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Sample records for mev cross sections

  1. Cross Sections and Analyzing Powers of Nitrogen -15(PROTON, NEUTRON)OXYGEN-15 at 200 Mev and 494 Mev.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciskowski, Douglas Edward

    Differential cross sections and analyzing powers have been measured for the ^{15} N(p,n)^{15}O(g.s.) reaction at bombarding energies of 200 MeV and 494 MeV. The 494 MeV data were obtained at the LAMPF Neutron Time-Of -Flight Facility on an 82 m flight path with a resolution of about 2.7 MeV. The 200 MeV data were obtained at IUCF on a 76 m flight path with a resolution of about 1.1 MeV. At both energies, the measured analyzing power is small, the magnitude is less than.2 for momentum transfers of less than 1 fm^{-1}. In contrast, both Relativistic and standard DWIA calculations predict a maximum of A = -.7 near q = 0.7 fm ^{-1}.

  2. Measurements of neutron cross sections for chromium, yttrium and terbium at 134 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Shun; Okumura, Shintaro; Yashima, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Kazuhiko; Shima, Tatsushi; Takahashi, Naruto; Shinohara, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Caffee, Marc; Shibata, Seiichi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu

    2014-09-01

    Neutron-induced reaction cross sections are essential to cosmochemists aiming to decipher the cosmic-ray irradiation history. These cross section data also serve as a comprehensive nuclear database for estimating residual radioactivities in accelerator facilities. Neutron cross sections in the energy range above 100 MeV have scarcely been measured experimentally; exceptions are for the target materials C, Cu, Pb, Bi. In many instances the neutron cross section is based on the corresponding proton cross section, the assumption being that above 100 MeV they are similar. In this work, we measured reaction cross sections of radionuclides produced through nuclear spallation reactions from Cr, Y and Tb induced by neutrons at 134 MeV. The irradiations were carried out using neutrons produced through Li-7 (p,n) reaction at N0 beam line in RCNP. To estimate quasi-monoenergetic neutron induced cross sections, the target stacks were irradiated on the two angles of 0 and 25 degrees for the axis of the primary proton beam. The results will be compared to the cross section data for the same target materials with 197, 287 and 386 MeV neutrons in our previous work. Neutron-induced reaction cross sections are essential to cosmochemists aiming to decipher the cosmic-ray irradiation history. These cross section data also serve as a comprehensive nuclear database for estimating residual radioactivities in accelerator facilities. Neutron cross sections in the energy range above 100 MeV have scarcely been measured experimentally; exceptions are for the target materials C, Cu, Pb, Bi. In many instances the neutron cross section is based on the corresponding proton cross section, the assumption being that above 100 MeV they are similar. In this work, we measured reaction cross sections of radionuclides produced through nuclear spallation reactions from Cr, Y and Tb induced by neutrons at 134 MeV. The irradiations were carried out using neutrons produced through Li-7 (p,n) reaction at N0

  3. Neutron-induced fission cross section of 242Pu from 15 MeV to 20 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovančević, N.; Salvador-Castineira, P.; Daraban, L.; Vidali, M.; Heyse, J.; Oberstedt, S.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Bonaldi, C.; Geerts, W.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate nuclear-data needs in the fast-neutron-energy region have been recently addressed for the development of next generation nuclear power plants (GEN-IV) by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). This sensitivity study has shown that of particular interest is the 242Pu(n,f) cross section for fast reactor systems. Measurements have been performed with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range from 15 MeV to 20 MeV produced by the Van de Graaff accelerator of the JRC-Geel. A twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber has been used in a back-to-back configuration as fission fragment detector. The 242Pu(n,f) cross section has been normalized to 238U(n,f) cross section data. The results were compared with existing literature data and show acceptable agreement within 5%.

  4. Isotopic production cross sections in proton-nucleus collisions at 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Machner, H.; Aschman, D.G.; Steyn, D.; Baruth-Ram, K.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Cowley, A.A.; Goldenbaum, F.; Nangu, B.M.; Spoelstra, B.; Pilcher, J.V.; Smit, F.D.

    2006-04-15

    Intermediate-mass fragments from the interaction of {sup 27}Al, {sup 59}Co, and {sup 197}Au with 200-MeV protons were measured in an angular range from 20 deg. to 120 deg. in the laboratory system. The fragments, ranging from isotopes of helium up to isotopes of carbon, were isotopically resolved. Double-differential cross sections, energy-differential cross sections, and total cross sections were extracted.

  5. Integral cross sections for π+p scattering between 52 and 126 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Goldring, A.; Wagner, G. J.; Altman, A.; Johnson, R. R.; Meirav, O.; Hanna, M.; Jennings, B. K.

    1989-11-01

    Integral cross sections for the elastic scattering of π+ on p from 20° and 30° to 180° were measured at seven energies between 52 and 126 MeV. These integrals are found to be in good agreement with predictions made with currently accepted phase shifts.

  6. Measurements of the neutron activation cross sections for Bi and Co at 386 MeV.

    PubMed

    Yashima, H; Sekimoto, S; Ninomiya, K; Kasamatsu, Y; Shima, T; Takahashi, N; Shinohara, A; Matsumura, H; Satoh, D; Iwamoto, Y; Hagiwara, M; Nishiizumi, K; Caffee, M W; Shibata, S

    2014-10-01

    Neutron activation cross sections for Bi and Co at 386 MeV were measured by activation method. A quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam was produced using the (7)Li(p,n) reaction. The energy spectrum of these neutrons has a high-energy peak (386 MeV) and a low-energy tail. Two neutron beams, 0° and 25° from the proton beam axis, were used for sample irradiation, enabling a correction for the contribution of the low-energy neutrons. The neutron-induced activation cross sections were estimated by subtracting the reaction rates of irradiated samples for 25° irradiation from those of 0° irradiation. The measured cross sections were compared with the findings of other studies, evaluated in relation to nuclear data files and the calculated data by Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System code.

  7. Total and Capture Cross Sections of Dysprosium Isotopes up to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.D.; Oh, S.Y.; Chang, J.H.

    2005-11-15

    Neutron data for total and capture cross sections were evaluated on {sup 160}Dy, {sup 161}Dy, {sup 162}Dy, {sup 163}Dy, and {sup 164}Dy up to 20 MeV. The resolved resonance parameters were adopted from the Mughabghab compilation, but one bound level resonance for each isotope except {sup 162}Dy was invoked to reproduce the reference thermal cross sections. The average resonance parameters for s-wave neutrons were obtained from the analysis of the statistical behavior of resolved resonance parameters. Recent measurements of the capture cross sections were taken into account in adjusting the average resonance parameters for p- and d-waves. From the first excited energy to 20 MeV, the optical model, Hauser-Feshbach model, and quantum mechanical models were used to produce total, elastic scattering, and capture cross sections. The energy-dependent optical model potential was decided based on the recent experimental data. The calculated cross sections were in good agreement with the experimental data. The present evaluation resulted in improvement over the ENDF/B-VI.7 code.

  8. Total reaction cross sections of 50 and 65 MeV pions on nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirav, O.; Friedman, E.; Altman, A.; Hanna, M.; Johnson, R. R.; Gill, D. R.

    1987-09-01

    Total reaction cross sections have been measured for 50 and 65 MeV π+/- on C, O, 18O, S, Ca, and Zr. The motivation for this experiment is to obtain cross sections to act as constraints in optical model fits to elastic scattering data. Measurements using the ``poor geometry'' transmission method were made for exceptionally small angles with the aim of improving the accuracy of the extrapolation to zero solid angle. At these small solid angles the muon cone from pion decay contributes significantly and its effects were explicitly included. The accuracies of the elastic correction are evaluated by using error matrix techniques and an additional systematic error is included.

  9. Neutron total and scattering cross sections of /sup 6/Li in the few MeV region

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.; Guenther, P.; Whalen, J.

    1980-02-01

    Neutron total cross sections of /sup 6/Li are measured from approx. 0.5 to approx. 4.8 MeV at intervals of approx.< 10 keV. Neutron differential elastic-scattering cross sections are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at approx.> 10 scattering angles and at incident-neutron intervals of approx.< 100 keV. Neutron differential inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured in the incident-energy range 3.5 to 4.0 MeV. The experimental results are extended to lower energies using measured neutron total cross sections recently reported elsewhere by the authors. The composite experimental data (total cross sections from 0.1 to 4.8 MeV and scattering cross sections from 0.22 to 4.0 MeV) are interpreted in terms of a simple two-level R-matrix model which describes the observed cross sections and implies the reaction cross section in unobserved channels; notably the (n;..cap alpha..)t reaction (Q = 4.783 MeV). The experimental and calculational results are compared with previously reported results as summarized in the ENDF/B-V evaluated nuclear data file.

  10. Cross sections from proton irradiation of thorium at 800 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan W.; Mashnik, Stepan G.; Weidner, John W.; Wolfsberg, Laura E.; Fassbender, Michael E.; Jackman, Kevin; Couture, Aaron; Bitteker, Leo J.; Ullmann, John L.; Gulley, Mark S.; Pillai, Chandra; John, Kevin D.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Nortier, Francois M.

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear formation cross sections are reported for 65 nuclides produced from 800-MeV proton irradiation of thorium foils. These data are useful as benchmarks for computational predictions in the ongoing process of theoretical code development and also in the design of spallation-based radioisotope production currently being considered for multiple radiotherapeutic pharmaceutical agents. Measured data are compared with the predictions of three mcnp6 event generators and used to evaluate the potential for 800-MeV productions of radioisotopes of interest for medical radiotherapy. In only a few instances code predictions are discrepant from measured values by more than a factor of 2, demonstrating satisfactory predictive power across a large mass range. Similarly, agreement between measurements presented here and those previously reported is good, lending credibility to predictions of target yields and radioimpurities for high-energy accelerator-produced radionuclides.

  11. Cross sections and analyzing powers of sup 15 N(p,n) sup 15 O at 200 MeV and 494 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ciskowski, D.E. )

    1989-11-01

    Differential cross sections and analyzing powers have been measured for the {sup 15}N(p,n){sup 15} O(g.s.) reaction at bombarding energies of 200 MeV and 494 MeV. The 494 MeV data were obtained at the LAMPF Neutron Time-Of-Flight Facility on an 82 m flight path with a resolution of about 2.7 MeV. The 200 MeV data were obtained at IUCF on a 76m flight path with a resolution of about 1.1 MeV. At both energies, the measured analyzing power is small, the magnitude is less than .2 for momentum transfers of less than 1 fm{sup {minus}1}. In contrast, both Relativistic and standard DWIA calculations predict a maximum of A={minus}.7 near q=0.7 fm{sup {minus}1}. 53 refs., 44 figs.

  12. Systematics of Fission Cross Sections in the MeV Range

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Robert Michael; Wright, Richard Q

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine years ago J. W. Behrens published a paper on the systematics of fission cross sections (3 5 MeV average). His study included 57 isotopes of elements ranging from radium through einsteinium (Z = 88 to 99). A systematic trend was seen for the element range from protactinium through curium. For a given element, the fission cross section decreased as the A-number increased. Fission cross sections are considerably more accurate now than those available in 1980. The current study represents an update of the Behrens study. Data for 11 elements and 53 nuclides were used. Trends for both the (Z,A) variation and the (2Z N) correlation are demonstrated. The current study clearly shows that the trends are quite well represented by straight lines. The trend for the fission cross sections of a given element to decrease with increasing A-number is observed for values of A < 248. For A > 248 there is a trend for the fission cross section to increase with increasing A-number.

  13. Total reaction cross sections for 20-30 MeV pions and the anomaly of pionic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Goldring, A.; Johnson, R. R.; Meirav, O.; Vetterli, D.; Weber, P.; Altman, A.

    1991-03-01

    Total reaction cross sections of 20 MeV π- and 30 MeV π+ and π- have been measured for carbon and nickel targets. The experimental results are in very good agreement with calculations based on commonly accepted pion-nucleus potentials but disagree with calculations based on the potentials associated with the so-called pionic atom anomaly.

  14. Gadolinium-148 production cross section measurements for 600-and 800-MEV protons.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, K. C.; Devlin, M. J.; Pitcher, E. J.; Mashnik, S. G.; Hertel, N. E.

    2004-01-01

    In a series of experiments at LANSCE's WNR facility, {sup 148}Gd production was measured for 600- and 800-MeV protons on tungsten, tantalum, and gold. These experiments used 3 {mu}m thin W, Ta, and Au foils and 10 {mu}m thin Al activation foils. Gadolinium spallation yields were determined from these foils using alpha spectroscopy and compared with the LANL codes CEM2k+GEM2 and MCNPX. When heavy metal targets, such as tungsten, are bombarded with protons greater than a few hundred MeV many different nuclides are produced. These nuclides are both stable and radioactive and are created by spallation, proton activation, or secondary reactions with neutrons and other nuclear particles made in the target. These products are distributed somewhat heterogeneously throughout a thick target because of the energy dependence of the cross sections and energy loss of the proton beam within the target. From this standpoint, it is difficult to measure nuclide production cross sections for a given energy proton in a thick target. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator complex, protons are accelerated to 800 MeV and directed to two tungsten targets, Target 4 at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility and 1L target at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. DOE requires hazard classification analyses to be performed on these targets and places limits on radionuclide inventories in the target as a means of determining the 'nuclear facility' category level. Presently, WNR's Target 4 is a non-nuclear facility while the Lujan 1L target is classified as a Category 3 nuclear facility. Gadolinium-148 is a radionuclide created from the spallation of tungsten and other heavy elements. Allowable isotopic inventories are particularly low for this isotope because it is an alpha-particle emitter with a 75-year half-life. The activity level of {sup 148}Gd is generally low, but it encompasses almost two-thirds of the total inhalation dose burden in an accident

  15. Search for narrow structure in proton-antiproton annihilation cross sections from 1900 to 1960 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, D.I.; Pealsee, D.C.; Miller, R.J.; Lewis, R.A.; Oh, B.Y.; Smith, G.A.; Whitmore, J.; Brando, T.; Daftari, I.; deGuzman, A.

    1985-01-01

    The anti pp annihilation cross section has been measured with good resolution (approx.2 MeV rms) in the mass range 1900-1960 MeV. No narrow structures are seen, the 90% confidence level upper limit being 8-12 mb-MeV for the integrated area of a resonance in this mass range. However, we do not rule out a very narrow bump-dip structure seen in an earlier experiment in the 1935-1941 MeV mass interval. The data also do not support the existence of a broad structure previously reported at 1937 MeV.

  16. Measurements of neutron capture cross sections on 70Zn at 0.96 and 1.69 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punte, L. R. M.; Lalremruata, B.; Otuka, N.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Iwamoto, Y.; Pachuau, Rebecca; Satheesh, B.; Thanga, H. H.; Danu, L. S.; Desai, V. V.; Hlondo, L. R.; Kailas, S.; Ganesan, S.; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.

    2017-02-01

    The cross sections of the 70Zn(n ,γ )Zn71m (T1 /2=3.96 ±0.05 -h ) reaction have been measured relative to the 197Au(n ,γ )198Au cross sections at 0.96 and 1.69 MeV using a 7Li(p ,n )7Be neutron source and activation technique. The cross section of this reaction has been measured for the first time in the MeV region. The new experimental cross sections have been compared with the theoretical prediction by talys-1.6 with various level-density models and γ -ray strength functions as well as the tendl-2015 library. The talys-1.6 calculation with the generalized superfluid level-density model and Kopecky-Uhl generalized Lorentzian γ -ray strength function predicted the new experimental cross sections at both incident energies. The 70Zn(n ,γ ) g+m 71Zn total capture cross sections have also been derived by applying the evaluated isomeric ratios in the tendl-2015 library to the measured partial capture cross sections. The spectrum averaged total capture cross sections derived in the present paper agree well with the jendl-4.0 library at 0.96 MeV, whereas it lies between the tendl-2015 and the jendl-4.0 libraries at 1.69 MeV.

  17. Neutron-induced fission cross section of 233Pa between 1.0 and 3.0 MeV.

    PubMed

    Tovesson, F; Hambsch, F J; Oberstedt, A; Fogelberg, B; Ramström, E; Oberstedt, S

    2002-02-11

    The energy dependent neutron-induced fission cross section of 233Pa has for the first time been measured directly with monoenergetic neutrons. This nuclide is an important intermediary in a thorium based fuel cycle, and its fission cross section is a key parameter in the modeling of future advanced fuel and reactor concepts. A first experiment resulted in four cross section values between 1.0 and 3.0 MeV, establishing a fission threshold in excess of 1 MeV. Significant discrepancies were found with a previous indirect experimental determination and with model estimates.

  18. Neutron production cross sections for (d,n) reactions at 55 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakasa, T.; Goto, S.; Matsuno, M.; Mitsumoto, S.; Okada, T.; Oshiro, H.; Sakaguchi, S.

    2017-08-01

    The cross sections for (d,n) reactions on natC-197Au have been measured at a bombarding energy of 55 MeV and a laboratory scattering angle of θ_lab = 9.5°. The angular distributions for the natC(d,n) reaction have also been obtained at θ_lab = 0°-40°. The neutron energy spectra are dominated by deuteron breakup contributions and their peak positions can be reasonably reproduced by considering the Coulomb force effects. The data are compared with the TENDL-2015 nuclear data and Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) calculations. Both calculations fail to reproduce the measured energy spectra and angular distributions.

  19. Activation cross sections for reactions induced by 14 MeV neutrons on natural tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Junhua; Tuo Fei; Kong Xiangzhong

    2009-05-15

    Cross sections for (n,2n), (n,p), (n,n{sup '}{alpha}), (n,t), (n,d{sup '}), and (n,{alpha}) reactions have been measured on tantalum isotopes at the neutron energies of 13.5 to 14.7 MeV using the activation technique. Data are reported for the following reactions: {sup 181}Ta(n,2n){sup 180}Ta{sup g}, {sup 181}Ta(n,p){sup 181}Hf, {sup 181}Ta(n,n{sup '}{alpha}){sup 177}Lu{sup m}, {sup 181}Ta(n,t){sup 179}Hf{sup m2}, {sup 181}Ta(n,d{sup '}){sup 180}Hf{sup m}, and {sup 181}Ta(n,{alpha}){sup 178}Lu{sup m}. The neutron fluences were determined using the monitor reaction {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na. Results were discussed and compared with the previous works.

  20. Activation Cross-Sections for 14.2 MeV Neutrons on Molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa Rao, C. V.; Lakshmana Das, N.; Thirumala Rao, B. V.; Rama Rao, J.

    1981-12-01

    Using the activation method, the cross-section for the following reactions on molybdenum were measured employing the mixed powder technique and Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectroscopy: 94Mo(n, 2n)93mMo, 3.5 ± 0.5 mbarn; 92Mo(n, 2n)91mMo, 19 ± 3 mbarn; 92Mo(n, 2n)91m+gMo, 226 ± 11 mbarn; 100Mo(n, p)100m2Nb, 9 ± 1 mbarn; 98Mo(n, p)98Nb, 10 ± 1 mbarn; 97Mo(n, p)97mNb, 5 ± 1 mbarn; 96Mo(n, p)96Nb, 12 ± 2 mbarn; 92Mo(n, α)89mZr, 2.1 ± 0.5 mbarn; and 92Mo(n, α)89m+gZr 24 ± 6 mbarn; the neutron energy was 14.2 ± 0.2 MeV. The experimental cross-sections were compared with the predictions of evaporation model and of different versions of pre-equilibrium model. The master equation approach appears to give satisfactory results.

  1. Neutron-photon multigroup cross sections for neutron energies less than or equal to400 MeV. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Drischler, J.D.

    1986-02-01

    Multigroup cross sections (66 neutron groups and 22 photon groups) are described for neutron energies from thermal to 400 MeV. The elements considered are hydrogen, /sup 10/B, /sup 11/B, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sodium, magnesium, aluminum, silicon, sulfur, potassium, calcium, chromium, iron, nickel, tungsten, and lead. The cross section data presented are a revision of similar data presented previously. In the case of iron, transport calculations using the earlier and the revised cross sections are presented and compared, and significant differences are found. The revised cross sections are available from the Radiation Shielding information Center of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Neutron-photon multigroup cross sections for neutron energies less than or equal to400 MeV. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Drischler, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    For a variety of applications, e.g., accelerator shielding design, neutrons in radiotherapy, radiation damage studies, etc., it is necessary to carry out transport calculations involving medium-energy (greater than or equal to20 MeV) neutrons. A previous paper described neutron-photon multigroup cross sections in the ANISN format for neutrons from thermal to 400 MeV. In the present paper the cross-section data presented previously have been revised to make them agree with available experimental data. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Measurements of Cross Sections for Neutron-induced Reactions on Chromium and Yttrium Targets at 197 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, S.; Suzuki, H.; Yashima, H.; Ninomiya, K.; Kasamatsu, Y.; Shima, T.; Takahashi, N.; Shinohara, A.; Matsumura, H.; Hagiwara, M.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Shibata, S.

    2014-05-01

    Reaction cross sections for Cr and Y induced by neutrons at 197 MeV were measured by using 7Li(p,n) reaction at N0 beam line in the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. To estimate quasi-monoenergetic neutron cross sections, Cr and Y samples were irradiated on the two angles of 0∘ and 25∘ relative to the axis of the primary proton beam. The measured cross section data in the natCr(n,x) and 89Y(n,x) reactions are compared to the JENDL high-energy file and the literature proton values, respectively. The results obtained are also compared to the cross section data for the same target materials with 287 and 386 MeV neutrons in our previous work.

  4. Measurement of 150-Sm(n,2ngammai) 149-Sm cross sections between threshold and 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J; Becker, J; Dashdorj, D; Dietrich, F S; Garrett, P; Hoffman, R; Younes, W; Nelson, R; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N

    2004-08-02

    Absolute partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for the production of discrete {gamma}-rays from the reaction {sup 150}Sm(n,2n{gamma}{sub i}){sup 149}Sm were measured using the GEANIE {gamma}-ray spectrometer coupled with the intense white neutron source at WNR/LANSCE. The measurements were made for incident neutron energies between threshold (8.04 MeV) and 20 MeV. The partial cross sections for 21 {gamma}-rays were extracted from the data. Of these, 17 were compared to calculations performed using the enhanced Hauser-Feshbach code STAPRE. The partial {gamma}-ray cross sections of the observed parallel decay paths to the ground state were summed, forming a lower bound for the (n,2n) reaction channel. A combination of theory and experiment was then used to deduce the (n,2n) reaction channel cross section.

  5. Neutron-photon multigroup cross sections for neutron energies less than or equal to 400 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barish, J.

    1981-06-01

    Multigroup cross sections (66 neutron groups and 21 gamma ray groups) are described for neutron energies from thermal to 400 MeV. The elements considered are hydrogen, /sup 10/B, /sup 11/B, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sodium, magnesium, aluminum, silicon, sulfur, potassium, calcium, chromium, iron, nickel, tungsten and lead. These cross sections are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 19 references.

  6. Cross Sections Calculations of ( d, t) Nuclear Reactions up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Yiğit, M.; Tanır, G.

    2013-04-01

    In nuclear fusion reactions two light atomic nuclei fuse together to form a heavier nucleus. Fusion power is the power generated by nuclear fusion processes. In contrast with fission power, the fusion reaction processes does not produce radioactive nuclides. The fusion will not produce CO2 or SO2. So the fusion energy will not contribute to environmental problems such as particulate pollution and excessive CO2 in the atmosphere. Fusion powered electricity generation was initially believed to be readily achievable, as fission power had been. However, the extreme requirements for continuous reactions and plasma containment led to projections being extended by several decades. In 2010, more than 60 years after the first attempts, commercial power production is still believed to be unlikely before 2050. Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. In the fusion reactor, tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. Therefore, for self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. Working out the systematics of ( d, t) nuclear reaction cross sections is of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. Since the experimental data of charged particle induced reactions are scarce, self-consistent calculation and analyses using nuclear theoretical models are very important. In this study, ( d, t) cross sections for target nuclei 19F, 50Cr, 54Fe, 58Ni, 75As, 89Y, 90Zr, 107Ag, 127I, 197Au and 238U have been investigated up to 50 MeV deuteron energy. The excitation functions for ( d, t) reactions have been calculated by pre-equilibrium reaction mechanism. Calculation results have been also compared with the available measurements in

  7. Determination of neutron capture cross sections of 232Th at 14.1 MeV and 14.8 MeV using the neutron activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chang-Lin; Zhang, Yi; Lv, Tao; Xie, Bao-Lin; Peng, Meng; Yao, Ze-En; Chen, Jin-Gen; Kong, Xiang-Zhong

    2017-04-01

    The 232Th(n, γ)233Th neutron capture reaction cross sections were measured at average neutron energies of 14.1 MeV and 14.8 MeV using the activation method. The neutron flux was determined using the monitor reaction 27Al(n,α)24Na. The induced gamma-ray activities were measured using a low background gamma ray spectrometer equipped with a high resolution HPGe detector. The experimentally determined cross sections were compared with the data in the literature, and the evaluated data of ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0u+, and CENDL-3.1. The excitation functions of the 232Th(n,γ)233Th reaction were also calculated theoretically using the TALYS1.6 computer code. Supported by Chinese TMSR Strategic Pioneer Science and Technology Project-The Th-U Fuel Physics Term (XDA02010100) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205076, 21327801)

  8. Measurement of the Am241(n,2n) reaction cross section from 7.6 MeV to 14.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Angell, C. T.; Boswell, M.; Crowell, A. S.; Fallin, B.; Hammond, S.; Howell, C. R.; Hutcheson, A.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Pedroni, R. S.; Tornow, W.; Becker, J. A.; Dashdorj, D.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Bond, E.; Chadwick, M. B.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Kawano, T.; Rundberg, R. S.; Slemmons, A.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2008-05-01

    The (n,2n) cross section of the radioactive isotope Am241 (T1/2=432.6 y) has been measured in the incident neutron energy range from 7.6 to 14.5 MeV in steps of a few MeV using the activation technique. Monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the H2(d,n)He3 reaction by bombarding a pressurized deuterium gas cell with an energetic deuteron beam at the TUNL 10-MV Van de Graaff accelerator facility. The induced γ-ray activity of Am240 was measured with high-resolution HPGe detectors. The cross section was determined relative to Al, Ni, and Au neutron activation monitor foils, measured in the same geometry. Good agreement is obtained with previous measurements at around 9 and 14 MeV, whereas for a large discrepancy is observed when our data are compared to those reported by Perdikakis near 11 MeV. Very good agreement is found with the END-B/VII evaluation, whereas the JENDL-3.3 evaluation is in fair agreement with our data.

  9. Proton-nucleus total inelastic cross sections - An empirical formula for E greater than 10 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letaw, J. R.; Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    An empirical formula for the total inelastic cross section of protons on nuclei with charge greater than 1 is presented. The formula is valid with a varying degree of accuracy down to proton energies of 10 MeV. At high energies (equal to or greater than 2 GeV) the formula reproduces experimental data to within reported errors (about 2%).

  10. Measurement of the Cross Section and Analyzing Powers for d+p Elastic Scattering at 180 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, C. D.; Stephenson, E. J.; Bacher, A. D.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Biegun, A.; Eslami-Kalantari, M.; Joulaeizadeh, L.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Mardanpour, H.; Moeini, H.; Ramazani-Moghaddam-Arani, A.; Shende, S. V.; Wörtche, H.; Stephan, E.; Kistryn, St.; Sekiguchi, K.

    2008-04-01

    We have measured cross sections and analyzing powers for various d+d reaction channels, including d+d elastic and d+d->p+t at 130 MeV and 180 MeV, with the hope of providing a testing ground for new 4-body theoretical predictions. These data were collected at the KVI cyclotron (Groningen) using the Big Bite spectrometer and a polarized deuteron beam. In addition to the d+d channels, we also measured the cross section and analyzing powers (Ay and Ayy) for d+p elastic scattering at the same energies for comparison with existing data and with 3-body calculations (with and without three nucleon forces). We report here our results for the d+p elastic data at 180 MeV. The analysis procedure will be reviewed and several preliminary results will be shown.

  11. Neutron-induced fission cross sections of 242Pu from 0.3 MeV to 3 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Eykens, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Göök, A.; Moens, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.; Pretel, C.

    2015-10-01

    The majority of the next generation of nuclear power plants (GEN-IV) will work in the fast-neutron-energy region, as opposed to present day thermal reactors. This leads to new and more accurate nuclear-data needs for some minor actinides and structural materials. Following those upcoming demands, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency performed a sensitivity study. Based on the latter, an improvement in accuracy from the present 20% to 5% is required for the 242Pu(n ,f ) cross section. Within the same project both the 240Pu(n ,f ) cross section and the 242Pu(n ,f ) cross section were measured at the Van de Graaff accelerator of the Joint Research Centre at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, where quasimonoenergetic neutrons were produced in an energy range from 0.3 MeV up to 3 MeV. A twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber has been used in a back-to-back configuration as fission-fragment detector. The 242Pu(n ,f ) cross section has been normalized to three different isotopes: 237Np(n ,f ) , 235U(n ,f ) , and 238U(n ,f ) . A comprehensive study of the corrections applied to the data and the uncertainties associated is given. The results obtained are in agreement with previous experimental data at the threshold region up to 0.8 MeV. The resonance-like structure at 0.8 to 1.1 MeV, visible in the evaluations and in most previous experimental values, was not reproduced with the same intensity in this experiment. For neutron energies higher than 1.1 MeV, the results of this experiment are slightly lower than the Evaluated Nuclear Data File/B-VII.1 evaluation but in agreement with the experiment of Tovesson et al. (2009) as well as Staples and Morley (1998). Finally, for energies above 1.5 MeV, the results show consistency with the present evaluations.

  12. Statistical Model Analysis of (n, α) Cross Sections for 4.0-6.5 MeV Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Odsuren, M.; Gledenov, Y. M.; Zhang, G. H.; Sedysheva, M. V.; Munkhsaikhan, J.; Sansarbayar, E.

    2016-02-01

    The statistical model based on the Weisskopf-Ewing theory and constant nuclear temperature approximation is used for systematical analysis of the 4.0-6.5 MeV neutron induced (n, α) reaction cross sections. The α-clusterization effect was considered in the (n, α) cross sections. A certain dependence of the (n, α) cross sections on the relative neutron excess parameter of the target nuclei was observed. The systematic regularity of the (n, α) cross sections behaviour is useful to estimate the same reaction cross sections for unstable isotopes. The results of our analysis can be used for nuclear astrophysical calculations such as helium burning and possible branching in the s-process.

  13. Neutron-induced fission cross section of 240Pu from 0.5 MeV to 3 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Eykens, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Göök, A.; Moens, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.; Pretel, C.

    2015-07-01

    240Pu has recently been pointed out by a sensitivity study of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) to be one of the isotopes whose fission cross section lacks accuracy to meet the upcoming needs for the future generation of nuclear power plants (GEN-IV). In the High Priority Request List (HPRL) of the OECD, it is suggested that the knowledge of the 240Pu(n ,f ) cross section should be improved to an accuracy within 1-3 %, compared to the present 5%. A measurement of the 240Pu cross section has been performed at the Van de Graaff accelerator of the Joint Research Center (JRC) Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) using quasi-monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range from 0.5 MeV to 3 MeV. A twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber (TFGIC) has been used in a back-to-back configuration as fission fragment detector. The 240Pu(n ,f ) cross section has been normalized to three different isotopes: 237Np(n ,f ) , 235U (n ,f ) , and 238U (n ,f ) . Additionally, the secondary standard reactions were benchmarked through measurements against the primary standard reaction 235U (n ,f ) in the same geometry. A comprehensive study of the corrections applied to the data and the associated uncertainties is given. The results obtained are in agreement with previous experimental data at the threshold region. For neutron energies higher than 1 MeV, the results of this experiment are slightly lower than the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation, but in agreement with the experiments of Laptev et al. (2004) as well as Staples and Morley (1998).

  14. The 13C(n,α0)10Be cross section at 14.3 MeV and 17 MeV neutron energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavrigin, P.; Belloni, F.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Griesmayer, E.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Weiss, C.

    2017-09-01

    At nuclear fusion reactors, CVD diamond detectors are considered an advantageous solution for neutron flux monitoring. For such applications the knowledge of the cross section of neutron-induced nuclear reactions on natural carbon are of high importance. Especially the (n,α0) reactions, yielding the highest energy reaction products, are of relevance as they can be clearly distinguished in the spectrum. The 13C(n,α0)10Be cross section was measured relative to 12C(n,α0)9Be at the Van de Graaff facility of EC-JRC Geel, Belgium, at 14.3 MeV and 17.0 MeV neutron energies. The measurement was performed with an sCVD (single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond detector, where the detector material acted simultaneously as sample and as sensor. A novel data analysis technique, based on pulse-shape discrimination, allowed an efficient reduction of background events. The results of the measurement are presented and compared to previously published values for this cross-section.

  15. Investigation of the Photoneutron Cross Section in LEAD-206 and LEAD-208 from 9 TO 16 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morford, Larry Joe

    The time of flight of photoneutrons from ('206)Pb and ('208)Pb was observed at scattering angles of 55(DEGREES), 90(DEGREES), and 125(DEGREES). Photons with energies between 9 and 16 MeV were used to excite the target nuclei. The incident photon beam was provided by the University of Illinois Tagged Photon Facility and had an effective energy resolution of around 400 keV. Neutron energies were determined by time of flight through a 1.5 meter path. The effective energy resolution of the neutrons was between 7.6% at 1 MeV and 12.5% at 5 MeV. Neutron detector efficiency was determined by measuring the photo-disintegration of deuterium. The resulting efficiency was found to be constant across the neutron energy range of interest. The fraction of neutrons with energy insufficient to pass the detector threshold was estimated to be 10.7%. The total cross section for both ('206)Pb and ('208)Pb are well described by Lorentzian curves with widths of 4.12 (+OR-) 0.24 MeV for ('206)Pb and 4.09 (+OR-) 0.38 MeV for ('208)Pb. The peak positions of the curves were determined to be 13.70 (+OR-) 0.06 MeV for ('206)Pb and 13.53 (+OR-) 0.05 MeV in ('208)Pb. No angular asymmetry about 90(DEGREES) in the differential cross sections was detected in either element above 11 MeV. Below 11 MeV the asymmetry varied with energy between alternate positive and negative values for each element. The time-of-flight spectra could be parameterized for low energy neutrons by a statistical decay with a nuclear temperature of 0.9 MeV. There was an excess of high energy neutrons above this distribution. A more detailed analysis of the spectra using the Hauser-Feshbach formalism suggests that this excess is also from the statistical decay of the nucleus.

  16. Study of activation cross-sections of deuteron induced reactions on rhodium up to 40 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.; Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2011-09-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of the activation cross-sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions, excitation functions of the 103Rh(d,x) 100,101,103Pd, 100g,101m,101g,102m,102gRh and 103gRu reactions were determined up to 40 MeV. Cross-sections were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. Excitation functions of the contributing reactions were calculated using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes. From the measured cross-section data integral production yields were calculated and compared with experimental integral yield data reported in the literature. From the measured cross-sections and previous data, activation curves were deduced to support thin layer activation (TLA) on rhodium and Rh containing alloys.

  17. Titanium spallation cross sections between 30 and 584 MeV and Ar-39 activities on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinburnn, F.; Fireman, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    The production cross sections of Ar39 for Ti spallation at 45-, 319-, 433-, and 584-MeV proton energies were measured to be 0.37 + or - 0.09, 12.4 + or - 3.7, 9.1 + or - 2.7, and 17.8 + or - 6.2 mb, respectively. Normalized Ar39 production rates and activities are also derived for protons above 40 MeV and for three differential proton spectra of the type approximately E(- alpha). It is concluded that, even for samples of high-Ti content, Ti spallation by solar protons below 200-MeV energy does not contribute significantly to their Ar39 radioactivity.

  18. Calculated neutron-induced cross sections for /sup 53/Cr from 1 to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, K.; Hetrick, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    Neutron-induced cross sections of /sup 53/Cr have been calculated in the energy regions from 1 to 20 MeV. The quantities obtained are the cross sections for the reactions (n,n'..gamma..), (n,2n), (n,np), (n,n..cap alpha..), (n,p..gamma..), (n,pn), (n,..cap alpha gamma..), (n,..cap alpha..n), (n,d), (n,t), (n,/sup 3/He), and (n,..gamma..), as well as the spectra of emitted neutrons, protons, alpha particles, and gamma rays. The precompound process was included above 5 MeV in addition to the compound process. For the inelastic scattering, the contribution of the direct interaction was calculated with DWBA. 36 refs., 23 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Activation cross sections of deuteron induced reactions on silver in the 33-50MeV energy range.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2017-02-01

    Excitation functions were measured for the (nat)Ag(d,x)(105,104)Cd, (110)(m,108m,106m,105g,104g)Ag and (101)Pd, (105,101m)Rh reactions over the energy range 33-50MeV by using the stacked foil activation technique and subsequent high-resolution gamma-spectrometry. We present the first experimental cross section data above 40MeV for all of these reactions and the first experimental cross section data for (nat)Ag(d,x)(108m,104g)Ag and (105,103)Rh. The experimental data are compared with results of the model calculations performed with the ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D theoretical nuclear reaction model codes and with the TALYS code results as available in the TENDL-2014 and -2015 on-line libraries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Differential cross section measurements for the 6Li(n,t)alpha reaction in the few MeV region

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, Matthew J; Taddeucci, Terence N; Hale, Gerald M; Haight, Robert C; O' Donnell, Johhn M

    2008-01-01

    New measured differential cross sections of tritons and alpha particles following the {sup 6}Li(n,t){alpha} reaction are reported for incident neutron energies between 0.2 and approximately 20 MeV. The neutrons were produced by spallation at the WNR facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science CEnter (LANSCE), with the incident neutron energy determined by the time-of-flight method. Four E-{Delta}E telescopes were used at eight laboratory angles. These data have been incorporated into a prior R-matrix fit for the compound {sup 7}Li system, and result in an (n,t) reaction cross section that is 4% to 10% higher than previous evaluations in the 1-3 MeV incident neutron energy region.

  1. Measurement of the displacement cross-section of copper irradiated with 125 MeV protons at 12 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Makoto; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Kuriyama, Yasutoshi; Uesugi, Tomonori; Ishi, Yoshihiro; Xu, Qiu; Yashima, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Mori, Yoshiharu; Ogitsu, Toru

    2015-03-01

    To validate Monte Carlo codes for the prediction of radiation damage in metals irradiated by >100 MeV protons, the defect-induced electrical resistivity changes related to the displacement cross-section of copper were measured with 125 MeV proton irradiation at 12 K. The cryogenic irradiation system was developed with a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler to cool the sample via an oxygen-free high-conductivity copper plate by conduction cooling. The sample was a copper wire with a 250-μm diameter and 99.999% purity sandwiched between two aluminum nitride ceramic sheets. The electrical resistivity changes of the copper wire were measured using the four-probe technique. After 125 MeV proton irradiation with 1.45 × 1018 protons/m2 at 12 K, the total resistivity increase was 4.94 × 10-13 Ω m (resistance increase: 1.53 μΩ), while the resistivity of copper before irradiation was 9.44 × 10-12 Ω m (resistance: 29.41 μΩ). The resistivity increase did not change during annealing after irradiation below 15 K. The experimental displacement cross-section for 125 MeV irradiation shows similar results to the experimental data for 1.1 and 1.94 GeV. Comparison with the calculated results indicated that the defect production efficiency in Monte Carlo codes gives a good quantitative description of the displacement cross-section in the energy region >100 MeV.

  2. [sup 12]C([gamma],[ital p])[sup 11]B cross section from 80 to 157 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, P.D.; McGeorge, J.C.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Owens, R.O.; Annand, J.R.M.; Anthony, I.; Crawford, G.I.; Dancer, S.N.; Hall, S.J.; Kellie, J.D.; Miller, G.J. ); Schoch, B.; Beck, R.; Schmieden, H.; Vogt, J.M. ); Ryckebusch, J. )

    1995-04-01

    The [sup 12]C([gamma],[ital p])[sup 11]B differential cross section has been measured over proton angles ranging from 58[degree] to 128[degree], using tagged photons of energy 80--157 MeV, for low-lying regions of residual excitation energy in [sup 11]B. The data have been compared with four different types of calculation. It is shown that scaling of the cross section with momentum mismatch occurs for both the ground-state and excited-state data.

  3. Absolute measurement of the differential cross section for deuteron photodisintegration from 63 to 71 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Debevec, P.T.; Harty, P.D.; Knott, J.E. ); Jenkins, D.A.; Jones, R.T. )

    1992-03-01

    The absolute differential cross section for the {sup 2}H({gamma},{ital p}){ital n} reaction has been measured using a large solid angle detector, with a tagged photon beam of mean energy 67 MeV. The data have been compared with nine different theoretical calculations of the cross section, which account for the data to varying degrees. Best agreement is obtained for models utilizing the nonrelativistic impulse approximation with a realistic nuclear potential, meson-exchange currents, and relativistic corrections.

  4. High-precision gamma-ray total cross-section measurements between 3.45 and 12 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Frankle, Christen M.; Moss, Calvin E.

    2008-12-01

    A Compton-backscatter capability has recently become available at the Duke University Free Electron Laser Laboratory. This capability allows one to produce high fluxes of tunable, nearly monoenergetic gamma rays. Using these gamma-ray beams, we have made high-precision (~0.5%) measurements of the gamma-ray total cross section at 3.45, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, and 12 MeV. The nuclei measured were Be, C, Cu, Ta, W, Pb, and U

  5. Measurement of the 236U(n,f) cross section from 170 meV to 2 MeV at the CERN n_TOF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmento, R.; Calviani, M.; Praena, J.; Colonna, N.; Belloni, F.; Gonçalves, I. F.; Vaz, P.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Diakaki, M.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fuji, K.; Furman, W.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrio, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vicente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2011-10-01

    The neutron-induced fission cross section of 236U was measured at the neutron Time-of-Flight (n_TOF) facility at CERN relative to the standard 235U(n,f) cross section for neutron energies ranging from above thermal to several MeV. The measurement, covering the full range simultaneously, was performed with a fast ionization chamber, taking advantage of the high resolution of the n_TOF spectrometer. The n_TOF results confirm that the first resonance at 5.45 eV is largely overestimated in some nuclear data libraries. The resonance triplet around 1.2 keV was measured with high resolution and resonance parameters were determined with good accuracy. Resonances at high energy have also been observed and characterized and different values for the cross section are provided for the region between 10 keV and the fission threshold. The present work indicates various shortcomings of the current nuclear data libraries in the subthreshold region and provides the basis for an accurate re-evaluation of the 236U(n,f) cross section, which is of great relevance for the development of emerging or innovative nuclear reactor technologies.

  6. (65)Cu isomeric cross sections for (n,α) reaction using approximately 14MeV neutrons.

    PubMed

    Durusoy, Ayşe; Reyhancan, Iskender Atilla; Akçalı, Özgür

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, activation cross-section measurements for the (65)Cu(n,α)(62m)Co (T1/2=13.86min.) reaction at six different neutron energies ranging from 13.6 and 14.9MeV are presented. The fast neutrons were produced via (3)H(d, n)(4)He reactions from an SAMES T-400 neutron generator. An activation technique was used to measure induced gamma activities. A high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer with a high-purity germanium (HpGe) detector was used to acquire the data. The measured cross section data were corrected for gamma-ray attenuations, pulse pile-up effects, dead time, variations in neutron flux, and contributions from scattered low-energy neutrons. The measured cross sections were compared with statistical model calculations (TALYS 1.6 code), the experimental data available in the literature and the data obtained from TENDL.

  7. Neutron Scattering Cross Section and Analyzing Power Measurements for LEAD-208 from 6 TO 10 Mev and Optical Model Analyses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Mark L.

    Differential cross sections and analyzing powers have been obtained for the scattering of neutrons from the ground and first excited states of ^ {208}Pb. These new measurements include differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering at 8.0 MeV, and analyzing powers for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering at 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, 9.0, and 10.0 MeV. These data complement earlier work performed at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) for elastic scattering of neutrons from ^{208 }Pb at 10.0, 14.0, and 17.0 MeV. All data were obtained using the TUNL pulsed beam facility and time -of-flight spectrometer. The data have been corrected for the effects of finite geometry, flux attenuation, and multiple scattering. The present elastic scattering data have been combined with the previously measured TUNL data and data measured elsewhere in order to obtain a detailed and high accuracy data set for neutron elastic scattering from ^{208}Pb over the 4.0 to 40.0 MeV energy range. This comprehensive data set has been described using the spherical optical model in which constant geometry fits, energy-dependent geometry fits, and fits incorporating the dispersion relation were performed. Although the overall description of the elastic n+^ {208}Pb scattering data was reasonably good using the various optical potentials, small systematic discrepancies remained at the backward angles of both the cross section and analyzing power data, and no optical model solution based on conventional Woods-Saxon form factors was found which could describe all of the details seen in the scattering data. To relax the constraint of having a Woods-Saxon form factor, the real central part of the optical model potential was modified using a Fourier-Bessel expansion of the real central potential. Individual fits at 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, 9.0, and 10.0 MeV, and fits to the combined 6.0 to 10.0 MeV data set were obtained using a Fourier -Bessel expansion of the real central potential

  8. High-Resolution Study of 237Np Fission Cross Section from 5 eV to 1 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, W.; Cennini, P.; Ketlerov, V.; Goverdovski, A.; Konovalov, V.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bec̆vár̆, F.; Benlliure, J.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Cortina, D.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; David, S.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dorochenko, A.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Guerrero, C.; Goncalves, I.; Gallino, R.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karamanis, D.; Karadimos, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kolokolov, D.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Sedysheva, M.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; N Tof Collaboration

    2005-05-01

    A series of measurements of 237Np fission cross section have been performed at the CERN spallation neutron facility n_TOF which covers a wide energy range from 1 eV up to 250 MeV. A fast ionization chamber (FIC) was used as a fission fragment detector with registration efficiency of not less than 97 %. Particular attention was paid to correct the fission cross section with use of 235U standard. Total experimental uncertainties are determined to be at the level of 3%. Analysis of the experimental data in the restricted neutron energy from 5 eV up to 1 MeV showed a systematic deviation from evaluated data (ENDF/B-VI). This discrepancy amounts to up to a factor 3 for resolved resonances in the neutron energy range of 5 eV - 2 KeV, and is in good agreement with some previous experiments. A similar disagreement at the level of 6-7% was found for higher energies around the threshold (En = 300 keV-1 MeV). This energy range is essential for the transmutation of neptunium in ADS or fast reactors. It is concluded that an updated evaluation of nuclear data for 237Np is required.

  9. Extension of activation cross section data of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on rhodium up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2015-11-01

    In the frame of the systematical study of light ion induced nuclear reactions activation cross sections for deuteron induced reactions on monoisotopic 103Rh were extended to 50 MeV incident energy. Excitation functions were measured in the 49.8-36.6 MeV energy range for the 103Rh(d,xn)100,101Pd, 103Rh(d,pxn)99m,99g,100,101m,101g,102m,102gRh and 103Rh(d,x)97,103Ru reactions by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and off-line high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. The experimental results are compared to our previous results and to the theoretical predictions in the TENDL-2014 library (TALYS 1.6 code).

  10. Measurement of Helicity-Dependent Photoabsorption Cross Sections on the Neutron from 815 to 1825 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutz, H.; Helbing, K.; Krimmer, J.; Speckner, T.; Zeitler, G.; Ahrens, J.; Altieri, S.; Annand, J. R.; Anton, G.; Arends, H.-J.; Beck, R.; Bock, A.; Bradtke, C.; Braghieri, A.; v. Drachenfels, W.; Frommberger, F.; Godo, M.; Goertz, S.; Grabmayr, P.; Hasegawa, S.; Hansen, K.; Harmsen, J.; Heid, E.; Hillert, W.; Holvoet, H.; Horikawa, N.; Iwata, T.; van Hoorebeke, L.; D'Hose, N.; Jennewein, P.; Kiel, B.; Klein, F.; Kondratiev, R.; Lang, M.; Lannoy, B.; Leukel, R.; Lisin, V.; Menze, D.; Meyer, W.; Michel, T.; Naumann, J.; Panzeri, A.; Pedroni, P.; Pinelli, T.; Preobrajenski, I.; Radtke, E.; Reicherz, G.; Rohlof, C.; Rostomyan, T.; Sauer, M.; Schoch, B.; Schumacher, M.; Tamas, G.; Thomas, A.; van de Vyver, R.; Weihofen, W.; Zapadtka, F.

    2005-04-01

    Helicity-dependent total photoabsorption cross sections on the deuteron have been measured for the first time at ELSA (Bonn) in the photon energy range from 815 to 1825 MeV. Circularly polarized tagged photons impinging on a longitudinally polarized LiD target have been used together with a highly efficient 4π detector system. The data around 1 GeV are not compatible with predictions from existing multipole analyses. From the measured energy range an experimental contribution to the GDH integral on the neutron of [33.9±5.5(stat)±4.5(syst)] μb is extracted.

  11. Absolute doubly differential cross sections for ionization of adenine by 1.0-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Iriki, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Imai, M.; Itoh, A.

    2011-09-15

    Double-differential ionization cross sections of adenine (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5}) by 1.0-MeV protons have been measured using a vapor-phase adenine target. Ejected electrons were analyzed by a 45 deg. parallel-plate electrostatic spectrometer in an electron energy range from 1 to 1000 eV at electron emission angles from 15 deg. to 165 deg. The effective target thickness of adenine was determined by a Rutherford forward scattering method and a vapor deposition method. Present data are in good agreement with recent calculations. Comparisons were made with other data on various hydrocarbon molecules. It was found that the ionization cross sections of these molecules can be scaled fairly well in terms of the total number of valence electrons.

  12. Calculation and analysis of cross-sections for p+184W reactions up to 200 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Zheng-Jun; Han, Yin-Lu

    2015-08-01

    A set of optimal proton optical potential parameters for p+ 184W reactions are obtained at incident proton energy up to 250 MeV. Based on these parameters, the reaction cross-sections, elastic scattering angular distributions, energy spectra and double differential cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 184W are calculated and analyzed by using theoretical models which integrate the optical model, distorted Born wave approximation theory, intra-nuclear cascade model, exciton model, Hauser-Feshbach theory and evaporation model. The calculated results are compared with existing experimental data and good agreement is achieved. Supported by National Basic Research Program of China, Technology Research of Accelerator Driven Sub-critical System for Nuclear Waste Transmutation (2007CB209903) and Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Thorium Molten Salt Reactor Nuclear Energy System (XDA02010100)

  13. Activation cross sections of deuteron induced reactions on niobium in the 30-50 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Activation cross-sections of deuterons induced reactions on Nb targets were determined with the aim of different applications and comparison with theoretical models. We present the experimental excitation functions of 93Nb(d,x)93m,90Mo, 92m,91m,90Nb, 89,88Zr and 88,87m,87gY in the energy range of 30-50 MeV. The results were compared with earlier measurements and with the cross-sections calculated by means of the theoretical model codes ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D and TALYS (on-line TENDL-2014 and TENDL-2015 libraries). Possible applications of the radioisotopes are discussed in detail.

  14. Theoretical study of isotopic production cross-sections in proton-nucleus reactions at 200MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Mohammad S.

    2016-03-01

    As NASA's future plans are likely to include extended human missions in deep space, protections from space radiation take on increased importance. When galactic cosmic rays, mainly protons, interacts with the material of spacecraft, secondary fragments are produced, which contribute substantially to the dose and dose equivalent received by the crew inside. A detailed understanding of the reaction mechanism, as well as a knowledge of cross sections are needed. We analyze energy spectra, angular distributions, and isotopic cross-sections of intermediate-mass fragments (IMFs) from the interaction of 27Al, 59Co, and 197Au with 200 MeV protons. Calculations within the modified statistical model with final state interaction were performed using SAPTON code. General agreement is obtained with the experiment which suggests that most of the IMFs are emitted after equilibrium is reached (i.e. in the evaporation stage).

  15. Fragmentation cross sections of 28Si at beam energies from 290AMeV to 1200A MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, C.; Fukumura, A.; Guetersloh, S.B.; Heilbronn, L.H; Iwata, Y.; Miller, J.; Murukami, T.

    2006-08-25

    In planning for long-duration spaceflight, it will beimportant to accurately model the exposure of astronauts to heavy ions inthe Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). As part of an ongoing effort to improveheavy-ion transport codes that will be used in designing futurespacecraft and habitats, fragmentation cross sections of 28Si have beenmeasured using beams with extracted energies from 290A MeV to 1200A MeV,spanning most of the peak region of the energy distribution of siliconions in the GCR. Results were obtained for six elemental targets:hydrogen, carbon, aluminum, copper, tin, and lead. The charge-changingcross sections are found to be energy-independent within the experimentaluncertainties, except for those on the hydrogen target. Cross sectionsfor the heaviest fragments are found to decrease slightly with increasingenergy for lighter targets, but increase with energy for tin and leadtargets. The cross sections are compared to previous measurements atsimilar energies, and to predictions of the NUCFRG2 model used by NASA toevaluate radiation exposures in flight. For charge-changing crosssections, reasonable agreement is found between the present experimentand those of Webber, et al. and Flesch, et al., and NUCFRG2 agrees withthe data to within 3 percent in most cases. Fragment cross sections showless agreement between experiments, and there are substantial differencesbetween NUCFRG2 predictions andthe data.

  16. Differential cross section for the π+d-->pp reaction from 80 to 417 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, J.; Altemus, R.; Minehart, R.; Orphanos, L.; Ziock, H. J.; Wadlinger, E. A.

    1982-05-01

    Differential cross sections were measured for the reaction, π+d-->pp, at seven energies, 80, 100, 140, 182, 230, 323, and 417 MeV. Sufficient data were taken for a 1% statistical uncertainty at eleven different angles for most of these energies. The elastic π+p reaction was used to normalize the π+d-->pp data. Legendre polynomial fits of the data are presented. The increased accuracy and energy of these data require an addition of a 6θ* term in the traditional low energy form of the differential cross section: C(A+2θ*+B4θ*). The coefficients, A and B, are used to compare the present data with a survey of previous experiments and the theoretical work of Niskanen. Agreement is usually within uncertainties, but some diagreement remains even among recent experiments. NUCLEAR REACTIONS d (π,pp), E=80-417 MeV; measured σ(θ) calculated Legendre polynomial fits; compared to earlier work.

  17. Precision Measurement of 56Fe(n,n γ) Cross Sections Using 14.1 MeV Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyu; Koltick, David

    2016-03-01

    Integral production cross sections for 846.8 keV and 1238.3 keV prompt gamma rays from 14.1 MeV neutrons interactions on 56Fe are reported. The experimental technique takes advantage of the 1.5 nanosecond coincidence timing resolution between the neutron production time and the gamma ray detection time to reject noise, together with the large 30% solid angle gamma ray coverage. The scattering angle coverage with respect to the neutron beam direction extends from 60 degrees to 120 degrees. The neutron flux is measured using the detected associated alpha-particle from the D-T fusion reaction produced using an associated particle neutron generator. Present cross section measurements using other techniques with limited timing resolution and solid angle coverage are in agreement at neutron energies lower than 6 MeV. At higher neutron energies reported results can disagree by more than 20%. The more accurate technique used in these measurements can distinguish between the differences in the present reported results at higher neutron energies. The author would like to thank TechSource, Inc. and Advanced Physics Technologies, LLC. for their support in this work.

  18. Energy dependence of analyzing power Ay and cross section for p+d scattering below 18 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagara, K.; Oguri, H.; Shimizu, S.; Maeda, K.; Nakamura, H.; Nakashima, T.; Morinobu, S.

    1994-08-01

    The vector analyzing power Ay(θ) of the 2H(p-->,p)2H scattering has been measured at Ep=5, 6, 6.5, 7, 8, 8.5, 9, 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18 MeV with a typical statistical accuracy of 0.0009 and an uncertainty in the beam polarization of less than 0.7%. The differential cross section σ(θ) of the 2H(p,p)2H scattering has also been measured with a typical uncertainty of 0.8% using unpolarized beams of the same energies and of 2, 2.5, 3, and 4 MeV. A large discrepancy of about 25% between the experiment and the Faddeev calculation with the Paris NN potential is observed at the maximum of Ay(θ) around θc.m.=120°. This discrepancy is shown to be reduced by modifying LS force in the NN potential, though a discrepancy still remains in the energy dependence of the Ay(θ) maximum. At the minimum of σ(θ) around θc.m.=120°, a large discrepancy ranging from -19% at 2 MeV to +24% at 18 MeV is observed between the experiment and the calculations with either of the original and the LS-modified NN potentials. This indicates that an improvement is also necessary in the scalar part of the potential. The difference in the Ay(θ) maximum between the p-->+d and the n-->+d scatterings is discussed.

  19. {sup 149}Sm(n,{alpha}){sup 146}Nd Cross Sections in the MeV Region

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Guohui; Liu Jiaming; Liu Xiang; Han Jinhua; Chen Jinxiang; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Sedysheva, M. V.; Voronov, Yu. N.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Szalanski, P. J.; Koehler, P. E.

    2011-12-16

    We have measured the {sup 149}Sm(n,{alpha}){sup 146}Nd cross section at 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, and 6.5 MeV. Measurements were performed at the 4.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of Peking University with monoenergetic neutrons produced via the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction using a deuterium gas target. Alpha particles were detected with a double-section gridded ionization chamber having two back-to-back {sup 149}Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples attached to the common cathode. Absolute neutron flux was measured using a small {sup 238}U fission chamber and monitored by a BF{sub 3} long counter. These are the first reported cross sections for this reaction at these energies, except at 6.0 eV, where our new data are in good agreement with our earlier result. The present results help to much better constrain the {sup 149}Sm(n,{alpha}){sup 146}Nd cross section in a region where its energy dependence is changing fairly rapidly and there are large differences between evaluated nuclear data libraries.

  20. Photodisintegration cross section of 9Be up to 16 MeV in the α + α + n three-body model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Yuma; Odsuren, Myagmarjav; Myo, Takayuki; Katō, Kiyoshi

    2016-05-01

    The photodisintegration of 9Be in the energy region lower than Eγ=16 MeV is investigated by using the α + α + n three-body model and the complex scaling method. The cross section exhibits two aspects in two different energy regions. In the low-energy region up to Eγ=6 MeV, the cross section is explained by the transition strengths into the excited resonant states of 9Be, while the dipole transition into the nonresonant continuum states of 8Be(2+) + n dominates the cross section in the energy region of 6 ≤Eγ≤16 MeV. Furthermore, it is shown that the dipole strength at Eγ˜8 MeV is understood to be caused by the single-neutron excitation from the 8Be(2+)⊗ ν p3 /2 configuration in the ground state.

  1. Initial Estimate of the 237U(n,f) Cross Section for 0.1 (less than) En (MeV) (less than or equal to) 20

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Britt, H C; Becker, J A; Wilhelmy, J B

    2003-06-27

    In response to a request for a {sup 237}U(n,f) cross section evaluation up to E{sub n} = 20 MeV, they have married a data set from the previous reliable estimate [1-3] of the cross section up to E{sub n} = 2.5 MeV, to an estimate of the remaining cross section up to E{sub n} = 20 MeV, deduced from simple physics arguments. This straw-man, work-in-progress estimate of the {sup 237}U(n,f) cross section is intended to be used in sensitivity-test comparisons to other evaluations of the cross section (e.g., ENDF/B-VI [4] and ENDL [5]). The simple approach used in this work to generate a consistent cross section up to E{sub n} = 20 MeV is validated using the well-known {sup 235}U(n,f) cross section as a test case (see Fig. 1). The corresponding estimate of the {sup 237}U(n,f) cross section is plotted in Fig. 2 and listed in Table I.

  2. The Study of ( n,d) Reaction Cross Sections for Some Medium Weight Targets up to 30 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, A.; Şahan, M.; Tel, E.; Şahan, H.; Uğur, F. A.

    2011-08-01

    In this study, neutron incident reaction cross sections for some medium target nuclei ( 44 Ca, 65 Cu, 54 Fe, 56 Fe, 57 Fe, 58 Ni, 60 Ni and 67 Zn) have been investigated for the ( n,d) reaction cross sections. These new calculations on the excitation functions of 44 Ca(n,d) 43 K, 65 Cu(n,d) 44 Ni, 54 Fe(n,d) 53 Mn, 56 Fe(n,d) 55 Mn, 57 Fe(n,d) 56 Mn, 58 Ni(n,d) 57 Co, 60 Ni(n,d) 59 Co and 67 Zn(n,d) 66 Cu reactions have been carried out up to 30 MeV incident neutron energy. In these calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been investigated. The PEQ calculations involve the new evaluated the Geometry Dependent Hybrid model. Equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing model. By using the new cross sections formulae for ( n,d) reactions developed by Aydin et al., the obtained results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data taken from EXFOR database.

  3. Cross sections of the (n ,p ) reaction on the 78Se and 80Se isotopes measured for 13.73 MeV to 14.77 MeV and estimated for 10 MeV to 20 MeV neutron energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attar, F. M. D.; Dhole, S. D.; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2014-12-01

    The cross sections of 78Se(n ,p ) 78As and 80Se(n ,p ) 80As reactions were measured at five neutron energies over the range 13.73 MeV to 14.77 MeV using 56Fe and 19F as monitor elements, respectively. The cross sections were also theoretically estimated using EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes over 10 MeV to 20 MeV neutrons and matched with the experimental cross sections by making proper choice of the model parameters. The theoretical and experimental cross sections of 80Se(n ,p ) 80As reaction are smaller as compared to the 78Se(n ,p ) 78As reaction at each neutron energy. This difference is attributed to the competing 80Se(n ,2 n )79Se and 80Se( n ,α )Ge77m reactions, which effectively decrease the cross sections of 80Se(n ,p ) 80As reaction as compared to that of the 78Se(n ,p ) 78As reaction over the neutron energy range used in the present work. The cross sections of 78Se(n ,p ) 78As and 80Se(n ,p ) 80As reactions estimated by the EMPIRE-II code initially increase but later on decrease with neutron energy, respectively, above 16 MeV and 19 MeV, whereas those estimated by the TALYS code continuously increase with neutron energy. The present results indicate that the trends in the variation of cross section with neutron energy depend on the model used in the calculations. The cross sections of the 80Se(n ,p ) 80As reaction at different neutron energies reported in the present work can be added as a new data in the nuclear data library.

  4. Measurements of the {sup 235}U(n,f) cross section in the 3 to 30 MeV neutron energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, A.D.; Wasson, O.A.; Lisowski, P.W.

    1991-12-31

    To improve the accuracy of the {sup 235}U(n,f) cross section, measurements have been made of this standard cross section at the target 4 facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The data were obtained at the 20-meter flight path of that facility. The fission reaction rate was determined with a fast parallel plate ionization chamber and the neutron fluence was measured with an annular proton recoil telescope. The measurements provide the shape of the {sup 235}U(n,f) cross section relative to the hydrogen scattering cross section for neutron energies from about 3 to 30 MeV neutron energy. The data have been normalized to the very accurately known value near 14 MeV. The results are in good agreement with the ENDF/B-VI evaluation up to about 15 MeV neutron energy. Above this energy differences as large as 5% are observed.

  5. Photodisintegration cross section of9Be up to Eγ = 16 MeV in the α + α + n three-body model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Odsuren, M.; Myo, T.; Katō, K.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the photodisintegration cross section (PDXS) of9Be in low and higher energy regions by using the α + α + n three-body model and the complex scaling method (CSM). The calculated photodisinegration cross section of well reproduces the recent experimental data, and shows that the transitions into the8Be(2+) + n states dominate the cross section in the energy region of 6 ≤Eγ ≥ 16 MeV.

  6. Higher-order corrections to electron-nucleus bremsstrahlung cross sections above a few MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangiarotti, A.; Martins, M. N.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that the first calculations of nuclear bremsstrahlung cross sections were performed for relativistic electrons more than 80 years ago by Sauter, Bethe and Heitler, and Racah, a fully satisfactory solution to this problem is still missing up to the present day. Numerical approaches are impractical for electrons with energies above a few MeV because they require a prohibitively large number of partial waves. Analytic formulae need to describe simultaneously and accurately the interaction with the Coulomb field of the nucleus and the screening effect of the atomic electrons. In the present paper, a state-of-the-art analytic calculation will be discussed. In particular, higher-order corrections to the interaction with the Coulomb field of the nucleus, a subject seldom tackled in the past, are included and compared extensively with published data. The emerged difficulties will be highlighted, but unfortunately they can be overcome only with future large coordinated theoretical and experimental efforts.

  7. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. By using high resolution gamma spectrometry cross-section data for the production of 51,48Cr, 48V, 48,47,46,44m,44g,43Sc and 43,42K were determined. Comparisons with the earlier published data are presented and results predicted by different theoretical codes (EMPIRE and TALYS) are included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and compared with the earlier experimental yield data. Depth distribution curves to be used for thin layer activation (TLA) are also presented.

  8. Experimental cross-sections for proton induced nuclear reactions on mercury up to 65 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Szücs, Z.; Brezovcsik, K.

    2016-07-01

    Cross-sections for formation of activation products induced by protons on natural mercury targets were measured. Results for 196m,196g,197g(cum), 198m,198g,199g(cum), 200g(cum), 201,202Tl, 194g(cum), 195g(cum), 196g(cum), 198m,199g(cum) Au and 195m,197m,203Hg are presented up to 65 MeV incident particle energy, many of these for the first time. The experimental data are compared with literature values and with the predictions of the TALYS 1.6 code (results taken from TENDL-2015 on-line library), thick target yields were derived and possible applications in biomedical sciences are discussed.

  9. Measurement of SEU cross sections in the CDF SVX3 ASIC using 63 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, G. P.; Bishai, M.; Gay, C.; Hill, C.; Nahn, S.; Pellett, D. E.; Pope, G.; Shepard, P. F.; Slaughter, A. J.; Webster, W. C., III

    2000-06-01

    The single event upset (SEU) cross section has been measured for 63 MeV protons incident on static memory cells in the CDF SVX3 pipelined silicon strip readout ASIC. The device was fabricated in the Honeywell 0.8 μm RICMOS IV bulk process, and contains a number of cells with minimum gate length transistors to control the mode of operation of the chip. Cross sections per cell of (4.4±1.8)×10 -16 cm2, (2.1±0.7)×10 -15 cm2, and (3.9±0.9)×10 -15 cm2 were measured for angles of incidence of 0°, 45°, and 80°, respectively, for cells with 0.8 μm gate length. The SVX3 SEU rate in Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron was estimated to be sufficiently low that it would not affect the performance of the CDF Silicon Tracker.

  10. A re-evaluation of /sup 32/S(n,p) cross sections from threshold to 5 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C.Y.

    1989-01-01

    Two evaluations of the /sup 32/S(n,p) reaction cross sections, currently being used for the Nagasaki and Hiroshima dosimetry studies, yielded results that differ significantly. These two evaluations were reviewed and both were found to be quite old and without benefit of modern theoretical guidance and recent experimental data, hence inadequate in view of its relative importance for the present application. The necessity for a re-evaluation is further enhanced by the fact that: the present data search has uncovered a relatively high-quality data set that was not known previously, a generalized Bayes-theorem code is now available for averaging the various data sets with uncertainties and generating uncertainties for the results, effects on data combination of differing energy resolution in the various measurements can now be accounted for, and the ENDF/B-VI standards for /sup 238/U(n,f) cross sections have become available for renormalizing two of the available data sets. The re-evaluation is performed to 5 MeV, the upper energy limit for the present purpose. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  11. The Breakup Cross Section of the D+D Reaction at 6.94 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, A. L.; Brune, C. R.; Ingram, D. C.; Dhakal, S.; Karki, A.; Massey, T. N.; O'Donnell, J. E.; Parker, C. E.

    2016-03-01

    The D+D reactions are well known and widely used for a variety of purposes, mainly because of the use of the D(d, n)3He reaction as a mono-energetic neutron source. The least studied of the D+D reactions is the D(d, n)pD reaction known as the deuteron breakup reaction, which produces a continuum of neutrons at energies below the monoenergetic peak. The neutron energy distribution as a function of angle for the cross section, {{{d^2}σ } over {dΩ dE}}, of the D(d,n)pD reaction has been measured using a 6.94-MeV pulsed deuteron beam incident upon a D2 gas target. The time-of-flight technique was used to determine the energy of the neutrons detected in an array of two lithium glass scintillators and one NE-213 scintillator. The breakup cross section was determined as low as 225-keV neutron energy in the lithium glass detectors.

  12. Cross section and complete set of proton spin observables in p-->d elastic scattering at 250 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Hirooka, D.; Kamiya, J.; Kitamura, Y.; Maeda, Y.; Noro, T.; Obayashi, E.; Sagara, K.; Saito, T.; Sakai, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Sekiguchi, K.; Tamii, A.; Wakasa, T.; Yagita, T.; Yako, K.; Yoshida, H. P.; Ladygin, V. P.; Kamada, H.; Glöckle, W.; Golak, J.; Nogga, A.; Witała, H.

    2002-10-01

    The angular distributions of the cross section, the proton analyzing power, and all proton polarization transfer coefficients of p-->d elastic scattering were measured at 250 MeV. The range of center-of-mass angles was 10°-165° for the cross section and the analyzing power, and about 10°-95° for the polarization transfer coefficients. These are the first measurements of a complete set of proton polarization observables for p-->d elastic scattering at intermediate energies. The present data are compared with theoretical predictions based on exact solutions of the three-nucleon Faddeev equations and modern realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials combined with three-nucleon forces (3NF), namely, the Tucson-Melbourne (TM) 2π-exchange model, a modification thereof (TM') closer to chiral symmetry, and the Urbana IX model. Large effects of the three-nucleon forces are predicted. The inclusion of the three-nucleon forces gives a good description of the cross section at angles below the minimum. However, appreciable discrepancies between the data and predictions remain at backward angles. For the spin observables the predictions of the TM 3NF model deviate strongly from the other two 3NF models, which are close together, except for Ky'y. In the case of the analyzing power all 3NF models fail to describe the data at the upper half of the angular range. In the restricted measured angular range the polarization transfer coefficients are fairly well described by the TM' and Urbana IX 3NF models, whereas the TM 3NF model mostly fails. The transfer coefficient Ky'y is best described by the Urbana IX but the theoretical description is still insufficient to reproduce the experimental data. These results call for a better understanding of the spin structure of the three-nucleon force and very likely for a full relativistic treatment of the three-nucleon continuum.

  13. Cross sections of proton-induced nuclear reactions on bismuth and lead up to 100 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari Oranj, L.; Jung, N. S.; Bakhtiari, M.; Lee, A.; Lee, H. S.

    2017-04-01

    Production cross sections of 209Bi(p , x n )207,206,205,204,203Po, 209Bi(p , pxn) 207,206,205,204,203,202Bi, and natPb(p , x n ) 206,205,204,203,202,201Bi reactions were measured to fill the gap in the excitation functions up to 100 MeV as well as to figure out the effects of different nuclear properties on proton-induced reactions including heavy nuclei. The targets were arranged in two different stacks consisting of Bi, Pb, Al, Au foils and Pb plates. The proton beam intensity was determined by the activation analysis method using 27Al(p ,3 p n )24Na, 197Au(p ,p n )196Au, and 197Au(p , p 3 n )194Au monitor reactions in parallel as well as the Gafchromic film dosimetry method. The activities of produced radionuclei in the foils were measured by the HPGe spectroscopy system. Over 40 new cross sections were measured in the investigated energy range. A satisfactory agreement was observed between the present experimental data and the previously published data. Excitation functions of mentioned reactions were calculated by using the theoretical model based on the latest version of the TALYS code and compared to the new data as well as with other data in the literature. Additionally, the effects of various combinations of the nuclear input parameters of different level density models, optical model potentials, and γ-ray strength functions were considered. It was concluded that if certain level density models are used, the calculated cross sections could be comparable to the measured data. Furthermore, the effects of optical model potential and γ-ray strength functions were considerably lower than that of nuclear level densities.

  14. Extension of the energy range of experimental activation cross-sections data of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on indium up to 50MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-11-01

    The energy range of our earlier measured activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on indium were extended from 40MeV up to 50MeV. The traditional stacked foil irradiation technique and non-destructive gamma spectrometry were used. No experimental data were found in literature for this higher energy range. Experimental cross-sections for the formation of the radionuclides (113,110)Sn, (116m,115m,114m,113m,111,110g,109)In and (115)Cd are reported in the 37-50MeV energy range, for production of (110)Sn and (110g,109)In these are the first measurements ever. The experimental data were compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS 1.6 nuclear model code as listed in the on-line library TENDL-2014.

  15. Measurements of the 169Tm(n,2n)168Tm cross section between 9.0 and 17.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soter, J.; Bhike, Megha; Krishichayan, Fnu; Finch, S. W.; Tornow, W.

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of the 169Tm(n,2n)168Tm cross section have been performed in 0.5 MeV intervals for neutron energies ranging from 9.0 MeV to 17.5 MeV in order to resolve discrepancies in the current literature data. The neutron activation technique was used with 90Zr and 197Au as monitor foils. After irradiation, de-excitation gamma rays were recorded off-line with High-Purity Germanium (HPGE) detectors in TUNL's Low-Background Counting Facility. In addition, data for the 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm reaction have also been obtained from 15.5 MeV to 17.5 MeV. The results of these measurements provide the basis for investigating properties of the interial confinement fusion plasma in deuterium-tritium (DT) capsules at the National Ignition Facility located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  16. Proton-induced cross sections relevant to production of 225Ac and 223Ra in natural thorium targets below 200 MeV.

    PubMed

    Weidner, J W; Mashnik, S G; John, K D; Hemez, F; Ballard, B; Bach, H; Birnbaum, E R; Bitteker, L J; Couture, A; Dry, D; Fassbender, M E; Gulley, M S; Jackman, K R; Ullmann, J L; Wolfsberg, L E; Nortier, F M

    2012-11-01

    Cross sections for (223,)(225)Ra, (225)Ac and (227)Th production by the proton bombardment of natural thorium targets were measured at proton energies below 200 MeV. Our measurements are in good agreement with previously published data and offer a complete excitation function for (223,)(225)Ra in the energy range above 90 MeV. Comparison of theoretical predictions with the experimental data shows reasonable-to-good agreement. Results indicate that accelerator-based production of (225)Ac and (223)Ra below 200 MeV is a viable production method. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Reaction and fusion cross sections for the near-symmetric system 129Xe+natSn from 8 A to 35 A MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduci, L.; Lopez, O.; Chbihi, A.; Rivet, M. F.; Bougault, R.; Frankland, J. D.; Borderie, B.; Galichet, E.; La Commara, M.; Le Neindre, N.; Lombardo, I.; Pârlog, M.; Rosato, E.; Roy, R.; Verde, G.; Vient, E.; Indra Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Background: We study heavy-ion reactions from barrier up to Fermi energy. The data were acquired with the INDRA detector at the GANIL (Caen, France) facility. Purpose: We aim to determine the reaction and fusion cross sections for the reactions induced by 129Xe projectiles on natSn targets for incident energies ranging from 8 A to 35 A MeV. In particular, the evaluation of the fusion and incomplete fusion cross sections is the main purpose, altogether with the comparison with the systematics of Eudes et al. [Europhys. Lett. 104, 22001 (2013), 10.1209/0295-5075/104/22001]. Method: The reaction cross sections are evaluated at each beam energy with data acquired thanks to the INDRA 4 π array. The events are sorted with the help of the observable Eiso,max. We focus therefore our study on a selected sample of events, in such a way that the fusion and incomplete fusion cross sections can be estimated. Results: We present the excitation function of reaction and fusion cross sections for the heavy and nearly symmetric system 129Xe+natSn from 8 A to 35 A MeV. For the fusion excitation function the comparison with the systematics of Eudes et al. seems to be in a fair agreement starting from the beam energy 20 A MeV. For the lower beam energies (8 A and 12 A MeV) discrepancies are observed. Conclusions: The evaluated fusionlike cross sections show a good agrement with a recent systematics for beam energies greater than 20 A MeV. For low beam energies the cross-sectional values are lower than the expected ones. A probable reason for these low values is in the fusion hindrance at energies above or close to the barrier.

  18. Calculation of SF6-/SF6 and Cl-/CFCl3 electron attachment cross sections in the energy range 0-100 meV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.

    1982-01-01

    Electron attachment cross sections for the processes SF6-/SF6 and Cl-/CFCl3 are calculated in a local theory using a model in which diatomic-like potential energy curves for the normal modes are constructed from available spectroscopic data. Thermally populated vibrational and rotational levels are included. Good agreement is found with experimental cross sections in the energy range 5-100 meV for a particular choice of potential energy curve parameters.

  19. Au, Bi, Co and Nb cross-section measured by quasimonoenergetic neutrons from p + 7Li reaction in the energy range of 18-36 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majerle, M.; Bém, P.; Novák, J.; Šimečková, E.; Štefánik, M.

    2016-09-01

    Au, Bi, Co and Nb samples were irradiated several times with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from p + 7Li reaction in the energy range of 18-36 MeV. The activities of the samples were measured with the HPGe detector and the reaction rates were calculated. The cross-sections were extracted using the SAND-II method with the reference cross-sections from the EAF-2010 database. The uncertainties of the final results are discussed.

  20. Extension of activation cross-section data of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on cadmium up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2016-10-01

    The excitation functions for 109,110g,111m+g,113m,114m,115mIn, 107,109,115m,115gCd and 105g,106m,110g,111Ag are presented for stacked foil irradiations on natCd targets in the 49-33 MeV deuteron energy domain. Reduced uncertainty is obtained by determining incident particle flux and energy scale relative to re-measured monitor reactions natAl(d,x)22,24Na. The results were compared to our earlier studies on natCd and on enriched 112Cd targets. The merit of the values predicted by the TALYS 1.6 code (resulting from a weighted combination of reaction cross-section data on all stable Cd isotopes as available in the on-line libraries TENDL-2014 and TENDL-2015) is discussed. Influence on optimal production routes for several radionuclides with practical applications (111In, 114mIn, 115Cd, 109,107Cd….) is reviewed.

  1. Impact of the In-medium Nucleon-nucleon Cross Section Modification on Early-reaction-phase Dynamics Below 100 A MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Basrak, Z.; Zoric, M.; Eudes, P.; Sebille, F.

    2009-08-26

    With a semi-classical transport model studied is the impact of the in-medium NN cross section modifications on the early energy transformation, dynamical emission and quasiprojectile properties of the Ar+Ni and Ni+Ni reactions at 52, 74 and 95(90) A MeV.

  2. Measurement of the sup 19 F(n,2n) sup 18 F cross section from 18 to 27 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, C.L.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    the {sup 19}F(n,2n){sup 18}F cross section was measured at neutron energies of 18, 21, 23, and 27 MeV. Nearly monoenergetic neutrons bombarded teflon (CF{sub 2}), Zr, and Au samples. {sup 19}F(n,2n){sup 18}F cross section values were determined relative to {sup nat}Zr(n,xn){sup 89}Zr and {sup 197}Au(n,2n){sup 196}Au from measurements of the {sup 18}F, {sup 89}Zr, and {sup 196}Au activities. Our results are in agreement with previous measurements below 20 MeV and extend the usefulness of this reaction to 27 MeV. 22 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Cross section asymmetry of two-body carbon disintegration 12C (γ , p)11B with polarized photons at energy 40-50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdeinyi, D.; Brudvik, J.; Fissum, K.; Ganenko, V.; Hansen, K.; Isaksson, L.; Livingston, K.; Lundin, M.; Nilsson, B.; Schroder, B.

    2017-01-01

    The cross section asymmetry of 12C (γ ,p01)11B and 12C (γ ,p2-6)11B reactions has been studied at the energy range 40-55 MeV, using linearly polarized tagged photons of the MAX-lab facility. The asymmetry of the 12C (γ ,p01)11B processes, which assume the one-body mechanism of the reaction, is Σ ≈ 0.82 ± 0.05 for photon energies 45-50 MeV. The asymmetry for the 12C (γ ,p2-6)11B reactions, which produce a maximum at excitation energy ∼ 6 MeV, is Σ ≈ 0.53 ± 0.13 for a photon energy 49 MeV. It is close to the asymmetry of reaction of the free deuteron photodisintegration, and can be resulted from the two-body mechanism of the photon absorption.

  4. Measurement of the e+e- → π+π- cross section between 600 and 900 MeV using initial state radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Eren, E. E.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, X. Q.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kühn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2016-02-01

    We extract the e+e- →π+π- cross section in the energy range between 600 and 900 MeV, exploiting the method of initial state radiation. A data set with an integrated luminosity of 2.93 fb-1 taken at a center-of-mass energy of 3.773 GeV with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider is used. The cross section is measured with a systematic uncertainty of 0.9%. We extract the pion form factor |Fπ | 2 as well as the contribution of the measured cross section to the leading-order hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to (g - 2) μ. We find this value to be aμππ, LO (600- 900MeV) = (368.2 ±2.5stat ±3.3sys) ṡ10-10, which is between the corresponding values using the BaBar or KLOE data.

  5. Neutron-induced fission cross section of Np237 in the keV to MeV range at the CERN n_TOF facility

    DOE PAGES

    Diakaki, M.; Karadimos, D.; Vlastou, R.; ...

    2016-03-17

    We experimentally determined the neutron-induced fission cross section of Np-237 at the high-resolution and high-intensity facility n_TOF, at CERN, in the energy range 100 keV to 9 MeV, using the U-235(n, f) and U-238(n, f) cross section standards below and above 2 MeV, respectively. Moreover, a fast ionization chamber was used in order to detect the fission fragments from the reactions and the targets were characterized as far as their mass and homogeneity are concerned by means of a spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy respectively. Finally, theoretical calculations within the Hauser-Feshbach formalism have been performed, employing the EMPIRE code, andmore » the model parameters were tuned in order to successfully reproduce the experimental fission cross-sectional data and simultaneously all the competing reaction channels.« less

  6. Neutron-induced fission cross section of 237Np in the keV to MeV range at the CERN n_TOF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakaki, M.; Karadimos, D.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Demetriou, P.; Skordis, E.; Tsinganis, A.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; David, S.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dorochenko, A.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, Ch.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fuji, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gallino, R.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Ioannidis, K.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Kolokolov, D.; Konovalov, V.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Sedysheva, M.; Stamoulis, K.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Voss, F.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.; n TOF Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The neutron-induced fission cross section of 237Np was experimentally determined at the high-resolution and high-intensity facility n_TOF, at CERN, in the energy range 100 keV to 9 MeV, using the 235U(n ,f ) and 238U(n ,f ) cross section standards below and above 2 MeV, respectively. A fast ionization chamber was used in order to detect the fission fragments from the reactions and the targets were characterized as far as their mass and homogeneity are concerned by means of α spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy respectively. Theoretical calculations within the Hauser-Feshbach formalism have been performed, employing the empire code, and the model parameters were tuned in order to successfully reproduce the experimental fission cross-sectional data and simultaneously all the competing reaction channels.

  7. A new measurement of the 6Li(n,α)t cross section at MeV energies using a 252Cf fission chamber and 6Li scintillators

    DOE PAGES

    Kirsch, Leo Edward; Devlin, Matthew James; Mosby, Shea Morgan; ...

    2017-09-01

    We present a new measurement of the 6Li(n,α)t cross section from 245 keV to 10 MeV using a 252Cf fission chamber with 6LiI(Eu) and Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) scintillators which act as both target and detector. Neutron energies are determined from the time of flight (TOF) method using the signals from spontaneous fission and reaction product recoil. Simulations of neutron downscatter in the crystals and fission chamber bring 6Li(n,α)t cross section values measured with the 6LiI(Eu) into agreement with previous experiments and evaluations, except for two resonances at 4.2 and 6.5 MeV introduced by ENDF/B-VII.1. Suspected neutron transport modeling issues cause themore » cross section values obtained with CLYC to be discrepant above 2 MeV.« less

  8. Fission cross section of the 232Th(n,f)131Sb reaction induced by neutrons around 14 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Lv, Tao; Pan, Xiao-dong; Wang, Qiang; Fang, Kai-hong; Lan, Chang-lin

    2017-06-01

    In order to make a more detailed study on the 232Th fission process, the cross section of 232Th(n,f)131Sb fission reaction induced by 14 MeV neutrons was measured precisely with the neutron activation method and off-line gamma ray spectrometric technique. Neutron flux was monitored on line using the accompanying α particle from T(d,n)4He reaction in the irradiation and neutron energies were given by the cross section ratio of 90Zr(n,2 n)89Zr reaction to 93Nb(n,2 n)92 mNb reaction. The experimentally determined cross sections were deduced to be 6.27±0.47, 6.19±0.54, 6.00±0.51 mb at 14.1±0.3, 14.5±0.3 and 14.8±0.3 MeV, respectively.

  9. Measurement of fission cross section for 232Th (n,f) 131 ZX ( Z = 50 , 51, 52, 53) reaction induced by neutrons around 14 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chang-lin; Qiu, Yi-jia; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Zheng-wei; Zhang, Qian; Tan, Jun-cai; Lai, Cai-feng; Fang, Kai-hong

    2017-06-01

    The fission cross sections of 232Th (n,f) 131m, gSn , 232Th (n,f) 131Sb , 232Th (n,f) 131m, gTe , 232Th (n,f) 131I fission reactions induced by 14MeV neutrons were measured precisely with the neutron activation technique. The neutron flux was monitored by accompanying α particle in the irradiation and the neutron energies were determined by the cross section ratio of 90Zr (n,2n) 89Zr to 93Nb (n,2n) 92mNb reaction. The values of the cross sections of 232Th (n,f) 131m, gSn were analyzed, and the cross sections of 232Th (n,f) 131Sb were deduced to be 6.5± 0.7 , 6.3± 0.6 , 6.1± 0.6 mb at 14.1± 0.3 , 14.5± 0.3 and 14.8± 0.3 MeV, respectively. The values of the cross sections of 232Th (n,f) 131gTe were deduced to be 1.8± 0.1 , 1.5± 0.1 and 1.4± 0.1 mb at 14.1± 0.3 , 14.5± 0.3 and 14.8± 0.3 MeV, respectively. The values of the cross sections of 232Th (n,f) 131I were given as 1.8± 0.2 , 1.6± 0.2 , 1.5± 0.1 mb at 14.1± 0.3 , 14.5± 0.3 and 14.8± 0.3 MeV, respectively.

  10. Evaluation of cross sections for neutron-induced reactions in sodium. [10/sup -5/ eV to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.C.

    1980-09-01

    An evaluation of the neutron-induced cross sections of /sup 23/Na has been done for the energy range from 10/sup -5/ eV to 20 MeV. All significant cross sections are given, including differential cross sections for production of gamma rays. The recommended values are based on experimental data where available, and use results of a consistent model code analysis of available data to predict cross sections where there are no experimental data. This report describes the evaluation that was submitted to the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) for consideration as a part of the Evaluated Nuclear Data File, Version V, and subsequently issued as MAT 1311. 126 references, 130 figures, 14 tables.

  11. Measurements of the differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering of 14-MeV neutrons in natural chromium, iron, nickel, and niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, E.G. . Dept. of Radiology); Tsirliganis, N.C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Electronics); Knoll, G.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences)

    1999-07-01

    The time-of-flight technique was used with the ring scattering geometry in a laboratory with low neutron-scattering background to measure the angular distributions of the cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering of 14-MeV neutrons in natural chromium, iron, nickel, and niobium. Specifically for inelastic scattering, the measurements included the 1.43- and 4.56-MeV levels of [sup 52]Cr; the 0.85-, (2.94 to 3.12)-, and (4.46 to 4.51)-MeV level groups of [sup 56]Fe; the 1.33-MeV level of [sup 60]Ni combined with the 1.45-MeV level of [sup 58]Ni; and the 4.48-MeV level of [sup 58]Ni. Pulses of neutrons with time width of 0.9 to 1.1 ns were produced via the D-T reaction in a 150-keV linear accelerator, with average intensities of 9 [times] 10[sup 8] n/s. The scattering angles ranged from [approximately]16 to [approximately]160 deg, with a typical step of [approximately]10 deg. The overall uncertainty for the elastic scattering cross section was in the range of 7 to 10% for all materials, except around the minima of the angular distribution for niobium. The uncertainties for the inelastic scattering cross sections were estimated to be between 8 and 24%. The measured angular distributions were compared with the evaluations in the ENDF/B-VI, JENDL-3, CENDL-2, BROND-2, and JEF-2 nuclear data libraries. For elastic scattering, there are no significant discrepancies in general, neither among the evaluations nor between the present data and the evaluations. For the inelastic scattering there are substantial discrepancies both in shape and magnitude among the evaluations (when available) as well as between the present data and the evaluations.

  12. Measurement of double differential charged-particle emission cross sections for reactions induced by 26 MeV protons and FKK model analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y.; Aoto, A.; Kashimoto, H.

    1994-06-01

    Double differential charged-particle emission cross sections of proton-induced reactions have been measured for {sup nat}C, {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Si, {sup 98}Mo, {sup 106}Pd, {sup 159}Tb and {sup 181}Ta at energies around 26 MeV. Several (p,p{prime}) and (p,n) data for {sup 98}Mo and {sup 106}Pd in the incident energy range from 12 to 26 MeV are analysed in terms of the Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin model, in order to study preequilibrium nucleon emission from nucleon-induced reactions.

  13. The (3He,tf) as a surrogate reaction to determine (n,f) cross sections in the 10 to 20 MeV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Basunia, M. S.; Clark, R. M.; Goldblum, B. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Phair, L.; Burke, J. T.; Beausang, C. W.; Bleuel, D. L.; Darakchieva, B.; Dietrich, F. S.; Evtimova, M.; Fallon, P.; Gibelin, J.; Hatarik, R.; Jewett, C. C.; Lesher, S. R.; McMahan, M. A.; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.; Wiedeking, M.

    2009-02-25

    The surrogate reaction 238U(3He,tf) is used to determine the 237Np(n,f) cross section indirectly over an equivalent neutron energy range from 10 to 20 MeV. A self-supporting ~;;761 mu g/cm2 metallic 238U foil was bombarded with a 42 MeV 3He2+ beam from the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Outgoing charged particles and fission fragments were identified using the Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies (STARS), consists of two 140 mu m and one 1000 mu m Micron S2 type silicon detectors. The 237Np(n,f) cross sections, determined indirectly, were compared with the 237Np(n,f) cross section data from direct measurements, the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B-VII.0), and the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL 3.3) and found to closely follow those datasets. Use of the (3He,tf) reaction as a surrogate to extract (n,f) cross section in the 10 to 20 MeV equivalent neutron energy is found to be suitable.

  14. Direct measurement of {sup 12}C+{sup 4}He→{sup 16}O+γ total cross section at E{sub cm}=1.2 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Sagara, K.; Fujita, K.; Kodama, D.; Narikiyo, Y.; Hamamoto, K.; Ban, T.; Tao, N.; Teranishi, T.

    2014-05-02

    A fusion reaction of {sup 12}C+{sup 4}He→{sup 16}O+γ is one of the main reactions in He-burning of stars and important for nucleosynthesis. The fusion cross section at stellar energy of E{sub cm}=0.3 MeV has not been determined precisely yet in spite of efforts for about 40 years. We plan to measure directly the total fusion cross section down to 0.7 MeV at Kyushu University Tandem accelerator Laboratory and to estimate the cross section at 0.3MeV by extrapolation. We have already measured the cross sections at 2.4 MeV and 1.5 MeV. The measurement at E{sub cm}=1.2 MeV is in progress.

  15. Production cross sections of niobium and tantalum isotopes in proton-induced reactions on (nat)Zr and (nat)Hf up to 14 MeV.

    PubMed

    Murakami, M; Haba, H; Goto, S; Kanaya, J; Kudo, H

    2014-08-01

    Production cross sections of Nb and Ta isotopes in the proton-induced reactions on (nat)Zr and (nat)Hf, respectively, were measured up to 14 MeV using a stacked-foil technique. The observed nuclides in the (nat)Zr(p,x) reactions were (90g,91m,92m,95m,95g,96)Nb, (95)Zr, and (87g,88)Y. In the (nat)Hf(p,x) reactions, (175,176,177,178,179)Ta and (175)Hf were observed. The obtained cross sections for each nuclide were compared with the previously reported data and with the theoretical cross sections calculated by the TALYS-1.4 code. Thick-target yields of the observed nuclides were deduced from the measured production cross sections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Neutron scattering cross sections for /sup 232/Th and /sup 238/U inferred from proton scattering and charge exchange measurements. [7 MeV, 26 and 27 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.F.; Grimes, S.M.; Pohl, B.A.; Poppe, C.H.; Wong, C.

    1980-01-01

    Differential cross sections for the (p,n) reactions to the isobaric analog states (IAS) of /sup 232/Th and /sup 238/U targets were measured at 26 and 27 MeV. The analysis of the data was done in conjunction with the proton elastic and inelastic (2/sup +/, 4/sup +/, 6/sup +/) differential cross sections measured at 26 MeV. Because collective effects are important in this mass region, deformed coupled-channels calculations were carried out for the simultaneous analysis of the proton and neutron outgoing channels. The sensitivity of the calculations was studied with respect to the optical model parameters used in the calculations, the shape of the nuclear charge distribution, the type of coupling scheme assumed among the levels, the magnitude of the deformation parameters, and the magnitude of the isovector potentials, V/sub 1/ and W/sub 1/. A Lane model-consistent analysis of the data was used to infer optical potential parameters for 6- to 7-MeV neutrons. The neutron elastic differential cross sections obtained from these calculations are compared with measurements available in the literature, and with results obtained using neutron parameters from global sets reported at these energies. 7 figures, 3 tables.

  17. {sup 48}Ti(n,xnpa{gamma}) reaction cross sections using spallation neutrons for E{sub n} = 1 to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Cooper, J R; Hoffman, R D; Younes, W; Devlin, N; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R O

    2005-01-06

    {gamma}-ray excitation functions have been measured for the interaction of fast neutrons with {sup 48}Ti (neutron energy from 1 MeV to 250 MeV). The Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source, at the LANSCE/WNR facility, provided a ''white'' neutron beam which is produced by bombarding a natural W target with a pulsed proton beam. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were measured with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Ge spectrometer, GEANIE. Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. Excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections, taking into account the dead-time correction, the target thickness, the detector efficiency, and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). The data analysis is presented here for neutron energies between 1 to 20 MeV. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for transitions in {sup 47,48}Ti, {sup 48}Sc, and {sup 45}Ca have been determined. These results are compared to Hauser-Feshbach predictions calculated using the STAPRE code, which includes compound nuclear and pre-equilibrium emission. The partial cross sections for {gamma} rays, whose discrete {gamma}-ray cascade path leads to the ground state in {sup 48}Ti, {sup 47}Ti, {sup 48}Sc, and {sup 45}Ca have been summed to obtain estimates of the lower limits for reaction cross sections. Partial cross sections for unobserved {gamma}-rays are predicted from the STAPRE code. These lower limits are combined with Hauser-Feshbach calculations to deduce {sup 48}Ti(n,n'){sup 48}Ti, {sup 48}Ti(n,2n){sup 47}Ti, {sup 48}Ti(n,p){sup 48}Sc, and {sup 48}Ti(n,{alpha}){sup 45}Ca reaction channel cross sections.

  18. NUCLEAR CROSS-SECTION CALCULATIONS IN THE 1 MEV TO 5 GEV RANGE WITH COMBINED SEMI-CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes, F.B.

    2002-03-07

    In this work we describe neutron and proton induced reaction cross-sections for iron produced by the codes TNG and CEM95 in the 5 to 300 MeV energy range. TNG calculations cover the 5-90 MeV range, while CEM95 covers the 50-300 MeV high energy range. The two codes show some disagreements in the overlap energy range, both among themselves and with the experimental data, which are presently being addressed. The experimental data used are from NNDC and/or from LA150 NSE references. We also describe some developments for combining TNG and CEM95 into a new code called CETNG (Cascade Exciton TNG).

  19. Gamma-ray production cross sections in multiple channels for neutron induced reaction on 48Ti for En=1 to 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Chadwick, M B; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Kawano, T; Nelson, R O; Younes, W

    2006-07-06

    Prompt {gamma}-ray production cross sections were measured on a {sup 48}Ti sample for incident neutron energies from 1 MeV to 200 MeV. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for transitions in {sup 45-48}Ti, {sup 45-48}Sc, and {sup 43-45}Ca were determined. The observation of about 130 transitions from 11 different isotopes in the present work provides a demanding test of reaction model calculations, and is the first study in this mass region to extract partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for many different reaction channels over a wide range of incident neutron energies. The neutrons were produced by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source located at the LANSCE/WNR facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the large-scale Compton-suppressed GErmanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Event neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections and then compared with model calculations using the enhanced GNASH reaction code. Compound nuclear, pre-equilibrium emission and direct reaction mechanisms are included. Overall the model calculations of the partial {gamma}-ray cross sections are in good agreement with measured values.

  20. Cross-section measurement for the /sup 7/Li(n,n't)/sup 4/He reaction at 14. 74 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Meadows, J.W.; Bretscher, M.M.; Cox, S.A.

    1984-09-01

    The cross section for the /sup 7/Li(n,n't)/sup 4/He reaction is measured at an average neutron energy of 14.74 MeV, with a resolution of 0.324 MeV, relative to the /sup 238/U neutron-fission cross section. Tritium activities for the irradiated lithium-metal samples (enriched to 99.95% in /sup 7/Li) are deduced using a liquid-scintillation counting method which relies upon the tritiated-water standard from the US National Bureau of Standards. The measured cross section ratio of /sup 7/Li(n,n't)/sup 4/He to /sup 238/U neutron fission is 0.2523 (+- 2.2%). The derived /sup 7/Li(n,n't)/sup 4/He reaction cross section is 0.301 (+- 5.3%) barn, based on the ENDF/B-V value of 1.193 (+- 4.8%) barn for the /sup 238/U neutron-fission cross section. 59 references.

  1. Experimental SF6/-//SF6 and Cl/-//CFC13 electron-attachment cross sections in the energy range 0-200 meV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental cross sections for the electron-attachment processes for SF6(-)/SF6 and Cl(-)/CFl3 are reported in the energy range 0-200 meV by normalizing each attachment line shape to measurement of a thermal rate coefficient. When the same ion states are detected, good agreement is found between present values, for which a monoenergetic electron source is used, and swarm-unfolded results. The present data constitute a new limit for cross sections reported at high resolution at the lowest electron energy.

  2. Cross-section activation measurement for U-238 through protons and deuterons in energy interval 10-14 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Guzhovskii, B.Y.; Abramovich, S.N.; Zvenigorodskii, A.G.

    1995-10-01

    There were presented results of cross-section measurements for nuclear reactions {sup 238}U(p,n){sup 238}Np, {sup 238}U(d,2n){sup 238}Np, {sup 238}U(d,t){sup 237}U, {sup 238}U(d,p){sup 239}U, and {sup 238}U(d,n){sup 239}Np. Interval of projectile energy was 10-14 MeV. For measurements of cross-sections it was used the activatio methods. The registration of {beta}- and {gamma}-activity was made with using of plastic scintillation detector and Ge(Li)-detector.

  3. Calculation of proton total reaction cross sections for some target nuclei in incident energy range of 10-600 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bueyuekuslu, H.; Kaplan, A.; Aydin, A.; Tel, E.; Yildirim, G.

    2010-10-15

    In this study, proton total reaction cross sections have been investigated for some isotopes such as {sup 12}C, {sup 27}Al, {sup 9}Be, {sup 16}O, {sup 181}Ta, {sup 197}Au, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 14}N by a proton beam up to 600 MeV. Calculation of the proton total cross sections has been carried out by the analytic expression formulated by M.A. Alvi by using Coulomb-modified Glauber theory with the Helm model nuclear form factor. The obtained results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data and found to be in agreement with each other.

  4. Analysis of nucleon-induced fission cross sections of lead and bismuth at energies from 45 to 500 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Prokofyev, A.V.; Mashnik, S.G.; Sierk, A.J.

    1998-08-01

    In order to investigate the applicability of the Cascade-Exciton model (CEM) of nuclear reactions to fission cross sections and hoping to learn more about intermediate-energy fission, the authors use an extended version of the CEM, as realized in the code CEM95 to perform a detailed analysis of proton- and neutron-induced fission cross sections of {sup 209}Bi and {sup 208}Pb nuclei and of the linear momentum transfer to the fissioning nuclei in the 45--500 meV energy range.

  5. Application of asymmetry depending empirical formulas for (p,n alpha) reaction cross-sections at 24.8 and 28.5 MeV incident energies.

    PubMed

    Tel, E; Aydin, E G; Aydin, A; Kaplan, A

    2009-02-01

    In this study, we have investigated the asymmetry term effect for the (p,n alpha) reaction cross-sections and we have obtained new coefficients for the (p,n alpha) reactions at 24.8 and 28.5 MeV energies. We have suggested empirical formulas including the new coefficients found by fitting two parameters for proton induced reactions. The coefficients were determined by least-squares fitting method. The obtained cross-section formulas with new coefficients have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data.

  6. Charge-changing cross-section measurements of C-1612 at around 45 A MeV and development of a Glauber model for incident energies 10 A -2100 A MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, D. T.; Ong, H. J.; Nguyen, T. T.; Tanihata, I.; Aoi, N.; Ayyad, Y.; Chan, P. Y.; Fukuda, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Hoang, T. H.; Ideguchi, E.; Inoue, A.; Kawabata, T.; Khiem, L. H.; Lin, W. P.; Matsuta, K.; Mihara, M.; Momota, S.; Nagae, D.; Nguyen, N. D.; Nishimura, D.; Ozawa, A.; Ren, P. P.; Sakaguchi, H.; Tanaka, J.; Takechi, M.; Terashima, S.; Wada, R.; Yamamoto, T.; RCNP-E372 Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We have measured for the first time the charge-changing cross sections (σCC) of C-1612 on a 12C target at energies below 100 A MeV. To analyze these low-energy data, we have developed a finite-range Glauber model with a global parameter set within the optical-limit approximation which is applicable to reaction cross section (σR) and σCC measurements at incident energies from 10 A to 2100 A MeV. Adopting the proton-density distribution of 12C known from the electron-scattering data, as well as the bare total nucleon-nucleon cross sections and the real-to-imaginary-part ratios of the forward proton-proton elastic scattering amplitude available in the literatures, we determine the energy-dependent slope parameter βp n of the proton-neutron elastic differential cross section so as to reproduce the existing σR and interaction cross-section data for 12C+12C over a wide range of incident energies. The Glauber model thus formulated is applied to calculate the σR's of 12C on a 9Be and 27Al targets at various incident energies. Our calculations show excellent agreement with the experimental data. Applying our model to the σR and σCC for the so-called neutron-skin 16C nucleus, we reconfirm the importance of measurements at incident energies below 100 A MeV. The proton root-mean-square radii of C-1612 are extracted using the measured σCC's and the existing σR data. The results for C-1412 are consistent with the values from the electron scatterings, demonstrating the feasibility, usefulness of the σCC measurement, and the present Glauber model.

  7. Computing the cross sections of nuclear reactions with nuclear clusters emission for proton energies between 30 MeV and 2.6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Korovin, Yu. A.; Maksimushkina, A. V. Frolova, T. A.

    2016-12-15

    The cross sections of nuclear reactions involving emission of clusters of light nuclei in proton collisions with a heavy-metal target are computed for incident-proton energies between 30 MeV and 2.6 GeV. The calculation relies on the ALICE/ASH and CASCADE/INPE computer codes. The parameters determining the pre-equilibrium cluster emission are varied in the computation.

  8. An Investigation of the 40Ar(n,p)40Cl Reaction Cross-Section below 50MeV at Crocker Nuclear Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Nicholas Ian

    Large underground liquid argon detectors are poised to detect neutrinos from the next galactic supernova. Liquid argon detectors are uniquely sensitive to the electron neutrino, thus giving them the capability to detect neutronization neutrinos for the first time. One background that may mimic the signal of this low-energy neutrino interaction in argon is the beta-decay of Cl-40 which is produced in argon by a fast neutron reaction. Previous measurements of this 40Ar+n->40Cl+p reaction cross section exist only below 15 MeV and the measurements differ by a factor of two. Using the U.C. Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory neutron beam this cross-section is determined by fitting to a parametrized model for neutron energies up to 50 MeV. Neutrons at this facility are generated from mono-energetic protons impinging on a thick beryllium target. Then, the neutrons that pass through the collimator are measured by time-of-flight and a fast-neutron activation technique. Using the neutron fluxes generated from five different proton energies, including 50 MeV protons, the 40Ar(n,p)40Cl reaction cross section is measured by irradiating liquid argon in each beam and counting the subsequent gammas from the Cl-40 decay in a high-purity germanium detector.

  9. Study of optical model parameters for high energy neutron cross sections from 5 to 50 MeV in the mass-140 region

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.W.; Camarda, H.S.; White, R.M.

    1980-05-08

    A study of the neutron optical potential on nuclei near mass-140 was begun to extend the energy range and improve the precision of previous neutron total cross section measurements. The extended energy range of this measurement reveals maxima and minima in the total cross section that are evidence of the nuclear Ramsauer effect. A 100-MeV linear accelerator is used to produce a continuum of neutron energies from a Ta-Be conversion target. A 250-meter flight path is used to measure neutron energies by the time-of-flight method. Transmission data for /sup 140/Ce and transmission ratios for /sup 142/Ce, /sup 141/Pr, and /sup 139/La relative to /sup 140/Ce were obtained. The /sup 140/Ce data have a precision of 1 to 3% and the ratios are obtained with a precision of about 0.3%. To analyze these total cross section data a computer code was developed to calculate the total elastic, reaction, and differential elastic scattering cross sections for a neutron interacting with a nucleus. The interaction is represented by a spherically symmetric complex potential that includes spin-orbit coupling. The parameters of this potential were adjusted to approximate the /sup 140/Ce total cross over the energy range from 2.5 to 60 MeV. The energy dependence of these parameters is described. 5 figures, 1 table.

  10. Cross-sections for 36Cl from Ti at E p=35-150 MeV: Applications to in-situ exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David; Vogt, Stephan; Hotchkis, Michael

    2000-10-01

    We have measured the low-energy yield of 36Cl from Ti for proton energies from 35 to 150 MeV. Thin Ti foil irradiations were performed at the Harvard University Cyclotron Laboratory and 36Cl concentrations were determined using the ANTARES AMS facility at ANSTO. Cross-sections ranged smoothly with energy from 0.32±0.05 mb at 35 MeV to 5.3±0.4 mb at 150 MeV. Results for E<110 MeV are new, while the upper region from 110 to 150 MeV agrees well with overlapping data from other studies. The in-situ production rate for 36Cl from Ti at the earth's surface and high latitude based on this excitation function and calculations of Masarik and Reedy (normalised to the mean measured yield of 36Cl from Ca) is estimated at ˜(13±3) atoms 36Cl (g Ti yr) -1. We thus conclude that in Ti-rich, Ca-poor rocks or in typical basalts, 36Cl yield from Ti can amount to ˜5-10% of total. This is similar to the contribution from slow muon capture on 40Ca and in some cases, from thermal neutron capture on native Cl.

  11. Measurements of proton induced γ-ray emission cross-sections on Mg from 1.0 to 3.0 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifzadeh, N.; Kakuee, O.; Mohammadi, S.

    2016-04-01

    Differential cross-section of proton induced γ-ray emission from the reactions 24Mg(p,p‧γ)24Mg (Eγ = 1369 keV), 25Mg(p,p‧γ)25Mg (Eγ = 390, 585, 975 keV) and 26Mg(p,γ)27Al (Eγ = 1014 keV) were measured for proton energies from 1 to 3 MeV using a 60 μg/cm2 Mg target evaporated on a 40 μg/cm2 Ag thin film. The γ-rays were collected by a 50% relative efficiency HPGe detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to the beam direction, while the backscattered protons were collected by an ion implanted Si detector placed at a scattering angle of 165°. Simultaneous collection of γ-ray and RBS spectra is a great advantage of this approach which makes differential cross-section measurements independent on the collected beam charge. Measured cross-section values were compared with the previously reported data in the literature. Absolute γ-ray differential cross-sections were obtained with an overall systematic uncertainty of about ±6% and statistical uncertainty of less than ±5% for proton energies higher than 2.24 MeV.

  12. New Evaluated Semi-Empirical Formula Using Optical Model for 14-15 MeV ( n, t) Reaction Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Durgu, C.; Aydın, A.; Bölükdemir, M. H.; Kaplan, A.; Okuducu, Ş.

    2009-12-01

    In the next century the world will face the need for new energy sources. Nuclear fusion can be one of the most attractive sources of energy from the viewpoint of safety and minimal environmental impact. Fusion will not produce CO2 or SO2 and thus will not contribute to global warming or acid rain. Achieving acceptable performance for a fusion power system in the areas of economics, safety and environmental acceptability, is critically dependent on performance of the blanket and diverter systems which are the primary heat recovery, plasma purification, and tritium breeding systems. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. The hybrid reactor is a combination of the fusion and fission processes. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. So working out the systematics of ( n, t) reaction cross-sections are of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at energies up to 20 MeV. In this study, we have calculated non-elastic cross-sections by using optical model for ( n, t) reactions at 14-15 MeV energy. We have investigated the excitation function character and reaction Q-values depending on the asymmetry term effect for the ( n, t) reaction cross-sections. We have obtained new coefficients for the ( n, t) reaction cross-sections. We have suggested semi-empirical formulas including optical model nonelastic effects by fitting two parameters for the ( n, t) reaction cross-sections at 14-15 MeV. We have discussed the odd-even effect and the pairing effect considering binding energy systematic of the nuclear shell model for the new experimental data and new cross-sections formulas ( n, t) reactions developed by Tel et al. We have determined a different parameter groups by the classification of nuclei into even-even, even-odd and odd-even for ( n, t) reactions cross-sections. The obtained cross-section formulas

  13. Cross sections and partial kerma factors for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering from nitrogen, oxygen and calcium at En = 21.6 MeV.

    PubMed

    Olsson, N; Ramström, E; Trostell, B

    1990-09-01

    The Studsvik high-resolution, low-background time-of-flight facility has been used to measure differential neutron scattering cross sections for nitrogen, oxygen and calcium at a neutron energy of 21.6 MeV. Angular distributions in the range 10 degrees-160 degrees have been measured for both elastic and inelastic scattering from some low-lying levels in the three nuclei. Angle-integrated cross sections have been determined by fitting Legendre polynomial expansions to the differential data. Partial kerma factors for elastic and inelastic scattering have been deduced from these fits. Analyses in terms of the spherical optical model and the distorted-wave Born approximation have provided information on potential parameters and deformations, which have been used to calculate cross sections and partial kerma factors. Comparisons have been made with other recent data sets and model predictions, as well as with the evaluated neutron data file ENDF/B-V.

  14. Evaluated cross section libraries and kerma factors for neutrons up to 100 MeV on {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.

    1995-07-01

    We present evaluations of the interaction of 20 to 100 MeV neutrons with oxygen and nitrogen nuclei, which follows on from our previous work on carbon. Our aim is to accurately represent integrated cross sections, inclusive emission spectra, and kerma factors, in a data library which can be used in radiation transport calculations. We apply the FKK-GNASH nuclear model code, which includes Hauser-Feshbach, preequilibrium, and direct reaction mechanisms, and use experimental measurements to optimize the calculations. We determine total, elastic, and nonelastic cross sections, angle-energy correlated emission spectra, for light ejectiles with A{<=}4 and gamma-rays, and average energy depositions. Our results for charged-particle emission spectra agree well with the measurements of Subramanian et al.. We compare kerma factors derived from our evaluated cross sections with experimental data, providing an integral benchmarking of our work. The evaluated data libraries are available as electronic files.

  15. Determination of the effects of nuclear level density parameters on photofission cross sections of 235U up to 20 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarpün, Ismail Hakki; Aydın, Abdullah; Pekdoğan, Hakan

    2017-09-01

    The level density models and level density parameters are two of important quantities for describing the properties of nuclei. Especially, the level density parameter has an important role as input in calculation of reaction cross sections. In this study, the cross sections on 235U(g,f) reaction were calculated for different level density models using the TALYS 1.6 code up to 20 MeV gamma incident energies. First, it was determined the level density model that was the closest to the experimental data. Secondly, cross sections obtained for different level density parameters of this model were compared with experimental data from the EXFOR database. Thus it was determined the best level density parameter fit to experimental data.

  16. Cross sections of ground and isomeric states for (n,p) reaction on Sm-154 between 13.57 and 14.83MeV neutrons.

    PubMed

    Reyhancan, Iskender Atilla

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the activation cross sections were measured for the (154)Sm(n,p)(154g)Pm, and (154)Sm(n,p)(154m)Pm reactions at several neutron energies between 13.57 and 14.83MeV, which were produced by the neutron generator (SAMES T-400) through the (3)H((2)H,n)(4)He reaction. The production of short-lived activity and the spectra accumulation were performed by the cyclic activation technique. Induced gamma-ray activities were measured using a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer equipped with a high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. In the cross section measurements, corrections were made regarding the effects of gamma-ray attenuation, dead-time, fluctuation of neutron flux, and low energy neutrons. The measured cross sections were compared with data reported in literature as well as model calculations using the code TALYS 1.6.

  17. Measurements of isomeric cross sections for the (n,α) reaction on the ¹⁴²Nd isotope at approximately 14 MeV neutrons.

    PubMed

    Reyhancan, Iskender Atilla

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the activation cross sections were measured for (142)Nd(n,α)(139m)Ce reaction at four neutron energies between 13.57 and 14.83 MeV, which were produced by a neutron generator through (3)H((2)H,n)(4)He reaction. The production of short-lived activity and the spectra accumulation were performed by the cyclic activation technique. Induced gamma-ray activities were measured using a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer equipped with a high-purity Germanium (HpGe) detector. In the cross section measurements, corrections were made regarding the effects of the gamma-ray attenuation, the dead-time, the fluctuation of the neutron flux, and low energy neutrons. The measured cross sections were compared with the published literature and the results of the model calculation (TALYS 1.4).

  18. Investigation of the pairing effect using newly evaluated empirical studies for 14-15 MeV neutron reaction cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Tel, E.; Tanir, G.; Aydin, A.

    2007-03-15

    The asymmetry term effects for the cross sections of (n, charged particle) and (n,2n) reactions at 14-15 MeV neutron incident energy have been investigated. The effects of pairing and odd-even nucleon numbers in new data and in the formula of Tel et al. [J. Phys. G. 29, 2169 (2003)] are discussed. We have determined three different parameters groups by the classification of nuclei into even-even, even-odd, and odd-even (n,d) reactions. In addition, since there are not enough experimental data available, we have considered two different parameters groups by the classification of nuclei into odd-A and even-A (n,t) reaction cross sections. The empirical formulas with two parameters for the evaluation of the (n,d) and (n,t) reactions cross sections are discussed in the present study.

  19. The cross section functions for neutron induced reactions with Rhenium in the energy range 13.0-19.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovančević, N.; Daraban, L.; Stroh, H.; Oberstedt, S.; Hult, M.; Bonaldi, C.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Lutter, G.; Marissens, G.; Vidali, M.

    2017-09-01

    The technique for measuring neutron activation cross-sections using wide energy neutron beams (NAXSUN) was recently developed at JRC-Geel . This method is based on the detection of the gamma activity induced by the activation of the samples in different but overlapping neutron fields and following an unfolding procedure. In the present work, measurements of the cross-section functions by the NAXSUN technique for the (n,a), (n,2n), (n,p) and (n,3n) reactions on rhenium isotopes 185Re and 187Re were performed. The results are the first experimental data for the mentioned reaction cross-sections in the energy range 13.0-19.5 MeV. The obtained data are of interest for possible applications of Re in nuclear technology and medicine.

  20. Neutron-induced fission cross-section of 233U in the energy range 0.5 < En < 20 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, F.; Calviani, M.; Colonna, N.; Mastinu, P.; Milazzo, P. M.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martınez, T.; Massimi, C.; Meaze, M. H.; Mengoni, A.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2011-01-01

    The neutron-induced fission cross-section of 233U has been measured at the CERN n_TOF facility relative to the standard fission cross-section of 235U between 0.5 and 20MeV. The experiment was performed with a fast ionization chamber for the detection of the fission fragments and to discriminate against α -particles from the natural radioactivity of the samples. The high instantaneous flux and the low background of the n_TOF facility result in data with uncertainties of ≈ 3% , which were found in good agreement with previous experiments. The high quality of the present results allows to improve the evaluation of the 233U (n,f) cross-section and, consequently, the design of energy systems based on the Th/U cycle.

  1. (n,2n) and (n,3n) cross sections of neutron-induced reactions on 150Sm for En from threshold to 35 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Mitchell, G; Kawano, T; Becker, J; Wu, C; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R; Kunieda, S

    2009-03-16

    Cross-section measurements were made of prompt discrete {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 35 MeV) on a {sup 150}Sm sample fo 1550 mg/cm{sup 2} of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} enriched to 95.6% in {sup 150}Sm. Results are compared with enhanced Hauser-Feshbach model calculations including the pre-equilibrium reactions. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Incident neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. Excitation functions for thirteen individual {gamma}-rays up to E{sub x} = 0.8 MeV in {sup 149}Sm and one {gamma}-ray transition between the first excited and ground state in {sup 148}Sm were measured. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections were calculated using GNASH, an enhanced Hauser-Feshbach statistical nuclear reaction model code, and compared with the experimental results. The particle transmission coefficients were calculated with new systematic 'global' optical model potential parameters. The coupled-channel optical model based on the soft rotor model was employed to calculate the particle transmission coefficients. The pre-equilibrium part of the spin distribution in {sup 150}Sm was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshbach, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK) and incorporated into the GNASH reaction model code. the partial cross sections for discrete {gamma}-ray cascade paths leading to the ground state in {sup 149}Sm and {sup 148}Sm have been summed (without double counting) to estimate lower limits for reaction cross sections. These lower limits are combined with Hauser-Feshbach model calculations to deduce the reaction channel cross sections. These reaction channel cross sections agree with previously measured experimental and ENDF/B-VII evaluations.

  2. R-Matrix Evaluation of {sup 16}O neutron cross sections up to 6.3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, R.O.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.; Spencer, R.R.; and Wright, R.Q.

    2000-08-01

    In this paper the authors describe an evaluation of {sup 16}O neutron cross sections in the resolved resonance region with the multilevel Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. Resonance analyses were performed with the computer code SAMMY [LA98] which utilizes Bayes' method, a generalized least squares technique.

  3. K -shell ionization cross sections of Al, Si, S, Ca, and Zn for oxygen ions in the energy range 1. 1--8 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Geretschlaeger, M. ); Smit, Z. ); Steinbauer, E. )

    1992-03-01

    {ital K}-shell ionization cross sections induced by 1.1--8-MeV oxygen ions in Al, Si, S, Ca, and Zn were measured using different target thicknesses. The cross sections for vanishingly thin and for charge-equilibrium targets were obtained by extrapolation. The experimental results are compared to the perturbed stationary-state approximation with energy-loss, Coulomb, and relativistic corrections (ECPSSR) cross sections (Brandt and Lapicki, Phys. Rev. A 23, 1717 (1981)), to the modification of the ECPSSR theory (MECPSSR) (Benka, Geretschlaeger, and Paul, J. Phys. (Paris) Colloq. Suppl. 12, C9-251 (1987)), to the theory for direct Coulomb ionization of the 1{ital s}{sigma} molecular orbital (Montenegro and Sigaud, J. Phys. B 18, 299 (1985)), and to several semiclassical approximation codes using either the united atom binding procedure or the variational approach of Andersen {ital et} {ital al}. (Nucl. Instrum. Methods 192, 79 (1982)). The cross sections were also compared to the statistical molecular-orbital theory of inner-shell ionization for (nearly) symmetric atomic collisions (Mittelman and Wilets, Phys. Rev. 154, 12 (1967)). For fast collisions ({xi}{similar to}1), the ionization cross sections are well reproduced by theories for direct Coulomb ionization. For slower collisions ({xi}{lt}1), the experimental cross sections are systematically higher than the direct-ionization values, but they agree satisfactorily with the summed cross sections for direct Coulomb ionization and for molecular-orbital ionization. Best agreement (within a factor of 2) was found for the sums of MECPSSR and statistical cross sections.

  4. Determination of cross sections of 60Ni(n,2n)59Ni induced by 14 MeV neutrons with accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ming; Xu, Yongning; Guan, Yongjing; Shen, Hongtao; Du, Liang; Hongtao, Chen; Dong, Kejun; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Xuran; Wang, Xiaoming; Ruan, Xiang dong; Liu, Jiancheng; Wu, Shaoyong; Zhao, Qingzhang; Cai, Li; Pang, Fangfang

    2015-10-01

    The cross section of the 60Ni(n,2n)59Ni induced by neutron with energy around 14 MeV is important for a fusion environment. However, the published values are strongly discordant. By taking advantage of the high sensitivity of 59Ni measurement at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), determination of the cross section has been carried out. A natural Nickel foil was irradiated by neutrons produce by a T(D,n)α neutron generator. 57Co and 58Co which produced in the Nickel foil were chosen for the neutron fluence determination. Then the ratio of 59Ni/60Ni for the irradiated sample was determined via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) utilizing a 13MV tandem accelerator and a Q3D magnet spectrometry at CIAE. As a result, the cross section of 60Ni(n,2n)59Ni for the incident neutron energy of (14.60 ± 0.40) MeV was determined to be (426 ± 53) mb.

  5. Measurement of the e+e-→π+π- cross section between 600 and 900 MeV using initial state radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Ablikim, M.

    2015-11-28

    We extract the e+e-→π+π- cross section in the energy range between 600 and 900 MeV, exploiting the method of initial state radiation. A data set with an integrated luminosity of 2.93 fb-1 taken at a center-of-mass energy of 3.773 GeV with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider is used. The cross section is measured with a systematic uncertainty of 0.9%. We extract the pion form factor |Fπ|2 as well as the contribution of the measured cross section to the leading-order hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to (g-2)μ. In conclusion, we find this value to be aπμπ,LO (600–900 MeV) = (368.2more » ±2.5stat±3.3sys) ·10-10, which is between the corresponding values using the BaBar or KLOE data.« less

  6. Absolute cross section measurements of neutron-induced fission of 242Pu from 1 to 2.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, C.; Belloni, F.; Heyse, J.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Thomas, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    The absolute neutron-induced fission cross section of 242Pu was measured at five energies between 1 and 2.5 MeV at the low-scatter neutron measurement facility of the National Physical Laboratory, UK. The measurements are part of an effort to reduce uncertainties of nuclear data related to fast spectrum reactors. The neutron-induced fission results are in good agreement with the Evaluated Nuclear Data File/B-VII.1 but disagree with several recent measurements near the resonance-like structure around 1.1 MeV. Within the same experimental campaign, the spontaneous fission half-life of 242Pu was measured and it is in good agreement with previous results.

  7. Inelastic partial {gamma}-ray cross sections of {sup 150}Sm+n reactions for E{sub n} = 1-15 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D.; Kawano, T.; Devlin, M.; Fotiades, N.; Nelson, R. O.; Mitchell, G. E.; Becker, J. A.; Garrett, P. E.; Kunieda, S.

    2011-06-28

    The {sup 150}Sm(n,n'{gamma}) reaction was measured from E{sub n} = 1 to 15 MeV at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Cemter (LANSCE). The {gamma} rays were detected with the Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Measured {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections, Twenty four individual {gamma}-rays up to E{sub x} = 1.8 MeV in {sup 150}Sm were measured. Results are compared with enhanced Hauser Feshbach model calculations: the spin distribution in the pre-equilibrium reaction is calculated with the quantum mechanical model of Feshbach, Kerman and Koonin. The particle transmission coefficients were calculated with two different global optical model potential parameter sets. We employed the coupled-channel optical model based on the soft rotor model and with spherical potential.

  8. Cross sections and analyzing powers for (p ⃗,n p ) reactions of 2H, 6Li, and 12C at 296 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakasa, T.; Yasuda, J.; Dozono, M.; Fukunaga, T.; Gotanda, S.; Hatanaka, K.; Ishibashi, K.; Kanaya, Y.; Kimura, S.; Maeda, Y.; Maeda, Y.; Nishio, Y.; Noro, T.; Nozoe, T.; Ohnaka, K.; Sakaguchi, S.; Sakemi, Y.; Sekiguchi, K.; Taguchi, T.; Wada, Y.

    2017-07-01

    We report measurements of cross sections and analyzing powers for nucleon-knockout (p ⃗,n p ) reactions of 2H, 6Li, and 12C at 296 MeV using the RCNP NPOL3 neutron detector and large acceptance spectrometer. The 1 s and 1 p knockout reactions were successfully separated with a separation-energy resolution of approximately 6 MeV. The resulting data were compared with plane-wave and distorted-wave impulse approximation calculations employing the nucleon-nucleon t matrix in free space. No significant differences were identified in the case of the present analyzing power data, in contrast to the significant reductions observed in (p ⃗,2 p ) values. The conventional Pauli blocking and nuclear binding effects with the g matrix and the relativistic effect of nucleon mass reduction in the nuclei are also discussed.

  9. Systematic study of three-nucleon force effects in the cross section of the deuteron-proton breakup at 130 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    St. Kistryn; E. Stephan; A. Biegun; K. Bodek; A. Deltuva; E. Epelbaum; K. Ermisch; W. Gloeckle; J. Golak; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; H. Kamada; M. Kis; B. Klos; A. Kozela; J. Kuros-Zolnierczuk; M. Mahjour-Shafiei; U.-G. Meissner; A. Micherdzinska; A. Nogga; P. U. Sauer; R. Skibinski; R. Sworst; H. Witala; J. Zejma; W. Zipper

    2005-08-11

    High precision cross-section data of the deuteron-proton breakup reaction at 130 MeV are presented for 72 kinematically complete configurations. The data cover a large region of the available phase space, divided into a systematic grid of kinematical variables. They are compared with theoretical predictions, in which the full dynamics of the three-nucleon (3N) system is obtained in three different ways: realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials are combined with model 3N forces (3NF's) or with an effective 3NF resulting from explicit treatment of the Delta-isobar excitation. Alternatively, the chiral perturbation theory approach is used at the next-to-next-to-leading order with all relevant NN and 3N contributions taken into account. The generated dynamics is then applied to calculate cross-section values by rigorous solution of the 3N Faddeev equations. The comparison of the calculated cross sections with the experimental data shows a clear preference for the predictions in which the 3NF's are included. The majority of the experimental data points is well reproduced by the theoretical predictions. The remaining discrepancies are investigated by inspecting cross sections integrated over certain kinematical variables. The procedure of global comparisons leads to establishing regularities in disagreements between the experimental data and the theoretically predicted values of the cross sections. They indicate deficiencies still present in the assumed models of the 3N system dynamics.

  10. Proton-impact ionization cross sections of adenine measured at 0.5 and 2.0 MeV by electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Iriki, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Imai, M.; Itoh, A.

    2011-11-15

    Double-differential ionization cross sections (DDCSs) of vapor-phase adenine molecules (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5}) by 0.5- and 2.0-MeV proton impact have been measured by the electron spectroscopy method. Electrons ejected from adenine were analyzed by a 45 Degree-Sign parallel-plate electrostatic spectrometer over an energy range of 1.0-1000 eV at emission angles from 15 Degree-Sign to 165 Degree-Sign . Single-differential cross sections (SDCSs) and total ionization cross sections (TICSs) were also deduced. It was found from the Platzman plot, defined as SDCSs divided by the classical Rutherford knock-on cross sections per target electron, that the SDCSs at higher electron energies are proportional to the total number of valence electrons (50) of adenine, while those at low-energy electrons are highly enhanced due to dipole and higher-order interactions. The present results of TICS are in fairly good agreement with recent classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations, and moreover, a simple analytical formula gives nearly equivalent cross sections in magnitude at the incident proton energies investigated.

  11. Proton-impact ionization cross sections of adenine measured at 0.5 and 2.0 MeV by electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iriki, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Imai, M.; Itoh, A.

    2011-11-01

    Double-differential ionization cross sections (DDCSs) of vapor-phase adenine molecules (C5H5N5) by 0.5- and 2.0-MeV proton impact have been measured by the electron spectroscopy method. Electrons ejected from adenine were analyzed by a 45∘ parallel-plate electrostatic spectrometer over an energy range of 1.0-1000 eV at emission angles from 15∘ to 165∘. Single-differential cross sections (SDCSs) and total ionization cross sections (TICSs) were also deduced. It was found from the Platzman plot, defined as SDCSs divided by the classical Rutherford knock-on cross sections per target electron, that the SDCSs at higher electron energies are proportional to the total number of valence electrons (50) of adenine, while those at low-energy electrons are highly enhanced due to dipole and higher-order interactions. The present results of TICS are in fairly good agreement with recent classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations, and moreover, a simple analytical formula gives nearly equivalent cross sections in magnitude at the incident proton energies investigated.

  12. Measurement of 232Th(n,5n γ) cross sections from 29 MeV to 42 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerveno, M.; Nolte, R.; Baumann, P.; Dessagne, Ph.; Jericha, E.; Jokic, S.; Koning, A. J.; Lukic, S.; Meulders, J. P.; Nachab, A.; Pavlik, A.; Reginatto, M.; Rudolf, G.

    2014-10-01

    The excitation function of the reaction 232 Th( n, 5 nγ)228 Th from 29 to 42 MeV has been measured for the first time at the quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam of the UCL cyclotron CYCLONE employing the 7Li(p,n) source reaction. Taking advantage of the good energy resolution of the planar High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors, prompt γ-ray spectroscopy was used to detect the γ-rays resulting from the decay of excited states of nuclei created by the (n, xn) reactions. The neutron beam was characterized by a combination of time of flight measurements carried out using a liquid scintillation detector and a 238U fission ionization chamber. Fluence measurements were performed using a proton recoil telescope. The results are compared with TALYS-1.4 code calculations.

  13. Measurement of (43)Sc and (44)Sc production cross-section with an 18MeV medical PET cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Carzaniga, Tommaso Stefano; Auger, Martin; Braccini, Saverio; Bunka, Maruta; Ereditato, Antonio; Nesteruk, Konrad Pawel; Scampoli, Paola; Türler, Andreas; van der Meulen, Nicholas

    2017-11-01

    (43)Sc and (44)Sc are positron emitter radionuclides that, in conjunction with the β(-) emitter (47)Sc, represent one of the most promising possibilities for theranostics in nuclear medicine. Their availability in suitable quantity and quality for medical applications is an open issue and their production with medical cyclotrons represents a scientific and technological challenge. For this purpose, an accurate knowledge of the production cross sections is mandatory. In this paper, we report on the cross section measurement of the reactions (43)Ca(p,n)(43)Sc, (44)Ca(p,2n) (43)Sc, (46)Ti(p,α)(43)Sc, and (44)Ca(p,n)(44)Sc at the Bern University Hospital cyclotron. A study of the production yield and purity performed by using commercially available enriched target materials is also presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Double differential cross section for light mass fragment production on tens of MeV proton, deuteron, helium and carbon induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Uozumi, Yusuke; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Koba, Yusuke

    2017-09-01

    Double differential cross sections (DDXs) of light mass fragment (LMFs - Li,Be,B,C,N and O) productions were measured for tens of MeV proton, deuteron helium and carbon induced reactions on Be, C, Al, Ti and Cu targets. The incident energies for the measurements were chosen to allow us to compare DDXs with same incident energy but different projectiles on various targets. Systematic data were obtained to see the differences between projectile energies, particles, targets and emitted particles. From the comparison, reaction processes of not only evaporation from complete fusion nucleus, but also scattering, pickup, stripping and projectile fragmentation were observed.

  15. Comparison of the (p,xn) cross sections from /sup 238/U, /sup 235/U, and /sup 232/Th targets irradiated with 200-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.Y.; Zhou, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    We have measured absolute cross sections for (p,xn) reactions (x ranges from 0 to 8) from /sup 238/U, /sup 235/U, and /sup 232/Th targets irradiated with 200-MeV protons at the Brookhaven AGS Linac injector. Chemical yields were determined by using /sup 239/Np and /sup 233/Pa as tracers. Yield patterns obtained in this work can be compared to the experimental results and theoretical calculations from earlier work, and they are consistent within the framework of intranuclear cascade followed by neutron evaporation and fission competition.

  16. Calculated neutron-induced cross sections for /sup 58,60/Ni from 1 to 20 MeV and comparisons with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hetrick, D.M.; Fu, C.Y.; Larson, D.C.

    1987-06-01

    Nuclear model codes were used to compute cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on both /sup 58/Ni and /sup 60/Ni for incident energies from 1 to 20 MeV. The input parameters for the model codes were determined through analysis of experimental data in this energy region. Discussion of the models used, the input data, the resulting calculations, extensive comparisons to measured data, and comparisons to the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B-V) for Ni (MAT 1328) are included in this report. 118 refs., 101 figs., 19 tabs.

  17. Activation cross-sections of longer lived radioisotopes of proton induced nuclear reactions on terbium up to 65MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Hermanne, A; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Ignatyuk, A V

    2017-09-01

    Experimental cross sections are presented for the (159)Tb(p,xn)(153,155,157,159)Dy, (152,153,155,156m2,m1,g,158)Tb and (153,151)Gd nuclear reactions up to 65MeV. The experimental results are compared with the recently reported experimental data and with the results of the nuclear reaction codes ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE and TALYS as reported in the TENDL-2015 on-line library. Integral thick-target yields are also derived for the reaction products used in practical applications and production routes are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Absolute measurement of the differential cross section for the reaction sup 4 He(. gamma. , p ) sup 3 H from 63 to 71 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.T.; Jenkins, D.A. ); Debevec, P.T.; Harty, P.D.; Knott, J.E. )

    1991-05-01

    Results are presented from a {sup 4}He photodisintegration experiment performed with quasimonochromatic photons using a large solid-angle detector. The tagged-bremsstrahlung technique gave a reliable absolute normalization. In addition, an unambiguous separation of the proton-triton channel from other photodisintegration channels was achieved. A total cross section of 218{plus minus}8 {mu}b was measured at a mean energy of 67{plus minus}4 MeV and Legendre coefficients up to {ital a}{sub 5} were extracted from the angular distributions.

  19. Investigation of total cross sections for reactions induced by 6He interaction with silicon nuclei at energies between 5 and 50 MeV/ A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabdrakhimova, G. D.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Kuhtina, I. N.; Kuterbekov, K. A.; Mendibaev, K. O.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental excitation functions in terms of the total cross sections for 6He + Si nuclear reactions are analyzed in the energy range between 5 and 50 MeV/ A, and a brief survey of the procedures used to obtain experimental data is given. Particular attention is given to describing experiments performed in beams of radioactive nuclei from the accelerators of the Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna). The experimental data in question are analyzed on the basis of a semimicroscopic optical model.

  20. Measurement of the neutron-induced fission cross-section of 243Am relative to 235U from 0.5 to 20 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, F.; Calviani, M.; Colonna, N.; Mastinu, P.; Milazzo, P. M.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Barbagallo, M.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Meaze, M. H.; Mengoni, A.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrio, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2011-12-01

    The ratio of the neutron-induced fission cross-sections of 243Am and 235U was measured in the energy range from 0.5 to 20 MeV with uncertainties of ≈ 4%. The experiment was performed at the CERN n_TOF facility using a fast ionization chamber. With the good counting statistics that could be achieved thanks to the high instantaneous flux and the low backgrounds, the present results are useful for resolving discrepancies in previous data sets and are important for future reactors with improved fuel burn-up.

  1. Calculated neutron-induced cross sections for /sup 52/Cr from 1 to 20 MeV and comparisons with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hetrick, D.M.; Fu, C.Y.; Larson, D.C.

    1987-09-15

    Nuclear model codes were used to compute cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on /sup 52/Cr for incident energies from 1 to 20 MeV. The input parameters for the model codes were determined through analysis of experimental data in this energy region. Discussion of the models used, the input data, the resulting calculations, extensive comparisons to measured data, and comparisons to the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B-V) for Cr (MAT 1324) are included in this report. 103 refs., 67 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Absolute Differential Cross-Sections for Elastic PION(+/-)/PROTON Scattering at 30 Less than or Equal to T(pion) Less than or Equal to 140 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, Jeffrey Thomas

    Differential cross sections for elastic pi^{+/-}p scattering have been measured at TRIUMF for 10 incident pion energies in three separate experiments at 66.8 <= T_{pi} <= 138.8 MeV, Tpi = 66.8 MeV (pi^+p only), and 30 <= T_{pi} <= 66.8 MeV, using three independent techniques. Typical statistical accuracies are 1-3% and normalization uncertainties are 1.2-3.0%. Extensive experimental checks were employed to minimize systematic errors. Incident pion beam rates were varied by a factor of 5, target thickness was varied by a factor of 10, different target compositions were used (CH_2 and CH_{1.1 }), and derangements of the detector geometry tested the reproducibility of the cross sections under widely varying conditions. Three separate Monte Carlo routines were used. All measurements used solid targets. Thin scintillators and time-of-flight (TOF) techniques were used to count and identify particles incident on the targets and to detect the scattered pions. Recoil protons were detected in coincidence with the scattered pions in two of the three experiments. At the upper range of incident pion energies (66.8 to 138 MeV), a two-arm coincidence technique was used in which proton detection was similar to pion detection (TOF). At the three lowest incident pion energies, an active target technique was used in which the recoil particles were detected by means of the light generated within the CH_ {1.1} scintillator-target. These are the only elastic pip coincidence measurements by any experimental group below 140 MeV incident pion energy. At 66.8 MeV, a third technique was used in which no recoil particles were detected. At incident pion energies of 100 MeV and above, all pi^{+/-}p results from these three measurements are in good agreement with previous measurements, as are the pi ^-p results at all energies. However, while the pi^{+/-}p results of these three experiments are consistent within experimental error at the overlapping energy of 66.8 MeV, they are 10-25% lower than

  3. Cross sections of the 56Fe(n ,α ) 53Cr and 54Fe(n ,α ) 51Cr reactions in the MeV region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhimin; Fan, Xiao; Zhang, Luyu; Bai, Huaiyong; Chen, Jinxiang; Zhang, Guohui; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Sedysheva, M. V.; Krupa, L.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.

    2015-10-01

    Cross sections of the 56Fe(n ,α ) 53Cr and 54Fe(n ,α )51Cr reactions were measured at En=5.5 and 6.5 MeV and En=4.0 ,4.5 ,5.5 ,and 6.5 MeV , respectively, using a double-section gridded ionization chamber as the α -particle detector. Natural iron and enriched 56Fe and 54Fe foil samples were prepared. A deuterium gas target was used to produce monoenergetic neutrons through the 2H(d ,n )3He reaction. Two rounds of experiments were performed at the 4.5-MV Van de Graaff Accelerator of Peking University. The foreground and background were measured in separate runs. The neutron flux was monitored by a B F3 long counter, and the cross sections of the 238U(n ,f ) reaction were used as the standard. Present results are compared with those of the talys-1.6 code calculations, existing measurements, and evaluations.

  4. Differential and angle-integrated cross sections for the 40Ca(n, α)37Ar reaction from 4.0 to 6.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinhua; Liu, Jiaming; Liu, Xiang; Fan, Xiao; Wang, Zhimin; Chen, Jinxiang; Zhang, Guohui; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Sedysheva, M. V.; Krupa, L.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Szalanski, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Differential cross sections for the 40 Ca( n,) , and reactions are measured at neutron energies of 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0 and 6.5MeV using a double-section gridded ionization chamber and two CaF2 samples. Monoenergetic neutrons were produced through the 2 H( d, n)3 He reaction with a deuterium gas target. A BF3 neutron counter was utilized to normalize the neutron flux among different measurements. The absolute value of neutron flux was calibrated using a 238U sample. Angle-integrated cross sections for the 40 Ca( n,) , and reactions are obtained from the integration of the differential data. Model calculations are performed using the TALYS-1.6 code and general agreement is achieved between measurements and calculations. Then the total 40Ca( n,)37Ar cross sections are derived from the angle-integrated cross sections combined with the code calculations. Present results are compared with existing measurements and evaluations.

  5. Activation cross-sections of long lived products of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 50 MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Csikai, J; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2014-01-01

    Activation cross-sections for production of (162m,161,155)Ho, (165,159,157,155)Dy and (161,160,156,155)Tb radionuclides in deuteron induced nuclear reactions on elemental dysprosium were measured up to 50 MeV for practical application and the test of the predictive power of nuclear reaction model codes. A stacked-foil irradiation technique and off-line gamma-ray spectrometry were used to determine the activities. No earlier cross-section data were found in the literature. The experimental data are compared with the predictions of the ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D and TALYS codes. Integral production yields were calculated from the fitted experimental data.

  6. Cross sections for K-shell ionization of atoms induced by 1.5-6.0 MeV 4He ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, E. K.; Wang, C. W.; Yu, Y. C.; Chuang, F. T.; Huang, Y. M.

    1992-12-01

    K-shell X-ray production cross sections have been measured for elements of Ti, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ga (Z = 22-31) using 4He-ion beams in the energy range 1.5-6.0 MeV. Results are compared with the predictions of the first-order Born approximation (FOBORN) and the energy-loss Coulomb-deflection perturbed-stationary-state relativistic theory (ECPSSR), and those of earlier measurements. The agreement with the ECPSSR theory is within 10%. In addition to the experimental cross sections, the Kβ/Kα X-ray yield ratios have been extracted, and compared with the calculated values of Scofield, and the "recommended" values of Khan and Karimi.

  7. Microscopic model analysis of the 6He, 6Li+28Si total reaction cross sections at the energy range 5-50 A MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, K. V.; Kukhtina, I. N.; Lukyanov, V. K.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.

    2007-05-22

    The existing and some preliminary experimental data on the total cross sections of the 4,6He, 6,7Li+28Si reactions at energies E=5-50 A MeV are demonstrated. The data on 6Li,6He+28Si are analyzed in the framework of the microscopic optical potential with real and imaginary parts obtained with a help of the double-folding procedure and by using the current models of densities of the projectile nuclei. Besides, the microscopic double-folding Coulomb potential is calculated and its effect on cross sections is compared with that when one applies the traditional Coulomb potential of the uniform charge distribution. The semi-microscopic potentials are constructed from both the renormalized microscopic potentials and their derivatives to take into account collective motion effect and to improve an agreement with experimental data.

  8. Measurement of 58Fe (p , n)58Co reaction cross-section within the proton energy range of 3.38 to 19.63 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Reetuparna; Badwar, Sylvia; Lawriniang, Bioletty; Jyrwa, Betylda; Naik, Haldhara; Naik, Yeshwant; Suryanarayana, Saraswatula Venkata; Ganesan, Srinivasan

    2017-08-01

    The 58Fe (p , n)58Co reaction cross-section within Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) region i.e. from 3.38 to 19.63 MeV was measured by stacked-foil activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique using the BARC-TIFR Pelletron facility at Mumbai. The present data were compared with the existing literature data and found to be in good agreement. The 58Fe (p , n)58Co reaction cross-section as a function of proton energy was also theoretically calculated by using the computer code TALYS-1.8 and found to be in good agreement, which shows the validity of the TALYS-1.8 program.

  9. L-shell x-ray production cross sections in Nd, Gd, Ho, Yb, Au and Pb for 25-MeV carbon and 32-MeV oxygen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, M.C.; McDaniel, F.D.; Duggan, J.L.; Mehta, R.; Lapicki, G.; Miller, P.D.; Pepmiller, P.L.; Krause, H.; Rosseel, T.M.; Rayburn, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    L-shell x-ray production cross sections in /sub 60/Nd, /sub 64/Gd, /sub 67/Ho, /sub 70/Yb, /sub 79/Au and /sub 82/Pb have been measured for incident 25 MeV /sub 6//sup 12/C/sup +q/(q = 4,5,6) and 32 MeV /sub 8//sup 16/O/sup +q/(q = 5,7,8) ions. Measurements were made on targets ranging in thickness from 1 to 100 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/. Echancement in the L-shell x-ray production cross section for projectiles with one or two K-shell vacancies over those for projectiles with no K-shell vacancies is observed. The sum of direct ionization to the continuum (DI) plus electron capture (EC) to the L,M,N ... shells and EC to the K-shell of the projectile have been extracted from the data. Calculations in the first Born approximation are approx. 10 times larger than the data. Predictions of the ECPSSR theory that accounts for the energy-loss, Coulomb deflection, perturbed-stationary state, and relativistic effects are in good agreement with the data for both ions.

  10. R-Matrix Evaluation of Cl Neutron Cross Sections up to 1.2 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, R.O.

    2003-03-27

    We have performed an evaluation of {sup 35}Cl, {sup 37}Cl, and {sup nat}Cl neutron cross sections in the resolved resonance region with the multilevel Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. Resonance analyses were carried out with the computer code SAMMY, which utilizes Bayes' method, a generalized least squares technique. A recent modification of SAMMY enabled us to calculate charged particle penetrabilities for the proton exit channel. Our resonance parameter representation describes the data much better than does ENDF/B-VI, and it should lead to improved criticality safety calculations for systems where Cl is present.

  11. Investigation of 14-15 MeV ( n, t) Reaction Cross-sections by Using New Evaluated Empirical and Semi-empirical Systematic Formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Aydın, A.; Kaplan, A.; Şarer, B.

    2008-09-01

    In the hybrid reactor, tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. Working out the systematics of ( n, t) reaction cross-sections are of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at energies up to 20 MeV. In this study we have investigated asymmetry term effect for the ( n, t) reaction cross-sections at 14-15 neutron incident energy. It has been discussed the odd-even effect and the pairing effect considering binding energy systematic of the nuclear shell model for the new experimental data and new cross-sections formulas ( n, t) reactions developed by Tel et al. We have determined a different parameter groups by the classification of nuclei into even-even, even-odd and odd-even for ( n, t) reactions cross-sections. The obtained empirical and semi-empirical formulas by fitting two parameter for ( n, t) reactions were given. All calculated results have been compared with the experimental data and the other semi-empirical formulas.

  12. Measurement of pion induced neutron-production double-differential cross sections on Fe and Pb at 870 MeV and 2.1 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Y.; Shigyo, N.; Satoh, D.; Kunieda, S.; Watanabe, T.; Ishimoto, S.; Tenzou, H.; Maehata, K.; Ishibashi, K.; Nakamoto, T.; Numajiri, M.; Meigo, S.; Takada, H.

    2004-08-01

    Neutron-production double-differential cross sections for 870 MeV π+ and π- and 2.1 GeV π+ mesons incident on iron and lead targets were measured with NE213 liquid scintillators by time-of-flight technique. NE213 liquid scintillators 12.7 cm in diameter and 12.7 cm thick were placed in directions of 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150° . The typical flight path length was 1.5 m . Neutron detection efficiencies were evaluated by calculation results of SCINFUL and CECIL codes. The experimental results were compared with JAERI quantum molecular dynamics code. For the meson incident reactions, adoption of NN in-medium effects was slightly useful for reproducing 870 MeV π+ -incident neutron yields at neutron energies of 10 30 MeV , as was the case for proton incident reactions. The π- incident reaction generates more neutrons than π+ incidence as the number of nucleons in targets decrease.

  13. Activation cross sections and isomeric ratios in reactions induced by 14.5 MeV neutrons on152Sm,154Sm and178Hf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirov, A.; Nenoff, N.; Georgieva, E.; Necheva, C.; Ephtimov, I.

    1993-09-01

    Cross sections for the reactions152Sm( n, p)152 g,m1, m2 Pm,154Sm( n, p)154 g,m Pm,178Hf( n, p)178 m,g Lu,154Sm( n, d)153Pm and152Sm( n, α)149Nd were measured at 14.5 MeV neutron energy by the activation method. On the basis of these cross sections, the associated isomeric ratios in154Pm,152Pm,178Lu and the comparison with the predictions of different compound and precompound models, conclusions are drawn about the role of the preequilibrium processes in 14.5 MeV neutron induced reactions. Calculations for equal angular momentum removal by equilibrium and preequilibrium emitted particles better reproduced the experimental isomeric ratios, than for higher angular momentum removal in the preequilibrium phase. The isomeric ratios may be used as a source of additional information about the spin of the isomeric states in152Pm and154Pm for which the spectroscopic information is uncertain.

  14. Precision Cross Sections Measurement of 56Fe(n,n γ) at 14.1 MeV using Associated Particle Neutron Elemental Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyu; Koltick, David

    2017-01-01

    Integral production cross sections for 846.8 keV and 1238.3 keV prompt gamma rays from 14.1 MeV neutrons interactions on 56Fe and are reported, using Associated Particle Neutron Elemental Imaging technique. The experimental technique involves: (1) The development of a VME standard high speed DAQ system and a MATLAB parallel cluster for offline signal analysis with full control of data flow; (2) The advantage of the <1.5 ns coincidence timing resolution between the neutron production and the gamma ray detection to reject noise; (3) A large 30% solid angle gamma ray coverage by an array of NaI(Tl) detectors. The neutron flux is measured through detecting the associated alpha-particle from the D-T fusion reaction in the neutron generator. Present cross section measurements using other techniques with limited timing resolution and solid angle coverage are in agreement at neutron energies lower than 6 MeV. At higher neutron energies reported results can disagree by more than 20%. This more accurate technique presented can distinguish between the differences in the reported results based on pulse-mode neutron source and neutron time-of-flight techniques, at higher neutron energies.

  15. Defect formation in MeV H+ implanted GaN and 4H-SiC investigated by cross-sectional Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai; Jia, Qi; You, Tiangui; Zhang, Shibin; Lin, Jiajie; Zhang, Runchun; Zhou, Min; Yu, Wenjie; Zhang, Bo; Ou, Xin; Wang, Xi

    2017-09-01

    Cross-sectional Raman spectroscopy is used to characterize the defect formation and the defect recovery in MeV H+ implanted bulk GaN and 4H-SiC in the high energy MeV ion-cut process. The Raman intensity decreases but the forbidden modes are activated at the damage region, and the intensity decrease is proportional to the damage level. The Raman spectrum is quite sensitive to detect the damage recovery after annealing. The main peak intensity increases and the forbidden mode disappears in both annealed GaN and 4H-SiC samples. The Raman spectra of GaN samples annealed at different temperatures suggest that higher annealing temperature is more efficient for damage recovery. While, the Raman spectra of SiC indicate that higher implantation temperature results in heavier lattice damage and other polytype clusters might be generated by high annealing temperature in the annealed SiC samples. The cross-sectional Raman spectroscopy is a straightforward method to characterize lattice damage and damage recovery in high energy ion-cut process. It can serve as a fast supplementary measurement technique to Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) for the defect characterizations.

  16. R-Matrix Evaluation of 16O Neutron Cross Sections up to 6.3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, R.O.

    2000-08-21

    In this paper we describe an evaluation of {sup 16}O neutron cross sections in the resolved resonance region with the multilevel Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. Resonance analyses were performed with the computer code SAMMY [LA98] which utilizes Bayes method, a generalized least squares technique. Over the years the nuclear community has developed a collection of evaluated nuclear data for applications in thermal, fast reactor, and fusion systems. However, typical neutron spectra in criticality safety applications are different from the spectra relevant to thermal, fast reactor, and fusion systems. In fact, the neutron spectra important for these non-reactor systems appear to peak in the epithermal energy range. Nuclear data play a major role in the calculation of the criticality safety margins for these systems. A thorough examination of how the present collection of nuclear data evaluations behaves in criticality safety calculations is needed. Many older evaluations will probably need to be revised, and new evaluations will be needed. Oxygen is an important element in criticality safety applications where oxides are present in significant abundance. The existing ENDF/B-VI.5 evaluation is expressed in terms of point-wise cross sections derived from the analysis of G. Hale [HA91]. Unfortunately such an evaluation is not directly useful for resonance analysis of data from samples in which oxygen is combined with other elements; for that purpose, Reich-Moore resonance parameters are needed. This paper addresses the task of providing those parameters. In the following sections we discuss the data, resonance analysis procedure, and results.

  17. Activation cross-sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on neodymium up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2014-04-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of activation cross sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on rare earths, the reactions on neodymium for production of therapeutic radionuclides were measured for the first time. The excitation functions of the natNd(d,x) 151,150,149,148m,148g,146,144,143Pm, 149,147,139mNd, 142Pr and 139gCe nuclear reactions were assessed by using the stacked foil activation technique and high resolution γ-spectrometry. The experimental excitation functions were compared to the theoretical predictions calculated with the modified model codes ALICE-IPPE-D and EMPIRE-II-D and with the data in the TENDL-2012 library based on latest version of the TALYS code. The application of the data in the field of medical isotope production and nuclear reaction theory is discussed.

  18. Evaluation of cross sections for Lα x-ray production by up to 4 MeV protons in representative elements from silver to uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapicki, Gregory

    2009-07-01

    Over the last two decades, Lα x-ray production cross sections have been fitted with a number of empirical formulae. Cross sections obtained from these formulae are averaged and fitted to a new empirical formula. These new empirical cross sections are compared with the results of the plane-wave Born approximation and the ECPSSR theory of Brandt and Lapicki (1981 Phys. Rev. A 23 1717). They are also gauged by the ECPSSR theory that has been corrected with a united atom approach in slow collisions, evaluated with Dirac-Hartree-Slater instead of screened hydrogenic wavefunctions, modified for intra-shell couplings as well as the change of the atomic parameters due to multiple ionizations. The effects of appropriately normalized intra-shell coupling factors and of multiple ionization were found to be small and essentially offset each other. The role of different sets of atomic parameters in conversion of the predictions of these ionization theories for Lα x-ray production in elements from the 47 <= Z2 <= 92 range of target atoms bombarded by up to 4 MeV protons is examined, and the selection of the optimal combination of ionization theory and atomic parameters for a reliable data base for PIXE analysis of elements heavier than palladium is discussed.

  19. Measurement of reaction cross-sections for 89Y at average neutron energies of 7.24-24.83 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Kim, Guinyun; Naik, Haladhara; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shahid, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    We measured neutron-induced reaction cross-sections for 89Y(n,γ)90mY and 89Y(n,α)86Rb reactions with the average neutron energy region from 7.45 to 24.83 MeV by an activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique using the MC-50 Cyclotron at Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. The neutron-induced reaction cross-sections of 89Y as a function of neutron energy were taken from the TENDL-2013 library. The flux-weighted average cross-sections for 89Y(n,γ)90mY and 89Y(n,α)86Rb reactions were calculated from the TENDL-2013 values based on mono-energetic neutron and by using the neutron energy spectrum from MCNPX 2.6.0 code. The present results are compared with the flux-weighted values of TENDL-2013 and are found to be in good agreement

  20. Measurements of proton induced γ-ray emission cross sections on MgF2 target in the energy range 1.95-3.05 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamboni, I.; Siketić, Z.; Jakšić, M.; Bogdanović Radović, I.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present differential cross sections for γ-ray emission from the reactions 19F(p,p‧γ)19F (Eγ = 110, 197, 1236 and 1349 + 1357 keV), 24Mg(p,p‧γ)24Mg (Eγ = 1369 keV) and 25Mg(p,p‧γ)25Mg (Eγ = 390, 585 and 975 keV). Differential cross sections were measured for proton energies from 1.95 to 3.05 MeV with a 15 keV step and beam energy resolution of 0.06%. Thin reference standard, 54.1 μg/cm2 of MgF2 deposited on thin Mylar foil with additionally evaporated 4 nm Au layer, was used as a target. The γ-rays were detected by a 20% relative efficiency HPGe detector placed at an angle of 135° with respect to the beam direction, while the backscattered protons were collected using silicon surface barrier detector placed at the scattering angle of 165°. Obtained cross sections were compared with the previously measured data available from the literature.

  1. Cross sections and differential spectra for reactions of 2-20 MeV neutrons of /sup 27/Al

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Komoto, T.T.

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes product yields, secondary n,p and ..cap alpha.. spectra, and ..gamma..-ray spectra calculated for incident neutrons of 2-20 MeV on /sup 27/Al targets. Results are all from the code ALICE, using the version ALISO which does weighting of results for targets which are a mix of isotopes. Where natural isotopic targets are involved, yields and n,p,..cap alpha.. spectra will be reported weighted over isotopic yields. Gamma-ray spectra, however, will be reported for the most abundant isotope.

  2. Development of a gaseous proton-recoil detector for fission cross section measurements below 1 MeV neutron energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, P.; Mathieu, L.; Aïche, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Tsekhanovich, I.

    2016-03-01

    The elastic H(n,p) reaction is sometimes used to measure neutron flux, in order to produce high precision measurements. The use of this technique is not straightforward to use below incident neutron energy of 1 MeV, due to a high background in the detected proton spectrum. Experiments have been carried out at the AIFIRA facility to investigate such background and determine its origin and components. Based on these investigations, a gaseous proton-recoil detector has been designed, with a reduced low energy background.

  3. Damage cross-sections for MeV energy He ion induced hydrogen ejection in polymers-material structure effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, H.; Touchrift, B.

    2004-03-01

    Using the elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) method for hydrogen analysis, a He-4(+) ion beam was used simultaneously for irradiating samples and as a tool to measure the hydrogen desorption yield as a function of irradiation dose. The influence of molecular structure on helium-induced desorption is studied for different polymers. The dose-response curves of hydrogen released from irradiated structures are presented and used to determine the damage cross-sections. The deduced desorption extent for a single impact is of the order of a few Angstroms, revealing localized regions of desorption. Hydrogen desorption is found to be sensitive to chemical composition of the target. The overall experimental data of the hydrogen desorption yield are described by the same function of the type Y(phi) = (C/phi(n) ) exp (-sigma phi) where phi is the irradiation dose and C and n are a fitting parameter. The first part of the function describes 'prompt ejection', predominant at lower irradiation dose where the created latent tracks remain separated. The exponential term accounts for the 'thermal ejection' process activated by ion-track overlapping involved at higher irradiation doses. A threshold dose is found that separates the two regimes and above which the overlapping tracks form a highly heated condensed gas and activate chemical processes. Chemical modifications have been studied using infrared-absorption spectroscopy, which reveal the formation of stable molecules that could desorb intact.

  4. R-matrix analysis of Cl neutron cross sections up to 1.2 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, R.O.; Guber, K.H.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.; Rauscher, T.

    2006-04-15

    We have analyzed and evaluated {sup 35}Cl, {sup 37}Cl, and {sup nat}Cl neutron cross section data in the resolved resonance region with the multilevel Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. Energies and widths were determined for 388 resonances in the range 0.2 to 1200 keV. New J assignments were made for 33 resonances, and parities were assigned for 15 of these resonances. Neutron strength functions were calculated for both s and p waves; our results include the first reported p-wave values for Cl. Resonance analyses were carried out with the computer code SAMMY, which utilizes Bayes' method, a generalized least-squares technique. Because SAMMY now has the ability to calculate charged-particle penetrabilities, it was possible to include a proton exit channel in the analysis and to deduce proton widths for several resonances. Our resonance parameter representation describes the data much better than previous evaluations, and it should lead to improved criticality safety calculations for systems where Cl is present.

  5. Neutron cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This handbook displays curves of neutron cross sections in the energy range of 0.01 eV to 200 MeV (and associated information) as a function of incident neutron energy. Tables include reference to all data. Information on isomeric state production is also included. This book represents the fourth edition of what was previously known as BNL-325, Neutron Cross Sections, Volume 2, the third edition of which was published in 1976.

  6. Neutron cross-sections above 20 MeV for design and modeling of accelerator driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomgren, J.

    2007-02-01

    One of the outstanding new developments in the field of partitioning and transmutation (P{&}T) concerns accelerator-driven systems (ADS) which consist of a combination of a high-power, high-energy accelerator, a spallation target for neutron production and a sub-critical reactor core. The development of the commercial critical reactors of today motivated a large effort on nuclear data up to about 20 MeV, and presently several million data points can be found in various data libraries. At higher energies, data are scarce or even non-existent. With the development of nuclear techniques based on neutrons at higher energies, nowadays there is a need also for higher-energy nuclear data. To provide alternative to this lack of data, a wide program on neutron-induced data related to ADS for P{&}T is running at the 20-180 MeV neutron beam facility at `The Svedberg Laboratory' (TSL), Uppsala. The programme encompasses studies of elastic scattering, inelastic neutron production, i.e., (n, xn') reactions, light-ion production, fission and production of heavy residues. Recent results are presented and future program of development is outlined.

  7. Differential cross section and analyzing power of the p-vectorp{yields}pp{pi}{sup 0} reaction at a beam energy of 390 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Y.; Segawa, M.; Yoshida, H. P.; Ishida, T.; Yagita, T.; Kacharava, A.; Nomachi, M.; Shimbara, Y.; Sugaya, Y.; Tamura, K.; Yasuda, K.; Wilkin, C.

    2008-04-15

    The differential cross section and analyzing power A{sub y} of the p-vectorp{yields}pp{pi}{sup 0} reaction have been measured at RCNP in coplanar geometry at a beam energy of 390 MeV and the dependence on both the pion emission angle and the relative momentum of the final protons has been extracted. The angular variation of A{sub y} for the large values of the relative momentum studied here shows that this is primarily an effect of the interference of pion s and p waves and this interference can also explain the momentum dependence. Within the framework of a very simple model, these results would suggest that the pion-production operator has a significant long-range component.

  8. Extension of activation cross section data of long lived products in deuteron induced nuclear reactions on platinum up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2017-06-01

    In the frame of a systematical study of light ion induced nuclear reactions on platinum, activation cross sections for deuteron induced reactions were investigated. Excitation functions were measured in the 20.8-49.2 MeV energy range for the natPt(d,xn)191,192,193,194,195,196m2,196g,198g,199Au, natPt(d,x)188,189,191,195m,197m,197gPt and natPt(d,x)189,190,192,194m2Ir reactions by using the stacked foil irradiation technique. The experimental results are compared with previous results from the literature and with the theoretical predictions in the TENDL-2014 and TENDL-2015 libraries. The applicability of the produced radio-tracers for wear measurements has been presented.

  9. Calculation of (p,γ) and (p,α) nuclear reaction cross sections in stars up to 10 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, Eyyup; Sahan, Muhittin; Sarpun, Ismail Hakki; Okur, Sureyya Gulistan

    2016-11-01

    In Knowledge of the proton-proton (p-p) chain and CNO cycle are required for the evolution of main sequence stars during the early formation of the universe. In this study, we summarized the excitation functions of (p,γ) and (p,α) reactions for 7Be(p,γ)8B, 12C(p,γ)13N, 13C(p,γ)14N, 14N(p,γ)15O and 15N(p,α)15O in p-p chain and CNO cycle using EMPIRE and TALYS computer up to 10 MeV. The calculated data on nuclear fusion cross sections in hydrogen-burning stars were compared with theoretical TENDL-2014 and ENDF/B-VII data from EXFOR. The calculation results show closed agreement between the calculations and the data from literature.

  10. Large Scale Accelerator Production of 225Ac: Effective Cross sections for 78-192 MeV Protons Incident on 232Th Targets

    DOE PAGES

    Griswold, Justin R; Medvedev, Dmitri G.; Engle, Jonathan W.; ...

    2016-09-28

    Actinium-225 and 213Bi have been used successfully in targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in preclinical and clinical research. This paper is a continuation of research activities aiming to expand the availability of 225Ac. The high energy proton spallation reaction on natural thorium metal target has been utilized to produce millicurie quantities of 225Ac. The results of sixteen irradiation experiments of Th metal at beam energies between 78 and 200 MeV are summarized in this work. Irradiations have been conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), while target dissolution and processing was carried out at Oak Ridgemore » National Laboratory (ORNL). Excitation functions for actinium and thorium isotopes as well as for some of the fission products are presented. The cross sections for production of 225Ac range from 3.6 to 16.7 mb in the incident proton energy range of 78 to 192 MeV. Based on these data, production of Curie quantities of 225Ac is possible by irradiating a 5.0 g cm-2232Th target for 10 days in either BNL or LANL proton irradiation facilities.« less

  11. Large scale accelerator production of (225)Ac: Effective cross sections for 78-192MeV protons incident on (232)Th targets.

    PubMed

    Griswold, J R; Medvedev, D G; Engle, J W; Copping, R; Fitzsimmons, J M; Radchenko, V; Cooley, J C; Fassbender, M E; Denton, D L; Murphy, K E; Owens, A C; Birnbaum, E R; John, K D; Nortier, F M; Stracener, D W; Heilbronn, L H; Mausner, L F; Mirzadeh, S

    2016-12-01

    Actinium-225 and (213)Bi have been used successfully in targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in preclinical and clinical research. This paper is a continuation of research activities aiming to expand the availability of (225)Ac. The high-energy proton spallation reaction on natural thorium metal targets has been utilized to produce millicurie quantities of (225)Ac. The results of sixteen irradiation experiments of thorium metal at beam energies between 78 and 192MeV are summarized in this work. Irradiations have been conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), while target dissolution and processing was carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Excitation functions for actinium and thorium isotopes, as well as for some of the fission products, are presented. The cross sections for production of (225)Ac range from 3.6 to 16.7mb in the incident proton energy range of 78-192MeV. Based on these data, production of curie quantities of (225)Ac is possible by irradiating a 5.0gcm(-2 232)Th target for 10 days in either BNL or LANL proton irradiation facilities.

  12. Measurements of the total neutron cross-sections of Be, Ni and Cu at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures in the energy range from 2. 2 eV to 2. 2 meV

    SciTech Connect

    Adib, M.; Abdel-Kawy, A.; Maayouf, R.M.A.; Eid, Y.; Shuriet, G.; Hamouda, I.

    1980-09-01

    The total neutron cross-sections of Be, Ni, and Cu are measured using two time-of-flight spectrometers installed in front of two of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. The measurements were carried out in the energy range from 2.2 eV to 2.2 meV at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature for neutron energies below 5 meV. The coherent scattering cross-sections of these elements were determined from the Bragg cut-offs observed in the behavior of the total cross-sections at cold neutron energies. The incoherent cross-sections of Be, Ni and Cu were obtained from the analysis of the total neutron cross-section data beyond the Bragg cut-off. The one phonon annihilation process was estimated at long neutron wavelengths and was found to be in reasonable agreement with the results of calculations.

  13. Cross Sections of P-Induced Reactions up to 100 MeV for the Interpretation of Solar Cosmic Ray Produced Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiekel, T.; Rosel, R.; Herpers, U.; Bodemann, R.; Michel, R.; Dittrich, B.; Hofmann, H. J.; Suter, M.; Wolfli, W.; Holmqvist, B.; Conde, H.; Malmborg, P.

    1992-07-01

    Integral excitation functions for the production of residual nuclides by proton-induced reactions are the basic data for an accurate modelling of the interactions of solar cosmic ray (SCR) particles with extraterrestrial matter. Due to the relatively low energies (<200 MeV/A) of SCR particles the production of nuclear active secondary particles can be widely neglected and theoretical production rate depth profiles can be calculated by simply folding the depth dependent SCR spectra with thin target cross sections of the underlying nuclear reactions. The accuracy of such calculations exclusively depends on the quality of the available cross sections. For many nuclides, in particular for long-lived radionuclides and stable rare gas isotopes, the exis- ting cross section database is neither comprehensive nor reliable. Therefore, we started a series of experiments to improve this situation. Eighteen elements (C, N as Si3N4, O as SiO2, Mg, Al, Si, Ti, V, Mn as Mn/Ni-alloy, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zr, Nb, Rh, Ba as Ba-contai- ning glass, and Au) were irradiated with 94 and 99 MeV protons at the external beam of the TSL-cyclotron at Uppsala. Cross sections were determined using the stacked foil technique. Beam monitoring was done by investigating the production of ^22Na from Al, for which evaluated cross sections exist. Residual nuclides were measured by X-, gamma- and accelerator-mass spectrometry. In order to check the quality of our experimental procedure some target elements (22 <= Z <= 28) were included in the new exper- iments, which had been formerly irradiated at Julich, at Louvain La Neuve, and at IPN Orsay. Comparisons between the earlier measurements (1,2) and the new cross sections showed excellent agreement. Up to now, cross sections were measured for more than 120 different reactions. Here, we report on the results obtained for the target elements C, N, O, Mg, Al, and Si. The status of experimental excitation functions for the production of some radionuclides

  14. Investigation of activation cross-sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natMo up to 40 MeV: New data and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2012-06-01

    Cross-sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum have been studied in the frame of a systematic investigation of charged particle induced nuclear reactions on metals for different applications. The excitation functions of 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 90Mo(cum), 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(cum), 92mNb, 95mNb, 95gNb, 96Nb and 88Zr(cum), 89Zr(cum) were measured up to 40 MeV proton energy by a using stacked foil technique and activation method. The main goals of this work were to study the production possibility of the medically important 99mTc and its 99Mo parent nucleus, to get experimental data for accelerator technology, for monitoring of proton beam, for thin layer activation technique and for testing nuclear reaction theories. The experimental data were compared with critically analysed published data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes.

  15. Evaluation of (50)Cr, (52)Cr, (53)Cr, (54)Cr Neutron Cross Section Data for Energies up to 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Pereslavtsev, P; Konobeyev, A; Fischer, U; Leal, Luiz C

    2011-01-01

    This work is on the evaluation of high energy general purpose neutron cross section data for the stable isotopes (50)Cr, (52)Cr, (53)Cr and (54)Cr. The GNASH and TALYS codes were applied for the nuclear reaction calculations that involve neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, hellions, alphas and photons in the energy range from 1 keV up to 200 MeV. The main focus of this work was on the quality of the evaluated data and their representation in ENDF files prepared in accordance with ENDF-6 format rules. Global optical model potentials were used for all particles in the calculations. The Geometry-Dependent Hybrid preequilibrium model (GDH) was included in TALYS for a better description of the complex particle emissions. The best fit of the experimental data was achieved by adjusting the nuclear model parameters. The data files include also newly evaluated resonance parameters and their covariances. Covariance data for all reaction channels were evaluated by the Unified Monte Carlo Approach. The new structure of the evaluated data files is discussed.

  16. Determination of the {sup 233}Pa(n,f) reaction cross section from 11.5 to 16.5 MeV neutron energy by the hybrid surrogate ratio approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Biswas, D. C.; Mirgule, E. T.; John, B. V.; Santra, S.; Vind, R. P.; Choudhury, R. K.; Ganesan, S.

    2008-12-15

    A new hybrid surrogate ratio approach has been employed to determine neutron-induced fission cross sections of {sup 233}Pa in the energy range of 11.5 to 16.5 MeV for the first time. The fission probability of {sup 234}Pa and {sup 236}U compound nuclei produced in {sup 232}Th({sup 6}Li, {alpha}){sup 234}Pa and {sup 232}Th({sup 6}Li, d){sup 236}U transfer reaction channels has been measured at E{sub lab}=38.0 MeV in the excitation energy range of 17.0 to 22.0 MeV within the framework of the absolute surrogate method. The {sup 233}Pa(n,f) cross sections are then deduced from the measured fission decay probability ratios of {sup 234}Pa and {sup 236}U compound nuclei using the surrogate ratio method. The {sup 233}Pa(n,f) cross section data from the present experiment along with the data from the literature, covering the neutron energy range of 1.0 to 16.5 MeV have been compared with the predictions of statistical model code EMPIRE-2.19. While the present data are consistent with the model predictions, there is a discrepancy between the earlier experimental data and EMPIRE-2.19 predictions in the neutron energy range of 7.0 to 10.0 MeV.

  17. Cross sections for production of the 15.10 MeV and other astrophysically significant gamma-ray lines through excitation and spallation of sup 12 C and sup 16 O with protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, F. L.; Werntz, C. W.; Crannell, C. J.; Trombka, J. I.; Chang, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    The ratio of the flux of 15.10-MeV gamma rays to the flux of 4.438-MeV gamma rays resulting from excitation of the corresponding states in C-12 as a sensitive measure of the spectrum of the exciting particles produced in solar flares and other cosmic sources. These gamma rays are produced predominantly by interactions with C-12 and O-16, both of which are relatively abundant in the solar photosphere. Gamma ray production cross sections for proton interactions have been reported previously for all important channels except for the production of 15.10-MeV gamma rays from O-16. The first reported measurement of the 15.10-MeV gamma ray production cross section from p + O-16 is presented here. The University of Maryland cyclotron was employed to produce 40-, 65-, and 86-MeV protons which interacted with CH2 and BeO targets. The resultant gamma ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium semiconductor detector at 70, 90, 110, 125, and 140 degrees relative to the direction of the incident beam for each proton energy. Other gamma ray lines resulting from direct excitation and spallation reactions with C-12 and 0-16 were observed as well, and their gamma ray production cross sections described.

  18. Cross sections for proton induced high energy γ -ray emission (PIGE) in reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O at incident proton energies between 1.5 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanelas, P.; Cruz, J.; Fonseca, M.; Henriques, A.; Lourenço, F.; Luís, H.; Machado, J.; Pires Ribeiro, J.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Teubig, P.; Velho, P.; Zarza-Moreno, M.; Galaviz, D.; Jesus, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the high energy gamma-rays produced in the reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O for incident proton energies from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV over NaF/Ag and CaF2/Ag thin targets in two different sets of data. Gamma-rays were detected with a High Purity Ge detector with an angle of 130° with respect to the beam axis. The cross-sections for the high energy gamma-rays of 6.129, 6.915 and 7.115 MeV have been measured for the whole group between 5 and 7.2 MeV with accuracy better than 10%. A new energy range was covered and more points are included in the cross-sections data base expanding the existing set of data. Results are in agreement with previous measurements in similar conditions.

  19. Cross Sections for the Production of Cosmogenic Nuclides with Protons up to 400 MeV for the Interpretation of Cosmic-Ray-produced Nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiekel, Th.; Rosel, R.; Herpers, U.; Bodemann, R.; Leya, I.; Gloris, M.; Michel, R.; Dittrich, B.; Kubik, P.; Suter, M.

    1993-07-01

    Integral excitation functions of the cosmogenic nuclides are the basic requirement for the interpretation of interactions between cosmic ray particles and extraterrestrial and terrestrial matter. Together with the knowledge of primary and secondary particle fields inside an irradiated body, model calculations can be developed to interpret abundances of cosmogenic nuclides in dependencies of the irradiation history of the irradiated body and of the cosmic particle ray itself. The quality of those model calculations depends on the quality of the available cross-section database, which is neither comprehensive nor reliable for the most important nuclides like the long-lived radionuclides (i.e., 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca) and the stable rare gas isotopes. For a systematic investigation in this field of science we carried out several irradiation experiments with protons in the energy region between 45 MeV and 400 MeV at the Paul Scherrer Institut (Villigen, Switzerland) and the Laboratoire Nationale Saturne (Saclay, France) using the stacked foil technique. We included 21 different target elements with Z between 6 and 79 (C, N as Si3N4, O as SiO2, Mg, Al, Si, Ca as CaC2H2O4, Ti, V, Mn as Mn/Ni alloy, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Sr as SrF2, Y, Zr, Nb, Rh, Ba as Ba containing glass and Au) in our experiments. The proton fluxes were monitored via the reaction 27Al(p,3p3n)22Na using the evaluated data of [1]. Residual nuclides were measured by X-, gamma-, and after a chemical separation by accelerator mass spectrometry. In order to check the quality of our experimental procedures we included some target elements in our new experiments for which consistent excitation functions have already been determined [2,3,4]. Our new data show excellent agreement with the earlier measurements. We measured cross sections for more than 120 different reactions. Here we report on the results for target elements with Z up to 28. The exsisting database of experimental excitation functions for the production

  20. 10B(n,α)7Li and 10B(n,α1γ)7Li cross section data up to 3 MeV incident neutron energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, Riccardo; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Vidali, Marzio; Ruskov, Ivan; Lamia, Livio

    2017-09-01

    The 10B(n,α) reaction cross-section is a well-established neutron cross-section standard for incident neutron energies up to 1 MeV. However, above this energy limit there are only scarce direct (n,α) measurements available and these few experimental data are showing large inconsistencies with each other. These discrepancies are reflected in the evaluated data libraries: ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2 and JENDL-4.0 are in excellent agreement up to 100 keV incident neutrons, whereas the 10B(n,α) data in the different libraries show large differences in the MeV region. To address these inconsistencies, we have measured the cross section of the two branches of the 10B(n,α) reaction for incident neutron energies up to 3 MeV. We present here the 10B(n,α) and the 10B(n,α1γ) reactions cross section data, their branching ratio and the total 10B(n,α) reaction cross section. The measurements were conducted with a dedicated Frisch-grid ionization chamber installed at the GELINA pulsed neutron source of the EC-JRC. We compare our results with existing experimental data and evaluations.

  1. Neutron-induced fission cross section of Np237 in the keV to MeV range at the CERN n_TOF facility

    SciTech Connect

    Diakaki, M.; Karadimos, D.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Demetriou, P.; Skordis, E.; Tsinganis, A.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; David, S.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dorochenko, A.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, Ch.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fuji, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gallino, R.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Ioannidis, K.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Kolokolov, D.; Konovalov, V.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Sedysheva, M.; Stamoulis, K.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Voss, F.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2016-03-17

    We experimentally determined the neutron-induced fission cross section of Np-237 at the high-resolution and high-intensity facility n_TOF, at CERN, in the energy range 100 keV to 9 MeV, using the U-235(n, f) and U-238(n, f) cross section standards below and above 2 MeV, respectively. Moreover, a fast ionization chamber was used in order to detect the fission fragments from the reactions and the targets were characterized as far as their mass and homogeneity are concerned by means of a spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy respectively. Finally, theoretical calculations within the Hauser-Feshbach formalism have been performed, employing the EMPIRE code, and the model parameters were tuned in order to successfully reproduce the experimental fission cross-sectional data and simultaneously all the competing reaction channels.

  2. Measurement of the {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) cross section from 20 meV to 500 keV with a high efficiency, highly segmented 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} detector

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, E.-I.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Glover, S. E.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; Mertz, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Schwantes, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Greife, U.; Hatarik, A. M.; Hatarik, R.

    2008-03-15

    The {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}){sup 238}Np cross section has been measured in the neutron energy range from 20 meV to 500 keV using the DANCE array at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This new facility allows experiments with submilligram samples and is therefore well suited to investigate isotopes with half-lives as low as a few hundred days. In this benchmark measurement, only 0.42 mg of {sup 237}Np was sufficient to determine differential cross sections relative to the well-known resonance at 0.5 eV. The thermal cross section was measured to {sigma}{sub 2200m/s}=177{+-}5 barn, {sigma}{sub kT=25.3meV}=167{+-}4 barn and the resonance integral to RI=693{+-}6 barn.

  3. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-04-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides (159)Dy, (157)Dy, (155)Dy, (161)Tb, (160)Tb, (156)Tb, (155)Tb, (154m2)Tb, (154m1)Tb, (154g)Tb, (153)Tb, (152)Tb and (151)Tb are reported in the 36-65MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013.

  4. Measurement of the Np237(n,γ) cross section from 20 meV to 500 keV with a high efficiency, highly segmented 4π BaF2 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esch, E.-I.; Reifarth, R.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Glover, S. E.; Greife, U.; Haight, R. C.; Hatarik, A. M.; Hatarik, R.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; Mertz, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Schwantes, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.

    2008-03-01

    The Np237(n,γ)Np238 cross section has been measured in the neutron energy range from 20 meV to 500 keV using the DANCE array at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This new facility allows experiments with submilligram samples and is therefore well suited to investigate isotopes with half-lives as low as a few hundred days. In this benchmark measurement, only 0.42 mg of Np237 was sufficient to determine differential cross sections relative to the well-known resonance at 0.5 eV. The thermal cross section was measured to σ2200m/s=177±5 barn, σkT=25.3meV=167±4 barn and the resonance integral to RI=693±6 barn.

  5. Measurement of the 115In(n,γ)116 m In reaction cross-section at the neutron energies of 1.12, 2.12, 3.12 and 4.12 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawriniang, Bioletty Mary; Badwar, Sylvia; Ghosh, Reetuparna; Jyrwa, Betylda; Vansola, Vibha; Naik, Haladhara; Goswami, Ashok; Naik, Yeshwant; Datrik, Chandra Shekhar; Gupta, Amit Kumar; Singh, Vijay Pal; Pol, Sudir Shibaji; Subramanyam, Nagaraju Balabenkata; Agarwal, Arun; Singh, Pitambar

    2015-08-01

    The 115In(n,γ)116 m In reaction cross section at neutron energies of 1.12, 2.12, 3.12 and 4.12 MeV was determined by using an activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique. The monoenergetic neutron energies of 1.12 - 4.12 MeV were generated from the 7Li(p,n) reaction by using proton beam with energies of 3 and 4 MeV from the folded tandem ion beam accelerator (FOTIA) at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) and with energies of 5 and 6 MeV from the Pelletron facility at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai. The 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction cross-section was used as the neutron flux monitor.The 115In(n,γ)116 m In reaction cross section at neutron energies of 1.12, 2.12, 3.12 and 4.12 MeV was determined by using an activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique. The monoenergetic neutron energies of 1.12 - 4.12 MeV were generated from the 7Li(p,n) reaction by using proton beam with energies of 3 and 4 MeV from the folded tandem ion beam accelerator (FOTIA) at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) and with energies of 5 and 6 MeV from the Pelletron facility at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai. The 197Au(n,γ)198 Au reaction cross-section was used as the neutron flux monitor. The 115In(n,γ)116 m In reaction cross-sections at neutron energies of 1.12 - 4.12 MeV were compared with the literature data and were found to be in good agreement with one set of data, but not with others. The 115In(n,γ)116 m In cross-section was also calculated theoretically by using the computer code TALYS 1.6 and was found to be slightly lower than the experimental data from the present work and the literature.)198Au reaction cross-section was used as the neutron flux monitor. The 115In(n,γ)116 m In reaction cross-sections at neutron energies of 1.12 - 4.12 MeV were compared with the literature data and were found to be in good agreement with one set of data, but not with others. The 115In(n,γ)116 m In cross-section was also calculated

  6. Isomeric cross-section ratio for the formation of 58Com,g in neutron, proton, deuteron, and alpha-particle induced reactions in the energy region up to 25 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudár, S.; Qaim, S. M.

    1996-06-01

    Excitation functions were determined for 58Fe(p,n)58Com, natFe(d,xn)58Com, 55Mn(α,n)58Com, and 59Co(n,2n)58Com reactions from the respective thresholds to 14.12 MeV in work with protons, 12.97 MeV with deuterons, 13 MeV with neutrons, and 25.52 MeV with alpha particles. The radioactivity of the activation product 58Com(T1/2=9.15 h) was determined by high resolution γ-ray and x-ray spectrometry. Using the present σm results and the (σm+σg) data reported earlier, the isomeric cross-section ratio σm/(σm+σg) was determined for each reaction. Statistical model calculations taking into account the precompound effects were performed for the above-mentioned four reactions as well as for the 58Ni(n,p)58Com,g process. A consistent set of model parameters was used. The isomeric cross-section ratio for the pair 58Com,g strongly depends on the level scheme and branching ratios of the known levels of 58Co. Different reactions produced different angular momentum distributions of the compound nucleus, resulting in different isomeric cross-section ratio at the same excitation of the compound nucleus. The ratio was found to be relatively high for target nuclei with high spin values.

  7. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; Matsushi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Matsumura, H.; Toyoda, A.; Oishi, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Boehnlein, D.; Coleman, R.; Lauten, G.; Leveling, A.; Mokhov, N.; Ramberg, E.; Soha, A.; Vaziri, K.; Ninomiya, K.; Omoto, T.; Shima, T.; Takahashi, N.; Shinohara, A.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Shibata, S.; Ohtsuki, T.

    2015-10-01

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV-24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased as the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. The difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.

  8. Measurement of flux-weight average cross-sections of natZn(γ,xn) reactions in the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 50, 55, 60, and 65 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Kim, Guinyun; Naik, Haladhara; Kim, Kwangsoo; Cho, Young-Sik; Lee, Young-Ok; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Kang, Yeong-Rok; Lee, Man-Woo

    2017-04-01

    The flux-weighted average cross-sections of (γ , xn) reactions on natZn induced by the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 50, 55, 60, and 65 MeV have been determined by activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique, using the 100 MeV electron linac at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL), Pohang, Korea. The theoretical photon-induced reaction cross-sections of natZn as a function of photon energy were taken from TENDL-2014 nuclear data library based on TALYS 1.6 program. The flux-weighted average cross-sections were obtained from the literature data and the theoretical values of TENDL-2014 based on mono-energetic photon. The flux-weighted reaction cross-sections from the present work and literature data at different bremsstrahlung end-point energies are in good agreement with the theoretical values. It was found that the individual natZn(γ , xn) reaction cross-sections increase sharply from reaction threshold to certain values where the next reaction channel opens. There after it remains constant for a while, where the next reaction channel increases. Then it decreases slowly with increase of bremsstrahlung end-point energy due to opening of different reaction channels.

  9. Photofission cross-section ratio measurement of 235 U/ 238 U using monoenergetic photons in the energy range of 9.0–16.6 MeV

    DOE PAGES

    Krishichayan,; Bhike, Megha; Finch, S. W.; ...

    2017-05-01

    Photofission cross-section ratios of 235U and 238U have been measured using monoenergetic photon beams from the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source facility at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. These measurements have been performed in small energy steps between 9.0 and 16.6 MeV using a dual-fission ionization chamber. The measured cross-section ratios are compared with the previous experimental data as well as with the recent evaluated nuclear data library ENDF.

  10. Measurements of the cross section for fission of /sup 242/Cm in nanogram quantities by neutrons with energy 0. 1--1. 4 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Vorotnikov, P.E.; Dmitriev, S.V.; Molchanov, Y.D.; Otroshchenko, G.A.; Pchelin, V.A.; Chistyakov, L.V.; Smirnov, A.N.

    1984-11-01

    Measurements of the cross section of neutron fission of /sup 242/Cm are reported. The measurements were made in a pulsed electrostatic accelerator with use of metal-oxide-semiconductor fragment detectors.

  11. Determination of flux-weighted average cross-sections of natPb(γ,xn), 208Pb(γ,xn), and 209Bi(γ,xn) reactions using bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 50-70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Haladhara; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Zaman, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Kang, Yeong-Rok; Woo Lee, Man; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun

    2016-11-01

    The flux-weighted average cross-sections of the natPb(γ, xn)198-204Pb reaction for the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 50-70MeV were determined by activation and off-line γ -ray spectrometric technique, using the 100 MeV electron linac at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL), Korea. The relative cross-sections of the 208Pb(γ, xn)202-204Pb and 209Bi(γ, xn)203-206Bi reactions from our earlier work were updated to absolute values and compared with the present data. The photo-neutron cross-sections of natPb, 208Pb, and 209Bi were also calculated, as a function of the photon energy using the TALYS 1.6 code. The flux-weighted average cross-sections were obtained from the theoretical values of the TALYS 1.6 code, based on mono-energetic photons, and compared with the present experimental data. The values were found to be in good agreement with the present data for the 209Bi(γ, xn)203-206Bi, 208Pb(γ, xn)202-204Pb, and natPb(γ, xn)198-202Pb reactions. However, the present data for the natPb(γ, xn)203, 204Pb reactions were higher than the flux-weighted values obtained using the TALYS 1.6 code.

  12. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    DOE PAGES

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; ...

    2015-08-12

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV–24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased asmore » the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. As a result, the difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.« less

  13. Neutron-induced fission cross section measurement of 233U, 241Am and 243Am in the energy range 0.5 MeV ⩽ En ⩽ 20 MeV at n_TOF at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, F.; Milazzo, P. M.; Calviani, M.; Colonna, N.; Mastinu, P.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Barbagallo, M.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Cerutti, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Ketlerov, V.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Meaze, M. H.; Mengoni, A.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Wallner, A.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.; n TOF Collaboration

    2012-10-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross section measurements of 233U, 243Am and 241Am relative to 235U have been carried out at the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN. A fast ionization chamber has been employed. All samples were located in the same detector; therefore the studied elements and the reference 235U target are subject to the same neutron beam.

  14. Measured fast-neutron activation cross sections of Ag, Cu, Eu, Fe, Hf, Ni, Tb and Ti at 10. 3 and 14. 8 MeV and for the continuum neutron spectrum produced by 7-MeV deuterons on a thick Be-metal target

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.W.; Smith, D.L.; Greenwood, L.R. ); Haight, R.C. ); Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C. . Dept. of Reactor Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    Four identical sample packets containing elemental Ag, Cu, Eu, Fe, Hf, Ni, Tb and Ti have been irradiated in three distinct accelerator neutron fields, at Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA, and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Japan, under the auspices of an International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Program to investigate the production of long-lived radionuclides for fusion waste disposal applications. Final experimental results are presented here for 13 distinct reactions which ultimately lead to production of the following activities: Ag-106m,108m; Co-60g; Cr-51; Eu-150g, -152g; Hf-175,-179m2; Mn-54; Sc-46g,-47,-48; Tb-158g. The neutron fluence standard used was Ni-58(n,p)Co-58. The measured data include differential cross section values at 10.3 and 14.8 MeV, and integral cross sections for the continuum neutron spectrum produced by 7-MeV deuterons incident on a thick Be-metal target. The U-238(n,f) cross section was also measured at 10.3 MeV as a consistency check on the experimental technique. Some of the results of this study are compared with corresponding values from earlier work at Argonne and from ENDF/B-6. 134 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  15. Measured fast-neutron activation cross sections of Ag, Cu, Eu, Fe, Hf, Ni, Tb and Ti at 10.3 and 14.8 MeV and for the continuum neutron spectrum produced by 7-MeV deuterons on a thick Be-metal target

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.W.; Smith, D.L.; Greenwood, L.R.; Haight, R.C.; Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C.

    1991-12-31

    Four identical sample packets containing elemental Ag, Cu, Eu, Fe, Hf, Ni, Tb and Ti have been irradiated in three distinct accelerator neutron fields, at Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA, and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Japan, under the auspices of an International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Program to investigate the production of long-lived radionuclides for fusion waste disposal applications. Final experimental results are presented here for 13 distinct reactions which ultimately lead to production of the following activities: Ag-106m,108m; Co-60g; Cr-51; Eu-150g, -152g; Hf-175,-179m2; Mn-54; Sc-46g,-47,-48; Tb-158g. The neutron fluence standard used was Ni-58(n,p)Co-58. The measured data include differential cross section values at 10.3 and 14.8 MeV, and integral cross sections for the continuum neutron spectrum produced by 7-MeV deuterons incident on a thick Be-metal target. The U-238(n,f) cross section was also measured at 10.3 MeV as a consistency check on the experimental technique. Some of the results of this study are compared with corresponding values from earlier work at Argonne and from ENDF/B-6. 134 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  16. K-italic-shell ionization cross sections for Al, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ag by protons and oxygen ions in the energy range 0. 3--6. 4 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Geretschlaeger, M.; Benka, O.

    1986-08-01

    Absolute K-italic-shell ionization cross sections have been measured for thin targets of Al, Ti, and Cu for protons in the energy range 0.3--2.0 MeV and for thin targets of Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ag for oxygen ions in the energy range 1.36--6.4 Mev. The experimental results are compared to the perturbed-stationary-state (PSS) approximation with energy-loss (E), Coulomb (C), and relativistic (R) corrections, i.e., the ECPSSR approximation (Brandt and Lapicki), to the semiclassical approximation (Laegsgaard, Andersen, and Lund), and to a theory for direct Coulomb ionization of the 1s-italicsigma molecular orbital (Montenegro and Sigaud (MS)). The proton results agree within 3% with empirical reference cross sections. Also, the ECPSSR provides best overall agreement for protons. For oxygen ions, ECPSSR and MS predict experimental results satisfactorily for scaled velocities xi> or =0.4. For lower scaled velocities, the experimental cross sections become considerably higher than theoretical predictions for Coulomb ionization. This deviation increases with increasing Z-italic/sub 1//Z/sub 2/; it cannot be explained by electron transfer to the projectile or by ionization due to target recoil atoms.

  17. Experimental cross-sections of deuteron-induced reaction on 89Y up to 20 MeV; comparison of natTi(d,x)48V and 27Al(d,x)24Na monitor reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebeda, Ondřej; Štursa, Jan; Ráliš, Jan

    2015-10-01

    We measured cross-sections of the deuteron-induced reactions on 89Y in the energy range of 3.9-19.5 MeV. Excitation functions for formation of 88Zr, 89mZr, 89Zr, 88Y, 90mY and 87mSr were determined and compared with previously published data and prediction of the TALYS code. Thick target yields for production of 88Zr, 89Zrcum, 88Y, 90mY and 87mSr were calculated from the measured cross-sections. Achievable activity versus radionuclidic purity of medically relevant 89Zr is discussed and compared with the production via the 89Y(p,n) reaction. Parallel use of titanium and aluminium beam monitors revealed systematic difference between the recommended cross-sections of both monitoring reactions and provided new cross-section data for formation of 24Na, 27Mg, 43Sc, 44mSc, 44Sc, 46Sc, 47Sc and 48Sc. The cross-sections for the natTi(d,x)46Sc reactions agree very well with recently proposed recommended values.

  18. Measurement of deuteron induced gamma-ray emission differential cross sections on natCl from 1.0 to 2.0 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokar, A.; Kakuee, O.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this research work, measured differential cross sections for gamma-ray emission from the nuclear reactions 35Cl(d,pγ1-0)36Cl (Eγ = 788 keV), 35Cl(d,pγ2-0)36Cl (Eγ = 1165 keV), 37Cl(d,pγ1-0)38Cl (Eγ = 671 keV) and 37Cl(d,pγ2-0)38Cl (Eγ = 755 keV) are presented. For these measurements a thin natural BaCl2 target evaporated onto a 50 μm-thick Mo foil was used. The gamma-rays and backscattered deuterons were detected simultaneously. An HPGe detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to the beam direction was employed to collect gamma-rays while an ion implanted Si detector placed at a scattering angle of 165° was used to detect backscattered deuterons. The validity of the obtained differential cross sections was verified through a thick target benchmarking experiment. The overall systematic uncertainty of cross section values was estimated to be ±10%.

  19. Report to the DOE nuclear data committee. [EV RANGE 10-100; CROSS SECTIONS; PHOTONEUTRONS; NEUTRONS; GAMMA RADIATION; COUPLED CHANNEL THEORY; DIFFERENTIAL CROSS SECTIONS; MEV RANGE 01-10; ; CAPTURE; GAMMA SPECTRA; THERMAL NEUTRONS; COMPUTER CALCULATIONS; DECAY; FISSION PRODUCTS; FISSION YIELD; SHELL MODELS; NUCLEAR DATA COLLECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, G.L.; Haight, R.C.

    1981-03-01

    Topics covered include: studies of (n, charged particle) reactions with 14 to 15 MeV neutrons; photoneutron cross sections for /sup 15/N; neutron radiative capture; Lane-model analysis of (p,p) and (n,n) scattering on the even tin isotopes; neutron scattering cross sections for /sup 181/Ta, /sup 197/Au, /sup 209/Bi, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U inferred from proton scattering and charge exchange cross sections; neutron-induced fission cross sections of /sup 245/Cm and /sup 242/Am; fission neutron multiplicities for /sup 245/Cm and /sup 242/Am; the transport of 14 MeV neutrons through heavy materials 150 < A < 208; /sup 249/Cm energy levels from measurement of thermal neutron capture gamma rays; /sup 231/Th energy levels from neutron capture gamma ray and conversion electron spectroscopy; new measurements of conversion electron binding energies in berkelium and californium; nuclear level densities; relative importance of statistical vs. valence neutron capture in the mass-90 region; determination of properties of short-lived fission products; fission yield of /sup 87/Br and /sup 137/I from 15 nuclei ranging from /sup 232/Th to /sup 249/Cf; evaluation of charged particle data for the ECPL library; evaluation of secondary charged-particle energy and angular distributions for ENDL; and evaluated nuclear structure libraries derived from the table of isotopes. (GHT)

  20. (n,p), (n,2n), (n,d), and (n,α) cross-section calculations of 16O with 0-40 MeV energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruk Ozdemir, Omer; Arasoglu, Ali

    2015-07-01

    Oxygen is one of the elements which interacts with emitted neutrons after fission reactions. Oxygen exists abundantly both in nuclear fuel (UO2) and moderators (H2O). Nuclear reactions of oxygen with neutrons are important in terms of stability of nuclear fuel and neutron economy. In this study, equilibrium and pre-equilibrium models have been used to calculate (n,p), (n,d), (n,2n) and (n,α) nuclear reaction cross-sections of 16O. In these calculations, neutron incident energy has been taken up to 40 MeV. Hybrid and Standard Weisskopf-Ewing Models in ALICE-2011 program, Weisskopf-Ewing and Full Exciton Models in PCROSS program, and Cascade Exciton Model in CEM03.01 program have been utilized. The calculated results have been compared with experimental and theroretical cross-section data which are obtained from libraries of EXFOR and ENDF/B VII.1.

  1. Measurements of the Differential Cross Sections for the Elastic n-{sup 3}H and n-{sup 2}H Scattering at 14.1 MeV by Using an Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; McNabb, D. P.; Navratil, P.; Quaglioni, S.; Sangster, T. C.; Glebov, V. Yu; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2011-09-16

    For the first time the differential cross section for the elastic neutron-triton (n-{sup 3}H) and neutron-deuteron (n-{sup 2}H) scattering at 14.1 MeV has been measured by using an inertial confinement fusion facility. In these experiments, which were carried out by simultaneously measuring elastically scattered {sup 3}H and {sup 2}H ions from a deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion, the differential cross section for the elastic n-{sup 3}H scattering was obtained with significantly higher accuracy than achieved in previous accelerator experiments. The results compare well with calculations that combine the resonating-group method with an ab initio no-core shell model, which demonstrate that recent advances in ab initio theory can provide an accurate description of light-ion reactions.

  2. Cross sections for (n, 2n), (n, p) and (n, ) reactions on osmium isotopes in the neutron energy range of 13.5-14.8 MeV.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liangyong; Yuan, Jilong; Tuo, Fei; Zhang, Yanbin; Kong, Xiangzhong; Liu, Rong; Jiang, Li

    2008-10-01

    Cross sections for (n, 2n), (n, p) and (n, alpha) reactions on the osmium isotopes were measured in the neutron energies 13.5-14.8 MeV by the activation technique with the monitor reaction (93)Nb(n, 2n)(92 m)Nb. Our measurements were carried out by gamma-detection using a coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. Natural high-purity osmium powder (99.9%) was fabricated as the samples. The neutron energies were determined by the cross-section ratios for (93)Nb(n, 2n)(92 m)Nb and (90)Zr(n, 2n)(89 m+g)Zr reactions. The fast neutrons were produced by the T(d, n)(4)He reaction. The results obtained were compared with previous data.

  3. Measurement of the cross section for the reaction {sup 20}Ne(n,{alpha}){sup 17}O in the neutron-energy between 4 and 7 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khryachkov, V. A.; Bondarenko, I. P.; Kuzminov, B. D.; Semenova, N. N.; Sergachev, A. I.

    2012-04-15

    The cross section for the reaction {sup 20}Ne(n, {alpha}){sup 17}O was measured in the neutron-energy range 4-7 MeV. An ionization chamber equipped with a Frisch grid combined with a pulse-shape digitizer was used as a detector. Gaseous neon that served as a target on which the reaction being studied proceeded was added to the gas filling the ionization chamber. The partial cross sections for the {alpha}{sub 0}, {alpha}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 2}, and {alpha}{sub 3} channels of the reaction {sup 20}Ne(n, {alpha}){sup 17}O were obtained for the first time.

  4. Measurement of the argon-38(n,2n)argon-37 and calcium- 40(n,alpha)argon-37 cross sections, and National Ignition Facility concrete activation using the rotating target neutron source. The design of an experiment to measure the beryllium-9(n,gamma)beryllium-10 cross section at 14 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belian, Anthony Paul

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS) was used in experiments to measure neutron induced cross sections at 14 MeV, and the activation properties of a specific mix of concrete. The RTNS is an accelerator based DT fusion neutron source located at the University of California, Berkeley. Two of the experiments performed for this thesis were specifically of interest for the construction and operation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), they were the 38Ar(n,2n)37Ar cross section measurement, and the concrete activation measurement. The NIF is a large multi-beam laser facility that will study the effects of age on the nation's stockpile of nuclear weapons. The NIF, when fully operational, will focus the energy of 192 Neodymium glass lasers onto a 1 mm diameter pellet filled with deuterium and tritium fuel. This pellet is compressed by the laser energy giving some of the individual atoms of deuterium and tritium enough kinetic energy to overcome the coulomb barrier and fuse. The energy output from these pellet implosions will be in the range of tens of mega-joules (MJ). The 38Ar(n,2n)37Ar reaction will be useful to NIF scientists to measure important parameters such as target energy yield and areal density. In order to make these measurements precise, an accurate 38Ar(n,2n)37Ar cross section was necessary. The cross sections measured were: 74.9 +/- 3.8 millibarns (mb) at 13.3 +/- 0.01 MeV, 89.2 +/- 4.0 mb at 14.0 +/- 0.03 MeV, and 123.57 +/- 6.4 mb at 15.0 +/- 0.06 MeV. With anticipated energy yields in the tens of mega-joules per pellet implosion, the number of neutrons released is in the range of 1019 to 1020 neutrons per implosion. With such a large number of neutrons, minimizing the activation of the surrounding structure is very much of interest for the sake of personnel radiation safety. To benchmark the computer codes used to calculate the anticipated neutron activation of target bay concrete, samples were irradiated at the RTNS. Dose rates from each sample

  5. L-subshell ionization cross sections in gold and bismuth by 3.6-9.5-MeV carbon and 4.0-7.2-MeV oxygen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, D.; Sarkar, M.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Sen, P.; Kuri, G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Lapicki, G.

    1994-06-01

    L-subshell ionization cross sections of Au and Bi induced by C2,3+ and O3+ ions have been measured for impact energies ranging from 0.25 to 0.79 MeV/u. The data have been compared with the predictions of the ECPSSR [perturbed-stationary-state (PSS) theory with energy-loss (E), Coulomb deflection (C), and relativistic corrections (R)] theory. Reasonable agreement between theory and experiment is observed for the L1(2s1/2) and L3(2p3/2) subshells. For the L2(2p1/2) subshell, however, large disagreement between the data and the ECPSSR predictions persists. This difference could be due to the ``collision-induced intrashell'' mechanism that was suggested by Sarkadi and Mukoyama [J. Phys. B 14, L255 (1981)].

  6. Theoretical investigation of the 19F(p, p0) differential cross section up to Ep = 2.3 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paneta, V.; Gurbich, A.; Kokkoris, M.

    2016-03-01

    The use of experimental cross-section data on fluorine in analytical EBS studies is quite problematic, because they are indeed inadequate and discrepant (up to ∼30%). The evaluated values on the other hand, being produced by incorporating the available experimental cross sections within a unified theoretical approach, provide the most reliable data to be used and are therefore very important. The present work contributes in this field by reproducing and attempting to extend the corresponding evaluation for 19F(p, p0), which ranges up to 1730 keV, to proton energies up to 2250 keV, using the AZURE code. The performed R-matrix calculations involved the simultaneous analysis of several experimental input datasets, as well as spectroscopic information concerning the formed compound nucleus 20Ne, while valuable feedback information was provided by proton benchmarking spectra on ZnF2 taken at Ep = 1730 and 2250 keV and at several backscattering angles for the fine tuning of the parameters used. The problem of the 19F(p, p‧) and 19F(p, αx) contributions in the obtained thick target yield spectra is also discussed.

  7. K -shell ionization cross sections for Si, P, K, Ca, Zn, and Ga by protons and carbon ions in the energy range 1--6. 4 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Geretschlaeger, M. ); Smit, Z. ); Benka, O. )

    1990-01-01

    Absolute {ital K}-shell ionization cross sections have been measured for thin targets of Si, P, S, K, Ca, Zn, and Ga using carbon ions between 1.0 and 6.4 MeV and protons of 1 and 2 MeV. The dependence of x-ray production cross sections on target thickness was determined. The experimental results are compared to the semiclassical approximation (Laegsgaard, Andersen, and Lund in 3 Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on the Physics of Electron and Atomic Collisions, Paris, 1977, edited by G. Watel (North-Holland, Amsterdam 1977)), to the theory for direct Coulomb ionization of the 1{ital s}{sigma} molecular orbital (Montenegro and Sigaud, J. Phys. B. 18, 299 (1985)), to the perturbed stationary-state approximation with energy-loss, Coulomb, and relativistic corrections (ECPSSR) (Brandt and Lapicki, Phys. Rev. A 23, 1717 (1981)), and to the modification of the ECPSSR approximation (MECPSSR) (Benka, Geretschlaeger, and Paul, J. Phys. (Paris) Suppl. 12, C9-251 (1987)). The results for carbon ions are also compared to the statistical molecular orbital theory of inner-shell ionization for symmetric or nearly symmetric atomic collisions (Mittelman and Wilets, Phys. Rev. 154, 12 (1967)).

  8. Measurements of activation cross-sections for the 96Ru(n,d*)95gTc reaction for neutrons with energies between 13.3 and 15.0MeV.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junhua; Tuo, Fei; Kong, Xiangzhong; Liu, Rong; Jiang, Li

    2008-12-01

    In this study, activation cross-sections were measured for the (9)(6)Ru(n,d*)(95g)Tc reaction at three different neutron energies from 13.5 to 14.8MeV. The fast neutrons were produced via the (3)H(d,n)(4)He reaction on a K-400 neutron generator. Induced gamma activities were measured by a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. Measurements were corrected for gamma-ray attenuations, random coincidence (pile-up), dead time and fluctuation of neutron flux. The data for (9)(6)Ru(n,d*)(95g)Tc reaction cross-sections are reported to be 196+/-18, 253+/-22 and 298+/-22mb at 13.5+/-0.2, 14.1+/-0.1 and 14.8+/-0.2MeV incident neutron energies, respectively. Results were compared with the previous works.

  9. Resonant and average behavior of the /sup 12/C+/sup 12/C total reaction cross section: 5. 6 < or = E/sub c. m. / < or = 10. 0 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Erb, K.A.; Betts, R.R.; Korotky, S.K.; Hindi, M.M.; Tung, P.P.; Sachs, M.W.; Willett, S.J.; Bromley, D.A.

    1980-08-01

    The gamma-radiation yields from the /sup 12/C+/sup 12/C interaction were measured in steps of 50 keV over the bombarding energy range 11.8 < or = E/sub lab/ < or = 20 MeV in order to study the energy dependence of the total reaction cross section. Several new resonances, occurring at E/sub c.m./=6.49, 7.30, 7.45, 9.33, and 9.67 MeV, were identified in these yields. Carbon partial widths were determined for a number of resonances, and these widths demonstrate the quasimolecular nature of the corresponding structures. The average or background trend of the energy dependence of the reaction cross section was found to be adequately described by an incoming-waves boundary condition model, however, and no evidence was found in the energy-averaged yields for anomalous absorption in the /sup 12/C+/sup 12/C system.

  10. Neutron cross sections: Book of curves

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Dunford, C.L.; Rose, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    Neuton Cross Sections: Book of Curves represents the fourth edition of what was previously known as BNL-325, Neutron Cross Sections, Volume 2, CURVES. Data is presented only for (i.e., intergrated) reaction cross sections (and related fission parameters) as a function of incident-neutron energy for the energy range 0.01 eV to 200 MeV. For the first time, isometric state production cross sections have been included. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  11. New JEFF-3.2 Sodium Neutron Induced Cross-sections Evaluation for Neutron Fast Reactors Applications: from 0 to 20 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archier, P.; Noguère, G.; De Saint Jean, C.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Rouki, C.

    2014-04-01

    In the framework of the ASTRID project, a new 23Na evaluation, containing re-evaluated nuclear data and associated covariances, has been prepared to be submitted for the future JEFF-3.2 library. This work has been motivated mainly because the current JEFF-3.1.1 sodium evaluation showed large differences with microscopic measurements and does not have covariances data. Recent experimental data from IRMM and high resolution measurements from Larson have been simultaneously analyzed with the data assimilation code CONRAD and a good agreement with the evaluated cross-sections has been achieved. Experimental systematic uncertainties have been propagated to the nuclear reaction model parameters in order to produce a coherent set of covariance data. Several figures are provided in this paper to illustrate the new features of this evaluation.

  12. Measurement of absolute hadronic branching fractions of D mesons and e+e- -->DD cross sections at Ec.m.=3773 MeV.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Park, W; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nandakumar, R; Randrianarivony, K; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Chen, J; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Crede, V; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Phillips, E A; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Shepherd, M R; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Urner, D; Weaver, K M; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Stoeck, H; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Williams, J; Wiss, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Li, S Z; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Zweber, P; Ernst, J; Mahmood, A H; Severini, H; Asner, D M; Dytman, S A; Love, W; Mehrabyan, S; Mueller, J A; Savinov, V; Li, Z; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Chasse, M; Cravey, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J

    2005-09-16

    Using 55.8 pb(-1) of e+e- collisions recorded at the psi(3770) resonance with the CLEO-c detector at CESR, we determine absolute hadronic branching fractions of charged and neutral D mesons using a double tag technique. Among measurements for three D0 and six D+ modes, we obtain reference branching fractions B(D0-->K-pi+)=(3.91+/-0.08+/-0.09)% and B(D+-->K-pi+pi+)=(9.5+/-0.2+/-0.3)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. Final state radiation is included in these branching fractions by allowing for additional, unobserved, photons in the final state. Using a determination of the integrated luminosity, we also extract the cross sections sigma(e+e- -->D0D0)=(3.60+/-0.07(+0.07)(-0.05)) nb and sigma(e+e- -->D+D-)=(2.79+/-0.07(+0.10)(-0.04)) nb.

  13. [ital L]-subshell ionization cross sections in gold and bismuth by 3. 6--9. 5-MeV carbon and 4. 0--7. 2-MeV oxygen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, D.; Sarkar, M.; Chatterjee, M.B.; Sen, P. ); Kuri, G.; Mahapatra, D.P. ); Lapicki, G. )

    1994-06-01

    [ital L]-subshell ionization cross sections of Au and Bi induced by C[sup 2,3+] and O[sup 3+] ions have been measured for impact energies ranging from 0.25 to 0.79 MeV/u. The data have been compared with the predictions of the ECPSSR [perturbed-stationary-state (PSS) theory with energy-loss (E), Coulomb deflection (C), and relativistic corrections (R)] theory. Reasonable agreement between theory and experiment is observed for the [ital L][sub 1](2[ital s][sub 1/2]) and [ital L][sub 3](2[ital p][sub 3/2]) subshells. For the [ital L][sub 2](2[ital p][sub 1/2]) subshell, however, large disagreement between the data and the ECPSSR predictions persists. This difference could be due to the collision-induced intrashell'' mechanism that was suggested by Sarkadi and Mukoyama [J. Phys. B 14, L255 (1981)].

  14. New evaluations of n + Cu and n + Zr cross-section data for neutron energies up to 200 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereslavtsev, P.; Leal, L.; Konobeyev, A.; Fischer, U.

    2017-09-01

    This work presents evaluated general purpose nuclear data files for the n+ 63,65Cu and n+ 90,91,92,94,96Zr reactions for neutron energies up to 200 MeV. The TALYS-1.8 code was used for the nuclear model simulations in the energy range from 1 keV to 200 MeV. To improve the pre-equilibrium particle emission the Geometry-Dependent Hybrid model (GDH) was used as option implemented in an extended version of the code as option. Resonance data based on recent measurements and their covariances were included in the files. A set of covariance data for all nuclear reactions was also prepared and included in the evaluations. The adjustments of the nuclear model parameters were performed to fit both available differential and integral measured data. The evaluated data were carefully checked against the latest fusion relevant integral measurements.

  15. Measurement of flux-weighted average cross-sections and isomeric yield ratios for 103Rh(γ,xn) reactions in the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 55 and 60 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakilur Rahman, Md.; Kim, Kwangsoo; Kim, Guinyun; Naik, Haladhara; Nadeem, Muhammad; Thi Hien, Nguyen; Shahid, Muhammad; Yang, Sung-Chul; Cho, Young-Sik; Lee, Young-Ouk; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Woo Lee, Man; Kang, Yeong-Rok; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Ro, Tae-Ik

    2016-07-01

    We measured the flux-weighted average cross-sections and the isomeric yield ratios of 99m, g, 100m, g, 101m, g, 102m, gRh in the 103Rh( γ, xn) reactions with the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 55 and 60MeV by the activation and the off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique, using the 100MeV electron linac at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL), Korea. The flux-weighted average cross-sections were calculated by using the computer code TALYS 1.6 based on mono-energetic photons, and compared with the present experimental data. The flux-weighted average cross-sections of 103Rh( γ, xn) reactions in intermediate bremsstrahlung energies are the first time measurement and are found to increase from their threshold value to a particular value, where the other reaction channels open up. Thereafter, it decreases with bremsstrahlung energy due to its partition in different reaction channels. The isomeric yield ratios (IR) of 99m, g, 100m, g, 101m, g, 102m, gRh in the 103Rh( γ, xn) reactions from the present work were compared with the literature data in the 103Rh(d, x), 102-99Ru(p, x) , 103Rh( α, αn) , 103Rh( α, 2p3n) , 102Ru(3He, x), and 103Rh( γ, xn) reactions. It was found that the IR values of 102, 101, 100, 99Rh in all these reactions increase with the projectile energy, which indicates the role of excitation energy. At the same excitation energy, the IR values of 102, 101, 100, 99Rh are higher in the charged particle-induced reactions than in the photon-induced reaction, which indicates the role of input angular momentum.

  16. Direct total cross section measurement of the 16O(α,γ)20Ne reaction at Ec.m.=2.26 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, U.; Brown, J. R.; Buchmann, L.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Erikson, L.; Fallis, J.; Greife, U.; Hutcheon, D.; Ottewell, D.; Ruiz, C.; Sjue, S.; Vockenhuber, C.

    2011-08-01

    In stellar helium burning, 16O represents the endpoint of the helium-burning sequence due to the low rate of 16O(α,γ)20Ne. We present a new direct measurement of the total capture reaction rate of 16O(α,γ)20Ne at Ec.m.=2.26MeV employing the DRAGON recoil separator. For the first time, the total S factor and its contributing direct capture transitions could be determined in one experiment.

  17. Measurements of 67Ga production cross section induced by protons on natZn in the low energy range from 1.678 to 2.444 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter, J. A.; Miranda, P. A.; Morales, J. R.; Cancino, S. A.; Correa, R.

    2015-02-01

    The experimental production cross section for the reaction natZn(p,x)67Ga has been measured in the energy range from 1.678 to 2.444 MeV. The methodology used in this work is based on characteristic X-ray emitted after irradiation by the daughter nuclei that decays by electron capture (EC) and the use of a complementary PIXE experiment. By doing so, expressions needed to determine cross section values are simplified since experimental factors such as geometric setup and an detector efficiency are avoided. 67Ga is a radionuclide particularly suited for this method since it decays by electron capture in 100% and the subsequent characteristic X-ray emission is easily detected. Natural zinc targets were fabricated by PVD technique and afterwards their thicknesses were determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Cross sections measurements were carried out by using the Van de Graaff accelerator located at Faculty of Sciences, University of Chile. It was found that our data for the natZn(p,x)67Ga reaction are, in general, in good agreement when compared to existing experimental data and to those calculated ALICE/ASH nuclear code. On the other hand, values predicted by Talys-1.6 are showing systematically lower magnitudes than our measured data.

  18. Cross sections and tensor analyzing powers A_yy of the reaction ^1H(|vec|d,pp)n in SCRE geometries at E_d=19 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ley; C. Dueweke; A. Emmerich; A. Imig; H. Paez gen. Schieck; J. Golak; H. Witala; Evgeny Epelbaum; A. Deltuva; A. C. Fonseca; W. Gloeckle; Ulf-G. Meissner; A. Nogga; P. U. Sauer

    2006-02-01

    We measured the cross sections and tensor analyzing powers of the 1H({approx}d,pp)n breakup reaction at Ed=19 MeV in four symmetric constant relative energy (SCRE) configurations. The data are compared with theoretical predictions from three different approaches: one based on high precision (semi)phenomenological potentials alone or combined with model three-nucleon forces, another on chiral forces up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in the chiral expansion. In both cases, the Coulomb interaction is not included. In addition, a comparison to predictions based on CD Bonn including the Lambda excitation and the Coulomb force is presented. In all cases the measured cross sections are significantly below the theoretical values whereas the magnitude of the tensor analyzing powers agree within the error bars in three of the four cases. The apparent discrepancies in the breakup cross sections are similar to the known differences for the space-star breakup. This adds to the data base of unsolved low-energy discrepancies.

  19. Measurement of the Sm151(n,γ) cross section from 0.6 eV to 1 MeV via the neutron time-of-flight technique at the CERN n_TOF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrone, S.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Benlliure, J.; Berthomieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Cortina, D.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dababneh, S.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran-Escribano, I.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W. I.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I. F.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P. E.; Konovalov, V.; Kritĉka, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Martinez-Val, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Molina-Coballes, A.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papaevangelou, T.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perlado, J. M.; Perrot, L.; Pignatari, M.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Policarpo, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J. M.; Raman, S.; Rapp, W.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Soares, J. C.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L. M. N.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin-Fernandez, D.; Vincente-Vincente, M.; Vlachoudis, V.; Voss, F.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2006-03-01

    The Sm151(n,γ) cross section was measured with the time-of-flight technique from 0.6 eV up to 1 MeV relative to the Au standard with an overall uncertainty of typically 6%. Neutrons were produced by spallation at the innovative n_TOF facility at CERN; the γ rays from capture events were detected with organic C6D6 scintillators. Experimental setup and data analysis procedures are described with emphasis on the corrections for detection efficiency, background subtraction, and neutron flux determination. At low energies, resonances could be resolved up to about 1 keV, yielding a resonance integral of 3575±210 b, an average s-wave resonance spacing of =1.49±0.07 eV, and a neutron strength function of =(3.87±0.33)×10-4. Maxwellian-averaged capture cross sections are reported for thermal energies between 5 and 100 keV. These results are of relevance for nuclear structure studies, nuclear astrophysics, and nuclear technology. The new value of the Maxwellian-averaged cross section at kT=30 keV is 3.08±0.15 b, considerably larger than previous theoretical estimates, and provides better constraints for the thermodynamic conditions during the occurrence of the slow neutron capture process in low-mass stars during their asymptotic giant branch phase.

  20. Differential cross section measurements of 27Al(p,p/γ)27Al and 27Al(p,αγ)24Mg reactions in the energy range of 1.6-3.0 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokar, A.; Kakuee, O.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Sharifzadeh, N.; Fathollahi, V.

    2015-11-01

    In this work measurement of differential cross sections of 27Al(p,p/γ)27Al (Eγ = 844, 1014 keV) and 27Al(p,αγ)24Mg (Eγ = 1369 keV) nuclear reactions in the proton energy range of 1.6-3.0 MeV are described and the measured values are presented. Thin Al target was prepared by evaporating a 26 μg/cm2 Al onto a 129 μg/cm2 self-supporting Ag film. The gamma-rays and backscattered protons were detected simultaneously. The gamma-rays and protons were collected by an HPGe detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to beam direction and an ion implanted Si detector placed at a scattering angle of 165°, respectively. In this experimental setup the great advantage is that differential cross sections could be independent on absolute values of the collected beam charge. The overall systematic uncertainty of cross sections was estimated to be ±9% while statistical errors were less than ±5%.

  1. Determination of integral cross sections of 3 H in Al foils monitors irradiated by protons with energies ranging from 40 to 2600 MeV

    DOE PAGES

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Chauzova, M. V.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Our results of 3H production in Al foil monitors (~ 59 mg/cm2 thickness) are presented. We irradiated these foils in 15×15 mm polyethylene bags of ~ 14 mg/cm2 thickness together with foils of Cr (~ 395 mg/cm2 thickness) and 56Fe (~ 332 mg/cm2 thickness) by protons of different energies in a range of 0.04 – 2.6 GeV. The diameters of all the foils were 10.5 mm. The irradiations were carried out at the ITEP accelerator U–10 under the ISTC Project # 3266 in 2006–2009. 3H has been extracted from Al foils using an A307 Sample Oxidizer. We then used anmore » ultra low level liquid scintillation spectrometer Quantulus1220 to measure the 3H β–spectra and the SpectraDec software package was applied for spectra processing, deconvolution and 3H activity determination. The values of the Al (p, x)3H reaction cross sections obtained in these experiments are compared with data measured at other labs and with results of simulations by the MCNP6 radiation transport code using the CEM03.03 event generator.« less

  2. Determination of integral cross sections of 3 H in Al foils monitors irradiated by protons with energies ranging from 40 to 2600 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Chauzova, M. V.; Chauzova, M. V.; Kashirin, I. A.; Malinovskiy, S. V.; Pavlov, K. V.; Rogov, V. I.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Zhivun, V. M.; Mashnik, S. G.; Stankovskiy, A. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Our results of 3H production in Al foil monitors (~ 59 mg/cm2 thickness) are presented. We irradiated these foils in 15×15 mm polyethylene bags of ~ 14 mg/cm2 thickness together with foils of Cr (~ 395 mg/cm2 thickness) and 56Fe (~ 332 mg/cm2 thickness) by protons of different energies in a range of 0.04 – 2.6 GeV. The diameters of all the foils were 10.5 mm. The irradiations were carried out at the ITEP accelerator U–10 under the ISTC Project # 3266 in 2006–2009. 3H has been extracted from Al foils using an A307 Sample Oxidizer. We then used an ultra low level liquid scintillation spectrometer Quantulus1220 to measure the 3H β–spectra and the SpectraDec software package was applied for spectra processing, deconvolution and 3H activity determination. The values of the Al (p, x)3H reaction cross sections obtained in these experiments are compared with data measured at other labs and with results of simulations by the MCNP6 radiation transport code using the CEM03.03 event generator.

  3. Determination of integral cross sections of 3H in Al foils monitors irradiated by protons with energies ranging from 40 to 2600 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Chauzova, M. V.; Chauzova, M. V.; Kashirin, I. A.; Malinovskiy, S. V.; Pavlov, K. V.; Rogov, V. I.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Zhivun, V. M.; Mashnik, S. G.; Stankovskiy, A. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    The results of 3H production in Al foil monitors (˜ 59 mg/cm2 thickness) are presented. These foils have been irradiated in 15×15 mm polyethylene bags of ˜ 14 mg/cm2 thickness together with foils of Cr (˜ 395 mg/cm2 thickness) and 56Fe (˜ 332 mg/cm2 thickness) by protons of different energies in a range of 0.04 - 2.6 GeV. The diameters of all the foils were 10.5 mm. The irradiations were carried out at the ITEP accelerator U-10 under the ISTC Project # 3266 in 2006-2009. 3H has been extracted from Al foils using an A307 Sample Oxidizer. An ultra low level liquid scintillation spectrometer Quantulus1220 was used to measure the 3H β-spectra and the SpectraDec software package was applied for spectra processing, deconvolution and 3H activity determination. The values of the Al (p, x)3H reaction cross sections obtained in these experiments are compared with data measured at other labs and with results of simulations by the MCNP6 radiation transport code using the CEM03.03 event generator.

  4. Measurement of activation cross-section of long-lived products in deuteron induced nuclear reactions on palladium in the 30-50MeV energy range.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2017-10-01

    Excitation functions were measured in the 31-49.2MeV energy range for the (nat)Pd(d,xn)(111,110m,106m,105,104g,103)Ag, (nat)Pd(d,x) (111m,109,101,100)Pd, (nat)Pd(d,x), (105,102m,102g,101m,101g,100,99m,99g)Rh and (nat)Pd(d,x)(103,97)Ru nuclear reactions by using the stacked foil irradiation technique. The experimental results are compared with our previous results and with the theoretical predictions calculated with the ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D and TALYS (TENDL libraries) codes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Alpha particle induced reactions on natCr up to 39 MeV: Experimental cross-sections, comparison with theoretical calculations and thick target yields for medically relevant 52gFe production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Adam Rebeles, R.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.

    2015-08-01

    Thin natCr targets were obtained by electroplating, using 23.75 μm Cu foils as backings. In five stacked foil irradiations, followed by high resolution gamma spectroscopy, the cross sections for production of 52gFe, 49,51cumCr, 52cum,54,56cumMn and 48cumV in Cr and 61Cu,68Ga in Cu were measured up to 39 MeV incident α-particle energy. Reduced uncertainty is obtained by simultaneous remeasurement of the natCu(α,x)67,66Ga monitor reactions over the whole energy range. Comparisons with the scarce literature values and results from the TENDL-2013 on-line library, based on the theoretical code family TALYS-1.6, were made. A discussion of the production routes for 52gFe with achievable yields and contamination rates was made.

  6. Measurement of the cross sections for the production of the isotopes 74As, 68Ge, 65Zn, and 60Co from natural and enriched germanium irradiated with 100-MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabanov, I. R.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Gurentsov, V. I.; Zhuykov, B. L.; Kianovsky, S. V.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kohanuk, V. M.; Yanovich, E. A.

    2010-07-01

    The cross sections for the production of the radioactive isotopes 74As, 68Ge, 65Zn, and 60Co in metallic germanium irradiated with 100-MeV protons were measured, the experiments being performed both with germanium of natural isotopic composition and germanium enriched in the isotope 76Ge. The targets were irradiated with a proton beam at the facility for the production of radionuclides at the accelerator of the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR, Moscow). The data obtained will further be used to calculate the background of radioactive isotopes formed by nuclear cascades of cosmic-ray muons in new-generation experiments devoted to searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge at underground laboratories.

  7. Measurement of the cross sections for the production of the isotopes {sup 74}As, {sup 68}Ge, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 60}Co from natural and enriched germanium irradiated with 100-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Barabanov, I. R.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Gurentsov, V. I.; Zhuykov, B. L.; Kianovsky, S. V.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kohanuk, V. M.; Yanovich, E. A.

    2010-07-15

    The cross sections for the production of the radioactive isotopes {sup 74}As, {sup 68}Ge, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 60}Co in metallic germanium irradiated with 100-MeV protons were measured, the experiments being performed both with germanium of natural isotopic composition and germanium enriched in the isotope {sup 76}Ge. The targets were irradiated with a proton beam at the facility for the production of radionuclides at the accelerator of the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR, Moscow). The data obtained will further be used to calculate the background of radioactive isotopes formed by nuclear cascades of cosmic-ray muons in new-generation experiments devoted to searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 76}Ge at underground laboratories.

  8. Tables and graphs of photon-interaction cross sections from 0. 1 keV to 100 MeV derived from the LLL evaluated-nuclear-data library

    SciTech Connect

    Plechaty, E.F.; Cullen, D.E.; Howerton, R.J.

    1981-11-11

    Energy-dependent evaluated photon interaction cross sections and related parameters are presented for elements H through Cf(Z = 1 to 98). Data are given over the energy range from 0.1 keV to 100 MeV. The related parameters include form factors and average energy deposits per collision (with and without fluorescence). Fluorescence information is given for all atomic shells that can emit a photon with a kinetic energy of 0.1 keV or more. In addition, the following macroscopic properties are given: total mean free path and energy deposit per centimeter. This information is derived from the Livermore Evaluated-Nuclear-Data Library (ENDL) as of October 1978.

  9. Determination of the cross section for (n,p) reaction with producing short-lived nuclei on the 162,163Dy isotopes at 13.5 and 14.8 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junhua; Feng, Zhifu; An, Li; Jiang, Li; He, Long

    2016-06-01

    Activation cross-sections for the 162Dy(n,p)162Tb and 163Dy(n,p)163Tb reactions have been measured by means of the activation technique and a coaxial HPGe γ-ray detector at 13.5 and 14.8 MeV. The fast neutrons were produced via the 3H(d,n)4He reaction on Pd-300 neutron generator. The natural high-purity Dy2O3 powder was used as target material. Theoretical excitation functions were calculated using the nuclear-reaction codes EMPIRE-3.2 Malta and TALYS-1.6 with default parameters, at neutron energies varying from the reaction threshold to 20 MeV. The results were also discussed and compared with some corresponding values found in the literature, with the comprehensive evaluation data in ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDF-4.0 libraries, and with the estimates obtained from a published empirical formula based on the statistical model with Q-value dependence and odd-even effects taken into consideration.

  10. Large Scale Accelerator Production of 225Ac: Effective Cross sections for 78-192 MeV Protons Incident on 232Th Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Griswold, Justin R; Medvedev, Dmitri G.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Copping, Roy; Fitzsimmons, Jonathan M.; Radchenko, Valery; Cooley, Jason; Fassbender, Michael; Denton, David L.; Murphy, Karen E.; Owens, Allison C.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; John, Kevin D.; Nortier, Francois M.; Stracener, Daniel W; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Mausner, Leonard F.; Mirzadeh, Saed

    2016-09-28

    Actinium-225 and 213Bi have been used successfully in targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in preclinical and clinical research. This paper is a continuation of research activities aiming to expand the availability of 225Ac. The high energy proton spallation reaction on natural thorium metal target has been utilized to produce millicurie quantities of 225Ac. The results of sixteen irradiation experiments of Th metal at beam energies between 78 and 200 MeV are summarized in this work. Irradiations have been conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), while target dissolution and processing was carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Excitation functions for actinium and thorium isotopes as well as for some of the fission products are presented. The cross sections for production of 225Ac range from 3.6 to 16.7 mb in the incident proton energy range of 78 to 192 MeV. Based on these data, production of Curie quantities of 225Ac is possible by irradiating a 5.0 g cm-2232Th target for 10 days in either BNL or LANL proton irradiation facilities.

  11. Large Scale Accelerator Production of 225Ac: Effective Cross sections for 78-192 MeV Protons Incident on 232Th Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Griswold, Justin R; Medvedev, Dmitri G.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Copping, Roy; Fitzsimmons, Jonathan M.; Radchenko, Valery; Cooley, Jason; Fassbender, Michael; Denton, David L.; Murphy, Karen E.; Owens, Allison C.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; John, Kevin D.; Nortier, Francois M.; Stracener, Daniel W; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Mausner, Leonard F.; Mirzadeh, Saed

    2016-09-28

    Actinium-225 and 213Bi have been used successfully in targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in preclinical and clinical research. This paper is a continuation of research activities aiming to expand the availability of 225Ac. The high energy proton spallation reaction on natural thorium metal target has been utilized to produce millicurie quantities of 225Ac. The results of sixteen irradiation experiments of Th metal at beam energies between 78 and 200 MeV are summarized in this work. Irradiations have been conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), while target dissolution and processing was carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Excitation functions for actinium and thorium isotopes as well as for some of the fission products are presented. The cross sections for production of 225Ac range from 3.6 to 16.7 mb in the incident proton energy range of 78 to 192 MeV. Based on these data, production of Curie quantities of 225Ac is possible by irradiating a 5.0 g cm-2232Th target for 10 days in either BNL or LANL proton irradiation facilities.

  12. Cross sections for production of 70 discrete-energy gamma rays created by neutron interactions with sup 56 Fe for E sub n to 40 MeV: Tabulated data

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, J.K.; Todd, J.H.; Larson, D.C.

    1990-09-01

    Inelastic and nonelastic neutron interactions with {sup 56}Fe have been studied for incident neutron energies between 0.8 and 41 MeV. An iron sample isotopically enriched in the mass 56 isotope was used. Gamma rays representing 70 transitions among levels in residual nuclei were identified, and production cross sections were deduced. The reactions studied were {sup 56}Fe(n,n{prime}){sup 56}Fe, {sup 56}Fe(n,p){sup 56}Mn, {sup 56}Fe(n,2n){sup 55}Fe, {sup 56}Fe(n,d + n,np){sup 55}Mn, {sup 56}Fe(n,t + n,nd + n,2np){sup 54}Mn, {sup 56}Fe(n,{alpha}){sup 53}Cr, {sup 56}Fe(n,n{alpha}){sup 52}Cr, and {sup 56}Fe(n,3n){sup 54}Fe. Values obtained for production cross sections as functions of incident neutron energy are presented in tabular form. 38 refs., 7 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Measurement of the total cross section of heavy water in the 0.1 meV-1 eV energy range at 20 and 50 ° C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez Damián, J. I.; Granada, J. R.; Baxter, D. V.; Parnell, S. R.; Evans, D. C.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the importance of heavy water as a neutron moderator, there are few measurements of its total neutron cross section for cold and thermal energies, and none of them covers the range of temperature (40-70 ° C) used in moderator and reflector tanks in research reactors, and in CANDU nuclear power plants. To cover this deficit, we measured the total cross section of liquid heavy water at 20 ° C and 50 ° C using the SANS beamline at the LENS facility at Indiana University. The time-of-flight technique was used, in a sample-in/sample-out measurement. The use of the solid methane cold neutron source at LENS allowed measuring in a broad range in energy, from 0.1meV to 1eV. In this paper we present details of the measurement and processing of the data, and comparison with previous experimental measurements and calculation models. This work is included in the Action Plan of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project "Advanced Moderators for Intense Cold Neutron Beams in Materials Research".

  14. Measurements of the cross section for the (182)W(n,p)(182(m+g))Ta and (184)(n,p)(184)Ta reactions in the 14MeV energy range using the activation technique.

    PubMed

    Song, Yueli; Zhou, Fengqun; Tian, Mingli; Li, Yong; Yuan, Shuqing; Lan, Changlin

    2015-04-01

    The cross section for the (182)W(n,p)(182(m+g))Ta and (184)W(n,p)(184)Ta reactions has been measured in the neutron energy range of 13.5-14.7MeV using the activation technique and a coaxial HPGe γ-ray detector. In our experiment, the fast neutrons were produced by the T(d,n)(4)He reaction at the ZF-300-II Intense Neutron Generator at Lanzhou University. Natural wolfram foils of 99.9% purity were used as target materials. The neutron flux was determined using the monitor reaction (93)Nb(n,2n)(92m)Nb and the neutron energies were determined using the method of cross-section ratio measurements employing the (90)Zr(n,2n)(89)Zr to (93)Nb(n,2n)(92m)Nb reactions. The results of this work are compared with experimental data found in the literature and the estimates obtained from a published empirical formula based on the statistical model with Q-value dependence and odd-even effects taken into consideration.

  15. Activation cross sections for 190Os( n, p) 190m,gRe, 188Os( n, p) 188Re and 190Os( n, n') 190mOs reactions from 13.5 to 14.8 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junhua; Zhang, Zhirong; Tian, Weisong; Tuo, Fei; Kong, Xiangzhong; Liu, Rong; Jiang, Li

    2009-04-01

    Cross sections for ( n, p) and ( n, n') reactions have been measured on osmium isotopes at the neutron energies from 13.5 to 14.8 MeV using the activation technique in combination with high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. Neutrons were produced via the 3H( d, n) 4He reaction using solid TiT. The neutron fluences were determined using the monitor reaction 93Nb( n,2 n) 92mNb. Data are reported for the following reactions: 190Os( n, p) 190mRe, 190Os( n, p) 190gRe, 190Os( n, p) 190Re, 188Os( n, p) 188Re and 190Os( n, n') 190mOs. Nuclear model calculations using the code HFTT, which employs the Hauser-Feshbach (statistical model) and exciton model (precompound effects) formalisms, were undertaken to describe the formation of the products. The cross sections were discussed and compared with experimental data found in the literature, with values of model calculations including the pre-equilibrium contribution, and with evaluation data of JEFF-3.1/A.

  16. Neutron-induced fission cross-section measurement of 234U with quasi-monoenergetic beams in the keV and MeV range using micromegas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsinganis, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Vlastou, R.; Kalamara, A.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Kanellakopoulos, A.; Lagoyannis, A.; Axiotis, M.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate data on neutron-induced fission cross-sections of actinides are essential for the design of advanced nuclear reactors based either on fast neutron spectra or alternative fuel cycles, as well as for the reduction of safety margins of existing and future conventional facilities. The fission cross-section of 234U was measured at incident neutron energies of 560 and 660 keV and 7.5 MeV with a setup based on `microbulk' Micromegas detectors and the same samples previously used for the measurement performed at the CERN n_TOF facility (Karadimos et al., 2014). The 235U fission cross-section was used as reference. The (quasi-)monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the 7Li(p,n) and the 2H(d,n) reactions at the neutron beam facility of the Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics at the `Demokritos' National Centre for Scientific Research. A detailed study of the neutron spectra produced in the targets and intercepted by the samples was performed coupling the NeuSDesc and MCNPX codes, taking into account the energy spread, energy loss and angular straggling of the beam ions in the target assemblies, as well as contributions from competing reactions and neutron scattering in the experimental setup. Auxiliary Monte-Carlo simulations were performed with the FLUKA code to study the behaviour of the detectors, focusing particularly on the reproduction of the pulse height spectra of α-particles and fission fragments (using distributions produced with the GEF code) for the evaluation of the detector efficiency. An overview of the developed methodology and preliminary results are presented.

  17. {sup 231}Pa photofission cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, A.S.; Rudnikov, V.E.; Smirenkin, G.N.

    1995-12-01

    The measurements of the {sup 231}Pa yield and cross section photofission in the energy range 7-9 MeV are presented. These measurements are a continuation of similar measurements performed for the {gamma}-ray energy range 4.8-7 MeV. The entire collection of experimental data which combine the results obtained in the present work and in Ref. 1 was analyzed.

  18. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  19. Neutron absorption cross section of uranium-236

    SciTech Connect

    Macklin, R.L.; Alexander, C.W.

    1988-11-01

    U-236 neutron absorption was measured as a function of neutron time-of-flight from 20 eV to 1 MeV. The neutron flux was monitored with a /sup 6/Li glass scintillator. Average cross sections from 3 keV to 1 MeV were derived. Estimated uncertainties were less than 5% below 600 keV and increased to 9.5% at 1 MeV. Resonance parametrization from 20 eV to a few keV remains to be done. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Neutron-Induced Partial Cross Section Measurements on Cu, Ge and Pb at En = 8 and 12 MeV for Background Radiation in 0νββ Decay Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, E.; Esterline, J. H.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C. R.; Hutcheson, A.; Kidd, M. F.; Tonchev, A.; Tornow, W.; Angell, C.; Karwowski, H.; Kelley, J.; Mei, D.; Hilderbrand, S.; Masters, D. B.; Pedroni, R. S.; Weisel, G. J.

    2008-04-01

    The search for the existence of 0νββ decay plays an important role in the uncovering of physics beyond the standard model. The detection of such decay would confirm that neutrinos are Majorana particles. The large lifetimes (i.e.,T1/2(^76Ge) > 10^25 y) and the corresponding long measuring times require extensive understanding of background radiation induced by neutron interactions with shielding and detector materials. For example, neutron induced γ-ray transitions in Pb and Cu and their escape peaks could interfere with the identification of the 2039 keV signature of 0νββ in the case of ^ 76Ge. Thus, it is necessary to determine the yields from possible background sources. The neutron-induced partial cross sections for γ-ray transitions in Cu, enriched ^76 Ge, and Pb were measured at TUNL using an array of HPGe detectors at En=8 and 12 MeV. The experimental setup and preliminary results will be presented.Supported by DOE Grants DE-FG02-97ER41033 & DE- FG02-97ER41042.

  1. Investigation of activation cross section data of alpha particle induced nuclear reaction on molybdenum up to 40 MeV: Review of production routes of medically relevant 97,103Ru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Hermanne, A.; Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A.

    2017-05-01

    The main goals of this investigations were to expand and consolidate reliable activation cross-section data for the natMo(α,x) reactions in connection with production of medically relevant 97,103Ru and the use of the natMo(α,x)97Ru reaction for monitoring beam parameters. The excitation functions for formation of the gamma-emitting radionuclides 94Ru, 95Ru, 97Ru, 103Ru, 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(m+) and 88Zr were measured up to 40 MeV alpha-particle energy by using the stacked foil technique and activation method. Data of our earlier similar experiments were re-evaluated and resulted in corrections on the reported results. Our experimental data were compared with critically analyzed literature data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE 3.1 (Rivoli) and TALYS codes (TENDL-2011 and TENDL-2015 on-line libraries). Nuclear data for different production routes of 97Ru and 103Ru are compiled and reviewed.

  2. A nuclear cross section data handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, H.O.M.

    1989-12-01

    Isotopic information, reaction data, data availability, heating numbers, and evaluation information are given for 129 neutron cross-section evaluations, which are the source of the default cross sections for the Monte Carlo code MCNP. Additionally, pie diagrams for each nuclide displaying the percent contribution of a given reaction to the total cross section are given at 14 MeV, 1 MeV, and thermal energy. Other information about the evaluations and their availability in continuous-energy, discrete-reaction, and multigroup forms is provided. The evaluations come from ENDF/B-V, ENDL85, and the Los Alamos Applied Nuclear Science Group T-2. Graphs of all neutron and photon production cross-section reactions for these nuclides have been categorized and plotted. 21 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. Evaluation of the /sup 238/U neutron total cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.; Poenitz, W.P.; Howerton, R.J.

    1982-12-01

    Experimental energy-averaged neutron total cross sections of /sup 238/U were evaluated from 0.044 to 20.0 MeV using regorous numerical methods. The evaluated results are presented together with the associated uncertainties and correlation matrix. They indicate that this energy-averaged neutron total cross section is known to better than 1% over wide energy regions. There are somwewhat larger uncertainties at low energies (e.g., less than or equal to 0.2 MeV), near 8 MeV and above 15 MeV. The present evaluation is compard with values given in ENDF/B-V.

  4. Fission cross sections in the intermediate energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.; Gavron, A.; Parker, W.E.; Ullmann, J.L.; Balestrini, S.J. ); Carlson, A.D.; Wasson, O.A. ); Hill, N.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Until recently there has been very little cross section data for neutron-induced fission in the intermediate energy region, primarily because no suitable neutron source has existed. At Los Alamos, the WNR target-4 facility provides a high-intensity source of neutrons nearly ideal for fission measurements extending from a fraction of a MeV to several hundred MeV. This paper summarizes the status of fission cross section data in the intermediate energy range (En > 30 MeV) and presents our fission cross section data for {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U compared to intranuclear cascade and statistical model predictions.

  5. [Fast neutron cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1992-10-26

    From its inception, the Nuclear Data Project at the University of Michigan has concentrated on two major objectives: (1) to carry out carefully controlled nuclear measurements of the highest possible reliability in support of the national nuclear data program, and (2) to provide an educational opportunity for students with interests in experimental nuclear science. The project has undergone a successful transition from a primary dependence on our photoneutron laboratory to one in which our current research is entirely based on a unique pulsed 14 MeV fast neutron facility. The new experimental facility is unique in its ability to provide nanosecond bursts of 14 MeV neutrons under conditions that are clean'' and as scatter-free as possible, and is the only one of its type currently in operation in the United States. It has been designed and put into operation primarily by graduate students, and has met or exceeded all of its important initial performance goals. We have reached the point of its routine operation, and most of the data are now in hand that will serve as the basis for the first two doctoral dissertations to be written by participating graduate students. Our initial results on double differential neutron cross sections will be presented at the May 1993 Fusion Reactor Technology Workshop. We are pleased to report that, after investing several years in equipment assembly and optimization, the project has now entered its data production'' phase.

  6. Excitation functions and isomeric cross section ratios of the 63Cu(n,α)60Com,g, 65Cu(n,α)62Com,g, and 60Ni(n,p)60Com,g processes from 6 to 15 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cserpák, F.; Sudár, S.; Csikai, J.; Qaim, S. M.

    1994-03-01

    Excitation functions were measured for the 63Cu(n,α)60Com, 65Cu(n,α)62Com, and 65Cu(n,α)62Cog reactions over the neutron energy range of 6.3 to 14.8 MeV. Use was made of the activation technique in combination with high resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. The nuetrons were produced via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction using a deuterium gas target at a variable energy compact cyclotron (En=6.3-11.9 MeV) and via the 3H(d,n)4He reaction using a solid Ti-T target at a neutron generator (En=13.7-14.8 MeV). From the available experimental data isomeric cross section ratios were determined for the isomeric pair 60Com,g in 63Cu(n,α) and 60Ni(n,p) reactions, and for the pair 62Com,g in the 65Cu(n,α) reaction. Statistical model calculations taking into account precompound effects were performed for the formation of both the isomeric and ground states of the products. The calculational results on the total (n,p) and (n,α) cross sections agree well with the experimental data; in the case of isomeric states, however, some deviations occur. The experimental isomeric cross section ratios are reproduced only approximately by the calculation; at 15 MeV the spin distribution of the level density has a significant effect on the calculation. For low-lying levels the isomeric cross section ratio depends strongly on the spins of the levels involved and not on their excitation energies. At a given neutron energy the population of the higher spin isomer appears to be higher in the (n,α) process than in the (n,p) reaction.

  7. Measurement of the 209Bi(n ,4 n )206Bi and 169Tm(n ,3 n )167Tm cross sections between 23.5 and 30.5 MeV relevant to reaction-in-flight neutron studies at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooden, M. E.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Champine, B.; Combs, D. C.; Finch, S.; Hayes-Sterbenz, A.; Henry, E.; Krishichayan, Rundberg, R.; Tornow, W.; Wilhelmy, J.; Yeamans, C.

    2017-08-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, experiments are being performed to measure charged-particle stopping powers in the previously unexplored warm dense plasma regime. These measurements are done using reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons from an inertial confinement fusion system. RIF neutrons are produced with a continuum of energies up to 30 MeV. By making activation measurements utilizing threshold reactions for neutrons in the energy range of 15 MeV , the number of RIF neutrons can be determined and from this the stopping power of the deuterium and tritium ions that produced the RIF neutrons can be inferred. Currently, the 169Tm(n ,3 n )167Tm reaction has been used. However, in an effort to provide a secondary complimentary measurement, efforts are underway to make use of the 209Bi(n ,4 n )206Bi reaction, with a threshold of 22.5 MeV. The cross sections were measured at the 10 MV tandem Van De Graaff accelerator at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory with quasimonoenergetic neutrons between 23.5 and 30.5 MeV, where few previous measurements have been made. Cross-section data are compared to calculations and other available measurements.

  8. MODELING AND FISSION CROSS SECTIONS FOR AMERICIUM.

    SciTech Connect

    ROCHMAN, D.; HERMAN, M.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2005-05-01

    This is the final report of the work performed under the LANL contract on the modeling and fission cross section for americium isotopes (May 2004-June 2005). The purpose of the contract was to provide fission cross sections for americium isotopes with the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE 2.19. The following work was performed: (1) Fission calculations capability suitable for americium was implemented to the EMPIRE-2.19 code. (2) Calculations of neutron-induced fission cross sections for {sup 239}Am to {sup 244g}Am were performed with EMPIRE-2.19 for energies up to 20 MeV. For the neutron-induced reaction of {sup 240}Am, fission cross sections were predicted and uncertainties were assessed. (3) Set of fission barrier heights for each americium isotopes was chosen so that the new calculations fit the experimental data and follow the systematics found in the literature.

  9. New Parameterization of Neutron Absorption Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1997-01-01

    Recent parameterization of absorption cross sections for any system of charged ion collisions, including proton-nucleus collisions, is extended for neutron-nucleus collisions valid from approx. 1 MeV to a few GeV, thus providing a comprehensive picture of absorption cross sections for any system of collision pairs (charged or uncharged). The parameters are associated with the physics of the problem. At lower energies, optical potential at the surface is important, and the Pauli operator plays an increasingly important role at intermediate energies. The agreement between the calculated and experimental data is better than earlier published results.

  10. Optical Model and Cross Section Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Herman,M.W.; Pigni, M.T.; Dietrich, F.S.; Oblozinsky, P.

    2009-10-05

    Distinct minima and maxima in the neutron total cross section uncertainties were observed in model calculations using spherical optical potential. We found this oscillating structure to be a general feature of quantum mechanical wave scattering. Specifically, we analyzed neutron interaction with 56Fe from 1 keV up to 65 MeV, and investigated physical origin of the minima.We discuss their potential importance for practical applications as well as the implications for the uncertainties in total and absorption cross sections.

  11. New Parameterization of Neutron Absorption Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1997-06-01

    Recent parameterization of absorption cross sections for any system of charged ion collisions, including proton-nucleus collisions, is extended for neutron-nucleus collisions valid from approx. 1 MeV to a few GeV, thus providing a comprehensive picture of absorption cross sections for any system of collision pairs (charged or uncharged). The parameters are associated with the physics of the problem. At lower energies, optical potential at the surface is important, and the Pauli operator plays an increasingly important role at intermediate energies. The agreement between the calculated and experimental data is better than earlier published results.

  12. Quantum radar cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2010-06-01

    The radar cross section σC is an objective measure of the "radar visibility" of an object. As such, σC is an important concept for the correct characterization of the operational performance of radar systems. Furthermore, σC is equally essential for the design and development of stealth weapon systems and platforms. Recent years have seen the theoretical development of quantum radars, that is, radars that operate with a small number of photons. In this regime, the radar-target interaction is described through photon-atom scattering processes governed by the laws of quantum electrodynamics. As such, it is theoretically inconsistent to use the same σC to characterize the performance of a quantum radar. In this paper we define a quantum radar cross section σQ based on quantum electrodynamics and interferometric considerations. We discuss the theoretical challenges of defining σQ, as well as computer simulations of σC and σQ for simple targets.

  13. Absolute np and pp cross section determinations aimed at improving the standard for cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, Alexander B; Haight, Robert C; Tovesson, Fredrik; Arndt, Richard A; Briscoe, William J; Paris, Mark W; Strakovsky, Igor I; Workman, Ron L

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of present research is a keeping improvement of the standard for cross section measurements of neutron-induced reactions. The cross sections for np and pp scattering below 1000 MeV are determined based on partial-wave analyses (PW As) of nucleon-nucleon scattering data. These cross sections are compared with the most recent ENDF/B-V11.0 and JENDL-4.0 data files, and the Nijmegen PWA. Also a comparison of evaluated data with recent experimental data was made to check a quality of evaluation. Excellent agreement was found between the new experimental data and our PWA predictions.

  14. New Arsenic Cross Section Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko

    2015-03-04

    This report presents calculations for the new arsenic cross section. Cross sections for 73,74,75 As above the resonance range were calculated with a newly developed Hauser-Feshbach code, CoH3.

  15. Difference between interaction cross sections and reaction cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Kohama, Akihisa; Iida, Kei; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2008-12-15

    We study the validity of the substitution of interaction cross sections for total reaction cross sections for a nucleus incident on a target nucleus at relativistic energies. We show that, for incident stable nuclei, the predicted difference between interaction and total reaction cross sections is large enough to probe the nuclear structure, particularly in a mass region of less than around 40. For analyses of the difference, we construct ''pseudo data'' for the reaction cross sections because empirical data are very limited at high energies. The construction of the pseudo data is based on our assumption that empirically unknown total reaction cross sections are precisely predicted by the phenomenological black-sphere model of nuclei that we developed recently. The comparison with the empirical interaction cross sections suggests a significant difference between the reaction and interaction cross sections for stable projectiles on a carbon target, which is of the order of 0-100 mb.

  16. Neutron total scattering cross sections of elemental antimony

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron total cross sections are measured from 0.8 to 4.5 MeV with broad resolutions. Differential-neutron-elastic-scattering cross sections are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of 50 to 200 keV and at scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160 degrees. Lumped-level neutron-inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured over the same angular and energy range. The exPerimental results are discussed in terms of an optical-statistical model and are compared with respective values given in ENDF/B-V.

  17. Total cross sections for neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, C. R.; Elster, Ch.; Thaler, R. M.; Weppner, S. P.

    1995-02-01

    Measurements of neutron total cross sections are both extensive and extremely accurate. Although they place a strong constraint on theoretically constructed models, there are relatively few comparisons of predictions with experiment. The total cross sections for neutron scattering from 16O and 40Ca are calculated as a function of energy from 50 to 700 MeV laboratory energy with a microscopic first-order optical potential derived within the framework of the Watson expansion. Although these results are aleady in qualitative agreement with the data, the inclusion of medium corrections to the propagator is essential to correctly predict the energy dependence given by the experiment. In the region between 100 and 200 MeV, where off-shell tρ calculations for both 16O and 40Ca overpredict the experiment, the modification due to the nuclear medium reduces the calculated values. Above 300 MeV these corrections are very small and depending on the employed nuclear mean field tend to compensate for the underprediction of the off-shell tρ results.

  18. Measurements of the Total Reaction Cross Sections for 6,8He and 8,9Li Nuclei with Energies of (25-45)A Mev on natAl, natTa and natPb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdemchimeg, B.; Artukh, A. G.; Klygin, S. A.; Kononenko, G. A.; Kyslukha, D. A.; Sereda, Yu. M.; Vorontzov, A. N.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Davaa, S.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Borcea, C.; Rotaru, F.; Stanoiu, M.; Martina, L.; Saillant, F.; Raine, B.

    2015-06-01

    The total nuclear reaction cross sections (σR) measurements have long been of interest since they tell us about the radii and transparency of these nuclei and give clues to understanding of their structure. For studies of unstable nuclei, in particular the physical properties of halo nuclei and the neutron skin thickness, it is valuable to know not only the root-mean-square radii (rms) but it is important to know the details of nucleusnucleus potentials. Our goal was to study total reaction cross sections (σR) by a direct measurement technique (the so-called beam attenuation or transmission method) which allows to extract model independent information. The interaction radii for 6He, 8,9Li were extracted, which are in agreement with the previous measurement at the similar energies (about a few tens of AMeV) Our results show a tendency of increasing radii as function of mass of the secondary targets.

  19. Nucleon-nucleus interaction data base: Total nuclear and absorption cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Buck, W. W.; Chun, S. Y.; Hong, B. S.; Lamkin, S. L.

    1988-01-01

    Neutron total cross sections are represented for Li to Pu targets at energies above 0.1 MeV and less than 100 MeV using a modified nuclear Ramsauer formalism. The formalism is derived for energies above 100 MeV by fitting theoretical cross sections. Neutron absorption cross sections are represented by analytic expressions of similar form, but shape resonance phenomena of the Ramsauer effect is not present. Elastic differential cross sections are given as a renormalized impulse approximation. These cross section data bases are useful for nucleon transport applications.

  20. Nucleon-nucleus interaction data base: Total nuclear and absorption cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Buck, W. W.; Chun, S. Y.; Hong, B. S.; Lamkin, S. L.

    1988-08-01

    Neutron total cross sections are represented for Li to Pu targets at energies above 0.1 MeV and less than 100 MeV using a modified nuclear Ramsauer formalism. The formalism is derived for energies above 100 MeV by fitting theoretical cross sections. Neutron absorption cross sections are represented by analytic expressions of similar form, but shape resonance phenomena of the Ramsauer effect is not present. Elastic differential cross sections are given as a renormalized impulse approximation. These cross section data bases are useful for nucleon transport applications.

  1. Experiments on Antiprotons: Antiproton-Nucleon Cross Sections

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chamberlain, Owen; Keller, Donald V.; Mermond, Ronald; Segre, Emilio; Steiner, Herbert M.; Ypsilantis, Tom

    1957-07-22

    In this paper experiments are reported on annihilation and scattering of antiprotons in H{sub 2}O , D{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2}. From the data measured it is possible to obtain an antiproton-proton and an antiproton-deuteron cross section at 457 Mev (lab). Further analysis gives the p-p and p-n cross sections as 104 mb for the p-p reaction cross section and 113 mb for the p-n reaction cross section. The respective annihilation cross sections are 89 and 74 mb. The Glauber correction necessary in order to pass from the p-d to the p-n cross section by subtraction of the p-p cross section is unfortunately large and somewhat uncertain. The data are compared with the p-p and p-n cross sections and with other results on p-p collisions.

  2. Accurate universal parameterization of absorption cross sections II--neutron absorption cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    1997-01-01

    A recent parameterization (here after referred as paper I, Ref. [4]) of absorption cross sections for any system of charged ions collisions including proton -nucleus collisions, is extended for neutron-nucleus collisions valid from approximately 1 MeV to a few GeV, thus providing a comprehensive picture of absorption cross sections for any system of collision pair (charged and/or uncharged). The parameters are associated with the physics of the problem. At lower energies, the optical potential at the surface is important and the Pauli operator plays an increasingly important role at intermediate energies. The agreement between the calculated and experimental data is better than earlier published results.

  3. Accurate universal parameterization of absorption cross sections II — neutron absorption cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1997-06-01

    A recent parameterization (here after referred as paper I, Ref. [4]) of absorption cross sections for any system of charged ions collisions including proton -nucleus collisions, is extended for neutron-nucleus collisions valid from ˜ 1 MeV to a few GeV, thus providing a comprehensive picture of absorption cross sections for any system of collision pair (charged and/or uncharged). The parameters are associated with the physics of the problem. At lower energies, the optical potential at the surface is important and the Pauli operator plays an increasingly important role at intermediate energies. The agreement between the calculated and experimental data is better than earlier published results.

  4. Radar cross section of insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, J. R.

    1985-02-01

    X-band measurements of radar cross section as a function of the angle between insect body axis and the plane of polarization are presented. A finding of particular interest is that in larger insects, maximum cross section occurs when the E-vector is perpendicular to the body axis. A new range of measurements on small insects (aphids, and planthoppers) is also described, and a comprehensive summary of insect cross-section data at X-band is given.

  5. Nuclear interaction cross sections for proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, M. B.; Jones, D. T. L.; Arendse, G. J.; Cowley, A. A.; Richter, W. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Newman, R. T.; Pilcher, J. V.; Smit, F. D.; Steyn, G. F.; Koen, JW; Stander, JA

    Model calculations of proton-induced nuclear reaction cross sections are described for biologically-important targets. Measurements made at the National Accelerator Centre are presented for double-differential proton, deuteron, triton, helium-3 and alpha particle spectra, for 150 and 200 MeV protons incident on C, N, and O. These data are needed for Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport and absorbed dose in proton therapy. Data relevant to the use of positron emission tomography to locate the Bragg peak are also described.

  6. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; Matsushi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Matsumura, H.; Toyoda, A.; Oishi, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Boehnlein, D.; Coleman, R.; Lauten, G.; Leveling, A.; Mokhov, N.; Ramberg, E.; Soha, A.; Vaziri, K.; Ninomiya, K.; Omoto, T.; Shima, T.; Takahashi, N.; Shinohara, A.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Shibata, S.; Ohtsuki, T.

    2015-08-12

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV–24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased as the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. As a result, the difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.

  7. Radar Cross Section Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-30

    Radar 54 17. Measured Range Sidelobe Performance of Chirp Radar 56 18. Range and Cross Range Image of Target Dror.’ŕ Vehicle 57 19. Incoherent rms...the measured range resolution, 4.9 in, closely agrees with the theoretical performance for this weighting. The measured range sidelobe performance...Interval 4.89in. 2% kHz 300 kHz 310 kHz (b) Expanded Scale + 5 ft from Target Figure 17. Measured Range Sidelobe Performance of

  8. XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 8 XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database (Web, free access)   A web database is provided which can be used to calculate photon cross sections for scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production, as well as total attenuation coefficients, for any element, compound or mixture (Z <= 100) at energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV.

  9. Proton Pair Production Cross Sections at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaorong

    Using data samples collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, the Born cross section of e + e - to pbar{p} at 12 center-of-mass energies from 2232.4 to 3671.0 MeV is provided. The corresponding effective electromagnetic form factor of the proton is deduced under the assumption that the electric and magnetic form factors are equal. In addition, the ratio of electric to magnetic form factors are extracted for the data samples with larger statistics. The measured cross sections are in agreement with recent results from BaBar, improving the overall uncertainty by about 30%. The |GE/GM| ratios are close to unity and consistent with BaBar results in the same q2 region.

  10. Neutron-induced fission cross section measurement of 233U, 241Am and 243Am in the energy range 0.5 MeV En 20 MeV at nTOF at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Belloni, F.; Milazzo, P. M.; Calviani, M.; Colonna, N.; Mastinu, P. F.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P. A.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Cerutti, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapico, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Koehler, Paul; The n_TOF Collaboration,

    2012-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross section measurements of 233U, 243Am and 241Am relative to 235U have been carried out at the neutron time-of-flight facility n TOF at CERN. A fast ionization chamber has been employed. All samples were located in the same detector; therefore the studied elements and the reference 235U target are subject to the same neutron beam.

  11. Measurement of the 10B(p ,α0)7Be cross section from 5 keV to 1.5 MeV in a single experiment using the Trojan horse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitaleri, C.; Puglia, S. M. R.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Cherubini, S.; Cvetinović, A.; D'Agata, G.; Gulino, M.; Guardo, G. L.; Indelicato, I.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Spartá, R.; Tudisco, S.; Tumino, A.; Del Santo, M. Gimenez; Carlin, N.; Munhoz, M. G.; Souza, F. A.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Depalo, R.; Menegazzo, R.; Rigato, V.; Lombardo, I.; Dell'Aquila, D.

    2017-03-01

    For the first time the astrophysical factor of the 10B(p ,α0)7Be reaction has been measured over a wide energy range, from 5 keV to 1.5 MeV, via the Trojan horse method (THM) applied to the quasifree 2H(10B,α 7Be)n reaction. Therefore, the S (E ) factor has been recast into absolute units by scaling in the energy range 200 keV-1.2 MeV to a recent measurement using the activation method, leading to a normalization uncertainty of 4 % . An R -matrix fit of the THM data was performed, to parametrize the S factor, obtain spectroscopic information on the populated resonances, and compare with other recent experiments. Finally, a new determination of the screening potential Ue has been obtained, Ue=240 ±50 eV, with a much smaller error than our previous measurement.

  12. Pion production cross sections and associated parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, J. N.

    Negative pions have been used for radiotherapy at the meson factories LAMPF (USA), SIN (Switzerland), and TRIUMF (Canada) and have been planned for use at new meson facilities under construction (USSR) and at proposed dedicated medical facilities. Providing therapeutically useful dose rates of pions requires a knowledge of the pion production cross sections as a function of primary proton energy (500 to 1000 MeV), pion energy (less than or equal to100 MeV), production angle, and target material. The current status of the data base in this area is presented including theoretical guidelines for extrapolation purposes. The target material and geometry, as well as the proton and pion beam parameters, will affect the electron (and muon) contamination in the beam which may have an important effect on both the LET characteristics of the dose and the dose distribution. In addition to cross-section data, channel characteristics such as length of pion trajectory, solid-angle acceptance, and momentum analysis will affect dose rate, distribution, and quality. Such considerations are briefly addressed in terms of existing facilities and proposed systems.

  13. Experimental nuclear cross sections for spacecraft shield analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peelle, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to validate and to supplement the intranuclear cascade model as a method for estimating cross sections of importance to spacecraft shield design. The experimental situation is inconclusive particularly for neutron-producing reactions, but is relatively sound for reaction cross sections and for proton spectra at several hundred MeV at medium forward angles. Secondary photon contributions are imprecisely known.

  14. Cross sections at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    The predicted cross sections are given for new Z'/sup 0/ bosons, for the Drell-Yan continuum of ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/ pairs, for high p/sub T/ hadron jets, for high p/sub T/ single photons, and for the associated production of heavy quarks. These processes have been selected not to cover the most interesting physics, but to provide a representative selection of cross sections for which to compare various energies and luminosities.

  15. Proton-Helium Elastic Electromagnetic Cross-Section

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Burn; Ng, Kingyuen B.

    2015-11-01

    In the test facility of the C-ADS project, A 25-MeV proton beam is directed to hit a target consisting of 1-mm tungsten balls lubricated by 100-Pa helium gas. To estimate the power loss to the helium gas, an accurate collision cross section is computed.

  16. Actinide neutron-induced fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tovesson, Fredrik K; Laptev, Alexander B; Hill, Tony S

    2010-01-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications in a wide energy range from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate ionization chamber are used to measure fission cross sections ratios relative to the {sup 235}U standard while incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239-242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. Obtained data are presented in comparison with ex isting evaluations and previous data.

  17. Accurate Cross Sections for Microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Rez, Peter

    2002-01-01

    To calculate the intensity of x-ray emission in electron beam microanalysis requires a knowledge of the energy distribution of the electrons in the solid, the energy variation of the ionization cross section of the relevant subshell, the fraction of ionizations events producing x rays of interest and the absorption coefficient of the x rays on the path to the detector. The theoretical predictions and experimental data available for ionization cross sections are limited mainly to K shells of a few elements. Results of systematic plane wave Born approximation calculations with exchange for K, L, and M shell ionization cross sections over the range of electron energies used in microanalysis are presented. Comparisons are made with experimental measurement for selected K shells and it is shown that the plane wave theory is not appropriate for overvoltages less than 2.5 V. PMID:27446747

  18. Cross section and analyzing power for quasifree (p,n) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Taddeucci, T.N.; Byrd, R.C.; Carey, T.A.; McClelland, J.B.; Rybarcyk, L.J.; Sailor, W.C. ); Ciskowski, D.E. ); Goodman, C.D.; Huang, W. ); Gulmez, E. ); Marchlenski, D.; Sugarbaker, E. ); Prout, D. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO

    1990-01-01

    Cross sections and analyzing powers have been measured for {sup 12}C(p,n) at 494 MeV and 795 MeV and for Pb(p,n) at 795 MeV. The data span an energy loss range of at least 200 MeV, which is sufficient to clearly reveal the large peak associated with quasifree neutron knockout. The kinematics, cross section, and analyzing power for this peak are compared to the corresponding observables for free nucleon-nucleon scattering and to the observables calculated with a relativistic Fermi-gas model. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Energy dependence of the 4He(π+,π-) total cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräter, J.; Bilger, R.; Clement, H.; Meier, R.; Wagner, G. J.; Friedman, E.; Schepkin, M.; Amaudruz, P. A.; Felawka, L.; Ottewell, D.; Smith, G. R.; Ambardar, A.; Hofman, G. J.; Kermani, M.; Tagliente, G.; Bonutti, F.; Camerini, P.; Grion, N.; Rui, R.; Hong, P.; Mathie, E. L.; Tacik, R.; Clark, J.; Sevior, M. E.; Patarakin, O.

    1998-09-01

    The total cross section of the 4He(π+,π-) reaction was measured for π+ kinetic energies ranging from 70 to 130 MeV using the CHAOS spectrometer at TRIUMF and a liquid 4He target. Around Tπ=90 MeV, total cross sections exceed conventional model predictions by a factor of 3, whereas at Tπ=70 MeV and for Tπ>130 MeV the data are consistent with these calculations. An attempt is made to understand this behavior by assuming the production of the hypothetical d' dibaryon.

  20. Neutrino Cross Sections at Supernova Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholberg, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Neutrinos with energies between a few and a few tens of MeV are relevant for a number of physics topics. Notably, this is the energy range corresponding to emission of neutrinos from supernovae. In addition, it is relevant for studies of solar, reactor and atmospheric neutrinos, as well as for physics using accelerator-produced neutrinos from pions or radioactive nuclei decaying at rest. Surprisingly, with the exception of interactions on electrons and protons, the interactions of neutrinos with matter in this energy range are quite poorly understood, both theoretically and experimentally. This talk will describe neutrino physics and astrophysics in the supernova-neutrino energy range, the state of knowledge of cross sections on relevant nuclei, and initiatives for experimental measurements.

  1. Neutrino cross-sections: Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez, F.

    2015-07-15

    Neutrino-nucleus cross-sections are as of today the main source of systematic errors for oscillation experiments together with neutrino flux uncertainties. Despite recent experimental and theoretical developments, future experiments require even higher precisions in their search of CP violation. We will review the experimental status and explore possible future developments required by next generation of experiments.

  2. Photoneutron cross sections for Au

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, O.; Utsunomiya, H.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Kondo, T.; Kamata, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Goko, S.; Nair, C.; Lui, Y.-W.

    2011-10-28

    Photoneutron cross sections were measured for Au in the entire energy range of the ({gamma},n) channel based on a direct neutron-counting technique with quasimonochromatic {gamma} rays produced in inverse Compton-scattering of laser photons with relativistic electrons. We present results of the measurement in comparison with the past data.

  3. Fission Cross Section Measurements of Actinides at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    F. Tovesson; A. B. Laptev; T. S. Hill

    2011-08-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications. By combining measurement at two LANSCE facilities, Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research center (WNR), differential cross sections can be measured from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. Incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method, and parallel-plate ionization chambers are used to measure fission cross sections relative to the 235U standard. Recent measurements include the 233, 238U, 239-242Pu, and 243Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. In this paper preliminary results for fission cross sections of 243Am and 233U will be presented.

  4. DPA Cross Section Library FermiDPA 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Pronskikh, V. S.; Mokhov, N. V.

    2013-06-05

    DPA cross section library FermiDPA 1.0 based on the industry standard NRT model calculations is described. The library contains DPA cross sections for neutrons in the energy range 10$^{-5}$ eV 20 (150) MeV. Calculations used neutron-induced reaction cross sections from ENDFB-VII database of evaluated nuclear data. The NJOY99 nuclear data processing system's module HEATR was applied to calculate NRT model radiation damage cross sections. The FermiDPA 1.0 library is a database of 395 text files (for 395 known isotopes) with DPA cross sections. It is code-independent and can be implemented in any transport code.

  5. Fission cross section measurements of actinides at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tovesson, Fredrik; Laptev, Alexander B; Hill, Tony S

    2010-01-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications. By combining measurement at two LANSCE facilities, Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research center (WNR), differential cross sections can be measured from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. Incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method, and parallel-plate ionization chambers are used to measure fission cross sections relative to the {sup 235}U standard. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239,242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. In this paper preliminary results for cross section data of {sup 243}Am and {sup 233}U will be presented.

  6. [Fast neutron cross section measurements]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1992-10-26

    From its inception, the Nuclear Data Project at the University of Michigan has concentrated on two major objectives: (1) to carry out carefully controlled nuclear measurements of the highest possible reliability in support of the national nuclear data program, and (2) to provide an educational opportunity for students with interests in experimental nuclear science. The project has undergone a successful transition from a primary dependence on our photoneutron laboratory to one in which our current research is entirely based on a unique pulsed 14 MeV fast neutron facility. The new experimental facility is unique in its ability to provide nanosecond bursts of 14 MeV neutrons under conditions that are ``clean`` and as scatter-free as possible, and is the only one of its type currently in operation in the United States. It has been designed and put into operation primarily by graduate students, and has met or exceeded all of its important initial performance goals. We have reached the point of its routine operation, and most of the data are now in hand that will serve as the basis for the first two doctoral dissertations to be written by participating graduate students. Our initial results on double differential neutron cross sections will be presented at the May 1993 Fusion Reactor Technology Workshop. We are pleased to report that, after investing several years in equipment assembly and optimization, the project has now entered its ``data production`` phase.

  7. Experimental absolute cross section for photoionization of Xe^7+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippers, S.; Müller, A.; Esteves, D.; Habibi, M.; Aguilar, A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.

    2010-03-01

    Collision processes with highly charged xenon ions are of interest for UV-radiation generation in plasma discharges, for fusion research and for space craft propulsion. Here we report results for the photoionization of Xe^7+ ionsootnotetextS. Schippers et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. (in print) which were measured at the photon-ion end station of ALS beamline 10.0.1. As compared with the only previous experimental studyootnotetextJ. M. Bizau et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 435 (2000) of this reaction, the present cross sections were obtained at higher energy resolution (50--80 meV vs. 200--500 meV) and on an absolute cross section scale. In the experimental photon energy range of 95--145 eV the cross section is dominated by resonances associated with 4d->5f excitation and subsequent autoionization. The most prominent feature in the measured spectrum is the 4d^9,s,f, resonance at 121.14±0.02 eV which reaches a peak cross section of 1.2 Gb at 50 meV photon energy spread. The experimental resonance strength of 160 Mb eV (corresponding to an absorption oscillator strength of 1.46) is in fair agreement with the theoretical result^2.

  8. Microscopic description of production cross sections including deexcitation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekizawa, Kazuyuki

    2017-07-01

    Background: At the forefront of the nuclear science, production of new neutron-rich isotopes is continuously pursued at accelerator laboratories all over the world. To explore the currently unknown territories in the nuclear chart far away from the stability, reliable theoretical predictions are inevitable. Purpose: To provide a reliable prediction of production cross sections taking into account secondary deexcitation processes, both particle evaporation and fission, a new method called TDHF+GEMINI is proposed, which combines the microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory with a sophisticated statistical compound-nucleus deexcitation model, GEMINI++. Methods: Low-energy heavy ion reactions are described based on three-dimensional Skyrme-TDHF calculations. Using the particle-number projection method, production probabilities, total angular momenta, and excitation energies of primary reaction products are extracted from the TDHF wave function after collision. Production cross sections for secondary reaction products are evaluated employing GEMINI++. Results are compared with available experimental data and widely used grazing calculations. Results: The method is applied to describe cross sections for multinucleon transfer processes in 40Ca+124Sn (Ec .m .≃128.54 MeV ), 48Ca+124Sn (Ec .m .≃125.44 MeV ), 40Ca+208Pb (Ec .m .≃208.84 MeV ), 58Ni+208Pb (Ec .m .≃256.79 MeV ), 64Ni+238U (Ec .m .≃307.35 MeV ), and 136Xe+198Pt (Ec .m .≃644.98 MeV ) reactions at energies close to the Coulomb barrier. It is shown that the inclusion of secondary deexcitation processes, which are dominated by neutron evaporation in the present systems, substantially improves agreement with the experimental data. The magnitude of the evaporation effects is very similar to the one observed in grazing calculations. TDHF+GEMINI provides better description of the absolute value of the cross sections for channels involving transfer of more than one proton, compared to the grazing

  9. Cross Sections for Planetary Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, C.

    2001-05-01

    Energetic charged-particle bombardment, dissociative recombination and photodissociation processes produce energetic recoil atoms which heat the thermosphere and can lead to escape from a planet affecting the evolution of the atmosphere. In describing these processes by Monte Carlo methods, many of the critical cross sections are not available in the energy range of interest, a few eV to 1 keV. Here we present our recent results for elastic collision and collisional dissociation cross sections relevant to Titan, Triton, Europa and the terrestrial planets [1,2]. Elastic and diffusion cross sections were calculated using both quantum mechanical techniques and the semiclassical JWKB approximation for the collision of ground state oxygen atoms in the energy range 1-10eV [2]. This involved calculation of phase shifts for each of the 18 molecular energy states of O2 which separate to two ground state O atoms. For an O thermosphere the total elastic cross section is close to that typically assumed but the escape depths are shown to be larger than those typically used. Dissociation cross sections of N + N2 were calculated using a semiclassical method, in the energy range 0-30eV. This required treating the vibrational motion quantum mechanically while the rotational and the relative translational motion were treated classically. The evolution of the system was calculated by simultaneous propagation of the classical as well as the quantal degrees of freedom. The solution to the classical part was carried out by solving Hamilton equations of motion using an effective London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato potential energy surface, calculated by Laganá et al [3]. Propagation of the quantal wavefunction was carried out by solving the time dependent Schrödinger equation using the split operator technique with the help of the fast fourier transform which was used to calculate the second derivatives arising from the kinetic energy operator. This work was supported by NASA's Planetary

  10. The solar neutrino capture cross section for 81Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, W. C.

    1981-09-01

    The solar neutrino capture rate for the reaction 81Br + νe --> 81Kr + e- is calculated for the standard solar and weak interaction models. The results show that the capture cross section is dominated by the lowest Gamow-Teller transition to the metastable 1/2- (0.190 MeV) state in 81Kr. As the inverse electron capture rate for this transition has been measured recently, one can then argue that the cross section is well determined experimentally. Thus uncertainties in nuclear physics should not be an obstacle to the recently proposed 81Br radiochemical measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino flux. Present address.

  11. Neutron-induced fission-cross-section measurements and calculations of selected transplutonic isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Browne, J.C.

    1982-08-27

    The neutron-induced fission cross sections of /sup 242m/Am and /sup 245/Cm have been measured over an energy range of 10/sup -4/ eV to approx. 20 MeV in a series of experiments at three facilities during the past several years. The combined results of these measurements, in which only sub-milligram quantities of enriched isotopes were used, yield cross sections with uncertainties of approximately 5% below 10 MeV relative to the /sup 235/U standard cross section used to normalize the data. We summarize the resonance analysis of the /sup 242m/Am(n,f) cross section in the eV region. Hauser-Feshbach statistical calculations of the detailed fission cross sections of /sup 235/U and /sup 245/Cm have been carried out over the energy region from 0.1 to 5 MeV and these results are compared with our experimental data.

  12. Neutron Fission of 235,237,239U and 241,243Pu: Cross Sections, Integral Cross Sections and Cross Sections on Excited States

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Britt, H C

    2003-07-10

    In a recent paper submitted to Phys. Rev. C they have presented estimates for (n,f) cross sections on a series of Thorium, Uranium and Plutonium isotopes over the range E{sub n} = 0.1-2.5 MeV. The (n,f) cross sections for many of these isotopes are difficult or impossible to measure in the laboratory. The cross sections were obtained from previous (t,pf) reaction data invoking a model which takes into account the differences between (t,pf) and (n,f) reaction processes, and which includes improved estimates for the neutron compound formation process. The purpose of this note is: (1) to compare the estimated cross sections to current data files in both ENDF and ENDL databases; (2) to estimate ratios of cross sections relatively to {sup 235}U integrated over the ''tamped flattop'' critical assembly spectrum that was used in the earlier {sup 237}U report; and (3) to show the effect on the integral cross sections when the neutron capturing state is an excited rotational state or an isomer. The isomer and excited state results are shown for {sup 235}U and {sup 237}U.

  13. Theoretical cross sections of tantalum on neutron induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddik, Tarik

    2016-11-01

    Neutron-induced cross-sections for the stable isotope 181Ta, in the energy region up to 20 MeV have been calculated. Statistical model calculations, based on the Hauser-Feshbach formalism, have been carried out using the TALYS-1.0 and were compared with available experimental data in the literature and with ENDF/B-VII, T = 300 K; JENDL-3.3, T = 300 K and JEFF-3.1, T = 300 K evaluated libraries.

  14. Nuclear Astrophysics and Neutron Cross Section Measurements Using the ORELA

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, R. R.

    2000-08-25

    This is the final report for a research program which has been continuously supported by the AEC, ERDA, or USDOE since 1973. The neutron total and capture cross sections for n + {sup 88}Sr have been measured over the neutron energy range 100 eV to 1 MeV. The report briefly summaries our results and the importance of this work for nucleosynthesis and the optical model.

  15. Measurements of the cross sections of the 186W(n ,γ )187W , 182W(n ,p )182Ta , 154Gd(n ,2 n )153Gd , and 160Gd(n ,2 n )159Gd reactions at neutron energies of 5 to 17 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makwana, Rajnikant; Mukherjee, S.; Mishra, P.; Naik, H.; Singh, N. L.; Mehta, M.; Katovsky, K.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Vansola, V.; Santhi Sheela, Y.; Karkera, M.; Acharya, R.; Khirwadkar, S.

    2017-08-01

    The cross sections of the 186W(n ,γ )187W , 183W(n ,p )183Ta and 154Gd(n ,2 n )153Gd , 160Gd(n ,2 n )159Gd reactions were measured at the neutron energies 5.08 ±0.165 , 8.96 ±0.77 , 12.47 ±0.825 , and 16.63 ±0.95 MeV . Standard neutron activation analysis technique and off-line γ ray spectrometry were used for the measurement and analysis of the data. Measurements were done in the energy range where few or no measured data are available. The results from the present work are compared with the literature data based on the EXFOR compilation. The experimental results are supported by theoretical predictions using nuclear modular codes TALYS 1.8 and EMPIRE 3.2.2. The predictability of different one-dimensional models available in TALYS 1.8 and Levden models in EMPIRE 3.2.2 were tested. A detailed comparison of experimental results with theoretical model calculations is made.

  16. Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 107 Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database (Web, free access)   This is a database primarily of total ionization cross sections of molecules by electron impact. The database also includes cross sections for a small number of atoms and energy distributions of ejected electrons for H, He, and H2. The cross sections were calculated using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model, which combines the Mott cross section with the high-incident energy behavior of the Bethe cross section. Selected experimental data are included.

  17. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of sup 58 Ni and nuclear models

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F. ); Chiba, S. . Tokai Research Establishment)

    1991-07-01

    The neutron total cross sections of {sup 58}Ni were measured from {approx} 1 to > 10 MeV using white-source techniques. Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from {approx} 4.5 to 10 MeV at {approx} 0.5 MeV intervals with {ge} 75 differential values per distribution. Differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured, corresponding to fourteen levels with excitations up to 4.8 MeV. The measured results, combined with relevant values available in the literature, were interpreted in terms of optical-statistical and coupled-channels model using both vibrational and rotational coupling schemes. The physical implications of the experimental results nd their interpretation are discussed in the contexts of optical-statistical, dispersive-optical, and coupled-channels models. 61 refs.

  18. Integral cross sections for π-p interaction in the 3,3 resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Paul, M.; Schechter, M.; Altman, A.; Jennings, B. K.; Wagner, G. J.; Fazel, N.; Johnson, R. R.; Suen, N.; Fraenkel, Z.

    1993-03-01

    Total cross sections for the π-p single charge exchange and 20° “partial-total” cross sections have been measured between 126 and 202 MeV pion energy. The former are about 4% below similar results of Bugg et al. and (5-10)% below predictions made with currently accepted phase shifts. The latter agree quite well with calculations.

  19. Cross Sections: No. 1 Hold section at Fr 24 Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cross Sections: No. 1 Hold section at Fr 24 Looking Fwd, No 1 Hold Section at Fr 28 Looking Aft, No 2 Hold Section at Fr 48 Looking Aft, No 3 Hold Section at Fr 70 Looking Aft, No 4 Hold Section at Fr 90 Looking Aft - General John Pope, Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  20. Photoproduction total cross section and shower development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, F.; García Canal, C. A.; Grau, A.; Pancheri, G.; Sciutto, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The total photoproduction cross section at ultrahigh energies is obtained using a model based on QCD minijets and soft-gluon resummation and the ansatz that infrared gluons limit the rise of total cross sections. This cross section is introduced into the Monte Carlo system AIRES to simulate extended air showers initiated by cosmic ray photons. The impact of the new photoproduction cross section on common shower observables, especially those related to muon production, is compared with previous results.

  1. Capture cross sections for the near symmetric {sup 124}Sn+{sup 96}Zr reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vinodkumar, A. M.; Loveland, W.; Sprunger, P. H.; Peterson, D.; Liang, J. F.; Shapira, D.; Varner, R. L.; Gross, C. J.; Kolata, J. J.

    2006-12-15

    Capture-fission cross sections were measured for the near symmetric reaction between the massive nuclei {sup 124}Sn and {sup 96}Zr for center of mass energies from 195 to 265 MeV. Coincident fission fragments were detected and separated from elastic and deep inelastic scattering products by angle/energy/mass conditions. The measured capture cross sections agree quite well with calculations using the dinuclear system (DNS) model. The DNS model also predicts the fusion cross section for this reaction with a fusion barrier height of 208.0 MeV. The deduced extra push energy, corresponding to this barrier height, differs from that deduced from evaporation residue measurements.

  2. The 237U(n,f) Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Britt, H C; Wilhelmy, J B

    2003-03-03

    The purpose of this note is to combine existing information on the {sup 237}U(n,f) cross section to determine if some consistency can be obtained for the neutron induced fission excitation of {sup 237}U. The neutron induced fission cross section of the 6.8 day {sup 237}U was measured directly by McNally et al. in 1968 using the Pommard nuclear device test. At the same time critical assembly measurements were done at Los Alamos using the Flattop assembly. A previous measurement was also made at LASL in 1954 with two different neutron sources, each peaked near 200 keV. The results were 0.66 {+-} 0.10 b and 0.70 {+-} 0.07 b for the (n,f) cross section. More recently Younes and Britt have reanalyzed direct reaction charged particle data of Cramer and Britt that had determined the fission probability of the {sup 238}U compound nucleus as a function of nuclear excitation energy. They have combined fission probabilities with calculated neutron absorption cross sections, including corrections for the differences in angular momentum between the direct and neutron induced reactions. From this analysis they have extracted equivalent {sup 237}U(n,f) cross sections. The technique for extracting surrogate (n,f) cross sections from (t,pf) data has been demonstrated in a recent publication for the test case {sup 235}U(n,f). In addition to this experimental information, Lynn and Hayes have recently done a new theoretical study of the fission cross sections for a series of isotopes in this region. A summary plot of the data is shown in Fig. 1. Below 0.5 MeV the McNally, Cowan, and Younes-Britt results are in reasonable agreement. The average cross section in the Younes-Britt results, for En = 0.1 to 0.4 MeV, is 0.80 times the McNally values which is well within the errors of the McNally experiment. Above 0.5 MeV the McNally results diverge toward higher values. It should be noted that this divergence begins approximately at the {sup 237}Np threshold and that {sup 237}Np is the

  3. Neutron scattering cross section measurements for Fe56

    DOE PAGES

    Ramirez, A. P. D.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Hicks, S. F.; ...

    2017-06-09

    Elastic and inelastic differential cross sections for neutron scattering from 56Fe have been measured for several incident energies from 1.30 to 7.96 MeV at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory. Scattered neutrons were detected using a C6D6 liquid scintillation detector using pulse-shape discrimination and time-of-flight techniques. The deduced cross sections have been compared with previously reported data, predictions from evaluation databases ENDF, JENDL, and JEFF, and theoretical calculations performed using different optical model potentials using the TALYS and EMPIRE nuclear reaction codes. The coupled-channel calculations based on the vibrational and soft-rotor models are found to describe the experimental (n,n0) andmore » (n,n1) cross sections well.« less

  4. New Resonance Parameter Evaluation of Cl Neutron Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, R.O.; Guber, K.H.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.

    2005-05-24

    Better measurements and evaluations are needed for many elements where the existing evaluations or the underlying nuclear cross-section data are not sufficiently accurate for reliable calculation of criticality safety margins. Deficiencies in the existing ENDF/B-VI data evaluation for Cl led to our resonance parameter evaluation of Cl neutron cross sections in the resolved resonance region with the multilevel Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. Our evaluation takes advantage of recent high-resolution capture and transmission measurements at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) as well as older total cross-section measurements at Karlsruhe (KFK) to extend the resolved resonance energy range to 1.2 MeV with much more accurate representation of the data than previous evaluations.

  5. Photoabsorption cross section of acetylene in the EUV region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Judge, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    The measurement of the absolute photoabsorption cross sections of C2H2 in the 175-740 A region by means of a double ionization chamber is reported. The continuum background source is the synchrotron radiation emitted by the Wisconsin 240 MeV electron storage ring. It is found that the cross sections range from 2 to a maximum of 36 Mb. Two new Rydberg series are identified and the cross section data are applied in the analysis of various sum rules. From the rules, it is shown that the data of C2H2 in the 580-1088 A range may be too low, while the measured ionization transition moment may be too high.

  6. Neutron scattering cross section measurements for 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, A. P. D.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Hicks, S. F.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Harrison, T. D.; Howard, T. J.; Jackson, D. T.; Lenzen, P. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Pecha, R. L.; Rice, B. G.; Thompson, B. K.; Yates, S. W.

    2017-06-01

    Elastic and inelastic differential cross sections for neutron scattering from 56Fe have been measured for several incident energies from 1.30 to 7.96 MeV at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory. Scattered neutrons were detected using a C6D6 liquid scintillation detector using pulse-shape discrimination and time-of-flight techniques. The deduced cross sections have been compared with previously reported data, predictions from evaluation databases ENDF, JENDL, and JEFF, and theoretical calculations performed using different optical model potentials using the talys and empire nuclear reaction codes. The coupled-channel calculations based on the vibrational and soft-rotor models are found to describe the experimental (n ,n0 ) and (n ,n1 ) cross sections well.

  7. Anomaly in the KS0Σ+ photoproduction cross section off the proton at the K* threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CBELSA/TAPS Collaboration; Ewald, R.; Bantes, B.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Brinkmann, K.-T.; Crede, V.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fornet-Ponse, K.; Frommberger, F.; Funke, Ch.; Gridnev, A. B.; Gutz, E.; Hillert, W.; Hannappel, J.; Hoffmeister, P.; Jaegle, I.; Jahn, O.; Jude, T.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kammer, S.; Kleber, V.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Krusche, B.; Lang, M.; Löhner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Menze, D.; Mertens, T.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Novinski, D.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L.; van Pee, H.; Roy, A.; Schadmand, S.; Schmidt, C.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S.; Sokhoyan, V.; Süle, A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch.

    2012-07-01

    The γ+p→K0+Σ+ photoproduction reaction is investigated in the energy region from threshold to Eγ=2250 MeV. The differential cross section exhibits increasing forward-peaking with energy, but only up to the K* threshold. Beyond, it suddenly returns to a flat distribution with the forward cross section dropping by a factor of four. In the total cross section a pronounced structure is observed between the K*Λ and K*Σ thresholds.

  8. SNL RML recommended dosimetry cross section compendium

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F.; VanDenburg, J.

    1993-11-01

    A compendium of dosimetry cross sections is presented for use in the characterization of fission reactor spectrum and fluence. The contents of this cross section library are based upon the ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90 cross section libraries and are recommended as a replacement for the DOSCROS84 multigroup library that is widely used by the dosimetry community. Documentation is provided on the rationale for the choice of the cross sections selected for inclusion in this library and on the uncertainty and variation in cross sections presented by state-of-the-art evaluations.

  9. Status of the Neutron Cross-Section Standards Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Carlson, Allan D.; Vonach, Herbert

    2005-05-01

    A new evaluation of the neutron cross-section standards is now underway. This evaluation has been supported by the Working Party on International Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC), the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), and an International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Program (CRP). The CRP has had the dominant role in producing these evaluations. An important goal is to produce the standards needed for the upcoming new ENDF/B-VII library. Since most neutron cross-section measurements are made relative to neutron cross-section standards, the standards evaluation is of crucial importance. The standard reactions to be evaluated are: H(n,n), 3He(n,p), 6Li(n,t), 10B(n,α), 10B(n,α1γ), C(n,n), Au(n,γ), 235U(n,f), and 238U(n,f). These standards should receive international acceptance to ensure that all evaluation projects use the same set of standards. The last complete evaluation of the standards dates back almost 20 years. In the meantime quite a number of new and improved measurements have occurred for the cross-section standards. International efforts are presently underway to update the experimental database and to improve the evaluation process. Due to the need for high-energy standards, the energy range is being extended to 200 MeV for some of the cross-section standards.

  10. Studies of 54,56Fe Neutron Scattering Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Vanhoy, J. R.; French, A. J.; Henderson, S. L.; Howard, T. J.; Pecha, R. L.; Santonil, Z. C.; Crider, B. P.; Liu, S.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Ross, T. J.; Yates, S. W.

    2015-05-01

    Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering differential cross sections and γ-ray production cross sections have been measured on 54,56Fe at several incident energies in the fast neutron region between 1.5 and 4.7 MeV. All measurements were completed at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory (UKAL) using a 7-MV Model CN Van de Graaff accelerator, along with the neutron production and neutron and γ-ray detection systems located there. The facilities at UKAL allow the investigation of both elastic and inelastic scattering with nearly mono-energetic incident neutrons. Time-of-flight techniques were used to detect the scattered neutrons for the differential cross section measurements. The measured cross sections are important for fission reactor applications and also for testing global model calculations such as those found at ENDF, since describing both the elastic and inelastic scattering is important for determining the direct and compound components of the scattering mechanism. The γ-ray production cross sections are used to determine cross sections to unresolved levels in the neutron scattering experiments. Results from our measurements and comparisons to model calculations are presented.

  11. Cross Sections: No 6 Hold Section at Fr 178 Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cross Sections: No 6 Hold Section at Fr 178 Looking Fwd, No 7 Hold Section at No 154 Looking Fwd, No 7 Hold Section at Fr 195 Looking Fwd Showing Trans 194, No 7 Hold Section at Fr 198 Looking Fwd - General John Pope, Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  12. On the search for a (n,f) cross-section reference at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, I.; Ventura, A.; Lo Meo, S.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Paradela, C.

    2017-09-01

    The (n,f) cross-sections proposed as references by the IAEA for 235U, 238U and 209Bi are compared with a new analysis that combines the measurements performed at CERN-n_TOF of their cross-section ratios with new calculations done using Monte Carlo codes based on phenomenological models INCL+ +, GEMINI+ +, and ABLA07. The calculations are cross-checked with those for the (p,f) reactions, where experimental values are available. We have evaluated in this way the (n,f) cross sections for 238U, 235U and 209Bi, in the intermediate energy region going from 190 MeV to 2 GeV. Our results definitively discard the JENDL/HE-2007 evaluations above 300 MeV, falling inside the confidence corridor proposed by IAEA but for the points around 300-400 MeV where a discrepancy is to be noticed.

  13. Level density parameters from excitation cross sections of isomeric states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakun, E. A.; Batij, V. G.

    1992-03-01

    Cross section ratios were measured for the production of the isomeric pairs99m,gRh,101m,gRh,102m,gRh,104m,gRh and108m,gIn in the (p,n)-reaction,107m,gIn and109m,gIn in the ( p, γ)-reaction over the energy range up to 9 MeV, and116m,gSb and118m,gSb in the (α, n)-reaction up to 24 MeV. The experimental results for these nuclei as well as for other isometric pairs excited in the ( p, n)-reaction were analysed in the frame of the statistical model for extracting the level density parameter values in the vicinity of closed nucleon shells. The level density parameter behaviour is discussed in the range of nuclear mass numbers under study.

  14. Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, George V.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

  15. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-03-01

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with the acetylene (HCCH) molecule. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2016.

  16. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Itikawa, Yukikazu; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  17. Annular-Cross-Section CFE Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed continuous-flow-electrophoresis (CFE) chamber of annular cross section offers advantages over conventional CFE chamber, and wedge-cross-section chamber described in "Increasing Sensitivity in Continuous-Flow Electrophoresis" (MFS-26176). In comparison with wedge-shaped chamber, chamber of annular cross section virtually eliminates such wall effects as electro-osmosis and transverse gradients of velocity. Sensitivity enhanced by incorporating gradient maker and radial (collateral) flow.

  18. Annular-Cross-Section CFE Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed continuous-flow-electrophoresis (CFE) chamber of annular cross section offers advantages over conventional CFE chamber, and wedge-cross-section chamber described in "Increasing Sensitivity in Continuous-Flow Electrophoresis" (MFS-26176). In comparison with wedge-shaped chamber, chamber of annular cross section virtually eliminates such wall effects as electro-osmosis and transverse gradients of velocity. Sensitivity enhanced by incorporating gradient maker and radial (collateral) flow.

  19. Theoretical antideuteron-nucleus absorptive cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, W. W.; Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Antideuteron-nucleus absorptive cross sections for intermediate to high energies are calculated using an ion-ion optical model. Good agreement with experiment (within 15 percent) is obtained in this same model for (bar p)-nucleus cross sections at laboratory energies up to 15 GeV. We describe a technique for estimating antinucleus-nucleus cross sections from NN data and suggest that further cosmic ray studies to search for antideuterons and other antinuclei be undertaken.

  20. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  1. Determining (n,γ) cross sections using surrogate reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scielzo, Nicholas; Escher, Jutta

    2009-10-01

    Direct measurements of neutron-reaction cross sections on unstable nuclei are extremely challenging due to the difficulties associated with radioactive targets and neutron beams. Indirect methods, such as the surrogate reaction method, are currently the only feasible way to determine many of the cross sections for radioactive nuclei that are of interest to nuclear astrophysics, nuclear energy, and other applications. We have used the surrogate reaction method to determine (n,γ) cross sections for ^153,155,157Gd nuclei at energies up to 3 MeV through inelastic proton scattering on stable targets. The STARS/LiBerACE silicon and germanium detector arrays were used to detect γ rays in coincidence with the scattered protons to determine γ-ray exit-channel probabilities. Techniques are being explored to extract reliable cross sections at energies for which the Weisskopf-Ewing limit of the Hauser-Feshbach theory is not applicable. This measurement will provide the first determination of the (n,γ) cross section for ^153Gd, an s-process branch-point nucleus with a half-life of 240 days. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Progress on FP13 Total Cross Section Measurements Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John Leonard; Couture, Aaron Joseph; Koehler, Paul E.; Mocko, Michal; Mosby, Shea Morgan; Wender, Stephen Arthur

    2016-09-26

    An accurate knowledge of the neutron capture cross section is important for many applications. Experimental measurements are important since theoretical calculations of capture have been notoriously difficult, with the ratio of measured to calculated cross sections often a factor of 2 or more in the 10 keV to 1 MeV region. However, a direct measurement of capture cannot be made on many interesting radioactive nuclides because of their short half-life or backgrounds caused by their nuclear decay. On the other hand, neutron transmission measurements of the total cross section are feasible for a wide range of radioactive nuclides since the detectors are far from the sample, and often are less sensitive to decay radiation. The parameters extracted from a total cross section measurement, which include the average resonance spacing, the neutron strength function, and the average total radiation width, (Γγ), provide tight constraints on the calculation of the capture cross section, and when applied produce much more accurate results. These measurements can be made using the intense epithermal neutron flux at the Lujan Center on relatively small quantities of target material. It was the purpose of this project to investigate and develop the capability to make these measurements. A great deal of progress was made towards establishing this capability during 2016, including setting up the flight path and obtaining preliminary results, but more work remains to be done.

  3. Neutron capture cross section of 102Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, C. L.; Krane, K. S.

    2005-05-01

    The cross sections for radiative neutron capture by 102Pd have been deduced from a measurement of the γ rays emitted by 17.0-d 103Pd. The thermal cross section has been determined to be σ=1.82±0.20 b, and the effective resonance integral is I=23±4 b. We also report thermal and resonance capture cross sections for 108Pd and note possible inconsistencies with the presently accepted values of the 110Pd cross sections.

  4. SU-E-I-43: Photoelectric Cross Section Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, A; Nakagawa, K; Kotoku, J; Horikawa, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The importance of the precision in photoelectric cross-section value increases for recent developed technology such as dual energy computed tomography, in which some reconstruction algorithms require the energy dependence of the photo-absorption in each material composition of human being. In this study, we revisited the photoelectric cross-section calculation by self-consistent relativistic Hartree-Fock (HF) atomic model and compared with that widely distributed as “XCOM database” in National Institute of Standards and Technology, which was evaluated with localdensity approximation for electron-exchange (Fock)z potential. Methods: The photoelectric cross section can be calculated with the electron wave functions in initial atomic state (bound electron) and final continuum state (photoelectron). These electron states were constructed based on the selfconsistent HF calculation, where the repulsive Coulomb potential from the electron charge distribution (Hartree term) and the electron exchange potential with full electromagnetic interaction (Fock term) were included for the electron-electron interaction. The photoelectric cross sections were evaluated for He (Z=2), Be (Z=4), C (Z=6), O (Z=8), and Ne (Z=10) in energy range of 10keV to 1MeV. The Result was compared with XCOM database. Results: The difference of the photoelectric cross section between the present calculation and XCOM database was 8% at a maximum (in 10keV for Be). The agreement tends to be better as the atomic number increases. The contribution from each atomic shell has a considerable discrepancy with XCOM database except for K-shell. However, because the photoelectric cross section arising from K-shell is dominant, the net photoelectric cross section was almost insensitive to the different handling in Fock potential. Conclusion: The photoelectric cross-section program has been developed based on the fully self-consistent relativistic HF atomic model. Due to small effect on the Fock

  5. Photoneutron cross sections for unstable neutron-rich oxygen isotopes.

    PubMed

    Leistenschneider, A; Aumann, T; Boretzky, K; Cortina, D; Cub, J; Datta Pramanik, U; Dostal, W; Elze, T W; Emling, H; Geissel, H; Grünschloss, A; Hellstr, M; Holzmann, R; Ilievski, S; Iwasa, N; Kaspar, M; Kleinböhl, A; Kratz, J V; Kulessa, R; Leifels, Y; Lubkiewicz, E; Münzenberg, G; Reiter, P; Rejmund, M; Scheidenberger, C; Schlegel, C; Simon, H; Stroth, J; Sümmerer, K; Wajda, E; Walús, W; Wan, S

    2001-06-11

    The dipole response of stable and unstable neutron-rich oxygen nuclei of masses A = 17 to A = 22 has been investigated experimentally utilizing electromagnetic excitation in heavy-ion collisions at beam energies about 600 MeV/nucleon. A kinematically complete measurement of the neutron decay channel in inelastic scattering of the secondary beam projectiles from a Pb target was performed. Differential electromagnetic excitation cross sections d sigma/dE were derived up to 30 MeV excitation energy. In contrast to stable nuclei, the deduced dipole strength distribution appears to be strongly fragmented and systematically exhibits a considerable fraction of low-lying strength.

  6. Fission cross section calculations of actinides with EMPIRE code

    SciTech Connect

    Sin, M.; Oblozinsky, P.; Herman,M.; Capote,R.

    2010-04-30

    The cross sections of the neutron induced reactions on {sup 233,234,236}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,242}Pu, {sup 241,243}Am, {sup 242,246}Cm carried out in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV with EMPIRE code are presented, emphasizing the fission channel. Beside a consistent, accurate set of evaluations, the paper contains arguments supporting the choice of the reaction models and input parameters. A special attention is paid to the fission parameters and their uncertainties.

  7. Studies of neutron cross-sections important for spallation experiments using the activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrzalová, J.; Chudoba, P.; Krása, A.; Majerle, M.; Suchopár, M.; Svoboda, O.; Wagner, V.

    2014-09-01

    A series of experiments devoted to studies of neutron cross-sections by activation method was carried out. The cross-sections of various threshold reactions were studied by means of different quasi-monoenergetic neutron sources with energies from 14 MeV up to 100 MeV. Threshold reactions in various materials are among other used to measure fast neutron fields produced during accelerator driven system studies. For this reason our measurements of neutron cross-sections are crucial. At present, neither experimental nor evaluated data above 30 MeV are available for neutron threshold reactions in Au, I and In published in this proceedings. We studied materials in the form of thin foils and compared our data with the calculations preformed using the deterministic code TALYS 1.4.

  8. Cross Section; Half Longitudinal Section Showing Middle Wall Reinforced with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cross Section; Half Longitudinal Section Showing Middle Wall Reinforced with Arch; Part Long Section Showing Inside of External Side Wall; East Entrance; Part Side South External; Part Reflected Plan of Soffite of Floor; Part Reflected Plan of Soffite of Roof - Blenheim Covered Bridge, Spanning Schoharie River, North Blenheim, Schoharie County, NY

  9. Neutrino flux predictions for cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hartz, Mark

    2015-05-15

    Experiments that measure neutrino interaction cross sections using accelerator neutrino sources require a prediction of the neutrino flux to extract the interaction cross section from the measured neutrino interaction rate. This article summarizes methods of estimating the neutrino flux using in-situ and ex-situ measurements. The application of these methods by current and recent experiments is discussed.

  10. Neutrino Cross Sections at Solar Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strigari, Louis

    2017-01-01

    I will review neutrino nucleus cross section measurements and uncertainties for energies applicable to solar neutrinos. I will discuss how these cross sections are important for interpreting solar neutrino experimental data, and highlight the most important neutrino-nucleus interactions that will be relevant for forthcoming dark matter direct detection experiments. NSF PHY-1522717.

  11. Absolute partial photoionization cross sections of ozone.

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Chemistry

    2008-04-01

    Despite the current concerns about ozone, absolute partial photoionization cross sections for this molecule in the vacuum ultraviolet (valence) region have been unavailable. By eclectic re-evaluation of old/new data and plausible assumptions, such cross sections have been assembled to fill this void.

  12. M1 and E1 transition cross sections in D(y->,n) reactions near reaction threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, C.; Akimune, H.; Utsunomiya, H.; Yamagata, T.; Kondo, T.; Kamata, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Harano, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Lui, Y.-W.

    2010-06-01

    M1 and E1 transition cross sections in the D(y->, n) reaction were separately determined by measuring the analyzing power for emitted neutrons with linearly-polarized gamma rays at four energies between 2.26 MeV and 3.70 MeV near reaction threshold at 2.224 MeV. We compared the experimental result with the JENDL evaluated data.

  13. Cross sections for He and Ne isotopes in natural Mg, Al, and Si, He isotopes in CaF2, Ar isotopes in natural Ca, and radionuclides in natural Al, Si, Ti, Cr, and stainless steel induced by 12- to 45-MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. R.; Heymann, D.; Yaniv, A.; Edgerley, D.; Rowe, M. W.

    1976-01-01

    Stacks of thin Mg, Al, Si, Ca, CaF2, Ti, and stainless steel foils were bombarded in twelve irradiations by a variable energy cyclotron. Cross sections are reported for He and Ne in natural Mg, Al, and Si, and for He in CaF2, and for Ar in natural Ca, as determined from mass spectrometer analysis of the inert gases. In addition, cross sections of Na-22 in natural Al and Si, of V-48 in natural Ti, and of Cr-51, Mn-52, and Co-57 in stainless steel are reported. From these were deduced Cr-51 and Mn-52 cross sections in natural Cr.

  14. Measurement of the 8Li( α, n) 11B reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Kawamura, T.; Nakai, K.; Ishiyama, H.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Miyatake, H.; Tanaka, M. H.; Yoshikawa, N.; Jeong, S. C.; Fuchi, Y.; Katayama, I.; Nomura, T.; Das, S. K.; Saha, P. K.; Fukuda, T.; Nishio, K.; Mitsuoka, S.; Ikezoe, H.; Matsuda, M.; Ichikawa, S.; Furukawa, T.; Izumi, H.; Shimoda, T.; Mizoi, Y.; Terasawa, M.

    2004-12-01

    An accurate exclusive measurement of the 8Li( α, n) 11B reaction cross sections has been carried out successfully by using a highly efficient detector system and high-purity low energy 8Li-beam. The excitation function obtained with high statistics in the energy region from 0.9 to 2.7 MeV in the center-of-mass system is reported. The present cross sections show that the averaged ratio of total cross section to the inverted neutron capture cross section is 4 ˜ 5. Some details of the experimental method are also described.

  15. Fast-neutron scattering cross sections of elemental silver

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1982-05-01

    Differential neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections of elemental silver are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 200 keV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160/sup 0/. Inelastically-scattered neutron groups are observed corresponding to the excitation of levels at; 328 +- 13, 419 +- 50, 748 +- 25, 908 +- 26, 1150 +- 38, 1286 +- 25, 1507 +- 20, 1623 +- 30, 1835 +- 20 and 1944 +- 26 keV. The experimental results are used to derive an optical-statistical model that provides a good description of the observed cross sections. The measured values are compared with corresponding quantities given in ENDF/B-V.

  16. Characterization of Single Event Latchup Cross-Section for ALPIDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szornel, Joanna; Michael, Elad; Torales-Acosta, Fernando; Greiner, Leo; Jacak, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Latchup cross-section was characterized for a prototype of ALPIDE (ALICE PIxel DEtector), a silicon pixel detector proposed for use in the ALICE inner tracking system. Before being implemented, the sensor needs to be tested to verify its effectiveness. When active it will be subject to bombardment from energetic ions which can cause single event latchups (SELs). These occur when parasitic effects result in short-circuits, causing potentially damaging increases in current. Ions with various LETs (5 - 40 MeV) were used to induce SELs whereupon event cross-section was measured. The likelihood of the sensor experiencing SEL increases with greater ion LET and fluence. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Nuclear Physics.

  17. Neutron Capture Cross Sections of 236U and 234U

    SciTech Connect

    Rundberg, R. S.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Bond, E. M.; Haight, R. C.; Hunt, L. F.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Schwantes, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Kronenberg, A.

    2006-03-13

    Accurate neutron capture cross sections of the actinide elements at neutron energies up to 1 MeV are needed to better interpret archived nuclear test data, for post-detonation nuclear attribution, and the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. The Detector for Advance Neutron Capture Experiments, DANCE, has unique capabilities that allow the differentiation of capture gamma rays from fission gamma rays and background gamma rays from scattered neutrons captured by barium isotopes in the barium fluoride scintillators. The DANCE array has a high granularity, 160 scintillators, high efficiency, and nearly 4-{pi} solid angle. Through the use of cuts in cluster multiplicity and calorimetric energy the capture gamma-rays are differentiated from other sources of gamma rays. The preliminary results for the capture cross sections of 236U are in agreement with the ENDF/B-VI evaluation. The preliminary results for 234U lower are than ENDF/B-VI evaluation and are closer to older evaluations.

  18. Neutron inelastic cross section measurements for natTi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olacel, Adina; Belloni, Francesca; Borcea, Catalin; Boromiza, Marian; Dessagne, Philippe; Henning, Gregoire; Kerveno, Maëlle; Negret, Alexandru; Nyman, Markus; Pirovano, Elisa; Plompen, Arjan

    2017-09-01

    A neutron inelastic scattering experiment was performed at the GELINA (Geel Electron LINear Accelerator) neutron source of the European Commission Joint Research Centre Geel (EC-JRC Geel) with the aim of determining the reaction cross sections for the stable isotopes of natural titanium. A 235U fission chamber was used to monitor neutrons with energies up to 20 MeV. The GAINS (Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering) spectrometer was employed to detect the γ rays resulting from the decay of the excited nuclei. We determined the γ-ray production cross sections of the first transitions in the 46,48,49,50Ti isotopes. The experimental values were compared with previous reported results and also with theoretical calculations performed with the TALYS 1.8 code using the default input parameters. Uncertainties of around 5% were obtained for the strongest observed transitions.

  19. Measurements of Radiative Capture Cross Sections at Big Bang Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Tanaka, Yutaro; Du, Hang; Ohnishi, Kousuke; Yagi, Shoichi; Sugihara, Takanobu; Hori, Taichi; Nakamura, Shoken; Yanagihara, Rikuto; Matsuta, Kensaku; Mihara, Mototsugu; Nishimura, Daiki; Iwakiri, Shuichi; Kambayashi, Shohei; Kunimatsu, Shota; Sakakibara, Hikaru; Yamaoka, Shintaro

    We measured d(p, γ )3He cross sections at ECM = 0.12, 0.19, 0.44, and 0.57 MeV. In this energy region, available experimental values are systematically smaller than the recent calculation, so that additional experiments are desired for understanding the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. The experiment was performed by bombarding proton beams to the D2 gas target with the 5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at Osaka University. The experimental d(p, γ )3He cross sections of the present study are systematically larger than previous data. On the other hand, recent theoretical results by Marcucci et al. are in good agreement with present experimental results.

  20. Ion induced fragmentation cross-sections of DNA constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudek, Benedikt; Arndt, Alexander; Bennett, Daniel; Wang, Mingjie; Rabus, Hans

    2015-10-01

    Proton collision with chemical analogs for the base, the sugar and the phosphor residue of the DNA, namely pyrimidine, tetrahydrofuran and trimethyl phosphate, respectively, has been investigated. The impact energies ranged from 300 keV up to 16 MeV. For the first time, relative fragmentation cross-sections for proton impact are reported for tetrahydrofuran and trimethyl phosphate; previously reported cross sections for pyrimidine are extended for energies beyond 2500 keV. Ionization of tetrahydrofuran leads to a ring break in about 80% of all events, trimethyl phosphate predominantly fragments by bond cleavage to one of the three methyl-groups and for pyrimidine the parent ion has the highest abundance. Such comparison supports earlier findings that the sugar is the weak spot for strand breaks.

  1. Absolute measurements of chlorine Cl+ cation single photoionization cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, E. M.; Juárez, A. M.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Aguilar, A.; Hernández, L.; Antillón, A.; Macaluso, D.; Morales-Mori, A.; González-Magaña, O.; Hanstorp, D.; Covington, A. M.; Davis, V.; Calabrese, D.; Hinojosa, G.

    2015-01-01

    The photoionization of Cl+ leading to Cl2+ was measured in the photon energy range of 19.5-28.0 eV. A spectrum with a photon energy resolution of 15 meV normalized to absolute cross-section measurements is presented. The measurements were carried out by merging a Cl+ ion beam with a photon beam of highly monochromatic synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The measured photoionization of Cl+ consists of several autoionization resonances surperimposed on the direct photoionization signal. Most of the prominent resonances are assigned to members of Rydberg series originating from the singlet ground state and from metastable triplet levels within the ground-state configuration of Cl+. The direct ionization cross section is no larger than 12 Mb.

  2. Improved activation cross sections for vanadium and titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, D.W.; Arthur, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    Vanadium alloys such as V-20Ti and V-Cr-Ti are attractive candidates for use as structural materials in fusion-reactor blankets. The virtual absence of long-lived activation products in these alloys suggest the possibility of reprocessing on an intermediate time scale. We have employed the modern Hauser-Feshbach nuclear-model code GNASH to calculate cross sections for neutron-activation reactions in /sup 50/V and /sup 51/V, to allow a more accurate assessment of induced radioactivity in vanadium alloys. In addition, cross sections are calculated for the reactions /sup 46/Ti(n,2n) and /sup 45/Ti(n,2n) in order to estimate the production of /sup 44/Ti, a 1.2-MeV gamma-ray source with a half-life of 47 years.

  3. Measured data used in the Watusi cross-section sets

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, M; Nethaway, D R

    1999-02-09

    In this document we list the experimental data that were used to make up the major cross- section sets that we use in the Watusi code to calculate the amount of detector activation in device tests. In order to use experimental data to make up a cross-section set, it is often necessary to extrapolate the cross sections down to either the threshold energy or to 0.01 keV, and to extrapolate up to 20 MeV. We then fit the data to a function so that we can get a smoothed set of interpolated values at up to 321 energy points. The combined data are then processed with the Hiroshima code into flux-weighted, group-averaged cross sections for use with the output from the different physics design codes. We typically use the standard 53 or 175 energy group structures. In a recent companion memo 1 we described the make up of all of the cross-section sets in detail, giving references to both the experimental data and the theoretical calculations that were used. The following sections have the experimental data, in the form of energy-cross section pairs, for the titanium, chromium, bromine, krypton, yttrium, zirconium, iodine, europium, lutetium, and bismuth sets. The other cross-section sets are not directly based on enough experimental data to warrant their listing here. Many of the reactions used in these sets are based on calculated cross sections. In making these calculations certain parameters are sometimes adjusted so that the calculated cross sections match experimental data. In some of these cases we have made a further normalization to give a closer agreement to selected experimental data, and such normalizations are noted in this document. In other cases no further normalization was made. In Table 1 we summarize the reactions for which we present the experimental data given in Tables 2-46. In Figs. 1-35 we show plots of the experimental data together with the actual excitation functions used in the cross-section sets. Some reactions in the current sets are based on

  4. Cross-sectional anatomy for computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    This self-study guide recognizes that evaluation and interpretation of CT-images demands a firm understanding of both cross-sectional anatomy and the principles of computed tomography. The objectives of this book are: to discuss the basic principles of CT, to stress the importance of cross-sectional anatomy to CT through study of selected cardinal transverse sections of head, neck, and trunk, to explain orientation and interpretation of CT-images with the aid of corresponding cross-sectional preparations.

  5. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.

  6. Comprehensive Amm242 neutron-induced reaction cross sections and resonance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Wimer, N.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2017-06-01

    The 242Am metastable isomer's neutron-induced destruction mechanisms were studied at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter. New Amm242 neutron-capture cross sections were determined from 100 meV to 10 keV, and the absolute scale was set with respect to a concurrent measurement of the well-known Amm242 neutron-induced-fission cross section. The new fission cross section spans an energy range from 100 meV to 1 MeV and was normalized to the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluated cross section to set the absolute scale. Our Amm242(n ,f ) cross section agrees well with the cross section of Browne et al. [Phys. Rev. C 29, 2188 (1984)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.29.2188 over this large energy interval. The new neutron-capture cross section measurement complements and agrees well with our recent results reported below 1 eV in Buckner et al. [Phys. Rev. C 95, 024610 (2017)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.95.024610. This new work comprises the most comprehensive study of Amm242(n ,γ ) above thermal energy. Neutron-induced resonance energies and parameters were deduced with the sammy R -matrix code for incident neutron energies up to 45 eV, and the new average Γγ is 13 % higher than the evaluated average γ width.

  7. Measurement of gamma-ray total absorption cross sections using a [sup 56]Co source

    SciTech Connect

    Frankle, Christen M.; Moss, Calvin E.

    2008-12-01

    We have used a 150 MBq [sup 56]Co source to perform gamma-ray total absorption cross section measurements with very high precision. The use of [sup 56]Co allowed us to simultaneously measure the total cross section at 15 energies ranging from 0.847 MeV to 3.451 MeV. Seven sample materials were measured: Be, C, Cu, Ta, W, Pb, and U. In general, the measurement precision is better than 0.5% and in all cases better than 1.3%.

  8. EGAF: Measurement and Analysis of Gamma-ray Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. B.; Abusaleem, K.; Basunia, M. S.; Bečvář, F.; Belgya, T.; Bernstein, L. A.; Choi, H. D.; Escher, J. E.; Genreith, C.; Hurst, A. M.; Krtička, M.; Renne, P. R.; Révay, Zs.; Rogers, A. M.; Rossbach, M.; Siem, S.; Sleaford, B.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; van Bibber, K.; Wiedeking, M.

    2014-05-01

    The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF) is the result of a 2000-2007 IAEA Coordinated Research Project to develop a database of thermal, prompt γ-ray cross sections, σγ, for all elemental and selected radioactive targets. No previous database of this kind had existed. EGAF was originally based on measurements using guided neutron beams from the Budapest Reactor on all elemental targets from Z=1-82, 90 and 92, except for He and Pm. The EGAF σγ data were published in the Database of Prompt Gamma Rays from Slow Neutron Capture for Elemental Analysis [1]. An international collaboration has formed to continue the EGAF measurements with isotopically enriched targets, derive total radiative thermal neutron cross sections, σ0, extend the σγ data from thermal to 20 MeV neutrons, compile a completed activation data file, improve sections of the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL) with more complete and up to date level and γ-ray data, evaluate statistical γ-ray data from reaction studies, and determine recommended neutron separations energies, Sn, for atomic mass evaluations. A new guided neutron beam facility has become available at the Garching (Munich) FRM II Reactor, and high energy neutron experimental facilities are being developed by a Berkeley area collaboration where 5-33 MeV neutron beams are available at the LBNL 88” cyclotron, 2.5 and 14 MeV beams at the University of California, Berkeley neutron generator laboratory, and high flux, 10 nṡcmṡ-2 s-1, neutron pulses available from the LLNL National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  9. Cross section measurements via residual nuclear decays: Analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Fengqun; Gao Lei; Li Kuohu; Song Yueli; Zhang Fang; Kong Xiangzhong; Luo Junhua

    2009-11-15

    We develop an approach to calculating the pure cross section of the ground state of artificial radioactive nuclides that subtracts the effect of an excited state on the ground state. We apply a formalism to obtaining pure cross sections by subtracting the effect of excited states in the reactions {sup 122}Te(n,2n){sup 121}Te{sup g} and {sup 128}Te(n,2n){sup 127}Te{sup g}, induced by neutrons of about 14 MeV. The cross sections are measured by an activation relative to the {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92}Nb{sup m} reaction and are compared with results that take into account the effect of the excited state. Measurements are carried out by {gamma} detection using a coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. As samples, spectroscopically pure Te powder is used. The fast neutrons are produced by the {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He reaction. The neutron energies in these measurements are determined using the method of cross-section ratios between the {sup 90}Zr(n,2n){sup 89}Zr{sup m+g} and {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92}Nb{sup m} reactions.

  10. Reaction cross sections of carbon isotopes incident on a proton

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Ibrahim, B.; Horiuchi, W.; Kohama, A.; Suzuki, Y.

    2008-03-15

    We systematically study total reaction cross sections of carbon isotopes with N=6-16 on a proton target for wide range of incident energies. An emphasis is put on the difference from the case of a carbon target. The calculations include the reaction cross sections of {sup 19,20,22}C at 40A MeV, the data of which have recently been measured at RIKEN. The Glauber theory is used to calculate the reaction cross sections. To describe the intrinsic structure of the carbon isotopes, we use a Slater determinant generated from a phenomenological mean-field potential, and construct the density distributions. To go beyond the simple mean-field model, we adopt two types of dynamical models: One is a core+n model for odd-neutron nuclei, and the other is a core+n+n model for {sup 16}C and {sup 22}C. We propose empirical formulas which are useful in predicting unknown cross sections.

  11. Measurement of proton inelastic scattering cross sections on fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, M.; Caciolli, A.; Calzolai, G.; Climent-Font, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.

    2016-10-01

    Differential cross-sections for proton inelastic scattering on fluorine, 19F(p,p')19F, from the first five excited levels of 19F at 110, 197, 1346, 1459 and 1554 keV were measured for beam energies from 3 to 7 MeV at a scattering angle of 150° using a LiF thin target (50 μg/cm2) evaporated on a self-supporting C thin film (30 μg/cm2). Absolute differential cross-sections were calculated with a method not dependent on the absolute values of collected beam charge and detector solid angle. The validity of the measured inelastic scattering cross sections was then tested by successfully reproducing EBS spectra collected from a thick Teflon (CF2) target. As a practical application of these measured inelastic scattering cross sections in elastic backscattering spectroscopy (EBS), the feasibility of quantitative light element (C, N and O) analysis in aerosol particulate matter samples collected on Teflon by EBS measurements and spectra simulation is demonstrated.

  12. International Evaluation of Neutron Cross Section Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, A. D.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Smith, D. L.; Larson, N. M.; Chen, Zhenpeng; Hale, G. M.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Gai, E. V.; Oh, Soo-Youl; Badikov, S. A.; Kawano, T.; Hofmann, H. M.; Vonach, H.; Tagesen, S.

    2009-12-01

    Neutron cross section standards are the basis for the determination of most neutron cross sections. They are used for both measurements and evaluations of neutron cross sections. Not many cross sections can be obtained absolutely - most cross sections are measured relative to the cross section standards and converted using evaluations of the standards. The previous complete evaluation of the neutron cross section standards was finished in 1987 and disseminated as the NEANDC/INDC and ENDF/B-VI standards. R-matrix model fits for the light elements and non-model least-squares fits for all the cross sections in the evaluation were the basis of the combined fits for all of the data. Some important reactions and constants are not standards, but they assist greatly in the determination of the standard cross sections and reduce their uncertainties - these data were also included in the combined fits. The largest experimental database used in the evaluation was prepared by Poenitz and included about 400 sets of experimental data with covariance matrices of uncertainties that account for all cross-energy, cross-reaction and cross-material correlations. For the evaluation GMA, a least-squares code developed by Poenitz, was used to fit all types of cross sections (absolute and shape), their ratios, spectrum-averaged cross sections and thermal constants in one full analysis. But, the uncertainties derived in this manner, and especially those obtained in the R-matrix model fits, have been judged to be too low and unrealistic. These uncertainties were substantially increased prior to their release in the recommended data files of 1987. Modified percentage uncertainties were reassigned by the United States Cross Section Evaluation Working Group's Standards Subcommittee for a wide range of energies, and no covariance (or correlation) matrices were supplied at that time. The need to re-evaluate the cross section standards is based on the appearance of a significant amount of precise

  13. Calculation of the Reaction Cross Section for Several Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Oberstedt, Stephan; Vladuca, Gheorghita; Tudora, Anabella; Filipescu, Dan

    2005-05-24

    New, self-consistent, neutron-induced reaction cross-section calculations for 235,238U, 237Np, and 231,232,233Pa have been performed. The statistical model code STATIS was extended to take into account the multi-modality of the fission process. The three most dominant fission modes, the two asymmetric standard I (S1) and standard II (S2) modes, and the symmetric superlong (SL) mode have been taken into account. De-convoluted fission cross sections for these modes in 235,238U(n,f) and 237Np(n,f) based on experimental branching ratios, were calculated for the first time up to the second chance fission threshold. For 235U(n,f) and 233Pa(n,f), the calculations being made up to 50 MeV and 20 MeV incident neutron energy, respectively, higher fission chances have been considered. This implied the need for additional calculations for the neighbouring isotopes.As a side product also mass yield distributions could be calculated at energies hitherto not accessible by experiment. Experimental validation of the predictions is being envisaged.

  14. Fast Neutron Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections in THORIUM-232.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarcia, Christopher Albert

    Fast neutron inelastic scattering cross sections for levels between 700-1550-keV excitation energy in the actinide nucleus, ('232)Th, have been measured using the (n,n') time-of-flight technique. Two series of measurements were undertaken using neutrons with a typical energy spread of 8-10 keV, generated by the ('7)Li(p,n)('7)Be reaction. These measurments for 125(DEGREES)-differential scattering cross sections were performed over the incident neutron energy regions of (i) 0.950-1.550 MeV, in 50-keV intervals with the time-of-flight spectrometer optimized to detect 0.200 -0.400-MeV scattered neutrons and (ii) 1.200-2.000 MeV, in 100-keV intervals with the time-of-flight spectrometer optimized to detect 0.400-0.800-MeV scattered neutrons. Over these scattered energy regions, an overall energy resolution of less than 15 keV was maintained. The relative neutron fluence was determined for each individual measurement, by positioning the main detector at 0(DEGREES) to view the primary neutron flux. Relative normalization was achieved by measuring the direct neutron flux from the lithium target with a fixed overhead monitor detector in both measurements. Main detector response was determined by comparison with a ('235)U fission chamber of known efficiency. Techniques for unfolding the complicated spectra obtained from these (n,n') studies were developed, employing user interactive computer codes to (i) generate simulated scattered neutron group response functions, (ii) subtract background effects from the measured spectra, (iii) approximate the background subtracted spectra in a weighted least-squares fashion by a superposition of response functions and (iv) make corrections for neutron absorption, finite scatterer size effects and multiple neutron scattering. Support codes consisting of graphics interaction packages, data file manipulation and transfer utility routines were created to assist in the spectral analysis procedure. Excitation function and angular distribution

  15. Nucleon-Nucleon Total Cross Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    2008-01-01

    The total proton-proton and neutron-proton cross sections currently used in the transport code HZETRN show significant disagreement with experiment in the GeV and EeV energy ranges. The GeV range is near the region of maximum cosmic ray intensity. It is therefore important to correct these cross sections, so that predictions of space radiation environments will be accurate. Parameterizations of nucleon-nucleon total cross sections are developed which are accurate over the entire energy range of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  16. Ultrahigh-energy photonuclear cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, R.; Sarcevic, I.; Burrows, A. ); Durand, L.; Pi, H. )

    1990-07-01

    We present results of calculations of the total inelastic photon-air cross sections at ultrahigh energies (up to 10{sup 8} GeV in the laboratory) of relevance to on-going cosmic-ray experiments. The calculations take into account the high-energy QCD structure of the photon and are performed for a variety of photon and proton structure functions. The total inelastic photon-air cross section is obtained from the photon-proton jet cross section via an eikonalization procedure using a QCD-based diffractive model. The results are discussed in the context of the apparent excess muon content of air showers associated with point sources.

  17. K-shell photoionization cross-sections.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daltabuit, E.; Cox, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Approximate values for the threshold energies, threshold cross sections, and energy dependence of the cross sections for K-shell photoionization are tabulated for H, He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, and S in all stages of ionization. The approximation of these data is based on the assumptions that the threshold energy is a simple function of the nuclear charge and the number of electrons present in the atom, and that the threshold values and energy dependence of the cross sections are determined only by the threshold energy.

  18. Cross Section Evaluations for Arsenic Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J; McNabb, D P; Ormand, W E

    2005-03-10

    The authors present an evaluation of cross sections describing reactions with neutrons incident on the arsenic isotopes with mass numbers 75 and 74. Particular attention is paid to (n,2n) reactions. The evaluation for {sup 75}As, the only stable As isotope, is guided largely by experimental data. Evaluation for {sup 74}As is made through calculations with the EMPIRE statistical-model reaction code. Cross sections describing the production and destruction of the 26.8 ns isomer in {sup 74}As are explicitly considered. Uncertainties and covariances in some evaluated cross sections are also estimated.

  19. Neutron Capture Cross Section of 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, S.; Arnold, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chyzh, A.; Couture, A.; Henderson, R.; Jandel, M.; Kwan, E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Ullmann, J. L.; Wu, C. Y.

    2014-05-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used to measure the 239Pu(n,γ) cross section from 10 eV to the keV region. Three experimental run conditions were used to characterize the prompt fission γ-ray spectrum across the entire energy regime, measure the cross section in the resolved resonance region, and obtain necessary count rate well into the keV region. The preliminary cross sections are in good agreement with current evaluations from 10 eV to 80 keV.

  20. [sup 3]He([gamma],[ital pd]) cross sections with tagged photons below the [Delta] resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, N.R.; Cairns, E.B.; Hackett, E.D.; Korkmaz, E.; Nakano, T.; Opper, A.K.; Quraan, M.A.; Rodning, N.L.; Rozon, F.M. ); Asai, J.; Feldman, G.; Hallin, E.; O'Rielly, G.V.; Pywell, R.E.; Skopik, D.M. )

    1994-05-01

    The reaction cross section for [sup 3]He([gamma],[ital pd]) has been measured using the Saskatchewan-Alberta Large Acceptance Detector (SALAD) with tagged photons in the energy range from 166 to 213 MeV. The energy and angle of the proton and the deuteron were measured with SALAD while the tagger determined the photon energy. Differential cross sections have been determined for 40[degree][lt][theta][sub [ital p

  1. A Time Projection Chamber for Precision {sup 239}Pu(n,f) Cross Section Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M.

    2008-04-17

    High precision measurements of the {sup 239}Pu(n,f) cross section have been identified as important for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and other programs. Currently, the uncertainty on this cross section is of the order 2-3% for neutron energies below 14 MeV and the goal is to reduce this to less than 1%. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) has been identified as a possible tool to make this high precision measurement.

  2. Energy dependence of fusion cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, J.M.; Ferreira, L.S.; Maglione, E.; Hansteen, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Observed enhancements of fusion cross sections at low energies are explained as caused by an underestimate of beam energy due to an overestimate of the stopping energy loss. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Bibliography of photoabsorption cross-section data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, R. D.; Kieffer, L. J.

    1970-01-01

    This bibliography contains only references which report a measured or calculated photoabsorption cross section (relative or normalized) in regions of continuous absorption. The bibliography is current as of January 1, 1970.

  4. The radar cross section of dielectric disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A solution is presented for the backscatter (nonstatic) radar cross section of dielectric disks of arbitrary shape, thickness and dielectric constant. The result is obtained by employing a Kirchhoff type approximation to obtain the fields inside the disk. The internal fields induce polarization and conduction currents from which the scattered fields and the radar cross section can be computed. The solution for the radar cross section obtained in this manner is shown to agree with known results in the special cases of normal incidence, thin disks and perfect conductivity. The solution can also be written as a product of the reflection coefficient of an identically oriented slab times the physical optics solution for the backscatter cross section of a perfectly conducting disk of the same shape. This result follows directly from the Kirchhoff type approximation without additional assumptions.

  5. Dijet cross sections in photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Breitweg, J.; et al.

    Dijet cross sections are presented using photoproduction data obtained with the ZEUS detector during 1994. These measurements represent an extension of previous results, as the higher statistics allow cross sections to be measured at higher jet transverse energy ( ETjet). Jets are identified in the hadronic final state using three different algorithms, and the cross sections compared to complete next-to-leading order QCD calculations. Agreement with these calculations is seen for the pseudorapidity dependence of the direct photon events with ETjet > 6 GeV and of the resolved photon events with ETjet > 11 GeV. Calculated cross sections for resolved photon processes with 6 GeV < ETjet < 11 GeV lie below the data.

  6. Capture cross sections on unstable nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Escher, J. E.; Scielzo, N.; Bedrossian, P.; Ilieva, R. S.; Humby, P.; Cooper, N.; Goddard, P. M.; Werner, V.; Tornow, W.; Rusev, G.; Kelley, J. H.; Pietralla, N.; Scheck, M.; Savran, D.; Löher, B.; Yates, S. W.; Crider, B. P.; Peters, E. E.; Tsoneva, N.; Goriely, S.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate neutron-capture cross sections on unstable nuclei near the line of beta stability are crucial for understanding the s-process nucleosynthesis. However, neutron-capture cross sections for short-lived radionuclides are difficult to measure due to the fact that the measurements require both highly radioactive samples and intense neutron sources. Essential ingredients for describing the γ decays following neutron capture are the γ-ray strength function and level densities. We will compare different indirect approaches for obtaining the most relevant observables that can constrain Hauser-Feshbach statistical-model calculations of capture cross sections. Specifically, we will consider photon scattering using monoenergetic and 100% linearly polarized photon beams. Challenges that exist on the path to obtaining neutron-capture cross sections for reactions on isotopes near and far from stability will be discussed.

  7. Benchmark cross sections for bottom quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.

    1988-01-07

    A summary is presented of theoretical expectations for the total cross sections for bottom quark production, for longitudinal and transverse momentum distributions, and for b, /bar b/ momentum correlations at Fermilab fixed target and collider energies.

  8. The radar cross section of dielectric disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    A solution is presented for the backscatter (monostatic) radar cross section of dielectric disks of arbitrary shape, thickness, and dielectric constant. The result is obtained by employing a Kirchhoff-type approximation to obtain the fields inside the disk. The internal fields induce polarization and conduction currents from which the scattered fields and the radar cross section can be computed. The solution for the radar cross section obtained in this manner will be shown to agree with known results in the special cases of normal incidence, thin disks, and perfect conductivity. It will also be shown that the solution can be written as a product of the reflection coefficient of an identically oriented slab times the physical optics solution for the backscatter cross section of a perfectly conducting disk of the same shape. This result follows directly from the Kirchhoff-type approximation without additional assumptions.

  9. Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. L.; Rohatgi, N. K.; Demore, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    Absorption cross-sections of hydrogen peroxide vapor and of neutral aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide were measured in the wavelength range from 195 to 350 nm at 296 K. The spectrophotometric procedure is described, and the reported cross-sections are compared with values obtained by other researchers. Photodissociation coefficients of atmospheric H2O2 were calculated for direct absorption of unscattered solar radiation, and the vertical distributions of these coefficients are shown for various solar zenith angles.

  10. High precision neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olacel, A.; Belloni, F.; Borcea, C.; Boromiza, M.; Dessagne, Ph.; Henning, G.; Kerveno, M.; Negret, A.; Nyman, M.; Pirovano, E.; Plompen, A.

    2017-06-01

    High precision neutron inelastic scattering cross section data are very important for the development of the new generation of nuclear reactors (Gen IV). Our experiments, performed using the GELINA neutron source and the GAINS spectrometer of the European Commission Joint Research Center, Geel, produce highly reliable and precise cross section data. We will present the details of the setup and the data analysis technique allowing production of such unique results, and we will show examples of two experimental results.

  11. Reaction cross sections of unstable nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Akira

    2006-11-02

    Experimental studies on reaction cross sections are reviewed. The recent developments of radioactive nuclear beams have enabled us to measure reaction cross-sections for unstable nuclei. Using Glauber-model analysis, effective nuclear matter density distributions of unstable nuclei can be studied. Recent measurements in RIBLL at IMP and RIPS at RIKEN are introduced. The effective matter density distributions for 14-18C are also mentioned.

  12. Shuttle orbiter radar cross-sectional analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; James, R.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical and model simulation studies on signal to noise levels and shuttle radar cross section are described. Pre-mission system calibrations, system configuration, and postmission system calibration of the tracking radars are described. Conversion of target range, azimuth, and elevation into radar centered east north vertical position coordinates are evaluated. The location of the impinging rf energy with respect to the target vehicles body axis triad is calculated. Cross section correlation between the two radars is presented.

  13. Krypton Production Cross Sections and Production Rates in Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilabert, E.; Lavielle, B.; Schiekel, Th.; Herpers, U.; Neumann, S.; Michel, R.

    1995-09-01

    The stacked-foil technique was used to measured proton induced excitation functions from Sr targets (SrF2). The irradiations were performed at the Laboratoire National Saturne in Saclay (F), the Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala (S) and the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen (CH) with primary energies from 45 to 400 MeV. After gamma-spectrometric measurement of short and medium-lived radionuclides and after sufficient cooling, stable and long lived Kr isotopes were measured at Centre Etude Nucleaire in Bordeaux (F). Deduced cross sections were corrected for the production of secondary protons and neutrons by a method developed by Lupke[1]. There are no literature data which can be compared with the cross sections from this work. Theoretical calculations of cross sections were performed using two approaches. The first one was using the hybrid model of preequilibrium reactions with the code AREL[2]. The second was using the Intra-Nuclear-Cascade/Evaporation model in the form of the High Energy Transport Code (HETC)[3]. This study shows that for energies above 200 MeV, the spallation model is better suited to explain the nuclear reactions whereas the preequilibrium model leads to underestimation of the experimental data. For energies above 200 MeV, HETC should be preferred to AREL calculations. In physical models describing galactic cosmic ray (GCR) interactions with matter [4], cross sections of both, proton and neutron-induced reactions, are important parameters. Using the measured cross sections for proton-induced reactions from this work and the experimental Kr depth profiles obtained from Sr targets in the LNS172 simulation experiment [5], we established a set of excitation functions for neutron-induced reactions, which now excellently describes the production rate depth profiles from the simulation experiment. Before measuring experimental cross sections for Kr from Sr, the theoretical depth profiles calculated with pure theoretical excitation functions showed

  14. Fast neutron cross section measurements. Final technical report, March 1, 1987--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1997-06-01

    The time-of-flight technique was used with the ring scattering geometry in a laboratory with low neutron scattering background to measure the angular distributions of the cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering of 14 MeV neutrons in natural chromium, iron, nickel, and niobium. Specifically for inelastic scattering included were: the 1.43 MeV and 4.56 MeV levels of {sup 52}Cr, the 0.85 MeV level, and (2.94-3.12) MeV and (4.46-4.51) MeV level groups of {sup 56}Fe, the 1.33 MeV level of {sup 60}Ni combined with the 1.45 MeV level of {sup 58}Ni, and the 4.48 MeV level of {sup 58}Ni. Pulses of neutrons with time width of 0.9-1.1 ns were produced via the {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He reaction in a 150 keV Cockcroft-Walton linear accelerator, with average intensities of 9x10{sup 8} n/s. The energy of the incident neutrons was between 14.75 MeV (at 16{degree}) and 13.48 MeV (at 160{degree}). High purity scattering ring samples were used. The scattering angles ranged from {approx}16{degree} to {approx}150{degree}, for iron, chromium, and nickel, and from {approx}16{degree} to {approx}160{degree} for niobium, with a typical step of {approx}10{degree}. High purity ring samples were used.

  15. Microscopic optical model calculations of 4He, 12C-nucleus absorption cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubey, R. R.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Calculations of absorption cross sections using a microscopic first-order optical potential for heavy-ion scattering are compared with experiments. In-medium nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross sections were used to calculate the two-body scattering amplitude. A medium-modified first-order optical potential was obtained for heavy-ion scattering using the in-medium two-body scattering amplitude. A partial wave expansion of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation in momentum space was used to calculate the absorption cross sections for various systems. The results are presented for the absorption cross sections for 4He-nucleus and 12C-nucleus scattering systems and are compared with the experimental values in the energy range 18-83A MeV. The use of the in-medium NN cross sections is found to result in significant reduction of the free space absorption cross sections in agreement with experiment.

  16. New yttrium evaluated cross sections and impact on 88-Y(n,2n)87-Y radchem

    SciTech Connect

    White, M; Kawano, T; Fotiadis, N; Devlin, M; Nelson, R; Garrett, P; Chadwick, M B; Becker, J A

    2004-03-04

    We evaluate new n+{sup 89}Y radchem cross sections using recent LANSCE/GEANIE measurements and GNASH nuclear model calculations, together with previous measurements at Livermore by Dietrich et al. A quantification of margins and uncertainties (QMU) analysis leads to evaluated cross sections for the (n,2n) population of the {sup 88}Y ground state and m1, m2 isomers, together with uncertainties. Our new results agree with historic radchem database cross sections within a few percent below 15 MeV (with larger differences above 15 MeV) and they therefore provide a validation of the historic Arthur work that is used in LANL simulation codes. Since the (n,2n) cross sections to the {sup 88}Y g.s. and m1, m2 isomers impact the average {sup 88}Y(n,2n){sup 87}Y cross section at leading-order, we determine the new 14.1 MeV average {sup 88}Y(n,2n){sup 87}Y cross section (crucially important for radchem). Our new 14 MeV average {sup 88}Y(n,2n){sup 87}Y cross section is 1107 mb ({+-} 4%) which agrees with the value obtained from the historic Arthur cross section data to 0.7%.

  17. 46 CFR 64.25 - Cross section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cross section. 64.25 Section 64.25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING...) Circular; or (b) Other than circular and stress analyzed experimentally by the method contained in UG-101...

  18. 46 CFR 64.25 - Cross section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cross section. 64.25 Section 64.25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING...) Circular; or (b) Other than circular and stress analyzed experimentally by the method contained in UG-101...

  19. Study of the 15N(p,n)15O reaction as a monoenergetic neutron source for the measurement of differential scattering cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenitz, E.; Nolte, R.; Schmidt, D.; Chen, G.

    2017-03-01

    The 15N(p,n) reaction is a promising candidate for the production of monoenergetic neutrons with energies of up to 5.7 MeV at the facilities where the T(p,n)3He reaction cannot be used. The characteristic properties of this reaction were studied focusing on its suitability as a source of monoenergetic neutrons for the measurement of differential scattering cross sections in the neutron energy range of 2 MeV to 5 MeV . For this purpose differential and integral cross sections were measured and the choice of optimum target conditions was investigated. The reaction has already been used successfully to measure of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for natPb in the energy range from 2 MeV to 4 MeV and for 209Bi and 181Ta at 4 MeV .

  20. Measurement of alpha-induced reaction cross sections on erbium isotopes for γ process studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Török, Zs.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gyürky, Gy.; Halász, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Rauscher, T.

    2014-05-01

    The cross sections of the 162Er(α,γ)166Yb and 162,164,166Er(α,n)165,167,169Yb reactions have been measured at MTA Atomki. The radiative alpha capture reaction cross section was measured between Ec.m. = 11.21 MeV and Ec.m. = 16.09 MeV just above the astrophysically relevant energy region (which lies between 7.8 and 11.48 MeV at T9 = 3 GK). The 162Er(α,n)165Yb, 164Er(α,n)167Yb and 166Er(α,n)169Yb reactions were studied between Ec.m. = 12.19 and 16.09 MeV, Ec.m. = 13.17 and 16.59 MeV and Ec.m. = 12.68 and 17.08 MeV, respectively. The aim of this work is to provide experimental data for modeling the γ process which is thought to be responsible for the production of the proton-rich isotopes heavier than iron.

  1. Measurement of alpha-induced reaction cross sections on erbium isotopes for γ process studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Török, Zs.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gyürky, Gy.; Halász, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Rauscher, T.

    2014-05-02

    The cross sections of the {sup 162}Er(α,γ){sup 166}Yb and {sup 162,164,166}Er(α,n){sup 165,167,169}Yb reactions have been measured at MTA Atomki. The radiative alpha capture reaction cross section was measured between E{sub c.m.} = 11.21 MeV and E{sub c.m.} = 16.09 MeV just above the astrophysically relevant energy region (which lies between 7.8 and 11.48 MeV at T{sub 9} = 3 GK). The {sup 162}Er(α,n){sup 165}Yb, {sup 164}Er(α,n){sup 167}Yb and {sup 166}Er(α,n){sup 169}Yb reactions were studied between E{sub c.m.} = 12.19 and 16.09 MeV, E{sub c.m.} = 13.17 and 16.59 MeV and E{sub c.m.} = 12.68 and 17.08 MeV, respectively. The aim of this work is to provide experimental data for modeling the γ process which is thought to be responsible for the production of the proton-rich isotopes heavier than iron.

  2. α scattering and α -induced reaction cross sections of 64Zn at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornelas, A.; Mohr, P.; Gyürky, Gy.; Elekes, Z.; Fülöp, Zs.; Halász, Z.; Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M. P.; Galaviz, D.; Güray, R. T.; Korkulu, Z.; Özkan, N.; Yalçın, C.

    2016-11-01

    Background: α -nucleus potentials play an essential role for the calculation of α -induced reaction cross sections at low energies in the statistical model. Uncertainties of these calculations are related to ambiguities in the adjustment of the potential parameters to experimental elastic scattering angular distributions and to the energy dependence of the effective α -nucleus potentials. Purpose: The present work studies the total reaction cross section σreac of α -induced reactions at low energies which can be determined from the elastic scattering angular distribution or from the sum over the cross sections of all open nonelastic channels. Method: Elastic and inelastic 64Zn(α ,α )64Zn angular distributions were measured at two energies around the Coulomb barrier, at 12.1 and 16.1 MeV. Reaction cross sections of the (α ,γ ) , (α ,n ) , and (α ,p ) reactions were measured at the same energies using the activation technique. The contributions of missing nonelastic channels were estimated from statistical model calculations. Results: The total reaction cross sections from elastic scattering and from the sum of the cross sections over all open nonelastic channels agree well within the uncertainties. This finding confirms the consistency of the experimental data. At the higher energy of 16.1 MeV, the predicted significant contribution of compound-inelastic scattering to the total reaction cross section is confirmed experimentally. As a by-product it is found that most recent global α -nucleus potentials are able to describe the reaction cross sections for 64Zn around the Coulomb barrier. Conclusions: Total reaction cross sections of α -induced reactions can be well determined from elastic scattering angular distributions. The present study proves experimentally that the total cross section from elastic scattering is identical to the sum of nonelastic reaction cross sections. Thus, the statistical model can reliably be used to distribute the total reaction

  3. abo-cross: Hydrogen broadening cross-section calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, P. S.; Anstee, S. D.; O'Mara, B. J.

    2015-07-01

    Line broadening cross sections for the broadening of spectral lines by collisions with neutral hydrogen atoms have been tabulated by Anstee & O'Mara (1995), Barklem & O'Mara (1997) and Barklem, O'Mara & Ross (1998) for s-p, p-s, p-d, d-p, d-f and f-d transitions. abo-cross, written in Fortran, interpolates in these tabulations to make these data more accessible to the end user. This code can be incorporated into existing spectrum synthesis programs or used it in a stand-alone mode to compute line broadening cross sections for specific transitions.

  4. Energy-dependent parameterization of heavy-ion absorption cross sections.

    PubMed

    Townsend, L W; Wilson, J W

    1986-01-01

    An energy-dependent parameterization of the total absorption (reaction) cross sections for heavy ion (Z > or = 2) collisions at energies above 25 MeV per nucleon is presented. The formula will be especially useful in heavy-ion transport applications.

  5. Fission Cross Sections and Fission-Fragment Mass Yields via the Surrogate Reaction Method

    SciTech Connect

    Jurado, B.; Kessedjian, G.; Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Bidaud, A.; Czajkowski, S.; Dassie, D.; Haas, B.; Mathieu, L.; Osmanov, B.; Ahmad, I.

    2008-04-17

    The surrogate reaction method is a powerful tool to infer neutron-induced data of short-lived nuclei. After a short overview of the experimental techniques employed in the present surrogate experiments, we will concentrate on a recent measurement to determine neutron-induced fission cross sections for the actinides {sup 242,243}Cm and {sup 241}Am. The latest direct neutron-induced measurement for the {sup 243}Cm fission cross section is questioned by our results, since there are differences of more than 60% in the 0.7 to 7 MeV neutron energy range. Our experimental set-up has also enabled us to measure for the first time the fission fragment ''pseudo-mass'' distributions of {sup 243,244,245}Cm and {sup 242}Am compound nuclei in the excitation energy range from a few MeV to about 25 MeV.

  6. Experimental measurements with Monte Carlo corrections and theoretical calculations of neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Xiao, Jun; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-10-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In has been measured by the activation technique at neutron energies of 2.95, 3.94, and 5.24 MeV with the neutron capture cross sections of 197Au as an internal standard. The effects of multiple scattering and flux attenuation were corrected using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. Based on the experimental values, the 115In neutron inelastic scattering cross sections data were theoretically calculated between the 1 and 15 MeV with the TALYS software code, the theoretical results of this study are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental results.

  7. Capture Cross Sections for the Near Symmetric 124Sn + 96Zr Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vinodkumar, A. M.; Loveland, Walter; Sprunger, Peter H; Peterson, Don; Liang, Junjien; Shapira, Dan; Varner Jr, Robert L; Gross, Carl J; Kolata, Jim J

    2006-12-01

    Capture-fission cross sections were measured for the near symmetric reaction between the massive nuclei {sup 124}Sn and {sup 96}Zr for center of mass energies from 195 to 265 MeV. Coincident fission fragments were detected and separated from elastic and deep inelastic scattering products by angle/energy/mass conditions. The measured capture cross sections agree quite well with calculations using the dinuclear system (DNS) model. The DNS model also predicts the fusion cross section for this reaction with a fusion barrier height of 208.0 MeV. The deduced extra push energy, corresponding to this barrier height, differs from that deduced from evaporation residue measurements.

  8. Capture Cross Sections for the Near Symmetric 124Sn+96Zr Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vinodkumar, A. M.; Loveland, Walter; Sprunger, Peter H; Peterson, Don; Liang, J Felix; Shapira, Dan; Varner Jr, Robert L; Gross, Carl J; Kolata, Jim J

    2006-12-01

    Capture-fission cross sections were measured for the near symmetric reaction between the massive nuclei 124Sn and 96Zr for center of mass energies from 195 to 265 MeV. Coincident fission fragments were detected and separated from elastic and deep inelastic scattering products by angle/energy/mass conditions. The measured capture cross sections agree quite well with calculations using the dinuclear system (DNS) model. The DNS model also predicts the fusion cross section for this reaction with a fusion barrier height of 208.0 MeV. The deduced extra push energy, corresponding to this barrier height, differs from that deduced from evaporation residue measurements.

  9. Reduction Methods for Total Reaction Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, P. R. S.; Mendes Junior, D. R.; Canto, L. F.; Lubian, J.; de Faria, P. N.

    2016-03-01

    The most frequently used methods to reduce fusion and total reaction excitation functions were investigated in a very recent paper Canto et al. (Phys Rev C 92:014626, 2015). These methods are widely used to eliminate the influence of masses and charges in comparisons of cross sections for weakly bound and tightly bound systems. This study reached two main conclusions. The first is that the fusion function method is the most successful procedure to reduce fusion cross sections. Applying this method to theoretical cross sections of single channel calculations, one obtains a system independent curve (the fusion function), that can be used as a benchmark to fusion data. The second conclusion was that none of the reduction methods available in the literature is able to provide a universal curve for total reaction cross sections. The reduced single channel cross sections keep a strong dependence of the atomic and mass numbers of the collision partners, except for systems in the same mass range. In the present work we pursue this problem further, applying the reduction methods to systems within a limited mass range. We show that, under these circumstances, the reduction of reaction data may be very useful.

  10. Undergraduate Measurements of Neutron Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Vanhoy, J. R.; French, A. J.; Santonil, Z. C.; Crider, B. P.; Peters, E. E.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Ross, T. J.; Yates, S. W.

    Undergraduate students at the University of Dallas have investigated basic properties of nuclei through γ-ray and neutron spectroscopy following neutron scattering. The former has been used primarily for nuclear structure investigations, while the latter has been used to measure neutron scattering cross sections important for fission reactor applications. A series of (n,n') and (n,n'γ) measurements have been made on 54Fe and 56Fe to determine neutron cross sections for scattering to excited levels in these nuclei. The former provides the cross sections directly and the latter are used to deduce inelastic neutron scattering cross sections by measuring the γ-ray production cross sections to states not easily resolved in neutron spectroscopy. All measurements have been completed at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory using a 7-MV Model CN Van de Graaff accelerator, along with the neutron production and neutron and γ-ray detection systems located there. Students participate in accelerator operation, experimental setup, data acquisition, and data analyses. An overview of the research program and student contributions is presented.

  11. Target correlation effects on neutron-nucleus total, absorption, and abrasion cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Second order optical model solutions to the elastic scattering amplitude were used to evaluate total, absorption, and abrasion cross sections for neutron nucleus scattering. Improved agreement with experimental data for total and absorption cross sections is found when compared with first order (coherent approximation) solutions, especially below several hundred MeV. At higher energies, the first and second order solutions are similar. There are also large differences in abrasion cross section calculations; these differences indicate a crucial role for cluster knockout in the abrasion step.

  12. Measured Total Cross Sections of Slow Neutrons Scattered by Gaseous and Liquid 2H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchison, F.; van den Brandt, B.; Bryś, T.; Daum, M.; Fierlinger, P.; Hautle, P.; Henneck, R.; Kirch, K.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Kühne, G.; Konter, J. A.; Pichlmaier, A.; Wokaun, A.; Bodek, K.; Kasprzak, M.; Kuźniak, M.; Geltenbort, P.; Giersch, M.; Zmeskal, J.; Hino, M.; Utsuro, M.

    2005-06-01

    The total scattering cross sections for slow neutrons with energies E in the range 300 neV to 3 meV for gaseous and liquid ortho-2H2 have been measured. The cross sections for 2H2 gas are found to be in excellent agreement with both the Hamermesh and Schwinger and the Young and Koppel models. For liquid 2H2, we confirm the existing experimental data in the cold neutron range and the discrepancy with the gas models. We find a clear 1/√(E') dependence at low energies for both states. A simple explanation for the liquid 2H2 cross section is offered.

  13. MCNP6 updated proton-induced fission cross section calculations at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, Leslie; Mashnik, Stepan; Mulvaney, John

    2017-09-01

    MCNP6 has been Validated and Verified against intermediate- and high-energy fission cross-section experimental data. Recent improvements contained in CEM03.03F and MCNP6-F to consider precompound emission of heavy clusters up to 28Mg has necessitated a re-calculation of fission cross sections. With our re-calculation, we find that CEM03.03F, which is used in MCNP6-F, predicts fission cross sections in good agreement with available experimental data for reactions induced by protons on both subactinide and actinide nuclei at incident energies from several tens of MeV to several GeV.

  14. The 237Np(n,f) cross section at the CERN n-TOF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadimos, D.; Vlastou, R.; Vlachoudis, V.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Konovalov, V.; Diakaki, M.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvár, F.; Benlliure, J.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; de Albornoz, A. Carrillo; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Cortina, D.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; David, S.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dorochenko, A.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, Ch.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gallino, R.; Cennini, P.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Kolokolov, D.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Sedysheva, M.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Voss, F.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2011-10-01

    The 237Np(n,f) cross sections have been measured at the n-TOF facility relative to the 235U and 238U fission cross sections. The n-TOF spallation neutron source at CERN is characterized by a high intensity flux, an excellent time resolution and an extensive neutron energy range (from eV to GeV). A fast ionization chamber was used as a fission fragment detector with efficiency better than 97%. Preliminary 237Np(n,f) cross sections have been deduced in the energy range from 20 keV to 10 MeV and are found in good agreement with data from literature.

  15. Absorption cross sections of stratospheric molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Two classes of molecular species must be considered in a calculation of photochemical rates in the stratosphere. The first class consists of molecular oxygen and ozone, while the second class contains the remainder of the minor constituents. If accurate values of the transmitted fluxes are required at large optical depths, the cross sections for molecular oxygen and ozone must be known to within a few per cent at least. On the other hand, the photochemical rates for the minor species are given simply by the relevant cross sections. A review of published cross sections is presented, giving attention to molecular oxygen, ozone, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrous oxide, nitric acid, ammonia, water vapor, hydrogen peroxide, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide.

  16. The cross section for double Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Employing elementary methods in nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics, the cross section for gamma sub 0 + e yields e + gamma + gamma is computed for arbitrary energy in the spectrum of the outgoing photons. The final result is given, differential in the energy of one of these photons, for the case where the incident photon is unpolarized and has energy E sub 0 much less than mc-squared, a polarization sum and angular integration being performed for the final-state photons. The cross section has a simple algebraic form resulting from contributions from the sum of squared direct and exchange amplitudes; interference terms from these amplitudes do not contribute to the angular-integrated cross section.

  17. Prospects for Precision Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.

    2016-01-28

    The need for precision cross section measurements is more urgent now than ever before, given the central role neutrino oscillation measurements play in the field of particle physics. The definition of precision is something worth considering, however. In order to build the best model for an oscillation experiment, cross section measurements should span a broad range of energies, neutrino interaction channels, and target nuclei. Precision might better be defined not in the final uncertainty associated with any one measurement but rather with the breadth of measurements that are available to constrain models. Current experience shows that models are better constrained by 10 measurements across different processes and energies with 10% uncertainties than by one measurement of one process on one nucleus with a 1% uncertainty. This article describes the current status of and future prospects for the field of precision cross section measurements considering the metric of how many processes, energies, and nuclei have been studied.

  18. Algorithmic analysis of quantum radar cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Venegas-Andraca, Salvador

    2015-05-01

    Sidelobe structures on classical radar cross section graphs are a consequence of discontinuities in the surface currents. In contrast, quantum radar theory states that sidelobe structures on quantum radar cross section graphs are due to quantum interference. Moreover, it is conjectured that quantum sidelobe structures may be used to detect targets oriented off the specular direction. Because of the high data bandwidth expected from quantum radar, it may be necessary to use sophisticated quantum signal analysis algorithms to determine the presence of stealth targets through the sidelobe structures. In this paper we introduce three potential quantum algorithmic techniques to compute classical and quantum radar cross sections. It is our purpose to develop a computer science-oriented tool for further physical analysis of quantum radar models as well as applications of quantum radar technology in various fields.

  19. Top differential cross section measurements (Tevatron)

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Andreas W.

    2012-01-01

    Differential cross sections in the top quark sector measured at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are presented. CDF used 2.7 fb{sup -1} of data and measured the differential cross section as a function of the invariant mass of the t{bar t} system. The measurement shows good agreement with the standard model and furthermore is used to derive limits on the ratio {kappa}/M{sub Pl} for gravitons which decay to top quarks in the Randall-Sundrum model. D0 used 1.0 fb{sup -1} of data to measure the differential cross section as a function of the transverse momentum of the top-quark. The measurement shows a good agreement to the next-to-leading order perturbative QCD prediction and various other standard model predictions.

  20. Improving activation cross section data with TALYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzysiuk, Nataliia; Koning, Arjan

    2017-09-01

    Needs for accurate (n,x) activation cross sections for fusion technology have been considered with reference to the current status of the TENDL library. The current work is focused on improving activation cross section data for nuclear reactions relevant mainly for fusion and astrophysical needs. The fits have been performed with the TALYS-1.8 code by means of nuclear model parameter variation, mostly for the optical model and level densities, followed by comparison to recent experimental data taken from EXFOR and other evaluated nuclear databases. The updated cross section data are going to be adopted into the new version of TENDL. The improvements have been performed both for differential as well as integral data sets.

  1. Covariance Evaluation Methodology for Neutron Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Herman,M.; Arcilla, R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pigni, M.; Pritychenko, b.; Songzoni, A.A.

    2008-09-01

    We present the NNDC-BNL methodology for estimating neutron cross section covariances in thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The three key elements of the methodology are Atlas of Neutron Resonances, nuclear reaction code EMPIRE, and the Bayesian code implementing Kalman filter concept. The covariance data processing, visualization and distribution capabilities are integral components of the NNDC methodology. We illustrate its application on examples including relatively detailed evaluation of covariances for two individual nuclei and massive production of simple covariance estimates for 307 materials. Certain peculiarities regarding evaluation of covariances for resolved resonances and the consistency between resonance parameter uncertainties and thermal cross section uncertainties are also discussed.

  2. Infrared absorption cross sections of alternative CFCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clerbaux, Cathy; Colin, Reginald; Simon, Paul C.

    1994-01-01

    Absorption cross sections have obtained in the infrared atmospheric window, between 600 and 1500 cm(exp -1), for 10 alternative hydrohalocarbons: HCFC-22, HCFC-123, HCFC-124, HCFC-141b, HCFC-142b, HCFC-225ca, HCFC-225cb, HFC-125, HFC-134a, and HFC-152a. The measurements were made at three temperatures (287K, 270K and 253K) with a Fourier transform spectrometer operating at 0.03 cm(exp -1) apodized resolution. Integrated cross sections are also derived for use in radiative models to calculate the global warming potentials.

  3. Cross section for 246Cm subbarrier fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, A. A.; Bergman, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Koptelov, E. A.; Samylin, B. F.; Trufanov, A. M.; Fursov, B. I.; Shorin, V. S.

    2010-10-01

    The cross section for 246Cm fission induced by neutrons of energy in the range 0.1 eV-20 keV was measured by the neutron lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS-100) of the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow). The parameters of the resonance area and of the fission width were evaluated for several low-lying s-wave neutron resonances. The parameters of the intermediate structure in the cross section for the subbarrier fusion of 246Cm nuclei were found. The results obtained in this way were compared with available experimental data and with recommended evaluated data.

  4. Multigroup cross section library for GFR2400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čerba, Štefan; Vrban, Branislav; Lüley, Jakub; Haščík, Ján; Nečas, Vladimír

    2017-09-01

    In this paper the development and optimization of the SBJ_E71 multigroup cross section library for GFR2400 applications is discussed. A cross section processing scheme, merging Monte Carlo and deterministic codes, was developed. Several fine and coarse group structures and two weighting flux options were analysed through 18 benchmark experiments selected from the handbook of ICSBEP and based on performed similarity assessments. The performance of the collapsed version of the SBJ_E71 library was compared with MCNP5 CE ENDF/B VII.1 and the Korean KAFAX-E70 library. The comparison was made based on integral parameters of calculations performed on full core homogenous models.

  5. Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Negret, Alexandru

    2012-11-20

    The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

  6. Universal Parameterization of Absorption Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1999-01-01

    Our prior nuclear absorption cross sections model is extended for light systems (A less than or equal to 4) where either both projectile and target are light particles or one is a light particle and the other is a medium or heavy nucleus. The agreement with experiment is excellent for these cases as well. Present work in combination with our original model provides a comprehensive picture of absorption cross sections for light, medium, and heavy systems, a very valuable input for radiation protection studies.

  7. Neutron Capture Cross Section of 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, S.; Arnold, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Ullmann, J. L.; Chyzh, A.; Henderson, R.; Kwan, E.; Wu, C. Y.

    2014-09-01

    The 239Pu(n,γ) cross section has been measured over the energy range 10 eV - 10 keV using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) as part of a campaign to produce precision (n,γ) measurements on 239Pu in the keV region. Fission coincidences were measured with a PPAC and used to characterize the prompt fission γ-ray spectrum in this region. The resulting spectra will be used to better characterize the fission component of another experiment with a thicker target to extend the (n,γ) cross section measurement well into the keV region.

  8. Total cross sections for +/-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gien, T. T.

    1987-03-01

    The total cross sections for electron and positron scatterings by lithium, sodium, and potassium in the intermediate energy range from 40 to 1000 eV are calculated using the modified Glauber and second Born approximations. A model potential approach is developed to enable an exact inclusion of the core-interaction effects. Within this approach, the positron cross sections are predicted to be somewhat smaller than those of electron scattering. Calculations have also been performed with the consideration of the inert-core and frozen-core assumption and the use of the Clementi wave function to represent the target electrons. Comparison to existing experimental data is made.

  9. Simulated (n,f) cross section of isomeric 235m-U

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J; Britt, H; Younes, W

    2003-12-18

    The neutron-induced fission cross section on the {sup 235}U, T{sub 1/2} {approx} 26 min isomer has been deduced for incident neutron energies in the range E{sub n}=0.1-2.5 MeV, using the surrogate-reaction technique. In this technique, {sup 236}U fission probabilities measured in the {sup 234}U(t, pf) reaction have been converted into {sup 235}U(n,f) and {sup 235m}U(n,f) cross sections, using reaction theory to compensate for the differences in angular-momentum and parity distributions in the fissioning systems, transferred by the (t,p) and neutron-induced reactions. Based on the comparison between the {sup 235}U(n,f) cross section extracted in this work and independent experimental data, the deduced {sup 235m}U(n,f) cross section is believed to be reliable to 20% below E{sub n} {approx} 0.5 MeV and 10% at higher energies. The surrogate-reaction technique, its validation in the case of the {sup 235}U(n,f) cross section, and the deduced {sup 235m}U(n,f) cross section are discussed. Validation of this method allows (n,f) cross sections for many short-lived nuclei, as well as isomeric nuclei, to be extracted from measured fission probabilities.

  10. Cross sections and barriers for nuclear fission induced by high-energy nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Grudzevich, O. T.; Yavshits, S. G.

    2013-03-15

    The cross sections for the fission of {sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu target nuclei that was induced by 20- to 1000-MeV neutrons and protons were calculated. The respective calculations were based on the multiconfiguration-fission (MCFx) model, which was used to describe three basic stages of the interaction of high-energy nucleons with nuclei: direct processes (intranuclear cascade), equilibration of the emerging compound system, and the decay of the compound nucleus (statistical model). Fission barriers were calculated within the microscopic approach for isotopic chains formed by 15 to 20 nuclei of the required elements. The calculated fission cross sections were compared with available experimental data. It was shown that the input data set and the theoretical model used made it possible to predict satisfactorily cross section for nuclear fission induced by 20- to 1000-MeV nucleons.

  11. Analyzing Powers and Cross Sections of Inclusive Polarized Proton Scattering on LEAD-208.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-Yan

    Inclusive polarized proton-nucleus scattering at 290 and 500 MeV was performed using a ^ {208}Pb(51 mg/cm^2) target. A broad range (0-250 MeV) of excitation energy has been studied over the 4^circ -27^circ angular range. The measured analyzing power and cross section of the continuum are compared with the recent DWIA model calculations. The analyzing power and cross section of low-lying states are compared with the DWBA model calculation. The cross section in the continuum region is found to be dominated by single -step quasifree scattering. The analyzing power angular distributions of continuum peaks support RIA model predictions, and indicate the presence of relativistic medium effects.

  12. Differential (p,p') and (p,d) Cross Sections of 89Y and 92Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeling, Molly; Burke, Jason; Koglin, Johnathon; McClory, John

    2016-03-01

    Differential cross sections for the (p,p') and (p,d) reactions on 89Y and 92Zr were measured using a 28.5-MeV proton beam at the 88-inch cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Angular distributions were obtained for the ground state and several excited states of each isotope using silicon detector telescopes over angles 10° to 140° in the reaction plane. Angular distributions for unresolved higher-energy states up to 22 MeV were also obtained. These data were obtained by fitting a Gaussian function to each peak in the energy spectra using the ROOT toolkit and integrating the number of counts under each peak. The cross sections will be included in nuclear structure models so that neutron and other particle reaction cross sections can be predicted for other isotopes, including eventually those farther from stability and those whose half-lives are too short to measure experimentally.

  13. Failure of Stadard Optical Models to Reproduce Neutron Total Cross Section Difference in the W Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J D; Bauer, R W; Dietrich, F S; Grimes, S M; Finlay, R W; Abfalterer, W P; Bateman, F B; Haight, R C; Morgan, G L; Bauge, E; Delaroche, J P; Romain, P

    2001-11-01

    Recently cross section differences among the isotopes{sup 182,184,186}W have been measured as part of a study of total cross sections in the 5-560 MeV energy range. These measurements show oscillations up to 150 mb between 5 and 100 MeV. Spherical and deformed phenomenological optical potentials with typical radial and isospin dependences show very small oscillations, in disagreement with the data. In a simple Ramsauer model, this discrepancy can be traced to a cancellation between radial and isospin effects. Understanding this problem requires a more detailed model that incorporates a realistic description of the neutron and proton density distributions. This has been done with results of Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov calculations using the Gogny force, together with a microscopic folding model employing a modification of the JLM potential as an effective interaction. This treatment yields a satisfactory interpretation of the observed total cross section differences.

  14. Surrogate measurement of the Pu238(n,f) cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressler, J. J.; Burke, J. T.; Escher, J. E.; Angell, C. T.; Basunia, M. S.; Beausang, C. W.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Casperson, R. J.; Goldblum, B. L.; Gostic, J.; Hatarik, R.; Henderson, R.; Hughes, R. O.; Munson, J.; Phair, L. W.; Ross, T. J.; Scielzo, N. D.; Swanberg, E.; Thompson, I. J.; Wiedeking, M.

    2011-05-01

    The neutron-induced fission cross section of Pu238 was determined using the surrogate ratio method. The (n,f) cross section over an equivalent neutron energy range 5-20 MeV was deduced from inelastic α-induced fission reactions on Pu239, with U235(α,α'f) and U236(α,α'f) used as references. These reference reactions reflect U234(n,f) and U235(n,f) yields, respectively. The deduced Pu238(n,f) cross section agrees well with standard data libraries up to ~10 MeV, although larger values are seen at higher energies. The difference at higher energies is less than 20%.

  15. Final Report - Nucelar Astrophysics & Neutron Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, Robert F.

    2005-02-01

    This enduring research program of 28 years has taken advantage of the excellent research facility of ORELA at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The fruitful collaborations include a number of scientists from ORNL and some from LASL. This program which has ranged from nuclear structure determinations to astrophysical applications has resulted in the identification and/or the refinement of the nuclear properties of more than 5,000 nuclear energy levels or compound energy states. The nuclei range from 30Si to 250Cf, the probes range from thermal to 50 MeV neutrons, and the studies range from capture gamma ray spectra to total and differential scattering and absorption cross sections.

  16. Cross Sections From Scalar Field Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank; Norman, Ryan B.; Nasto, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    A one pion exchange scalar model is used to calculate differential and total cross sections for pion production through nucleon- nucleon collisions. The collisions involve intermediate delta particle production and decay to nucleons and a pion. The model provides the basic theoretical framework for scalar field theory and can be applied to particle production processes where the effects of spin can be neglected.

  17. Reaction cross section of 22C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togano, Yasuhiro; Samurai Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Reaction cross section of 22C on a carbon target at an energy of 240 MeV/nucleon have been measured by using the transmission method. The most neutron-rich carbon isotopes 22C is a candidate of a two-neutron halo nucleus. Tanaka et al. [1] measured the reaction cross section of 22C on a hydrogen target at 40 MeV/nucleon. It is showed 22C to have a large matter radius of 5 . 9 +/- 0 . 9 fm, which is much larger than the ones of carbon isotopes with N <= 14 , suggesting 22C is the halo nucleus. This reported radius has a large uncertainty due to a lack of statistics. To deduce a more accurate matter radius of 22C, the measurement of reaction cross section with higher statistics at a higher beam energy are required. The experiment was performed by using the SAMURAI spectrometer at RIBF. The 22C beam at 240 MeV/nucleon was impinged on a carbon target, and the reaction product was identified by using SAMURAI spectrometer. In the present talk, the extracted reaction cross section and derived matter density distribution of 22C will be presented.

  18. Cotton fibre cross-section properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    From a structural perspective the cotton fibre is a singularly discrete, elongated plant cell with no junctions or inter-cellular boundaries. Its form in nature is essentially unadulterated from the field to the spinning mill where its cross-section properties, as for any textile fibre, are central ...

  19. Photoelectric absorption cross sections with variable abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balucinska-Church, Monika; Mccammon, Dan

    1992-01-01

    Polynomial fit coefficients have been obtained for the energy dependences of the photoelectric absorption cross sections of 17 astrophysically important elements. These results allow the calculation of X-ray absorption in the energy range 0.03-10 keV in material with noncosmic abundances.

  20. Cross-sectional structural parameters from densitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleek, Tammy M.; Whalen, Robert T.

    2002-01-01

    Bone densitometry has previously been used to obtain cross-sectional properties of bone from a single X-ray projection across the bone width. Using three unique projections, we have extended the method to obtain the principal area moments of inertia and orientations of the principal axes at each scan cross-section along the length of the scan. Various aluminum phantoms were used to examine scanner characteristics to develop the highest accuracy possible for in vitro non-invasive analysis of cross-sectional properties. Factors considered included X-ray photon energy, initial scan orientation, the angle spanned by the three scans (included angle), and I(min)/I(max) ratios. Principal moments of inertia were accurate to within +/-3.1% and principal angles were within +/-1 degrees of the expected value for phantoms scanned with included angles of 60 degrees and 90 degrees at the higher X-ray photon energy (140 kVp). Low standard deviations in the error (0.68-1.84%) also indicate high precision of calculated measurements with these included angles. Accuracy and precision decreased slightly when the included angle was reduced to 30 degrees. The method was then successfully applied to a pair of excised cadaveric tibiae. The accuracy and insensitivity of the algorithms to cross-sectional shape and changing isotropy (I(min)/I(max)) values when various included angles are used make this technique viable for future in vivo studies.

  1. Cross-sectional structural parameters from densitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleek, Tammy M.; Whalen, Robert T.

    2002-01-01

    Bone densitometry has previously been used to obtain cross-sectional properties of bone from a single X-ray projection across the bone width. Using three unique projections, we have extended the method to obtain the principal area moments of inertia and orientations of the principal axes at each scan cross-section along the length of the scan. Various aluminum phantoms were used to examine scanner characteristics to develop the highest accuracy possible for in vitro non-invasive analysis of cross-sectional properties. Factors considered included X-ray photon energy, initial scan orientation, the angle spanned by the three scans (included angle), and I(min)/I(max) ratios. Principal moments of inertia were accurate to within +/-3.1% and principal angles were within +/-1 degrees of the expected value for phantoms scanned with included angles of 60 degrees and 90 degrees at the higher X-ray photon energy (140 kVp). Low standard deviations in the error (0.68-1.84%) also indicate high precision of calculated measurements with these included angles. Accuracy and precision decreased slightly when the included angle was reduced to 30 degrees. The method was then successfully applied to a pair of excised cadaveric tibiae. The accuracy and insensitivity of the algorithms to cross-sectional shape and changing isotropy (I(min)/I(max)) values when various included angles are used make this technique viable for future in vivo studies.

  2. Neutron capture cross section of Am241

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Clement, R. R.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Kawano, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Parker, W. E.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.

    2008-09-01

    The neutron capture cross section of Am241 for incident neutrons from 0.02 eV to 320 keV has been measured with the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The thermal neutron capture cross section was determined to be 665±33 b. Our result is in good agreement with other recent measurements. Resonance parameters for En<12 eV were obtained using an R-matrix fit to the measured cross section. The results are compared with values from the ENDF/B-VII.0, Mughabghab, JENDL-3.3, and JEFF-3.1 evaluations. Γn neutron widths for the first three resonances are systematically larger by 5-15% than the ENDF/B-VII.0 values. The resonance integral above 0.5 eV was determined to be 1553±7 b. Cross sections in the resolved and unresolved energy regions above 12 eV were calculated using the Hauser-Feshbach theory incorporating the width-fluctuation correction of Moldauer. The calculated results agree well with the measured data, and the extracted averaged resonance parameters in the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those for the resolved resonances.

  3. Testing (Validating?) Cross Sections with ICSBEP Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, Albert C. III

    2012-06-28

    We discuss how to use critical benchmarks from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments to determine the applicability of specific cross sections to the end-user's problem of interest. Particular attention is paid to making sure the selected suite of benchmarks includes the user's range of applicability (ROA).

  4. Future experimental programme for neutrino cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, Sara

    2017-09-01

    The neutrino-nucleus interaction modelling is crucial for a precise measurement of neutrino oscillations. The advantages and the drawbacks of the planned strategies to measure the neutrino-nucleus cross section with different detector technologies will be discussed. The present document summarizes a talk given on these topics at Neutrino 2016 conference.

  5. Cross section measurements at LANSCE for defense, science and applications

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Ronald O.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has three neutron sources that are used for nuclear science measurements. These sources are driven by an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator and cover an energy range from sub-thermal to hundreds of MeV. Research at the facilities is performed under the auspices of a US DOE user program under which research proposals are rated for merit by a program advisory committee and are scheduled based on merit and availability of beam time. A wide variety of instruments is operated at the neutron flight paths at LANSCE including neutron detector arrays, gamma-ray detector arrays,more » fission fragment detectors, and charged particle detectors. These instruments provide nuclear data for multiple uses that range from increasing knowledge in fundamental science to satisfying data needs for diverse applications such as nuclear energy, global security, and industrial applications. In addition, highlights of recent research related to cross sections measurements are presented, and future research initiatives are discussed.« less

  6. Cross section measurements at LANSCE for defense, science and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald O.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has three neutron sources that are used for nuclear science measurements. These sources are driven by an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator and cover an energy range from sub-thermal to hundreds of MeV. Research at the facilities is performed under the auspices of a US DOE user program under which research proposals are rated for merit by a program advisory committee and are scheduled based on merit and availability of beam time. A wide variety of instruments is operated at the neutron flight paths at LANSCE including neutron detector arrays, gamma-ray detector arrays, fission fragment detectors, and charged particle detectors. These instruments provide nuclear data for multiple uses that range from increasing knowledge in fundamental science to satisfying data needs for diverse applications such as nuclear energy, global security, and industrial applications. In addition, highlights of recent research related to cross sections measurements are presented, and future research initiatives are discussed.

  7. Cross Section Measurements at LANSCE for Defense, Science and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Ronald O.

    2015-05-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has three neutron sources that are used for nuclear science measurements. These sources are driven by an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator and cover an energy range from sub-thermal to hundreds of MeV. Research at the facilities is performed under the auspices of a US DOE user program under which research proposals are rated for merit by a program advisory committee and are scheduled based on merit and availability of beam time. A wide variety of instruments is operated at the neutron flight paths at LANSCE including neutron detector arrays, gamma-ray detector arrays, fission fragment detectors, and charged particle detectors. These instruments provide nuclear data for multiple uses that range from increasing knowledge in fundamental science to satisfying data needs for diverse applications such as nuclear energy, global security, and industrial applications. Highlights of recent research related to cross sections measurements are presented, and future research initiatives are discussed.

  8. The Elusive p-air cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, M. M.

    2006-09-01

    For the $\\pbar p$ and $pp$ systems, we have used all of the extensive data of the Particle Data Group[K. Hagiwara {\\em et al.} (Particle Data Group), Phys. Rev. D 66, 010001 (2002).]. We then subject these data to a screening process, the ``Sieve'' algorithm[M. M. Block, physics/0506010.], in order to eliminate ``outliers'' that can skew a $\\chi^2$ fit. With the ``Sieve'' algorithm, a robust fit using a Lorentzian distribution is first made to all of the data to sieve out abnormally high $\\delchi$, the individual i$^{\\rm th}$ point's contribution to the total $\\chi^2$. The $\\chi^2$ fits are then made to the sieved data. We demonstrate that we cleanly discriminate between asymptotic $\\ln s$ and $\\ln^2s$ behavior of total hadronic cross sections when we require that these amplitudes {\\em also} describe, on average, low energy data dominated by resonances. We simultaneously fit real analytic amplitudes to the ``sieved'' high energy measurements of $\\bar p p$ and $pp$ total cross sections and $\\rho$-values for $\\sqrt s\\ge 6$ GeV, while requiring that their asymptotic fits smoothly join the the $\\sigma_{\\bar p p}$ and $\\sigma_{pp}$ total cross sections at $\\sqrt s=$4.0 GeV--again {\\em both} in magnitude and slope. Our results strongly favor a high energy $\\ln^2s$ fit, basically excluding a $\\ln s$ fit. Finally, we make a screened Glauber fit for the p-air cross section, using as input our precisely-determined $pp$ cross sections at cosmic ray energies.

  9. Sketching cross sections with a portable microcomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberley, M.M.

    1985-02-01

    Computer applications have been carried to the field long ago by geophysicists and their dog houses. The advent of inexpensive battery-powered microcomputers promises to allow the field geologist to participate in this application. The field geologist may record data directly onto a computer-readable medium and calculate statistics or plot a cross section. A program for routine plotting of cross sections in the field has been developed and field-tested. The program proved to be useful to 30 computer-illiterate geologists on a 6-week mapping project in New Mexico. The program allows the user to control vertical exaggeration and displays the correct apparent dip along the chosen line of section. Cubic-spline interpolation is used to plot both topography and folded bedding planes. The program executes in Pascal on an Apple IIc in a few seconds.

  10. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of {sup 58}Ni and nuclear models

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.; Lawson, R.D.; Chiba, S.

    1991-12-31

    An extensive experimental and theoretical study of the fast-neutron interaction with {sup 58}Ni was undertaken. The neutron total cross sections of {sup 58}Ni were measured from {approx} 1 to > 10 MeV using white source techniques. Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from {approx} 4.5 to 10 MeV at {approx} 0.5 Mev intervals with {ge} 75 differential values per distribution. Differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured, corresponding to fourteen levels with excitations up to {approx} 4.8 Mev. The measured results, combined with lower-energy values previously obtained at this laboratory and with relevant values available in the literature, were interpreted in terms of optical-statistical, dispersive-optical and coupled-channels models using both vibrational and rotational coupling schemes. The physical implications of the experimental results and their interpretation are discussed. The considerations are being extended to collective vibrational nuclei generally, exploring the potential for utilizing electro-magnetic matrix elements, deduced from experiment or predicted by the shell model, to determine the strengths of the neutron interaction. Detailed aspects of this work are given in the Laboratory Report, ANL/NDM-120 (in press). 9 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of sup 58 Ni and nuclear models

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.; Lawson, R.D.; Chiba, S.

    1991-01-01

    An extensive experimental and theoretical study of the fast-neutron interaction with {sup 58}Ni was undertaken. The neutron total cross sections of {sup 58}Ni were measured from {approx} 1 to > 10 MeV using white source techniques. Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from {approx} 4.5 to 10 MeV at {approx} 0.5 Mev intervals with {ge} 75 differential values per distribution. Differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured, corresponding to fourteen levels with excitations up to {approx} 4.8 Mev. The measured results, combined with lower-energy values previously obtained at this laboratory and with relevant values available in the literature, were interpreted in terms of optical-statistical, dispersive-optical and coupled-channels models using both vibrational and rotational coupling schemes. The physical implications of the experimental results and their interpretation are discussed. The considerations are being extended to collective vibrational nuclei generally, exploring the potential for utilizing electro-magnetic matrix elements, deduced from experiment or predicted by the shell model, to determine the strengths of the neutron interaction. Detailed aspects of this work are given in the Laboratory Report, ANL/NDM-120 (in press). 9 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Cross sections for fast-neutron interaction with Lu, Tb, and Ta isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Dzysiuk, N.; Kadenko, I.; Yermolenko, R.; Koning, A. J.

    2010-01-15

    The cross sections for (n,x) reactions with Lu, Tb, and Ta isotopes were measured at (d,t) neutron energies around 14 MeV with the activation technique using metal foils of natural composition. Additionally, tantalum samples were irradiated with (d,d) neutrons and filtered neutron beams. To ensure an acceptable precision of the results all major sources of uncertainties were taken into account. Calculations of efficiency and correction factors were performed with the Monte Carlo technique. The cross section results obtained for the {sup 175}Lu(n,{alpha}){sup 172}Tm reaction at (d,t) neutron energies are reported for the first time. {sup 181}Ta(n,{gamma}){sup 182}Ta{sup m2} reaction cross sections were also measured for the first time at 1.9, 58.7, and 144.3 keV and at 2.85 MeV. The earlier evaluated cross section upper estimate for the nuclear reaction {sup 159}Tb(n,n{sup '}{alpha}){sup 155}Eu is reported in this article to be one order lower. Some other cross sections were obtained with higher precision. Theoretical calculations of excitation functions were performed with the TALYS-1.0 code and compared with the experimental cross section values.

  13. Status update on the NIFFTE high precision fission cross section measurement program

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, Alexander B; Tovesson, Fredrik; Burgett, Eric; Greife, Uwe; Grimes, Steven; Heffner, Michael D; Hertel, Nolan E; Hill, Tony; Isenhower, Donald; Klay, Jennifer L; Kornilov, Nickolay; Kudo, Ryuho; Loveland, Walter; Massey, Thomas; Mc Grath, Chris; Pickle, Nathan; Qu, Hai; Sharma, Sarvagya; Snyder, Lucas; Thornton, Tyler; Towell, Rusty S; Watson, Shon

    2010-01-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) program has been underway for nearly two years. The program's mission is to measure fission cross sections of the primary fissionable and fissile materials ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 238}U) as well as the minor actinides across energies from approximately 50 keV up to 20 MeV with an absolute uncertainty of less than one percent while investigating energy ranges from below an eV to 600 MeV. This basic nuclear physics data is being reinvestigated to support the next generation power plants and a fast burner reactor program. Uncertainties in the fast, resolved and unresolved resonance regions in plutonium and other transuranics are extremely large, dominating safety margins in the next generation nuclear power plants and power plants of today. This basic nuclear data can be used to support all aspects of the nuciear renaissance. The measurement campaign is utilizing a Time Projection Chamber or TPC as the tool to measure these cross sections to these unprecedented levels. Unlike traditional fission cross section measurements using time-of-flight and a multiple fission foil configurations in which fission cross sections in relation to that of {sup 235}U are performed, the TPC project uses time-of-flight and hydrogen as the benchmark cross section. Using the switch to hydrogen, a simple, smooth cross section that can be used which removes the uncertainties associated with the resolved and unresolved resonances in {sup 235}U.

  14. Calculated differential and double differential cross section of DT neutron induced reactions on natural chromium (Cr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajput, Mayank; Vala, Sudhirsinh; Srinivasan, R.; Abhangi, M.; Subhash, P. V.; Pandey, B.; Rao, C. V. S.; Bora, D.

    2017-07-01

    Chromium is an important alloying element of stainless steel (SS) and SS is the main constituent of structural material proposed for fusion reactors. Energy and double differential cross section data will be required to estimate nuclear responses in the materials used in fusion reactors. There are no experimental data of energy and double differential cross section, available for neutron induced reactions on natural chromium at 14 MeV neutron energy. In this study, energy and double differential cross section data of (n,p) and (n,α) reactions for all the stable isotopes of chromium have been estimated, using appropriate nuclear models in TALYS code. The cross section data of stable isotopes are later converted into the energy and double differential cross section data of natural Cr using the isotopic abundance. The contribution from compound, pre-equilibrium and direct nuclear reaction to total reaction have also been calculated for 52,50Cr(n,p) and 52Cr(n,α). The calculation of energy differential cross section shows that most of emitted protons and alpha particles are of 3 and 8 MeV respectively. The calculated data is compared with the data from EXFOR data library and is found to be in good agreement.

  15. Tables of nuclear cross sections for galactic cosmic rays: Absorption cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A simple but comprehensive theory of nuclear reactions is presented. Extensive tables of nucleon, deuteron, and heavy-ion absorption cross sections over a broad range of energies are generated for use in cosmic ray shielding studies. Numerous comparisons of the calculated values with available experimental data show agreement to within 3 percent for energies above 80 MeV/nucleon and within approximately 10 percent for energies as low as 30 MeV/nucleon. These tables represent the culmination of the development of the absorption cross section formalism and supersede the preliminary absorption cross sections published previously in NASA TN D-8107, NASA TP-2138, and NASA TM-84636.

  16. Tables of nuclear cross sections for galactic cosmic rays: Absorption cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1985-05-01

    A simple but comprehensive theory of nuclear reactions is presented. Extensive tables of nucleon, deuteron, and heavy-ion absorption cross sections over a broad range of energies are generated for use in cosmic ray shielding studies. Numerous comparisons of the calculated values with available experimental data show agreement to within 3 percent for energies above 80 MeV/nucleon and within approximately 10 percent for energies as low as 30 MeV/nucleon. These tables represent the culmination of the development of the absorption cross section formalism and supersede the preliminary absorption cross sections published previously in NASA TN D-8107, NASA TP-2138, and NASA TM-84636.

  17. Absolute np and pp Cross Section Determinations Aimed At Improving The Standard For Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, A. B.; Haight, R. C.; Tovesson, F.; Arndt, R. A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Paris, M. W.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Workman, R. L.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose of present research is a keeping improvement of the standard for cross section measurements of neutron-induced reactions. The cross sections for np and pp scattering below 1 GeV are determined based on partial-wave analyses (PWAs) of nucleon-nucleon scattering data. These cross sections are compared with the most recent ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-4.0 data files, and the Nijmegen PWA. Also a comparison of evaluated data with recent experimental data was made to check a quality of evaluation. Excellent agreement was found between the new experimental data and our PWA predictions.

  18. Cross-sections of alpha scattering on Boron 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    There has been a recent renewal in the interest of aneutronic fusion as a power source using the ^11B(p,α)2α. In light of this, TUNL has been requested to measure accurate cross sections for the ^11B(p,α)2α reaction as well as ^11B(α,α). To measure the cross section of ^11B(α,α) the capture group at TUNL has collected data using a target with a 2-3 μg/cm^2 layer of isotopically pure ^11B between two layers of gold. A beam was generated using the TUNL alpha source and accelerated with the tandem accelerator producing beam energies up to 7 MeV. Silicon surface barrier detectors were placed at angles 45, 60, 75, 90, 90, 110, 130, 150 degrees. There are some discrepancies between the present data and the previous data that have yet to be resolved. Preliminary results as a function of energy and angle will be shown and compared to previous measurements.

  19. Simulated (n,f) Cross Sections on Various Th, U, Np, Pu, and Am Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W.; Britt, H.C.

    2005-05-24

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections have been deduced from measured fission probabilities for targets of 231,233Th, 234,235,235m,236,237,239U 236,236m,237,238Np, 237,237m,240,241,243Pu, and 240,241,242,242m,243,244,244mAm. The fission-probability data were measured for (t,pf) reactions, up to an equivalent incident neutron energy of En {approx} 2.2 MeV, and for (3He,xf) reactions, up to an equivalent En {approx} 6 MeV. The procedure used to deduce cross sections for the corresponding (n,f) reactions, within the equivalent neutron-energy range of the fission-probability data, is briefly reviewed. The deduced (n,f) cross sections obtained to date are summarized. The limitations of the present formalism and proposed improvements are discussed, within the context of extending the (n,f) cross sections beyond the range of the fission-probability data, up to En = 20 MeV.

  20. Rotational averaging of multiphoton absorption cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, Daniel H.; Beerepoot, Maarten T. P.; Ruud, Kenneth

    2014-11-01

    Rotational averaging of tensors is a crucial step in the calculation of molecular properties in isotropic media. We present a scheme for the rotational averaging of multiphoton absorption cross sections. We extend existing literature on rotational averaging to even-rank tensors of arbitrary order and derive equations that require only the number of photons as input. In particular, we derive the first explicit expressions for the rotational average of five-, six-, and seven-photon absorption cross sections. This work is one of the required steps in making the calculation of these higher-order absorption properties possible. The results can be applied to any even-rank tensor provided linearly polarized light is used.

  1. Rotational averaging of multiphoton absorption cross sections.

    PubMed

    Friese, Daniel H; Beerepoot, Maarten T P; Ruud, Kenneth

    2014-11-28

    Rotational averaging of tensors is a crucial step in the calculation of molecular properties in isotropic media. We present a scheme for the rotational averaging of multiphoton absorption cross sections. We extend existing literature on rotational averaging to even-rank tensors of arbitrary order and derive equations that require only the number of photons as input. In particular, we derive the first explicit expressions for the rotational average of five-, six-, and seven-photon absorption cross sections. This work is one of the required steps in making the calculation of these higher-order absorption properties possible. The results can be applied to any even-rank tensor provided linearly polarized light is used.

  2. Universal Parameterization of Absorption Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a simple universal parameterization of total reaction cross sections for any system of colliding nuclei that is valid for the entire energy range from a few AMeV to a few AGeV. The universal picture presented here treats proton-nucleus collision as a special case of nucleus-nucleus collision, where the projectile has charge and mass number of one. The parameters are associated with the physics of the collision system. In general terms, Coulomb interaction modifies cross sections at lower energies, and the effects of Pauli blocking are important at higher energies. The agreement between the calculated and experimental data is better than all earlier published results.

  3. Extinction cross section of a dielectric strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowerah, Subratananda; Chakrabarti, Aloknath

    1988-05-01

    The problem of scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a dielectric strip is formulated in terms of an uncoupled system of three-part Wiener-Hopf equations by using a set of approximate boundary conditions derived and utilized recently. The resulting Wiener-Hopf problems are solved approximately for sufficiently large values of the width of the strip by using Jones' method (1964). An analytical formula is derived for the excitation cross section of the strip under consideration from which numerical values are obtained in specific situations and the results are presented graphically. The radar cross section of the strip is also computed for several special circumstances and these are presented separately.

  4. Fusion cross sections measurements with MUSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Fernández Niello, J. O.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Ugalde, C.; Paul, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.

    2014-09-01

    The interaction between exotic nuclei plays an important role for understanding the reaction mechanism of the fusion processes as well as for the energy production in stars. With the advent of radioactive beams new frontiers for fusion reaction studies have become accessible. We have performed the first measurements of the total fusion cross sections in the systems 10 , 14 , 15C + 12C using a newly developed active target-detector system (MUSIC). Comparison of the obtained cross sections with theoretical predictions show a good agreement in the energy region accessible with existing radioactive beams. This type of comparison allows us to calibrate the calculations for cases that cannot be studied in the laboratory with the current experimental capabilities. The high efficiency of this active detector system will allow future measurements with even more neutron-rich isotopes. The interaction between exotic nuclei plays an important role for understanding the reaction mechanism of the fusion processes as well as for the energy production in stars. With the advent of radioactive beams new frontiers for fusion reaction studies have become accessible. We have performed the first measurements of the total fusion cross sections in the systems 10 , 14 , 15C + 12C using a newly developed active target-detector system (MUSIC). Comparison of the obtained cross sections with theoretical predictions show a good agreement in the energy region accessible with existing radioactive beams. This type of comparison allows us to calibrate the calculations for cases that cannot be studied in the laboratory with the current experimental capabilities. The high efficiency of this active detector system will allow future measurements with even more neutron-rich isotopes. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and the Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Argentina, Grant SJ10/39.

  5. Fusion cross sections and the new dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1981-05-01

    The prediction of the need for an extra push over the interaction barrier in order to make the heavier nuclei fuse is made the basis of a simple algebraic theory for the energy-dependence of the fusion cross-section. A comparison with recent experiments promises to provide a quantitative test of the New Dynamics (the theory of macroscopic nuclear shape evolutions based on the one-body dissipation concept).

  6. How to Calculate Colourful Cross Sections Efficiently

    SciTech Connect

    Gleisberg, Tanju; Hoeche, Stefan; Krauss, Frank

    2008-09-03

    Different methods for the calculation of cross sections with many QCD particles are compared. To this end, CSW vertex rules, Berends-Giele recursion and Feynman-diagram based techniques are implemented as well as various methods for the treatment of colours and phase space integration. We find that typically there is only a small window of jet multiplicities, where the CSW technique has efficiencies comparable or better than both of the other two methods.

  7. Inclusive jet cross section at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, M.

    1996-09-01

    Preliminary measurement of the central ({vert_bar}{eta}{vert_bar} {<=} 0.5) inclusive jet cross sections for jet cone sizes of 1.0, 0.7, and 0.5 at D{null} based on the 1992-1993 (13.7 {ital pb}{sup -1}) and 1994-1995 (90 {ital pb}{sup -1}) data samples are presented. Comparisons to Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) calculations are made.

  8. Inclusive jet cross section measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Pagliarone, C.

    1996-08-01

    The CDF Collaboration has measured the inclusive jet cross section using 1992-93 collider data at 1.8 TeV. The CDF measurement is in very good agreement with NLO QCD predictions for transverse energies (E{sub T}) below 200 GeV. However, it is systematically higher than NLO QCD predictions for E{sub T} above 200 GeV.

  9. Active-beam cross-sectional modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Ortega-Morales, Miguel

    2000-06-01

    A finite-element based analysis for modeling active composite beams with embedded anisotropic actuation is presented. It is derived from three-dimensional electroelasticity, where the original problem is reduced via the variational asymptotic method. The resulting cross-sectional analysis takes into consideration passive and active anisotropic and nonhomogeneous materials, and represents general (thin-walled, thick-walled, solid) cross-sectional geometries. The formulation requires neither the costly use of 3-D finite element discretization nor the loss of accuracy inherent to any simplified representation of the cross section. The developed formulation is numerically implemented in VABS-A, and several numerical and experimental tests cases are used to support validation of the proposed theory. Also, the effect of the presence of a core in originally hallow configurations is presented and counter-intuitive conclusions are discussed. The generality of the method and accuracy of the results increase confidence at the design stage that the active beam structure will perform as expected and, consequently, should lower costs from experimental tests and further adjustments.

  10. Quality Quantification of Evaluated Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Varet, S.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.

    2015-01-15

    Presently, several methods are used to estimate the covariance matrix of evaluated nuclear cross sections. Because the resulting covariance matrices can be different according to the method used and according to the assumptions of the method, we propose a general and objective approach to quantify the quality of the covariance estimation for evaluated cross sections. The first step consists in defining an objective criterion. The second step is computation of the criterion. In this paper the Kullback-Leibler distance is proposed for the quality quantification of a covariance matrix estimation and its inverse. It is based on the distance to the true covariance matrix. A method based on the bootstrap is presented for the estimation of this criterion, which can be applied with most methods for covariance matrix estimation and without the knowledge of the true covariance matrix. The full approach is illustrated on the {sup 85}Rb nucleus evaluations and the results are then used for a discussion on scoring and Monte Carlo approaches for covariance matrix estimation of the cross section evaluations.

  11. Average cross section measurement for 162Er (γ, n) reaction compared with theoretical calculations using TALYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagena, E.; Stoulos, S.

    2017-01-01

    Bremsstrahlung photon beam delivered by a linear electron accelerator has been used to experimentally determine the near threshold photonuclear cross section data of nuclides. For the first time, (γ, n) cross section data was obtained for the astrophysical important nucleus 162Er. Moreover, theoretical calculations have been applied using the TALYS 1.6 code. The effect of the gamma ray strength function on the cross section calculations has been studied. A satisfactorily reproduction of the available experimental data of photonuclear cross section at the energy region below 20 MeV could be achieved. The photon flux was monitored by measuring the photons yield from seven well known (γ, n) reactions from the threshold energy of each reaction up to the end-point energy of the photon beam used. An integrated cross-section 87 ± 14 mb is calculated for the photonuclear reaction 162Er (γ, n) at the energy 9.2-14 MeV. The effective cross section estimated using the TALYS code range between 89 and 96 mb depending on the γ-strength function used. To validate the method for the estimation of the average cross-section data of 162Er (γ, n) reaction, the same procedure has been performed to calculate the average cross-section data of 197Au (γ, n) and 55Mn (γ, n) reactions. In this case, the photons yield from the rest well known (γ, n) reactions was used in order to monitoring the photon flux. The results for 162Er (γ, n), 197Au (γ, n) and 55Mn (γ, n) are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values obtained by TALYS 1.6. So, the present indirect process could be a valuable tool to estimate the effective cross section of (γ, n) reaction for various isotopes using bremsstrahlung beams.

  12. The differential production cross section of the (1020) meson in = 7 TeV collisions measured with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, C. W.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. 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O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. S.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2014-07-01

    A measurement is presented of the production cross section at = 7 TeV using collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 383 , collected with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Selection of (1020) mesons is based on the identification of charged kaons by their energy loss in the pixel detector. The differential cross section is measured as a function of the transverse momentum, , and rapidity, , of the (1020) meson in the fiducial region 500 1200 MeV, 0.8, kaon 230 MeV and kaon momentum 800 MeV. The integrated -meson production cross section in this fiducial range is measured to be = 570 8 (stat) 66 (syst) 20 (lumi).

  13. Proton-Proton Scattering at 105 Mev and 75 Mev

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Birge, R. W.; Kruse, U. E.; Ramsey, N. F.

    1951-01-31

    The scattering of protons by protons provides an important method for studying the nature of nuclear forces. Recent proton-proton scattering experiments at energies as high as thirty Mev{sup 1} have failed to show any appreciable contribution to the cross section from higher angular momentum states, but it is necessary to bring in tensor forces to explain the magnitude of the observed cross section.

  14. Neutron Cross Section Covariances for Structural Materials and Fission Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoblit, S.; Cho, Y.-S.; Herman, M.; Mattoon, C. M.; Mughabghab, S. F.; Obložinský, P.; Pigni, M. T.; Sonzogni, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    We describe neutron cross section covariances for 78 structural materials and fission products produced for the new US evaluated nuclear reaction library ENDF/B-VII.1. Neutron incident energies cover full range from 10 eV to 20 MeV and covariances are primarily provided for capture, elastic and inelastic scattering as well as (n,2n). The list of materials follows priorities defined by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, the major application being data adjustment for advanced fast reactor systems. Thus, in addition to 28 structural materials and 49 fission products, the list includes also 23Na which is important fast reactor coolant. Due to extensive amount of materials, we adopted a variety of methodologies depending on the priority of a specific material. In the resolved resonance region we primarily used resonance parameter uncertainties given in Atlas of Neutron Resonances and either applied the kernel approximation to propagate these uncertainties into cross section uncertainties or resorted to simplified estimates based on integral quantities. For several priority materials we adopted MF32 covariances produced by SAMMY at ORNL, modified by us by adding MF33 covariances to account for systematic uncertainties. In the fast neutron region we resorted to three methods. The most sophisticated was EMPIRE-KALMAN method which combines experimental data from EXFOR library with nuclear reaction modeling and least-squares fitting. The two other methods used simplified estimates, either based on the propagation of nuclear reaction model parameter uncertainties or on a dispersion analysis of central cross section values in recent evaluated data files. All covariances were subject to quality assurance procedures adopted recently by CSEWG. In addition, tools were developed to allow inspection of processed covariances and computed integral quantities, and for comparing these values to data from the Atlas and the astrophysics database KADoNiS.

  15. Averaging cross section data so we can fit it

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.

    2014-10-23

    The 56Fe cross section we are interested in have a lot of fluctuations. We would like to fit the average of the cross section with cross sections calculated within EMPIRE. EMPIRE is a Hauser-Feshbach theory based nuclear reaction code, requires cross sections to be smoothed using a Lorentzian profile. The plan is to fit EMPIRE to these cross sections in the fast region (say above 500 keV).

  16. Fragmentation cross sections and binding energies of neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, M. B.; Lynch, W. G.; Friedman, W. A.; Mocko, M.; Sun, Z. Y.; Aoi, N.; Cook, J. M.; Delaunay, F.; Famiano, M. A.; Hui, H.; Imai, N.; Iwasaki, H.; Motobayashi, T.; Niikura, M.; Onishi, T.; Rogers, A. M.; Sakurai, H.; Suzuki, H.; Takeshita, E.; Takeuchi, S.; Wallace, M. S.

    2007-10-01

    An exponential dependence of the fragmentation cross section on the average binding energy is observed and reproduced with a statistical model. The observed functional dependence is robust and allows the extraction of binding energies from measured cross sections. From the systematics of Cu isotope cross sections, the binding energies of Cu76,77,78,79 have been extracted. They are 636.94±0.4,647.1±0.4,651.6±0.4, and 657.8±0.5 MeV, respectively. Specifically, the uncertainty of the binding energy of Cu75 is reduced from 980 keV, as listed in the 2003 mass table of Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault to 400 keV. The predicted cross sections of two near drip-line nuclei, Na39 and Mg40 from the fragmentation of Ca48 are discussed.

  17. Fragmentation cross sections and binding energies of neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, M. B.; Lynch, W. G.; Mocko, M.; Cook, J. M.; Delaunay, F.; Famiano, M. A.; Hui, H.; Rogers, A. M.; Wallace, M. S.; Friedman, W. A.; Sun, Z. Y.; Aoi, N.; Imai, N.; Motobayashi, T.; Takeuchi, S.; Iwasaki, H.; Onishi, T.; Sakurai, H.; Suzuki, H.; Niikura, M.

    2007-10-15

    An exponential dependence of the fragmentation cross section on the average binding energy is observed and reproduced with a statistical model. The observed functional dependence is robust and allows the extraction of binding energies from measured cross sections. From the systematics of Cu isotope cross sections, the binding energies of {sup 76,77,78,79}Cu have been extracted. They are 636.94{+-}0.4,647.1{+-}0.4,651.6{+-}0.4, and 657.8{+-}0.5 MeV, respectively. Specifically, the uncertainty of the binding energy of {sup 75}Cu is reduced from 980 keV, as listed in the 2003 mass table of Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault to 400 keV. The predicted cross sections of two near drip-line nuclei, {sup 39}Na and {sup 40}Mg from the fragmentation of {sup 48}Ca are discussed.

  18. Total reaction cross sections for 8Li + 90Zr at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakou, A.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Mazzocco, M.; Acosta, L.; Aslanoglou, X.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Grebosz, J.; Keeley, N.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I.; Parascandolo, C.; Rusek, K.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Sgouros, O.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Soukeras, V.; Stiliaris, E.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Trzcinska, A.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2015-05-01

    Total reaction cross sections for the radioactive nucleus 8Li on 90Zr are reported at the near-barrier energies of 18.5 and 21.5MeV, derived from quasi-elastic scattering measurements. An analysis of the quasi-elastic scattering results is performed within an optical model framework using the BDM3Y1 interaction and total reaction cross sections are deduced. These quantities, appropriately reduced, are compared with previous data obtained in elastic scattering measurements with well and weakly bound projectiles on various targets and a formula for predicting total reaction cross sections with an uncertainty of % is obtained. Further on, the ratios of direct to total reaction cross sections are estimated for 6,8Li on various targets and are compared with CDCC or CRC calculations. The energy dependence of the optical potential is also discussed.

  19. Proton Radius of 14Be from Measurement of Charge-Changing Cross Sections1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, S.; Tanihata, I.; Kanungo, R.; Estradé, A.; Horiuchi, W.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knoebel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Neff, T.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Vargas, J.; Winfield, J. S.; Weick, H.

    Charge-changing cross sections for 7,9-12,14Be have been measured at ˜900A MeV on a carbon target. These cross sections are discussed both in terms of a geometrical and a Glauber model. From several different analyses of the cross sections, the proton distribution radius (proton radius) of 14Be was determined for the first time to be 2.41 ± 0.04 fm. A large difference in the proton and neutron radii is found. The charge-changing cross sections and the proton distribution radii are compared to the results of fermionic molecular dynamics (FMD) and antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) under the Glauber model.

  20. Actinide cross sections from the reaction of sup 13 C with sup 254 Es sup g

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, K.J.; Lougheed, R.W.; Dougan, R.J.; Hulet, E.K.; Wild, J.F.; Summerer, K.; Hahn, R.L.; Aarle, J.v.; Bethune, G.R. )

    1990-01-01

    We have measured cross sections for the formation of actinide transfer products in the reaction of 72-MeV {sup 13}C projectiles with {sup 254}Es{sup {ital g}} targets. The pattern of nuclide yields is similar to those observed in the reactions of heavier ions with {sup 254}Es{sup {ital g}}. We have constructed the primary element yields from these results and show that the total cross section for transfer reactions is 58 mb. The total reaction cross section is about 300 mb. Lawrencium isotopes are formed with larger cross sections than are consistent with the trends of the transfer-product distributions; we explain this in terms of massive transfer, and model the lawrencium yields with an evaporation code.

  1. Charge-changing cross sections of Ne30, Na32,33 with a proton target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, A.; Moriguchi, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Aoi, N.; Fang, D. Q.; Fukuda, N.; Fukuda, M.; Geissel, H.; Hachiuma, I.; Inabe, N.; Ishibashi, Y.; Ishimoto, S.; Ito, Y.; Izumikawa, T.; Kameda, D.; Kubo, T.; Kuboki, T.; Kusaka, K.; Lantz, M.; Ma, Y. G.; Mihara, M.; Miyashita, Y.; Momota, S.; Nagae, D.; Namihira, K.; Nishimura, D.; Ooishi, H.; Ohkuma, Y.; Ohnishi, T.; Ohtake, M.; Ogawa, K.; Shimbara, Y.; Suda, T.; Sumikama, T.; Suzuki, H.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, T.; Takechi, M.; Takeda, H.; Tanaka, K.; Watanabe, R.; Winkler, M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Yasuda, Y.; Yoshinaga, K.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, K.

    2014-04-01

    The total charge-changing, charge pick-up, and partial charge-changing cross sections of very neutron-rich nuclei (Ne30, Na32,33) with a proton target have been measured at ˜240A MeV for the first time. We introduced the phenomenological correction factor in Glauber-model calculations for the total charge-changing cross sections with the proton target, and applied it to deduce the proton radii of these nuclei. For Ne30 and Na32, the neutron skin thicknesses of the nuclei were deduced by comparing the proton radii with the matter radii deduced from the interaction cross-section measurements. A significant thick neutron-skin has been observed for the nuclei. We also found that the charge pick-up cross sections are much larger than those in the systematics of stable nuclei.

  2. Preliminary cross section of Englebright Lake sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Noah P.; Hampton, Margaret A.

    2003-01-01

    Overview -- The Upper Yuba River Studies Program is a CALFED-funded, multidisciplinary investigation of the feasibility of introducing anadromous fish species to the Yuba River system upstream of Englebright Dam. Englebright Lake (Figure 1 on poster) is a narrow, 14-km-long reservoir located in the northern Sierra Nevada, northeast of Marysville, CA. The dam was completed in 1941 for the primary purpose of trapping sediment derived from mining operations in the Yuba River watershed. Possible management scenarios include lowering or removing Englebright Dam, which could cause the release of stored sediments and associated contaminants, such as mercury used extensively in 19th-century hydraulic gold mining. Transport of released sediment to downstream areas could increase existing problems including flooding and mercury bioaccumulation in sport fish. To characterize the extent, grain size, and chemistry of this sediment, a coring campaign was done in Englebright Lake in May and June 2002. More than twenty holes were drilled at 7 different locations along the longitudinal axis of the reservoir (Figure 4 on poster), recovering 6 complete sequences of post-reservoir deposition and progradation. Here, a longitudinal cross section of Englebright Lake is presented (Figure 5 on poster), including pre-dam and present-day topographic profiles, and sedimentologic sections for each coring site. This figure shows the deltaic form of the reservoir deposit, with a thick upper section consisting of sand and gravel overlying silt, a steep front, and a thinner lower section dominated by silt. The methodologies used to create the reservoir cross section are discussed in the lower part of this poster.

  3. The Status of Cross Section Measurements for Neutron-induced Reactions Needed for Cosmic Ray Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Cosmic ray interactions with lunar rocks and meteorites produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. Advances in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) allow production rates to be measured routinely in well-documented lunar rocks and meteorites. These measurements are analyzed using theoretical models to learn about the object itself and the history of the cosmic rays that fell on it. Good cross section measurements are essential input to the theoretical calculations. Most primary cosmic ray particles are protons so reliable cross sections for proton-induced reactions are essential. A cross section is deemed accurate if measurements made by different experimenters using different techniques result in consistent values. Most cross sections for proton induced reactions are now well measured. However, good cross section measurements for neutron-induced reactions are still needed. These cross sections are required to fully account for all galactic cosmic ray interactions at depth in an extraterrestrial object. When primary galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles interact with an object many secondary neutrons are produced, which also initiate spallation reactions. Thus, the total GCR contribution to the overall cosmogenic nuclide archive has to include the contribution from the secondary neutron interactions. Few relevant cross section measurements have been reported for neutron-induced reactions at neutron energies greater than approximately 20 MeV. The status of the cross section measurements using quasi-monoenergetic neutron energies at iThemba LABS, South Africa and white neutron beams at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Los Alamos are reported here.

  4. The Status of Cross Section Measurements for Neutron-induced Reactions Needed for Cosmic Ray Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Cosmic ray interactions with lunar rocks and meteorites produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. Advances in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) allow production rates to be measured routinely in well-documented lunar rocks and meteorites. These measurements are analyzed using theoretical models to learn about the object itself and the history of the cosmic rays that fell on it. Good cross section measurements are essential input to the theoretical calculations. Most primary cosmic ray particles are protons so reliable cross sections for proton-induced reactions are essential. A cross section is deemed accurate if measurements made by different experimenters using different techniques result in consistent values. Most cross sections for proton induced reactions are now well measured. However, good cross section measurements for neutron-induced reactions are still needed. These cross sections are required to fully account for all galactic cosmic ray interactions at depth in an extraterrestrial object. When primary galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles interact with an object many secondary neutrons are produced, which also initiate spallation reactions. Thus, the total GCR contribution to the overall cosmogenic nuclide archive has to include the contribution from the secondary neutron interactions. Few relevant cross section measurements have been reported for neutron-induced reactions at neutron energies greater than approximately 20 MeV. The status of the cross section measurements using quasi-monoenergetic neutron energies at iThemba LABS, South Africa and white neutron beams at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Los Alamos are reported here.

  5. Top Production Cross Sections at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Kvita, Jiri

    2009-07-01

    We report on measurements of the ttbar production cross section at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the D0 experiment during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We use candidate events in lepton+jets and dilepton final states. In the most sensitive channel (lepton+jets channel), a neural network algorithm that uses lifetime information to identify b-quark jets is used to distinguish signal from background processes. We also present measurements of single top quark production at D0 using several multivariate techniques to separate signal from background.

  6. Critical behavior of cross sections at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, I. M.

    2016-07-01

    Recent experimental data on elastic scattering of high energy protons show that the critical regime has been reached at LHC energies. The approach to criticality is demonstrated by increase of the ratio of elastic to total cross sections from ISR to LHC energies. At LHC it reaches the value which can result in principal change of the character of proton interactions. The treatment of new physics of hollowed toroid-like hadrons requires usage of another branch of the unitarity condition. Its further fate is speculated and interpreted with the help of the unitarity condition in combination with present experimental data. The gedanken experiments to distinguish between different possibilities are proposed.

  7. Measurement of (n,α) cross section for set of structural material isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khryachkov, Vitaly; Gurbich, Alexander; Khromyleva, Tatiana; Bondarenko, Ivan; Ketlerov, Vladimir; Prusachenko, Pavel

    2017-09-01

    A novel spectrometer was developed and used to measure the cross section for the (n,α) reaction at IPPE. Direct measurements of the α-particles yield from solid isotopic pure targets of 50, 52 and 53 chromium, 54 and 57 iron, 60 nickel, and 64 zinc were carried out in the neutron energy range from 4.7 to 7.2 MeV. For some isotopes the (n,α) reaction cross-section for neutron energies less than 14 MeV were measured for the first time. The result of the comparison of new experimental data with the evaluated data from libraries ENDF/B VII, JENDL 4.0, JEFF 3.1, ROSFOND 2010 and BROND 3 and with the experimental data of other authors is presented.

  8. 3He(γ,pp)n cross sections with tagged photons below the Δ resonance energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, N. R.; Feldman, G.; O'rielly, G. V.; Pywell, R. E.; Skopik, D. M.; Hackett, E. D.; Quraan, M. A.; Rodning, N. L.

    1996-11-01

    Cross sections have been measured for the 3He(γ,pp)n reaction with tagged photons in the range Eγ =161-208 MeV using the Saskatchewan-Alberta Large Acceptance Detector (SALAD). The protons were detected over a range of polar angles of 40°-140° and azimuthal angles of 0°-360° with an energy threshold of 40 MeV. Comparisons are made with a microscopic calculation which includes one-, two-, and three-nucleon absorption mechanisms. One- and two-nucleon processes, including final-state interactions, are unable to account for the measured cross sections. The addition of three-nucleon absorption diagrams gives roughly the right strength, but the distribution in phase space is in disagreement with the data.

  9. Neutron, proton, and photonuclear cross-sections for radiation therapy and radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, M B

    1998-12-01

    I review recent work at Los Alamos undertaken to evaluate neutron, proton, and photonuclear cross-sections up to 150 MeV (to 250 MeV for protons), based on experimental data and nuclear model calculations. These data are represented in the ENDF format and can be used in computer codes to simulate radiation transport. They permit calculations of absorbed dose in the body from therapy beams, and through use of kerma coefficients allow absorbed dose to be estimated for a given neutron energy distribution. In radiation protection, these data can be used to determine shielding requirements in accelerator environments and to calculate neutron, proton, gamma-ray, and radionuclide production. Illustrative comparisons of the evaluated cross-section and kerma coefficient data with measurements are given.

  10. Absolute measurements of electron capture cross sections of C3+ from atomic and molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant'Anna, M. M.; Melo, W. S.; Santos, A. C. F.; Shah, M. B.; Sigaud, G. M.; Montenegro, E. C.

    2000-02-01

    Absolute measurements of single- and double-electron-capture cross sections by C3+ projectiles on atomic and molecular hydrogen targets were performed for projectile energies between 1.0 and 3.5 MeV for the single- and 1.0 and 2.0 MeV for the double-capture processes. The icons/Journals/Common/sigma" ALT="sigma" ALIGN="TOP"/> H /icons/Journals/Common/sigma" ALT="sigma" ALIGN="TOP"/> H2 cross section ratios were measured using an absolutely calibrated tungsten-tube furnace for the production of atomic hydrogen. The single-capture data are compared with calculations based on the boundary-corrected first Born approximation, the eikonal approximation and a semiclassical model, presenting a good overall agreement. Calculations for the double capture using an analytical expression, obtained within the independent electron approximation and based on the same semiclassical model, give a reasonable qualitative description of the data.

  11. Electron-loss and excitation cross sections for a He+ ion colliding with various atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Toshiaki

    1985-10-01

    A unitarized impact-parameter method is applied to calculate the electron-loss and excitation cross sections for He+ ions colliding with atoms. The projectile ionization and excitation are dominantly caused by the average potential field of the target atom (atomic number Z2). The inelastic process of exciting the target atom contributes negligibly except for light target elements. We adopt the Molière potential to describe this average potential field. The energy dependences of the electron-loss cross sections in He, N2, and Ar targets are in good agreement with the reported data. In the case of the Kr target, the present theory yields larger cross sections than the data, especially below 1 MeV impact energy of a He+ projectile. The calculated loss cross sections at impact velocity ranging from 2v0 to 6v0 (v0=2.18×108 cm/s) show a weaker Z2 dependence in the large Z2 region than that given by the Bohr formula. As for the cross section for exciting the ground state of a projectile to the first excited state, a similar weak Z2 dependence can be found. The recent experimental results using 40-MeV F8+ ions colliding with He, Ne, Ar, and Kr targets have supported this tendency.

  12. Exploring the anomaly in the interaction cross section and matter radius of (23)O

    SciTech Connect

    Kanungo, R.; Uchida, M.; Perro, C.; Prochazka , A.; Lenske, H.; Boutin, D.; Farinon, F.; Knoebel, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Suzuki, Y.; Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, T.; Aumann, T.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Davids, B.; Diakaki, M.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Kruecken, R.; Maierbeck, P.; Janik, R.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Szarka, I.; Jensen, O.; Jonson, B.; Lantz, M.; Nilsson, T.; Litvinov, Y.; Musumarra, A.; Sun, B.; Tanihata, I.

    2011-01-01

    New measurements of the interaction cross sections of {sup 22,23}O at 900A MeV performed at the GSI, Darmstadt are reported that address the unsolved puzzle of the large cross section previously observed for {sup 23}O. The matter radii for these oxygen isotopes extracted through a Glauber model analysis are in good agreement with the new predictions of the ab initio coupled-cluster theory reported here. They are consistent with a {sup 22}O + neutron description of {sup 23}O as well.

  13. Characteristic plateau in the L1 -subshell ionization cross section of Ag induced by proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavčič, M.; Šmit, Ž.

    2009-12-01

    A characteristic dependence of the proton-induced 2s subshell ionization cross section generated by the nodal structure of the 2s wave function was probed via high-resolution measurements of the Lβ3 (L1-M3) and Lβ6 (L3-N1) x-ray lines of Ag. The intensity ratio of the measured lines depends strongly on the proton energy exhibiting a pronounced maximum around 0.4 MeV. The experimental intensities are critically compared to the theoretically predicted values. The latter were obtained using the ionization cross sections calculated within the semiclassical approximation employing hydrogenlike and Dirac-Fock electron wave functions.

  14. Integral cross sections for π+p interactions at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Goldring, A.; Wagner, G. J.; Altman, A.; Johnson, R. R.; Meirav, O.; Jennings, B. K.

    1990-08-01

    Integral cross sections for the elastic scattering of π+ by protons into angles greater than 20° or 30° (lab) have been measured by the beam-attenuation technique over the energy range of 45-126MeV. The measurements are aimed at providing independent checks on the absolute normalization of differential cross sections, where discrepancies exist between different data sets. Comparisons with predictions made with existing phase shifts show very good agreement with the dispersion-relation constrained phase shifts of the Karlsruhe group.

  15. Performing Neutron Cross-Section Measurements at RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L E

    2003-05-20

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) is a proposed accelerator for the low energy nuclear physics community. Its goal is to understand the natural abundances of the elements heavier than iron, explore the nuclear force in systems far from stability, and study symmetry violation and fundamental physics in nuclei. To achieve these scientific goals, RIA promises to produce isotopes far from stability in sufficient quantities to allow experiments. It would also produce near stability isotopes at never before seen production rates, as much as 10{sup 12} pps. Included in these isotopes are many that are important to stockpile stewardship, such as {sup 87}Y, {sup 146-50}Eu, and {sup 231}Th. Given the expected production rates at RIA and a reasonably intense neutron source, one can expect to make {approx} 10 {micro}g targets of nuclei with a half-life of {approx}1 day. Thus, it will be possible at RIA to obtain experimental information on the neutron cross section for isotopes that have to date only been determined by theory. There are two methods to perform neutron cross-section measurements, prompt and delayed. The prompt method tries to measure each reaction as it happens. The exact technique employed will depend on the reaction of interest, (n,2n), (n,{gamma}), (n,p), etc. The biggest challenge with this method is designing a detector system that can handle the gamma ray background from the target. The delayed method, which is the traditional radiochemistry method for determining the cross-section, irradiates the targets and then counts the reaction products after the fact. While this allows one to avoid the target background, the allowed fraction of target impurities is extremely low. This is especially true for the desired reaction product with the required impurity fraction on the order of 10{sup -9}. This is particularly problematic for (n,2n) and (n,{gamma}) reactions, whose reaction production cannot be chemically separated from the target. In either case, the

  16. High resolution measurement of neutron inelastic scattering cross-sections for 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouki, C.; Archier, P.; Borcea, C.; De Saint Jean, C.; Drohé, J. C.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Nankov, N.; Negret, A.; Noguère, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Stanoiu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross-section of 23Na has been measured in response to the relevant request of the OECD-NEA High Priority Request List, which requires a target uncertainty of 4% in the energy range up to 1.35 MeV for the development of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The measurement was performed at the GELINA facility with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS), featuring eight high purity germanium detectors. The setup is installed at a 200 m flight path from the neutron source and provides high resolution measurements using the (n,n'γ)-technique. The sample was an 80 mm diameter metallic sodium disk prepared at IRMM. Transitions up to the seventh excited state were observed and the differential gamma cross-sections at 110° and 150° were measured, showing mostly isotropic gamma emission. From these the gamma production, level and inelastic cross-sections were determined for neutron energies up to 3838.9 keV. The results agree well with the existing data and the evaluated nuclear data libraries in the low energies, and provide new experimental points in the little studied region above 2 MeV. Following a detailed review of the methodology used for the gamma efficiency calibrations and flux normalization of GAINS data, an estimated total uncertainty of 2.2% was achieved for the inelastic cross-section integrals over the energy ranges 0.498-1.35 MeV and 1.35-2.23 MeV, meeting the required targets.

  17. JEF 2.2 Cross Section Library for the MCNP Monte Carlo Code.

    SciTech Connect

    MASSIMO,; PESCARINI,

    2003-11-24

    Version 01 This continuous energy cross-section data library for MCNP is based on the JEF-2.2 evaluated nuclear data library (ACE format). The present library was satisfactorily tested in thermal and fast criticality benchmarks. For analyses below 20 MeV, MCJEF22NEA.BOLlB was applied also in cell and core calculations dedicated to the study of the subcritical accelerator driven systems (ADS).

  18. Helicity dependence of the total inclusive cross section on the deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gdh; A2 Collaborations; Ahrens, J.; Altieri, S.; Annand, J. R. M.; Arends, H.-J.; Beck, R.; Blackston, M. A.; Braghieri, A.; D'Hose, N.; Dutz, H.; Heid, E.; Jahn, O.; Klein, F.; Kondratiev, R.; Lang, M.; Lisin, V.; Martinez Fabregate, M.; McGeorge, J. C.; Meyer, W.; Panzeri, A.; Pedroni, P.; Pinelli, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Reichertz, G.; Rohlof, Ch.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Schwamb, M.; Tamas, G.; Thomas, A.; Weller, H. R.

    2009-03-01

    A measurement of the helicity dependence of the total inclusive photoabsorption cross section on the deuteron was carried out at MAMI (Mainz) in the energy range 200MeV. The experiment used a 4π detection system, a circularly polarized tagged photon beam and a frozen spin target which provided longitudinally polarized deuterons. These new results are a significant improvement on the existing data and allow a detailed comparison with state-of-the-art calculations.

  19. Theoretical and experimental cross sections for neutron reactions on /sup 64/Zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    Accurate measurements of the /sup 64/Zn (n,2n)/sup 63/Zn and /sup 64/Zn (n,p)/sup 64/Cu cross sections at 14.8 MeV have been made using a Texas Nuclear Neutron Generator and the activation technique. A NaI(Tl) spectrometer (using two 6'' x 6'' NaI detectors/crystals) was ued to measure the gamma radiation emitted in coincidence from the positron-emitting decay products. The measurements were made relative to /sup 65/Cu (n,2n)/sup 64/Cu and /sup 63/Cu (n,2n)/sup 62/Cu cross sections, which have similar half-lives, radiation emission, and were previously measured to high accuracy (2%). The value obtained for the (n,2n) measurement was 199 +- 6 millibarns, and a value of 176 +- 4.5 millibarns was obtained for the (n,p) measurement. In concert, a theoretical analysis of neutron induced reactions on /sup 64/Zn was performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory in the GNASH code over an energy range of 100 keV to 20 MeV. Calculations included width fluctuation corrections, direct reaction contributions, and preequilibrium corrections above 6 MeV. Neutron optical model potentials were determined for zinc. The theoretical values agree with the new 14.8 MeV measurements approximately within experimental error, with calculations of 201 millibarns for the (n,2n) cross section and 170 millibarns for the (n,p) cross section. Results from the analysis will be made available in National Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF/B) for fusion energy applications. 50 refs., 34 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Neutron induced fission cross section measurements of 240Pu and 242Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, F.; Eykens, R.; Heyse, J.; Matei, C.; Moens, A.; Nolte, R.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Richter, S.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Wynants, R.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate neutron induced fission cross section of 240Pu and 242Pu are required in view of making nuclear technology safer and more efficient to meet the upcoming needs for the future generation of nuclear power plants (GEN-IV). The probability for a neutron to induce such reactions figures in the NEA Nuclear Data High Priority Request List [1]. A measurement campaign to determine neutron induced fission cross sections of 240Pu and 242Pu at 2.51 MeV and 14.83 MeV has been carried out at the 3.7 MV Van De Graaff linear accelerator at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig. Two identical Frisch Grid fission chambers, housing back to back a 238U and a APu target (A = 240 or A = 242), were employed to detect the total fission yield. The targets were molecular plated on 0.25 mm aluminium foils kept at ground potential and the employed gas was P10. The neutron fluence was measured with the proton recoil telescope (T1), which is the German primary standard for neutron fluence measurements. The two measurements were related using a De Pangher long counter and the charge as monitors. The experimental results have an average uncertainty of 3-4% at 2.51 MeV and for 6-8% at 14.81 MeV and have been compared to the data available in literature.

  1. Measurement of electron-attachment line shapes, cross sections, and rate constants in HI and DI at ultralow electron energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alajajian, S. H.; Chutjian, A.

    1988-01-01

    Electron-attachment cross sections are reported in the electron energy range 0-150 MeV, at an energy resolution of 6.5 MeV (full width at half maximum) for the molecules HI and DI. Use is made of the Kr photoionization method to obtain cross sections for HI, and a signal intercomparison technique to obtain cross sections and the thermal-attachment rate constant for DI. Attachment properties of the two molecules are very similar. The ratio of attachment cross sections is discussed in terms of the reduced-mass dependence of the dissociation width and the survival probability, and in terms of spectroscopic thresholds and rotational populations for attachment at 300 K. Approximate potential-energy curves for the lowest states of the neutral molecule and negative ion are given.

  2. Determining the 239Np(n,f) cross section using the surrogate ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeszumska, A.; Angell, C. T.; Burke, J. T.; Scielzo, N. D.; Norman, E. B.; Austin, R. A. E.; Boutoux, G.; Casperson, R. J.; Chodash, P.; Hughes, R. O.; Mattoon, C. M.; Méot, V.; Munson, J.; Phair, L.; Ressler, J. J.; Roig, O.; Ross, T. J.; Swanberg, E.; Wang, B.

    2013-03-01

    Background: Neutron-induced fission cross-section data are needed in various fields of applied and basic nuclear science. However, cross sections of short-lived nuclei are difficult to measure directly due to experimental constraints.Purpose: The first experimental determination of the neutron-induced fission cross section of 239Np at nonthermal energies was performed. This minor actinide is the waiting point to 240Pu production in a nuclear reactor.Method: The surrogate ratio method was employed to indirectly deduce the 239Np(n,f) cross section. The surrogate reactions used were 236U(3He,p) and 238U(3He,p) with the reference cross section given by the well-known 237Np(n,f) cross section. The ratio of observed fission reactions resulting from the two formed compound nuclei, 238Np and 240Np, was multiplied by the directly measured 237Np(n,f) cross section to determine the 239Np(n,f) cross section.Results: The 239Np(n,f) cross section was determined with an uncertainty ranging between 4% and 30% over the energy range of 0.5-20 MeV. The resulting cross section agrees closest with the JENDL-4.0 evaluation.Conclusions: The measured cross section falls in between the existing evaluations, but it does not match any evaluation exactly (with JENDL-4.0 being the closest match); hence reactor codes relying on existing evaluations may under- or overestimate the amount of 240Pu produced during fuel burnup. The measurement helps constrain nuclear structure parameters used in the evaluations.

  3. Cross-section measurements of neutron threshold reactions in various materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrzalová, J.; Svoboda, O.; Kugler, A.; Suchopár, M.; Wagner, V.

    As members of international collaboration "Energy and Transmutation of radioactive Waste" we routinely use (n,xn) threshold reactions in various materials to measure high energy neutron flux from spallation reactions. The cross-sections of many reactions important for our activation detectors are missing. To improve situation, we studied the neutron cross-sections using different quasi-monoenergetic neutron sources based on proton reaction on 7Li target. The measurements were performed in Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic in Řež near Prague and in The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala (Sweden). We used neutron energies 17, 22, 30 and 35 MeV from the quasi-monoenergetic neutron source in Řež and neutron energies 22, 47 and 94 MeV in Uppsala. The last experiment was carried out in February 2010 in Uppsala using neutron energies 59, 66, 72 and 89 MeV. The study of neutron threshold reactions in yttrium was performed first time during this irradiation. We have developed procedure for the subtraction of contribution of the background neutrons. We studied various materials in the form of thin foils and observed good agreement with the data in EXFOR database and also with the calculations performed in deterministic code TALYS. Many cross-sections were measured in the energy regions where no experimental data are available so far.

  4. Total fission cross section of {sup 181}Ta and {sup 208}Pb induced by protons at relativistic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E.; Schmidt, K. H.; Jurado, B.; Pol, H. A.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Pleskac, R.; Enqvist, T.; Rejmund, F.; Giot, L.; Henzl, V.; Lukic, S.; Ngoc, S. N.; Boudard, A.; Leray, S.; Kurtukian, T.; Schmitt, C.; Henzlova, D.; Paradela, C.; Bacquias, A.; Loureiro, D. P.; Foehr, V.; Tarrio, D.; Kezzar, K.

    2011-07-01

    Total fission cross section induced by protons in {sup 181}Ta and {sup 208}Pb at energies in the range of 300 to 1000 A MeV have been measured at GSI (Germany) using the inverse kinematics technique. A dedicated setup with high efficiency made it possible to determine these cross sections with high accuracy. The new data seed light in the controversial results obtained so far and contribute to the understanding of the fission process at high excitation energies. (authors)

  5. Evaluation of Cross Section Uncertainties Using Physical Constraints: Focus on Integral Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    De Saint Jean, C. Archier, P.; Privas, E.; Noguère, G.; Litaize, O.; Leconte, P.

    2015-01-15

    Evaluation of neutron-induced reactions between 0 eV and 20 MeV is mainly based on nuclear reaction models with parameters estimated from data assimilation on experiments. Several inconsistencies may appear such as mismatches for the cross sections, larger uncertainties on boundary and no cross-correlations between high energy domain and resonance range. In addition, different evaluations could give good overall behaviour of integral experiments with large compensating effects among them. After a summary of several methods which take into account physical constraints on overlapping energy domains where two nuclear reaction models are needed, we focus on a review of the use of integral experiments as additional physical constraints in the evaluation of parameters and cross section covariances. In particular, we present comparison of traditional multigroup adjustment with data assimilation based on nuclear model parameters by the analysis of JEZEBEL. A general consistency is obtained between these adjustments as well as important reduction of fission cross section uncertainties.

  6. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    DOE PAGES

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used inmore » the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.« less

  7. The total, elastic and inelastic scattering fast neutron cross sections of natural chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, P.T.; Smith, J.F.; Whalen, A.B.

    1982-12-01

    The present experimental results comprise a comprehensive intermediate resolution neutron total and scattering cross-section data base for elemental chromium over the energy range from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV. Nonetheless, due to the fluctuating nature of the cross sections involved, the definition of energy-averaged cross sections is uncertain. The consequences of these energy-dependent fluctuations and attendant complications influence the data analysis and interpretation. All finite sample total crosssection measurements result in effective cross sections that have to be corrected to yield the true energyaveraged cross sections. This was accomplished by concurrent multiple sample thickness measurements the results of which were then linearly extrapolated to the zero thickness cross section. It was noted that the resulting sample thickness correction showed marked local fluctuations necessitating an energy by energy treatment. Furthermore, the cross sections, even after averaging over wide energy intervals, retained undulations that complicated comparisons with model calculations. Quantitative comparisons of the present elastic and inelastic scattering results with those obtained at isolated energies by other authors were difficult, if not deceptive, due to persistent fluctuations.

  8. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (∼ 50 MeV to ∼ 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are available now. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results. Our current results indicate this is, in fact, the case.

  9. Low-energy and very-low energy total cross sections for electron collisions with N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Masashi; Kishino, Takaya; Okumura, Takuma; Kobayashi, Naomasa; Sayama, Atsushi; Mori, Yuma; Hosaka, Kouichi; Odagiri, Takeshi; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Absolute grand total cross sections for electron scattering from N2 are obtained in the energy range from 20 eV down to 5 meV with very narrow electron energy width of 9 meV using the threshold-photoelectron source. Total cross sections obtained in the present study are compared with the previous experimentally obtained results. At the very-low energy region below 50 meV, the present total cross sections are somewhat smaller than those reported by the Aarhus group [S.V. Hoffmann et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 4157 (2002)], which has been the only experimental work that provided the total cross sections in the very-low energy region. The energy positions of the peaks in the total cross sections due to the 2Πg shape resonance are obtained with higher accuracy, due to the improved uncertainty of the energy position in the present measurement compared to the previous works. The resonance structure in the total cross sections due to the Feshbach resonances of N2 at around 11.5 eV are also observed. Analysis of the resonant structure was carried out in order to determine the values of resonance width of Feshbach resonances of N2. Contribution to the Topical Issue: "Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications", edited by Gordon W.F. Drake, Jung-Sik Yoon, Daiji Kato, Grzegorz Karwasz.

  10. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) Cross Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This drawing shows a cross-section view of the test cell at the heart of the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) that flew on two Spacelab missions. The middle and lower drawings depict the volume of the silicone oil layer that served as the atmosphere as the steel ball rotated and an electrostatic field pulled the oil inward to mimic gravity's effects during the experiments. The GFFC thus produced flow patterns that simulated conditions inside the atmospheres of Jupiter and the Sun and other stars. The principal investigator was John Hart of the University of Colorado at Boulder. It was managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). An Acrobat PDF copy of this drawing is available at http://microgravity.nasa.gov/gallery. (Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  11. Absolute photoneutron cross sections of Sm isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Utsunomiya, H.; Filipescu, D.; Nyhus, H.-T.; Renstrom, T.; Tesileanu, O.; Shima, T.; Takahisa, K.; Miyamoto, S.

    2015-02-24

    Photoneutron cross sections for seven samarium isotopes, {sup 144}Sm, {sup 147}Sm, {sup 148}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, {sup 150}Sm, {sup 152}Sm and {sup 154}Sm, have been investigated near neutron emission threshold using quasimonochromatic laser-Compton scattering γ-rays produced at the synchrotron radiation facility NewSUBARU. The results are important for nuclear astrophysics calculations and also for probing γ-ray strength functions in the vicinity of neutron threshold. Here we describe the neutron detection system and we discuss the related data analysis and the necessary method improvements for adapting the current experimental method to the working parameters of the future Gamma Beam System of Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility.

  12. Lunar Radar Cross Section at Low Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P.; Kennedy, E. J.; Kossey, P.; McCarrick, M.; Kaiser, M. L.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Tokarev, Y. V.

    2002-01-01

    Recent bistatic measurements of the lunar radar cross-section have extended the spectrum to long radio wavelength. We have utilized the HF Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) radar facility near Gakona, Alaska to transmit high power pulses at 8.075 MHz to the Moon; the echo pulses were received onboard the NASA/WIND spacecraft by the WAVES HF receiver. This lunar radar experiment follows our previous use of earth-based HF radar with satellites to conduct space experiments. The spacecraft was approaching the Moon for a scheduled orbit perturbation when our experiment of 13 September 2001 was conducted. During the two-hour experiment, the radial distance of the satellite from the Moon varied from 28 to 24 Rm, where Rm is in lunar radii.

  13. Top cross section measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Compostella, Gabriele; /INFN, CNAF /Padua U.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the latest measurements of the t{bar t} pair production cross section performed by the CDF Collaboration analyzing p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV from Fermilab Tevatron, as presented at the XVIII International Workshop on Deep-Inelastic Scattering and Related Subjects. In order to test Standard Model predictions, several analysis methods are explored and all the top decay channels are considered, to better constrain the properties of the top quark and to search for possible sources of new physics affecting the pair production mechanism. Experimental results using an integrated luminosity up to 5.1 fb{sup -1} are presented.

  14. Angle-averaged Compton cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    The scattering of a photon by an individual free electron is characterized by six quantities: ..cap alpha.. = initial photon energy in units of m/sub 0/c/sup 2/; ..cap alpha../sub s/ = scattered photon energy in units of m/sub 0/c/sup 2/; ..beta.. = initial electron velocity in units of c; phi = angle between photon direction and electron direction in the laboratory frame (LF); theta = polar angle change due to Compton scattering, measured in the electron rest frame (ERF); and tau = azimuthal angle change in the ERF. We present an analytic expression for the average of the Compton cross section over phi, theta, and tau. The lowest order approximation to this equation is reasonably accurate for photons and electrons with energies of many keV.

  15. Cross sections for n+{sup 14}N from an R-matrix analysis of the {sup 15}N system

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, G.M.; Young, P.G.; Chadwick, M.B.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program, a new evaluation of the neutron cross sections for {sup 14}N was made for ENDF/B-VI, based at energies below 2.5 MeV on a multichannel R-matrix analysis of reactions in the {sup 15}N system. The types of data used in the analysis, and the resulting cross sections and resonance structure for {sup 15}N are briefly described. The resonant features of the neutron cross sections were especially well determined by including precise, high-resolution neutron total cross section measurements from ORNL. While the new evaluated cross section appear to be significant improvements over the earlier ones, they still need to be tested more extensively against recent measurements of the differential elastic cross section from Oak Ridge.

  16. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  17. Total and ionization cross sections of electron scattering by fluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, B. K.; Joshipura, K. N.; Mason, N. J.

    2005-02-01

    Electron impact total cross sections (50-2000 eV) and total ionization cross sections (threshold to 2000 eV) are calculated for typical plasma etching molecules CF4, C2F4, C2F6, C3F8 and CF3I and the CFx (x = 1-3) radicals. The total elastic and inelastic cross sections are determined in the spherical complex potential formalism. The sum of the two gives the total cross section and the total inelastic cross section is used to calculate the total ionization cross sections. The present total and ionization cross sections are found to be consistent with other theories and experimental measurements, where they exist. Our total cross section results for CFx (x = 1-3) radicals presented here are first estimates on these species.

  18. Analyzing Powers and Differential Cross Sections for Polarized Proton Neutron Going to Negative Pion Proton Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Fraser Andrew

    There is considerable interest in the pn to pi^-pp reaction which can proceed by a nonresonant channel from the isospin 0 pn initial state (an NDelta intermediate state cannot be formed). This thesis describes a measurement of analyzing powers and triple differential cross sections for a subset of this reaction, pn to pi^-pp(^1S_0) by isolating the quasifree process in pd to pi^-ppp_{s}. The experimental arrangement selects the relative S-wave component of the outgoing "diproton". The experiment was done on TRIUMF beam line 1B using a LD_2 target; the pion was detected in a magnetic spectrometer, the two outgoing protons in a scintillator bar array. The spectator proton was undetected. Data were taken in August 1989 at 353, 403 and 440 MeV beam energies. Of these the 403 and 440 MeV data are analysed in this thesis and analyzing powers and triple differential cross sections as a function of pion scattering angle extracted at centre of mass kinetic energies, T_{CM}, of 55 and 70 MeV (corresponding to the 403 and 440 MeV beam energies respectively). Partial wave analysis of the data shows that, while the isospin 0 channel dominates the reaction, contributing approximately 75% of the cross section at the energies studied here, there are significant contributions from the s and d-wave pion, isospin 1 channels. Of particular importance is the contribution from the s-wave pion, isospin 1, channel whose interference with the isospin 0 channels produces the characteristic shapes of the cross sections and analyzing powers observed in the data. The d-wave pion, isospin 1 channels, are also required to fully explain the observed analyzing power distributions, and are essential for the T_{CM} = 70MeV data. Comparisons of the pion production data measured in this experiment with pion absorption measurements on ^3He, where the absorption process is pi^-pp(^1S_0) to pn, show a shift in the shape of the differential cross section which can be interpreted as due to differences in

  19. Electron Elastic-Scattering Cross-Section Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 64 NIST Electron Elastic-Scattering Cross-Section Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of differential elastic-scattering cross sections, corresponding total elastic-scattering cross sections, phase shifts, and transport cross sections for elements with atomic numbers from 1 to 96 and for electron energies between 50 eV and 20,000 eV (in steps of 1 eV).

  20. Indirect (n,γ) cross sections of thorium cycle nuclei using the surrogate method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. N.; Gunsing, F.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bürger, A.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A.-C.; Mansouri, P.; Renstrøm, T.; Rose, S. J.; Semchenkov, A.; Siem, S.; Syed, N. U. H.; Toft, H. K.; Wiedeking, M.; Wiborg-Hagen, T.

    2012-03-01

    Indirect neutron capture (n,γ) cross sections have been extracted for the key thorium cycle nuclei 232Th, 231Pa, and 230Th using the surrogate reaction method. Final nucleus γ-decay probabilities were measured between the neutron binding energy and around 1 MeV above it using the 232Th(d,p)233Th, 232Th(3He,t)232Pa, and 232Th(3He,α)231Th reactions in experiments with the CACTUS γ-detector array and Silicon Ring charged-particle detectors at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory. Because the neutron capture cross section for 232Th is already well known from direct measurements a comparison with these results provides a stringent test of the applicability of the surrogate method in the actinide region for indirect (n,γ) cross-section measurements. In addition, a new technique for correcting measured γ-ray decay probabilities below the neutron emission energy threshold is proposed and used. We find good agreement between indirect and direct (n,γ) cross-section measurements in the range 500 keV-1 MeV, but large discrepancies outside this range. Explanations for the observed differences are proposed.