculum, and abnormal levels of gephyrin in collagen XIX-deficient hippocampal extracts all suggest inhibitory synapses are affected by the loss of collagen XIX. Together, these data not only reveal that collagen XIX is expressed by central neurons, but show for the first time that a nonfibrillar collagen is necessary for the formation of hippocampal synapses.

  1. Right Heart Pressure Increases after Acute Increases in Ambient Particulate Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Rich, David Q.; Freudenberger, Ronald S.; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Cho, Yong; Kipen, Howard M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We explored the association between acute changes in daily mean pulmonary artery (PA) and right ventricular (RV) pressures and concentrations of ambient fine particulate matter [PM with aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5)] as an explanation for previous associations between congestive heart failure (HF) hospital admissions and PM. Materials and methods In the Chronicle Offers Management to Patients with Advanced Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure (COMPASS-HF) trial, to see whether management of ambulatory HF could be improved by providing continuous right heart pressure monitoring to physicians, the Chronicle Implantable Hemodynamic Monitor (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) continuously measured multiple right heart hemodynamic parameters, heart rate, and activity trends in subjects with moderate/severe HF. Using these trial data, we calculated daily mean pressures, using only those time intervals where the subject was not physically active (n = 5,807 person-days; n = 11 subjects). We then studied the association between mean daily PA/RV pressures and mean ambient PM2.5 concentrations on the same day and previous 6 days. Results Each 11.62-μg/m3 increase in same-day mean PM2.5 concentration was associated with small but significant increases in estimated PA diastolic pressure [0.19 mmHg; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.05–0.33] and RV diastolic pressure (0.23 mmHg; 95% CI, 0.11–0.34). Although we saw considerable differences in the magnitude of response by COMPASS-HF randomization group (total data access for physicians vs. blocked clinician access), season, left ventricular ejection fraction, and obesity, these effects were not significantly different. Conclusions These pilot study findings provide a potential mechanism for previous findings of increased risk of HF associated with ambient PM. However, because of the small number of subjects, a larger study is needed for confirmation. PMID:18795158

  2. Purification and characterization of parvalbumins, the major allergens in red stingray (Dasyatis akajei).

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiu-Feng; Liu, Guang-Ming; Li, Teng; Hara, Kenji; Wang, Xi-Chang; Su, Wen-Jin; Cao, Min-Jie

    2010-12-22

    Fish has received increasing attention because it induces IgE-mediated food allergy. Parvalbumin (PV) represents the major allergen of fish, and IgE cross-reactivity to PV in various teleost fish species has been shown, while little information is available about allergens in elasmobranch fish. In this study, two PV isoforms (named as PV-I and PV-II) from red stingray (Dasyatis akajei) were purified to homogeneity by a series of procedures including ammonium sulfate precipitation and column chromatographies of DEAE-Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200. Purified PVs revealed a single band on tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular masses of PV-I and PV-II were 12.29 and 11.95 kDa, respectively, as determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Western blot using antifrog PV monoclonal antibody (PARV-19) showed positive reactions to the two proteins, confirming that they were PVs, although their immunological reactivities were weaker than those of PV from silver carp. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of PV-I was determined, and comparison with PVs from other fish species showed low homology between teleost and elasmobranch fish. The isoelectric points of PV-I and PV-II were 5.4 and 5.0, respectively, as determined by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), suggesting that both isoforms belong to the α-group. IgE immunoblotting analysis showed that sera from fish-allergic patients reacted to both PV-I and PV-II from red stingray. Thermal stability revealed that PV-I easily formed oligomers than PV-II, which might contribute to the maintenance of its allerginicity during heat processing.

  3. Turbidimeter Design and Analysis: A Review on Optical Fiber Sensors for the Measurement of Water Turbidity

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz Bin; MatJafri, Mohd Zubir Bin

    2009-01-01

    Turbidimeters operate based on the optical phenomena that occur when incident light through water body is scattered by the existence of foreign particles which are suspended within it. This review paper elaborates on the standards and factors that may influence the measurement of turbidity. The discussion also focuses on the optical fiber sensor technologies that have been applied within the lab and field environment and have been implemented in the measurement of water turbidity and concentration of particles. This paper also discusses and compares results from three different turbidimeter designs that use various optical components. Mohd Zubir and Bashah and Daraigan have introduced a design which has simple configurations. Omar and MatJafri, on the other hand, have established a new turbidimeter design that makes use of optical fiber cable as the light transferring medium. The application of fiber optic cable to the turbidimeter will present a flexible measurement technique, allowing measurements to be made online. Scattered light measurement through optical fiber cable requires a highly sensitive detector to interpret the scattered light signal. This has made the optical fiber system have higher sensitivity in measuring turbidity compared to the other two simple turbidimeters presented in this paper. Fiber optic sensors provide the potential for increased sensitivity over large concentration ranges. However, many challenges must be examined to develop sensors that can collect reliable turbidity measurements in situ. PMID:22408507

  4. PREFACE: XXXVIII Symposium on Nuclear Physics (Cocoyoc 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Rodal, E.

    2015-09-01

    The 38th edition of the Symposium on Nuclear Physics was held at Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico from January 6-9, 2015. As in previous years, the Symposium brought together leading scientists from all around the world, working on: nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, physics with radioactive ion beams, hadronic physics, nuclear astrophysics, neutron physics and relativistic heavy-ion physics. The scientific program consisted of 27 invited talks, proposed by the international advisory committee that covered, in a balanced way, the experimental and theoretical work that currently is undergoing in the research fields of the Symposium. Ten posters complemented the program, providing students with an opportunity to bring their work to the attention of visiting scientists. This year, the conference activities also included a special talk presented by Archaeologist Omar Espinosa Severino about the ancient ruins found in Chalcatzingo, a village located approximately a 40 minute drive from the conference venue. The talk was followed by a visit to the archaeological site, guided by the group led by Archaeologist Mario Cordova Tello. The present volume contains 14 research articles based on invited talks presented at the Symposium. I would like to thank all the authors for their enthusiastic contribution. Special thanks to the anonymous referees for the time devoted to the review process, their input helped to maintain a high standard of the Conference Proceedings. Finally I would also like to thank the Symposiums' International Advisory Committee and the Sponsoring Organizations that made this event possible.

  5. KSC-2011-6822

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-08

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- On Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, members of NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) launch team monitor GRAIL's launch countdown from the Mission Directors Center in Hangar AE. From left are Dana Grieco, launch operations manager, Analex, NASA's Launch Services Program (LSP); Bruce Reid, GRAIL mission manager, LSP; Al Sierra, manager of the Flight Project Office, LSP; Omar Baez, GRAIL assistant launch director, LSP; and Tim Dunn, GRAIL launch director, LSP; David Lehman, spacecraft mission director and GRAIL project manager, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); and John Henk, GRAIL program manager, Lockheed Martin Space Systems. Launch is scheduled for 8:37:06 a.m. EDT Sept. 8 from Space Launch Complex 17B on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem around the moon to precisely measure and map variations in the moon's gravitational field. The mission will provide the most accurate global gravity field to date for any planet, including Earth. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/grail. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  6. KSC-2012-4624

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-25

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Launch Services Program officials oversee the countdown of NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probes, or RBSP, and its United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from consoles in the Atlas V Spaceflight Operations Center on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. From left are Omar Baez, assistant launch manager for RBSP, Tim Dunn, launch manager for RBSP, and Albert Sierra, chief of the Flight Projects Office. Weather conditions associated with lightning, as well as cumulus and anvil clouds, kept the probes on Space Launch Complex 41 for the duration of the 20-minute launch window which opened at 4:07 a.m. EDT. RBSP will explore changes in Earth's space environment caused by the sun -- known as "space weather" -- that can disable satellites, create power-grid failures and disrupt GPS service. The mission also will provide data on the fundamental radiation and particle acceleration processes throughout the universe. The launch is rescheduled for 4:05 a.m. EDT on Aug. 30, pending approval from the range. For more information on RBSP, visit http://www.nasa.gov/rbsp. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  7. Mortality rates decline in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    1991-11-01

    Experiencing remarkable decreases in mortality rates over the past 3 decades, Malaysia currently has one of the lowest mortality rates among developing countries, a rate that compares favorably with those of developed countries. Between 1957 and 1989, the crude death rate dropped from 12.4/1000 population to 4.6. Over the same period, Malaysia recorded even greater decreases in the infant mortality rate, from 75.5/1000 births to 15.2. The Maternal mortality rate also declined from 1.48 in 1970 to 0.24 in 1988. The data indicates that mortality rates vary from state to state, and that rural areas have a higher mortality than urban areas. According to a study by the National Population and Family Development Board, the use of maternal and child health services has played an important role in reducing neonatal, perinatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates. Nearly all women in Malaysia receive antenatal services. While the country has achieved great gains on mortality rates, programs focusing on specific age and socioeconomic groups could lead to even greater reductions. The Minister for National Unity and Social Development, Dato Napsiah Omar, has called for the development of programs designed to improve the population's quality of life.

  8. Modified bases enable high-efficiency oligonucleotide-mediated allelic replacement via mismatch repair evasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Harris H.; Xu, George; Vonner, Ashley J.; Church, George

    2011-01-01

    Genome engineering using single-stranded oligonucleotides is an efficient method for generating small chromosomal and episomal modifications in a variety of host organisms. The efficiency of this allelic replacement strategy is highly dependent on avoidance of the endogenous mismatch repair (MMR) machinery. However, global MMR inactivation generally results in significant accumulation of undesired background mutations. Here, we present a novel strategy using oligos containing chemically modified bases (2′-Fluoro-Uridine, 5-Methyl-deoxyCytidine, 2,6-Diaminopurine or Iso-deoxyGuanosine) in place of the standard T, C, A or G to avoid mismatch detection and repair, which we tested in Escherichia coli. This strategy increases transient allelic-replacement efficiencies by up to 20-fold, while maintaining a 100-fold lower background mutation level. We further show that the mismatched bases between the full length oligo and the chromosome are often not incorporated at the target site, probably due to nuclease activity at the 5′ and 3′ termini of the oligo. These results further elucidate the mechanism of oligo-mediated allelic replacement (OMAR) and enable improved methodologies for efficient, large-scale engineering of genomes. PMID:21609953

  9. KSC-2013-1384

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-08

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Media attend a prelaunch press conference at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California to discuss NASA's readiness to launch the Landsat Data Continuity Mission LDCM. From left are George Diller of NASA Public Affairs, LDCM program executive David Jarrett from NASA Headquarters, NASA Launch Director Omar Baez from Kennedy Space Center, United Launch Alliance Program Manager for NASA Missions Vernon Thorp, LDCM Project Manager Ken Schwer from Goddard Space Flight Center, and 1st Lt. Jennifer Kelley, launch weather officer for the 30th Operations Support Squadron at Vandenberg. Launch of LDCM aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Vandenberg's Space Launch Complex-3E is planned for Feb. 11 during a 48-minute launch window that opens at 10:02 a.m. PST, or 1:02 p.m. EST. LDCM is the eighth satellite in the Landsat Program series of Earth-observing missions and will continue the program’s critical role in monitoring, understanding and managing the resources needed for human sustainment, such as food, water and forests. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., is responsible for LDCM project management. Orbital Sciences Corp. built the LDCM satellite. NASA's Launch Services Program at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida provides launch management. After launch and the initial checkout phase, the U. S. Geological Survey will take operational control of LDCM, and it will be renamed Landsat 8. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  10. River flow trends in the west of Iran during the past 40 years: Impact of precipitation variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abghari, Hirad; Tabari, Hossein; Hosseinzadeh Talaee, P.

    2013-02-01

    A better understanding of hydrological changes associated with climate change can be achieved by analyzing the temporal trends in river discharge time series. We used the non-parametric Spearman's rho, Kendall's tau, Mann-Kendall and Theil-Sen approaches to evaluate annual and monthly trends in river flow data from 12 stations located in the mountainous western regions of Iran over a 40-year period spanning the hydrological years 1969-1970 to 2008-2009. The Pearson correlation analysis was also applied to explore the relationships between precipitation and river flow series. Using a 5% significance level, we found an evidence of downward trends in annual river discharge at Varayeneh, Omar-Abad, Saleh-Abad, Zehtaran and Bahadorbeig stations at the rates of 0.491, 1.00, 0.101, 0.044, and 0.020 m3/s per decade, respectively. These significant downward trends started in the hydrological years of 2005-2006, 2000-2001, 2006-2007, 1995-1996 and 1995-1996, respectively. The greatest numbers of stations with significant river discharge trends occur in October and November, accounting for seven and six stations respectively. Annual precipitation exhibited no strong directional trend, although the tendency was toward increasing annual precipitation. Monthly precipitation variability seems to be also increasing for most of the months but no overall trend pattern in monthly precipitation totals emerged. Correlation analyses indicated strong relationships between river discharge and precipitation at the annual scale and for most of the months.

  11. Regional Hydrothermal Cooling During the Initiation of Continental Rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, W. R.

    2001-12-01

    Thermochronologic data from the uplifted flanks of the Red Sea clearly indicate at least two distinct phases of regional cooling: the first at about 32 Ma and the second at about 21 Ma according to Omar and Steckler (1995). The latter phase correlates well with the rapid subsidence in the rift and uplift of the flanks. Thus this cooling data is generally interpreted to result from tectonic denudation. The earlier cooling is more problematic, since sediments of the same age are not clearly identified in rift basins. A different explanation for the early cooling episode is suggested by numerical models of lithospheric stretching. Those models show that rift initiation can result in a very broad region of lithospheric downbending. This bending produces small magnitude (several percent) surface extension of the sides of the rift. Eventually, these rift flanks are bent in the opposite sense and uplifted. The earlier phase of extensional strain may create a system of cracks and faults of sufficient permeability to allow significant water circulation. Hydrothermal flow could produce cooling of rocks as deep as 5-10 km. The cooling would be recorded in low-temperature thermochrologic systems such as apatite fission tracks. Model thermal histories for different rift and hydrothermal flow histories are compared to fission track data from the Red Sea region.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Thermal Evolution of the Danba Anticline, Sichuan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. J.; Wang, W. H.; Lee, Y. H.

    2014-12-01

    We applied finite difference method with markers in cell technique to simulate the thermal evolution in the Danba anticline, which is located to the north of the Sichuan basin within the Songpan-Ganzi orogen. We obtained the thermal history of the Danba anticline by solving thermokenematic equations for detachment folding. With that, we calculated the corresponding fission track ages based on a chemical kinetic model proposed by Lutz and Omar and compared them with the observed ones to find out the optimal model parameters. Our results show that the Danba anticline is most likely formed by horizontal contraction along a detachment fault at depth about 15 km, corresponding to the brittle-ductile transition in the mid-crust. For the last 25 My, the horizontal shortening is estimated to be about 72 km over a cross section with a width of 180 km. The average contraction velocity of about 2.9 mm/yr but it has been accelerating in a parabolic function to about 5~6 mm/yr at the present time, which is comparable with GPS observations. Our findings suggest that a weak detachement zone should exist beneath the Danba anticline, which might be associated with crustal channel flow.

  13. Quaternary sea level high-stand deposits of the southeast U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain: Age, distribution, and implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, R. K.; Cronin, T. M.; Ghaleb, B.; Portell, R.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Wehmiller, J. F.; Thompson, W. G.; Oches, E. A.; Willard, D. A.; Katz, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Emerged Quaternary paleo-shorelines and marine deposits provide a more direct way to reconstruct and analyze sea-level variability than methods using oxygen isotope analyses of deep ocean benthic foraminifera. New Uranium-series dates on fossil corals (primarily Astrangia spp. and Septastrea spp.) combined with previously published dates have allowed us to constrain the age, elevation, and geographical distribution of marine sediments deposited in the United States Atlantic Coastal Plain (ACP) from Virginia to Florida during periods of past high relative sea level (SL). We present new dates from deposits (VA/NC: Tabb/Norfolk, Nassawadox, & Omar Formations; SC: Wando, Socastee, & Canepatch Formations; FL: Anastasia, Ft. Thompson, & Bermont Formations) representing interglacial high-stands during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 5, 7, 9, and 11. In addition, we incorporate stratigraphic, marine micropaleontologic, and palynologic records with our SL chronology to reconstruct a more complete history of middle-to-late Pleistocene interglacial climates of the ACP. Ultimately, these results will test modeled sea-level fingerprint studies based on various melting scenarios of the Greenland and/or Antarctic ice sheets.

  14. A field trail for sealing abandoned mine shafts and adits with lightweight concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, E.H.; Beckett, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    An abandoned mine shaft near Omar, in Logan County, WV, was permanently sealed through a cooperative agreement between the West Virginia Department of Commerce, Labor, and Environmental Resources, Division of Environmental Protection, and the US Bureau of Mines (USBM), Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Program. An engineered shaft seal design was developed and demonstrated that featured lightweight concrete as a key material component at a wet density of about 45 lb/ft[sup 3]. A reinforced concrete cap designed for 5 psi live load was placed over the shaft seal. Applicable new concrete technologies relating to a 100-yr design life were utilized to assure future integrity of the shaft seal. Waterproofing methods were included in the shaft seal design to provide protection from ambient moisture and corrosive mine waters and to increase the long-term durability of the shaft seal. All construction methods used in the field trial are fully adaptable for the mine-reclamation contractor. The USBM research objectives were to develop a broad generic design that will be widely applicable to other adit-sealing and shaft-sealing problems throughout the mining industry.

  15. Monthly streamflow forecasting with auto-regressive integrated moving average

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Najah; Samsudin, Ruhaidah; Shabri, Ani

    2017-09-01

    Forecasting of streamflow is one of the many ways that can contribute to better decision making for water resource management. The auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model was selected in this research for monthly streamflow forecasting with enhancement made by pre-processing the data using singular spectrum analysis (SSA). This study also proposed an extension of the SSA technique to include a step where clustering was performed on the eigenvector pairs before reconstruction of the time series. The monthly streamflow data of Sungai Muda at Jeniang, Sungai Muda at Jambatan Syed Omar and Sungai Ketil at Kuala Pegang was gathered from the Department of Irrigation and Drainage Malaysia. A ratio of 9:1 was used to divide the data into training and testing sets. The ARIMA, SSA-ARIMA and Clustered SSA-ARIMA models were all developed in R software. Results from the proposed model are then compared to a conventional auto-regressive integrated moving average model using the root-mean-square error and mean absolute error values. It was found that the proposed model can outperform the conventional model.

  16. KSC-08pd1603

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-06-09

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center, key personnel brief the media on NASA's Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope, or GLAST, launch scheduled for June 11. From left are Dr. Jon Morse, director of NASA's Astrophysics Division; Omar Baez, NASA launch director/launch manager at Kennedy; Kris Walsh, director of the Delta NASA and Commercial Programs with United Launch Alliance; Kevin Grady, GLAST project manager at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center; Dr. Steven Ritz, GLAST project scientist/astrophysicist at Goddard; and Joel Tumbiolo, the U.S. Air Force Delta II launch weather officer with the 45th Weather Squadron at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. GLAST is a powerful space observatory that will explore the Universe's ultimate frontier, where nature harnesses forces and energies far beyond anything possible on Earth; probe some of science's deepest questions, such as what our Universe is made of, and search for new laws of physics; explain how black holes accelerate jets of material to nearly light speed; and help crack the mystery of stupendously powerful explosions known as gamma-ray bursts. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  17. KSC-08pd1604

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-06-09

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At left, Public Information Officer George Diller moderates a media briefing on NASA's Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope, or GLAST, launch scheduled for June 11. On the panel next to Diller are Dr. Jon Morse, director of NASA's Astrophysics Division; Omar Baez, NASA launch director/launch manager at Kennedy; Kris Walsh, director of the Delta NASA and Commercial Programs with United Launch Alliance; Kevin Grady, GLAST project manager at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center; Dr. Steven Ritz, GLAST project scientist/astrophysicist at Goddard; and Joel Tumbiolo, the U.S. Air Force Delta II launch weather officer with the 45th Weather Squadron at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. GLAST is a powerful space observatory that will explore the Universe's ultimate frontier, where nature harnesses forces and energies far beyond anything possible on Earth; probe some of science's deepest questions, such as what our Universe is made of, and search for new laws of physics; explain how black holes accelerate jets of material to nearly light speed; and help crack the mystery of stupendously powerful explosions known as gamma-ray bursts. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  18. Analysis and Reduction of Complex Networks Under Uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanem, Roger G

    2014-07-31

    This effort was a collaboration with Youssef Marzouk of MIT, Omar Knio of Duke University (at the time at Johns Hopkins University) and Habib Najm of Sandia National Laboratories. The objective of this effort was to develop the mathematical and algorithmic capacity to analyze complex networks under uncertainty. Of interest were chemical reaction networks and smart grid networks. The statements of work for USC focused on the development of stochastic reduced models for uncertain networks. The USC team was led by Professor Roger Ghanem and consisted of one graduate student and a postdoc. The contributions completed by the USC team consisted of 1) methodology and algorithms to address the eigenvalue problem, a problem of significance in the stability of networks under stochastic perturbations, 2) methodology and algorithms to characterize probability measures on graph structures with random flows. This is an important problem in characterizing random demand (encountered in smart grid) and random degradation (encountered in infrastructure systems), as well as modeling errors in Markov Chains (with ubiquitous relevance !). 3) methodology and algorithms for treating inequalities in uncertain systems. This is an important problem in the context of models for material failure and network flows under uncertainty where conditions of failure or flow are described in the form of inequalities between the state variables.

  19. KSC-2013-3942

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-15

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – During a news conference at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, agency and contractor officials discussed preparations for the launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, mission. Calling on a member of the news media for a question, is George Diller of NASA Public Affairs, left. Also participating are Geoffrey Yoder, NASA deputy associate administrator of programs in the Science Mission Directorate, center, and Omar Baez, NASA launch director. MAVEN is being prepared for its scheduled launch on Nov 18, 2013 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Positioned in an orbit above the Red Planet, MAVEN will study the upper atmosphere of Mars in unprecedented detail. For information on the MAVEN mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/maven/main/index.html. Photo credit: NASA MAVEN is being prepared for its scheduled launch on Nov 18, 2013 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Positioned in an orbit above the Red Planet, MAVEN will study the upper atmosphere of Mars in unprecedented detail. For more information, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/maven/main/index.html Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  20. KSC-2013-3944

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-15

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – During a news conference at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, agency and contractor officials discussed preparations for the launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, mission. Participating in the briefing is Omar Baez, NASA launch director. MAVEN is being prepared for its scheduled launch on Nov 18, 2013 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Positioned in an orbit above the Red Planet, MAVEN will study the upper atmosphere of Mars in unprecedented detail. For information on the MAVEN mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/maven/main/index.html. Photo credit: NASA MAVEN is being prepared for its scheduled launch on Nov 18, 2013 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Positioned in an orbit above the Red Planet, MAVEN will study the upper atmosphere of Mars in unprecedented detail. For more information, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/maven/main/index.html Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  1. The significance of large variations in oil properties of the Dai Hung field, Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Behrenbruch, P.; Du, P.Q.

    1995-10-01

    The Dai Hung Oil field, offshore Vietnam, is comprised of a complex subsurface structure containing stacked reservoir sequences typically found in many other Southeast Asian fields. Combined with areal fault compartmentalization, this situation has led to the observed, large variations in oil properties. Furthermore, the depositional environment in terms of burial history has created a unique overpressure situation which also had an affect, particularly on the crude saturation conditions of individual reservoirs. For commercial and technical reasons, this situation required a detailed analysis, both in terms of variation in crude assay and live oil properties. For whole crude properties: gravity, K factor, wax content and pour point-graphs were drawn up using a large data base of worldwide crudes against which the Dai Hung data could be validated. In case of PVT properties (bubble point and formation volume factor) existing industry correlations were examined. It could be concluded that the sweet, medium gravity and moderately waxy Dai Hung crude has whole crude properties which are comparable to other, similar crudes. The general framework of crude properties established is suitable to type other crudes, even if limited information is available. Of the existing PVT correlations tested, it was found that Standing`s correlation for the oil formation volume factor and the Kartoatmodjo-Schmidt correlation for the bubble point fitted the Dai Hung crude data the best. For the lower shrinkage Dai Hung crudes the Malaysian oil formation volume factor correlation by Omar-Todd gave the best data fit.

  2. Conserved B-Cell Epitopes among Human Bocavirus Species Indicate Potential Diagnostic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaying; Zhou, Hongli; Wu, Chao; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vernet, Guy; Guo, Li; Wang, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    Background Human bocavirus species 1–4 (HBoV1–4) have been associated with respiratory and enteric infections in children. However, the immunological mechanisms in response to HBoV infections are not fully understood. Though previous studies have shown cross-reactivities between HBoV species, the epitopes responsible for this phenomenon remain unknown. In this study, we used genomic and immunologic approaches to identify the reactive epitopes conserved across multiple HBoV species and explored their potential as the basis of a novel diagnostic test for HBoVs. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated HBoV1–3 VP2 gene fragment phage display libraries (GFPDLs) and used these libraries to analyze mouse antisera against VP2 protein of HBoV1, 2, and 3, and human sera positive for HBoVs. Using this approach, we mapped four epitope clusters of HBoVs and identified two immunodominant peptides–P1 (1MSDTDIQDQQPDTVDAPQNT20), and P2 (162EHAYPNASHPWDEDVMPDL180)–that are conserved among HBoV1–4. To confirm epitope immunogenicity, we immunized mice with the immunodominant P1 and P2 peptides identified in our screen and found that they elicited high titer antibodies in mice. These two antibodies could only recognize the VP2 of HBoV 1–4 in Western blot assays, rather than those of the two other parvoviruses human parvovirus B19 and human parvovirus 4 (PARV4). Based on our findings, we evaluated epitope-based peptide-IgM ELISAs as potential diagnostic tools for HBoVs IgM antibodies. We found that the P1+P2-IgM ELISA showed a higher sensitivity and specificity in HBoVs IgM detection than the assays using a single peptide. Conclusions/Significance The identification of the conserved B-cell epitopes among human bocavirus species contributes to our understanding of immunological cross-reactivities of HBoVs, and provides important insights for the development of HBoV diagnostic tools. PMID:24475201

  3. Meeting Report: 2013 PDA Virus & TSE Safety Forum.

    PubMed

    Willkommen, Hannelore; Blümel, Johannes; Brorson, Kurt; Chen, Dayue; Chen, Qi; Gröner, Albrecht; Hubbard, Brian R; Kreil, Thomas R; Ruffing, Michel; Ruiz, Sol; Scott, Dorothy; Silvester, Glenda

    2014-01-01

    The report provides a summary of the presentations and discussions at the Virus & TSE Safety Forum 2013 organized by the Parenteral Drug Association (PDA) and held in Berlin, Germany, from June 4 to 6, 2013. The conference was accompanied by a workshop, "Virus Spike Preparations and Virus Removal by Filtration: New Trends and Developments". The presentations and the discussion at the workshop are summarized in a separate report that will be published in this issue of the journal as well. As with previous conferences of this series, the PDA Virus & TSE Safety Forum 2013 provided again an excellent opportunity to exchange information and opinions between the industry, research organizations, and regulatory bodies. Updates on regulatory considerations related to virus and transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) safety of biopharmaceuticals were provided by agencies of the European Union (EU), the United States (US), and Singapore. The epidemiology and detection methods of new emerging pathogens like hepatitis E virus and parvovirus (PARV 4) were exemplified, and the risk of contamination of animal-derived raw materials like trypsin was considered in particular. The benefit of using new sequence-based virus detection methods was discussed. Events of bioreactor contaminations in the past drew the attention to root cause investigations and preventive actions, which were illustrated by several examples. Virus clearance data of specific unit operations were provided; the discussion focused on the mechanism of virus clearance and on the strategic concept of viral clearance integration. As in previous years, the virus safety section was followed by a TSE section that covered recent scientific findings that may influence the risk assessment of blood and cell substrates. These included the realization that interspecies transmission of TSE by blood components in sheep is greater than predicted by assays in transgenic mice. Also, the pathogenesis and possibility of

  4. First identification of porcine parvovirus 6 in North America by viral metagenomic sequencing of serum from pigs infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Schirtzinger, Erin E; Suddith, Andrew W; Hause, Benjamin M; Hesse, Richard A

    2015-10-16

    Currently, eight species in four genera of parvovirus have been described that infect swine. These include ungulate protoparvovirus 1 (classical porcine parvovirus, PPV), ungulate tetraparvovirus 2 (PPV3), ungulate tetraparvovirus 3 (which includes PPV2, porcine hokovirus, porcine partetravirus and porcine PARV4), ungulate copiparvovirus 2 (which includes PPV4 and PPV5), ungulate bocaparvovirus 2 (which includes porcine bocavirus 1, 2 and 6), ungulate bocaparvovirus 3 (porcine bocavirus 5), ungulate bocaparvovirus 4 (porcine bocavirus 7) and ungulate bocaparvovirus 5 (porcine bocavirus 3, 4-1 and 4-2). PPV6, the most recently described porcine parvovirus, was first identified in China in late 2014 in aborted pig fetuses. Prevalence of PPV6 in China was found to be similar in finishing age pigs from farms with and without evidence of swine reproductive failure. Porcine parvovirus 6 (PPV6) was detected by sequence-independent single primer amplification (SISPA) and confirmed by overlapping and real-time PCR in the serum of porcine reproductive and respiratory virus (PRRSv) positive samples. Seven nearly complete genomes of PPV6 were identified in PRRSv genotype 2 positive serum samples submitted to state veterinary diagnostic laboratories in 2014. Further testing using overlapping and real-time PCR determined PPV6 to be present in 13.2 % of the serums tested. Additionally, PPV6 was present in samples from all of the geographic locations sampled encompassing nine states in the United States and one state in Mexico. The presence of PPV6 in serum indicates that the PPV6 infection is disseminated and not localized to a specific tissue type. Alignments of the near full length genomes, NS1, and capsid genes identified one of the five PPV6 isolates from China (98.6-99.5 % identity with the North American strains) to be the North American strains nearest relative. These results are the first to report the presence of PPV6 in North America and demonstrate that the virus is

  5. Identification and genomic characterization of a novel porcine parvovirus (PPV6) in China.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianqiang; Qiao, Caixia; Han, Xue; Han, Tao; Kang, Wenhua; Zi, Zhanchao; Cao, Zhen; Zhai, Xinyan; Cai, Xuepeng

    2014-12-02

    Parvoviruses are classified into two subfamilies based on their host range: the Parvovirinae, which infect vertebrates, and the Densovirinae, which mainly infect insects and other arthropods. In recent years, a number of novel parvoviruses belonging to the subfamily Parvovirinae have been identified from various animal species and humans, including human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), porcine hokovirus, ovine partetravirus, porcine parvovirus 4 (PPV4), and porcine parvovirus 5 (PPV5). Using sequence-independent single primer amplification (SISPA), a novel parvovirus within the subfamily Parvovirinae that was distinct from any known parvoviruses was identified and five full-length genome sequences were determined and analyzed. A novel porcine parvovirus, provisionally named PPV6, was initially identified from aborted pig fetuses in China. Retrospective studies revealed the prevalence of PPV6 in aborted pig fetuses and piglets(50% and 75%, respectively) was apparently higher than that in finishing pigs and sows (15.6% and 3.8% respectively). Furthermore, the prevalence of PPV6 in finishing pig was similar in affected and unaffected farms (i.e. 16.7% vs. 13.6%-21.7%). This finding indicates that animal age, perhaps due to increased innate immune resistance, strongly influences the level of PPV6 viremia. Complete genome sequencing and multiple alignments have shown that the nearly full-length genome sequences were approximately 6,100 nucleotides in length and shared 20.5%-42.6% DNA sequence identity with other members of the Parvovirinae subfamily. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PPV6 was significantly distinct from other known parvoviruses and was most closely related to PPV4. Our findings and review of published parvovirus sequences suggested that a novel porcine parvovirus is currently circulating in China and might be classified into the novel genus Copiparvovirus within the subfamily Parvovirinae. However, the clinical manifestations of PPV6 are still unknown in that the

  6. Connecting onshore and offshore near-surface geology: Delaware's sand inventory project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, K.W.; Jordan, R.R.; Talley, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Beginning in 1988, the Delaware Geological Survey began a program to inventory on-land sand resources suitable for beach nourishment. The inventory included an assessment of the native beach textures using existing data and developing parameters of what would be considered suitable sand textures for Delaware's Atlantic beaches. An assessment of the economics of on-land sand resources was also conducted, and it was determined that the cost of the sand was competitive with offshore dredging costs. In addition, the sand resources were put into a geologic context for purposes of predicting which depositional environments and lithostratigraphic units were most likely to produce suitable sand resources. The results of the work identified several suitable on-land sand resource areas in the Omar and Beaverdam formations that were deposited in barrier-tidal delta and fluvial-estuarine environments, respectively. The identified on-land resources areas have not been utilized due to difficulties of truck transport and development pressures in the resource areas. The Delaware Geological Survey's participation in years 8, 9, and 10 of the Continental Margins Program was developed to extend the known resource areas onshore to offshore Delaware in order to determine potential offshore sand resources for beach nourishment. Years 8 and 9 involved primarily the collection of all available data on the offshore geology. These data included all seismic lines, surface grab samples, and cores. The data were filtered for those that had reliable locations and geologic information that could be used for geologic investigations. Year 10 completed the investigations onshore by construction of a geologic cross-section from data along the coast of Delaware from Cape Henlopen to Fenwick. This cross section identified the geologic units and potential sand resource bodies as found immediately along the coast. These units and resources are currently being extended offshore and tied to known and

  7. Physical-chemical treatment of tar-sand processing wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    King, P.H.

    1982-07-01

    This final report for Phase I summarizes work done to determine the ability of several coagulants to contribute significantly in the treatment of selected tar sand wastewaters. The coagulation process must be considered as one possible step in a treatment scheme to reduce pollutants in these wastewaters and lead to a water quality acceptable for reuse or disposal. Two wastewaters were provided by the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC). The primary emphasis in this study was focused on a representative steam flooding wastewater designated in the report as TARSAND 1S. The coagulation study in which treatment of this wastewater was the prime goal is described in full detail in the thesis entitled Chemical Coagulation of Steam Flooding Tar Sand Wastewaters. This thesis, written by Mr. Omar Akad, is included as Appendix A in this report. A representative combustion wastewater, designated as TARSAND 2C, was also provided by LETC. This wastewater was characteristically low in suspended solids and after initial screening experiments were conducted, it was concluded that coagulation was relatively ineffective in the treatment of TARSAND 2C. Hence, efforts were concentrated on the parametric evaluation of coagulation of TARSAND 1S. The objectives for the research conducted under Phase I were: (1) to compare the effectiveness of lime, alum, ferric chloride and representative synthetic organic polymers in reducing suspended solids and total organic carbon (TOC) from TARSAND 1S wastewater; (2) to determine the effects of pH, coagulant aids, and mixing conditions on the coagulation process; (3) to determine the relative volume of sludge produced from each selected coagulation process.

  8. Electron kinetics dependence on gas pressure in laser-induced oxygen plasma experiment: Theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Abdellatif, Galila

    2017-08-01

    A study is performed to investigate the dependency of threshold intensity on gas pressure observed in the measurements of the breakdown of molecular oxygen that carried out by Phuoc (2000) [1]. In this experiment, the breakdown was induced by 532 nm laser radiation of pulse width 5.5 ns and spot size of 8.5 μm, in oxygen over a wide pressure range (190-3000 Torr). The analysis aimed to explore the electron kinetic reliance on gas pressure for the separate contribution of each of the gain and loss processes encountered in this study. The investigation is based on an electron cascade model applied previously in Gamal and Omar (2001) [2] and Gaabour et al. (2013) [3]. This model solves numerically a differential equation designates the time evolution of the electron energy distribution, and a set of rate equations that describe the change of excited states population. The numerical examination of the electron energy distribution function and its parameters revealed that photo-ionization of the excited molecules plays a significant role in enhancing the electron density growth rate over the whole tested gas pressure range. This process is off set by diffusion of electrons out of the focal volume in the low-pressure regime. At atmospheric pressure electron, collisional processes dominate and act mainly to populate the excited states. Hence photo-ionization becomes efficient and compete with the encountered loss processes (electron diffusion, vibrational excitation of the ground state molecules as well as two body attachments). At high pressures ( 3000 Torr) three body attachments are found to be the primary cause of losses which deplete the electron density and hence results in the slow decrease of the threshold intensity.

  9. The fate of river organic carbon in coastal areas: A study in the Rhône River delta using multiple isotopic (δ13C, Δ14C) and organic tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathalot, C.; Rabouille, C.; Tisnérat-Laborde, N.; Toussaint, F.; Kerhervé, P.; Buscail, R.; Loftis, K.; Sun, M.-Y.; Tronczynski, J.; Azoury, S.; Lansard, B.; Treignier, C.; Pastor, L.; Tesi, T.

    2013-10-01

    A significant fraction of the global carbon flux to the ocean occurs in River-dominated Ocean Margins (RiOMar) although large uncertainties remain in the cycle of organic matter (OM) in these systems. In particular, the OM sources and residence time have not been well clarified. Surface (0-1 cm) and sub-surface (3-4 cm) sediments and water column particles (bottom and intermediate depth) from the Rhône River delta system were collected in June 2005 and in April 2007 for a multi-proxy study. Lignin phenols, black carbon (BC), proto-kerogen/BC mixture, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), carbon stable isotope (δ13COC), and radiocarbon measurements (Δ14COC) were carried out to characterize the source of sedimentary organic material and to address degradation and transport processes. The bulk OM in the prodelta sediment appears to have a predominantly modern terrigenous origin with a significant contribution of modern vascular C3 plant detritus (Δ14COC = 27.9‰, δ13COC = -27.4‰). In contrast, the adjacent continental shelf, below the river plume, seems to be dominated by aged OM (Δ14COC = -400‰, δ13COC = -24.2‰), and shows no evidence of dilution and/or replacement by freshly produced marine carbon. Our data suggest an important contribution of black carbon (50% of OC) in the continental shelf sediments. Selective degradation processes occur along the main dispersal sediment system, promoting the loss of a modern terrestrial OM but also proto-kerogen-like OM. In addition, we hypothesize that during the transport across the shelf, a long term resuspension/deposition loop induces efficient long term degradation processes able to rework such refractory-like material until the OC is protected by the mineral matrix of particles.

  10. Uranium-series dating of mollusks and corals, and age of Pleistocene deposits, Chesapeake Bay area, Virginia and Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mixon, Robert B.; Szabo, B. J.; Owens, James Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Geologic mapping in conjunction with uranium-series dating of fossil mollusks and corals suggests that the low-lying ( < 17 m in altitude) terrace deposits in the central and southern Chesapeake Bay area include two main depositional sequences, each of which represents a high stand of the sea in late Pleistocene time. The older depositional sequence includes the Accomack and Omar beds of the Delmarva area, the fossiliferous deposits along the lower Rappahannock River, and the Norfolk Formation deposits west of the Suffolk scarp. These beds have yielded a single reliable coral age estimate of 184,000?20,000 years B.P., suggesting an early late Pleistocene age. The younger sequence, including the type beds of the Norfolk Formation and equivalent strata east of the Suffolk scarp, has yielded several coral ages ranging from about 62,000 to 86,000 years B.P. (including ages from our samples and previously reported age estimates); thus, it is clearly late Pleistocene in age. Groupings of ages obtained from our quahog analyses also suggest two transgressive sequences; however, the estimated quahog ages are consistently younger than ages based on coral samples from the same and equivalent stratigraphic units. Stratigraphic, paleoclimatic, and geomorphic data suggest that the estimated uranium-series age of 71,000?7,000 years B.P. for the type beds of the Norfolk, obtained by averaging our coral dates, may be too young by as much as several tens of thousands of years. A postulated equivalency of the type Norfolk beds, upper Pleistocene deposits near Charleston, S.C. (apparent uranium-series age = 95,000?5,000 years), and deposits in the Caribbean area thought to represent the highest sea stand during the last interglacial period (apparent age, 125,000?10,000 years) implies diagenetic modification of coralline material possibly in part because of regional differences in depositional and postdepositional environments.

  11. Quaternary Sea-Level History from the US Atlantic Coastal Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, R. K.; Cronin, T. M.; Katz, M. E.; Browning, J. V.; Miller, K. G.; Willard, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Analyses of emerged Quaternary paleo-shorelines and marine deposits aid in the reconstruction of environmental conditions and variability surrounding recent ice volume and sea-level histories derived from oxygen isotope records. We present preliminary results from a project designed to analyze the age, elevation, and paleoclimate history of Quaternary sediments deposited during sea level highstands along the United States Atlantic Coastal Plain (ACP) from Maryland to Florida. Prior studies have shown that, depending on the region, ACP sediments correlate with past interglacial periods corresponding to Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 5, 7, possibly 9, and 11. Stratigraphy, marine micropaleontology, and palynology indicate at least two major marine transgressive sequences on the Delmarva Peninsula in Virginia corresponding to MIS 5a and 11, the Nassawadox Formation and Accomack beds of the Omar Formation, respectively. These depositional sequences represent sea-level positions of approximately +10m and +15m, relative to today. Despite generally corresponding to glacio-eustatic sea levels of +5-9m for MIS 5a-e (Potter & Lambeck, 2003; Kopp et al., 2009), and of +6-13m for MIS 11 (Raymo & Mitrovica, 2012), the relative sea-level positions during both interglacial periods were likely affected by glacio-isostatic adjustment in the region. Corresponding marine units and paleo-shorelines, identified by pronounced inland scarps separated by intermittent terraces on the western side of the Chesapeake Bay, are likely from MIS 5, 7, and 11. Ostracode and foraminifera assemblages identify significant environmental variability within these transgressive interglacial deposits, likely driven by relatively minor, suborbital climatic and sea-level oscillations.

  12. Quantifying entanglement of overlapping indistinguishable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gittings, Joseph R.

    This thesis develops the quantitative study of quantum entanglement in systems of identical particles. Understanding this topic is essential for the construction of quantum information processing devices involving identical particles. A brief overview of necessary concepts and methods, such as the density matrix, the entanglement in pure and mixed states of distinguishable particles, and some common applications of entanglement is given in the introduction. Some competing methods of calculating the entanglement in bipartite pure states of indistinguishable particles are examined. It is shown that only the 'site entropy' measure introduced by Zanardi satisfies all the criteria for a correct entanglement measure. A teleportation protocol which utilizes all the entanglement carried (in both the spin and space degrees of freedom) in a doubly- occupied molecular bonding orbital is presented. The output from an interferometer in a thought experiment described by Omar et al. is studied as an example to see whether entanglement can be separated into space-only, spin-only, and space-spin components. A similar exercise is performed for a doubly-occupied molecular bonding orbital. The relationship between these results and the application of superselection rules (SSRs) to the quantification of useful entanglement is discussed. A numerical method for estimating the entanglement of formation of a mixed state of arbitrary dimension by a conjugate gradient algorithm is described. The results of applying an implementation of the algorithm to both random and isotropic states of 2 qutrits (i.e. two three-dimensional systems) is described. Existing work on calculating entanglement between two sites in various spin systems is outlined. New methods for calculating the entanglement between two sites in various types of degenerate quantum gas - a Fermi gas, a Bose condensate, and a BCS superconductor - are described. The results of numerical studies of the entanglement in a normal metal

  13. Multi objectives model to optimise the economical value of agriculture water use in Gaza Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouda, O.; Bardossy, A.

    2003-04-01

    Multi objectives model to optimise the economical value of agriculture water use in Gaza Strip. O. Ouda (1), A. Bárdossy (1) (1) Institut fuer Wasserbau, Universitaet Stuttgart Fax: +49-(0)711-685-4746/ e-mail: omar.ouda@iws.uni-stuttgart.de Key words: Multi objectives model, agriculture water use, and Gaza Strip. ============================================================================ Abstract The Gaza Strip faces a serious water shortage problem, with a present water shortage of about 61 Mm3/year. The problem is projected to become even larger in the future due to a high population growth of about 3.2%. The water deficit is presently covered by abstraction of the groundwater beyond the sustainable yield, where groundwater is the only natural source in Gaza strip. Irrigated agriculture consumed about 60% (90 Mm3/year) of water in Gaza strip. The economical value of water used for agriculture propose is very low in comparison with water opportunity cost of 1 US/m3 , ( seawater desalination cost). A Multi objective optimisation model (MOM) based on mathematical programming techniques aimed to optimise the economical return value of agriculture water use has been formulated, where 20 crops distributed over 16 zones have been considered. The available agriculture area, Available treated wastewater, Local agriculture products demand were considered as constrains. Irrigation water demand for each crop for three meteorological conditions dry, wet and average year, and Average product prices were considered as variables. A modification of the MOM models has been made toward equitable profit distribution (US/hectare) among the different 16 zones, where additional constrain of minimum profit per hectare in each zone has been implemented. Finally a sensitivity analysis for the effect of water price, crop price and crop products demand on the model output has been made. The MOM presents a good analytical basis for policy makers toward optimising the economical return of

  14. KSC-08pd1817

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-06-18

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – A prelaunch news conference is held on North Vandenberg Air Force Base to present the latest information about the Ocean Surface Topography Mission, or OSTM/Jason 2. Seated from left are the moderator George Diller; Steve Neeck, OSTM/Jason 2 program executive; Omar Baez, NASA launch director at NASA's Kennedy Space Center; Kris Walsh, director of NASA and commercial programs for, United Launch Alliance; Parag Vaze, OSTM/Jason 2 project manager at the NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory; and Capt. Andrew M. Frey, launch weather officer with the 30th Weather Squadron. The OSTM/Jason 2 satellite will embark on a globe-circling voyage to continue charting sea level, a vital indicator of global climate change. The mission will return a vast amount of new data that will improve weather, climate and ocean forecasts. OSTM/Jason 2's expected lifetime of at least three years will extend into the next decade the continuous record of these data started in 1992 by NASA and the French space agency Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, or CNES, with the TOPEX/Poseidon mission. The data collection was continued by the two agencies on Jason-1 in 2001. The launch window extends from 12:46 a.m. to 12:55 a.m. PDT. The satellite will be placed in an 830-mile-high orbit at an inclination of 66 degrees after separating from the Delta II 55 minutes after liftoff. Photo credit: Photograph by Carleton Bailie for United Launch Alliance

  15. Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratios of Lofted Aerosol Layers Observed During the First Three Months of CALIPSO Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hu, Yongxiang; Reagan, John A.; Winker, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Case studies from the first three months of the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO) measurements of lofted aerosol layers are analyzed using transmittance [Young, 1995] and two-wavelength algorithms [Vaughan et al., 2004] to determine the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratios at 532 and 1064 nm. The transmittance method requires clear air below the layer so that the transmittance through the layer can be determined. Suitable scenes are selected from the browse images and clear air below features is identified by low 532 nm backscatter signal and confirmed by low depolarization and color ratios. The transmittance and two-wavelength techniques are applied to a number of lofted layers and the extinction-to-backscatter ratios are compared with values obtained from the CALIPSO aerosol models [Omar et al., 2004]. The results obtained from these studies are used to adjust the aerosol models and develop observations based extinction-to-backscatter ratio look-up tables and phase functions. Values obtained by these techniques are compared to Sa determinations using other independent methods with a goal of developing probability distribution functions of aerosol type-specific extinction to backscatter ratios. In particular, the results are compared to values determined directly by the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) during the CALIPSO CloudSat Validation Experiments (CCVEX) and Sa determined by the application of the two-wavelength lidar Constrained Ratio Aerosol Model-fit (CRAM) retrieval approach [Cattrall et al., 2005; Reagan et al., 2004] to the HSRL data. The results are also compared to values derived using the empirical relationship between the multiple-scattering fraction and the linear depolarization ratio by using Monte Carlo simulations of water clouds [Hu et al., 2006].

  16. Environmental forensics evaluation of sources of sediment hydrocarbon contamination in Milford Haven Waterway.

    PubMed

    Little, David I; Galperin, Yakov; Bullimore, Blaise; Camplin, Mike

    2015-02-01

    Current and historic petroleum-related activities in Milford Haven Waterway (MHW; Wales, UK) contribute to hydrocarbon contamination of surficial sediments. Three main hydrocarbon components of sediments were analyzed: (1) aliphatic hydrocarbons of predominantly biogenic origin, representing about 5-15% of total hydrocarbons (THC); (2) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from recent petrogenic and mainly older pyrogenic sources, representing about 2-6% of THC; (3) unresolved complex mixture from spill-related and heavily-weathered petrogenic sources, representing as much as 70-85% of THC. Environmental forensics evaluation of the data demonstrate that although 72,000 tonnes (t) crude oil spilled from the Sea Empress in 1996, the Forties blend cargo was not identified in 2010. However, using biomarkers, heavy fuel oil (HFO) from Sea Empress' bunkers (480 t spilled) was detected further upstream and more widely than previously. Iranian crude (100 t) spilled by the El Omar in 1988 and fuel (130,000 t) lost during bombing in 1940 also were tentatively identified. The PAH source ratios demonstrate that the historic pyrogenic PAHs come mainly from biomass and coal combustion. The distribution pattern of PAHs appeared more pyrogenic in 2012 than in 1996, as if recovering from the more petrogenic signature, in places, of the Sea Empress. The heavier PAH distributions were pyrogenic at most stations, and similar to those in sediments from oil terminal berths up to 2006, when dredging operations peaked. Partly as a result of this, in 2007 the concentrations of PAHs peaked throughout the waterway. Apart from effluent, atmospheric and runoff inputs, most of the identified inputs to the surficial sediments are historic. Therefore, likely processes include disturbance by construction (e.g. pile-driving) and dredging of contaminants sequestered in sediments, followed by their wide redistribution via suspended sediment transport.

  17. Thickness of the surficial aquifer, Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denver, Judith; Nardi, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    A digital map of the thickness of the surficial unconfined aquifer, including from the land surface and unsaturated zone to the bottom of sediments of geologic units identified as part of the surficial aquifer, was produced to improve understanding of the hydrologic system in the Maryland and Delaware portions of the Delmarva Peninsula. The map is intended to be used in conjunction with other environmental coverages (such land use, wetlands, and soil characteristics) to provide a subsurface hydrogeologic component to studies of nitrate transport that have historically relied on maps of surficial features. It could also be used to study the transport of other water soluble chemicals. The map was made using the best currently available data, which was of varying scales. It was created by overlaying a high resolution land surface and bathymetry digital elevation model (DEM) on a digital representation of the base of the surficial aquifer, part of hydrogeologic framework, as defined by Andreasen and others (2013). Thickness was calculated as the difference between the top of land surface and the bottom of the surficial aquifer sediments, which include sediments from geologic formations of late-Miocene through Quaternary age. Geologic formations with predominantly sandy surficial sediments that comprise the surficial aquifer on the Delmarva Peninsula include the Parsonsburg Sand, Sinepuxent Formation (Fm.), and parts of the Omar Fm. north of Indian River Bay in Delaware, the Columbia Fm., Beaverdam Fm., and Pennsauken Fm. (Ator and others 2005; Owens and Denney, 1986; Mixon, 1985; Bachman and Wilson, 1984). Formations with mixed texture and sandy stratigraphy including the Scotts Corner Fm. and Lynch Heights Fm. in Delaware are also considered part of the surficial aquifer (Ramsey, 1997). Subcropping aquifers and confining beds underlie the surficial aquifer throughout the Peninsula and may increase or limit its thickness, respectively (Andreasen and others, 2013

  18. Looking Deep with Infrared Eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-07-01

    . "Nothing quite like it has ever been built before. The fact that it is working reliably and reaching its theoretical sensitivity is a testament to the hard work and skill of the engineering team at the UKATC." ESO PR Photo 24a/06 ESO PR Photo 26a/06 Faint Red Galaxy in the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey A small amount of data was released in January 2006 and already teams led by Omar Almaini at the University of Nottingham and Nigel Hambly of the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Edinburgh are beginning to reveal some of the secrets of star and galaxy formation. Omar Almaini, Ross McLure and the Ultra Deep Survey team have been looking at distant galaxies by surveying the same region of sky night after night to see deeper and to find these very faint objects. This survey will be one hundred times larger than any similar survey attempted to date and will cover an area four times the size of the full Moon. So far several hundred thousand galaxies have been detected and among the early discoveries, nine remarkable galaxies have been found that appear to be 12 billion light years away. As it has taken 12 billion years for the light to travel from these galaxies to Earth, we are seeing them as they were when they were very young - only a billion years after the Big Bang. The newly discovered galaxies are unusual as they appear to be very massive for their age. This challenges thinking on how galaxies form, since it was thought that large galaxies form gradually over billions of years as smaller components merge together. "We're surveying an enormous volume of the distant Universe, which allows us to discover rare massive galaxies that were previously almost impossible to find. Understanding how these galaxies form is one of the Holy Grails of modern astronomy, and now we can trace them back to the edge of the known Universe" said Omar Almaini. ESO PR Photo 26b/06 ESO PR Photo 26b/06 Brown Dwarf Candidates in the Pleiades Cluster (UKIDSS) Nigel Hambly and Nicolas Lodieu

  19. PREFACE: X Workshop of the Gravitation and Mathematical Physics Division, Mexican Physical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    Avanzados (CINVESTAV), Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (UAM-I), Universidad de Guanajuato (UG), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). We especially acknowledge the support and the kind hospitality of our host, the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo. Ricardo Becerril Bárcenas, Héctor H. Hernández Hernández, Miguel Sabido, Carlos A. Soto, Luis Alberto López, Omar Pedraza, Victoria E. Cerón. Editors

  20. E-Waste and Harm to Vulnerable Populations: A Growing Global Problem

    PubMed Central

    Heacock, Michelle; Kelly, Carol Bain; Asante, Kwadwo Ansong; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Bergman, Åke Lennart; Bruné, Marie-Noel; Buka, Irena; Carpenter, David O.; Chen, Aimin; Huo, Xia; Kamel, Mostafa; Landrigan, Philip J.; Magalini, Federico; Diaz-Barriga, Fernando; Neira, Maria; Omar, Magdy; Pascale, Antonio; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Sly, Leith; Sly, Peter D.; Van den Berg, Martin; Suk, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Electronic waste (e-waste) is produced in staggering quantities, estimated globally to be 41.8 million tonnes in 2014. Informal e-waste recycling is a source of much-needed income in many low- to middle-income countries. However, its handling and disposal in underdeveloped countries is often unsafe and leads to contaminated environments. Rudimentary and uncontrolled processing methods often result in substantial harmful chemical exposures among vulnerable populations, including women and children. E-waste hazards have not yet received the attention they deserve in research and public health agendas. Objectives: We provide an overview of the scale and health risks. We review international efforts concerned with environmental hazards, especially affecting children, as a preface to presenting next steps in addressing health issues stemming from the global e-waste problem. Discussion: The e-waste problem has been building for decades. Increased observation of adverse health effects from e-waste sites calls for protecting human health and the environment from e-waste contamination. Even if e-waste exposure intervention and prevention efforts are implemented, legacy contamination will remain, necessitating increased awareness of e-waste as a major environmental health threat. Conclusion: Global, national, and local levels efforts must aim to create safe recycling operations that consider broad security issues for people who rely on e-waste processing for survival. Paramount to these efforts is reducing pregnant women and children’s e-waste exposures to mitigate harmful health effects. With human environmental health in mind, novel dismantling methods and remediation technologies and intervention practices are needed to protect communities. Citation: Heacock M, Kelly CB, Asante KA, Birnbaum LS, Bergman AL, Bruné MN, Buka I, Carpenter DO, Chen A, Huo X, Kamel M, Landrigan PJ, Magalini F, Diaz-Barriga F, Neira M, Omar M, Pascale A, Ruchirawat M, Sly L, Sly PD

  1. SU-E-T-329: Dosimetric Impact of Implementing Metal Artifact Reduction Methods and Metal Energy Deposition Kernels for Photon Dose Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J; Followill, D; Howell, R; Liu, X; Mirkovic, D; Stingo, F; Kry, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate two strategies for reducing dose calculation errors near metal implants: use of CT metal artifact reduction methods and implementation of metal-based energy deposition kernels in the convolution/superposition (C/S) method. Methods: Radiochromic film was used to measure the dose upstream and downstream of titanium and Cerrobend implants. To assess the dosimetric impact of metal artifact reduction methods, dose calculations were performed using baseline, uncorrected images and metal artifact reduction Methods: Philips O-MAR, GE’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs).To assess the impact of metal kernels, titanium and silver kernels were implemented into a commercial collapsed cone C/S algorithm. Results: The CT artifact reduction methods were more successful for titanium than Cerrobend. Interestingly, for beams traversing the metal implant, we found that errors in the dimensions of the metal in the CT images were more important for dose calculation accuracy than reduction of imaging artifacts. The MARs algorithm caused a distortion in the shape of the titanium implant that substantially worsened the calculation accuracy. In comparison to water kernel dose calculations, metal kernels resulted in better modeling of the increased backscatter dose at the upstream interface but decreased accuracy directly downstream of the metal. We also found that the success of metal kernels was dependent on dose grid size, with smaller calculation voxels giving better accuracy. Conclusion: Our study yielded mixed results, with neither the metal artifact reduction methods nor the metal kernels being globally effective at improving dose calculation accuracy. However, some successes were observed. The MARs algorithm decreased errors downstream of Cerrobend by a factor of two, and metal kernels resulted in more accurate backscatter dose upstream of metals. Thus

  2. Final Report. Analysis and Reduction of Complex Networks Under Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Marzouk, Youssef M.; Coles, T.; Spantini, A.; Tosatto, L.

    2013-09-30

    The project was a collaborative effort among MIT, Sandia National Laboratories (local PI Dr. Habib Najm), the University of Southern California (local PI Prof. Roger Ghanem), and The Johns Hopkins University (local PI Prof. Omar Knio, now at Duke University). Our focus was the analysis and reduction of large-scale dynamical systems emerging from networks of interacting components. Such networks underlie myriad natural and engineered systems. Examples important to DOE include chemical models of energy conversion processes, and elements of national infrastructure—e.g., electric power grids. Time scales in chemical systems span orders of magnitude, while infrastructure networks feature both local and long-distance connectivity, with associated clusters of time scales. These systems also blend continuous and discrete behavior; examples include saturation phenomena in surface chemistry and catalysis, and switching in electrical networks. Reducing size and stiffness is essential to tractable and predictive simulation of these systems. Computational singular perturbation (CSP) has been effectively used to identify and decouple dynamics at disparate time scales in chemical systems, allowing reduction of model complexity and stiffness. In realistic settings, however, model reduction must contend with uncertainties, which are often greatest in large-scale systems most in need of reduction. Uncertainty is not limited to parameters; one must also address structural uncertainties—e.g., whether a link is present in a network—and the impact of random perturbations, e.g., fluctuating loads or sources. Research under this project developed new methods for the analysis and reduction of complex multiscale networks under uncertainty, by combining computational singular perturbation (CSP) with probabilistic uncertainty quantification. CSP yields asymptotic approximations of reduceddimensionality “slow manifolds” on which a multiscale dynamical system evolves. Introducing

  3. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2009-07-01

    Armani Paolo (Università di Trento) Benhar Omar (INFN Roma) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonanno Luca (Università di Ferrara) Catara Francesco (Università di Catania) Cò Giampaolo (Università di Lecce) Colonna Maria (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN Catania) Colonna Nicola (INFN Bari) Conti Francesco (Università di Pavia) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Cristoforetti Marco (Technische Universität München, Germania) Cuofano Carmine (Università di Ferrara) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) Drago Alessandro (Università di Ferrara) Faccioli Pietro (Università di Trento) Farina Nicola (INFN Roma) Finelli Paolo (Università di Bologna) Fiorentini Giovanni (Università di Ferrara) Fortunato Lorenzo (Università di Padova) Gambacurta Danilo (Università di Catania) Gandolfi Stefano (Università di Trento) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (INFN Pisa) Giusti Carlotta (INFN Pavia) Illarionov Alexei (SISSA Trieste) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Leidemann Winfried (Università di Trento) Lenzi Silvia (Università di Padova) Lipparini Enrico (Università di Trento) Lissia Marcello (Università di Cagliari) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Maieron Chiara (Università di Lecce) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Millo Raffaele (Università di Trento) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pastore Alessandro (Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Finlandia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pisent Gualtiero (Università di Padova) Prete Gianfranco (INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro) Quarati Piero (Politecnico di Torino) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Salmè Giovanni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Traini Marco (Università di Trento) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Vitturi Andrea (Universit

  4. PREFACE: 12th Conference on ''Theoretical Nuclear Physics in Italy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2009-07-01

    These Proceedings contain the invited and contributed papers presented at the 12th Conference on Theoretical Nuclear Physics in Italy held in Cortona, Italy, from 8-10 October 2008. As usual, the meeting was held at il Palazzone, a 16th century castle owned by the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. The aim of this biennal conference is to bring together Italian theorists working in various fields of Nuclear Physics to discuss their latest results and confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. This offers the opportunity to promote collaborations between different groups. There were about 50 participants at the conference, coming from 14 Italian Universities (Cagliari, Catania, Ferrara, Firenze, Genova, Lecce, Milano, Napoli, Padova, Pavia, Pisa, Roma, Trento, Trieste). The program of the conference, prepared by the Organizing Committee (Ignazio Bombaci, Aldo Covello, Laura Elisa Marcucci and Sergio Rosati) focused on six main topics: Few-Nucleon Systems, Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics, Nuclear Astrophysics, Structure of Hadrons and Hadronic Matter, Nuclear Structure, Nuclear Physics with Electroweak Probes. Winfried Leidemann, Maria Colonna, Marcello Lissia, Elena Santopinto, Silvia Lenzi and Omar Benhar took the burden of giving general talks on these topics and reviewing the research activities of the various Italian groups. In addition, 19 contributed papers were presented, most of them by young participants. In the last session of the Conference there were two invited talks related to experimental activities of great current interest. Gianfranco Prete from the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro spoke about the Italian radioactive ion beam facility SPES and the status of the European project EURISOL, while Nicola Colonna from the INFN, Bari, gave an overview of the perspectives of development of fourth-generation nuclear reactors. We would like to thank the authors of the general reports for their hard work in reviewing the main achievements in

  5. High resolution numerical wave propagation in coastal area : benefits in assessment of the marine submersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorville, Jean-François; Cayol, Claude; Palany, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    based on Stockdon et al. 2006 to validate the water level estimation. The water circulation due to storm surge and tide is at this point computed separately with an oceanic model including a coastal configuration and only used as an input in the wave models. The method is testing on two documented hurricane events (Dean 2007 and Omar 2008), results, accuracy and computation cost are presented. A special attention is brought to wave breaking simulation on coast of small to medium slope.

  6. Establishing improved normal values for nerve conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Buschbacher, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    Prahlow and Elizabeth Grossart, MD. Lastly, median and ulnar sensory amplitude differences are described, including the contributions of Dr. Zaliha Omar, Dr. Andrew Berkson, and Doug Mottley, MD.

  7. E-Waste and Harm to Vulnerable Populations: A Growing Global Problem.

    PubMed

    Heacock, Michelle; Kelly, Carol Bain; Asante, Kwadwo Ansong; Birnbaum, Linda S; Bergman, Åke Lennart; Bruné, Marie-Noel; Buka, Irena; Carpenter, David O; Chen, Aimin; Huo, Xia; Kamel, Mostafa; Landrigan, Philip J; Magalini, Federico; Diaz-Barriga, Fernando; Neira, Maria; Omar, Magdy; Pascale, Antonio; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Sly, Leith; Sly, Peter D; Van den Berg, Martin; Suk, William A

    2016-05-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is produced in staggering quantities, estimated globally to be 41.8 million tonnes in 2014. Informal e-waste recycling is a source of much-needed income in many low- to middle-income countries. However, its handling and disposal in underdeveloped countries is often unsafe and leads to contaminated environments. Rudimentary and uncontrolled processing methods often result in substantial harmful chemical exposures among vulnerable populations, including women and children. E-waste hazards have not yet received the attention they deserve in research and public health agendas. We provide an overview of the scale and health risks. We review international efforts concerned with environmental hazards, especially affecting children, as a preface to presenting next steps in addressing health issues stemming from the global e-waste problem. The e-waste problem has been building for decades. Increased observation of adverse health effects from e-waste sites calls for protecting human health and the environment from e-waste contamination. Even if e-waste exposure intervention and prevention efforts are implemented, legacy contamination will remain, necessitating increased awareness of e-waste as a major environmental health threat. Global, national, and local levels efforts must aim to create safe recycling operations that consider broad security issues for people who rely on e-waste processing for survival. Paramount to these efforts is reducing pregnant women and children's e-waste exposures to mitigate harmful health effects. With human environmental health in mind, novel dismantling methods and remediation technologies and intervention practices are needed to protect communities. Heacock M, Kelly CB, Asante KA, Birnbaum LS, Bergman AL, Bruné MN, Buka I, Carpenter DO, Chen A, Huo X, Kamel M, Landrigan PJ, Magalini F, Diaz-Barriga F, Neira M, Omar M, Pascale A, Ruchirawat M, Sly L, Sly PD, Van den Berg M, Suk WA. 2016. E-waste and harm to

  8. Multi-year Cluster Analyses of CALIPSO Aerosol Layer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, A. H.; Sumner, A. J.; Vaughan, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission, a collaboration between NASA and Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES), was launched in April 2006 to provide vertically resolved measurements of cloud and aerosol distributions. The primary instrument on the CALIPSO satellite is the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), a near-nadir viewing two-wavelength polarization-sensitive instrument. The unique nature of CALIOP measurements make it quite challenging to validate backscatter profiles, aerosol type, and cloud phase, all of which are used to retrieve extinction and optical depth. We exploit the large data set generated by CALIPSO between 2006 - 2013 to find groups in the data from which we can infer aerosol type. We use classical clustering analyses (k-means) to group the data based on five Level 2 data parameters: integrated attenuated backscatter (532 nm), volume depolarization ratio, integrated attenuated color ratio, layer base altitude, and layer top altitude. The data are screened using standard CALIPSO quality assurance flags, cloud aerosol discrimination (CAD) scores, overlying features and layer properties. Furthermore, the data were standardized to a 'z score' in order to remove weighting bias due to arbitrary units. The k-means algorithm forms clusters by minimizing the Euclidian distance between each data point and its respective cluster centroid independently for each parameter. Silhouette coefficients, a dimensionless measure of internal cluster interrelation or consistency and external cluster separation or uniqueness were used to determine the validity of clusters. These investigations yielded optimally distinct clusters when six groups were formed similar to the result in Omar et al, 2005 which form the basis for the current CALIPSO aerosol subtypes. While the number of clusters in both studies coincide, the clusters do not match with all aerosol subtypes. Analysis of the data

  9. GPS and Geologic Deformation Rates Agree to Within Uncertainties in the Arabia-Africa- Eurasia Zone of Plate Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilinger, R. E.; McClusky, S.

    2008-12-01

    Geodetically-derived motions for Arabia and Nubia relative to Eurasia agree within 1 standard deviation with plate rates estimated from geologic observations (McQuarrie et al., GRL, 2003) for the past 11 Myr for Nubia and greater than 25 Myr for Arabia. Furthermore, fault slip rates derived from an elastic block model constrained by GPS agree within uncertainties (about +/- 15 percent) with geologically determined, long-term slip rates in this complex area of plate interaction. Detailed geomorphological studies of the central North Anatolian fault (NAF) constrained by quantitative dating (Kozaci et a al., Geology, 2007) indicate slip rates that agree within uncertainties, but appear to be systematically lower than geodetic rates. While real rate changes of a few mm/yr cannot be ruled out at present, we note that geodetic inversions for coseismic fault slip on the NAF, and most other faults well constrained by geodetic observations, indicate larger slip at depth than at the surface. If this difference persists throughout the earthquake deformation cycle, it would account for the small difference in geodetic and geologic rates. Extrapolating present-day geodetic motions for Arabia relative to Nubia and Somalia to the time of initiation of Red Sea and Gulf of Aden extension indicates that Arabia separated from Nubia and Somalia simultaneously along the full extent of both rifts at about 25 Myr BP, consistent with independent geologic estimates for the style, and age of initiation of Red Sea extension (Omar and Steckler, 1995, Science). In addition, structural offsets across the Gulf of Suez (GoS) and Gulf of Aqaba (GoA) are consistent with a transfer of strain form the GoS to the GoA at around 12 Ma BP, roughly consistent with the age on initiation of the Dead Sea fault system. We further show that the apparent discrepancy between geodetic deformation of the Aegean (plate-like motion with low internal deformation), and geologic deformation (extensive crustal thinning

  10. A video demonstration of preserved piloting by scent tracking but impaired dead reckoning after fimbria-fornix lesions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Whishaw, Ian Q; Gorny, Boguslaw P

    2009-04-24

    Piloting and dead reckoning navigation strategies use very different cue constellations and computational processes (Darwin, 1873; Barlow, 1964; O'Keefe and Nadel, 1978; Mittelstaedt and Mittelstaedt, 1980; Landeau et al., 1984; Etienne, 1987; Gallistel, 1990; Maurer and Se guinot, 1995). Piloting requires the use of the relationships between relatively stable external (visual, olfactory, auditory) cues, whereas dead reckoning requires the integration of cues generated by self-movement. Animals obtain self-movement information from vestibular receptors, and possibly muscle and joint receptors, and efference copy of commands that generate movement. An animal may also use the flows of visual, auditory, and olfactory stimuli caused by its movements. Using a piloting strategy an animal can use geometrical calculations to determine directions and distances to places in its environment, whereas using an dead reckoning strategy it can integrate cues generated by its previous movements to return to a just left location. Dead reckoning is colloquially called "sense of direction" and "sense of distance." Although there is considerable evidence that the hippocampus is involved in piloting (O'Keefe and Nadel, 1978; O'Keefe and Speakman, 1987), there is also evidence from behavioral (Whishaw et al., 1997; Whishaw and Maaswinkel, 1998; Maaswinkel and Whishaw, 1999), modeling (Samsonovich and McNaughton, 1997), and electrophysiological (O'Mare et al., 1994; Sharp et al., 1995; Taube and Burton, 1995; Blair and Sharp, 1996; McNaughton et al., 1996; Wiener, 1996; Golob and Taube, 1997) studies that the hippocampal formation is involved in dead reckoning. The relative contribution of the hippocampus to the two forms of navigation is still uncertain, however. Ordinarily, it is difficult to be certain that an animal is using a piloting versus a dead reckoning strategy because animals are very flexible in their use of strategies and cues (Etienne et al., 1996; Dudchenko et al., 1997

  11. Distribution and lability of land-derived organic matter in the surface sediments of the Rhône prodelta and the adjacent shelf (Mediterranean sea, France): a multi proxy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, S.; Pruski, A. M.; Sun, M.-Y.; Buscail, R.; Lantoine, F.; Vétion, G.; Rivière, B.; Charles, F.

    2011-03-01

    The Gulf of Lions is a river-dominated ocean margin (RiOMar) that receives high loads of nutrients, sediments and particulate matter from the Rhône river. Most of the particulate materials from the Rhône settle rapidly on the seafloor, this raises the question of the fate of these large quantities of organic carbon delivered to the benthic boundary layer. Surface sediments (0-0.5 cm) were collected in the Rhône prodelta and its adjacent shelf during a period of low river discharge (April 2007, 16 stations). The sources, distribution and lability of sedimentary organic matter was examined using bulk (organic carbon, total nitrogen, grain size) and molecular-level (pigments, amino acids, fatty acids, δ13C of individual fatty acids) analyses. Our results confirmed previous observations of a southwestward Rhodanian imprint in the nearshore sediments. Fatty acid biomarkers and compound-specific δ13C signatures of most fatty acids clearly indicate that the Rhône inputs consist in a mixture of organic matter (OM) from different sources with a strong contribution from terrestrial plants, and a smaller input from freshwater microalgae, mostly diatoms. The influence of the Rhône River was prominent within the first ten kilometers, but may still be observed in the outer shelf (~21 km) as indicated by the occurrence of long chain fatty acids derived from vascular plants and their δ13C signatures. In the proximal prodelta, bacteria-specific fatty acids were abundant (1.65 mg g-1OC at the mouth site) and were relatively depleted in δ13C confirming that bacteria preferentially utilize terrestrial OM in this area. In the shelf area, the inputs of marine OM and its preferential utilization by the bacteria was confirmed, but the coupling between the pelagic and the benthic compartments appeared limited at this period of the year. Overall, degradation indexes based on amino acids (Dauwe's degradation index) and pigments (ratio of intact chlorophyll-a to the sum of

  12. PREFACE: ARENA 2006—Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino detection Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Lee

    2007-06-01

    , University College London, UK Vladimir Lyashuk, ITEP, Russia Radovan Milincic, University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA Rolf Nahnhauer, DESY, Zeuthen, Germany Christopher Naumann, University of Erlangen, Germany Valentin Niess, CPPM Jonathan Perkin, University of Sheffield, UK Steve Ralph, University of Sheffield, UK Christopher Rhodes, Imperial College London, UK Carsten Richardt, University of Erlangen, Germany Karsten Salomon, University of Erlangen, Germany Olaf Scholten, KVI/University of Groningen, Netherlands Terry Sloan, University of Lancaster, UK Pierre Sokolsky, University of Utah, USA Lee Thompson, University of Sheffield, UK Omar Veledar, Northumbria University, UK David Waters, UCL, USA Dawn Williams, Pennsylvania State University, USA Igor Zheleznykh, Institute for Nuclear Research, Russia Conference photograph

  13. PREFACE: 17th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    persons had the opportunity to enjoy a comfortable and friendly ambiance as well as the beautiful landscapes of the region including big lakes and high mountains. During the conference vivid and interesting scientific discussions were maintained by the participants in a relaxed environment. The Local Organizing Committee would like to recognize the generous contributions made by various institutions: International Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (CNEA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Investigación Aplicada S. E. (INVAP), Patagonia Norte Division of CONICET, Instituto Balseiro and NEC Corporation. The Local Chairs would like to express their gratitude to all the other members of the Local Organizing Committee who collaborated with a great effort and in countless ways to the success of the conference. In particular, we thank Omar Fojón for the outstanding collaboration received, and Juan Manuel Monti, who worked hard for the production of the Book of Abstracts and other related activities. We also would like to thank Renata Della Picca, Juana Gervasoni and Silvina Seguí, for their generous work in printing the book of abstracts, bags, banners, etc. and for their continuous help at the Registration Desk. We extend our gratitude to the younger members of the Local Organizing Committee, Marcos Feole, Francisco Navarrete and Juan Martín Randazzo for their help with the poster logistics; and to Luis Rodríguez for ensuring that all the presentations were ready and on schedule. We thank María Silvia Gravielle, our colleague and liaison in Buenos Aires, for helping delegates to get their visas on time; Sebastián Otranto and Jocelyn Hanssen, for their early work collecting and sorting the talk's proposals and Carlos Stia, for helping with the revision of the style of the manuscripts. We also thank M. Galassi, P Focke and D. Fregenal. We recognize Sergio Suárez, for getting funding from private

  14. Advances In Global Aerosol Modeling Applications Through Assimilation of Satellite-Based Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, James; Hyer, Edward; Zhang, Jianglong; Reid, Jeffrey; Westphal, Douglas; Xian, Peng; Vaughan, Mark

    2010-05-01

    ]. Inversion retrievals of aerosol extinction are performed for one-degree latitudinal averages of CALIOP backscatter signal (thus matching the horizontal resolution of NAAPS) by constraining total column transmission using the model estimate of AOD at the corresponding wavelength. As such, this system serves as a post-processing module predicated on newly-operational NAAPS aerosol analysis fields that feature 2D-VAR assimilation of NASA Moderate Resolution Infrared Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD observations [Zhang and Reid, 2006; Zhang et al., 2008]. We describe the influence of 3D-VAR assimilation on NAAPS analyses and forecasts by considering the physical evolution of Saharan dust plumes during their advection across the tropical Atlantic basin. Steps taken towards characterizing spatial covariance parameters that broaden the horizontal influence of information obtained along the limited lidar orbital swath are discussed. This latter context is critical when comparing the efficacy and impact of 3D-VAR assimilation with that of 2D-VAR procedures, which benefit from passive observations with a relatively wide field-of-view and, therefore, greater/more routine global coverage. With multiple satellite-lidar projects either pending launch or in design stages, including the dual ESA missions (AEOLUS and EarthCARE), we describe the potential impact of future 3D-VAR assimilation activities; both for NAAPS forecast capabilities, and the anticipated growth in aerosol transport modeling efforts at federal and cooperative global agencies worldwide. 1 http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/aerosol/ References Campbell, J. R., J. S. Reid, D. L. Westphal, J. Zhang, E. J. Hyer, and E. J. Welton, CALIOP aerosol subset processing for global aerosol transport model data assimilation, in press, J. Selected Topics Appl. Earth Obs. Rem. Sens., December 2009. Winker, D. M., M. A. Vaughan, A. Omar, Y. Hu, K. A. Powell, Z. Liu, W. H. Hunt, and S. A. Young, Overview of the CALIPSO mission and CALIOP data